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1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"NEWLYN, a parish in the hundred of Pyder, county Cornwall, 8 miles N. of Truro, and 8 N.W. of Grampound, its post town. The parish, which is large, lies between St. Enoder and Perranzabuloe, and is bounded on the N. by St. Columb. It includes, besides the village of its own name, part of the hamlet of Mitchell, and the ancient manor of Cargol, which last at the time of the Domesday Survey belonged to the priory of Bodmin, and was afterwards possessed by the bishops of Exeter, who had a palace here. The surface is hilly, and in parts intersected with deep valleys. The land is nearly evenly distributed into three classes, according to its natural capabilities, viz: arable, pasture, and meadow, and the remainder downs, common, and waste. The soil is of various qualities, but produces good crops of wheat, barley, and turnips. The prevailing timber is oak and elm, of which there are some stately trees. There are several chalybeate springs in the parish. The substratum is rich in mineral wealth, and the lead mine called East Wheal Rose yields ore in which about 40 ounces of silver are found to the ton. The petty sessions for the W. division of the hundred of Pyder are held in the village, which was once a market town, under a grant obtained for it by the Bishop of Exeter in 1312. It is compactly built in the most elevated part of the parish, and commands a wide prospect over the surrounding country. The population has of recent years considerably increased. The parish contains several old mansions, including Trerice, formerly the seat of Lord John Arundell, who was present with Queen Elizabeth at the review of the troops at Tilbury, and who so bravely defended Pendennis Castle at the advanced age of eighty. Only part of this once baronial edifice is still standing, and is much dilapidated. Tresilian is the seat of Richard Gully Bennett, Esq. The present lords of the manor and principal landed proprietors are, Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, Viscount Falmouth, the Bishop of Exeter, and Christopher H. T. Hawkins, Esq. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £755, and the vicarial for £470, with a glebe of 9 acres. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Exeter, value £380, in the patronage of the bishop. The church, dedicated to St. Newlyn, is a spacious cruciform structure with a lofty square embattled tower crowned with pinnacles or minarets at each of the angles, and containing a peal of five bells. The church, which is of great antiquity, has undergone much repair, having been partly rebuilt at various periods, and was reroofed in 1846. It contains a marble monument bearing the bust of Lady Margaret Arundell. The Wesleyans and Bryanites have chapels. There is a parochial school for boys and girls, with a small endowment. On the Downs in the vicinity are several barrows."