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A History of Carmarthenshire

Lloyd, Sir John E., (Ed.). 2 vols., Cardiff, London Carmarthenshire Society (1935, 1939).

With the kind permission of the publishers sundry extracts from this book have been extracted by Gareth Hicks onto some parish pages, these snippets below are in random order.

Here is a list of the book's contents and contributors.


History of the Church in the County

A Religious and Educational Movement

"The movement (an Association to rule the Methodist societies)  in North Wales acquired an able recruit in Thomas Charles, who was born in 1755 in the parish of Llanfihangel Abercywyn. He gave the association a new and honourable status. He had been educated at Oxford, and served two curacies in Somerset. Circumstances led him to settle at Bala........"

Puritan Domination: a Period of Depression

"The bishopric remained vacant until ...the appointment of George Bull.........the presentment of church wardens at his primary visitation in 1705 ..... supply evidence as to the state of the churches in the various parishes at the beginning of the 18th century.................the vicar of Llanfihangel Abercywyn resided at Meidrym, 'ye mother church'. His name was Thomas Price ( grandfather of John Evans, vicar of Eglwys Cymyn). The services were conducted in Welsh and partly in English..."

Nonconformity and Methodism

Methodism and Associated Movements/Calvinistic Methodism

"Only one other Carmarthenshire Methodist attained the stature of William Williams and Peter Williams. This was Thomas Charles (1755-1814); his name cannot possibly be omitted from any History of his county (he was born at Longmoor in Llanfihangel Abercywyn parish), but practically all his career fell outside its bounds."

Economic and Social Life

Agriculture/The Sixteenth Century

"At Llanfihangel Abercywyn, the widow of a tenant who had been killed on active service in the Low Countries, was evicted from her husband's lands by two prosperous landowners in that locality, despite the fact that she was burdened with five children "

The Age of the Native Princes

The Norman Conquest of the Towy Valley

"Another Welsh chieftain, one Bleddri ap Cydifor, was entrusted with the defence of the castle of Robert Courtemain (in Welsh "Lawgam") at "Aber Cofwy": this may be conjectured to be the motte and bailey castle of which the vestiges are to be seen near Llanfihangel Abercywyn. "

Castles, Boroughs, and Religious Houses

Castles/The Motte and Bailey Castle

".....the wooden tower could provide refuge for but a brief space of time; it was useless as a base for active operations. At Castell Abertaf, Llanfihangel Abercywyn and Ystum Enlli --- all low-lying sites---the bailey is placed on the seaward side of the motte. "

"At Newchurch was Bleddri ap Cydifor, who in 1116 was entrusted with the keeping of the Castle of one Robert the Crook-handed at Aber Covwy, believed to be Llanfihangel Abercywyn. Bleddri had pronounced Norman leanings and acted as interpreter between his people and the alien. "

Monastic Lands and Revenues

"The churches that came into possession of the religious houses were as follows;

Prehistoric and Roman Times

List of Carmarthenshire Hill Forts/Hill Forts with Earthen Ramparts

Slight traces indicate the possible former existence of a hill fort with earthen ramparts at the following sites ;

List of Carmarthenshire Megaliths/Standing Stones


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[Gareth Hicks  10 June 2003]

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