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Thatcham

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"THATCHAM, a parish in the hundreds of Faircross and Reading, county Berks, 3 miles E. of Newbury, its post town, and 14 W. of Reading. It is a station on the Reading and Bath section of the Great Western railway, near the navigable river Kennet and the Kennet and Avon canal, and includes the chapelries of Greenham and Midgham. It was a place of importance at the time of the Norman survey, and was formerly a market town, under charter of Henry II. to the Abbot of Reading, to whom the manor then belonged. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the silk trade, and some in a paper-mill at Colthrop. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Oxford, value £460. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, contains several monuments, including one to Lord Chief Justice Danvers." (There is more of this description).

"ASHMORE GREEN, a place in the parish of Thatcham, in the county of Berks."

"CROOKHAM COMMON, a named area in the parish of Thatcham, near Newbury, in the county of Berks."

"GOLDFINCH BOTTOM, a named area in the parish of Thatcham, in the county of Berks."

"GREENHAM, a chapelry in the parish of Thatcham, hundred of Faircross, county Berks, 1 mile S.E. of Newbury, its post town and railway station on the Hungerford branch of the Great Western railway. The river Kennet flows through the place. At Landleford was a cell to Reading Abbey, and the Knights Hospitallers possessed a preceptory and some estates. The village may be regarded as an extension of the town of Newbury, and has a good trade. Boatbuilding is carried on, and many of the people are employed in hide-curing, and in the corn-mills. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to that of Thatcham, in the diocese of Oxford. The church stands on a hill, and is a small edifice of ancient date, but was enlarged in 1825. The Baptists and Primitive Methodists have chapels, and there is a National school. The Craven hounds meet here."

"MIDGHAM, a tything in the parish of Thatcham, hundred of Faircross, county Berks, 7 miles E. of Newbury, its post town, and 1½ mile from Woolhampton station on the Newbury line of railway. It is situated on the northern bank of the river Kennet, and on the Kennet and Avon canal. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Oxford. The church, dedicated to St. Margaret [actually St Matthew, see below], is an ancient edifice, rebuilt by John Hillersdon in 1714. The parochial charities produce about £2 per annum. Thomas Thorpe Fowke, Esq., is lord of the manor. There are a National school, supported by subscription, and almshouses, erected by the late William Poyntz, Esq."

From The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland(1868). Transcribed by by Colin Hinson ©2003 Other descriptions can be found from other periods in various trade directories covering Berkshire from the early 19th century onwards, from Berkshire FHS for Thatcham and Greenham, and from A Vision of Britain Through Time.

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Archives & Libraries

In addition to those listed on the Berkshire home page, see the Research Wiki from Family Search (the Church of Latter-day Saints (Genealogical Society of Utah)).

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Description & Travel

You can see pictures of Thatcham which are provided by:

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Gazetteers

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Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Thatcham has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

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History

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Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SU522675 (Lat/Lon: 51.404134, -1.250956), Thatcham which are provided by:

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Poor Houses, Poor Law

Thatcham was in the Newbury Union.  For more information, see Poorhouses.