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Help and advice for INVERKEILLOR, Angus - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

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INVERKEILLOR, Angus - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"INVERKEILLOR, a parish in the county Forfar, Scotland, containing the post village of Chance-Inn. It is over 7 miles long, and its greatest breadth is over 4. It has a coast line of about 6 miles in extent on the German Ocean, and is otherwise bounded by the parishes of Carmylie, St. Vigeans, Kirkdell, Kinnell, and Lunan. The surface is variable in contour, with generally a good soil. The Keilor stream rises in the S., and empties itself into Lunan water, on the S. wing of which stretches out Redhead. The Lunan water and Eighty burn, good salmon streams, also traverse parts of the parish. The surface is intersected by the roads from Arbroath to Montrose and Brechin. The Arbroath and Forfar railway also crosses the parish in the W. This parish is in the presbytery of Arbroath and synod of Angus and Mearns, in the patronage of the crown. The minister has a stipend of £247. The church was built in 1735, and enlarged about a century since. Here is a Free church and endowed school, library, and savings-bank. Ethie House is the seat of the Earl of Northesk; the other residences are Anniston, Kinblythmont, and Lawton. The Earl of Northesk and Lord Panmure, with four others, are the landowners. Near Ethie House are the ruins of St. Murdock's chapel; there are also chapel ruins at Quytefield, now used by the Boy sacks as a family burial-place. There are traces of Danish camps on the lands of the Earl of Northesk and of Mr. Carnegie, but the most interesting remains are those of Redcastle, supposed to have been built by William the Lion as a hunting seat. There is a quarry of Arbroath stone in the parish, and very extensive freestone works at Redhead, where Scotch pebbles are also found."

"AMESTON, a village in the parish of Inverkeillor, in the county of Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles to the N.E. of Arbroath. Ameston (or Anniston) House stands near it."

"CHAPELTON-OF-BOYACK, a village in the parish of Inverkeillor, in the county of Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles N. of Arbroath."

"LEYSMILL, a hamlet in the parish of Inverkeillor, county Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles N.W. of Arbroath. It is a station on the Dundee, Arbroath, and Forfar branch of the Scottish North-Eastern railway."

"MILLFIELD, a hamlet in the parish of Inverkeillor, county Forfar, Scotland, 6 miles N. of Arbroath."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]