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Gyffin


National Gazetteer (1868)

"GYFFIN, a parish in the hundred of Isaf, county Carnarvon, 2 miles from Conway. The parish, which is of considerable extent, containing five townships, is situated near the river Conway. It was at this place that the Welsh gained a victory in 880 over the Saxons under Earl Eadred. Here was once a Cistercian abbey, founded by Llewelyn-ap-Jorwerth, which was subsequently removed by Edward I. to Maenan. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Bangor, value 115, in the patronage of the Dean of Bangor. The church is an ancient structure with stained-glass windows and an antique font. The charities produce about 7 per annum, including the income of Dean Jones's school."

"BODIDDA, a township in the parish of Gyffin, and hundred of Isaf, in the county of Carnarvon, North Wales, 1 mile from Conway."

"CYMRYD, a township in the parish of Gyffin, hundred of Isaf, in the county of Carnarvon, 1 mile from Conway."

"GWEREDOS, a township in the parish of Gyffin, county Carnarvon, 2 miles from Conway."

"LLECHAN, a township in the parish of Gyffin, county Carnarvon, in the vicinity of the town of Conway."

"MERCHLYN, a township in the parish of Gyffin, county Carnarvon, near Conway."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson 2003]

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales
Samuel Lewis, 1833

GYFIN, a parish in the hundred of LLECHWEDD-ISAV, county of CARNARVON, NORTH WALES, 1/2 mile (S. by W.) from Aberconway, on the road to Llanrwst, containing 641 inhabitants. This parish, which lies adjacent to, and is intimately connected with, the borough of Aberconway, is distinguished as the scene of a memorable battle, which took place in 880, between the forces of Anarawd, Prince of North Wales, and those of Eadred, Earl of Mercia, in which the latter were defeated with considerable slaughter. It was also here that Llewelyn ab Iorwerth founded the Cistercian abbey, originally called Caer Gyfin abbey, and afterwards Conway abbey, which Edward I. removed to Maenan, when he erected Conway castle, in 1284. The village is pleasantly situated on the small river Gyfin, from which the parish takes its name, and near the confluence of this stream with the river Conway : from its proximity to the port of Aberconway, it shares in all the commercial advantages of that town, of which, indeed, it may be considered as forming an integral part. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Bangor, endowed with 400 royal bounty, and 1600 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Dean of Bangor, as impropriator of the tithes. The church, dedicated to St. Benedict, is obscurely situated, and in a state of dilapidation. There is a place of worship for Calvinistic Methodists. The Rev. John Jones, Dean of Bangor, in 1719, bequeathed 100 for teaching twelve poor children of this parish to read Welsh, the interest of which sum is appropriated to that purpose ; and there are some trifling charitable donations and bequests for distribution among the poor. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is 254.

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