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INVERESK - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"INVERESK, a parish in county Edinburgh, Scotland, containing besides the village of Inveresk, the post town of Musselburgh, and the town of Fisherrow. It is a little over 3 miles in length and the same in breadth. The Frith of Forth forms its northern boundary. From about half a mile from the shore the surface begins to ascend by gentle elevations till it reaches the hills of Fallside, Carberry, and Inveresk. The river Esk divided the parish into two parts, and the memorable Pinkieburn passes near the hill of Inveresk on its way to the Esk. The surface is highly cultivated. The parish is traversed by the London and Edinburgh road and the North British railway, which has a station here.

This parish is in the presbytery of Dalkeith and synod of Lothian and Tweeddale. The minister has a stipend of £353. The present church was built about 1800. It is situated on the summit of Inveresk Hill, and its beautiful spire somewhat redeems its general ugliness in other points. There are a Free church, chapel-of-ease, two United Presbyterian churches, and Episcopal, Methodist, Independent, and Evangelical chapels.

The educational establishments are very numerous; among them are agrammar and two boarding schools. Carberry House, a structure of great antiquity, has recently been modernised. Monkton House is the seat of Sir Archibald Hope. The Duke of Buccleuch, the Earl of Wemyss, and Sir Archibald Hope, are among the principallandowners. The village of Inveresk has been called the Montpelier of Scotland. It consists chiefly of villa residences, disposed in a curved line corresponding to the concave base of Inveresk Hill and the bend of the river Esk.

The monks of Dunfermline received grants from Malcolm Canmore, David I., in Great and Little Inveresk, two then existing manors. This district was afterwards granted to Lord Thirlestane by James VI. In 1709 it was purchased by the Duchess of Buccleuch. The battle of Pinkie was fought here in 1547, and further inwards is Carberry Hill, the scene of Mary's surrender to the nobility in 1567. The spot now occupied by the church is found to have been the site of the Roman Prætorium, from the numerous traces of Roman structures which have been discovered. Freestone and limestone are extensively worked, and there is a considerable seam of coal."

"COWPITS, a village in the parish of Inveresk, in the county of Edinburgh, Scotland, 1 mile from Musselburgh, and 7 miles from Edinburgh."

"CRAIGHALL, (and New Craighall) villages in the parish of Inveresk, in the county of Edinburgh, Scotland, 2 miles N. of Dalkeith, and 8 from Edinburgh. Sir J. Hope, Bart., M.P., is chief heritor. There are also villages of the same name in the counties of Ayr, Fife, and Perth.

"MONKTON HALL, a village in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 1 mile S. of Musselburgh. In the village is the "Routing Well", below a coal mine. It was at this place that the Scots encamped before the battle of Pinkie."

"NEW HAILES, a seat in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, 1 mile from Musselburgh, and 6 miles E. of Edinburgh. It stands near the mouth of the Esk, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, and was once the residence of Lord Hailes, the historian.

"PINKIE HOUSE, a demesne in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 1 mile from Musselburgh, and 6 miles E. of Edinburgh. It is situated near the mouth of the river Esk, above the Frith of Forth, and came from the Abbots of Dunfermline to the Setons in the reign of James VI., and now belongs to Sir A. Hope, Bart. It was here that the Duke of Somerset defeated the Scots in 1547."

"STONEYHALL, a hamlet in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, Scotland, near Musselburgh. Witches were formerly burnt here. The principal residence is Stoneyhall House, once the seat of Sir W. Sharp, son of the archbishop, and subsequently of Colonel Charteris."

"WALLIFORD, a village in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 1½ mile E. of Musselburg, near the field of Pinkie."

"WESTPANS, a village in the parish of Inveresk, county Edinburgh, Scotland, 1¼ mile N.E. of Musselburgh, and 2½ miles W. of Tranent. The inhabitants are principally employed in the collieries."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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