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MANAFON - Gazetteers

National Gazetteer, 1868

"MANAFON, a parish in the hundred of Newtown, county Montgomery, 7 miles from Welshpool, its post town, and 7 N. of Newtown. It is situated near the river Rhiew, and contains the townships of Manafon, Gaynog, Llan, and Llys, also the hamlet of Dwyriew. The parish abounds in hills and open moorland. The village is small, but neatly built. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of St. Asaph, value, £460, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is an ancient edifice, recently restored. The parochial charities produce about £5 per annum. There are village schools."

"DOLGWYN-FELYN, a hamlet in thetownship of Dwyriew, in the county of Montgomery, 3 miles S. of Llanfair."

"DWYRIEW, a township in the parish of Manafon, in the county of Montgomery, 2 miles S.E. of Llanfair."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis, 1833

MANAVON, a parish in the lower division of the hundred of NEWTOWN, county of MONTGOMERY, NORTH WALES, 8 1/2 miles (W. S. W.) from Welshpool, containing 775 inhabitants. This parish is situated in a mountainous district nearly in the centre of the county, and is intersected by the river Rhiw, and also by the road leading from Llanvair to Newtown and Montgomery : it comprises an extensive tract of land, of which a considerable portion is uncultivated, and of the remainder, one-half consists of old enclosures, and the other has been enclosed and brought into a state of cultivation under the provisions of an act of parliament obtained in 1796. The surrounding scenery is strikingly diversified ; and from the higher grounds are obtained extensive and pleasingly varied prospects. The manufacture of flannel is carried on to a limited extent. The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry and diocese of St. Asaph, rated in the king's books at £8. 18.4., and in the patronage of the Bishop of St. Asaph. The church, dedicated to St. Michael, is an ancient structure, in the early style of English architecture, appropriately fitted up for the performance of divine service : in the churchyard are two fine yew trees of luxuriant growth. In the township of Dolgynvelyn was formerly a chapel of ease, which has been in ruins for many years. There is a place of worship for Welsh Calvinistic Methodists. A parochial school for the gratuitous instruction of poor children is supported by subscription. George Baxter, in 1658 ; John Thomas, at a period unknown ; Evan Thomas, in 1689 ; and Judith James, in 1718, gave each a certain portion of land to the poor : Rowland Evans, in 1735, bequeathed a portion of land for teaching poor children ; and William Foulkes, in 1781, bequeathed £30 in money, the interest of which was to be divided among twelve decayed housekeepers. The Rev. Walter Davies, distinguished as a philologist and antiquary, has been for many years rector of this parish. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £ 392. 3.


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