DURNESS - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"DURNESS, a parish in the county of Sutherland, Scotland, 13 miles N.W. of Grubmore. The parish extends along the sea-coast, between Whitenhead and Cape Wrath Light, including Strathmore and Far-out Head. The coast is extremely rocky, and off the shore are the Stags Rock and Nun Shoal. In the streams salmon abound, and in Loch Borley are red trout. In 1724 the districts of Tongue and Eddrachillis were detached from this parish. It is in the presbytery of Tongue, and synod of Sutherland and Caithness. The minister's stipend is 158, in the patronage of the crown. The village contains the parish church, two Free churches, and several schools. In the church is an old monument to McKay of Davock. A mile from the village there is a remarkable cavern, 100 feet wide, and, 180 to 300 feet in height, which repeats a curious echo. The Duke of Sutherland is the only landowner. Dozen, the Gaelic poet, was a native of this place."

"BEN DEARG, a mountain range in the W. of the parish of Durness, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, near Cape Wrath."

"BEN HOPE, a mountain in the parish of Durness, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, rising to the height of 3,150 feet above the sea."

"CLASHCARNOCK, a small harbour in the parish of Durness, in the county of Sutherland, Scotland, 3 miles E. of Cape Wrath."

"ERIBOLL LOCH, in the parish of Durness, county Sutherland, Scotland, an intrusion of the Atlantic, extending about 10 miles between Ruspin and Whitenhead. Its width is 3 miles, and it contains several small islands. Its shores have a number of curious caves. Eriboll House is the neighbouring seat."

"GARAN, (or Garron), a small island within the parish of Durness, county Sutherland, Scotland, 4 miles E. of Cape Wrath. Flocks of seafowl frequent its rocks."

"MEALMEADHONOCH, a mountain in the parish of Durness, county Sutherland, Scotland."

"THE MOIST, a moorish tract in the parishes of Durness and Tongue, county Sutherland, Scotland. It stretches in a southwardly direction from the coast of Whitenhead, and attains an altitude of 1,300 feet above sea-level. It is about 12 miles by 4 in extent, and is the property of the Duke of Sutherland, at whose expense a new line of road has been formed along the coast."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

Return to top of page u_arrow (1K)