DEARHAM, Cumberland - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]
"DEARHAM, a parish in the ward of Allerdale-below-Derwent, in the county of Cumberland, 6 miles N.W. of Cockermouth, and 14 W. of Wigton. It has a station on the Maryport and Carlisle railway, and contains Ellenborough and Ewanrigg. There are extensive collieries, the coal from which is shipped at Maryport; also a manufactory for earthenware. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Carlisle, value £85, in the patronage of J. Christian, Esq. The church was much altered by repairs in 1814. It contains a carved Saxon font, and in the churchyard is a sculptured cross. The charities amount to £32 per annum. The Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans have each a chapel. There are parochial and three Sunday schools. A Roman camp is traceable in the vicinity. The Earl of Lonsdale is lord of the manor." "ELLENBOROUGH WITH EWANRIGG, a township in the parish of Dearham, ward of Allerdale-below-Derwent, county Cumberland, 1 mile S.E. of Maryport, its post town, and 1 S.W. of Dearham. This is a coal district, and most of the people are employed in the collieries. There was a Roman camp or entrenchment here, of which there are still some remains, and various relies of that period, as altars, inscribed tablets, &c., have been found. Camden and Baxter suppose it to have been Volantium, Horsley Virosidum, and others Olenacum. The Law family take the title of earl from this place. Joseph Pocklington Senhouse, Esq., is lord of the manor." "EWANRIGG, a hamlet in the parish of Dearham, ward of Allerdale-below-Derwent, county Cumberland, 1 mile S.E. of Maryport. Coal is abundant. Ewanrigg Hall, a noble mansion, is the principal residence. It forms a township in union with Ellenborough." "UNERIGG WITH ELLENBOROUGH, a township in the parish of Dearham, ward of Allerdale-below-Derwent, county Cumberland, and 1½ mile S.E. of Maryport."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]