STEWARTON, Ayrshire

"In the reign of James V., the vicarage of Stewarton was taxed at 4/-, being a tenth of the estimated value. At the Reformation the tithes and other revenues of the church yielded yearly, to the monks of Kilwinning, 133 bolls of meal, I boll of beer, 254 bolls of oats, and 34 6s 8d for part of the tithes which were leased. The church, built in 1696, served its purpose down to the year 1825, when a large addition was made to it, increasing the sittings to about 1300. The only noteworthy feature in its architecture is its very unassuming spire, which rises semi-detached from the front gable. Over the pointed arched doorway in front of its base, now, however, built up, is a rather oblong, window-like compartment, in which the shake-fork forms, as it were, the mullion. The shake-fork is the crest of the Cuninghame family, to whom the patronage of the church belonged."

"Ayrshire Nights Entertainment: A Descriptive Guide to the History, Traditions, Antiquities of the County of Ayr" by John MacIntosh of Galston, Ayrshire, published in 1894, by John Menzies & Co. of Kilmarnock, Dunlop and Drennan.

Church History

"William Cuninghame, of Lainshaw, who, it appears, differed in his time with the Kirk Session, had for himself and his followers a place of worship fitted up in Stewarton. The origin of his congregation, as expressed in the preamble of the Deed of Constitution, was due to the action of the Kirk Session of the parish in refusing to admit to the Lord's Supper several individuals who were employed as teachers in the Sabbath Schools established in the town of Stewarton by him, "under the pretext that the doctrine of the death of Christ for the whole human race, which was professed by them, was contrary to the standards of the Church."

"Ayrshire Nights Entertainment: A Descriptive Guide to the History, Traditions, Antiquities of the County of Ayr" by John MacIntosh of Galston, Ayrshire, published in 1894, by John Menzies & Co. of Kilmarnock, Dunlop and Drennan.

Description and Travel

Stewarton is a a small but ancient police burgh located on Annick Water to the north-east of Irvine. It was known for its hosiery, lace and dye works.

An 1837 description of Stewarton, including a listing of the key personalities of the town, is given in this extract from Pigot's Directory for Ayrshire. The transcript was provided by Keith Muirhead from the Sunshine Coast of Queensland.

View photographs of Stewarton and the surrounding area.

Gazetteers

Historical Geography

Information about boundaries and administrative areas is available from A Vision of Britain through time.

Maps

View maps of Stewarton.