Kirkcaldy Parish Records


Church History

There is more information about some churches on the Dysart and Abbotshall pages.

An authoritative book is Kirkcaldy's Churches, 1999, Kirkcaldy Civic Society, ISBN 0946294178, available from Fife Family History Society. The much briefer historical notes below were provided by the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN).

The parish church of Kirkcaldy was dedicated to St Bryce and formerly belonged to the Abbey of Dunfermline. Ministry of the session, which was previously known as St Bryce, is recorded from 1560 in the person of George Scott. The church was enlarged and repaired in 1643 and was later rebuilt in 1807. The kirk session, which is presently called Kirkcaldy: St Bryce Kirk, sits within the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy.

Dunnikier Free Church began as Kirkcaldy Pathhead (Antiburgher) Church. After the union with the Burghers in 1820 a minority stood out and eventually joined the FC in 1852, as Kirkcaldy Dunnikier. The congregation passed successively to the United Free Church and the Church of Scotland, and united with Kirkcaldy Victoria Road as Kirkcaldy St Andrew's in 1972. The Church of Scotland charge was in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.
Mission services first took place at Kirkcaldy Raith in 1875 when a church was purchased at Linktown and the parish of Raith was later disjoined from Abbotshall in 1884. In 1964 Kirkcaldy Raith was united once more with Kirkcaldy Abbotshall under the name of Kirkcaldy Abbotshall and under the ministry of Rev M.W. Cooper. The Kirk Session of Kirkcaldy Raith sat within the jurisdiction of the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy throughout its existence.
The parish of Kirkcaldy St James's, (formerly Cowan Street or Port Brae) was disjoined from Kirkcaldy and erected as a separate charge, quoad sacra, on the 24th June 1872. The congregation of Kirkcaldy St James's Kirk Session, which sat within the jurisdiction of the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy, was dissolved in 1974.
Kirkcaldy Pathhead was erected as an independent parish on the 16th March 1859 when it was disjoined from Dysart. In 1943, following the union of the Church of Scotland and the United Free Church in 1929, Kirkcaldy Pathhead Parish Church (also known as Kirkcaldy Pathhead East) was united with the former United Free Church congregation of Kirkcaldy Pathhead West. The two sessions united under the name of Kirkcaldy Pathhead and under the ministry of Rev K.B. Citron, minister at Kirkcaldy Pathhead West. The kirk session has fallen within the jurisdiction of the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy throughout its existence.

Pathhead (Antiburgher) Church was formed at the Breach of 1747, when an existing congregation (later Kirkcaldy Bethelfield) split over the burgess oath. The dissentient minority met for 15 years in a barn, but then built a church, in 1763, much of the work being carried out without payment by tradesmen members of the congregation. The first minister was ordained in 1748. At the union of 1820 with the Burghers, a large minority, including the minister, broke away and eventually joined the Free Church as Kirkcaldy Dunnikier in 1852. The FC charge was in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.

The parish of Kirkcaldy Sinclairtown was disjoined from that of Dysart on the 9th February 1912; a chapel had been erected here a number of years prior in 1878. In 1977 Kirkcaldy Sinclairtown united with the charge of Kirkcaldy Gallatown, under the name of Kirkcaldy Viewforth, and a link was later established in 1995 with the session of Thornton. The kirk session has sat within the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy throughout its existence.
The Kirk Session of Kirkcaldy Templehall first began as an extension charge within the expanding district of Templehall, and in order to provide a premises for the charge, in 1952 Cleish Gardens Hall was opened and dedicated. Kirkcaldy Templehall, which sits within the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy, was later granted full status by the Church of Scotland and the charge is at present sitting as a vacancy.
Kirkcaldy, Victoria Road United Presbyterian Church began as a church extension church in 1885, with a minister ordained in the following year. The congregation, which was also formed in 1886, worshipped in a former established church building. It passed successively to the United Free Church and the Church of Scotland, and united with Kirkcaldy Dunnikier as Kirkcaldy St Andrew's in 1972. The Church of Scotland charge was in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.
-
Kirkcaldy Second Associate Congregation, which was also known as the Union U.P. congregation, was established in 1821 following a petition presented to the United Secession Presbytery of Dunfermline, requesting that sermon be provided. The Rev. John More of Cairneyhill first preached to the session in July of that year and a church was built in 1822. The first minister of Kirkcaldy Union U.P. was ordained on the 5th April 1826. During the year 1837 it is recorded that, of the members of the congregation, one third were resident within the parish of Kirkcaldy, one third resided within Dysart parish and the remainder were from Abbotshall, Kinghorn and Wemyss. In 1900, upon the union of the United Presbyterians and the Free Church, the charge of Kirkcaldy Second Associate Congregation became Kirkcaldy Union United Free Church however the congregation, which sat within the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy, was dissolved a number of years thereafter in 1928.
Kirkcaldy, Bethelfield (Burgher) United Associate Congregation originated with a group of Seceders in the town, who from 1740 had a minister serving a congregation in Abbotshall and Kirkcaldy. Abbotshall later separated. Kirkcaldy passed to the United Presbyterian Church, as Kirkcaldy Bethelfield, and then to the United Free Church and the Church of Scotland. In 1991 Kirkcaldy Linktown was formed by the union of Kirkcaldy Bethelfield and Kirkcaldy Invertiel. The Church of Scotland charge was in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.

Kirkcaldy, Pathhead Free Church originated at the Disruption, when the minister and congregation adhered to the Free Church. A new church building opened in 1844. It passed successively to the United Free Church, with the congregation being evicted from the buildings for a time from 1904-1906, and to the Church of Scotland, in the latter case as Kirkcaldy Pathhead West. Kirkcaldy Pathhead East and West united as Kirkcaldy Pathhead in 1958. The Church of Scotland charge was in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.

In 1876 Kirkcaldy United Presbyterian Church considered a Church Extension in Kirkcaldy. A new church was erected in Loughborough Road, Kirkcaldy, in 1878. The first minister, John C. Baxter, was inducted in 1879. A new church was opened in 1881. Following the union in 1900 of the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church, the charge became Kirkcaldy, Loughborough Road, United Free Church. The first minister was Edward Marr (b 1863) who was inducted in 1900. In 1929 the church rejoined the Church of Scotland. In 1953 the buildings were renovated. The congregation was dissolved in 1969.
In 1857, in response to a request from Gallatown Mission Committee, a Free Church station was established within the district of Kirkcaldy Gallatown , which was later sanctioned in 1875. A church was erected to house the congregation in 1861-1862 and prior to 1875 services were conducted by probationers under the Home Mission Committee. A new church was later erected in 1883 and the old building was converted for use as a hall. In 1900, upon the union of the Free Church and the United Presbyterians, Kirkcaldy Gallatown became Kirkcaldy Gallatown United Free Church, and following the 1929 union between the Church of Scotland and the United Free Church, Kirkcaldy Gallatown U.F. became Kirkcaldy Gallatown Church of Scotland. In 1977 Kirkcaldy Gallatown established a union with the congregation of Kirkcaldy Sinclairtown, under the name of Kirkcaldy Viewforth, and the united session was linked in 1995 with Thornton. The congregation of Kirkcaldy Viewforth remains active today.
In 1836 there was a mission chapel built at Invertiel and the parish of Kirkcaldy Invertiel was later erected in 1869 when it was disjoined from Kinghorn and Abbotshall. In 1952, Kirkcaldy Invertiel established a union with the former United Free Church congregation of Kirkcaldy Invertiel North. The united charge continued under the name of Kirkcaldy Invertiel and the old Invertiel Parish Church was sold in 1954 to a coachbuilder. A further union followed in 1991 between Kirkcaldy Invertiel and Kirkcaldy Bethelfield to form the session of Kirkcaldy Linktown and the united session was additionally linked with Auchtertool during the same year. Kirkcaldy Invertiel Kirk Session sat within the jurisdiction of the Presbytery of Kirkcaldy.
Invertiel Free Church began as a Church of Scotland Church Extension charge whose congregation adhered to the Free Church and were able to retain the building until 1856. A new church was built thereafter. It passed successively to the United Free Church, as Kirkcaldy Invertiel North, and to the Church of Scotland. Invertiel North united with Kirkcaldy Invertiel under that name in 1952. Kirkcaldy Linktown was formed in 1991 by the union of Kirkcaldy Bethelfield and Kirkcaldy Invertiel. The Church of Scotland charges were in the presbytery of Kirkcaldy and the synod of Fife.
The West End Congregational Church, Kircaldy, was established in the former Cowan Street Chapel in 1873. They removed to the newly erected church in the High Street in April 1874 and are still active.
-
Return to top of page

Church Records

At the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

At the ScotlandsPeople Centre, Edinburgh but not online:

At the National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh: At the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, USA, but available on microfilm at LDS Family History Centres around the world:
Return to top of page

Court Records

At the NationalArchives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

At the Fife Council Archive Centre, Markinch:

Return to top of page

Heritors' Records

At the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

Return to top of page

Land & Property

At the NationalArchives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

At the Fife Council Archive Centre, Markinch:

Return to top of page

Occupations

At the FifeCouncil Archive Centre, Markinch:

Return to top of page

Parochial Board  /  Parish Council Records

At the Fife Council Archive Centre, Markinch:

Return to top of page

School Records

At the Fife Council Archive Centre, Markinch:

Entries less than 50 years old may contain sensitive personal information and are not on open access. If you are a former pupil you are entitled to see your own entry. Please contact the Archivist for further details.
Return to top of page

Taxation

At the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

Return to top of page

Town Records

At the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh:

At the Fife Council Archive Centre, Markinch:

Return to top of page

Voting Registers

Return to top of page

Data provided by the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN)