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OLD RADNOR


National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"OLD RADNOR, (or Maes-hyved Hen) a parish partly in the hundred of Radnor, and partly in that of Wigmore, county Radnor, and also containing some places in the county of Herefordshire, 4 miles from Kington, its post town, and 3 from New Radnor. It is situated on the river Somergill, and contains the townships of Ednal, Kinnerton, Evenjobb, Upper and Lower Harpton, and Walton. It had formerly a castle, which was burnt in 1189 by Rhys ap Gruffydd, and of which there are still traces. There are also remains of a Druidical circle.

The hills of Old Radnor, Stanner, Hanter, and Worzel are worthy of the geologist's attention. Some of the hills consist of trap and greenstone, similar to the rare hypersthene rock of Coruisk in the Isle of Skye. Limestone is abundant, and there is a tram rail from the works to Kington. At Stones, in 1645, Charles I. supped with a yeoman, when retreating before Cromwell.

The living is a vicarage* with the curacy of Kinnerton annexed, in the diocese of Hereford, value 195, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. The church, dedicated to St. Stephen, is an ancient structure, with a tower containing six bells. The roof of the church is carved. In the interior are an old font, a carved-oak screen, and several monuments to the family of Lewis, of Harpton. The parochial charities produce about 59 per annum, of which 40 goes to Hartstonge's school."

"BARLAND, (or Bareland) a township in the parish and borough of Old Radnor, in the hundred and county of Radnor, South Wales, 3 miles from Radnor. It is not far from the famous Dyke of Offa, the ancient boundary of Wales and Mercia."

"BORVA, (or Burfa), a township united with Bareland, in the parish of Old Radnor, and borough of New Radnor, in the county of Radnor, South Wales, 5 miles to the E. of New Radnor. It is situated in a level and wooded district on the borders of Herefordshire, on the north side of the small river Hendwell. The township is crossed by Offa's Dyke."

"BURFA, a joint township with Evenjobb and several others, in the parish of Old Radnor, hundred and county of Radnor, South Wales. The hamlet is situated on the river Borva."

"BURLINGJOBB, a township and hamlet in the parish of Old Radnor, in the borough, hundred, and county of Radnor, South Wales, 2 miles to the S.E. of New Radnor. It is not far from Kington, the terminus of the branch railway from the Shrewsbury and Hereford line."

"EDNAL, a township in the parish of Old Radnor, county Radnor, 2 miles S.E. of New Radnor. The living is a curacy annexed to Old Radnor."

"EVENJOBB, (or Enjobb), a township in the parish of Old Radnor, borough and county Radnor, 4 miles N.W. of Kington. It includes Barland, Burfa, and Newcastle."

"KINNERTON, a township in the parish of Old Radnor, borough and county of Radnor, 3 miles N.E. of Radnor. It is joined with Salford and Badland. The living is a curacy annexed to the vicarage* of Old Radnor. The principal residence is Kinnerton House."

"SALFORD, a hamlet in the parish of Old Radnor, county Radnor. It is in conjunction with Kinnerton, and is included within the borough of New Radnor."

"UPPER HARPTON, a township in the parish of Old Radnor, county Radnor, 3 miles from Kington. It contains the hamlet of Wolfpits. The principal residence is Harpton Court."

"WEYTHEL, a hamlet in the parish of Old Radnor, county Radnor, 4 miles S.E. of New Radnor."

"WOLFPITS, a hamlet in the township of Upper Harpton, parish of Old Radnor, county Radnor, 3 miles N.W. of Kington, and 2 E. of Radnor."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson 2003]

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 A Topographical Dictionary of Wales
Samuel Lewis, 1833

RADNOR (OLD), or MAES-YVED-HEN, a parish, comprising the townships of Ednol, Evenjobb with Bareland, Harpton, Kinnarton with Badland, Old Radnor, and Walton, each supporting its own poor, in the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 2 1/2 miles (E. S. E.) from New Radnor, containing 1458 inhabitants. This place by the Welsh is also called Pen y Graig, which name it derives from the situation of its church on the summit of a rock : it was anciently of some importance, and had a castle, which Sir Richard Colt Hoare identifies with that mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis, under the appellation of " Cruker," but of which no vestiges can be discovered. In the Iter Carolinum it is noted that, " on 6th Aug., 1645, Charles I. went from Brecon to Gwernevit, the house of Sir H. Williams, to dinner ; he supped at Old Radnor, at a yeoman's house, the court being dispersed : on the 7th he proceeded to Ludlow." The house here which gave temporary refuge to that unfortunate monarch is called "The Stones," and stands about half a mile to the west of the church. The parish, which is of very great extent, is intersected by a stream called Somergil, and also by the Hendwell, a brook issuing from a small lake of that name, which abounds with excellent trout and eels. The surface is principally flat, though partly undulating, and in some places rising into hills of considerable elevation : the lands, with the exception of some tracts of common, and some woodland, are enclosed and in a good state of cultivation. The soil is in general a fertile loam, well adapted for the growth of corn, and affording pasturage for sheep and cattle. In the southern part of the parish there exists an extensive deposite of transition limestone, from which a most valuable supply of lime is obtained. The parish is intersected by the turnpike road from Hereford to Aberystwith. The surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified ; and the neighbourhood is enlivened with several gentlemen's seats, among which are, Harpton Court, the residence of the Right Hon. Thomas Frankland Lewis, a handsome mansion situated in grounds tastefully laid out; Evenjobb, the seat of P. R. Mynors, Esq.; Womaston, that of S. Lewin, Esq.; and Newcastle Court, that of John Whittaker, Esq., all good houses pleasantly situated, and forming interesting features in the scenery of the place.

The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Hereford, rated in the king's books at 35. 1. 0 1/2., and in the possession of the Dean and, Chapter of Worcester, by whom a stipendiary curate is appointed and paid, and is further supported by the interest of 800 parliamentary grant. The church, dedicated to St. Stephen, is a spacious and venerable structure, with a lofty square tower containing six bells : the body consists of a nave, with north and south aisles, and a chancel separated from the rest by a screen of richly carved oak, which extends across the nave and both the aisles : the font is of large dimensions, rudely carved out of a single stone ; and on the north side of the chancel stand the remains of a singular organ case, of large size, elaborately though somewhat rudely carved in oak : there are some handsome monuments of modern erection to the family of Lewis, of Harpton. At Ednol and Kinnarton are chapels of ease to the mother church. There is a place of worship for Independents. Lady Joan Hartstongue bequeathed a house and twenty-five acres of land at Weythel, in this parish, for the foundation and endowment of a school for the gratuitous instruction of poor children of the parishes of Old Radnor, Llanvihangel-Nant-Melan, and Gladestry : the present annual income arising from the endowment is about 30, and is regularly appropriated to the support of the school. A farm called the Wolfpits, now producing 12 per annum, and another called the Broken Bank, in the parish of Gladestry, were bequeathed by an unknown benefactor to the poor of this parish. Mrs. Cassandra Davies, in 1635, bequeathed to the poor not receiving parochial relief some land in the township of Bareland, now producing 2 per annum, which is regularly paid ; but a bequest of thirty shillings per annum, charged on an estate called the Callenders, has long ceased to be paid. Near the church are the remains of an ancient religious house, supposed to have been a nunnery : the moat by which it was surrounded is still plainly visible. Within the limits of the parish, and nearly in the centre of the Vale of Radnor, there is a singular relic of antiquity, generally supposed to be Druidical : it consists of four stones placed at the angles of a square, each stone being of such vast dimensions that it is as difficult to conjecture by what means as for what purpose they were placed there. Their position corresponds precisely with the cardinal points of the compass, the largest being to the south, and the smallest to the north; and they are ranged symmetrically, as far as their rude shapes will allow. A stone tablet is by some thought to have covered the whole ; but the unequal height of the stones, and their distance from each other, render this supposition improbable. Whatever may have been the object of this monument of a rude and uncivilized age, its destruction is said by Camden to have taken place in the reign of John, when this district was ravaged by Rhys ab Grufydd. The poor are maintained by an average annual expenditure amounting to 729. 17. for the entire parish, of which sum, 170. 10. is assessed on the township of Old Radnor.      

 

BADLAND

BADLAND, a joint township with Kennarton, in the parlsh of OLD RADNOR, within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, NORTH WALES, 2 miles (N. E.) from New Radnor. The population is returned with Kennarton.

BARELAND

BARELAND, a joint township with BORVA, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 3 miles (S. W.) from Presteign, containing, with the township of Evenjobb, 369 inhabitants. It is situated on the border of Herefordshire, and is passed on the west, at the distance of about half a mile, by that remarkable work of the Saxons, Offa's Dyke. It is assessed jointly with the township of Evenjobb for the support of its poor, the average annual expenditure amounting to 228. 12.

BORVA

BORVA, a joint township with Bareland, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, County of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 5 1/2 miles (E.) from New Radnor. The population is returned with the townships of Evenjobb and Newcastle. This township, situated on the border of Herefordshire, is extremely well wooded. Offa's Dyke passes through it, near which are the remains of an ancient camp.

BURLINJOBB

BURLINJOBB, a joint township with Old Radnor in the parish of OLD RADNOR, liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES 4 1/4 miles (S. E. by E.) from New Radnor. The population is returned with the parish. The Kington railway commences at the lime-works in this township proceeds westward to Castle Weir, and then southward until it joins the Hay railway : it was formed under an act obtained in 1818. The old Roman road fron Builth passed between this place and Old Radnor.

EDNOL

EDNOL (EDNAWL), a chapelry in the parish of OLD RADNOR, within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 4 miles (N.E. by N.) from New Radnor, containing 45 inhabitants. This chapelry is situated on the eastern side of the tract called the Forest of Radnor, but divine service is not often performed in the chapel, owing to its proximity to the church of New Radnor. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor amounts to 10. 11.

EVENJOBB

EVENJOBB, a joint township with Newcastle, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 3 1/2 miles (E. by N.) from New Radnor. The population is returned with Bareland. It is situated at the inter-section of two cross roads, one leading from New Radnor to Presteign, and the other from Discoed to Old Radnor. Offa's Dyke crosses the brow of the hill about half a mile distant to the eastward, near which are vestiges of an ancient camp. This place is assessed jointly with Bareland for the support of the poor, the average annual expenditure amounting to 228. 12.

HARPTON

HARPTON, a township in the parish of OLD RADNOR, within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR., county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 1 3/4 mile (S. E.) from New Radnor, containing 212 inhabitants. This township, of which the Welsh name is Trev y Delyn, is situated on the road from New Radnor to Kington, and the principal respectable residence is Harpton Court. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor amounts to 62. 17.

KENNARTON

KENNARTON, a joint hamlet with Badland, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 2 1/2 miles (N. E.) from New Radnor, containing, with Badland and Salford, 246 inhabitants. This place is situated on the road between New Radnor and Discoed, and near the Best brook, which turns the Holbech mill. There is a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. Mary. The average annual expenditure for the support of the. poor, conjointly with Badland, amounts to 117. 4.

NEWCASTLE

NEWCASTLE, a joint township with Evenjobb, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 3 1/4 miles (E. N. E.) from New Radnor. The population is returned with Bareland.

SALFORD

SALFORD, a joint township with Kennarton, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, NORTH WALES. The population is returned with Kennarton.

WALTON

WALTON, a joint township with Womaston, in that part of the parish of OLD RADNOR which is within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 3 miles (E.) from New Radnor, containing, with Womaston, 186 inhabitants. This township is situated on the road from Kington to New Radnor, which is here crossed by another from Discoed. A tributary of the Somergil brook flows through it. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor, conjointly with Womaston, amounts to 140. 3.

WOMASTON,

WOMASTON, a joint township with Walton, in the parish of OLD RADNOR, and within the liberties of the borough of NEW RADNOR, county of RADNOR, SOUTH WALES, 4 miles (E.) from New Radnor, containing, with Walton, 186 inhabitants. It is situated in a fertile district on the banks of the little river Somergil. Womaston, the seat of S. Lewis, Esq., is a good house, occupying a pleasant situation. This township is separately assessed with Walton for the support of its poor, the average annual expenditure amounting to  140. 3.

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