KIRRIEMUIR, Angus - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"KIRRIEMUIR, (vulgarly pronounced Killamuir), a parish in the county Forfar, Scotland. It comprises the post town of its own name, and the villages of Northmuir, Southmuir, Westmuir, Sledmuir, and Padanaram. It consists of two detached parts separated by the parish of Kingoldrum, and is 8 miles in length by 6 in breadth. The surface to the E. and W. of the town is almost level, but the greater portion of the district is varied with hills and dales. The whole of the northern portion is mountain and waste, with the exception of about 2,000 acres of partly arable and partly fine pasture and meadow. The southern portion has about 11,000 acres under tillage, and 4,500 in plantation and pasture. It is watered by the rivers Esk, Carity, Gairie, and Prosen, the latter giving name to the large district known as Glenprosen. The lake of Kinnordy has been almost entirely converted into meadow. Kinnordy and Balloch mosses are extensively used for fuel. Sir Charles Lyell, of Kinnordy, is the chief landowner. The parish is in the presbytery of Forfar and synod of Angus and Mearns. The minister's stipend is £246. The parish church, a commodious structure, was built in 1786. The South church was erected in 1836, and is under the patronage of the communicants. There is also a church in the Glenprosen district, served by the same missionary minister as the church at Clova. The United Presbyterians have two churches, the Free Church two, the United Original Secession Church one, and the Episcopalians a chapel. Throughout the parish there are fourteen schools, two of which are endowed. Near the junction of the Carity with the Esk stands the castle of Invercarity, built of hewn stone, and in good repair, except the E. wing, which was demolished in 1445 by the Earl of Crawfurd in a feud between the Ogilvies (then its proprietors) and the Lindsays. The modern seats are, Ballandarg, Palnaboth, Kinnordy, and Shielhill. In the neighbourhood are two mounds respectively called Witchpool and Court-hillock. There are tumuli, and remains of a Roman road; also canoes, battle-axes, and arrow-heads, have been discovered in this district. The parish is intersected by roads in all directions, and by a branch of the Scottish Midland line. There were anciently five places of worship in this parish besides the parish church. The town of Kirriemuir, which is of considerable antiquity, is a burgh of barony and a railway station on a branch of the Scottish Midland line, 18 miles N. of Dundee, 6 N.W. of Forfar, and 5 N. of Glamis. It is situated at the foot of the braes of Angus, on the northern edge of a glen, through which flows the small rivulet Gairie. The prospect of the lower part of the town is bounded by the southern braes of the glen, but from the higher part almost the whole of the valley of Strathmore is visible. The town consists of several streets, which are so arranged as to resemble the shaft and arms of an anchor. It contains a parish church with spire and clock, an Episcopal chapel surmounted by a spire, and a building formerly used as a townhall, but now converted into an United Presbyterian church. There are some good shops in the town, and although some of the houses are of mean appearance, the whole has a general air of industry and prosperity. There are offices of the British Linen, City of Glasgow, National, and Union banks, also a savings-bank, together with several insurance agencies. The principal inns are the Crown, the Commercial, and Lowden's. The town is well paved and lighted with gas. There are several religious and philanthropic institutions, also educational, horticultural, and other societies. For a long period Kirriemuir has been a thriving seat of the linen manufacture, comprising about twenty varieties. It is under Sir Charles Lyell, of Kinnordy, but has neither revenue, property, nor debt. The only magistrate is a baron bailie, appointed by the superior. At one period the jurisdiction of its bailie extended over a larger tract of country than at present. There is also a superintendent of police and a body of constables annually appointed. A sheriffs small-debt court is held on the third Mondays of January, March, May, July, September, and November, and a justice of peace small-debt court on the first Friday of every month. Friday is market day, and a cattle market is held fortnightly. Annual fairs are held in June, July, October, and December."

"ELLINORTON, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland."

"INVERQUHARITY, a demesne in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland. The castle, standing on the river South Esk, was built previous to the 15th century, and is the seat of Sir J. Ogilvie, Bart."

"LOGIE, a quoad sacra parish in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles N.W. of Forfar. It is situated near the river Esk. The living is in the presbytery of Forfar, and patronage of the seat-holders."

"MARYTON, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 6 miles N.W. of Forfar."

"NORTHMUIR, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles N.W. of Forfar."

"PADANARUM, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 1 mile S.E. of Kerricmuir."

"SLEDMUIR, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 2 miles from Kerriemuir."

"SOUTHMUIR, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 5 miles N.W. of Montrose."

"WESTMUIR, a village in the parish of Kirriemuir, county Forfar, Scotland, 4 miles N.W. of Forfar."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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