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Hanes Eglwysi Annibynnol Cymru.
(History of the Welsh Independent Churches)

By Thomas Rees & John Thomas; 4 volumes (published 1871+)
From the CD published by Archive CD Books

Pembrokeshire section (Vol 3, pages 2 - 149)

TRANSLATIONS

 

The main project page for PEM is on /big/wal/PEM/Hanes2.html  where there is a complete Welsh only version of the entries for the PEM chapels in this book.

This page is for translations of histories as they are done, randomly selected

The chapels below have been translated by Maureen Saycell and are;

 


CAPEL ALBANY, NEU Y GREEN, HWLFFORDD

(ALBANY CHAPEL OR THE GREEN, HAVERFORDWEST)

(Haverfordwest, St Thomas parish)

Welsh version on /big/wal/PEM/Hanes2.html

Pages 2 -12

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

The church that meets here is the oldest Independent Church in Pembrokeshire. It was gathered and formed through the efforts of Mr Peregrine Phillips, a nonconformist minister. After Mr Phillips was thrown out of the churches at Llangwm and Freystrop in August 1662, he rented a cottage named Dredgman Hill, near Haverfordwest, from Sir Herbert Perrot, who was a kind protector to him during all the persecution that he suffered. Soon after settling at Dredgman Hill, Mr Phillips began to preach in his own home, but both he and some of those listening were taken to prison for doing so. It appears that he was preaching in his own house supported occasionally by Mr John Luntley, who had been thrown out of Llanstadwell and Nolton, as often as these dangerous times permitted, through the miserable times from 1662 until 1689, when the nonconformists were protected by the Act of Toleration. In October 1667 the first Holy Communion  recorded was celebrated at Dredgman Hill. It is likely that it was then the church was formed. When Charles II granted some freedom to the nonconformists, Mr Phillips licenced his own home and that of Mr Richard Meyler, in Haverfordwest, for preaching as an Independent minister. The date on the licences is April 30th, 1672. This freedom lasted little more than a year, then he and those who followed him were forced  to work as best they could through all the objections and persecution. In 1687, James II granted freedom to the nonconformist protestants, so that he had an excuse to grant freedom to the Papists. Mr Phillips took advantage and again licenced his home and that of Mr R. Meyler, they were allowed a degree of peace until the Act of Tolerance came into force in 1689. They aquired a house on the Green in Haverfordwest, which they converted to a chapel in 1691, and it is there that the people worship to this day. Soon after the chapel was completed, if not before the faithful old minister was called from his work to his reward. Weekly worship continued at Dredgman Hill for many years after the death of Mr Phillips and after the opening of the chapel on the Green. Mr Constantine Phillips, son of the old minister, continued to live in his father's house and was a faithful and useful member of the church. The church was very scattered in Mr Phillips' time, some of the members lived in Tenby, Pembroke, Trefgarn, Lawrenny and other distant places. It is thought that there were sixty members in 1691 when Mr Phillips died.

Soon after Mr Phillips death Mr Thomas Davies was chosen as his successor. Mr Davies began his ministry before the end of 1691. Soon afterwards branches of the mother-church were formed in Pembroke Town, and in Trefgarn, and as it was Mr Davies ministering to them all his field of labour was large, although he had some occasional preachers in the congregation to help him. In 1701 the chapel on the Green was so badly damaged by storms that it had to be rebuilt the following year. Mr Davies worked here, associated with Pembroke and Trefgarn until the beginning of 1720 when he confined his ministry to Pembroke only.

Soon after the departure of Mr Thomas Davies the church sent a call to Mr Evan Davies, a student at Dr Ridgley's College in London. After being here on trial for about three years he was ordained on June 5th, 1723. Officiating at the ceremony were Mesrs David Price, Maesyronen, Thomas Perrot, Caerfyrddin, Thomas Davies, the previous minister, Phillip Pugh, Blaenpennal, Benjamin Lewis, and Mr Watkins. We have no history of the last two.

The year following Mr Davies' ordination, one hundred guineas were spent on repairing the chapel. Mr Davies was successful here for twenty three years, but he complained that he had been worried by some wild men here, and that was the reason he decided to leave. In 1741, after the death of Mr Vavasor Griffiths, the Board of Elders and the Congregational Board chose Mr Davies as a teacher in the College to replace him. As a result of that this the College was moved from Montgomeryshire to Haverfordwest and remained there until 1742, when Mr Davies accepted a call from Llanybri and Bwlchnewydd, and moved there. The college was then moved to Carmarthen and amalgamated with the Grammar School run by Mr Samuel Thomas. the minister of Heol Awst. Mr Thomas was now chosen as a teacher along side Mr Davies. Mr Davies was succeeded at the Green by Mr Jenkin Jones, a student of  Dr. Doddridge. The church could not agree to give him the call because his thinking was considered to be (following teaching of ' Ariaeth'  - Arius ?), and they did not think that he had the sense of responsibility that they expected in a minister. As most of the congregation were in his favour his opponents withdrew, and they took a room in which to worship until such time that they felt they could return to the chapel. They judged that his stay would be short, and so it was. He died after about two years following an accident while hunting. After his death those who withdrew returned to the chapel.

Following the death of Mr Jenkin Jones, a call was sent to Mr John Hughes, from Carmarthen College, to work here on trial. He began to preach here on September 14th, 1745 and after two years he was given an united call and was ordained on September 23rd,1747. The "ordination sermon" was given by Mr David Williams, Cardiff, the ordination prayer by Mr Samuel Thomas, Carmarthen, Mr George Palmer, Swansea, preached on the duty of the minister. the following were also present and some took part in the service :- William Maurice, Trefgarn; Samuel Jones, Capel Seion; David Thomas, Castellnedd; David Evans, Drewen; David Grifflths, Llechryd ; David Lloyd, Brynberian; Thomas Morgan, Henllan, a William Llewelyn, Cwmmawr. Fifty eight members signed the call to Mr Hughes.He remained in office until July 10th, 1775, when he gave up the care of the church. We do not know why he left. The church books show that he confirmed one hundred and twenty new members during the thirty years that he was here, and it was gradual, about three or four a year, over the whole time that the increase occured. In 1777 a call was sent to Mr Benjamin Evans, Llanuwchllyn, to which he agreed, but his stay here was very short. He acepted a call fromthe church at Drewen, Cardiganshire, he mived there on June 24th, 1779. After Mr Evans departure, a call wassent to Mr Thomas Davies, Hanover, Monmouthshire, who began his ministry here on September17th, 1780. Soon after his induction some argument began in the chapel which caused the godfearing minister some worry, and in April 1788 he gave up his ministry.. We have no knowledge of the cause of the argument. All we have been told is that "some dubious circumstances" caused the disagreement that ended in the departure of this excellent minister.

After Mr Thomas Davies left, a call was sent to Mr John Evans, Oswestry College, to come here on trial. He began to preach hereon May 11th, 1788, and having been on trial he was called ion June5th, 1789. there were sixty six members at that time and all but four of them signed the call, they felt that he was not Calvinistic enough in his views.It would appear that the four were wealthy because, after they left the Green,they helped the Baptists to build a chapel. Mr Evans' ordination took place on July 22nd, 1789. The ordination sermon was preached by Mr John Griffiths, Glandwr, the ordination prayer given by Mr Richard Morgan, Henllan, the sermon on the duties of a minister by Mr B. Evans, Drewen.Also attending were Messrs. John Richards, Trefgarn and Stephen Lloyd, Brynberian. Mr Evans continued to work here until the end of his life in 1808. It appears he was respected by the people, and successful to a degree. Since he, like the ministers before him, did not keep a record of those accepted by them, we do not know the numbers. After Mr Evans' death, one came as a trial, but he was not called, his name is not known. Mr Josiah Hill came here on trial but didnot stay as minister.

The next minister here was Mr John Bulmer, Rotheram College. He was ordained on April 28th, 1813. The service was started byMr Harries, Pembroke, a sermon by Mr Peter, Carmarthen, the ordination prayer given by Mr Lloyd, Henllan, the sermon on the duties of a minister by Mr Warlow, Milford and in the evening Mr Peter, Carmarthen preached on the duty of a church. Also present and participating were Mr. Griffiths,Glandwr,  Mr. Evans, St. Florence, a Mr. Griffiths, St. Davids. Mr Bulmer was minister here for twenty seven years, and was well respectedby the congregation and the area generally. In 1840 he moved to England.following the departure of Mr Bulmer, a call was sent to Mr W.W. Fletcher son of Dr Fletcher, London. He was ordainedon July 13th. 1841. The chapel was rebuilt around this time, it was opened on March 18th, 1841. Mr Fletcher only stayed here for three years. In 1845 a call was sent to Mr James Williams, Keyston, who accepted the care of the Green alongside Keyston. his induction service was held on September 2nd, 1845. On the occasion Mr Griffiths, St. David's preached on the nature of a church, a prayer to bless the union was given by Mr Warlow, Milford. Mr Rees, Llanelli preached to the minister and Mr Caleb Morris to the church. He was here for the remainder of his life, much respected. He was in poor health for the last sixteen years of his life, which restricted his ability to serve in the way a man of his talent and cheerful attitude could have done if he had been in good health.

Since the death of Mr Williams until last summer, the church has depended on occasional preaching. On June 27th, 1872 Mr William J. Evans, Brecon College was ordained here.On the occasion Mr J. Lewis, Tenby, preached on the nature of a church. The young minister was challenged by his brother, Mr E. Evans, Caernarvon, the ordination prayer was offered by Mr C. Guion, Milford. A sermon to the minister was given by Prof. Morris, teacher of Divinity at Brecon College and to the church by Mr J.Davies Glandwr. The service was closed with a prayer from Dr. Thomas Davies, teacher at the Baptist College in Haverfordwest. The place looks very hopeful, and the ministry of Mr Evans appears to be acceptable and successful.There have been many influential and responsible people belonging to this cause from it's beginnings, such as Captain Longman, of High Freystrop; Hugh Harries, Esq., Crug-glas; William Meylett, Esq., Bryn, near Pembroke; Messrs Samuel Smith of Sympston; Samuel Ferrior, Pennar; Richard Meyler, Haverfordwest, and many others.The descendants of some of these people are now among the well-off gentry in Pembrokeshire,but for some generations now they have turned from the nonconformist principles of their elders, and have become hothead churchmen. As we understand the church has never been very numerous, but some members have been notable countrymen. We gather from suggestions in old records that there has seldom been a time when there were not some argumentative and intractable men associated with this church. Such people were the reason for Mr. Thomas Davies, Mr. Evan Davies, a Mr. Thomas Davies, the second, leaving here. We hope that there are no such men here now or will be in the future.Without doubt the cause could have been much stronger, and then the descendants of the famous old members, who have left may not have strayed, had there been a more peaceful attitude in the past. It is very likely that  many preachers have been raised here, but we only have the following names:-

* see below

BIOGRAPICAL NOTES *

JOHN LUNTLEY - No early history. Died 1672

PEREGRINE PHILLPS- Born Amroth, Pembrokeshire, 1623. Father local Vicar. Grammar School Haverfordwest - Brampton Bryan school under Sir Robert Harley - Dr William Thomas, Bishop of St David's school -Oxford University until war broke in 1642 - Curate at Kidwelly - Llangwm Pembrokeshire. He once preached aboard the fleet at Cromwell's request. Died September 17th, 1691

THOMAS DAVIES- Born 1666Llanybri, Carmarthenshire.Educated Mr John Woodhouse College, Sheriffhales, Shrewsbury. Kept his own school inCarmarthenshire - called The Green - Died February 20th, 1724.

EVAN DAVIES - His history with Llanybri.

JENKIN JONES - No early history - Died 1745. Educated at Northampton.

JOHN HUGHES - Born Llanelli, Carmarthenshire 1720. Educated Mr Samuel Jones school, Capel Seion - Carmarthen College - began preaching Haverfordwest September 14th, 1745 - ordained September 23rd, 1747 - married Elizabeth Meyler - moved to Bristol - Died there 1777, 31st of either May or September ( both dates are quoted in the text)- Wife died August12th, 1817 aged 95 years

BENJAMIN EVANS - His history with Trewen.

THOMAS DAVIES - Born Llanfynach, Pembrokeshire - Father deacon at Glandwr - educated at Mr Griffiths school, Glandwr - kept school Penygroes, Pembrokeshire - Abergavenny College 1772 - Called Hanover chapel, ordained May 23rd, 1776 - The Green, 1780 - Died July 25th, 1788.       

JOHN EVANS - no early history - Oswestry College, September,1784 - began to preach Haverfordwest May 11th,1788. Ordained July 22nd, 1789 - married Mrs Anne Meylett, widow of Morgan Meylett, Lawrenny - Died October 1808.

JOHN BULMER - Born Yorkshire 1784 - Educated Rotheram College - Haverfordwest 1812. Ordained 1813 - Rugeley, Staffordshire 1840 -  - Bristol, not as a minister - occasional preacher Newbury, Berkshire - Longrove and Buxton, Ross, Herefordshire. retired November 26th, 1857 aged 74.

JAMES WILLIAMS - elder son of David Williams, Troedrhiwdalar - Born 1806 - educated Neuaddlwyd school - Carmarthen College - Ordained Keyston, Pembrokeshire November, 1828 - The Green 1845 - Died October 4th, 1870 age 64.

Most of the above information has been gleaned from The Green's old record books, kindly loaned to us by Mr Evans. Also from the writings of Mr Bulmer.

 

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.

 


Trefgarn Owain  

(Brawdy parish)

Pages 12 - 20

Welsh version on /big/wal/PEM/Hanes2.html

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

Some say that Trefgarn is a corruption of Trefwgan Owain, and the name was originally given because a man by the name of Wgan Owain was the owner, somewhere in the distant past. But it is not the name we are to discuss but the history of Independents in this place.Trefgarn is in the parish of Brawdy, some eight miles north east of Haverfordwest. It is not known when the cause began here. It is fairly certain that Mr Peregrine Phillips preached fairly frequently in this area during the time of the republic, and it is said that Mr Stephen Hughes, Meidrym came here occasionally. There was a folk tale in the area that Mr Hughes preached in the church with the permission of the church warden, one Price of Dreicert, had fallen out with the vicar and allowed, out of spite, the nonconformist to preach in the church. It is said that the vicar and Price settled their differences and  pledged to prevent Mr Hughes from visiting the area again, and locked the church against him.If there is any truth in this tale then the visit must have taken place after1662, because up to that year any ordained minister was free to preach in any parish church. Soon after 1662 Mr Peregrine Phillips established a chuch in his own home at Dredgman Hill, near Haverfordwest, some of his members lived in the area of Trefgarn. With time the members living in this area dormed a branch of the mother church. We do not know the exact date this took place. The number of members in Trefgarn when Mr Phillips died in 1691 was thirty two, among them we have the names Hugh Harries, Esq., Crug-glas, and his wife; David Skeel, Isaac Banner, James and David Hicks, George and Thomas Gilbert, etc.The names can all be seen in the old church books of the Green, Haverfordwest. It was in a dwelling hisein Eveston, about a mile from Brawdy, that worship took place for a number of years, but around 1686 a small chapel was built near Trefgarn, on the land belonging to Mr Hugh Harries, and it is thiught that Mr Harries bore most of the cost of building, if not all of it. It is stated in the books of the Green that he built a chapel on his own land in Trefgarn.It would not be improper for us, before we go any further, to give what history we have for this good man.

He was a gentleman financially, and a gentleman on a higher level, he was blessed by grace. He was accepted for communion at Dredgman-Hill, March 4th, 1668 and  he was chosen to be a deacon March 3rd, 1672. He was imprisoned at the same time as Mr Phillips, because of his nonconformity, but nothing changed his principles. He was encouraged to preach, and was an acceptable and useful preacher for many years, but because of his low self esteem, he refused all offers to be ordained. It was in Trefgarn that he preachedas an assistant to the minister. He lived to about eighty years of age and died peacefully on March 3rd, 1725. The sermon at his funeral was preached by Mr William Maurice, who had taken on the ministry of Trefgarn. This good man is descended from the Harries' of Trefacwn.

The church in Trefgarn was under the same ministry as Haverfordwest and Pembroke until Mr Thomas Davies confined his ministry to Pembroke only. It was then that Mr Evan Davies was chosen for Haverfordwest, and Mr William Maurice in Trefgarn. It was in June 1725 that Mr Maurice was ordained, but we beleive that he had been preaching here for three or four years before that, as had Mr E. Davies in Haverfordwest.Mr Maurice began his ministerial  life in this vast area with exceptional zeal and liveliness, and continued industriously and faithfully until old age and it's failings stopped him.

He collected and established a branch of Tregarn at Rhosycaerau in 1724, about a year before he was ordained. Many years after the death of Mr Hugh Harries the church of Trefgarn had toleave it's chapel. It is not certain why this was, but probably because the lease did not cover the entrace to the chapel and the owner of the land was reluctant to allow access. This was in 1743. But as one door closed providence opened another. One of the members named Ellen Bury Perrot who had a sister that was a housekeeper for a gentleman named Thomas Jones, Esq., Brawdy and inthis way the gentleman was persuaded to provide a piece of land to build a new chapel on, within a hundred yards to the east of the old chapel. A lease was granted for ninety nie years at half a crown a year. The trustees were David Perkins, parish of St. Nicholas; William Williams, parish ofLlanwnda, a George Watts, parish of Llandeloy. The date of the deed is July 6th, 1743. the new chapel was built without delay, it was 48 feet by 15 feet and nine foot high.

Those most involved with the building were Messrs Evan Griffiths, Treicert; Daniel Davies, Caswilia; Rees Davies, Tynewydd, and William Harries, Trenicol. Some twenty eight years later, because of an increase in the congregation, there was need to extend. It was not lengthened but fourteen feet were added to the width and the roof was ridged like the old parish churches. Whwn it was reopened after the extension, mr Maurice preached on"If God does not build the house, the builders labours are in vain". Mr Henry Skeel, Castellhaidd, and David Moore Trehywel along withall those who were still alive of those previously named, took part in the hour.

After Mr William Maurice had laboured busily in Trefgarn, Rhosycaerau and surrounding areas for thirty four years, seeing the work area expanding and his own energy diminishing, encouraged the churches under his care to appoint someone to help him. In the year 1756 they gave a call to Mr Morris Griffiths, of Carmarthen College, and he was ordained here on September 29th, 1757, when Messrs Lewis Rees and Evan Davies, Carmarthen, preached. Mr Griffiths was zealous and energetic, and his work was a blessing in the area, but despite his usefulness, the Lord saw fit to weaken him, and his sun set while it was yet day, some years ahead of the old minister. His useful career ended in 1769. In the face of this another helper had to be found. The choice fell on Mr John Richards, of Brecon College, who Mr Morris Griffiths had recomended on his deathbed. Mr Richards was ordained in Rhosycaerau, where he was intended to minister mainly, but he , like his predecessor Mr Griffiths, ministered to the whole area. He was ordained in 1770. A short time after he settled here he married one of the daughters of  the old minister, Mr Maurice. After the death of the old minister all the work fell to Mr Richards. His work was very successful. He collected and established a church in Rhodiad, St. David's Parish, and Trefgarn, Rhosycaerau and Rhodiad remained in his care until he left the country. After working with great respect and considerable success for twenty five years, much to the concern of his congregation and the country generally, he decided to migrate to America. A special service was held to mark his departure at Trefgarn, in March 1795. A very large crowd gathered, and he preached his farewell sermon from Acts xx 38 " What distressed them most was his saying that they would never see his face again. So they escorted him to his ship." It is said that everyone there was moved to such an extent that no one was able to hold back their tears.Soon after this he and his family sailed to the United States, and within three weeks of landing he died and he was buried in Elizabeth Town.

The first Sunday after Mr Richards left, Mr Stephen Lloyd, Brynberian, preached in Trefgarn from Mat. ix 36 " The sight of the people moved him to pity, they were like sheep without a shepherd, harassed and helpless". Soon afterward and with the departing advice of Mr Richards, the churches of Trefgarn, Rhosycaerau and Rhodiad called four brothers who were members among them and had been occasional preachers: Daniel Jenkins, Thomas Skeel, James Meyler, and William Harries. They were ordained on Ocober 20th, 21st and 22nd, 1795. the following ministers were present and took part in the services J. Griffiths, Glandwr; T. Davies, Pantteg; B. Evans, Drewen; S. Lloyd, Brynberian; John Thomas, Llangathen, previously Rhayader; Jenkin Lewis, Wrexham;  J. Evans, Haverfordwest; P. Maurice, Ebenezer; M. Jones, Trelech, a J. Phillips, Trewyddel. The plan was for Messrs D. Jenkins and T. Skeel to focus on Trefgarn, Mr Meyler on Rhosycaerau and Mr Harries on Rhodiad, with the understanding that all four churches would benefit from their specific skills as ministers. This only lasted a short time before they focused on their allocated chapels. Shortly after this a chapel was built in Solva, which was intended as a branch of Trefgarn and Rhodiad, but it was then agreed for it to be in association with Rhodiad only. Soon afterwards Trefgarn built a chapel in Penybont, this is known as Ford.

In May 1809 trefgarn and those who worshipped in Penybont sent an united call to Mr Benjamin Griffiths, Llanboidy, Carmarthenshire, to come and work with Mr Jenkins and Mr Skeel. Mr Griffiths was ordained on November 9th, 1809. The following ministers took part W. Harries, Rhodiad; T. Phillips, D.D., Neuaddlwyd; J. Davies, Bethlehem; B. Evans, St. Florence; M. Jones, Trelech; H. George, Brynberian; J. Meyler, Rhosycaerau; J. Lloyd, Henllan; W. Griffiths, Glandwr; T. Griffiths, Hawen, and W. Davies, Rhosycaerau. Mr Jenkins, one of the ministers, died just over a year after Mr Griffiths ordination, but Mr Skeel continued to work with him until 1821 when he ,in conjunction with his nephew, Mr Daniel Davies, confined his labours to the branch at Penybont and Zion's Hill, leaving Trefgarn to Mr Griffiths alone. Mr Griffiths was very successful here. The members numbered 138 when he was ordained, between then and 1845, 564 new members had been welcomed. In 1826 a dwelling named Penycwm was converted to be a house of worship and to hold a Sunday School. This small chapel was opened on June 14th, 1826, when Messrs J. Roberts, Llanbrynmair and Caleb Morris, then of Narberth. Mr and Mrs Thomas, Llethr, were the leaders with the building of the chapel. In 1833 the old chapel of Trefgarn was demolished and the present one built. The people were so hard working that the whole cost of the building before the opening day. The following preached at the opening Messrs  J. Bulmer, Haverfordwest; D. Rees, Llanelli; D. Davies, Cardigan; J. Davies, Glandwr, and others. Another small chapel was built, named Paran, by the church at Trefgarn, to hold Sunday schools and occasional preaching. The land was obtained from Mr Hicks, Trefmaenhir, on a lease of 999 years. It was opened in October 1843, when sermons were given by Messrs Williams, St. Clears; Lewis, Henllan, and Hughes, Trelech.  

In 1845, because the area of his ministry had become large, and Mr Griffiths was affected by his advancing age, a call was sent to Mr John Greiffiths, Brecon College, to be his fellow minister. Mr Griffiths was ordained here on October 15th, 1845, when most of the following took part:-D. Williams, Troedrhiwdalar; D. Rees, Llanelli; J. Davies, Glandwr; W. Davies, and D. Bateman, Rhosycaerau; T. Mortimer, Solva; D. Davies, Zion's-hill; J. Evans, Hebron; S. Evans, Penygroes; J. Griffiths, St. David's; W. Williams, Llandilo; J. Lewis, Henllan; S. Thomas, Trefdraeth; E. Lewis, Brynberian; J. Williams, Haverfordwest, and B. James, Llandilo. Mr J. Griffiths was working here alongside Mr B. Griffiths very succesfully until 1853,because of family circumstances, he decided to give up his post. The church was once again under the sole care of Mr B. Griffiths until 1855, when a call was sent to Mr John Morgan Evans, Carmarthen College. He was ordained on August 21st and 22nd, when there were approximately thirty ministers present. Mr W. Morgan, Carmarthen preached on the nature of a church, the questions were asked by Mr J. Griffiths, St. David's, the ordination prayer by Mr S. Griffiths, Horeb. Mr J. Davies, Glandwr preached to the minister, and Mr H. Jones, Carmarthen to the church. Mr Griffiths was ageing and becoming less able to carry out his ministry when Mr Evans began his work so that most of the work fell to him. In 1856 Mr Evans set up a regular religious service at Nolton, a seaside place about six miles from Trefgarn, in a totally anglicised area. In 1857 a chapel was built there mainly through the work of Mr D. Banton, Nolton and Mr J. Thomas, Llethr.Trefgarn donated about sixty pounds to the cost of the building. After the opening a church was established of fifteen members, eight from Trefgarn and the remainder from reyston and other areas. Mr Evans continued to minister to them free of charge until there were seventy members, and all the debt paid. Soon after the ordination of Mr Evans Trefgarn elected twelve deacons in a secret ballot, which all went peacefully. In 1862, the old minister, Mr Griffiths, died, elderly and fulfilled with the respect of both people and church.Mr Evans had been troubled for some time by some ill-feeling between some of the members, but despite tryng all remedies failed to resolve the problem. It affected him so much that he gave up his ministry, he had not received or looked for another call when he did this.As soon as it became known that he was moving he was called by Ebenezer, Cardiff, where he is currently. His ministry in Trefgarn finished in 1866 and he began his work in Cardiff at the beginning of 1867. After Mr Evans left, the church gave a call to Mr D. L. Jenkins, Carmarthen College. He was ordained here on July 1st, 1868. The following officiated - Messrs H. Davies, Bethania; D. Henry, Penygroes; J. Davies, Glandwr; W. Morgan, Carmarthen, and others. During the ministry of Mr Jenkins a beautiful new chapel was built at Penycwm, the debt was cleared before the end of 1871. At the end of 1871 Mr Jenkins accepted a call from the english church at Splotlands, Cardiff, and moved there. Since he left Trefgarn has not had a permanent minister.The cause here is in very good order, with large congregations gathering both in the mother church and the branches. There have been many notable religious people associated with this church from time to time, they are remembered fondly in the area even today, and there are some of their descendants bearing their names and inheriting their enthusiasm. This church was a great debating ground in the old days especially regarding  the new system and Mr J. Morgan Evans tells of an old member, Thomas Watts, grandfather of the famous singer Miss Watts, told him "If you had preached here forty years ago , you would have been pulled out of the pulpit". There was a family named Charles, who considered themselves protectors of the Doctrines, who were very hard on many a young preacher when he descended from the pulpit. They tested them with hard questions and frequently continued the discussion until dawn. Undoubtedly there are many preachers raised in this chapel that we have no records of. The following are the ones we know of :-

We understand that many much respected occasional preachers have been raised here, but we have no record of them.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES *

We have already mentioned Messrs P. Phillips and T. Davies, the first two ministers of this church, in the history of The Green

WILLIAM MAURICE - No definite early history - Mr Davies, Rhosycaerau says born North Wales, Mr Griffiths, St. David's says born Carmarthenshire - No detail of his education, probably paid his own way - probably settled at Trefgarn 1720, ordained 1725 - Married Miss Perkins, daughter of David Perkins, Rhosycaerau. - 11 children from first wife - son was Thomas Maurice, Laugharne - Married a second time to a Baptist from  Llangloffan - 11 children again - Daughters married to:- Mr John Richards, Trefgarn. Mr William Harries, Rhodiad. Mr Mortimer, Trewellwell, parents of Mr T. Mortimer, Solva - quoted as saying that "the sound of children was music to his ears" - Died aged 85 years October16th, 1778. - buried with his second wife in Llanrhian.

MORRIS GRIFFITHS - Born Llangybi, Caernarfonshire 1721 -  while still young went to live with William Pritchard, Glasfrynfawr, moved to Anglesey with him because of persecution - escaped a press gang - occasional preacher travelling around North Wales - recommended by Mr Lewis Rees went to Carmarthen College June 4th, 1750, paid for by the Board - Ordained Trefgarn and Rhoscaerau September 29th, 1757 - Died October 17th, 1769 - buried in Mathry church, his wife died 1807, buried with him.

JOHN RICHARDS - born Carmarthenshire, location not known - Abergavenny College May 8th, 1767. - ordained Trefgarn and Rhosycaerau in 1770 - History given with Trefgarn.

DANIEL JENKINS - Born near Trefgarn  - Parents Calvinistic Methodists at Woodstock, became Independents - apprenticed as a shoemaker - occasional preacher for many years at Trefgarn - ordained 1795 - Died January 18th, 1811 aged 61years.

BENJAMIN GRIFFITHS - Born Meidrym, Carmarthenshire. July 16th, 1778 - parents members at Bethlehem, St Clears - he became a member of Bethlehem in 1801, encouraged by his uncle Mr Thomas Llwynbychan - began to preach 3 years later - occasional preacher for 5 years while continuing with his business - 1809 ordained at Trefgarn - Died June 17th, 1862 aged 84 years - Buried at Glandwr - brother of James Griffiths, St. David's.

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.

 


KEYSTON

(Camrose Parish)

Pages 128/9

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This place is a few miles west of Haverfordwest. Known as Tregethin by the Welsh. The inhabitants are all English. There is something very striking about the beginnings of this church. One Sunday morning in 1787, Mr Stephen Lloyd, Brynberian, rose very early and walked from Brynberian to Keyston - around twenty five miles - and preached on the road in the middle of the village. The appearance of a stranger bringing a remarkable message, created excitment among the residents. A good congregation gathered and listened intently, but at the end they all turned and went their own way and no one offered the minister any food or drink. After everyone had left, he walked down to the bottom of the village and turned to knock on a door. The lady of the house came to the door, her name was Mrs Lewis. Mr Lloyd and Mrs Lewis had never met. When she opened the door, he asked "Do you love Jesus Christ, and would you want to go to heaven?" "I certainly hope so" she replied. "Well" he said "if you love Jesus Christ, you should respect his servant. Today I walked from Brynberian to spread his word in this place, and I am hungry." The lady invited him in and he was kindly received and offered all comforts. Within a year the son of that house, Mr James Lewis, and many others from the village had become members of the church. We do not know whether it was a personal urge or had Mr Lloyd been encouraged to go and preach here we do not know, but there is no reason to doubt the story as it was quoted by the venerable William Davies, Rhoscaerau, who was minister of Keyston for twenty years. Mr Lloyd returned a second and third time, until he had enough support to establish a church and build a chapel. The cause was under the care of Mr Lloyd and his helper Mr Henry George from it's inception in 1797. In that year a call was sent to Mr Joseph Davies, Wrexham College, but his appointment was unfortunate for the cause. He was here for eight or nine years without confirming one new member. The cause got weaker and weaker each year. Eventually he was found to be immoral and was cast out, the cause was now in a very low situation. Mr William Davies, Rhosycaerau was preaching here, at that time he was a student in Mr Harries, Pembroke's school. At the end of the service a malicious nonbeleiver asked " Young man, do you know Mr Meyler, Rhosycaerau?", "Yes, very well, I am a member in his church", replied Mr Davies. " Well, ask him to come here and preach at a funeral" he said. "Whose funeral?" asked Mr Davies."The cause in Keyston" he replied, "it has been dead for some time". Mr Meyler went there soon afterwards and gave a powerful sermon on the words " On this rock I will build my church and the gates of hell will not conquer it. Yeah" he continued " it is on the rock the church is built and not on one malicious doubter." Instead of burying the cause at Keyston, his visit was the start of a strong revival here.This took place around 1806, when Mr Davies was appointed to support Mr Meyler at Rhosycaerau. They took on the ministry of Keyston and worked together until the death of Mr Meyler in 1825. During their ministry the church increased from twelve members to one hundred and twenty. After the death of Mr Meyler, Mr Davies had to give up the care of Keyston as his ministry became too big  for him to manage on his own. In 1828 a call was sent to Mr James Williams, Carmarthen College, son of the venerable David Williams, Troedrhiwdalar. Mr Williams remained here until 1845, with great respect, when he took on the care of  The Green, Haverfordwest, in association with Keyston. He remained minister here until his death in 1870, despite his having moved to Haverfordwest, and more so when his health deteriorated, this place had very little care from him. There has been no minister here since the death of Mr Williams. There is a great possibility here for a dedicated minister.

The following preachers were raised here:-

* Letter Mr Bateman, Rhosycaerau.

 


DALE

Page 130

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

It was in 1838 that the cause began here, thanks to the efforts of a good man by the name of James Palmer, who looked after St. Anne's Lighthouse, at the entrance to Milford Haven. We do not think that Mr Palmer was a preacher, but certainly a good christian. This place, like St. Ismael, has been under the same ministry as Little Haven. The number of members here is about twenty, the listeners about sixty and the Sunday School about seventy. These three places - Little Hayen, St. Ismael, and Dale are on the western end of the English area of Pembrokeshire. In each of these places there are some warm and faithful religious people, but there has been not one raised as a preacher.*

* Letter Mr Theophilus James.

 


ST.ISMAEL

Page 130

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

It was through the work of Mr David Phillips, Wolfsdale, the cause here was started in 1828, and it has been under the same ministry as Little Haven from the beginning. There is only a small congregation, which could not be otherwise as the total number of residents is only 469. The number of members is sixty and the listeners about the same.

 


LITTLE HAVEN

(Talbenny Parish)

Page 129

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

The cause was started here around 1800, or soon after, by Mr James Meyler, Rhosycaerau, and he and his fellow minister Mr Davies ministered here for many years. On the Sundays that they were not available an occasional preacher from Tabernacl, Haverfordwest came to fill in. In 1824 the ministers from Rhosycaerau gave up the ministry and Mr David Phillips, Wolfsdale took on the most of the care.That gentleman worked here and other places in the area until 1836. From then until 1845 this place, with St Ismael and Dale were under the care of Mr James Williams, in association with Keyston, and the County Union maintained a local missionary to help him. When Mr Williams gave up the ministry in 1845, Mr Theophilus James was ordained and remains the current minister. The County Union has not contributed to maintain the the ministry here, as they did,  since Mr James was ordained. The number of members here is fifty, but the listeners number over a hundred and the Sunday School around one hundred and fifty.

 

 


NOLTON

Page 130

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

We have already mentioned the beginning of this church with the history of Trefgarn, but as there is an Independent church here we should mention it on it's own right. In 1856 Mr John Morgan Evans, Trefgarn, started to preach  in this area and the following year a church was established with fifteen members. A chapel was built with Mr Evans, Mr John Thomas, Llethr, and Mr D. Banton, Nolton, taking the lead in the building of it. Trefgarn donated sixty pounds toward the cost of building. Once the church had about sixty members Mr Evans gave up the care of it. As we understand it there has not been a settles minister since then. It is a totally English area. Although it could not be expected that there would be a large congregation in a thinly populated area, but a small successful cause could continue here with the Lord's blessing.

 


ROSEMARKET

Page 131

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

The beginning of this cause is the fruit of visits by Messrs R. Morgan, Henllan; M. Jones, Trelech, and J. Meyler, Rhosycaerau, to the English area of Pembrokeshire. A congregation was gathered and a church was formed about 1801. In 1803 Mr Arnold Davies settled here as minister. For the previous two or three years he has worked as a travelling preacher among the English in Pembrokeshire. This good minister continued to work here and the surrounding areas with great success until his death in 1814. The next minister here was Mr David Thomas, Carmarthen College. He was ordained here and the newly formed church in Tier's Cross on April 17th, 1816. The service was opened with a prayer from Mr Bulmer, Haverfordwest. Mr David Davies, Pantteg preached on the nature of a church, the confession of faith was taken by Mr Meyler, Rhosycaerau. Mr Warlow, Milford gave the ordination prayer. Mr D. Peter, Carmarthen gave a sermon on the duty of a minister and Mr W. Harries, Abergavenny on the duty of the church.The morning and evening of the previous day  sermons were given by Messrs  Price, Llanedi; Rowlands, Llanybri, and others.Mr Thomas remained here for seven years. and at the end of 1823, he moved to Wooton under Edge, Gloucestershire, where he remained for the rest of his life. The thied minister was Mr Henry Davies, Carmarthen College. He was ordained here on October 7th, 1824. On the occasion Mr D.L.Jones, Capel Sion,  preached on the nature of a church, questions were asked by Mr J. Bulmer, Haverfordwest, the ordination prayer by Mr Warlow, Milford. Mr D. Peter, Carmarthen preached on the minister's duty and Mr D. Davies, Pantteg on the duty of a church. Mr Davies was here until the beginning of 1828, when he moved to Narberth. It apprears that there was no preacher here from when Mr Davies left and Mr Thomas Jones, Newport (Pem), settled here in 1836. He left here soon after 1844 and joined the established  Church. On November 10th, 1847 Mr Evan Thomas was ordained here, from Carmarthen College, and he remains as minister here today.

We would have liked to give more detail regarding this cause, but the person that could have, and should have, provided them to us failed to do so. We have therefore had to make do with what we could ascertain without any help from anyone still associated with the cause. The number of members in 1861 was 53, we do not know if this has gone up or down currently.

 


TIER'S CROSS

(Steynton Parish)

Pages 131/3

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

It was through the industry and devotion of Arnold Davies, the minister of Rosemarket, that a cause was started here. The building of the Chapel had already begun before his death, it was opened in June, 1815, just nine months after his death. In April,1816 Mr David Thomas settled here as minister, in association with Rosemarket. This place has been under joint ministry with Rosemarket from the beginning. The number of members here was 60 in 1861, the listeners 91 and the Sunday school 100. We have no more information.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES **

ARNOLD DAVIES - born Wolfscastle, Pembrokeshire 1772 - no formal education, taught himself - at 18 joined Calvinistic Methodists, Woodstock - continued as a farm labourer until he was 22, then became a Schoolmaster in Spittal, near Haverfordwest - 1800 became a travelling preacher under the Independents, ordained Manorbier 1802 for that purpose - settled Rosmarket 1803 - 1811 spent 3 months preaching in Guildford, London - Died October 25th, 1814, aged 42.*

DAVID THOMAS LODWICK - Born Llanedi, Carmarthenshire, 1793 - In1812, age 19, Carmarthen College - Ordained 1816, Rosemarket and Tier's Cross - 1823, moved to Wotton under Edge where he remained until he died on March 28th, 1861, aged 68.

*Evangelical Magazine, for 1816.

**Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated

 


LONGSTONE

(Ludchurch Parish)

Page 133

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This cause was started through the efforts of Mr T. R. Williams, Templeton. The first chapel was built here in 1848, and the first minister Mr Williams died in 1850, After his death this church and the others that had been under his ministry relied on occasional ministers for some years. In 1854 Mr William Thomas was ordained, he had been nurtured by Mr Williams to be his successor in Longstone. He worked here with comparative success until his death in 1869. The chapel had been rebuilt in 1862. In 1871 Mr Heber Williams, son of the first minister, was ordained from Carmarthen College. He is the current minister.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES *

WILLIAM THOMAS - Born Bedford Farm, near Narberth, November 7th, 1807 - Childhood minister was Mr Caleb Morris, Narberth - became a member at Templeton, minister was Mr T. R. Williams - began to preach in 1835 - ordained at Longstone in 1854 - last sermon given July 11th, 1869. Died 9 days later, buried at Longstone.

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.

 


MIDDLEHILL

(Freystrop Parish)

Pages 134/5

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

It is said that prayer meetings were being held in this area by members of The Green, Haverfordwest, since 1778. These meetings were held at Middlehill, the home of Mary Morgans. In 1813, or the following year, Mr John Bulmer was invited to preach by one of his members who lived in Freystrop Cross, in this area, to preach at his house. As this house was closer to Rosemarket than Haverfordwest, Mr Bulmer asked Mr Arnold Davies to go and preach there as often as possible.One morning they both came to visit the house theyhad been invated to, but they felt that it was too small to hold any regular services. As they were leaving they saw a large farmhouse and decided to go there and ask if they could preach there. They found it was owned by a widow who had previously been a member of the Wesleyans.This lady, because of family tragedy, had neglected religion for many years. After talking to the two ministers she was most willing to allow them to preach there. Mr Davies was the first to preach to a large congregation. He was taken ill soon afterwards and died shortly afterwards.The coming of the word to this house was a blessing to the lady and many of her descendants. About two years later the widow died in the full comfort of her religion. After her death the house continued to be available thanks to her son in law, Mr William Davies, and his wife. They were accepted as members at Rosemarket by Mr David Thomas, and after a church was formed at Middlehill, William Davies served as a deacon till he died. Preaching continued at the house until the chapel was built at Middlehill. We have been unable to discover when exactly the chapel was built and the church established, but we are reasonably certain it was around 1820. The church was formed from members of Rosemarket, The Green and Tabernacl, Haverfordwest. Those who took the lead with building the chapel were John Morgan, one of the family of the lady whose home was used for prayer meetings, in 1778, William Davies, already mentioned, George Whitlow, and William Canton. The first minister to settle here was Mr Nathaniel Harries. He appears to have settled  around 1825, but was not ordained until 1830. His ministry here was very successful. The chapelwas rebuilt and extended in 1841, and the following year a branch of the mother chapel was built at Westhook. Mr Harries died  in 1857. When he died the membership was eighty, the listeners two hundred and thirty and the Sunday School two hundred. In 1859 Mr William Edwards, Carmarthen College, was ordained here. He worked here and at Westhook until 1865, when he moved to Mere, Wiltshire. He is now in Kilsby, Northamptonshire. In March, 1866, Mr Howell Davies was ordained, he left here in August 1871 to go to Tredegar, and has just moved from there to Silverwell, near Wigan. There has been no minister at Middlehill and Westhook since he left.

Some have been raised to preach here but we do not have their names. It was in the widow's house that Mr George Rogers, of Harmerhill, Shropshire; Mr James Rowlands, of Hanley-on-Thames, and Mr William Thomas, of Stone, Staffordshire preached their first sermons, the two former were members at The Green, and the latter at Rosemarket.

 


NEBO

(Cosheston Parish)

Page 136

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This is a very small chapel a few miles from Pembroke town. The cause was started as the result of the labour of Mr Richard Morris, Home Missionary, who worked in the English area of the county under the auspices of the English Union. The chapel was built in 1832. The place was considered to be a kind of Missionary Station for some years after it was built. In 1858 a church was established here. It has been under the ministry of Pembroke from the beginning. The membership is about twenty and the Sunday School between fifty and sixty. The area ia very thinly populated therefore cannot generate a large congregation. One or two have been raised to preach, but we do not have their names.*

*Letter W. Trewent, Esq.

 


WESTHOOK

(Llangwm Parish)

Pages 135/6

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

As noted this church is a branch of Middlehill. It was built in 1842, the two most responsible for the building were Thomas Davies and Joseph Phillips, two members of Middlehill. Mr Harries, the mininster of the mother church, preached here every Sunday from when the chapel was built, but the church was not established until April, 1857, and about a month after the first Holy Sacrament was celebrated, the faithful old minister, Mr Harries, died. The membership was about thirty when the church was formed, but the listeners and Sunday school numbered around one hundred and sixty. This cause has been under the ministry of Middlehill from the beginning. We hope that the Lord will send a shepherd close to his heart to care for these two flocks.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES *

NATHANIEL HARRIES - Born Llanhaden, near Narberth, 1796 - early guidance from Mr Thomas Brigstoke, Vicar of Llanhaden, he educated him to a standard that he became a teacher at the parish school - remained a teacher for eight years - 1822 moved to Tier's Cross and joined the Independents - minister at Middlehill 1825 - died there May 16th, 1857 aged 61.

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.


WOLFSDALE

(Camrose Parish)

Pages 136/7

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This place is close to the border between the English and the Welsh speaking areas, but the religious services  are only conducted in English. Around 1810, Messrs J. Meyler and W. Davies, Rhosycaerau began to come and preach occasionally in this area. Having seen that there was an interest among the people, they came regurlarly every month. The result was that many were moved to make a declaration of their faith, and they were accepted as members at Keyston. In 1826 some land was acquired to build a chapel here from John Reynish, Esq., on a lease of one thousand years. In 1827 a church was established.When Mr James Williams was ordained at Keyston in 1828, he took on this young churc, alongside the mother church of Keyston. The place was under the care of Mr Williams for some years, when he gave up the care, Mr Davies , Rhosycaerau came here on a monthly basis to minister the sacraments until the present minister was ordained. Mr Henry Mathias was ordained here on April 1st, 1839, he had been a student at Mr Davies, Narberth's school for four years. This was the order of the ordination service:- Mr Griffiths, St. David's preached on the nature of a church, Mr Davies, Narberth accepted the declaraation of faith, Mr J. Bulmer, Haverfordwest, gave the ordination prayer, a sermon on the duty of a mininster was given by Mr W. Davies, Rhosycaerau, Mr D. Davies, Zion's Hill preached on the duty of a church. The membershipat the start of Mr Mathias' Ministry was between sixty and seventy, but by 1861 this had increased to one hundred and twenty, we beleive that the current number is the same or slightly higher. Mr Mathias continues to labour here with respect and a degree of success.

 


CRUNDALE

(Rudbaxton Parish)

Page 137

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This cause was started through the efforts of Mr Davies, Zion's Hill. A small chapel was opened here on April13th, 1838, it was notably beautiful and  comfortable.The following took part in the opening ceremony:- Messrs  Davies, Glandwr ; Griffiths, St.David's ; Griffiths, Carm, Gloucestershire; Williams, Keyston, and Davies, Rhosycaerau.As far as we know this church has always been associated with Wolfsdale, under the ministry of Mr Henry Mathias. This is a happy little cause. The members number one hundred or more and the listeners and Sunday School number about the same. This place like Wolfsdale in on the borderline of English and Welsh speakers, but the services are conducted in English only. If anyone was raised to preach here we do not know their names.

 


MILFORD

(Steynton Parish)

Pages 137/8

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

At the beginning of this century the government built The Royal Dockyards with the result that a place, previously a small village, grew to be a sizeable town within  three or four years. In 1806 Mr William Warlow, minister of Tabernacl, Haverfordwest, came here to preach occasionally in dwelling houses. Some church members from Haverfordwest and other places had moved here, and having found no place of worship of any denomination, they spoke to Mr Warlow about building a chapel. As Mr Warlow had given up his ministry in Haverfordwest in 1807, he was able to give his attention totally to Milford.He acquired some land from Mrs Waldegrave to build a chapel, and the foundation stone, of the chapel named Tabernacl, was laid in June 1807 by Mr Warlow. The building was completedand it was opened on April 17th, 1808, when the following preached Mr Bickerdike, from Woolwich ; Mr Peter, Carmarthen ; Mr George, Brynberian, and Mr Griffiths, Glandwr.The chapel, although a good size, was too small to house the large congregations that day. Soon after the opening a church was established here with eight members. Eventually the small numbers grew to hundreds. Mr Warlow was comfortably off and served the young church for three and a half years without pay, so that the debt on the chapel could be paid off. The cause soon strengthened and grew. Most of the overseers  in the dockyards joined this church, and one of them was involved with setting up one of the most effective Sunday Schools in this Principality.Mr Warlow continued to work here with great respect, influence and exceptional success until old age disabled him. In 1845 a helper was sought and a call was given to Mr Thomas Lloyd, Brecon College, who began his labour at the end of that year.. He was ordained in early 1846 and by then the old minister had been called from his labour to his reward. Mr Lloyd continued here very successfully until 1857, when he moved to Ebbley, Gloucestershire. Prior to his leaving a meeting was held to present him with twenty six valuable books as a mark of respect for his service. In an address Mr Garret, one of the deacons, expressed the church, congregation and the town's sorrow at their losing such a respected and industrious minister, who had been in their lives for eleven years. A call was sent to Mr E. F. Woodman, Bethnal Green, London without delay.Having been here for about two years this gentleman decided that the grass was greener in the fields of the Established Church, and he deserted nonconformism in 1859.Any further history of his is of no interest.In 1860 a call went out to Mr Caleb Guion, minister at The Plough, Brecon and he has been the minister here since then. There has been a strong cause here from the start. The number of members in 1861 was about two hundred and the listeners about the same. We do not know the current numbers. We understand that many were raised to preach fere but we have no names. The chapel that was built in 1808 is still in use, although it has been renovated since then.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES *

WILLIAM WARLOW - Born January 19th, 1765 -  Son of Charles and Martha, of Camroes near Haverfordwest -raised by his aunt - 1781 listened to Mr Rowland Hill Preaching at Haverfordwest - became a member at Tabernacl, Haverfordwest - 1782 moved to Bristol - occasional preaching and prayer - 1791 first sermon in public at Trefgarn and Keyston - returned to Bristol 1792 encouraged to become a minister - to Hoxton College - after 2 years went to Wincanton in1794 to preach for the summer - increased the congregation from 20 to 300 - returned as promised  at Christmas - began his ministry in 1795, ordained May 10th 1796 -1796 married Mary, daughter of Mr Richard Adams, Herbranstone, Pembrokeshire - left Wincanton in 1801, returned to Pembrokeshire - called to Tabernacl, Haverfordwest - 1806 moved to Milford to the end of his life - Died January 21st, 1846 at 80 years of age, while on a visit to his daughter in Ramsgate.

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.

 


LANTEGUE

(Crunwear Parish)

Page 140

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

The name of the parish is Lantegue. Occasional preaching took place here by the Independents for many years, there were seven or eight who were members at Sardis and Carfan. The ministers of these churches would come occasionally and preach in these peoples houses, and there were many occasional preachers like Mr Warriott Edwards, Glandwr, and many others, who frequently held services here. When Mr J. C. Davies, now of Newton, Swansea, settled at Carfan as minister,managed to get a schoolroom thet the locals had built for use as a day school and community meetings, for use every Sunday to hold services.either Mr Davies or an occasional preacher would come here every Sunday at 2 pm to preach. At the end of 1854 a meeting was held to establish a church.Mr Davies and Mr Lewis, Henllan officiated on the occasion. There were ten members on the formation of the church, originally members of Sardis and Carfan.Mr Davies was the minister here until 1859, when he moved to Swansea. Recently Mr Heber Williams, Longstone,has undertaken the ministry here and Mr Mathias at Amroth.

The congregation continues to worship in the schoolroom. The membership is now between twenty and thirty. Those who were of most assistance to Mr Davies were Thomas Phillips, and his son ; Daniel Thomas, and his wife, and William Raymond, and his wife.

 


AMROTH

Page 140

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

Amroth is the parish next to Lantegue, nearer the sea.There have been Independents preaching here in various houses for many years. Mr Warriott Edwards is mentioned as having preached here many times when he ran a school in the area. Because so many members of Sardis lived here, Mr Mathias, and many of them decided to build a chapel here. The chapel was built in 1869, it was partly funded by the 5,000  from Mr Morley, M.P. to help build English language chapels in Wales. It is a beautiful building, and a small chuch has been formed there. Mr Mathias, Sardis and Mr Williams, Longstone have been joint ministers here.

***When writing about Sardis we forgot to include that it was here Mr John Evans, B.A. was ordained in 1856, as the successor to Mr W Thomas. After Mr Evans moved to Neath in 1859, Mr Mathias undertook the ministry of Sardis along with Saundersfoot.


HOREB

(Martletwy Parish)

Page 141

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

This place is within a few miles of Haverfordwest. Through the hard work, useful and godly David Phillips, Wolfsdale, of whom we have already spoken, that a congregation was gathered and a cause started in this area. This church was formed in a dwelling house in 1826, by Mr Henry George, Brynberian and it was him that administered the sacraments here for a long time. David Phillips would preach here on other Sundays. When Mr George gave up the care of this area, Mr W. Thomas, Sardis came here for some time. Soon after Mr T. R. Williams settled in Templeton, he took on the care of this small cause, and continued for the remainder of his working life in 1850. Worship continued to be held in a dwelling house until 1843. In that year Mr Williams acquired some land from Mr Phillips, Picton Castle, and a small chapel was built on it. After Mr Williams' death this church was without a settled minister until Mr Jason Jenkins was ordined at St. Florence. He then took on the care of Horeb along with St. Florence until he left for Pontypool in 1861. In February 1862, Mr William Davies, Carmarthen College, began his ministry here, and remains here to this day. Horeb and Carew, Newton under the care of Mr Davies. The future in both places looks well. Considering that the population here is small, the cause in Horeb is strong. The membership is between fifty and sixty and the Sunday school about one hundred. We do not know of anyone was raised to preach here or of any notable occurence.Very few similar examples can be found in the history of nonconformity.

 


TEMPLETON

(Narberth Parish)

Page 141/2

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Translation by Maureen Saycell (April 2008)

William Benjamin Evans, St. Florence, supported by Mr William Thomas, Sardis, and others began the cause in this place. A chapel was opened here in 1818 and opened on March 30th, 1819 when sermons were given by Messrs B. Evans, St. Florence; David Thomas, Tier's Cross, and others. The church was under joint ministry of Mr Evans, St Florence and Mr Thomas, Sardis until 1830, when Mr Thomas R. Williams, Pembroke Dock, moved here. Mr Williams was a good minister and teacher here until his death in 1850. Following his death the church was under the care of Mr Joseph Morris, along with Narberth. After he gave up the care Mr Jason Jenkins came here along with St. Florence, till 1861. He gave up the ministry in that yearand Mr Thomas Jones, Carmarthen College, was ordained but he was here for only a year.After he left the church was dependent on occasional ministry until 1865, then Mr Evan Griffiths, Bala College, was ordained here. Mr Griffiths was minister here and Reynoldston, a cause he started, with some success until earlier this year, when he moved to Neyland. The chapel was rebuilt in 1839, and has been repaired recently. The congregation here is small, but the population is low and there are many other chapels in the area.

There are no detail of any raised here to preach only Mr William Thomas, Longstone, and two sons of Mr Williams, the minister. One of them is Mr Heber Williams, the current minister of Longstone.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES *

THOMAS R. WILLIAMS -Born 1805 Llanina, Cardiganshire - early education at Mr Jeremiah Lloyd's school in New Quay - member at Penrhiwgaled - College at Neuaddlwyd - 1826 settled in Pembrock Dock - after 4 years and some disagreement moved to Templeton, where he married and spent the rest of his life - kept a day school - Died November 19th, 1850, aged 45 years

*Only a shortened version of these biographical and professional notes have been translated.

 


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( Gareth Hicks - 17 April 2008)

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