ROGART

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"ROGART, a parish in the county of Sutherland, Scotland. It extends in length about 17 miles from S.E. to N.W., with an extreme breadth of about 9 miles, and is bounded by the parishes of Farr, Clyne, Golspie, Dornoch, Criech, and Lairg. The surface is of a hilly character, being composed of two valleys, and separated by a group of rocky hills, some of which rise from 800 to 1,000 feet above the level of the sea. It is traversed by the rivers Brora and Fleet, the former rises in the extreme N., and flows into the Clyne, while the river Fleet arises from a lake, and falls into the Dornoch. There are none but wooden bridges. The vales of Strathbrora and Strathfleet, which derive their names from the above-mentioned streams, vary in breadth from a few yards to near a mile, occupying the principal portion of the parochial area. Gneiss is the prevailing rock. The lands in the straths are liable to be overflowed. The soil at the bottom of the valleys and on the skirts of the hills is of a sandy and gravelly nature. Peat moss abounds to a great extent. The village is distant about 6 miles N.W. of Golspie, and is situated nearly on the summit of a high hill; hence it derives its name from Rogh Ard, or "very high." In the parish are many traces of Picts' houses, Danish camps, and tumuli. This parish is in the presbytery of Dornoch and synod of Sutherland and Caithness. The stipend of the minister is 155. The church, erected in 1777, is situated on an eminence. There are a Free church, a parochial school, and two other schools. The Duke of Sutherland owns most part of the land."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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