DRAINIE - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"DRAINIE, a parish in the county of Elgin, Scotland. It contains the town of Lossiemouth and the villages of Stotfield and Branderburgh. Soon after the Restoration this parish was formed by the union of the ancient parishes of Kinnedder and Ogston. It is bounded on the N. by the Moray Firth; and on the other sides by the parishes of Urquhart, St. Andrew's Lhanbryde, Spynie, and Duffus. It extends about 4 miles in length from E. to W., with a breadth of about 2 miles. The surface is low and flat, the only two small eminences yielding freestone, which is much employed in building, The greater part of the loch of Spynie, which lies along the southern boundary, was drained in 1807, but the reclaimed land is very various in character. Lead has been worked in Coulart Hill, between Lossiemouth and Stotfield. The fisheries are valuable, and there are great facilities of communication by the branch railway to. Elgin, and from the Leith and Inverness steamers, which call at Lossiemouth. This parish is in the presbytery of Elgin, and synod of Moray, and in the patronage of Gordon Cumming of Altyre. The minister has a stipend of 242. There is a chapel subordinate to the parish church in Lossiemouth; there are also a Free church and an United Presbyterian church."

"LOSSIEMOUTH, a village in the parish of Drainie, county Elgin, Scotland, 4 miles N.E. of Elgin, and 86 from Aberdeen. It is situated at the mouth of the river Lossie, and is a subport to Inverness. It is the terminus of the Great North of Scotland railway."

"STOTFIELD, a village in the parish of Drainie, county Moray, Scotland, 4 miles N. of Elgin. It is situated on the coast, near Stotfield Point."

"KINNEDER, an ancient parish in county Elgin, Scotland, now united to Drainey. Here are the ruins of an ancient church, and also of a castle where the bishops of Moray formerly resided."

"OGSTON, an ancient parish in the county of Elgin, Scotland, now joined to Drainie."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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