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1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"ROACH, (or Roche), a parish in the E. division of Powder hundred, county Cornwall, 5½ miles N. of St. Austell, its post town, and 7 S.W. of Bodmin. The village, which is chiefly agricultural, is situated near Hensbarrow beacon. Roche is mentioned in Domesday Book as Treroache, and was held by the De Rupes. On a rugged quartz rock are ruins of a hermitage 15 feet by 10½, said to have been once inhabited by the celebrated hermit Conan, who afterwards removed to the see of St. Germans. A portion of the inhabitants are engaged in the tin stream works, of which there are several in this parish, and a rich mine, called the Rock Mine, was opened in 1831. China clay is also found in large quantities, and sent to Liverpool for the potteries. The lofty elevation called Hainsborough, or Hensbarrow, and which gives rise to the river Fal, is partly in this parish. In the streams which descend from this eminence grains of pure gold are occasionally discovered. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Exeter, value £413. The church, dedicated to St. Gomonda, was rebuilt in 1822, and has a square embattled tower containing six bells. In the churchyard is an ancient cross. There is a National school for both sexes. The Wesleyans and Bible Christians have each a place of worship. Fairs are held in May, July, and October, for the sale of cattle.