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CRANSTON - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"CRANSTON, (or Cranstown) a parish in the district and county of Edinburgh, Scotland. This parish contains the villages of Cowsland, Preston, Chester Hill, Sauchenside, and part of the village of Ford. It is bounded by the county of Haddington on the E., and by the parishes of Crichton, Borthwick, Dalkeith, Newbattle, and Inveresk. Its length northward is 5 miles, with a breadth of 3 miles. The surface is undulating, picturesque, and well cultivated. The Earl of Stair, whose mansion is Oxenford Castle, is the principal landowner. Coal, limestone, and sandstone are abundant. Cakemuir Tower, in the middle of the parish of Crichton, is in an isolated portion of this parish. It is square, four stories high, and is said to have been occupied by Queen Mary on her escape from Borthwick Castle.

The road from Edinburgh to Lauder passes through the parish. This parish is in the presbytery of Dalkeith, and in the patronage of the Earl of Stair. The stipend of the minister is £260. The church has been rebuilt in the pointed style. There is also an United Presbyterian church at Ford. Cranston gives title of baron to the noble family descended from Sir W. Cranston, who was raised to the peerage in 1609. Turnips, cabbages, and other vegetables are said to have been first introduced into thus part of Scotland by Sir J. Dalrymple; and coal-tar was first made there by Earl Dundonald.

"CHESTERHILL, a village in the parish of Cranston, in the county of Edinburgh, 3 miles S.E. of Dalkeith."

"COULSLAND, a village in the parish of Cranston, in the county of Edinburgh, Scotland, 3 miles E. of Dalkeith, and 8 from Edinburgh. It was the site of a chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, which belonged to Kelso Abbey. The castle, the seat of Earl Stair, was burnt by the Duke of Somerset in the reign of Queen Mary."

"COWSLAND, a village in the parish of Cranston, in the county of Edinburgh, Scotland, 3 miles N. of Dalkeith, and 9 from Edinburgh."

"FORD, a post village in the parishes of Borthwick, Crichton, and Cranston, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 11 miles S.E. of Edinburgh, on the road from thence to Lauder. It stands on the banks of the Tyne, near the viaduct which crosses the valley of the Tyne. It contains a United Presbyterian church. Ford House is the neighbouring seat. Fairs are held on the first Thursdays in August and September."

"PRESTON, a village in the parish of Cranston, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 4 miles S.E. of Dalkeith. It is situated on the river Tyne, near Preston Hall."

"SAUCHENSIDE, a village in the parish of Cranston, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 3 miles S.E. of Dalkeith. It is in conjunction with Chesterhill."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]


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