Miscellaneous Places, Ayrshire

"AIRD'S MOSS, in the district of Kyle, in Ayrshire, Scotland. It is a large tract of elevated moorland, or morass, extending over about 10 square miles, 3 miles to the N. of Cumnock. A profound interest attaches itself to the spot, for here, in 1680, the covenanter Richard Cameron and a party of his friends were slaughtered by dragoons. "Cameron Stone," as the people call it, a large flat stone, with an inscription to their memory and words of pious cheer, at a little distance from the highway, formerly marked the spot where the fiercest struggle took place; but it has long disappeared, and been replaced by a modern structure. It was one of the simple monuments that aroused the enthusiasm and exercised the patience and skill of "Old Mortality."

"ANNOCK, a small river of Renfrewshire and Ayrshire. It takes its rise from the White Loch, in the parish of Mearns, and after a course of 14 miles joins the river Irvine Water, a little above the town of Irvine."

"AUCHENCLOICH, a village in the county of Ayr, Scotland, 3 miles from Mauchline."

"BARNWEILL, a suppressed parish, in the district of Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland. Its territory was, in the 17th century, divided between Craigie and Tarbolton."

"CAIRNHILL, a village in the county of Ayr, Scotland, not far from Galston."

"CARRICK DISTRICT, one of the 3 ancient divisions of the county of Ayr, Scotland, being that part of the county which is bounded on the N. by the river Doon. It extends about 32 miles in length from N. to S., and about 20 miles in breadth, and is a wild and hilly country. It comprises the parishes of Ballantrae, Barr, Colonel, Dailly, Girvan, Kirkmichael, Kirkoswald, Maybole, and Straiten. The highest ground is at Benerara, which rises to the height of 1,440 feet. The principal rivers are the Girvan and the Stinchar, which are both fed by many smaller streams. Carrick gives name to an earldom, which, since the marriage of Robert Bruce with the Countess of Carrick, has belonged to the royal family, and is now held by the Prince of Wales. Its superficial area may be computed at about 300,000 acres."

"COILSFIELD, a seat of the Earl of Eglinton, in the county of Ayr, Scotland, 4 miles W. of Mauchline, and 10 N. of Ayr. It is situated in a pleasant spot, near the river Ayr, and is celebrated by Burns as the "Castle of Montgomery," where his "Highland Mary" lived. Coilsfield is derived from a neighbouring barrow, which was opened in 1837, and designated by tradition as the grave of "Auld King Coil," or "Cole.""

"CUNNINGHAME, a district in the county of Ayr, Scotland. It is the most northern portion of the county, being bounded on the W. by the Firth of Clyde, on the N. and N. E. by the county of Renfrew, on the E. by the county of Lanark, and on the S. by the river Irvine, which separates it from the district of Kyle. Its length from N.W. to S.E. is 25 miles, with an extreme breadth of 13 miles. It contains the parishes of Ardrossan, Dreghorn, Dalry, Berth, Fenwick, Irvine, Kilbirnie, Kilmarnock, West Kilbride, Kilmaurs, Kilwinning, Largs, Loudoun, Stevenston, Stewarton, and part of Dunlop The surface presents a pleasant mixture of hill and dale, and is watered by many streams, the chief of which are the Irvine, the Rye, the Garnock, and the Caaf. Coal, limestone, and freestone abound. For a hundred years past this district has been celebrated for the excellence of its dairy produce, and cheese of superior quality has been recently produced. This district was formerly a bailiewick, under the Earl of Eglinton. Some of the chief families, such as those of Eglinton, Glencairn, rind Loudon, took a prominent part in Scottish affairs. The De Morvilles largely endowed the celebrated abbey of Kilwinning, and at one time owned the greater part of the district."

"DALJARROCK, a village in the county of Ayr, Scotland, 6 miles S. of Girvan. It is situated on the river Stinchar."

"DALMULLIN, a hamlet in the district of Kyle, in the county of Ayr, Scotland. There was formerly a Gilbertine Friary here, founded by Walter Stuart as a cell to Paisley."

"DOON, a river, and a lake from which the river flows, partly in the county of Kirkcudbright, and partly in the county of Ayr, Scotland. The waters of the lake, which sometimes used to flood the lowlands bordering the river, are now under control, having been lowered by two tunnels cut in the rock, and also by the erection of sluices. The river, the "banks and braes "of which have been rendered classic by Burns, flows between banks of great beauty, and during the whole of its course through the county of Ayr forms the boundary between the districts of Carrick and Kyle."

"DRYBRIDGE, a hamlet in the district of Cunninghame, in the county of Ayr, Scotland, 5 miles from Kilmarnock by the Ayr section of the Glasgow and South-Western railway, on which it is a station."

"GARNOCK, a river rising under Misty Law, county Ayr, Scotland: after a course of 15 miles, in which it forms a beautiful cascade near Kilbirnie, it falls into Irvine harbour."

"HOLLYBUSH, a station on the Dalmellington branch of the Glasgow and South-West of Scotland railway, in Ayrshire, 7 miles from Ayr."

"HORSE ISLAND, an islet lying a little N.W. of the town of Ardrossan, county Ayr, Scotland. A beacon tower has been erected on the island."

"KELBURN CASTLE, in county Ayr, Scotland. It is situated in a glen near Largs, and is the seat of the Earl of Glasgow, who takes from this place the title of viscount."

"KILKERRAN, a village in the district of Carrick, county Ayr, Scotland, 4 miles from Maybole and 8 from Girvan. It is a station of the Maybole and Girvan branch of the Glasgow and South-Western railway."

"KNOCKDOLIAN, a lofty mountain in the S. division of county Ayr, Scotland, 4 miles N.E. of Ballantrae. Its summit is nearly 2,000 feet above the sea-level. At its base is Knockdolian Castle."

"KYLE, a district in the county Ayr, Scotland. It contains the parishes of Ayr, Auchinleck, Coylton, Craigie, Dalmellington, Dalrymple, Dundonald, Galston, Mauchline, Monkton, Muirkirk, New Cumnock, Newton, Ochiltree, Old Cumnock, Riccarton, St. Quivox, Sorn, Stair, Symington and Tarbolton. The whole of the district is in the presbytery of Ayr."

"LADY ISLE, an islet in the Frith of Clyde, county Ayr, Scotland, 5 miles N. of Ayr. There are beacons on it to warn ships off the half-tide rock which lies near it."

"LAPPOCK, a rock near Lady Isle, county Ayr, Scotland, 1 mile S.W. of Irvine."

"LOGAN, a village in the district of Kyle, county Ayr, Scotland, 4 miles from Cumnock, and 62 from Edinburgh. It is situated on a stream called the Logan Water."

"LUCE, a river, partly in the county Ayr, but chiefly in county Wigtown, Sotland. It rises on the S. side of Benerard Hill, 1,430 feet high, and consists of two streams until within 6 miles of the sea. It runs 16 miles S. through Glenluce, past New Luce and Old Luce, to Luce Bay."

"LUGAR WATER, a river of county Ayr, Scotland, rises under Wardlaw Hill, and after a course of 15 miles, in which it receives the waters of the Guelt and Burnock, joins the river Ayr near Barskimming. It gives name to a station on the Glasgow and South-Western and Portpatrick railway."

"LUGTON WATER, a stream of county Ayr, Scotland, rising in Loch Libo, county Renfrew, and joins the Garnock near Eglintoun Castle."

"MAIN WATER, a stream of county Ayr, Scotland, rises under Benerard, and joins the river Luce at New Luce."

"MARTORHAM, a loch in county Ayr, Scotland, 4 miles S.E. of Ayr. It is near a mile in length by a quarter broad, and is one of the sources of the Ayr Water."

"MINNICK, (or Minnock), a rivulet in the county of Ayr, Scotland. It rises among the lofty mountains in Barr parish, and flows 13 miles S. to the Cree."

"MOSSGIEL, a hamlet in county Ayr, Scotland, near the town of Mauchline. Here is the farm where the poet Burns once resided, and wrote some of his best pieces."

"NESS, a glen near Loch Doon, county Ayr, Scotland."

"NITH, a river in the counties of Ayr and Dumfries, Scotland. It was known to the ancients as the Nidus (lumen, and has a course of about 50 miles, abounding in trout and salmon. It rises in the hills near Dalmellington in Ayrshire, and, flowing through Nithsdale, which formerly gave title of earl to the Maxwells, enters Dumfriesshire, and falls into the Solway Frith, about 3 miles S. of Dumfries, below which it is navigable for large craft."

"NODE, a rivulet giving name to Nodesdale, county Ayr, Scotland. It falls into the Frith of Clyde at Largs."

"PENWHERRY, a ruined castle on the river Stinchar, county Ayr, Scotland, 6 miles S. of Girvan."

"PORTINCROSS, (or Pencross), a ruined castle on the cliffs near Fairlie Head, county Ayr, Scotland. It was once a royal seat of the Stuart kings."

"RYEWATER, a stream of the county of Ayr, Scotland, rises in Largs, and joins the Garnoch, near Dalry."

"STINCHAR WATER, a river of the county of Ayr, Scotland, rises about 6 miles N.W. of Loch Doon, in Carrick, and falls into the sea at Ballantrae."

"TURNBERRY CASTLE, a ruined stronghold in county Ayr, Scotland, 5 miles N. of Girvan. It is situated on the coast, and once belonged to the lairds of Carrick."

"WARDLAW, several hills in Scotland, the principal being Wardlaw Mountain, near Ettrick, county Selkirk, 2,000 feet above the sea; Wardlaw Hill, in Caerlaverock, county Dumfries, 826 feet; and Wardlaw Hill, near Camnock, county Ayr."

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003