CASTLE SOWERBY, Cumberland - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"CASTLE SOWERBY, (or Sowerby-Castle), a parish in Leith ward, in the county of Cumberland, 2 miles S.E. of Hesket-Newmarket, 10 S. of Carlisle, and 11 N.W. of Penrith, its post town and railway station, being 295 from London. It lies within the limits of the forest of Inglewood, near the river Caldew, and includes the townships of Bustabeck Bound, How Bound, Row Bound, Southernby Bound, and Stockdalewath Bound. In How Bound formerly stood a castle, of which all traces have disappeared. The manor is now held by the Duke of Devonshire. Some estates in this parish were held by the curious tenure, long obsolete, of their owners riding through Penrith on Tuesday in Whitsun week, brandishing their spears. The title "Red Spears" was applied both to the lands and their holders. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Carlisle, value £90, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. Kentigern, is a small stone building in the township of How Bound. There is a chapel of ease at Roughton Head, and Sunday schools." "BOUND HOW, a township in the parish of Castle Sowerby, ward of Leath, county Cumberland, 3½ miles S.E. of Hesket Newmarket. The hamlet is considerable. On the summit of How Hill is an enclosure containing several large oaks, surrounded by a mound of earth and stones." "BUSTABECK BOUND, a township in the parish of Castle-Sowerby, Leath ward, in the county of Cumberland, 3 miles to the S.E. of Hesket Newmarket." "ROWBOUND, a township in the parish of Castle Sowerby, ward of Leath, county Cumberland, 3 miles S.E. of Hesket-Market." "SOUTHERNBY-BOUND, a township in the parish of Castle-Sowerby, Leath ward, county Cumberland, 9 miles N.W. of Penrith." "STOCKLEDALEWATH-BOUND, a township in the parish of Castle Sowerby, county Cumberland, 8 miles S.W. of Carlisle. In this township are traces of a Roman camp, 188 yards by 160, called Castle-Steads, also ruins of a Druidical temple."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]