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Ladykirk

"A parish in Berwickshire, on the banks of the Tweed, anciently called Upsettintoune [Upsettlington], but changed to its present name by James IV, after he had built a handsome church in it which he dedicated to the Virgin Mary. This church is famous as the place where the supplemental treaty to that of Chateau Cambresis was concluded, between the English and Scots commissioners. The parish is 2½ miles long, and 1 broad, and contains 3500 acres ... Population in 1801, 516."
From the Gazetteer of Scotland published 1806, Edinburgh.

Cemeteries

Pre-1855 inscriptions for the parish are contained in the Scottish Genealogy Society's volume of Berwickshire Monumental Inscriptions (Pre-1855).

Census

Census returns for Ladykirk in 1811 and 1831 have apparently survived among kirk session records held in the National Records of Scotland in Edinburgh (NRS reference CH2/660/4,5). Please bear in mind that the amount and depth of information in these early returns may differ from that in later ones (source: Gordon Johnson's Census Records for Scottish families at Home and Abroad - see the Census section on the main Scotland GENUKI page for further details of this publication).

Graham and Emma Maxwell have transcribed and indexed the 1811, 1831, 1841, 1851 and 1861 census returns for this parish.

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Ladykirk area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church Records

The parish church (Church of Scotland) has registers dating from 1697. Old Parish Registers (before 1855) are held in the National Records of Scotland in Edinburgh, and copies on microfilm may be consulted in local libraries and in LDS Family History Centres around the world. Later parish registers (after 1855) are often held in the National Records of Scotland as are any records of non-conformist churches in the area (often unfilmed and unindexed, and only available there).

The presence of non-conformist churches in the parish is revealed by Rutherfurd's Southern Counties Register and Directory which lists the following in the year 1866:

  • United Presbyterian Church

There may have been other non-conformist churches at different times.

Civil Registration

Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths began in Scotland on 1st January 1855. For further details of this see the National Records of Scotland website.

Description and Travel

You can see pictures of Ladykirk which are provided by:

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Ladykirk has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Maps

The National Records of Scotland holds the following as part of its collection of maps and plans:

  • 1774: Plan of the River Tweed [in Ladykirk parish]. Scale 1:800. Size 123x67cm. Grid (map) reference NT8496. NRS reference RHP.67.
  • circa 1780: Plan of part of road between Swinton and River Tweed. Scale 1:5800. Size 21x15cm. Grid (map) reference NT8545. NRS reference RHP.645.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference NT887476 (Lat/Lon: 55.721723, -2.181448), Ladykirk which are provided by:

Population

Here are some figures showing the parish's population through time:

  • 1755 - 386
  • 1791 - 534
  • 1801 - 516
  • 1811 - 535
  • 1821 - 527
  • 1831 - 485
  • 1861 - 565