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Help and advice for Inquests 1846-1910 - from the Torquay Times

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1846-1910

Articles taken from Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser

and

Torquay Directory and South Devon Journal

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included: Abbot; Abbott; Abel; Abrahams; Abrams; Ackrell; Adams(5); Aggett(3); Agnew; Allan; Allen; Allin; Amery; Andrew; Andrews(2); Angel; Antony; Arbin; Arlidge; Armstrong; Arscott; Ash(3); Ashford; Ashton; Aspland; Aston; Austin; Avery(2); Ayshford; Babbage; Badcock(2); Badge; Baiss; Baker(10); Ball; Balsom; Barnes; Barr; Barrett; Barter; Bartlet; Bartlett; Baskwell; Bassett; Baxter; Beck; Beer; Bell(2); Bellamy; Bennett(3); Bent; Bentley; Berrett; Best(2); Bicknell; Bidder; Bidwell; Biggar; Bindon; Bingham; Binmore(2); Bird(3); Bishop(2); Blackburn; Blackler(2); Blake; Blight; Blyde; Bodley; Bond(4); Borlase; Botterill; Boucher; Bousfield(2); Bovey(2); Bow; Bowden(3); Bowdon; Bradford; Bradd; Bray; Breton; Brewer(3); Bridgett; Bridgman; Brooking; Brooks; Broom; Brown(8); Browne(2); Browning; Bruce; Bryant; Buchan; Buckingham; Buckpitt; Budd; Buffett; Bullen; Bulley; Bulteel; Bunch; Bunclark(2); Burbage; Burgess; Burne; Burnett; Burrows; Burt(2); Button; Callard; Callicott(2); Came; Cameron(2); Cann(2); Carey; Carnall; Caspall; Cater(2); Caunter; Causeley; Cawley; Chalk; Chalmers; Champfleury; Chapman; Chave; Chesterfield; Ching(2); Chown; Christian; Churchward(3); Clancey; Clare; Clark; Clarke(2); Clayton; Clear; Clement; Clements; Clift; Cloutte; Coad; Coaker; Cobley; Cockram; Cole; Coles(3); Collier; Collings(2); Conlan; Connett; Connor; Cook(2); Coomb; Coombes; Coombs; Cooper; Corner; Cornett; Corrick; Costello; Cotton; Cowell; Coyde; Crews; Crickett; Cridland; Crocker(2); Croker(2); Crook; Croote; Cross; Crossman; Crowdy; Croydon; Cullen; Dacie; Daley; Daniel; Dare; Dart; Davey(2); Davis; Dawe; Day; Dear(2); Delafield; Delbridge; Delve; Delves; Denning; Dennis(2); Denunzi; Desborough; Deussen; Dicker; Dist; Dodd(2); Doidge; Donovan(2); Douglas; Down(2); Drake(2); Drew(4); Driscoll; Duncan; Dunn(2); Dyer(2); Dymond(2); Eales; Easterbrook(2); Eddles; Eddy; Edgcumbe; Edwards(4); Edworthy; Eggbeer; Ellicomb; Ellicott; Elliott; Ellis(4); Elworthy; Emmett; Endacott; Escott; Evans(2); Eveleigh; Farleigh; Farley(3); Farr; Farrell; Fawn; Fedrick; Fenwick; Ferris; Fey; Firth; Fisher(2); Fitzgerald; Fleet; Fletcher; Flory; Fogwell; Fogwill; Folland; Foote; Ford(2); Forrest; Foxlow; Fraser; Free; Frost(4); Fry; Fuke; Furneaux(2); Fursdon; Furze; Gale(2); Gant; Gard; Gaye; Gayler; George(2); Gerry; Gibbs; Giffard; Gilbert; Gilding; Gill; Gillard(3); Gilley; Gilpin; Glanfield; Gleen; Glossop; Gloyn; Godfrey(3); Goldsworthy; Good; Goodfellow; Gooding(2); Goodman; Goodyear; Gould(2); Govier; Grant; Green; Greenslade(2); Gregory; Gribble; Grist; Guest; Guillon; Guise; Gunhouse; Haddy; Hadfield; Hall(2); Hambling; Hamlyn(2); Hammett; Hanbury; Hanley; Hannaford(2); Harding(3); Hardingham; Harnack; Harris(6); Hart; Harvey(3); Hatherley; Hawking; Hawkings; Hayes; Hayman; Head(2); Heale; Heawood; Hebbes; Hellier; Hellyar; Helmore; Herd; Heriot; Hewings; Heysett; Heyward; Higgins; Higgs; Hill(7); Hillman; Hilton; Hindom; Hingston; Hitchings; Hoare; Hobbs(2); Hobley; Hockin; Hocking; Hockings; Hodge; Hodgson; Hole(3); Holloway; Holt; Honeywill(2); Hook; Hooper(2); Hopkins; Horswell; Howard; Hoyland; Huffadine; Huggins; Hughes; Humphries; Hunt(3); Huntley; Hurdon; Hurrell; Hurvid; Hussey; Hutchill; Huxham(3); Ider; Inch(2); Ingram; Isaac; Jackman; Jackson; Jago; James(2); Jannetta; Jenkins; Jenkinson; Jennings; Jervis; Jetter; Johns; Joint; Jones(4); Jordan; Josland; Keen; Kellond; Kelly(2); Kemble; Kendall; Key(2); Kilminster(2); Kinder; King(3); Kingwell; Knowles; Laird; Lakin; Lambell; Lamble; Land; Lane(3); Lang(2); Langdon; Langley(2); Langridge; Lasson; Lathrop; Lavers(2); Lavis; Lawrence(3); Lear(2); Leat; Lee(2); Leem; Lemon(2); Lendon; Lethbridge; Lever; Lewis(3); Lidstone; Lightfoot(2); Lintern; Lock; Lonsdale; Loomis; Loud; Loveridge; Loving; Lowe; Lowton; Luke; Luscombe; Luxton; Lyte; MacDonald; Mace; MacKenzie; Maddick; Major; Male; Mance; Mantle; Mardon; Marles; Marshall; Martin(9); Martyn; Mason; Massingham; Matson; Matthews; Maunder; Maye; Mayne; McKnight; McLean; Meal; Melhuish; Memery; Mensor; Michelmore(3); Mildon; Miller; Mills; Millman; Milman; Milson; Mingo; Mitchell(2); Mogridge(3); Monk; Moore(4); Morgan; Morris(2); Mortimore; Moss; Mould; Moxey(2); Mudge(3); Mugford; Munday; Munro; Murch; Muxworthy; Myles; Neale; Neck; Netherway; Neville; Newland; Newman; Nicholson; Noble; Norman(2); Norrish(2); North; Northcote; Northmore; Northway; Norton(2); Nosworthy(2); O'Leary; Olver; Opie; Oswald; Otten; Owen; Pack; Palliser; Parfitt; Parker; Parkhouse; Parnell(2); Parrish(2); Parsons(2); Pascoe; Paterson; Patterson; Patton; Paul; Pavey; Paynter; Pearce(4); Pearse; Peckham; Peckins; Pedrick; Peek; Penny; Penwill; Pepperell; Pepprell; Perriam; Perring; Perrow; Perry; Pethebridge; Petherbridge; Petherick; Phelps; Phillips(4); Piddell; Pidgeon; Pike; Pile; Pim; Pinn; Pinsent; Plank; Pleece; Pletts; Pollard; Pomeroy; Pook; Poole; Pooley; Pope(2); Potter; Pound(2); Powlesland; Pratt; Preston(2); Pridham(2); Prowse; Purcell; Pyke; Pym(2); Quick; Rabbage; Radford; Raddon; Radmore; Rafferty; Ram; Raper; Rawling; Raymont; Rea; Reade; Reddaway; Redding; Reed(5); Remington; Rendle(2); Reynolds; Rice(2); Richards(2); Richardson; Ried; Riley; Rintoul; Rix; Roberson; Roberts(5); Robinson; Rodgers; Rogers; Rohrs; Rolph; Rolstone; Rook(3); Roper; Rose; Row; Rowden(2); Rowdon; Rowe; Rowell; Rowett; Rowland; Royce; Rundle; Ryder; Sabin; Sage; Salter(2); Sanders(3); Saunders(4); Scott(3); Scource; Searle(3); Seeley; Sermon; Setters(2); Shanham; Shannon; Shapley; Shapter; Sharland; Sharman; Shears; Shelton; Shepherd(2); Sheriff; Sherwood; Shimmell; Shinner; Shipway; Short(3); Shortlands; Simmons; Skinner(3); Skullin; Slee; Smale(2); Small(3); Smerdon; Smith(10); Smyth; Snelgrove; Snell(3); Snelling; Snow; Soper; Splatt; Standley; Stapleton; Stark; Steer(2); Stephens(2); Stevens; Stewart; Stidworthy; Stocker; Stockman(2); Stoddart; Stone(5); Stranger; Stratford; Strawbridge; Stuckey; Sutton; Symons(5); Tapson; Tarr; Taylor(4); Terry(2); Thomas(3); Thorn; Thorne(2); Tickell(2); Tidball; Tinkham; Tolhurst; Tolley; Tolly; Tomkins; Tooley; Tope; Tothill; Towell; Tozer(4); Trace; Treleaven; Tribble; Trickey; Tripp; Trott; Truman; Tucker(8); Turner; Underhay(3); Upham; Vail; Valley; Vanstone; Veal; Viggers; Vincent(2); Vivian; Vosper; Vowler; Vulliamy; Vye; Vyse; Waddington; Wade; Wakeham; Wakeley; Walker(2); Wallace; Wallen; Walsh; Warr; Watson; Watts(3); Way(4); Waymouth; Webb; Webber(3); Weeks; Welby; Wellington; Westaway(2); Wharram; Wheaton; White(4); Whiteway; Whitty; Widdicombe; Wigley; Wilcocks; Wilcox; Wilkinson; Willcocks(2); Williams(9); Willis; Wills(5); Wilson(3); Winchester; Winne; Wippell; Wolland; Wonnacott; Wood(5); Woodley(2); Woollcombe; Woollett; Worth; Wotton(2); Wreyford; Wyatt(5); Wyman; Yea; Young(2); Zable; Zaple; Zigrang

Torquay Directory and South Devon Journal - Friday 10 April 1846
TORQUAY - Fatal Occurrence. - An Inquest was held April 2nd, at the Half Moon Inn, Torquay, on the body of WILLIAM TUCKER, a young man, who met with his death in the following manner:- Mr Andrew Bearne: lives opposite the street where the rock was blasted; on Wednesday last, about 6 o'clock, I heard an explosion; I went over and found the rock cracked very much. John Westaway then began to put more gunpowder into the original hole; he put a cup and half of powder; I suppose the cup to hold about ¼ lb.; he Westaway then said to his master, Mr Coysh, I must tamp it in again and get more powder, as I have not sufficient; Charles Bedford was the person who was assisting John Westaway, handing him a kettle with rubbish, such as they use to tamper holes; about 7 o'clock I heard another explosion; I then ran into the street from my house; I saw a great crowd collected just below my house; I went to see what was the matter; I there saw a young man; several men were raising him on his legs; I then observed blood issuing from some part of the head; I saw a stone there about nine or ten pounds close to the deceased; the deceased did not appear to be the least conscious, and did not speak; Westaway was standing in the crowd; I asked him how much powder he put into the hole after I left the first time; in answer he said about a pound and a half. I then went over to the building; I saw a quantity of rock blown out, and the walls and joist knocked down; many stones fell on my house and over it; I have seen stones with blasting thrown out in the road, but never saw so much stone thrown out at one time before. - John Chillcott, policeman: I live near the spot where the rock is; I was in the street; I heard a boy give notice of fire; I heard a man's voice also from the quarry; very soon after, about a second or two, a great blast took place; I saw a lot of stone flying over the building nearer to Mr Rossiter's house than upwards. When I saw the rock coming over the building I ran towards Temperance Street; I soon returned, and saw the deceased lifted up by a man; I saw a stone lying beside of him about ten or twelve pounds; I saw the man had been injured; I saw the blood about the back part of his head; in the road was a very large stone; the road was strewed; I saw a person take up the stone, who carried it away; I don't know the person. I said to John Westaway that it was a serious job; he then said it would not have happened if it had not been the rock was shelving; he stood behind in a recess after he had blasted the rock. Westaway told me that he fired the holes, and that Bedford had nothing to do with firing the hole. - Sarah Collings, (the wife of Richard Collings, and aunt to the deceased); deceased lodged at my house, was a labourer; was brought home to my house on Wednesday last about half-past 7 much injured about the head; he only spoke once, saying take care of my watch; I helped to undress him; he died about half-past 10 o'clock the same evening. The deceased is about 19 years of age. - Mr Edward Rossiter, who lives near, heard a violent blast about 7 o'clock, on Wednesday evening last; I was standing at my bar; I thought the house was coming down; a stone came through the roof of my house ,and also broke in two windows; I observed the deceased walking on the pavement by Mr Matthews's door; I saw a large stone come from the blast of the rock and fall on the deceased's head or shoulders, who immediately fell with the blow; I sung out that the man was killed; I then ran to the quarry directly and saw Westaway; I said, you rascal you have done it now - you have killed a man; he said ----------- what do you know about it. I have cautioned Westaway many times about his overcharging the holes. - Charles Bedford who works in the quarry belonging to Mr Coysh with John Westaway; on this occasion he fetched the materials for Westaway, who charged the hole with powder and lighted it. I then called out "fire" from the rock on which we stood. - John Jolley, Surgeon: I first saw the deceased soon after 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening last; I found him at his lodgings sitting in a chair supported by two men; I ordered him immediately to be put to bed; I then examined his head, but could not detect any fracture from the great extravasation of blood. I endeavoured to administer some brandy and water but he could not swallow it. I saw him again about half an hour after, and then found deceased suffering under compression of the brain. Having ordered the head to be shaved, I applied cold lotions; bled him largely; took 25 oz., or as near as I can judge; ordered hot brick to his feet; gave him an injection when he breathed his last. - The cause of death, compression of the brain caused by the falling of a stone. Verdict, "Manslaughter" against Westaway, who was committed by the Coroner, Mr Gribble, to take his trial at the next Assizes.

Torquay Directory and South Devon Journal - Friday 3 July 1846
KINGSTEIGNTON - On Friday se'nnight an Inquest was held on the body of WILLIAM LANG, whose death resulted from gangrene caused by a stroke of the sun.

Torquay Directory and South Devon Journal - Friday 17 July 1846
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at the King William the Fourth Inn, in this town, on Saturday sen'nnight, before J. Gribble, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of EDWIN HAMLYN LAWRENCE, aged 22 years. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest, it appears the deceased has been in a desponding state of mind for some time past, and on Thursday morning left his home and proceeded under the Beacon Hill, and after fastening an handkerchief around his waist, to which there was a large stone attached, threw himself into the sea. A report spread on the evening of that day that probably deceased had destroyed himself as he could not be found, and search was made and the body of the unfortunate man was picked up on Friday morning, a lifeless corpse. Verdict - destroyed himself while in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Torquay times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 7 August 1869
DEVONPORT - Murder Of A Non-Commissioned Officer At Devonport. - Corporal ARTHUR SKULLIN, of the 57th Regiment, now stationed in Raglan Barracks, Devonport, was on Saturday morning shot dead by William Taylor, a private soldier in the same corps. On Saturday morning the accused, a very fine man, about twenty-two years of age, was brought up at the Devonport Guildhall, before the Mayor (Dr Rolston), Colonel Brown, Messrs. C. Row, J. L. Cutcliffe, J. May, A. Norman, and R. J. Laity, magistrates, charged with the wilful murder of SKULLIN. Sufficient evidence was given to justify a remand until Monday. - On Saturday afternoon Mr A. Bone, the borough Coroner, met a Jury at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, where the latter were sworn, after which they proceeded to the dead-house, at the Military Hospital, to view the body of the deceased, which presented a fearful spectacle, a great part of the head being shot away. The Coroner and Jury then adjourned to the Devonport Guildhall where evidence was taken. Mr John Beer appeared to watch the case on behalf of the War Department; prisoner was present in the charge of Inspector Bryant. It appeared that from the evidence that about half-past six on Saturday morning Taylor and two other soldiers "fell in" on the Barrack-square for defaulters' drill. The whole of these men were ordered by the deceased corporal to "fall out," and shew their knapsacks, it being a regulation in the army for all men who are undergoing defaulter's drill to appear on parade with the whole of their kits in their knapsacks. There was some portion of clothes in two of the men's knapsacks, but Taylor's was entirely empty. This was reported by SKULLIN to Sergeant Bailey, and he informed the sergeant-major of the circumstances. Presently Bailey said that Taylor had better be sent to the guard-room for disobeying orders, but SKULLIN said he would report his conduct to the adjutant of the regiment. Taylor said "he was for guard that day, and he had borrowed a knapsack to appear on parade with." SKULLIN desired him to proceed to his barrack-room, and put on his own knapsack, and added that he had better take his rifle - a Snider breech-loader with him. Taylor took up his rifle and went away to his room, but previous to his doing so his rifle and ammunition - 20 rounds of ball cartridge - had been examined by Sergeant Bailey; this being another regulation with regard to defaulters. Taylor was absent from the square for a few minutes, and when he returned he and the two other defaulters were drilled by SKULLIN. This continued until 7.30 when they were dismissed, and the deceased walked away towards his room. Taylor followed about seven paces behind him, and when they had proceeded about twenty yards the accused halted. He brought his rifle, which had been at the trail, up to the "present" at the shoulder, and before anyone could prevent him he fired at SKULLIN, who instantly fell to the ground. Lance-Corporal Burns and Drummer Walsh, both of the 57th Regiment, who were in the square and had seen Taylor fire, instantly ran and seized him, and after taking away his rifle and bayonet, marked him to the guard-room, where he was given into the custody of Sergeant Green. He was put in a cell, and Green said to him, "What made you do this?" Prisoner said, "It will end my life, and that is what I want; you don't know everything; I have a wife and child, and have behaved very badly to them." In the meantime Mr Poppelwell, the surgeon of the regiment, had been sent for, and on arrival he examined the deceased. He was dead, and there were two large wounds in his head; one behind the left ear, and the other under the left eye. The wounds were such as would be caused by a rifle bullet which was fired at a short distance. The whole of the bones on the left side of the head and face were smashed, and the brain was protruding. Death, said Mr Poppelwell, must have been instantaneous. - P.C. Shubert took accused into custody. He charged him with the murder of SKULLIN, and he replied, "Yes." He was then taken to the station-house, and on the way there, he said to Shubert - "It is curious what things come into a man's mind. He was the drill corporal, and he was annoying me the whole morning. I had seven days to barracks. I had not my kit in my knapsack, and he took my name down to report me. It must have been the devil that tempted me." When prisoner was taken into custody his ammunition was examined, and it was found that one cartridge was missing. - Sergeant Green said, in answer to a question from a Juror, that he had known Taylor for two years, and that he bore a good character in the regiment; at this time he had a good conduct badge. The Coroner remarked to the Jury that the case appeared to him to be as plain as it was melancholy. A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was instantly returned against Taylor. - On Monday morning, Taylor was taken before the Plymouth magistrates, charged with the Wilful Murder of SKULLIN, and after a long Inquiry, was committed to take his trial at the assizes, and unless there is a gaol delivery he will not be tried till March next. The funeral of SKULLIN took place on Monday afternoon from the Military Hospital, Stoke. The body was placed on a gun carriage, drawn by two black horses, and conveyed to the Cemetery, where it was interred with full military honours. The whole of the officers and men of the regiment not on duty - to the number of about 400 - attended. The band of the regiment was also present, and played the Dead March.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 August 1869
BABBICOMBE - Melancholy Cases of Drowning. - On Saturday afternoon last, a young gentleman, about 21 years of age, named WILLIAM WALTER HOLT, was drowned at Babbicombe whilst bathing. The deceased suffered from something in one of his legs, which caused a weakness, and, whilst bathing in shallow water, fell backwards, and the outward current took him into deep water. Assistance was immediately at hand, but the body was not recovered till some time afterwards, when life was extinct. Mr Steel and Mr Pollard, surgeons, were speedily in attendance, but their efforts were of no avail. An Inquest was held on Monday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

TOTNES - Another accident of a similar nature occurred at Totnes on Saturday evening. Some boys had been pilfering apples, and being detected, one of them named JOHN ANDREWS, ten years of age, ran away; and, instead of crossing at a shallow part of the river Dart, ran into deep water and was drowned. A young man jumped into the water immediately afterwards and recovered the body. Three surgeons were quickly on the spot, but their united efforts to restore life for three hours were useless.

Torquay times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 September 1869
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of A Young Man. - A young man named HENRY TOTHILL, about 21 years of age, a footman, in the service of Miss Masters, at Highfield, was found dead in his bed on Saturday morning. He had only been in his situation a few days, and was a very well conducted young man, very regular in his habits, and had never had a day's sickness in his life. He complained of pains in the head on Thursday and Friday last and was rather low spirited, but in the afternoon of Friday took a trip on the water, and returned home about 6 o'clock. He appeared to be very sleepy in the evening, and had to be aroused to do his work. He went to his bed at 10 o'clock and as he did not appear at the usual time the next morning, a servant went to his room and found him quite dead. An Inquest was held at the house by Dr Gay, Deputy Coroner, on Monday, and a post mortem examination of the body was made by Dr Huxley, who said the heart, lungs, viscera, kidneys and the other organs were in a very healthy state; but on examining the brain he found it far advanced in decomposition and quite liquid: there was no trace of apoplexy or serious effusion. At the base of the skull there were evidences of tubercules, and in the absence of disease in any other part of the system, he attributed death to disease of the brain, accelerated by the warm weather. He had been informed by Dr Ramsay, with whom the deceased lived temporarily, that he frequently complained of pains in the head, and had no doubt that he was suffering from some obscure disease of the brain. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 11 September 1869
BERRY POMEROY - Curious Case Of Drowning. - The body of a man named STREET BREWER, a labourer of Stoke Gabriel, was found in a brook at Berry Pomeroy, on Tuesday last. At the Inquest which was held on Wednesday, before Mr Henry Michelmore, a man named Drew said that he discovered the body of the deceased in the brook, when there was no more than a foot of water, with his face downwards. Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, was of opinion that the deceased was attacked with apoplexy and was afterwards drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 October 1869
BABBICOMBE - Case Of Drowning At Babbicombe. - On Tuesday night last, about eleven o'clock, JOHN GOLDSWORTHY, 44 years of age, captain of the yacht, Kestrel, belonging to Dr Smith, of Babbicombe, was drowned in Babbicombe Bay. Deceased and the mate were proceeding in a punt to the yacht, and on their way, stopped to take off some fish from a net, and while doing so the punt capsized, and both were precipitated into the water, the boat being turned bottom upwards. The mate, William Edwards, immediately after the accident, heard the deceased cry out, "Bill, save me," but could not get near enough to do so, and only escaped himself by swimming ashore, where he arrived in an exhausted state. The two men fell one on each side of the boat, and the mate endeavoured to get into the boat, but it upset twice. The body was found the next morning, with the boat close to it on Oddicombe Beach, by Jonathan Thomas, a fisherman, and taken to the Cary Arms. An Inquest was held on Thursday afternoon, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 16 October 1869
PLYMOUTH - Concealment Of Birth At Plymouth. - ELIZABETH DOWN was charged on Tuesday at the Plymouth Guildhall, by Superintendent Wreford, with concealing the birth of her male child on the 2nd October. Prisoner had been nurse in the Exminster Asylum. She had been living in Torquay lately, and on October 2nd she came down to Plymouth and left her parcels in the Brunel Arms. While she was absent one of the servants, who was dusting the room, thought she felt a baby's head in one of the parcels, a brown paper one. She partly opened it, and finding it was a child gave information to the police. When the police arrived prisoner had come back, and she was arrested. Prisoner's friends lived at Gunnislake, where she was going, but feeling ill she stopped at the Brunel Arms. The Inquest was held on the day the body was found. By a post mortem examination it was found that the child had never breathed. Prisoner was committed for trial.

DARTMOUTH - Mysterious Death At Dartmouth. - The body of a woman named MARY ANN JONES was found in the Dartmouth harbour on Thursday morning. The deceased, who was forty years, and an immoral character, was seen talking to a grey headed man having a dog with him, on Wednesday evening. The captains of the vessels were examined, and stated that although they were in conversation with women at the end of the pier, they did not speak to the deceased. At the Coroner's Inquest the medical evidence was conflicting. Dr Newman stating that he considered death resulted from blows on the head, whilst Dr Puddicombe thought that death was caused from drowning. The police are thought to have a further clue to the mystery.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 October 1869
DARTMOUTH - The Mysterious Death At Dartmouth. - At the conclusion of the Coroner's Inquest, which was held upon the body of MARY ANN JONES, which was found in the Dartmouth harbour last week, the Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned, but whether drowning was accidental or wilful there was no evidence to show.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 November 1869
ELLACOMBE - The Finding Of The body Of SAMUEL STONE. - The body of SAMUEL STONE, a mason, who had been missing from his home at Ellacombe for some days was found in the river Teign at Newton, on Monday by two lightermen. An Inquest was opened on the body the same day but adjourned to this day (Friday) for the production of other evidence.

BABBICOMBE - Suicide - GEORGE CROOTE, a labourer, in the employ of the Torquay Local Board, committed suicide on Monday. Mr Callard, a butcher, had occasion to pass Bishop's Brake, near Bishopstowe, on the Babbicombe-road, and discovered the body of the deceased hanging from a small tree. With the assistance of a man called Godfrey the body was cut down, but life was extinct, and it was supposed he had been hanging there for two or three hours. Mr Chilcott, surgeon, was called to see the deceased. The body was subsequently removed to the Roughwood Inn, Babbicombe, where an Inquest was held on it on Wednesday morning, before Mr H. Michelmore, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. At the wish of the Jury, the Coroner severely reprimanded the wife of the unfortunate man, who, it is said, was much addicted to drink, and had driven him to commit the rash act.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 November 1869
Inquest. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," at the Coroner's Inquest on the body of SAMUEL STONE, on Friday last.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 December 1869
KINGSKERSWELL - Mysterious Death At Chapel Hill. - The lifeless body of ABRAHAM DYER, landlord of the Seven Stars Inn, Kingskerswell, was found in the ruins of the old chapel on Chapel Hill, under somewhat mysterious circumstances, on Monday afternoon. The deceased left his home to go to Torquay for the purpose of transacting some business, but instead of doing so seems, after his arrival at the Torre Station, to have met a friend or two, and subsequently to have proceeded to Chapel Hill, for what purpose is not known. The finding of the body was purely accidental. A Mr Runcorn and a friend were walking on the hill, and to settle a dispute regarding the former use of the old building they entered the interior, and much to their surprise there saw the body of the deceased. Examination was at once made, but life was quite extinct, and the deceased seemed to have died in a very placid manner. Information was at once given to the police, and the deceased removed to the Clarence Hotel, Torre. Mr H. Michelmore held an Inquest on the body on Tuesday, when, after hearing the evidence as to the finding of the body, it was adjourned till the following day for the purpose of making a post mortem examination of the body, as there were no signs whatever of any violence having been used. The Inquiry was resumed on Wednesday, when evidence as to the post mortem examination was given by Drs. Finch and Evans, of St. Mary Church, who stated their belief that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Coachman. - Mr H. Michelmore also held an Inquest at the Infirmary on Wednesday evening, on the body of GEORGE WILLIS, about 25 years of age, coachman to Dr Hall, who came by his death in a very sad manner. The deceased about noon on Monday, was engaged in singeing one of his master's horses, and whilst in a crouching position under the belly of the animal, from some cause it kicked the deceased in the abdomen. He did not call the assistance of anybody, but went into his room by the fire, where he was found some time afterwards by his master in a very pitiful state. He was at once put to bed, and everything that was requisite done for him by Dr Hall. It was found that the deceased was getting worse in the night, when Dr Pollard was called in, and after a short consultation it was decided to send him to the Infirmary, to which place he was speedily and carefully removed. He there received every attendance, but only lingered on in great agony up to Tuesday night, when he expired. He was a native of North Devon, and had lived with Dr Hall about two years, and was a very quiet, steady, and well conducted young man. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 11 December 1869
EXETER - Death Of A Torquay Cabman In The County Gaol. - An Inquest was held at noon, on Friday last, in the infirmary of the Devon County Prison, before Mr Coroner Crosse, to Inquire into the death of JOHN TAPSON. Mr Rose, the governor, said the deceased was received into the Prison on December 15th last year. He had been a gentleman's servant, but since that a cab driver of Torquay, from which place he was committed on the charge of maliciously wounding a man with whom he had a quarrel, and at the January Sessions of this year he was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. His age was 28, and when he came into the Prison he appeared in good health, and underwent the usual labour. He was a very well-behaved man, and did not complain of his illness until it was noticed by the warders. On the 18th of October he came under the doctor's care, and continued so up to the time of his death. On the 25th of November he was removed to the Infirmary, and was placed under the care of a nurse, whose sole duty was to attend to his wants. The doctor's certificate was sent to the Home Office and on the 24th of November he (the governor) received a pardon for him from the Secretary of State, but he was too ill to be removed and continued to get worse up to the time of his death, which occurred on Thursday morning last. During his illness his relations were communicated with, and his sisters came and saw him before his death. Verdict - "Died from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser -Saturday 1 January 1870
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Woman From A Blow By Her Husband At Plymouth. - On Monday evening a man named HENRY WILLIAMS, a seaman, had a quarrel with his wife, SUSAN DOVE WILLIAMS, in the Napoleon Inn, High-street, Plymouth. The man, it appears, entered the house some little time prior to the arrival of his wife, who came in accompanied by another woman. He received great provocation from her, and submitted to it several minutes, but the annoyance on the part of his wife was carried to such an extent that he became exasperated, followed her from the room in which they had been drinking, and struck her a blow in the face. The poor woman staggered and fell, and it is believed that her head came in contact with the gas meter. At any rate, she died in a few moments afterwards. Her husband was at once taken into custody by P.C. Lock, who was called in by the landlord of the house immediately after the unfortunate occurrence, and on Tuesday morning he was brought before the Mayor (William Luscombe, Esq.) and James B. Wilcocks, Esq., charged with striking his wife and thereby causing her death. Several witnesses were examined, and the prisoner was remanded, the Mayor informing him that if in the meantime he desired to obtain the presence of persons who could place the matter in a proper light before the Bench, he could do so through the police, and every assistance would be rendered him. - An Inquest was held in the afternoon, at the Guildhall, by Mr Coroner Brian. The same witnesses who gave evidence before the magistrates in the morning were again examined, and those who had known the deceased were cross-examined by Mr Elliot Square, who watched the proceedings on behalf of the prisoner, as to what her mode of life had been. They stated that she had been lately leading a very immoral life, and that on the evening of the unfortunate occurrence WILLIAMS did all he could to avoid her, and seemed desirous of preventing a quarrel. The evidence of the surgeon, Mr J. N. Stevens, was to the effect that in his opinion, death resulted from the effects of a fall, and not from the blow, and after a short deliberation, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Death Of A Child From Starvation At Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter Against The Mother. - The adjourned Inquiry into the death of a female child, named GUNHOUSE, four months and a half old, was held on Tuesday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall. Mr Graham, surgeon, who had at times attended the child, said the mother brought the child to his house about a fortnight ago for examination. It was then in a very emaciated state, and the mother was smelling of alcohol. The child had the appearance of being very much neglected. He prescribed for her, and told the mother to come again within two days, but she did not do so, and he did not see the child until Mrs Wilkinson (who causally attended the child just previous to her death, and who had been previously praised for her kindness) brought the infant to him about a week after in a dying state. He had made a post mortem examination of the child. Its body was greatly emaciated. The features were contracted, looking more like an old person than that of a child. The body weighed 6lbs. 14.oz. From 8lb to 11bs. is the proper weight of a newly-born child. There was no subcutaneous fat whatever about it. There was also appearance of uncleanliness externally. The body indicated disease, and shewed that the child had been properly cared for two or three days previous to death. In his opinion the child died from pleura-pneumonia, a disease generally brought on from want of proper nourishment and care. The disease was not of more than two or three weeks' standing. - ANNE CUNNINGHAM, the mother of the child's mother, was then sworn, and said her daughter's husband, who is a captain of a coasting vessel, had been away nearly five weeks. She had seen her daughter every day during that time; she had generally been tipsy, and had spent much of her time in public houses near her house. She had seen the mother give the child the breast every night. She would swear the mother was every night in bed at 11 o'clock - when the beer-shops closed - when she was often very tipsy, and was not in a condition to take care of the child. Witness had repeatedly stopped there all night. She had noticed that the child was wasting away during the absence of its father, and drew the mother's attention to it. The mother, she believed, took it to Doctors Pearse, Dale and Graham. She had repeatedly seen her give the child the breast, and had often accused her of neglecting it. Last Monday week she found the child gone. She would swear the child was not left 18 hours alone. The child was always delicate, and did not improve at all. It had got much worse the last five weeks. The mother left her house every morning, and did not return until the last thing at night, and then was tipsy. The Coroner reviewed the case and pointed to the state of the body, as one of the strongest facts of the case. - The mother, who was present, was asked if she would like to say anything to the Jury? - She replied - "I should like to say something, but there are so many against me." - The Coroner told her that if she gave evidence she would have to submit to cross-examination, and advised her to say nothing. - She began to cry and said - "I acknowledge my fault - a very great fault - in neglecting my child." - She was again asked if she would give evidence and consented, but at the advice of the Coroner, refrained saying - "Perhaps I am not worthy to make a statement." She attributed her mother's evidence to "passion more than anything else," and frequently muttered she did not think the child was dangerously ill. The Court was then cleared for the Jury to consider their verdict, during which time the mother fainted. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict that MRS GUNHOUSE did "feloniously kill and slay" her child. The mother, who conducted herself with much decorum, was afterwards taken charge of by the police and committed for trial under the Coroner's warrant.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 22 January 1870
BURRINGTON - Terrible Accident In North Devon. - A heavy gloom has been cast over the little village of Burrington, North Devon, and a strong sympathy for the sufferers has been excited throughout the whole of the county, by a calamity, the like of which within anything like local range, it is not often our painful duty to record. A house, belonging to a Mr Wm Buckingham, of Exeter, and held under lease from Earl Portsmouth, was rented by a young man named EDWARD BIRD, who with a family of three children, and an old man named GOULD had resided there for seven years. During this period the cottage has been thatched two or three times; but the rain permeated the straw and settled upon the wooden supports of the house, so as to cause them to rot. BIRD had constantly noticed that the rain came into the house, and saw the damage that was being done, and had spoken to the landlord respecting putting the house in repair. In November last MRS BIRD intimated to Mr Buckingham the state of the house, and showed him the necessity of at once having the house made safe and inhabitable. Mr Buckingham immediately ordered the necessary work to be done. This order, from some cause which at present remains unexplained, was not attended to, and the rough weather of December and January made the chimney base bricks loose, and caused the gradually rotting beams to break up by pieces. From November, when the order for repair was given, up to last Friday, nothing further was heard of the work. On that day, however, the landlord's mason visited the premises for the purpose of reporting the state of the same to Mr Buckingham. On Friday night MRS BIRD, with her children and the old man GOULD, retired to their respective bed rooms: MR BIRD being in employ at Barnstaple, only visited his house about two or three times a month, and was not on this occasion at home. During the night MRS BIRD was aroused by the cry of her youngest child, a boy, and whilst searching for a candle, she heard the fearful crash which caused the death of two of her children, and the old man; her preservation was almost miraculous. The chimney, weakened probably by the recent winds and rain, fell upon the roof, which gave way in a mass, crushing to death under it BIRD'S eldest and youngest daughters, and the old man GOULD. Although surrounded by bricks, beams and straw, a beam seems to have fallen and rested just above the bed of MRS BIRD, completely sheltering her from the stones and timber work which lay so thick about her. Moreover the place where her bed was resting was the only part of the bedroom boarding which did not fall through to the kitchen floor. The chimney was a huge pile of stone and brick which stood upon the cob wall, and weighed several tons; this mass of stone work falling in a body upon the roof of an already shaky building, could have produced no other effect than that of demolishing the house. The tenants of the adjoining homesteads, called from their beds by the fall, speedily rendered assistance. Those enabled to speak were first removed, and then the groans of the old man buried in the debris, called the neighbours to a corner of the ruin. Before the stones and straw could be removed the old man had breathed his last. The two girls were next searched for, and when found were quite dead. The elder seemed to have received no blows, but was apparently suffocated; the head of the younger was jammed between two pieces of timber. The whole tale is a sad one. BIRD, poor fellow, has lost house, furniture, and two children, and has scarcely a penny in the world. Great sympathy is evinced by all the villagers for the saddened and bereaved parents; their loss is great. The Pastor of the parish, and the ministers of the dissenting Churches, made strong appeals on Sunday for aid for the sufferers, and the congregations expressed their pity and sympathy by good collections. A Committee has been formed for the purpose of receiving and appropriating subscriptions for the aid of BIRD, and Mr Dillon, of Pavington, Burrington, will be glad to receive the same. An Inquest on the bodies was held on Monday, before Mr H. Toller, Deputy Coroner; during which the landlord of the house, who is a solicitor at Exeter, met with a rather exacting questioner in the person of the Foreman of the Jury. The following is a portion of the examination. - The Foreman: Do you mean that you thought from your books that the work was done? - Witness: From my book? What do you mean? - The Foreman: You pay your servants every week I believe, and you could tell if the work was done by your books. - Witness: I pay my labourers weekly, but not he thatcher, mason, and tradesmen. - The Foreman: Do you mean to say then, Mr Buckingham, that you believe the place had been repaired? - Witness: It is my impression that it had been done. - The Foreman: But do you really mean to say so? - Mr Buckingham: I have already told you so on my oath. I don't know what you mean to question my word in this way. I think you are a very unfit man to be in the place you are. The way in which you have put questions is most improper. You are taking a very one sided view of the matter. - The Foreman: It's a very bad case of it, Mr Buckingham. The Jury, after some little consultation, returned the following verdict:- We believe the death of these persons to be Accidental, through the fall of a house, which, however, at the time, was out of repair. The Jury gave up their fees for the benefit of the BIRD family.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 26 February 1870
TORRINGTON - A very singular suicide occurred at Torrington, North Devon, on Tuesday. A woman, sixty years of age, took a razor and deliberately cut her arm so badly that from loss of blood she died. On Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of the woman, whose name was WAKELEY, before Mr J. Toller, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 19 March 1870
BRIXHAM - Melancholy Death Of A Brixham Innkeeper. - On Monday a Coroner's Inquest was held at Banfield's Old George Inn, Brixham, before H. Michelmore, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM MICHELMORE, the landlord of the Rising Sun. Deceased died on Friday last from injuries alleged to have been received in quelling a disturbance in his house in December last. A sailor, named Isaac Crocker, assaulted MR MICHELMORE and broke his thumb, and it appears that the deceased has been ailing ever since, and ultimately succumbed. Crocker was summoned before the local magistrates, in January last, and convicted of an assault and fined £1. After hearing the evidence, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest in order to produce testimony sufficient to show if the deceased fell, or was thrown down. The investigation will be resumed on Monday, the 11th April.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 April 1870
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At The New Harbour Works. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Tuesday, before Mr Michelmore, the Coroner for the district, on the body of HENRY FURNEAUX, a mason, 21 years of age, who sustained fatal injuries at the new harbour works on the previous Friday afternoon, from which he died the following Sunday afternoon. It appeared from the evidence of John Hemmett, a labourer, who was at work near the deceased at the time of the accident, that several men were engaged in lifting a large stone into its place when the chain that supported the derrick broke, and it fell down on deceased's thighs, glanced off, and struck him across the left leg, below the knee, breaking the bone. The derrick was immediately removed, and the young man removed first in a wheelbarrow to the cab-stand, and then to the Infirmary. When admitted he was sensible, but he shortly after became unconscious, and remained in this state until his death. The only cause for the breaking of the chain was attributed by Mr Mountstephens, the clerk of the works, to a "kink" having been left unobserved in it - or in other words, that it had been left twisted, and the strain of the stone had thus caused it suddenly to snap. He said it was not caused by the weight of the stone, for the chain was a 7/8 inch one, and it was capable of lifting eighteen tons, whilst the stone it was lifting at the time of accident weighed only about three tons. A curious incident in connection with the sad event was that the broken link of the chain had not been found since the occurrence, although search had been made for it; and it was conjectured that it must have flown out into the sea. Mr Mountstephens bore testimony to the quiet and respectable conduct of the deceased, observing that he had so much confidence in him that he could trust him anywhere. Dr Powell, the house surgeon at the Infirmary, attributed the cause of death to an effusion of blood on the brain, no doubt caused by the shock received to the system by the accident. He said the deceased's left leg was broken and he had received some severe contusions about the knees and thighs, but these injuries were not in themselves the immediate cause of death. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, of whom Mr J. H. Morgan was the Foreman, pointed out that the only question in this sad case was whether proper care had been exercised in the erection of the machinery used for the purpose of lifting the stones. For his own part he said he had not the least doubt on that point, after hearing the evidence that had been adduced. The Jury concurred in this opinion, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". Several of the Jurors presented their fees to the Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 May 1870
COLYFORD - Murder in East Devon. - On Monday an adjourned Inquest was held at Colyford, near Seaton, on the body of JAMES PEPPERELL. The deceased, a labourer, of Membury, was thirty years of age, and of rather dissolute habits. On the 22nd April he went to the East Devon steeplechases, at Colyton, where he indulged pretty freely in drink, and on the same evening he was drinking at the White Hart, Colyford, with James Harris, a labourer, of Lyme Regis, and a woman of ill-fame named Gunn. At eleven o'clock Harris left, going in the direction of Axminster and PEPPERELL followed alone about ten minutes afterwards. Nothing was seen of PEPPERELL until a fortnight afterwards, when his body was found floating in the river Axe, about a couple of hundred yards from the White Hart - where he was drinking on the night of the races. When taken out of the water his head was found to be covered with bruises, and it was evident that he had met with foul play. Suspicion at once fell on Harris, who bears but an indifferent character. On his being apprehended he denied any knowledge of the affair, stating that he was at home at two o'clock on the morning of the races, and that he had never had any stick in his possession on the night in question. (A stick, which was stated to be similar to that carried by Harris on the night of the murder was found near the spot.) When the Inquest was opened about a week since evidence was given shewing that the statements respecting the hour on which he arrived home, and that he had not any stick with him, were false. It was also stated by a Mr Fowler, a farmer, that about half-past eleven on the race night he heard loud cries as if of a man in distress coming from the direction of Axe Bridge - near where the body was found - but the cries did not frighten him, as he thought it was merely a row between people returning from the races. His daughter also stated that she heard cries of distress. Mr Hoare, a miller of Shute, said he found the prisoner sleeping in a field about half a mile from the scene of the murder on the day after the races. The prisoner complained of being cold and thirsty, and when witness offered to give him some beer if he came as far as the public-house he took off a "slop" he was wearing, remarking that if he kept it on, as it was torn, people would think he was a rough fellow. When nearing the bridge, where the body was afterwards discovered, Harris crossed from one side of the road to the other, and on coming to the bridge he looked over into the water on the same side as where the body of deceased was found. Sergeant Gunn apprehended Harris, and on his "slop" were marks of blood, which he said were caused by a rabbit which he caught. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against James Harris," who was afterwards removed in custody to Axminster. At the Axminster Petty Sessions on Tuesday, James Harris was charged with the Wilful Murder of JAMES PEPPERELL. No new facts were elicited, and the magistrates remanded Harris until today Friday at 10.30, when he will be brought up at the Axminster police-station. Prisoner still remains in the Axminster lock-up.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 18 June 1870
DAWLISH - Distressing Suicide. - Dawlish Station was the scene of a sad death on Tuesday afternoon. A retired tradesman, named WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS, of Clifton, about 40 years of age, who for some time previously had been in an imbecile state of mind, arrived with his wife at the station from Exmouth, by the train leaving Exeter at 1.40 p.m. It is stated he was only married a few months since. He was also accompanied by a man who was engaged a week ago to render any assistance, should MR EDWARDS in any way become violent. MR EDWARDS was standing close to the edge of the up platform, on the approach of the train, having crossed over the line from the down train, his wife being a little behind him, and the attendant was engaged taking out their luggage. When the train was about two-thirds of the distance up the platform, and just where MR EDWARDS was standing, he made a sudden jump on to the outer rail, and being knocked down by the engine was caught under the "guard", thrown across the rail, and carried along three or four yards; the engine and two carriages then passed over the poor man's body, causing instantaneous death. The body was afterwards removed to the Royal Albert Hotel, where an Inquest was held on it on Wednesday, and a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 July 1870
TORQUAY - Another Fatal Accident At The New Harbour Works. - We have the painful duty of recording another fatal accident in connection with the works now being carried out at the New Pier. It was only a month or two since that a young man named Furneaux lost his life by a derrick falling on him, and last Saturday evening DAVID WHITE, a labourer, 37 years of age, met an untimely death by missing his footing and falling into the water whilst engaged in walking backwards with a rail. In falling the poor fellow struck the back of his head against an abutment, by which he was evidently stunned. The body sank almost immediately, and was not recovered until after the lapse of half an hour or more, when it was taken up by means of a grapnel. The dangerous practice of walking backwards with a rail, was commented on by the Coroner, Mr Michelmore, of Newton Abbot, at the Inquest held on the body, at the Bath Saloon, on Monday morning last. The following is a full report of the proceedings:- The first witness called was the wife of the deceased, CHARLOTTE HELEN WHITE, who stated that her husband's age was thirty-seven, and that he was a labourer, working for Mr Mountstephen. Samuel Piper, a labourer, stated that he knew the deceased, DAVID WHITE, who had worked with him on the New Harbour Works. He was with him at half-past eight on Saturday night; witness and the deceased were taking up a railway metal to carry it out on a balk, and he helped to take it out with him. Deceased said it had better be left to him, and then another man took the other end. The deceased then took the rail and walked out backwards on the staging, and when he got out to the end of the permanent works, instead of stepping on the plank, which joined on to the permanent work, he missed his footing and fell overboard backwards. Witness looked over, and saw the deceased lying in the water; his back and head were visible. He gave a rod to Bulley, in order to catch hold of him. Bulley touched him two or three times, but as the body was sinking he could not get hold of it. The deceased never moved. Directly WHITE fell over the man who had hold of the other end of the rail put it down and went over to see what was the matter. The two men were working very steadily. It was a customary thing to walk backwards with the rails. - William Pope stated that he was one of the persons who had hold of the other end of the rail. There were four men in all working in shifting and carrying the rails. The deceased and Piper had hold of one end of the rail, and witness and Netherway had the other. The deceased said it had better be left to two, and thereupon witness and Piper let go. As soon as deceased began to step back with his end of the metal, he fell over; he was in the act of stepping from the permanent work on to a plank, which was of the usual width. He saw the deceased taken out about three-quarters of an hour after. The plank was the ordinary size used - eleven inches. The deceased was not pushed over. Mr Halls, one of the Jurymen, said an eleven-inch plank was insufficient for men carrying such heavy weights as the rails, and more planks ought to have been put down. - Thomas Bulley, a fellow workman, said he saw the deceased stooping down and walking backwards, and then fall over; he struck against a cross piece of wood, and rebounded into the water. The wood was bound and fastened with iron, and the deceased struck against the iron work. Witness immediately got down with a rod, with the object of getting hold of the deceased, but he never once moved. The body might have been in the water about three-quarters of an hour before it was recovered. The Coroner: What were you doing all the time; was nothing done to save him? - Witness: Nothing more than what I have said; he sank directly. The Coroner: You said you were trying to touch him with a rod? - Witness: The body was going down then. The Coroner: How long was it before it sank? - Witness: It was sinking when I got down with the rod; I saw it going down. The Coroner: How was the body taken up? - Witness: By a grapnel from a boat. - George Netherway was called in, and in reply to the Coroner, stated that he was not well, and had not been to work that morning, having been so much affected by the accident. He stated that he had been working with the deceased and others, and had put down the rail; also that he was under the pile engine, fastening it, at the time the accident occurred. Piper and witness were close together; could not say who carried the metal, and could not say whether Piper let it go. He and others were passing the rails from one to another. The Coroner: Who had hold of the rail? - Witness: I do not know; I was about another job I did not see the accident. The Coroner: What were you about? - Witness: I was under the pile engine, fastening it with a rope. The Coroner: Who had hold of the rail? - Witness: The deceased was not carrying the rail, he was lifting the end to put it on the balk. The Coroner: We have had evidence that you and the deceased were carrying the rail at the moment of the accident, that you were helping him with the rail. Witness: I was not touching the rail when he fell. I was on the other side of the balk, making fast the engine; there was not room for all of us about the job. The Coroner: The other witnesses said that you had hold of the other end of the rail. Witness: It's a mistake. The Coroner: Did you hear the deceased make any remark as to their being too many, and that two would do better than four? - Witness: I did not. The Coroner: Did you see Pope there and the other man? - Witness: Yes, but I did not notice what they were about. The Coroner: Can you say whether Pope held on the rail with you? - Witness: I cannot exactly say. Pope, Piper and Bulley were then called in and confronted with Netherway. The Coroner asked these men if Netherway was the man who had hold of the rail at the end of the permanent way, and they replied affirmatively, adding that Piper and the deceased was at one end, and Netherway with another man at the other. The Coroner: How far from the pile engine was the end of the rail? - All the men replied that it was close by. The Coroner enquired whether they saw any one fastening the pile engine? - The three witnesses stated that no one was near it. The Coroner: Can you all swear that Netherway was not near it? - Piper: I did not see him; I believe he was at the end of the metal. Pope: Netherway was at the end of the metal when I let go, and he continued to carry it with the deceased till the accident happened. The Coroner (to Netherway): You have nothing to fear from telling the truth. Netherway: I have told the truth; I was under the pile engine, and ran over to see the poor fellow in the water. The Coroner: Do not be afraid to speak out: if you did have one end of the rail, you may not be more to blame than the others. Why were you not at work this morning? - Witness: I felt too ill. The Coroner: May it not be that you cannot recollect what occurred, or that the shock has caused you to be afraid? Witness: I know I was under the pile engine after I helped over the rail. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury after Netherway had left the room, said he thought there was a very unfortunate discrepancy in his evidence, which he must leave to them to form their own opinion on. The witness Netherway, although stating he was near the spot at the time, most effectively denied having hold of the rail at the time of the sad occurrence; and it so happened that the man who had hold of the other end would be the only man who must have had anything to do with the accident. Although they had had three witnesses before them, and two had sworn that Netherway had hold of the rail, they had also the fact that he was not at his work that day, which, if he had had nothing whatever to do with the accident, and was only a spectator, would be rather singular. he was inclined to form his own opinion that Netherway had not told the truth, whilst he believed that the other three men had told the truth. But, as they said that at the time of the accident Netherway did nothing out of the common, he did not think they were obliged to take any notice of it. He left it to them to say whether Netherway had done what he ought not to have done, or whether they would attach any weight to his denial. It might be for them, in considering this denial of all participation whatever in this sad affair, to say whether the evidence of the three other witnesses was to be relied upon, and whether it would exculpate Netherway from all blame. If they considered his denial, not as the result of fear, but as a wilful denial, they would then view the case with suspicion, and take into consideration their verdict accordingly. They might be inclined to think that the walking backwards was a dangerous practice, and one that should not be continued in future; but still he did think the contractor was to blame in this respect. The room was then cleared for the purpose of allowing the Jury to have some deliberation in arriving at their verdict. After the lapse of a few minutes, the reporters were admitted, and, the Coroner addressing the witness Netherway said: The Jury have returned a verdict that deceased met with his death Accidentally. I cannot, however, dismiss you without a few words of caution. I believe you have come here today and have - possibly through fear or forgetfulness - travelled out of your way and told a falsehood, for I cannot look at it in any other way. The three witnesses distinctly swear that you had hold of the end of the rail, and you went out of your way to swear that you not only had not hold of the end of the rail, but that you were under the pile engine at the time of the accident. One of the witnesses says he saw the deceased with the other end of the rail, and I cannot help giving the poor fellow the credit of carrying out the orders given him. I wish to caution you, for on these occasions you have nothing to fear if you tell the truth and the whole truth. Again I saw you have nothing whatever to fear on these occasions, and I hope that you will always tell the truth and stick to it. At the same time, the Jury give you credit for saying what you have through fear. The verdict of "Accidental Death" was then recorded, and the Jury, through Acting Sergeant board, gave their fees to the poor widow, who is left with five children.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 July 1870
ELLACOMBE - The Last Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, on the body of GEORGE POTTER, a labourer, twenty-nine years of age, who came to an untimely death at the quarry beneath Daddy Hole on the previous Thursday, under circumstances reported in our last week's paper. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 6 August 1870
TORQUAY - Melancholy Sudden Death From Intoxication. - A sad case of sudden death, the result of suffocation produced whilst in a state of intoxication, has been enquired into during the present week. The deceased was a sailor, named WILLIAM EDWORTHY, 28 years of age, and it seems that he returned to Torquay from sea about five or six months since with a large sum of money in his possession. Instead of living with his parents, he had preferred low company, and his dissolute habits eventually resulted in his untimely end. He was found dead early on Sunday morning in a house of ill-fame at Ellacombe, having been conveyed there in a helpless state of intoxication the previous night. The Inquest on the body was opened on Monday evening at the Torbay Infirmary, before the Coroner, Mr H. Michelmore, and the following gentlemen, who were empanelled as a Jury:- Messrs. J. Brittan (Foreman), P. Blampey, W. Aysh, J. Chillcott, E. Spreckley, W. Soper, G. Shinner, A. Palk, and W. Lambshead. The first witness called was:- JOHN EDWORTHY, the father of the deceased, who is a labourer, living at Torre. He said his son came home from sea the Tuesday before Christmas-day, and had been living in the town ever since. He saw but very little of him, and knew that he was living in a bad house at Ellacombe, where he ought not to be. Between half-past five and six o'clock on Sunday morning he was told that his son was dead, and he went to No. 39 Higher Ellacombe Road, where he saw the body lying on the bed. A girl called Millman was in the room, and also an elderly woman, named Sarah Farmer. The latter told him that deceased was brought to her house in a cab, very tipsy, the night before, and that she helped to undress and put him to bed, and the girl said she found his son dead by her side about five o'clock the next morning. - By the Jury: His son had over £100 when he came home, but he did not know whether he had any left at the time of his death. - By the Coroner: He had been told that some person had had the handling of the money, but it was no one in Farmer's house, or connected with it. He did not care to say who it was; it was the landlord of the Steam Packet Inn. - William Tregaskis, a seaman, said he knew the deceased, and had been his companion since he had been home from sea. He met him at the Steam Packet Inn, about twelve o'clock on the previous Saturday, and remained there until ten minutes before twelve at night, when he left him there. When he left deceased was the worse for liquor, but he had his senses and could walk. The deceased had his dinner with the servants at the inn, and had been drinking beer the best part of the day. They played a few games of skittles together, and slept for more than two hours after seven o'clock in the evening. When he woke up deceased, who was tipsy before, said he was quite fresh, and began drinking again, and he was drinking gin and water when he left. He was stopping at Ellacombe at the same time as the deceased, though not in the same house. Early on Sunday morning he was called by Isabella Millman to come down, as she said BILL was dead. He went as far as the door of the house, but refused to go in until a policeman came. - The Coroner: What was your object in not going in? - Witness: I thought it was no good after he was dead. - The Coroner: What! and he a companion of yours, and you wouldn't go in when you only heard, and didn't know for certain, that the poor fellow was dead? - Witness: I didn't think it was my place to go in before a policeman came. The Coroner: If you had been in a similar position, would you have liked him to have done the same thing? - Witness: I didn't know whether I was doing right or not in going in. They told me they had sent for a policeman. The Coroner: And did you wait outside until he came? - Witness: Yes, sir. The Coroner: And did you go in then? - Witness: Yes; and I found him lying dead on his back, in Millman's room. In continuation he said he did not know whether deceased paid for the drink he was supplied with at the Steam Packet Inn. He knew that he sometimes left his money with Mr. Crocker, the landlord, but he knew he had none for him now, as he was drinking on "tick" some time during Saturday. About three months ago he saw deceased give Mr Croker a £5 note. Mr Croker supplied him with the gin and water, but he did not see deceased pay for it. - Edward Langworthy, a plasterer of Happaway Row, Stentiford's Hill, stated that he saw the deceased at the Steam Packet Inn, about seven o'clock on the previous Saturday evening. He was then sitting in the skittle alley with his coat off, as if he had been playing. He was still there when witness left, and when he returned to the inn he again saw the deceased at "turn-out time" 0 a few minutes before midnight. He then came out with the rest of the people, and caught hold of the rails, as he was very tipsy and could hardly stand. Deceased came out by himself, and there was a young woman, named Millman, waiting outside for him. Thomas Harding, James Aggett, and another young man named Shears came out at the same time as witness, and when they had got to the Strand Aggett said he should be sorry to see deceased get into trouble and he went back for him. The girl Millman had hold of him by one arm and Aggett by the other, and in this position they walked on together until they came to the Big Tree, when the deceased wouldn't go any further and wanted to lie down. The girl let him go, and Harding took him by the arm and assisted him up as far as the London Inn. They could get him no further, as he had fallen down on his knees, and some of them looked out for a cab. The girl Millman, who was looking on at the time, took off deceased's hat and caught him by the hair of the head, saying "You're not so drunk as you make out." She afterwards partly lifted him up, and repeating what she had said before she gave him a shove and exclaimed with an oath, "Lie there!" He fell back in the road; and after he had lain there about a minute they took him up, carried him over to the pavement and sat him up. Millman went up the street, and Shears and witness went to look for a cab. In the meantime three of the other young men had taken the deceased on their shoulders and carried him as far as Mrs Rippon's, the fruiterer, when they heard a cab coming. The girl, Millman, hailed it, and the deceased was put in with the girl and drove away to Ellacombe. - By the Coroner: He didn't know whether the deceased fell down when he came out of the Steam Packet Inn, but he had no chance of falling after they assisted him. The girl swore when she pushed him: s he was not drunk, and though she had been drinking she knew what she was about. - By the Jury: When she pushed the deceased he should consider, by the sound of the blow, that it was violently. He did not speak when he was put into the cab. - Thomas Harding, a painter, of Torre, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness in almost every particular, and especially with reference to the girl pushing the deceased. He said when she pushed him he fell violently and struck the back part of his head. He never spoke afterwards, but groaned three times. - William Huxham, a fly driver, living at the Belgrave Mews, proved being hailed by the girl Millman shortly after twelve o'clock on the Saturday night, as he was driving up Fleet-street, after attending the late express train at Torquay station. He also stated that according to Millman's instructions he drove to the house No. 39, Higher Ellacombe Road, where he helped to put the deceased on a bed. - By the Jury: He was not undressed when he left him. He saw no stains of blood on his carriage the next morning when he cleaned it, nor did he see any marks of violence on the deceased. - At this stage of the proceedings, it being nearly ten o'clock and several additional witnesses to be examined, the Coroner adjourned the Enquiry until six o'clock the following evening. On its being resumed, the Coroner briefly recapitulated to the Jury the facts already adduced in evidence, and proceeded to call:- Henry Crocker, the landlord of the Steam Packet Inn, Victoria Parade, who stated that the deceased had used his house ever since his return from sea. He came there on the previous Saturday between twelve and one o'clock in the day; and, with the exception of his going out some time during the evening, he remained there until closing time. The deceased let him have three £5 notes on one occasion, about two or three months ago, to keep for him, but they were returned the next morning. Deceased never told him what money he had. He had frequently lent him 5s. but he had always paid him back again. When the deceased left his house he wished him "good night" and walked half-way across the road by himself. - The Coroner: Are you sure of this, because we have direct evidence to the contrary? - Witness: I am certain of it, but he may have come back again afterwards. - The Coroner: What state was the deceased in when he left your house? - Witness: Well, I should think he had had plenty enough, but I have seen him go away with more. I do not know what he drank, as I did not supply him during the evening. - Tregaskis, re-called, was asked by the Coroner if the deceased went out during the evening. He replied that he did not see him leave, and that if he did, it must have been only for a short time. - Isabella Millman, a single woman, said the deceased had spent his nights with her nearly all the time he had been home from sea. She gave her version of the manner in which the deceased was conveyed from the Steam Packet Inn, and the only material difference in her evidence from that of the other witnesses was that, instead of pushing him, the deceased was leaning heavily on her, and she was obliged to let him fall to prevent herself from falling. She admitted saying when he fell, "You're not so drunk as you make out;" and said the deceased fell with the back of his head on a woman's boot. He never spoke whilst in the cab with her. When they got him into her room she helped to undress him and laid him in the bed on his left side. She went to bed herself about ten minutes afterwards, and slept soundly until five o'clock. When she awoke the deceased was lying on his face, and after she turned him round she saw that blood was coming from his nose and mouth, and that his face was slightly discoloured. - Sarah Farmer, the wife of a labourer, of whom the girl Millman rents the room in which the deceased was found dead, proved helping to put him to bed and being called by the girl the next morning and finding the deceased as described by her. Some lamentable facts were elicited by the Jury from the witness relative to the character of the house in which she lives. - P.C. Boundy proved being called to see the deceased on Sunday morning, and finding him dead, in the house No. 39, Higher Ellacombe Road. He took possession of his clothes and found a watch and chain, 2s. in his watch-pocket, and a brass tobacco-box with his name engraved on it. - Dr Powell, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said he should think that the deceased had been dead some hours when he was called to see him. He examined the body externally, but found no marks of violence: the face and neck were of a dark purple colour. He had since made a post mortem examination. He first opened the head, and found the membranes of the brain healthy, though there was a great deal of congestion on the surface, and throughout its substance. He next examined the chest, and found the heart full of dark fluid blood; the walls were thin and soft, and there appeared to be some fatty degeneration there. The lungs were intensely congested, and when cut a quantity of dark blood issued from them. The wind-pipe was also much congested, and there was a slight disease of the liver, but it was not of any consequence. In the stomach he found a few mustard seeds and a little undigested food, but no trace of beer - only a slight alcoholic smell. The blood throughout the body was fluid. All the internal organs were much congested, but they were not sufficiently diseased to cause death. He believed the immediate cause of death was deprivation of air, which produced suffocation. The habits of life of the deceased would certainly tend to produce congestion. - By the Jury: There were no marks of a blow on the back of the head. The appearance of the brain was not the result of a blow; if the deceased had received a violent blow he must have seen appearances of it. In his helpless and drunken condition, the deceased had no doubt turned over on his face whilst lying in the bed, and thus being deprived of air he had been suffocated. - Tregaskis, re-called, said, in reply to the Coroner, that there was quarrel at the Steam Packet Inn during the time he was there with the deceased. - The Coroner then summed up the evidence in his usual clear and lucid manner, commenting on the statements of the several witnesses. He said he considered that Tregaskis had been guilty of a great unkindness to the deceased, towards whom he professed to be a companion and comrade, in not going into the house when he was told he was dead without a policeman. With reference to Mr Crocker, he did not say that he was free from blame, for it was evident that it was at his house that the mischief began which ended in the death of the deceased. He did not know, however, that the Jury should take any notice of this, as it was more a question for the police if the house was not conducted in a proper manner. They might possibly think it right to say that when the deceased left that house he was turned out not in a fit state to go away; but then it had been proved that he found some persons to take care of him and Crocker had denied supplying him drink, but another person in his house did. Still there could be no doubt that the deceased was supplied with drink when he was not in a fit state to receive it. As regarded the girl Millman, he thought she gave her evidence in a straight-forward way, and that there was nothing criminal proved against her. From the first she seemed to have tried to assist the deceased to her home, and the only discrepancy in the evidence was that the other witnesses who were with her said she pushed him down. She confessed she let him fall, and that she told him he was not so drunk as he made out, but her subsequent conduct was different, and not the conduct of one who was intentionally serving the deceased bad, for the next thing she did was to get a cab, pay for it, and take the poor fellow to her own home. He did not justify her conduct or general character, or either that of Mrs Farmer, but in this Enquiry the Jury had nothing to do with the offence against morals which had necessarily been brought out against the parties. Dr Powell had conclusively proved that the deceased had not met his death from any blow, and he found after a careful examination of the body that the congestion of nearly all the organs was the result of his habits of life - that they were produced from other causes and not from any blow. It would be for the Jury to say whether the evidence of the doctor as to the supposed cause of death was sufficient; whether the suffocation which had resulted in death was accidentally or purposely caused by the girl, for she alone could have done it; or whether there was sufficient evidence before them to say how the deceased came by his death. If they believed the evidence of the girl they had quite sufficient before them to say that the deceased came to his death by suffocation in an accidental way; if they had any doubt on this then they had only the evidence that he was suffocated, but how they could not say. If they did not place credence in Dr Powell's evidence, that deceased had no violence shewn him, then it would be their duty to return a verdict of manslaughter or even murder against some person; but he need not direct them to that, because the evidence did not go to that extent. He left it with them to say whether the death of the deceased resulted from suffocation, caused accidentally or by the girl Millman, or whether they had any evidence to show how it came. - After a short consultation the Jury returned the verdict "That the deceased died from Accidental Suffocation whilst in a state of helpless intoxication." - The Coroner, in accordance with the almost unanimous wish of the Jury, then called in Mr Crocker, the landlord of the Steam Packet Inn. After informing him of the verdict arrived at by the Jury, he said they and himself quite concurred in the opinion that the deceased was in a helpless state of intoxication when he left his house on Saturday night. The evidence abundantly proved that he was there during the whole of Saturday, that he was not only drunk once, but that he afterwards went to sleep and in a measure got sober, and that drink was then supplied to him again. He was of course aware that he was equally responsible if the deceased was supplied with liquor by any other person as if he had supplied him himself, because it was his duty to leave proper persons in charge of his house, and to see they did not do wrong. He trusted that this sad circumstance would prove a warning to him, and that he would not let this occasion pass by and think no more of it; but that if on any future occasion a young man or an old man came to his house in an intoxicated state he would not allow drink to be supplied them after they had had enough. There was not the slightest doubt but that this had been done in this case. He impressed on him not to let this sad affair pass without its proving a warning to him, and he trusted it would be for the benefit of the house generally. - Tregaskis was next called in and reprimanded for his conduct in refusing to go in to see the deceased before a policeman came. The Coroner said he had stated that his comrade and companion was lying dead in a house of ill-fame, where he knew he was for no good purpose, away from his parents, and in the company of this girl; and after being told he was dead he trusted to the statement and took no further steps whatever to see if he could do him any good. He only trusted that if on any future occasion he should be placed in a similar position, which he trusted he never would, that he would consider it his duty to act as a faithful friend and endeavour to see if assistance was required; and he also hoped that if ever he should be found in the same condition that he would have a kinder friend than he had proved to the deceased. If he had been in a fit he might, by going to him immediately, have been the means of saving his life, although the evidence proved in this instance such was not the case. He trusted that if in the future he had an opportunity of being of any aid to a fellow mortal, he would do so. In this case it was running no risk, and if he had gone into the house for the purpose of saving the life of a fellow creature, no blame whatever would have attached to him. - The woman, Sarah Farmer, was the last witness called, and to her the Coroner said that she might consider herself very fortunate that the Jury had returned the verdict they had. He trusted this would prove a warning to her. She had laid herself open to a very serious charge, for had anything criminal happened in her house which would have brought her under the eye of the law she would have been placed in very serious circumstances. She was at that moment keeping an improper house in Torquay, and he hoped after this she would go home and do her best from henceforth to improve it, and to lead a proper life.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 17 September 1870
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At The New Pier. The Inquest. - Another fatal accident happened at the New Pier Works on Thursday morning, by which two men, named HENRY STRAWBRIDGE and GEORGE VEAL, lost their lives, and two others were so injured as to necessitate their removal to the Torbay Infirmary. The Inquest on the bodies were held at the Bath Saloon this (Friday) morning, before H. Michelmore, Esq., Coroner. The following gentlemen were empanelled as a Jury:- Mr John Brittan (Foreman), and Messrs. W. Aysh, R. Butland, T. G. Stedham, G. S. Bridgman, G. Tripe, A. Saunders, J. Chubb, J. M. Bovey, J. H. T. Wills, T.Edwards, and Baker. The Coroner and Jury, having viewed the bodies and the scene of the sad disaster, returned to the Bath Saloon, where the following evidence was adduced: LOUISA STRAWBRIDGE, the wife of the deceased HENRY STRAWBRIDGE, said she identified the dead body she had seen as that of her husband, who was a labourer, and was 35 years of age. He had worked at the New Pier about two years and six months. - JAMES VEAL, a labourer, of Victoria Cottages, Ellacombe, also proved the identity of his brother, GEO. VEAL, who he said was 29 years of age. He was about to be married in a month or six weeks. John Guest, a labourer, living at No. 5, the Braddons, said: I am employed on the New Pier works, and have worked there nearly two years, under Mr James Mountstephens. I was there at work on Thursday morning, looking after the trolly on the cross-road. The deceased, HENRY STRAWBRIDGE and GEORGE VEAL were there at work at the same time: STRAWBRIDGE was on top of the traveller, lowering the block, and VEAL was in the boat under. The diver John Niass, signalled for the traveller to go ahead to Westcott, who was in charge of it. I saw the traveller go ahead about a foot or eighteen inches, and when it had gone this distance Westcott told me to "slack out," as my chain was of no more use. My gear was fastened to the traveller and the block as well; the block was lowered in its place within four or five inches. I let go my chain, and with the same the traveller went down into the water, and I went down with it. I saved myself by catching hold of a plank on getting to the top of the water, and so got ashore. My chain had nothing whatever to do with fastening the traveller; it was only to guide the block. John Niass, a mason, said: I have been employed on the New Pier works above three years. I was at work there yesterday morning, setting a block under the water. I was standing completely under water, at a depth of about sixteen feet, on a block that had been fixed, ready to fix the other, which was required to be placed about three inches further ahead. I signalled to John Towell, the man who attends to the life lines, to shift the block as I required, and when I looked up again I saw the traveller and the whole of the gear coming down into the water. I immediately jumped off the block, and the men on the top pulled me up by the life-line I had attached to the diving-dress. Five or six minutes afterwards I went into the diver's boat and descended into the water again, and brought up the bodies of VEAL and STRAWBRIDGE as quick as I could. I found VEAL at the bottom, lying on his face; I brought him up first, and then went down again for STRAWBRIDGE, who was lying flat on his back. By the Jury: The block that was being lowered was about the usual size. The traveller, when picked up-, was out over the end of the works beyond the blocks. - Mr Jas. Mountstephens, Foreman in charge of the works at the New Pier, said: I direct the work, and all the men take their orders from me. I was on the stage of the Pier yesterday morning. Edward Westcott was the man who had charge of the crane which was the cause of the accident. It was being used for lowering the blocks. Westcott has had this duty to perform nearly two years. When the crane is brought to the edge for the purpose of lowering the blocks, it is usually fastened by a crab-winch at the top, and by a chain made fast to the main road. When the crane requires to be moved this chain should be slackened a little, and then Westcott, with a bar, should move the crane ahead. There are two means of fastening the crane - one by the crab-winch, and the other by fastening the wheel with a chain. Either of these precautions would keep the crane safe, but both are not generally used, except when there is a heavy sea running. I had just left when the accident happened, leaving STRAWBRIDGE on the crane, attending to the lowering of the block. When I left I noticed that the crab-winch chain was secure, but the wheel was not fastened. The block that was being lowered at the time was twelve tones in weight - about three tons lighter than those generally lowered. When I left VEAL was in a boat under the stage, in order to pick up any one that might accidentally fall over the stage into the water. Just after I left I turned round and saw the crane running right out over the works. From the place where the block was being lowered to where the crane went out over into the water it was a distance of about ten feet, one half of which was metalled. I attribute the running out of the crane in this manner to the crab-winch being undone altogether, instead of being only slackened, so as to allow the crane to go on three inches. It is at times the duty of Westcott to undo the crab-winch, and fasten it in front in order to move the crane, but not when it is only required to be shifted such a short distance as three inches. When the crane is wanted to be moved a few inches or a foot, it is done by slackening the chain at the wheel and forced a forward by bar; and when it is wanted to be moved a distance of five feet or more it is stopped by a piece of chain or timber being placed in front of the wheel by the man in charge. I do not know of my own knowledge that the winch-chain was fastened in front at the time of the accident, but I should consider it was, and that the crane was propelled forward by the jerk of the men at the wheel whilst fastening the chain in front. I have always found Westcott a trustworthy man, and up to this time he has always carried out the work properly. - By the Foreman: The lowering of blocks is certainly a most important part of the work, but I could not be everywhere. There was no defect in the machinery, for when it was found nothing was broken. - Edward Westcott, a labourer, living at No. 4, Melville-street, said: I have been working at the New Pier works about three years. I have generally had charge of the large traveller used for lowering the blocks of cement into the water. There is a chain at the back of the traveller attached to a smaller "crab" and with this chain it is moved either forward or backward. The traveller is never moved with the bar whilst the block is being lowered. Just before the accident happened yesterday morning the block was swung, and I had just received a signal from the driver to heave the crane ahead. I moved it ahead with the chain about a foot, and then put a piece of four-inch deal timber under both wheels. Just as I had done this, and before I had time to undo the chain and fasten it back, I heard something cracking under the front wheels of the traveller, and before we had time to see what it was we were all struggling in the water. I could not move the crane forward with the bar, because the rails inclined upwards, and the wheels were greasy. The bottom block was laid about three weeks ago, and the crane was then shifted into the proper position by the crab-chain, with the piece of timber placed before the wheels, exactly as it was done yesterday. I chain is sometimes used to fasten the wheel f the traveller to the metal baulk, but it is not used when a block is being lowered by the side. It is impossible to move it with the bar when the block is swinging and the metals incline upwards, as they did in this instance. The accident must have happened by something giving way under the crane: it could not have gone forward else, as the piece of timber was in front of it. - By the Jury: I don't think the crane ran right over the works; I fell down into the water with the timber. I don't know what it was cracking, but I should think it must have been the wood-work under the front wheels of the traveller. When I got to the top of the water I caught hold of a piece of baulk, many pieces of which were in the water. At the time of the accident, the crane was about eighteen inches out over the last cross-piece. - Mr Mountstephens, re-called, in answer to the Coroner, said he could not deny the statement of the last witness as to the manner in which the traveller was fixed when the bottom block was laid three weeks since. his opinion was that the cracking the men heard was the piece of deal in front of the traveller being cracked by the wheels. He stood and saw the crane go out over the end of the works; if it had gone down bodily the men that were on it would have been smashed to pieces. - William Pearce, a labourer, living in Lower Union Lane, who was at work on the top of the traveller when the accident happened, said he was helping to fasten the chain when he heard something crack underneath, and immediately fell down into the water. When he found himself in the water he was a little on one side of the place where he had been working; he didn't believe the crane moved forward but went straight done. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he was afraid the result of the evidence left a great deal to the imagination of the Jury, as it was very scant and meagre as to how the accident happened. He referred to the straight-forward manner in which the man Westcott gave his evidence; and he said a consideration of the evidence adduced brought him to the idea that there was not sufficient precaution used in moving the crane when the blocks were being swung. If it was necessary - and he believed, from the weight of the blocks, that it was necessary - in order to move the crane that something more than an iron bar should be used, it ought not to be moved forward unless a chain was attached at the rear. He thought the sad affair was the result of a pure accident, for everyone seemed to have used the means given them. If the Jury thought Westcott had been guilty of carelessness or negligence it would be their duty to return a verdict of manslaughter against him, but for himself he did not think Westcott was much to blame. After some consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a recommendation to Mr Mountstephens to have a back-chain placed to the crane in future and also to have additional piles placed beneath the tramway. The Inquiry lasted four hours.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 3 December 1870
TORQUAY - Sad Case Of Infanticide. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Wednesday morning last, on the body of a newly-born male child, which was found in a box at Fernhill House on the previous day. Mr R. R. Crosse, of Cullompton, acted as Coroner, in the room of Mr H. Michelmore, who is at present in Germany. Mr Henry Crockwell was the Foreman of the Jury. The mother of the child is named ELIZABETH SMITH. She is twenty-two years of age, and has been acting for the past eleven months in the capacity of lady's maid to Mrs Trant. Mrs Trant is an elderly lady, upwards of eighty years of age, and has occupied Fernhill for some years. It appeared from the evidence adduced that during the time the young woman SMITH has been in Mrs Trant's employ she has been on a visit to Dublin, the residence of Mr Ion Trant Hamilton, Mrs Trant's grandson. This gentleman has in his service a footman, named William Robinson, who was called as the first witness. He stated the fact of SMITH'S being in his master's house in Ireland, and her leaving about a month ago for the purpose of returning to Torquay. He also said she was in Mr Hamilton's house about three months, and that the first time he became acquainted with her was about four months and a half ago. Eliza West, the housemaid at Fernhill, and who has been on intimate terms with her fellow servant since they have lived together, stated that she never suspected SMITH of being enceinte, and that when she complained of being unwell she attributed it to another cause. The crime was discovered by Mr William Pollard, surgeon, who was called to attend the young woman at the request of her mistress, SMITH herself having refused to have medical assistance. He first called on her on Sunday last, when she made the same false representation to him as to the cause of her illness as she had to her fellow servant. Believing her statement at the time to be correct, he gave her advice as to what to do, and left. He saw her again on the following day; and having in the interim had his suspicions aroused by a communication made to him in the house, he questioned SMITH as to whether or not her illness was not occasioned by a cause otherwise than that she had stated. She denied that such was the case; but when he questioned her more closely on the matter on the following day she confessed to him that she had been confined on the previous Saturday. He asked her where the child was, and she pointed to a box by her bedside and gave him the keys to unlock it. He did so, and underneath some clothing he found the dead body of a new-born child, lying on its face. He lifted it up a little, but on perceiving that there was a tape tied round its neck he replaced it in its original position and immediately communicated with the police. On his asking the mother if the child was born alive, she replied that she did not know, but that she believed it was still-born as it never cried, and remained motionless for half-an hour after its birth. She also said that she tied the tape around its neck to enable her to put the body into her box, as it slipped from her hand when she held it by the arm. Since her confinement the subsequent discovery and confession, SMITH told her fellow servant West, in the course of conversation, that she could not tell her how she could have so deceived her, but that she thought the devil had helped her. Sergeant Ockford stated that, in consequence of the information he received from Mr Pollard, he went to Fernhill, and found the dead body of the child in SMITH'S box. There was a good supply of servants' clothing in the box, but no baby linen whatever. When he charged the young woman with concealing the birth of her child, she replied, "Oh, dear! oh, dear! what shall I do?" The sergeant had the body removed to the Infirmary, where it was examined by Dr Powell, the house surgeon. The result of his post mortem examination shewed that a piece of tape had been tied twice round the child's neck, with a double knot tied in two places. It was a remarkably fine child, and fully developed, weighing 7 ¾ lbs., and being 22 inches in length. Respiration had fully taken place, and all the organs of the body were in a healthy condition. All the appearances were consistent with the fact that the child was born alive; and the cause of death was strangulation, caused by the tape tied round its neck. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, pointed out to the Jury that if they believed the evidence of Dr Powell, that suffocation was the cause of death, then they must disbelieve the voluntary statement made by the young woman to Mr Pollard. He considered that the house surgeon's statement was entitled to the most credence, and that this was either a case of murder or nothing at all. The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the mother of the child, ELIZABETH SMITH. Of course she was not able to attend, but as soon as she is sufficiently recovered she will be brought before the Magistrates for her offence. The witnesses were severally bound over in their own recognizances to appear and give evidence in the case at the next Devon Assizes. The fees of the Jury were handed over to Sergeant Ockford in aid of the funds of the Infirmary. The Coroner complimented the sergeant at the conclusion of the Enquiry on the excellent manner in which he had prepared the evidence, considering the short notice he had received.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 March 1871
BABBICOMBE - Sad Death At Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at the Roughwood Inn, Babbicombe, on Thursday, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of a labourer named RICHARD FORD MATTHEWS, forty-five years of age. The deceased left his home on the 18th January, and was not again seen alive. His dead body was picked up on Oddicombe Beach on Wednesday morning by a fisherman. It appears that the poor man had previously been in a depressed state of mind. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Servant. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last at the Clarence Hotel, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of ELIZA COLES, aged 23. The deceased was a domestic servant at St Norbert's, St. Michael's Road. It appears that on Saturday week whilst engaged in her household duties, the deceased was standing with her back to the fire, when her dress by some means became ignited. A fellow servant, named Ham, extinguished the flames by throwing a blanket over the deceased, but she died on Sunday last from the effects of the burns. The Coroner complimented Ham on the presence of mind and coolness she displayed under the circumstances. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury kindly gave their fees to the Torbay Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 24 June 1871
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Child. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Wednesday last, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, touching the death of REGINALD GEORGE PEDRICK, aged three years and nine months. Mr J. Robinson was Foreman of the Jury. GEORGE PEDRICK, residing at 7, Brunswick-square, Torre, father of the deceased, deposed that he last saw the child alive at his house on Tuesday afternoon, at two o'clock, when it left for school. The child was usually accompanied by an elder brother, who was unfortunately ill on this occasion. About ten minutes after the child had left, he was informed that he had been run over by a timber waggon; and on going out he saw two policemen taking him to the Infirmary. - Thomas Ashford, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Stooke, timber merchant, of Kingskerswell, stated that on Tuesday last he left Newton to go to Bradley, for an oak tree to take to the New Pier at Torquay. When near Mr Oliver's, draper, he heard the people screeching. He stopped the horses immediately, and found that a wheel of the waggon had passed over a child. A bundle of trifolium grass was on the vehicle, just before the hind wheels. In answer to the coroner, the witness said he did not notice any children playing near the spot just before the accident. P.C. Payne said whilst on duty at Brunswick Square on the afternoon of Tuesday last, he saw a waggon pass driven by the last witness. On looking round he saw the deceased in the act of picking flowers from the bundle of grass which was on the waggon. The child was knocked down immediately by the wheel which passed over his shoulder and neck. With the assistance of P.C. Cooper, he picked up the child and carried it to the Infirmary. The child never moved after it was picked up. The driver was proceeding very steadily, walking at the head of his horses on the opposite side to where the child was picking the flowers. One of the Jury mentioned that a similar accident happened some time since, and suggested the desirability of having two men to attend to these timber waggons. The Coroner remarked that this was a very humane suggestion, but it could not go any further; they could not compel the owners of timber-waggons to employ two men because children ran under the wheels. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 15 July 1871
PARKHAM - Shocking Murder In North Devon. - A shocking murder has been committed in North Devon. From the facts that have already appeared, it would seem that up to Wednesday, the 28th of June, there lived in a little cottage at Goldsworthy, near Bideford, an old man, named ANTHONY CLEMENTS. He had been a labourer, but though in receipt of parish relief, he was popularly supposed to have put by some money, and he lived in the expectation of one day coming into a fortune. He was the sole occupant of his cottage, and his only near neighbours were a labourer and his wife, Mr and Mrs Short, who occupied the adjacent cottage, separated from that of CLEMENTS by a thin partition. On Wednesday week, Mrs Short says, she last saw her neighbour alive; he came to her, told her he was going to Hartland, and asked her to take care of his donkey during his absence. That was the last she saw of him. The last she heard of him was the sound of his locking the doors inside the house, and she afterwards concluded he had gone to Hartland, though she did not see him pass out of the cottage. Shortly after midnight on Thursday Mrs Short was awakened by what she describes as "a smash like earthenware being broken," and then she heard a groan. These were remarkable sounds to issue from a supposed empty house, but Mrs Short was satisfied with her husband's suggestions that "it might be some one outside," and made no remark to any body till last Friday morning, when CLEMENTS not having returned, and nothing having been heard of him, she told a man named Samuel Lewis, who was passing, that she was distressed at the deceased's disappearance, and induced him to look into the bedroom window, which he did by means of a gate, and there he thought he saw the old man on the bed. Further assistance was obtained, and access was obtained through the window. A man named Pearson and deceased's eldest son were the first to enter, and a ghastly sight was presented to them. On a bed (there were two in the room), close to the thin partition separating the room from that in which the Shorts slept, the old man lay on his right side, with his head, which appeared to be a mass of coagulated blood, hanging over. The fragments of an earthen ware article, which had been smashed, were lying by the bedside. The face was quite black, and decomposition had set in. He had on a pair of fustian trousers, stockings, waistcoat, and neckerchief. The forehead and left temple were greatly bruised. Above the left ear were marks of violent blows. The skull was broken in four different places. The blows had apparently been inflicted with a circular instrument, such as a hammer. The bones of the skull were beaten in, and a fracture extended from the middle of the forehead to the crown of the head. The blows appeared to have been struck while the old man was in a sitting position, and their force was so great that the blood had spurted out and splashed the ceiling and the partition as if ejected from a syringe. The room was undisturbed, but no money was found, with the exception of three-pence, which deceased had in one of his pockets. There were a few red gooseberries in the bed, as if placed there by accident or design. There was no blood about the bedroom, nor on the fragments of earthen ware. The key of the front door was searched for, but could not be found, though the door was locked and not bolted. On the upper stair there were large spots of blood, which appeared to have been accidentally wiped by the sweeping of a dress, and on the side of the wall close by the top stair was a large spot of coagulated blood as if it had been taken from something. The motive of the crime appears to have been to obtain the little money the murdered man was supposed to possess. The Inquest was held at the New Inn, Parkham, by Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner, and after evidence of the above facts were elicited it was adjourned until Saturday. There is at present no clue to the identity of the criminal, beyond that which the police are always announced to be in possession of contemporaneously with the discovery of a murder. It is hoped, however, that the perpetrator of this dreadful deed will not long go undetected.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 22 July 1871
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Child. - A sad occurrence happened on Monday at Hutton, Belgrave Crescent, Torre, the residence of MR J. and the HON. MRS FARRELL, by which their youngest child LUCRETIA, sixteen months old, lost its life. The facts were detailed at an Inquest held at the house on Tuesday evening, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner. Mr T. Memery was the Foreman of the Jury. About half-past two on Monday afternoon Margaret Byran, the head-nurse, was in the nursery at the top of the house with the child: the nurse was engaged in doing something at a chest of drawers, which were close to the window, from which the deceased was looking to see her brothers at play in the green below. There are two protecting bars across the lower part of the window, which was open about half-way up; and whilst the nurse was occupied as stated she suddenly missed the child from the window and just caught sight of her dress as she fell out over the bars of the window on to the balcony. The nurse immediately ran downstairs, but on her way she met her mistress - who had heard the fall and picked up the child - with the deceased in her arms. The girl was too terrified to explain how the accident had occurred, but she did so subsequently. Mr Stabb, surgeon, was sent for, and was promptly in attendance. He found the child had sustained severe contusions about the body, and that there were two blows on the head - one on the temple, and the other over the left eye. He examined the body, and found no bones broken, and after being dressed and put in a bath the child was laid in its cot in the nursery. The surgeon told MRS FARRELL that if the deceased had sustained no internal injuries she might do well. He called again at six o'clock, when he found the child worse; blood was oozing from the ear - a sign which did not make its appearance on his first examination. The child died about eight o'clock on Monday evening, the cause of death being fracture of the base of the skull. MRS FARRELL, the mother of the deceased, was deeply affected on entering the room to give her evidence, supported by her husband, and much sympathy was felt for the bereaved lady. She bore testimony to the kindness the nurse had always shewn towards her child, and expressed her belief that she had met her death under purely accidental circumstances. There could be no doubt, the Coroner observed, that the child met its death by falling out of the window; and the only question was whether it was the result of an accident or not. After haring MRS FARRELL'S evidence on this point, however, he thought the Jury would be doing their duty by returning a verdict of "Accidental Death." A verdict in accordance with the suggestion of the Coroner was accordingly returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 July 1871
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - A sad accident happened on Thursday morning to FREDERICK WILLIAM ABBOTT, aged fourteen, the eldest son of MR ABBOTT, butcher, of Fleet-street. The deceased was riding a horse near the Torbay Road, when he accidentally fell, through the breaking of the girth of the saddle. The unfortunate lad sustained severe injuries about the head. Capt. Bentill, of Furswill House, St. Mary-Church, found the deceased and conveyed him to his home. Dr Pollard was sent for and was quickly in attendance, but medical skill proved of no avail, the injuries terminating fatally about five o'clock in the afternoon. Much commiseration is felt for MR and MRS ABBOTT in their sad and sudden bereavement. An Inquest on the body will probably be held this (Friday) evening.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 5 August 1871
TORQUAY - The Recent Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hal on Saturday morning last, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of FREDERICK WILLIAM ABBOTT, fourteen years of age, the son of MR ABBOTT, butcher, of Fleet-street. A brief notice of the unfortunate event appeared last week, and some additional particulars were adduced at the Inquiry. It seems that on the Thursday morning the deceased had rode out to Mr Froude's house for orders, and that on his return, shortly before eleven o'clock, he met Philip Michelmore Crockwell, a son of Mr H. Crockwell, upholsterer, and stopped and spoke to him near the slip at Livermead beach. He subsequently rode on, but he had not proceeded thirty yards when he was seen to sit loosely on his horse and then to fall off, pitching on his head and shoulders, the cause of his fall being the breaking of the saddle girth. Crockwell ran to the deceased and picked him up, but he was insensible, and unable to speak. He sat him up against the wall, whilst the horse galloped on to the turnpike-gate, where it was stopped. Captain Bentall happened to be passing in his carriage at the time, and took up the deceased and drove him to his home. Mr J. Pollard, surgeon, who attended the deceased about an hour after the accident, found him quite insensible. There was a bruise on the left hip. The deceased remained insensible up to the time of his death, the cause of which was believed to have been owing to the brain being lacerated, causing an effusion of blood on it. It was explained that the pace at which deceased was riding at the time of the accident was just over a canter. This explanation was given at the wish of the father of the deceased, who said people might otherwise think the accident was caused by fast riding. Rufus Barter, a salesman, and MR ABBOTT also gave testimony; and in summing up the Coroner condemned the two prevalent practice of butchers' boys riding with a single saddle girth. The verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned; and the Jury, of whom Mr Bond was the Foreman, presented their fees, amounting to 11s., through Acting-Sergeant board, to the Torbay Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 September 1871
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Saturday, before Mr H. Michelmore, on the body of WILLIAM CAME, a plasterer, who received injuries which resulted in his death by falling off the roof of Hendon House, on the 24th June last. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was sixty years of age, was at work on the roof in the morning. In consequence of having neglected to fasten a small ladder on which he was standing, and in endeavouring to repair a chimney, he overbalanced himself and fell to the ground. He was taken up in an insensible condition, and was found to be suffering from concussion of the brain. He was at first attended by Dr Thompson, and afterwards removed to the Infirmary, where every attention was paid him by Dr Powell, the house surgeon. He gradually sunk under his injuries, however, and died on the 31st August, from softening of the brain, caused by the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and they presented their fees, through Sergeant Ockford, to the Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 16 September 1871
BABBICOMBE - Melancholy Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening at the Roughwood Hotel, Babbicombe, on the body of JOHN THOMAS SMITH, aged twenty, a solicitor's clerk, of London, who was drowned off the White Beach at Anstis Cove the previous day, under circumstances as detailed in the appended evidence. Mr H. Michelmore was the Coroner, and Mr Thos. Gibson was chosen as the Foreman of the Jury. From the evidence it appeared that between half-past seven and eight o'clock on Wednesday morning the deceased went to the White Beach for the purpose of bathing. On his way to the beach he met a sailor named James Earle, whom he asked if there were any machines let out there for gentlemen. Earle replied that there were not, and deceased then went to the water and commenced bathing in a rather rough sea - so rough that some of the waves were said to rise at a height of ten feet before breaking on the beach. The deceased swam out very well for about a hundred yards, and then returned; and he swam out again a second time. When he had got out the same distance as at first he suddenly cried out for help. and on hearing this Mr Henry Thomas, the boatman at Anstis Cove - who happened to be passing from one beach to the other at the time - immediately ran towards the White Beach. He requested his man Earle to get him a rope, and having partially undressed himself he waded through the water as far as the rope would allow him. He called to the deceased to get as near him as possible, but the more he tried to do this the further he got from him. The waves then knocked Thomas off his legs, and when he recovered himself he went back to the beach, at the same time telling deceased to swim on his back whilst he procured a boat. The young man did this at once, and Thomas and his man went to Anstis Cove and put off a boat to rescue the deceased. More than twenty minutes elapsed, however, before they could approach him, in consequence of the rough sea that prevailed, and when at length they got near the body it was turned over with the face downwards, but still floating on the water. The body was taken into the boat and conveyed to Thomas' house at Anstis Cove. Dr Bernard, who had previously been sent for, was quickly in attendance, and when he arrived he found the persons there were taking the proper means to restore him. They had dressed him in dry clothes; they were rubbing his body, and had put hot water bottles to his feet. The appearance of the body was that of a healthy, well-grown man; and, hoping it might be only a case of suspended animation, they continued their efforts to restore it for an hour and a half, Mr Thomas supplying everything that was wanted, as if it had been his own son. No circulation, however, could be restored; and Dr Bernard considered deceased died from the lungs being filled with water, as was the case with persons whose deaths were caused by drowning. MR THOMAS SMITH, the father of the deceased, who resides at Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, was present at the Inquest. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very clear but painful case. This poor young fellow came down from London to enjoy his holidays in Devonshire, and, with a little foolhardiness, perhaps, he went out to bathe when he ought not. He thought they would agree with him that both Earle and Thomas did all they could to save the life of the deceased, that no blame attached to any one, and that his death was the result of a pure accident. The Jury concurred in the observations of the Coroner, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 September 1871
BABBICOMBE - Reckless Bathing. - An Inquest was held at Gasking's Cary Arms, Babbicombe, on Wednesday morning, by Mr H. Michelmore, on the body of ALBERT JACKMAN, a young man who was drowned at Teignmouth on the 10th inst. Henry Stoneman and Frank Hannaford, who were bathing with the deceased at the time of his death, gave evidence that the sea was very rough, and although they both endeavoured to save him the waves prevented them. The body was picked up by Wm. Stiggins in Babbicombe Bay on Tuesday. The Coroner, in commenting on the evidence, condemned the reckless manner in which young men persisted in bathing when the sea was too rough. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned by the Jury.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 October 1871
ST. MARY CHURCH - Fatal Accident at St. Mary-Church. - A very sad occurrence took place at the Palk Arms Brewery, St. Mary-Church, about six o'clock on Saturday evening last. A brewer named ROBERT SYMONS, about forty years of age, in the employ of Mr Mortimore, was walking over a vat containing boiling liquor, when he unfortunately missed his footing and fell into the seething, scalding liquid. The poor man's injuries and sufferings must have been frightful; he was severely scalded about the lower parts of the body. Dr Finch was sent for and was promptly in attendance, but notwithstanding all that was done to alleviate the unfortunate man's intense pain he gradually sank and died on Sunday evening. What makes the occurrence all the more sad is that the deceased had only just recovered from a bad scald, and that he leaves a widow and one child unprovided for. At the Inquest, which was held at the Palk Arms, on Tuesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death"; and at the same time expressed their opinion that a rail should be placed around the vat, and a lighted lamp at its head. This Mr Mortimer, the proprietor, stated should be done. The Jury, of whom Mr Wm. Taylor, was the Foreman, agreed to give up their usual fees to the widow of the unfortunate deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 28 October 1871
TORQUAY - Death By Drowning. - On Thursday a little boy, named HENRY CHING, four years of age, the son of MR CHING, broker, of Market-street, fell into the water near the coal quay and was drowned. An Inquest was held on the body this (Friday) afternoon, at the Torbay Infirmary, but the Enquiry was adjourned until Monday morning next for further evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 24 February 1872
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Sailor. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Wednesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, the County Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Hammick, of Union-street, was Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances connected with the death of GEORGE POMEROY, whose body was found close to the coal quay on Monday evening last. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 March 1872
TORQUAY - Melancholy Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Torquay, on Saturday afternoon last, before Dr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY CHARLOTTE, the wife of MR JOHN ADAMS, boot and shoe maker, of Lower Union-street, who was found dead early the previous morning. Mr John Pook was the Foreman of the Jury. - MR ADAMS said he had been married twenty-four years, and had one son living. His wife's health was, to the best of his belief, usually good. She attended to the household duties, and made no complaint until Thursday, when she said she felt unwell. He last saw her alive between ten and eleven o'clock on the night preceding her death. She was then sitting in a chair in his son's bedroom, partially undressed. She was apparently very sleepy when he wished her good night. His wife had been to Torre during the evening, and on her return at eight o'clock she appeared perfectly well. As far as he knew, his wife was a most temperate woman. He never saw her take gin and water before going to bed. She sometimes slept with him and sometimes not. It was a quarter to six on Friday morning when he discovered his wife sitting in the chair, leaning on her arm, with her head hanging down. He received no answer on speaking to her, and when he put his hand to her heart and found she was dead, he gave information to his next door neighbour, Mr Turner, and sent for a doctor. - FRANCIS ADAMS, the son of the deceased, said after his mother came back from Torre they shut the shop together. He went to bed the same time as his mother, who sat down in the chair. She did not complain of being unwell, nor did she appear so. After undressing he went into his father's room and slept with him. He was awoke early the following morning by his father, who told him he thought his mother was dead or dying. He had not heard any disagreement between them the previous evening. - Mr Geo. Turner, jeweller, of Lower Union-street, said the deceased came into his house between six and seven o'clock on Thursday evening. She seemed in her usual spirits, and said she was going to Torre to get some money. When he went into the house next morning, at MR ADAMS' request, he saw the deceased in a chair, with part of her dress undone, and her head lying downwards. Finding she was dead, he went for Dr Robinson. He had never heard the deceased and her husband quarrel, nor had he on any occasion heard her complain of any ill-treatment by her husband. - Dr Robinson said when he saw the deceased her head was resting on her shoulder, with the palms of her hands outwards. She must have been dead five or six hours. She appeared to have vomited slightly over her dress, apparently being unable to move. The vomit consisted of food partially digested, and there was no blood mixed with it. He had professionally attended the deceased during the last four or five years, and he had no reason to think she was addicted to drink. In the post-mortem examination he subsequently made he was assisted by Mr P. Q. Karkeek. They found no bruise or abrasion of the body, which was well nourished; and in his opinion serous apoplexy was the cause of death. A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 June 1872
TORQUAY - Melancholy Suicide Of A Woman. - For some time past ELIZABETH MILSON, fifty-two years of age, the wife of a smith in the employ of Messrs. Stark & Co., has been suffering from despondency, and on Wednesday she complained of pains in the head and sought medical aid. She was last seen alive at her house in Melville-street about nine o'clock on Wednesday evening by a next-door neighbour. The next morning her dead body was discovered by a lady residing in Scarborough Terrace lying just beyond the slip at Livermead, partially covered with sand. The face was swollen and disfigured; her bonnet was on, but her cloak was found about sixty yards off. The lady at once informed Andrew Berryman, the young man in charge of the Torre Abbey turnpike-gate, of what she had seen; and he promptly caused the information to be extended to P.C. Hurson, who happened to be on the Torbay-road at the time. He soon procured a conveyance, and took the body to the Infirmary, where an Inquest has been held on it this (Friday) afternoon by Mr H. Michelmore, the County Coroner. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was the result of the Inquiry. The poor woman was much esteemed by her friends and neighbours, and much commiseration is felt at her sad end. She leaves one child, a daughter, about sixteen years of age.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 March 1873
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, by Mr Michelmore, Coroner, at the residence of MR SUPT. STODDART, on the body of his little boy, six years of age, whose night-dress caught on fire whilst he was in bed on the 56th of February. Notwithstanding the prompt attendance of Dr Huxley, and his subsequent attention to the little sufferer, he gradually succumbed to his injuries, and died on Wednesday week. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned; and the Jury, through Sergeant Board, gave their fees to the Infirmary. The funeral of the deceased took place at the cemetery on Tuesday, when the members of the police force attended. Sergt. Board and P.C.'s Hurson, Grills, and Charley acted as bearers; and Sergt. Ockford and 20 Constables formed an escort in front.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 12 April 1873
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident to A Quarryman At Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, on Saturday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM LEWIS, a quarryman, 69 years of age, who was accidentally killed whilst at work at the Wall's Hill Quarry, on Friday afternoon. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Wm. Drake, of Ellacombe, had been engaged in quarry work for forty years. John Hutchings, a quarryman, of Babbicombe, who was at work with the deceased at the time of the accident, about three o'clock in the afternoon, said they were engaged in blasting rock, and had charged two holes with powder. The witness fired the fuse, but before he lighted it the deceased had gone off at a distance of fifty yards in the open air, there being no covered shelter. They were both standing near each other at the same place before the first charge went off. When it did, a large stone came flying in the direction of the deceased; and, although his companion pulled him by the arm, he failed to get out of its way quick enough, and it struck him in the middle of the back and knocked him down. The stone was a half hundred weight or more, and came in a sideway direction. The deceased was knocked into a pit of water close by, and when his fellow workman picked him up he was almost speechless. He was at once laid on sacks in the bottom of a cart, and taken to the Torbay Infirmary, but he was dead by the time he arrived at the institution. In reply to the Coroner, Hutchings said the charge of powder in the hole, which was uncovered, was fifteen inches deep, at a depth of three feet, and about an inch and a half in diameter. Fifteen inches of powder was none too much, in fact was scarcely enough, to lift the piece of rock three feet deep. The cause of the stone coming in the direction of the deceased was that a piece of rock about a foot in depth from the top was blown off. Instead of stepping sideways to get out of the way, the deceased attempted to run away in a straight direction, and so the stone struck him in the back and knocked him forward. The Coroner remarked that the occurrence was purely accidental, although he thought fifty yards was hardly a sufficient distance for quarrymen to retire whilst the fuses were being fired without any covering on the holes charged with powder. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned; and the Jury, of whom Mr Pepprell was the Foreman, gave their fees through Sergeant board to the widow.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 19 April 1873
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - On Monday evening several lads were at play in the Avenues, and one of them, named HARRY MARTIN, ten years of age, had climbed up a tree. He was suddenly surprised by one of the other boys calling out that a policeman was coming, and in his hurry to descend he fell from one of the braches to the ground. He received such injuries to his head that he died during the night at the Torbay Infirmary, where he was removed. The deceased was the son of SAMUEL MARTIN, of America, and formerly a gardener in the employ of Dr Gillow, of Stapleton. A letter from MARTIN, speaking of the good field of labour in Canada recently appeared in our columns. An Inquest was held on the body at the Infirmary, on Tuesday evening, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The Jury, through Sergeant Ockford, handed their fees to the Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 27 September 1873
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest. Fatal Accident At Hope's Nose. - An inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Tuesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT PIM, a fisherman, who was brought into the institution about six weeks since suffering from injuries sustained by an accident, and who died on Monday morning. Mr Pook was the Foreman of the Jury. The following evidence was adduced: RICHARD PIM, a fisherman, living in Pimlico, said the deceased was his father, and resided opposite him. He was 70 years of age, and died on the 22nd September from injuries sustained in falling over a cliff at Hope's Nose. Witness spoke to him at nine o'clock the same morning, whilst he was looking out for mackerel, but he did not again see him until two days after the accident, when he was insensible. he had frequently seen him since, and in reply to a question the deceased once said he slipped as he was going down the pathway. Thomas Harvey, a fisherman, of Pimlico, said he was fishing off Hope's Nose on the day in question, when he saw the deceased coming down by the lower path which led from his hut to the beach. He was about 150 yards from the spot at the time, but he saw the deceased slip over the edge of a cliff where two paths meet, roll a little way down on to a grass plot, and then fall nearly fifty feet further to the bottom. Witness gave the alarm, and immediately ran to the deceased's assistance, with other fishermen. He found that he was insensible, and apparently "dead to the world;" and he was at once put into a boat and brought to Torquay. Sergeant Ockford said he saw the deceased brought in, and the men pulled as if for their life. Mr William Powell, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said the deceased was brought there on the 8th August, and had continued under his care until the previous day, when he died. He was insensible when brought in. On examining him he found he was suffering from fractured ribs on the left side and a lacerated wound on the head. In all probability he had also sustained internal injuries; and from the first he never had any hope of his recovery. A fisherman, named John Harrington, one of the crew that pulled in the boat, and who had been summoned to attend as a witness, did not appear, but the Coroner said he would not on this occasion carry out the penalty of the law against him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At The Old Woods. - At the same time and place a second Inquest was held respecting a fatal accident that had happened the same evening. Several of the Jurymen complained of the lateness of the hour in holding the Inquests. They thought it most unreasonable and unjust to be called away from their homes at so late an hour - nine o'clock for the first Inquest and ten o'clock for the second. The Coroner said he was sorry to hear the remarks made, because he did not think it reasonable to call them together a second time the following morning. The remarks were uncalled for, and but for the special occasion he would not allow them to have been made. He did not expect such observations, and he hoped he should hear no more of them. The Inquest was then proceeded with. - The name of the deceased was WILLIAM CATER, a labourer in the employ of Messrs. Webber and Stedham, brickmakers and cement manufacturers, of Market Street, Torquay. He was at work digging clay on the Old Woods Brick Works on the Newton Road, during Tuesday. He was undermining a bank of clay about nine or ten feet high, and when Mr Webber spoke to him about four o'clock in the afternoon he saw no signs of cracks. Robert Melhuish, tilemaker, and foreman at the works, said he saw the deceased about an hour before his death, and also shortly after the clay had fallen on him, before he had ceased moaning. He immediately took a shovel and removed about nine inches of clay from the face of the deceased. From the position in which he was lying, witness considered the deceased was not at work when the clay fell on him. He breathed three or four times when the clay was removed from his face, but by the time his whole body was taken out the man was dead. In reply to the Coroner, witness said the only reason he could give for the fall of the clay was that the recent wet weather might have caused the clay to fall more quickly than at other times. CATER had recently been home ill, and had only resumed work on the previous Thursday. Frederick Llewellyn Bowerman, a brickmaker, also employed at the works, said it would perhaps be rather safer, but propping was not required in the process of undermining. It was usual for a man to watch the tope, but deceased did not call any one to watch during the afternoon. He should think half-a-dozen tons of clay altogether fell on the deceased. He thought the fall was caused by a gutter running at the back of the bank, causing it to be moist. In reply to the Coroner, Sergt. Ockford said the deceased was 33 years old, and buried his only child a few weeks since. The Coroner remarked that undermining clay seemed to be a dangerous process, and one in which they might possibly think precautions might be taken in carrying it out. It was for the Jury to say whether the slip was caused accidentally, or whether precautions might not have been taken by propping, or to have a man or boy to watch. They might recommend this precaution, although the want of it was not criminal in this case, because the men could always have someone to watch for the asking. Still they might be doing a kind act to the rest of the workmen there, and at other works in the neighbourhood, by making such a recommendation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner impressed on the Foreman the importance of acquainting every workman in future of the nature of the clay he has to dig. In the first case the Jurymen's fees were given to the Infirmary, and in the second they were given to the widow, through Sergt. Ockford.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 December 1873
TORQUAY - Fatal Cab Accident. - An Inquest was held at Mr D. Gibbons' Commercial Hotel, Torwood-street, on Monday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JANE GEORGE, a widow, 76 years of age, who died the previous Saturday from injuries received from being knocked down in the street a few weeks ago. Mr Tripe was the Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness was John Boles, who said he saw the horse and cab which knocked down the deceased on the 22nd November. The horse was coming along at a rate of about five or six miles an hour. - Ann Berry, a widow, residing at 2, Park Lane, said the deceased, who lived at her house, was brought home on the evening in question, having sustained injuries in her right arm and side, from which she died on Saturday morning. - Dr Nind said he was called to see the deceased about quarter past six on the evening named. He found her in bed, suffering from a contusion of the right elbow, a fracture of the neck of the thigh bone on the same side, and a shock to the nervous system. He was informed she had been knocked down by a cab, but he did not enquire from the deceased how the occurrence happened. The cause of her death was exhaustion, principally from the shock to the system. - George German, boots at the Royal Hotel, said he saw the deceased on the ground outside the hotel. The horse and cab were stopped, and the driver was assisting to help the old lady up. It was a very dark night, though the lamps were lit. - Peter Payne, the driver, after receiving the usual caution from the Coroner, expressed his wish to tell the truth about the occurrence. He said he was in the employ of Mr Hodge, of Ilsham Cottages. On the evening in question he was trotting along slowly from Bater's shop, in Victoria Parade, in the direction of Torwood-street. Just as he got outside the hotel the horse's head came in contact with the deceased, who was crossing the road. It was very dark, and he did not see her before. He called to her the moment he did see her, and he pulled up so quickly that only the horse's nose touched her and knocked her over. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said there was only one witness who could carry the evidence any further, and that was the boots at the Royal Hotel, who saw the occurrence. He was too ill to attend, but he was not prepared to lay blame on anyone. Payne, the driver, had given his evidence fairly enough, and he saw no necessity for carrying the Enquiry further, though the Jury could obtain additional evidence if they wished. It was rather a pity that neither Ann Berry nor Dr Nind enquired of the deceased and obtained from her an account of how the occurrence happened. If the Jury were of opinion that the driver could not have helped knocking the deceased down they would return a verdict of accidental death. The Foreman said he thought the occurrence was undoubtedly the result of an accident, but he thought the coroner should caution the cabman. What was the prescribed rate of driving - six miles an hour? - The Coroner: Is there no bye-law in Torquay to that effect? - Sergeant board said there was not. The Foreman said he did not think any blame was to be attributed to the driver, a remark in which the remainder of the Jury concurred. A verdict of Accidental Death was therefore returned. The Coroner then, at the wish of the Jury, called in Payne, the driver, informing him that he was not to blame in this case, yet he desired to caution him and through him the other cab-drivers in the town that it behoved them to be more careful. He had heard that there had been several accidents and narrow escapes in Torquay lately in consequence of furious driving, and he expressed a hope that this would prove a general caution to all. The Jury gave their fees, and Mr Gibbons also gave the fee for the use of the room, through Sergeant Board, to the daughter of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 27 December 1873
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest At The Town Hall. The Necessity For Holding Inquests. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Torquay, on Saturday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of JOHN HILL, a livery-stable keeper, late in the employ of Messrs. Holman and Son, carriage proprietors, of Cobourg Place, Rock Road. The deceased, who was sixty-three years of age, and resided in Melville Street, died on Thursday night from injuries received on the previous Tuesday afternoon. Mr John Pook was the Foreman of the Jury. The first duty of the Jury was to go and view the body, and on their return, Mr W. Croft, as a Juryman, asked the Coroner, whether there was any necessity for holding this Inquest, after the certificate of death which had been given by Dr Colt. - The Coroner: The necessity for the Inquest has been shewn by your being summoned here this evening. Had there been no necessity for the Inquest I should not have issued a warrant for it. Mr Croft said of course he could not ask where that warrant was derived from. - The Coroner: (sternly) The warrant, Sir, was derived from my hand. This was all that was then said on the subject, and Mr Croft resumed his seat. - William Henry Leader, a blacksmith, of Melville Street, was the first witness called. He said he had known the deceased for many years, and as Mr Holman's coach-house door was opposite his shop he saw him go out and return with the shillabeer, or modern hearse, on Tuesday afternoon. Whilst still on the box, the deceased asked witness to shut the coach-house door, and he did so. Knowing that one of the two horses attached to the vehicle was young and spirited, witness proffered his assistance further, but the deceased said he could do without it, and witness returned to his shop. The deceased then got off the box and commenced taking off the harness and the next thing that attracted the witness's attention was a rumbling noise and a cry. On turning round he saw the vehicle going sharply around the corner, and one of the wheels going over the body of the deceased, who was on his face and hands. He ran to him as fast as he could, and he got up nimbly for a man of his age. The horses had got loose and gone down over the hill, and witness went after them to prevent further accident. A man named Hyne had hold of one, and the other, which had broken away from the remaining trace, had run away down the hill through Coburg Place on to Mr Dendy's front door. The deceased helped the vehicle back, and returned with Mr Holman and himself to the stable. The deceased's mouth was bleeding, but he did not complain, and on witness saying he must have been shaken he said he should soon be better again. Witness saw him the next day, when he complained of being sore and stiff, but hoped it would pass off again. That was all that passed, and he never saw the poor old man after. The young horse he had mentioned was fresh and rather skittish, but not inclined to be vicious. In reply to several questions from the Jury, the witness said he was positive that the wheel passed over the body of the deceased. He saw marks of dirt on his clothes, but whether they were produced from the fall or by the wheel he could not say. - James Western, a youth sixteen years of age, apprentice to Mr Leader, said on the afternoon in question he saw the deceased get off the box and undo the reins, and he then went on with his work. Hearing a "rumpus," he turned round and saw the deceased going after the two horses, which had broken loose. He could not catch hold of the other he fell and the front and hind wheel of the vehicle passed over him as it went down over the hill. The deceased got up as soon as the wheels had gone over him. - Honor Trace, wife of John Trace, yachtsman, living in Melville-street, said she saw the deceased drive the shillabeer back. She saw him get off the box, and whilst he was undoing the traces, his shoulder seemed to touch the rump of one of the horses, which started round. As he caught the other hold by the bridle he lost his legs and fell, and the left hind wheel of the vehicle went over his should towards the hip. - Thomas Archer Colt, M.D., residing at Maidencombe, said he saw the deceased on Thursday afternoon, having been requested to visit him. He enquired of the deceased the nature of the accident, and he said he was unharnessing a young horse that was rather fresh on Tuesday afternoon when the both horses made a bolt and flung him violently on the ground, and that some of his neighbours told him the hearse had gone over him, but he was not aware himself whether it had or not. Witness examined him, and found a considerable bruise on the inner side of the left leg and eye. He was also exceedingly tender about his liver and stomach, and had been and was then vomiting. Deceased also complained so much of pains in his head that he concluded, from the flashing of his eyes and dilation of the pupils, that he was suffering from compression of the brain. He told the relatives it was an exceedingly critical case, from the age of the deceased, and said he would see him again the next day. He died, however, the same night. In the opinion of the witness, the cause of death was the shock to the system and compression of the brain, which might unquestionably have been caused by the body being thrown violently to the ground, just as in the case of a railway accident. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Colt said he gave Mr Waymouth the certificate of death conditionally, on his informing him that the deceased was ill three days, and that the occurrence was not attributable to any wilful violence. The Coroner said then it was his duty to caution Dr Colt that when he gave the certificate to Mr Waymouth he had no right to do so. It was not for Mr Waymouth or the doctor to say how this occurrence happened. It was for the Jury alone to say whether the shock to the system was caused by an accident or by any other means. Dr Colt admitted this was so, and said he would take care he would not give a certificate under similar circumstances in future. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said he did not think they would have any difficulty in coming to a verdict in this case. The witnesses called had proved that the deceased was thrown to the ground by some means in connection either with himself or with the two horses. If they were satisfied that the horses were safe, they would say at once that it was by accident, and not wilfully, that the occurrence happened. Compression of the brain must be caused by something beyond natural causes, and in this case there was the shock to the system to account for it. Whether this shock was caused by the wheel passing over the body or by the fall would be immaterial, provided death was caused by one or the other, and that either was an accident. Before, however, leaving the case to the decision of the Jury, he wished to answer more clearly and fully the question which one of their number put to him at the opening of the enquiry. From the information he received he had not the slightest doubt that an Inquest was necessary, and this had been fully borne out by the evidence. The certificate given by Dr Colt ought not to have been given, for if it had been taken to a registrar he could not have ordered the burial on that alone. The Jury were called together, not to enquire whether this was a natural death, but, knowing possibly that death resulted from the shock to the system, they had to decide what caused it, and whether it was accidental or otherwise. It was not for Mr Waymouth to tell the doctor that there was no one near the deceased at the time of the occurrence, or that no one was to blame in the matter; that was a question for the Jury, and the Jury alone. It was not even for him (the Coroner) to say such a thing; in any case of death by violence an Inquest must be held. A man might be thrown from his horse and have his leg broken, and might not die for a week afterwards, and in such a case persons had frequently enquired as to the necessity for holding an Inquest. But the doctor could not say how the leg was broken, or the shock caused; he could only say that the deceased died from the shock to the system. That, therefore, was the necessity for holding an Inquest in such cases. He was always loath to hold an Inquest where he thought he could avoid it, and the number of recent sudden deaths in Torquay, which he had not caused to be enquired into except by himself with the police, testified to this. Whenever he could avoid holding an Inquest he did so, but in such a case as the present he was bound, as Coroner, to hold an Inquiry, and he could not prevent it. With these few remarks, he left it in their hands to say whether the deceased's death was the result of an accident or not. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The fees were given, through Sergeant Ockford, to the widow of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 24 January 1874
BISHOPSTEIGNTON - Sad Occurrence. - A painful occurrence has taken place at Bishopsteignton. A young woman named ANN PETHERICK, 27 years of age, a lady's maid to Mrs Huddlestone, at The Lodge, returned from London, where she had been with her mistress, on Monday, the 5th inst., and on the following Tuesday she was taken ill. She went to bed, and it was supposed that she had taken cold whilst on her journey down. She refused to see a doctor, saying that "it was very cruel of them to bring a doctor when she had no wish to see one." On the Wednesday and Thursday there were no signs of her getting better, and she was again advised to have medical advice, but she refused, stating that she would soon recover. On Saturday last Mrs Gater, wife of the gardener at The Lodge, on going to a cupboard in the young woman's room, found the dead body of a male child wrapped up in a shawl. A doctor was sent for, and PETHERICK was accused of being the mother. She at first denied it, but on Sunday evening, confessed to Mrs Huddlestone that she had given birth to the child. On Monday Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest, at which Mr Edwards, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that the child was fully developed, but he could not say whether it had had an independent existence, and an Open Verdict was returned. The matter has had a still more tragical termination than is usual in such cases, for from the time the discovery was made the unfortunate mother sank gradually, and on Tuesday she died.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 14 February 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - An inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, on Thursday afternoon, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BURNETT, a marine store dealer, who resided at Brunswick Square, Torre, and who was a well-known character in the town and neighbourhood. From the evidence adduced, it appears that on the evening of Wednesday week the deceased was walking along the road near Mr Knight's, baker, Torre, when, in getting out of the way of a carriage which was passing, he was by some means knocked down. One of Mr Farrant's waggons, loaded with goods, was coming from Torre Station at the time, and the wheel passed over his leg, breaking it at the ankle joint. He was immediately picked up by the driver, Richard Crute, and a man named Tall, and placed in a cab and taken to the Infirmary, where he was promptly attended by Dr Powell. During the evening a consultation was held by Messrs. J. Pollard, W. Pollard, J. Huxley, and Dr Powell, at which it was decided to amputate the foot above the ankle joint, the operation being performed by Mr Huxley, assisted by Dr Powell. The old man, who was in his sixty-seventh year, never rallied, and expired about midnight on Tuesday. The Jury, of which Mr J. Pook was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating the driver from all blame. The Jury fees were given, through Sergt. Ockford, to the Infirmary.

TORQUAY - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Monday evening, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of LOUISA ROW, belonging to Paignton. On Tuesday, January 27th, it is presumed she was taking a kettle of water off the fire when her dress caught. Her screams brought to her assistance two women named Pope and Furze, who extinguished the flames, but the girl was so badly burnt as to necessitate her removal to the Infirmary, where she died on Saturday last. Dr Powell, who attended the deceased, stated it as his opinion that she died from burning, and shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and through Sergeant Ockford gave their fees to the father, whose wife died only about a month since.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 February 1874
TORQUAY - Death Through Sucking Matches. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Torquay, on Monday evening, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of EMILY ZABLE, aged two years and three months, who lived with her parents at 22 Melville Street. The mother of the deceased girl, SARAH JANE ZABLE, stated that she was a married woman, that her husband was called FRANK ZABLE, and that they lived at 22 Melville Street. The deceased was their daughter, and was two years old last November. About half-past ten on Saturday morning she went upstairs to scrub the bedroom, leaving the deceased at the front door at play. About eleven o'clock, when she came down again, she found the deceased in the living-room with a lucifer match in her hand, going to put it in her mouth. The witness took the match away, and washed her mouth out, and the child went away to play again. Witness also saw some matches under the grate. The child ate a good dinner about half-past twelve, but about four o'clock she was a little sick. Witness then took her to Mr Glynn, chemist, of Abbey Road. She told him that about eleven o'clock the deceased had sucked some matches, and asked him if he could give her something for the child. Mr Glynn gave her some castor oil; he did not tell her to do anything to the deceased, but said if the child got worse she was to take it to a medical man. Witness then took the child home and gave it the castor oil, and about three quarters of an hour afterwards she vomited. The deceased slept during the night and about one o'clock on Sunday morning she woke up, had some tea and biscuit, played with her little sister and went off to sleep again. She again woke up about five o'clock, and called for her father, who gave her some warm tea. Witness went downstairs for Mrs Knapman (who lives in the same house), who came up with her at once. Her husband went for Dr Powell, at the Infirmary, but returned without him. She then went up with her husband for Dr Dalby, who lives in the Warren Road, and when they returned with him the child was lying where she left her, dead. FRANK ZABLE stated he was the husband of the last witness and a lamp-lighter in the employ of the Local Board. On Sunday morning, between one and two o'clock, he left his house to make out the lamps. The deceased slept in a bed with her sister in the same room as his wife. He subsequently went for Dr Powell, at the Infirmary, as soon as he saw there was a change. When he arrived there a woman asked him through the door what he wanted, and when he had told her a man came out. Witness told him that there was a little girl dying at 22 Melville Street; he also said she had been sucking matches on Saturday. The man asked him whether he had a ticket and he replied no. The man then said that he should go and get a medical man. Witness came home, and went with his wife for Dr Dalby, who came back with them. Witness stated that his wages were 16s. per week, and that he had a wife and three children to maintain. Dr Powell was next called, and stated that he was the house surgeon at the Infirmary. Between five and six o'clock on Sunday morning he received a message from the dispenser that a child called ZABLE, living in Melville Street, who had been sucking matches the day before, was dying. He sent a message to say that if they wanted the child attended at the house, they must send for a medical man, the rule of the Infirmary being that all cases of accident and emergency should be treated at the institution. Mr William Bennett Dalby, M.D., living at Warwick House, Warren Road, said about half-past five on Sunday morning he was called and told by MRS ZABLE that her child had been sucking matches on Saturday. The deceased was dead, however, before he arrived. Mr Dalby, in answer to the Coroner, said he could not say that if the child had been taken to a surgeon in the first instance its life could have been saved. A grain of phosphorous was sufficient to destroy life, and it was probable that the child had taken that if not more. The child was delicate, and it was a deadly poison. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Poison," and through Sergt. Ockford gave their fees to the parents.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 28 February 1874
PAIGNTON - Fatal Accident To An Actor. - An Inquest was held at the Pier Inn, Paignton, on Wednesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS WALTER WATTS, an actor at the Paignton Bijon Theatre, and whose stage name was FRANK CLIFFORD. The evidence adduced shewed that the deceased and his wife had been lodging at a house near the pier, kept by Mrs Mary Dowell, during the past three weeks. They came in about one o'clock on Tuesday morning, after drinking, although the deceased was said by the manager to have been sober when he left the theatre on Monday night, shortly after eleven. His wife, however, had been drinking at the Commercial Inn during the night, and was said by the landlord to be drunk. Angry words passed between the two on their arrival at their lodgings, and the deceased went out once, but returned again. The quarrel was again renewed, but although the deceased's wife spoke angrily he spoke in a kind tone. She was heard to ask him to go downstairs and get the matches, and as he was going over the stairs he fell nearly from the top to the bottom. His wife and the landlady ran down at once, the former screaming dreadfully. They found the deceased quite unconscious, and he died within two hours and half-an-hour before Dr Pridham, who was sent for, arrived. The cause of death was fracture of the skull. The wife of the deceased was present at the Inquest, and seemed much affected. She was cautioned by the Coroner, but made no statement. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 14 March 1874
TORQUAY - The Fatal Canoe Accident At Anstis Cove. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST ALFRED CROWDY, the young gentleman who was drowned off Anstis Cove on the previous Thursday afternoon, and whose body was picked up on Wednesday morning off Hope's Nose. The Enquiry took place at Ilsham, Middle Warberry Road, the residence of the parents of the deceased Mr W. Hearder was the Foreman of the Jury. MR CROWDY, the father of the deceased, was the first witness. He briefly said that his was eighteen years of age, and was very fond of going on the water. - Henry Thomas, boatman at Anstis Cove, said he knew the deceased very well. He was frequently in the habit of going on the water with him; and last summer had often been out in a common canoe, one built by Salter, of Oxford. This was the first time, however, he had used it this season. On Tuesday the deceased was out with him all the afternoon, and he then engaged to go out in a sailing boat shooting on Thursday, should there be any wind. He came down about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon, but did not bring any gun with him, saying as there was no wind there was no chance of sailing. he then said as it was very smooth, there being scarcely a ripple on the water, he should prefer having the canoe. Witness tried to persuade him from it, saying it was early yet for canoeing, and that the water was cold. He had heard deceased say he couldn't swim, and that he intended to come with witness and learn in the summer. Deceased, however, would not be persuaded against going, and offered to help witness take the canoe down from where it had been stored during the winter. This was done in a few minutes, and witness pushed the canoe off with the deceased in it. There were a number of fishermen's boats out in the cove. Witness watched the deceased for the first half-hour, and saw that he handled the double paddle very cleverly. He saw him cruising about the cove, and had him under his notice within a minute of the canoe being capsized. His attention to it was called by a gentleman and another man; at this time the canoe was three quarters of a mile from him. He saw that all was not right, and he instantly ran to the water's edge, where his wife launched the boat with him and his man in it. Not more than seven minutes elapsed before he reached the canoe, which he found bottom up, with the footboard, sponge and deceased's cap floating alongside. He saw nothing of the deceased, and after the lapse of about two minutes, during which two other boats had arrived at the spot, he went ashore for the lines and creeps, with which he again put off instantly, these lines being always kept ready in case of accidents. He left a man in a boat in the event of the deceased rising to the surface, but he did not do so. They then grappled for the body until dark, but without success. About half-past ten on Wednesday morning they were out sweeping for the body, which was found about a mile off Hope's Nose, in ten fathoms of water. He had hold of one part of the line and his cousin the other, and on bringing the body up it was conveyed at once to the residence of the parents of the deceased. In reply to Jurymen, witness said where the deceased went down was seven fathoms of water, which was two deep for diving. This was the first accident of the kind he had ever had at Anstis Cove. He had six life-belts for any one to use who liked to use them, but young gentlemen did not think it plucky to wear them. A canoe when capsized and full of water would float and would keep anyone up, it being provided with air-tight compartments. The Coroner advised Thomas in future to refuse young gentlemen the loan of his canoes unless they could swim. Witness said he would do so, although he believed deceased would not have been drowned if he had not been suffering from heart disease. MR CROWDY said he was not aware his son had ever been out in a canoe before: had he known it, he should certainly not have permitted it. - Robert Weeks, a painter, of Plainmoor, St. Mary-Church, said he was standing on Stoodleigh Hill on Thursday afternoon, overlooking Anstis Cove. He saw the canoe pushed off with deceased in it, and he afterwards noticed him paddling about near the rocks. He was looking through a glass, and saw him paddle from Blackhead Point, to the right of Anstis cove, to a black object which he struck several times with his paddle, and he went round it three times to get closer to it. Then he appeared to lean on one side with one hand as if to pick the object up, but instead of that he fell over on it, the canoe upsetting. He first heard the deceased call out for Thomas, and saw him throw out his arm as if to catch hold of the keel of the canoe, but he missed it. He then went under water, witness hearing him call out "Hoy." Witness halloaed to some persons on the beach and they called to Thomas, who was on the White Beach at the time. He quickly went from one beach to the other, and got out to the canoe in about five minutes. He did not know what the black object deceased struck was, but he was told afterwards that it was a kettle floating. - George Thomas, a boatman, who also went out to the canoe, said he noticed a black tin can floating about 100 yards from the canoe. This can, which would hold about half a pint, he struck with his oar, and it filled and sank. The Coroner remarked that there was no object in pursuing the Enquiry as to what this object was. The evidence shewed that the deceased was out by himself, that he was able to manage a canoe perfectly well, and that, the weather being calm, Thomas did not consider there was any danger in letting him go. It was also shewn that the canoe was accidentally upset in his endeavour to reach over to this object, whatever it was. It seemed to be a fact that the unfortunate young man had been suffering from heart disease, and very possibly and very probably, when he got into the water, that would bring on an attack of the complaint. He might have been seized with a spasm, and that might have been the reason of his not making an effort to save himself, and therefore the immediate cause of death in that way. The questions for the Jury to decide, in order to return a verdict of accidental death, were whether they thought the canoe was accidentally upset and whether they were satisfied it was the deceased's own act in going out in it on the day in question. It would be much better, bearing this sad occurrence in mind, that in future Thomas should refuse to let young gentlemen have canoes who could not swim. A Juryman asked if there was no way of compelling persons unable to swim to take life-belts with them on going on the water? The Coroner said there was none, except a person's own common sense. There was no law on the subject. A boatman was placed in a rather awkward position under the circumstances. If he said to a young gentleman, "You shan't go out because you can't swim," he would go elsewhere with his custom. They could not throw any blame on a boatman if, after he had warned a young gentleman, and tried to persuade him against going, he still went out in a canoe. In reply to the Foreman, MR CROWDY said he did not attach any blame to Thomas. Several Jurymen expressed their opinion that there ought to be a law of some kind providing that no light boats - especially canoes, being so risky and dangerous - should be lent to young persons unable to swim. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and through Sergt. Board gave their fees to the Torbay Infirmary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 May 1874
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held in the Board-room of the Newton Abbot Union on Friday, before Dr Gaye, on the body of WILLIAM STOCKMAN, about forty years of age, who was accidentally killed the previous day by a quantity of earth falling on him whilst at work in constructing the new line of railway from Newton to Torquay. The deceased, who was a single man, and lived at St. Mary-Church, was a brother-in-law to Charles John Blank, a cabman, of this town, by whom he was identified. It appeared from the evidence that the poor fellow was engaged with another man in filling a waggon, when suddenly one of the others digging at the cutting saw a quantity of dirt falling. He gave the alarm, and all three ran away, but the deceased, in an attempt to recover his shovel, which he had left behind, was caught by a large lump of earth in his heels. This threw him down, and he got embedded in the earth up to his chest. The weight of the earth was two tons, and the deceased received such severe injuries that death resulted in an hour afterwards. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 May 1874
Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Suicide Of A Torquay Tradesman. - A very painful feeling was created throughout the town during Sunday on the intelligence becoming known that MR EDWIN GREENSLADE BRADFORD, jeweller, of the Strand, had committed suicide by cutting his throat with a bread knife late the previous night or early the same morning. The Inquest was held at the residence of the deceased on Monday afternoon, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner. The Jury composed as follows:- Mr H. Crockwell (Foreman), and Messrs. J. C. Wreyford, G. Turner, J. Fogan, Jas. Blackmore, J. Hammick, R. Bartlett, P. Michelmore, C. Narracott. G. Clow, W. D. Marler, W. Watson, jun., and Capt. Graham. The Jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was adduced. - Jane Maria Redaway, a domestic servant, said she lived with the deceased, and about quarter to seven on Sunday morning she was coming towards the landing, and had gone up three stairs, when she saw the body of her master lying along the landing covered in blood. She immediately went back again, and told MISS BRADFORD. After the body was removed, she found the knife with which the deceased had cut his throat. It was a white-handled bread knife, and she saw it on the table the previous night at supper time. She removed the supper things at half-past six on Sunday morning, and when she did so the knife was not there. It was almost directly afterwards that she approached the landing and discovered the body of the deceased. She had been in his service seven weeks, but during that time she had not noticed anything peculiar about him. He went to bed about nine o'clock on Saturday night, and after that she saw him; she asked him if he was comfortable and if the fire was all right, and he said it was. His brother, MR DENIS BRADFORD, was with him at the time, and stopped talking to him until ten. On the previous Tuesday he said something to one of his daughters which led them to think he was out of his mind, and they gave him a sleeping draught to pass it off. She had heard MISS BRADFORD say she heard some one go downstairs between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night, and she now thought it must have been her father. - MR DENIS JOHN BRADFORD, jeweller, of Victoria Parade, said he was the brother of the deceased, who was 57 years of age. He had been in the habit of frequently visiting the deceased since his wife's death in September last, and there could be no doubt he had much altered since then. He (witness) came up to his house about nine o'clock on Saturday night, and then found him in bed. He had been suffering for several months past from a pain in his throat, and during their conversation he said that the pain was going from his throat to his head. He said nothing, however, which led him to think he was premeditating destruction. He left him within a few minutes of ten o'clock still in bed. He never complained of anyone ill-treating him, or of his being in difficulties with regard to money matters. He had, however, often since his wife's death, said he heard a voice speaking to him and saying, "What are you doing here? one half of you is buried in the grave." During his wife's life she and the deceased lived on the most affectionate terms. (MR BRADFORD gave his evidence under the influence of much emotion.) - Dr Charles Radclyffe Hall said he had known the deceased for upwards of twenty years, and during the last year and a half he had been in occasional attendance upon him. He had been suffering from general feebleness of health and relaxed throat. He had had impressions that the sensation to his ears and nostrils in consequence would lead to something serious, but he told him that was a mistake. He had always been depressed about his health, and since his wife's death he had been much more depressed. He had just recovered from a slight attack of pleurisy, and he advised him that he would soon get well if he could get a change of scene. He was only waiting for the west winds to pass away, when he was to go away for a time to renovate his health. On the previous Tuesday witness called, and MISS BRADFORD told him that her father, who was out at the time, had not slept for ten nights. He left a prescription for a sleeping draught, which was given the deceased, and the draught was repeated every night. The deceased appeared refreshed in consequence, and when witness saw him on Saturday he was particularly bright and cheerful. He told him then that there was nothing the matter with him which a change would not remedy. The last time he saw him was on Saturday evening. He (witness) was riding on horseback, and as he passed deceased, who was walking in the Torbay Road, he nodded to witness in an unusually cheerful manner for him. MISS BRADFORD had mentioned to him that her father said the sleeping draught benefitted him, and made her promise that, if he went out of his mind, she would not have him sent to an asylum. - Mr Wm. Pollard, surgeon, said he was called at half-past seven on Sunday morning, to come to the house of the deceased at once. On arriving he was told by MISS BRADFORD that her father had killed himself. He found him lying on his back on the landing on the first flight of stairs. He examined him, and found he was dead, with his throat cut. The knife was lying close by his right hand, as if it had just been dropped. The wound in the throat was just such as that which a man would inflict on himself. He attended deceased previous to his wife's death, but beyond holding exaggerated ideas of the complaint in his throat he had not noticed anything peculiar about him. There was an immense gash in the throat. The body was quite cold, and the deceased must have been dead many hours. The deed was no doubt committed between eleven and twelve the previous night. The deceased was in his shirt and stockings. He knew that his father was once placed under restraint for insanity, and that he died in a lunatic asylum. - The Coroner said he had called before the Jury what he hoped they would consider sufficient evidence to prove that the deceased was not in a right state of mind at the time the deed was committed. He wished to spare the members of the family as much as possible and unless the Jury wished, he did not propose to call any more of them. The Jury concurred in these remarks, and immediately returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity. The fees were given, through Sergt. Ockford, to the Torbay Infirmary. The funeral took place on Wednesday morning in the Torquay Cemetery. Mr H. Crockwell was the undertaker.

TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Ellacombe. - An Inquest was held at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, on Wednesday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST MARK STIDWORTHY, a little boy, a year and ten months old, who was run over by a water cart opposite Ellacombe Terrace the previous day. An absent Juryman was about to be find for non-attendance, but he put in an appearance directly after the Jury had been sworn, and Sergt. Board having stated that it was the first time he had known the Juryman to be late, and that he had always found him very willing to attend, the Coroner stated that he would pass it over this time. - The first witness called was the father of the deceased, JOHN RICHARD STIDWORTHY, who stated that he was a shoemaker, and resided at 15, Ellacombe Terrace. The deceased child was his; he was called ERNEST MARK STIDWORTHY, and was one year and ten months old. The deceased was quite well when witness left home in the morning, and was left in charge of its mother. He was not present when the accident occurred, but saw the deceased about half-past eleven, lying on the table injured. The child died about quarter-past one in the afternoon; Mr Gill was not present at its death. The deceased was not very strong on his legs. - Mr Stanley Augustine Gill stated that he was a surgeon practising in Torquay. He was coming up Ellacombe when the accident happened, and as far as he recollected it was about quarter-past eleven. He saw the water cart previous to its running over the deceased. Witness hearing some one scream, looked up and saw a dark object on the ground, and the wheel of the cart pass over it: the cart was about 30 yards ahead of him. On running up he had the child taken into a neighbour's house, and from there into the father's, where it was placed on a table on pillows. he had the clothes taken off, and on examining the deceased he found a slight laceration on the right and back part of the head, a severe bruise on the upper part of the thorax, and a fracture of the ribs on the upper part of the chest. On the right arm there was a slight laceration of the skin just above the elbow joint. His impression, from the position of the bruises, was that the wheel passed over deceased's throat and chest in a slanting direction. The child was insensible when he picked it up, and he had no hopes of saving its life. Witness gave it a quarter pint of brandy and water, and applied a fomentation to its chest. He was with the deceased over half an hour, and used all the remedies he could to save its life. - James Saunders, the driver of the cart which ran over the deceased, was next called, and having been cautioned by the Coroner, stated that he wished to tell all he knew about it. He said that he was a labourer, working for the Torquay Local Board. On Tuesday he was watering the streets, and on coming up by Ellacombe Terrace he noticed the deceased about three houses off before he came up to him, standing on the edge of the footpath. The water-cart was on the side of the road nearest the footpath. As he was going to put on the water pump, he saw the deceased fall out under the horse's legs and the wheel. Witness called out and pulled up the horse as fast as he could, but the wheel went right over the child. He was so frightened that he could not touch the deceased, but the child's grandfather, Hearing witness call to the horse to stop, ran out and picked the deceased up. There was no one present when the accident occurred. The cart was full of water at the time. Children were very plentiful in Torquay, and gave him a great deal of trouble. The Coroner stated that Saunders had given his evidence in a straightforward manner, and was, in his opinion, quite exempt from blame. He (the Coroner) nearly drove over three children as he was coming up to the Country House Inn, they having run right across his horse's head; in fact, had he been going down hill instead of up, he did not think he could have saved them from being run over. The Jury, of whom Mr John Riley was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The fees were given, through Sergeant Board, to the parents of the deceased child, the father of whom desires to thank the Jurymen for their kindness.

TEIGNMOUTH - Fatal Boat Accident At Teignmouth. The Result of "Larking." - On Sunday evening five lads belonging to Teignmouth proceeded in a boat for a row on the river. They had been out some little time, and when near Floor Point some of them began rocking the boat. By this means the boat was capsized, and the boys were thrown into the water. A boatman hearing their cries for help put out and succeeded in taking four out of the five on board, but the other, a boy named KEMBLE, had disappeared, and although a search was made his body was not then recovered. The rescued boys were at once removed, in an exhausted condition, to their homes, where one of them, named ALFRED FREDERICK HILTON, died soon afterwards from exhaustion consequent upon his immersion. The Inquest was held on Tuesday. The evidence of the other three boys who were in the boat, and who were saved by James Hook, the waterman, went to show that they all went to Coombe Cellars, where they had two quarts of beer and three pints of cider. On their return journey they changed oars near Mr Hill's house, at "Floor," Bishopsteignton. When changing one of them slipped, causing the boat to roll on its side. The whole of them rushed to the other side, upsetting the boat. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and complimented Hook on his courage and zeal in rescuing the boys. The Jury gave their fees to Hook and Mr Hill, to whose house the boys were taken after their rescue.

ST. MARY CHURCH. - Sudden Death At St. Mary Church. - About nine o'clock on Thursday night EDWARD HILLMAN, fifty-six years of age, who has recently been earning a livelihood as a newsman in Torquay, and who lived at Ellacombe, died suddenly on the road as he was entering St. Mary Church. The deceased had walked from Exmouth during the day, and it is supposed he died from exhaustion. An Inquest will be held on the body either this (Friday) evening or tomorrow morning.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 30 May 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Child. - An Inquest was held at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Swan Street, on Thursday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of EDWIN LETHBRIDGE, three years and a half old. The evidence shewed that on the afternoon of Tuesday week the deceased, whilst sitting on his mother's lap, was scalded in the lower part of the stomach by the upsetting of a teapot. The child was attended by Dr Huxley, and subsequently by Mr Nicholson, house surgeon of the Torbay Infirmary, but died from the injuries received on Wednesday last. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Brittan was the Foreman, returned a verdict of Accidental Death

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 11 July 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Castle Inn, on Thursday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM HARDING, late a pawnbroker, of Higher Union Street. It appears, from the evidence adduced, that the deceased, on Monday evening last, was riding with two friends on a waggonette belonging to Mr Robert Chambers to Torre Station to catch the 7.39 p.m. train. The driver got off from his seat when near Mr Oliver's, at Torre, to speak to Mr Chambers, and during his temporary absence the deceased, in attempting to get into the driver's seat, fell over on the lamp iron. He went on, however, to the station, but on arriving there he said he felt unwell. He was placed in a cab, and sent home, where he complained of excruciating pains in his stomach. Mr J. Lawton, surgeon, soon after arrived, but no external injury was visible. He had no doubt, however, that death was caused by internal injuries to the bowels. The deceased, who was 48 years of age, died early on Wednesday morning. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Carleton was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." With regard to the fees, it was proposed by Mr Collis that they should be handed over as usual, through Sergt. Ockford, to the Infirmary. Several of the Jurymen, however, considered that, as they were debarred from holding the Inquiry at the institution, the fees should be withheld. This was the opinion of the majority, and the fees were consequently withheld.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 1 August 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident Off The Old Pier. Inquest This Day: Searching Inquiry. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary this (Friday) morning, at nine o'clock, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of JOHN GOULD, a shoemaker, living at Ellacombe, who fell off the steamer Sensation at the Old Pier on Wednesday night. Mr Joseph Abbott was the Foreman of the Jury. - Mr A. Tucker, principal officer H. M. Customs, at Torquay, stated that he knew the deceased by sight, but not personally. The first time he saw him was on Wednesday night, on board the steamer Sensation, standing on the paddle-box. The steamer belongs to Teignmouth; she had been running hourly during the afternoon, and left Paignton with a good many passengers on board for the last time about ten minutes before nine, arriving at Torquay about quarter-past. The passengers were landed at the Old Pier-head; some of them went on shore before the deceased got on the paddle-box. Witness did not observe any one on the paddle-box, excepting the captain and mate, who were conducting the passengers on shore. The top of the paddle-box was much lower than the quay, and the passengers were landed across the usual plank from the bridge of the steamer. It was misty at the time, and witness would not be certain whether the plank was put out from the bridge or paddle-box. The deceased came up from the deck of the steamer on to the paddle-box, and then made a leap on to the quay. The distance between the paddle-box of the steamer and the quay, he should think, was between two and three feet. He did not think, when the deceased jumped to the pier, that he was going to fall. Directly he heard the splash in the water he considered it was the deceased who had fallen in, because there were no other passengers attempting to land in that way. Witness raised an alarm, and rendered assistance. It was scarcely two minutes after the alarm was given before the deceased was picked up again. He fell clear into the water and made an effort to swim; the master of the vessel then threw a rope round the arms of the deceased and kept him up until a boat arrived and he was taken up. He was apparently insensible when he was taken out. Dr Huxley arrived and attended to the deceased, and he was afterwards taken to the Infirmary. There were no hand rails to the plank. He attributed the accident to the deceased jumping from the paddle-box instead of going over the plank. - Mr George M. Tripe, collector of harbour dues at Torquay, said he knew the deceased and saw him get into the Sensation at Paignton. Witness told him to go down on the deck, as he had been taking a little something, but he was not the worse for liquor, and witness thought if the deceased stayed on the bridge it would be dangerous. The deceased declined to go down on the deck, and he saw nothing further of him until he was being put into the cab after the occurrence. - Henry Wise Bond, sailing master of the steamer Sensation, said on Wednesday they were making trips to Paignton and back. He assisted the passengers to land on the last trip home. He took the passengers in at the Old Pier-head, and landed them there again. He directed the passengers to come upon the steps on each side of the paddle-box and go ashore over the plank, but many of them did not wait for the plank to be put ashore. As witness was coming up the fore side of the paddle-box, the deceased came up over the aft side of it, and when the deceased got on the top of the paddle-box witness told him to be careful, as he was rushing along like a mad man. In attempting to get ashore the deceased tripped in the plank and fell into the water on the bow side of the steamer. There were no passengers on the plank at the time the deceased attempted to get ashore. He was picked up by the towing master in three-quarters of a minute. No passengers came up over the steps on the bridge, but over the paddle-box. He did not see the deceased knock himself when he fell into the water. - Robert Call, second hand on board the Sensation, said he did not notice the deceased when he came on board at Paignton, and the first time his attention was called to him was just as they got alongside the Old Pier and made all safe. He then heard some one fall into the water; he was close to the deceased when he fell. Deceased swam two or three strokes. Witness then put a rope around his arms, until the arrival of a boat, when he was put in the steamer. Their landing-stage had no rails, and was about ten or twelve feet long, he could not say for certain. He generally steered going in and out of the harbours, as he was more acquainted with them than the captain. - Mr Arthur Nicholson, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, stated that he was not present when the deceased was admitted to the Infirmary on Wednesday night. The deceased was received by the dispenser. He saw him in the ward about eleven o'clock; he had not all his senses. Witness did not notice any bruises about him, and left him in bed. About twenty minutes to two o'clock the nurse called him and said the deceased was much worse, and when witness got to him he was dead in the bed where he left him. The deceased was almost in a state of collapse when he left him, and he left orders to be called. He did not expect the deceased to die so early as two o'clock. Mr James Pollard saw the deceased about ten minutes after his admission, and he gave the necessary instructions to his assistant, Mr Bartlett, and to the nurses. He examined his chest thoroughly and found the heart intermittent, and it occurred to him that there had been previous disease of the heart. He told the nurses to wrap the blanket around him, and leave him perfectly quiet; in his opinion nothing more could be done. The ward was full of patients, and he was astonished to find the deceased dead when the nurse called him. - Mr James Pollard stated that when he left him the deceased was in a state of collapse. He gave him some tea to see if he could swallow and he did so. - Francis Bartlett, dispenser at the Torbay Infirmary, said the deceased was received in the institution about ten minutes past ten on Wednesday night. He was insensible and was wet through. He was undressed and put to bed. It was about twenty minutes afterwards that Mr Pollard saw him. He was rubbed with flannels, a poultice was applied to his chest, mustard and water was given him to drink, and hot water bottles were applied to his feet. Mr Pollard said the poultice was not required, and it was taken off. He inquired, when they brought the deceased to the Infirmary, how long he had been in the water, and they told him two minutes. He believed he told Mr Nicholson how long the deceased had been in the water. - Emma Verender, the day nurse at the Infirmary, said when she left the deceased about half-past twelve he was breathing heavily. Mr Nicholson told her that if the deceased got worse he was to be called immediately. Witness was called again at half-past one o'clock by the other nurse, Elizabeth Rice, who said the deceased was much worse or dying. She did not think the deceased breathed after she got into the room, and he was lying where she left him at half-past twelve. A policeman named Trott was left in charge of the deceased whilst the nurse called the doctor. - Elizabeth Rice, the night nurse at the institution, said she had charge of the deceased on Wednesday night, and the first time she saw a change for the worse was when the deceased attempted to get out of bed to go to the closet. She called P.C. Trott, who was in the next ward watching the man Chalcroft, to help the deceased into bed, which he did. Trott stayed there whilst she went for Mr Nicholson. The deceased only drew one breath after she came back from Mr Nicholson and died. - P.C. Trott said when he was called into the ward he saw the deceased on the floor and helped him into bed. - Mr John Webb Toms, tailor, of 32 Victoria Parade, stated that on Wednesday evening he was coming in to the harbour in a small boat, and heard a splash in the water. It was his boat that picked up the deceased and assisted to help him on board the steamer. Witness should say the paddle-box was close to the pier. He picked the deceased up from the bow side of the steamer. - Mr John Henry Wills, pawnbroker, stated that the deceased, JOHN GOULD, was 51 years of age. He had known him to be suffering from heart complaint for many months. He was witness's brother-in-law, and was a shoemaker by trade. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the time deceased was in the water was not sufficient to cause death; it more probably arose from heart disease. His belief was that the deceased jumped from the paddle-box and got a footing on the pier, but immediately fell back into the water. The Jury, after some consultation by themselves, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased came to his death by Accidentally Falling into the Water from the steamer; that he was suffering from heart disease at the time, and the shock caused death. They did not blame anyone, but strongly recommended that pleasure steamers should in future use proper landing-stages, and come sufficiently alongside the pier when they discharged passengers. The Inquiry lasted over four hours. The Jury gave their fees, through Sergeant Ockford, to the widow of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 August 1874
TORQUAY - Sad Case Of Destitution. Inquest At The Town Hall. - Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Jas. Hammick was the Foreman, were occupied three hours on Wednesday night, at the Town Hall, in investigating the circumstances connected with the death of SARAH DENNIS, a poor woman, living in Swan Street, who died somewhat suddenly on Monday night. The Coroner, after swearing the Jury, and prior to their proceeding to view the body, said statements had appeared in the public prints concerning the case, but whether they were true or false it was their duty to dismiss them from their minds and to give a verdict according to the evidence that would be adduced. - The first witness called was WILLIAM DENNIS, a boy fourteen years of age, and the eldest son of the deceased. He said his father was a gatherer of rags and bones, that he lived in Swan Street, and had three brothers, one of whom was a baby six weeks old the previous Monday. His mother had been ill a long while, and he had stayed home to look after her. Dr Pollard saw his mother at her confinement, and attended her four days, but he did not know that any other doctor had seen her since. His mother was ill before the baby was born; his father used to bring home money to maintain them all, and he (witness) used to go the errands and buy bread and meat. They had had tings given them; sometimes he would fetch it, and sometimes it would be brought. When his mother was taken ill, when they lived at Ellacombe, something was given her from the parish, but that was a year ago. Since they had lived in Swan Street, she had had a loaf of bread from the relieving officer, but he did not know of anything more. His mother died in the middle of the night on Monday. No doctor was there to see her during last week. Dr Hartland, the parish doctor, called once, but his mother was at the Town Hall, where his brother was in custody for stealing apples. Witness had never been kept short of food. Mrs Ford, a neighbour, got them some bread and meat for dinner. On Monday he had bread and treacle to eat, but no meat. He had no meat on Sunday. He thought he had some meat during last week, but he wasn't certain. Mother had meat several days; it was bought from Riley's eating-house, and two ounces lasted two days. - MARY MERRIFIELD, a widow, and the mother of the deceased, living in Pimlico, said her daughter was 35 years old. The deceased had had six children altogether, of whom two were dead. She had been ill three or four months, and had grown worse since she was confined. Witness had been stopping with her since May, and at first she slept in the house. Dr Pollard attended her in her confinement; she supposed she had him through paying into a club. The parish doctor came to see her on the previous Wednesday, but she was at the Town Hall at the time. The doctor told witness if her daughter was able to go there she was also able to come to him. She told deceased what he said when she came home, and she said Dr Hartland's was too far for her to go to. A fortnight ago she went to the Infirmary and saw the house-surgeon, who gave her some castor oil, and, she being very deaf, he wrote on a piece of paper telling her to get a recommend. She tried several places to get one, but did not succeed. Witness was with the deceased every day, and no doctor saw her after her visit to the Infirmary. She always had a bit of bread and butter and a cup of tea. Witness did not eat much herself, and took nothing from them. On Monday the deceased went out in the middle of the day, and was brought home by a lady in a carriage about half-past five. The lady said she found her in the St. Mary-Church Road, and helped her, as she was very weak. She was so weak that she could hardly get up over the three flights of stairs. Witness did not think it necessary to get a doctor for her, as she had been in a weak state for several weeks past. She made her a cup of cocoa and gave her that and a biscuit. The deceased went to bed about nine o'clock and witness left her asleep at ten and went home. The husband fetched her just before twelve, saying his wife had been taken worse. She went immediately, and the deceased died in about twenty minutes after her arrival. She tried to speak, but couldn't; she was too far gone. She had never seen the deceased's husband ill-treat her, nor heard her complain that he had refused her anything. Neither had she complained of not having enough to eat and drink. - Selina Bishop, wife of a baker, said she lived near the deceased and went to see her daily since her confinement and washed the baby for her. She was very ill during the last few weeks, and about three weeks after her confinement she went to the Dispensary, but she had had no medical attendance since. She had food to eat, but not of that kind which she ought to have had, for what was bread and butter to keep a dying woman alive? She wanted beef tea and other nourishing things. She could not eat bread, for as soon as she tried to swallow it she threw it up again. Witness had occasionally given her a little gruel and other things, as much as she could afford. On Monday night, at ten o'clock, the deceased sent for her ,and she found her very ill and weak. Witness said her mother ought to go for the doctor, but the mother said the doctor wouldn't come, as he had said if she was able to go out she was able to go to him. The deceased was in bed at this time, and complained of great pain in her bowels. Witness fried some salt and applied to her bowels; and also sent for two-pennyworth of wine and gave her. She thought before that the deceased was dying, but this seemed to rally her. Her mother left at ten o'clock, just after she came. When witness left, half an hour afterwards, she told the eldest boy to call her if his mother was taken worse. he did fetch her, but by the time she got to the room she was dead. Witness had never heard that the deceased's husband had ill-treated her. - Mr Arthur Nicholson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said he remembered the deceased coming to the Infirmary a fortnight since. That was the first time he had seen her. She then complained of a cough, of weakness, and of great pain in her bowels. She said she had had the cough for two months. He examined her chest, and formed the opinion that she was suffering from bronchitis. He gave her a ticket to go to the dispenser for some medicine for this, and also some castor oil, and told her to come again to be treated for worms. He also told her to get a recommend by going to one of the governors; he did not tell her who they were, they were too many. - The Coroner: How was she to find out who they were? - Witness: I'm sure I don't know. The Coroner: Did you tell her to come again when she had a recommend? - Witness: Yes. The Coroner: You didn't tell her to come again without a recommend? - Witness: No, I didn't. The Coroner: Now when you saw the deceased did you consider her case such a bad one that she was going to die so quickly? - Witness: No, I did not. The Coroner: And, judging from what you saw of her in that examination, if she had had proper nourishment, is it your opinion she would have died suddenly? - Witness: No, if no other disease had supervened. The Foreman of the Jury: When poor people come to you, and you tell them to get a recommend, do you ever tell them where to apply for one? - Witness: I tell them when they ask. I don't volunteer information. The Foreman: And this woman didn't ask for information? - Witness: No. Another Juryman: Is it your opinion the woman had not sufficient to eat? - Witness: I cannot say. She was very thin and emaciated when I saw her. - CHARLES DENNIS, the husband, was the next witness called. He gave his name in a loud tone of voice, and in a manner utterly different to what might have been expected under the circumstances. The Coroner: Do you live in Swan Street? - Witness: Yes, sir when I'm there. The Coroner: What do you mean? - Witness: Why, when I'm there and ain't anywhere else. The Coroner: Where have you been during the last two hours? - Witness: Well, let me see, for the last two hours I've been here, sir. The Coroner: Where did you come from then? - Witness: From Swan Street. The Coroner: Are you sure you didn't come from a public-house? - Witness: Yes, sir. The Coroner (sternly): Then just be steady in your answers. The Witness, in continuation, said he had been married to the deceased nine years. He had no regular work. Sometimes he did a little on the quay; at others he took his shoe-black box; and, when he had a shilling to start with, he would take out his rag bag and try to earn a loaf of bread. He was formerly in the navy, but was invalided from it on account of fits. The Coroner: What should you say you have been able to take home to your wife and family? - Witness: When working on the quay, 18s. a week; and when with the blacking-box 2s. a day more or less. And when I've taken out the rag bag I've been out many a day and not earned a penny. He went on to say that he gave the money he earned to his wife, and that when he wanted a shilling to start with he asked her for it. On the 24th of July he applied for relief and got a 2s. 6d. ticket from the relieving officer. he was never refused except once, when two of his boys were ill. He then went before the Newton Board of Guardians, and they offered him an order for him and his wife and family to go into the house, but he refused it. The lying-in ticket was got from an institution at Torre. - The Coroner: You must have seen your wife was ill; why didn't you go for a doctor for her? - Witness: Her mother was there, and I thought she was as much able to go for a doctor as I was a stopping home and hindering me from getting a loaf of bread. The Coroner: Have you had tings given you? - Witness: Yes; it's no good to tell a falsehood about it, I have. Some ladies have been very kind. The Coroner: Have you, so far as your pocket would allow you, found things for your wife to make use of? - Witness: Yes, I have, sir, as far as my pocket would run. I couldn't do impossibilities. - Mr Ash, a Juryman: Have you ever run away from your wife? - Witness: Never. Mr Ash: Haven't you absconded from her several times? _ Witness: Only once, and then I gave her notice I was going to the manoeuvres. Mr Ash said he had evidence to prove that the witness had absconded from his wife several times, for he had visited her day after day, when she had not more than 1s. 6d. of her husband's earnings for two or three weeks. When he returned it would be in a fit of drunkenness lasting a day or two. The Coroner (to Mr Ash): you ought not to have been put on the Jury if you were a witness of this. You had better leave the Jury, and I will take you as a witness. Mr Ash thereupon vacated his seat as a Juryman, and placed himself in readiness to give evidence. The husband in reply to further questions, said his wife had helped him to get a livelihood by hawking braid-work and combs. This she did on the Friday and Saturday prior to her death. - The Foreman: How much did you bring her home last Saturday night? - Witness: Sevenpence! - The Foreman: Was that sufficient to keep you all from Saturday night to Monday morning? - Witness: Excuse me, sir, but I went out on Sunday morning with my blacking-box and earned 2s. The Foreman: What did you earn the week before? - Witness: Four shillings and that I got for beating carpets. In reply to another question, the husband said he did not go home until eleven o'clock on the previous Saturday night, he was out with his blacking-box and not in the public-house. - Mr Wm. Ash, broker and general commission agent, said he knew the deceased woman, and had heard her complain of her husband's conduct to her, but not recently. She then complained of her inability to pay the rent in consequence of the small earnings of her husband, and his having absconded and left her destitute. She said the little he did earn was spent in drink, and he would go away from her for a fortnight or three weeks at a time without her having the slightest knowledge of his whereabouts. Witness went to the deceased's house daily for many days on one occasion, having been employed to collect the rent, and after waiting a long time he found the husband had returned and was dead drunk. That was more than twelve months ago, and he had not seen him in a similar state since. - Mr Pratt, officer of the Torquay Mendicity Society, said the deceased has never complained to him of want or ill-treatment from her husband. He knew she had been offered mendicity tickets, and that she had never accepted them. - P.C. John Patt said he had known the deceased fourteen or fifteen months, and she had complained to him of the ill-treatment of her husband in coming home drunk with no money, and smashing up the tings. Sometimes, she said, he would bring her home 6d., or 1s., or 1s. 6d., and he remembered that when she spoke to him first about it she said her husband had not brought her home anything for a fortnight. That was about fourteen months ago. The deceased's last complaint was made to him two months since, when she was on her way to the Town Hall for a policeman to get her husband locked up. She said he would be the cause of her death, the way he was going in and the state she was then in. When she complained of her husband smashing up the things they lived in Boston Fields, and witness saw the broken crockery-ware himself. He locked him up on one occasion, and he was fined for drunkenness; and witness had cautioned him several times since. - Mr C. A. Tozer, relieving officer, said he had given the husband relief at various times. This case had never been brought under his notice, except by DENNIS or members of his family. DENNIS came to him when his wife was confined and he gave him a ticket for a half-crown's worth of bread and groceries. Witness was at the house some time afterwards, to register the child, and on his enquiring he was told the husband was at work. No further relief was then asked of him. - This was all the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said the main point for the Jury to decide was whether this poor woman came by her death from natural causes or whether it was from neglect, and if so whether that neglect was proved to their satisfaction to be sufficient to render any one culpably liable. The evidence of all the family was to the effect - and there could not be the slightest doubt about it - that this poor creature had been living in an utter state of destitution. Whether this was the result of the dissipated and drunken habits of the husband or not was a matter for their consideration, but that the family had not sufficient to live must, he thought, be plain before them. The witness Mrs Bishop had told them that the food that could be bought with the money brought home by the husband was not of that class and not sufficient to keep a dying woman alive. The poor woman had evidently for a long time been in a bad state of health, and had ultimately succumbed to it; and it would be for the Jury to say whether her death had been hastened by culpable neglect or not. The statement of the policeman shewed that the husband must have spent a portion of the money he earned in drink, but that of itself would not be sufficient to find him guilty of the death of his wife. That the woman's life had been lost and her death hastened by want and neglect there could not be the slightest doubt; and her husband, although he might be acquitted at their hands of any criminal blame, must see that his wife's death had been hastened by his conduct, and that the poor woman had been sent to her last end quicker than she otherwise would if he had gone steadily to work and brought her home all his earnings to provide for herself and the family instead of spending a portion in drink. At the same time he did not think there was sufficient evidence before the Jury to justify them in saying that anything beyond moral blame attached to the man. He had taken a great deal of the evidence because he was informed that the woman had died from want, and that her death was partly attributable to her not getting relief when it was sought at the hands of the relieving officer. He thought that had been fully answered, and that there was no reason in any way to cast blame on the relieving officer or on the Board of Guardians. If the Jury were of opinion that they did not attach any criminal neglect to the husband, but were inclined to concur in what he had previously said - and which he hoped DENNIS would remember as long as he lived - then they might blame him without going so far as to say he was guilty of manslaughter. A man, if he was able to provide for his wife, was supposed to do it; and he had no right to spend his earnings in drink and leave his wife to starve. If the husband had done that wilfully and knowingly, he was guilty of her death; but if the woman came by her death from natural causes, hastened by his neglect, then the Jury would return a verdict to that effect. - The Jury found that the deceased died from bronchitis, and, whilst they did not think the husband guilty of criminal neglect, they requested the Coroner to address a few words of warning to him. - DENNIS was then called forward by the Coroner, who spoke to him as follows: You have just heard the verdict of the Jury. It is a correct one, in my opinion, but at the same time it is a merciful verdict for you. You have undoubtedly been guilty of neglect in providing drink for yourself when you might have provided necessaries for your dead wife. You stated on oath that you had done so. I wish you had told the truth instead of a lie. If you had only stuck to the truth, and not given way to those habits of drink, you would have been enabled to maintain your wife and family honestly. Let this be a warning to you. You have now, although not a wife to help you, four children to take care of. Let this sad lesson remain with you, and remember that if you work honestly God will help you, but if you continue in habits of idleness and drunkenness you will have no one to hold out a helping hand to you. The Jury do not mean to be unkind to you, but they hope this will prove a warning to you. If you will only remember this lesson, and let it work good in you instead of evil, it will, though severe, be of real and lasting service to you. - DENNIS assured the Coroner that when he went into public-houses he was asked to sing a song and then offered beer. That was hoe he got intoxicated without squandering a shilling a week of his earnings. The Coroner: Then let this be a lesson to you to keep out of temptation's way. DENNIS who by this time appeared to have come to a more sensible state of mind, promised to bear in mind and act on the warning given him. This Inquiry commenced at eight o'clock and terminated at eleven.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 15 August 1874
EXETER - Execution At Exeter - On Monday morning, at eight o'clock, THOMAS MACDONALD was hanged within the Devon County Gaol at Exeter for the murder of BRIDGE WELSH, at Plymouth. The convict was only thirty-five years of age, and had been discharged from the Royal Marines. He then went to live with WELSH, who was a married woman with a family of children, but separated from her husband. Upon the evening of July 29th he violently assaulted the woman, and at noon the next day both MACDONALD and WELSH were found in the lodgings they occupied stretched out upon the floor apparently dead; but this was not the case, only with the latter, for, although the man's throat was cut, he was insensible, and was soon restored and cured. On the table of the room there were two letters, which he had written - one before and one after the deed. These letters were, as the learned judge described them, a "mixture of ignorance and religion." In the first the prisoner alleged that the woman had been unfaithful to him, and expressed his intention of killing her. In the second he stated that he had killed her, but he hoped that they would meet in Heaven, and he trusted that her fate would be a warning not to "try a man too far." He requested that his property (between £20 and £30) might be divided among the poor of Stonehouse, and he also mentioned a sum to be paid to the Roman Catholic priest for masses for the souls of the woman and himself. At the trial a defence of insanity was set up, but there was no evidence to support this, and almost without a moment's hesitation the Jury found the prisoner guilty. Since his conviction the condemned man has appeared to be quite resigned to his fate, and the moroseness which distinguished him at the trial passed away almost immediately afterwards. He was very attentive to the ministrations of the Roman Catholic priest, the Rev. Father Hobson. Calcraft was the executioner, but he brought an assistant with him. The prisoner has, ever since his sentence, expressed himself prepared for his fate, and has during the interval conducted himself perfectly satisfied with the justice of his sentence. It is believed that MACDONALD is a feigned name, as no inquiries have been made by an relatives since he has been in gaol. The convict himself stated that he had a father and mother living, and they were in good circumstances, but he would rather die a hundred deaths than they should hear of the end that had overtaken him. On Sunday night he slept well for between six and seven hours, and got up and dressed about half-past five o'clock on Monday morning. An hour afterwards he received the priest in his cell, and the rev. gentleman remained with him until his death. The prisoner walked firmly to the scaffold, but just as the priest was leaving the platform the convict fell back into the arms of Calcraft's assistant; simultaneously, however, the drop fell, and the culprit appeared to die at once. An Inquest was held at half-past nine.

TORQUAY - Strange Death Of A Mason At Upton. - An Inquest was opened at Giles's Torbay Inn on Monday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT BECK, a mason, who resided at Church Road, Torre. The first witness called was George Taylor, a mason, living at Upton. He said about half-past five on Thursday morning, as he was coming from Upton to go to Vane Hill, he found the deceased lying along the road, near his residence. He was on his back, and had his boots and hat off, and his clothing was undone. He spoke to the deceased, but could get no sense out of him. As witness was lifting the deceased up a man and woman looked out of a window close by. Witness asked them if they could tell him where the deceased lived, and they replied that it was old MR BECK, and that he lived at No. 5. Just then a man named Noyes, a fowl-seller, came up, and they both helped the deceased to his house and left him in charge of his brother, who said he wondered he had not been in before. When witness first saw the deceased something of a green colour was issuing from his mouth, but he did not notice whether it was still coming out when he left him in charge of his brother, for to tell the truth he (witness) was frightened at the time. He had not seen the deceased before and had not the slightest knowledge of how he came into the road. - FRANCIS BECK, brother of the deceased, stated that he was a plasterer and resided at 5, Church Road. The deceased was a plasterer by trade; he was 56 years of age, and resided with him. On Thursday morning he was at the back of his house and was called from his back door by a man named Eden, who said "Your brother is out in the street almost dead." Witness ran right through the house, and when he got to the front door he saw the deceased about two doors off, sitting on the kerb, with his feet in the road. The last witness, Mr Noyes, Mr Short and Eden were there. Mr Short helped the deceased into witness's house and they put him to bed. The last time (before Thursday morning) that he saw the deceased was on Tuesday night, about half-past nine, when he sat with him after supper and he smoked his pipe. He was sorry to say that the deceased had taken to drinking lately. He was a widower, and had five children, none of whom, however, lived at home. After he was put to bed witness's wife took the deceased up a cup of tea and a piece of bread and butter, both of which he took in. He was sound asleep at dinner-time on Thursday, but in the evening he saw that the deceased was ill, and the next morning he applied for a Dispensary ticket and sent for the doctor. At eleven o'clock, when witness went to bed, he took the deceased up some coffee and he drank half a tea-cup of it. The next morning he saw that deceased was worse; his eyes began to sink in his head, and he breathed very heavily. He believed the ticket was taken to the Infirmary about ten o'clock on Friday morning and the doctor came about three o'clock in the afternoon of the same day. He always left the back door open so that the deceased might come in. He died at five minutes to five on Saturday evening. - Mr Arthur Nicholson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that the ticket to visit the deceased was left at the Infirmary about half-past eleven on Friday morning, and he visited him about three o'clock the same day. He examined the deceased, but did not find any marks about him. He treated him for bleeding on the brain; when he saw the deceased he thought he was dangerously ill. He saw him twice before he died, and his assistant once. The bleeding on the brain might have been caused by a blow, or by disease of the arteries of the brain. He did not detect any smell of drink. He could not leave his duties at the Infirmary until three o'clock to attend the deceased. He expected bleeding on the brain commenced on the deceased becoming insensible after the fall. - The Coroner here stated that he did not think it was any use calling the remainder of the evidence at present, as he thought, after the evidence of the doctor, a post mortem examination was necessary. The Inquest was then adjourned for this purpose until eight o'clock the next evening. The Inquiry was resumed on Tuesday, when the following additional evidence was given:- Charles Brunt, landlord of the Brunswick Inn beerhouse, Torre, said he knew the deceased and saw him last on Wednesday afternoon between five and six o'clock, when he came into his house and had a pennyworth of cider, which he paid for. The deceased also had a pint of cider given him by some man who was there. He left soon after he drank it. He never saw the deceased after; he was quite sober when he left. - Elizabeth Kentisbeer, the wife of Joseph Kentisbeer, who keeps the Old Church Inn, Torre, said the deceased came into her house about six o'clock on Wednesday evening and stayed there until nine. He was perfectly sober when he left; two other men were also there, and they drank between them and the deceased three or four pints of beer. She did not see the deceased after he left in the evening. He was a very quiet man when under the influence of drink. - Jane Rendle, a single woman, living at 57, Higher Union Street, said she saw the deceased standing at the corner of Mr Oliver's house at Torre about ten minutes before ten on the night of Wednesday week. There was another man with him, dressed in dark grey clothes. She afterwards saw the deceased go into Mr Brunt's with the man who was with him; she saw him come out from Mr Brunt's again about ten minutes before eleven o'clock with the same man, and the two then parted. She went over and spoke to the deceased, who was tipsy; she would not let him go home with her as he was so drunk, and she was afraid he might go to sleep in her room. The deceased had been home with her before. She told the deceased to go home and go to bed, and he replied "he thought he should." The deceased was so drunk that he did not know what he was talking about. She then said "good night" and left him. She was sure it was Brunt's house the deceased came out of. She had known the deceased go home more tipsy than he was that night. She left him at the back of Brunswick Terrace. - The Coroner here told Sergt. Ockford to recall the witness Brunt, who, in answer to the coroner, stated that he always told the people to clear out at closing time, and he was quite positive the deceased was not there when he cleared his house on the night in question. - Mr Arthur Nicholson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased. He first examined his head and found a slight swelling on the side, which was covered with hair. On cutting down through the scalp to the skull, he found a bruise about an inch and a half in diameter; there was more blood there than he expected to find in a bruise of that description, between the scalp and the skull. The skull was not fractured, nor were there any marks on it. On taking off the skull cap there was a congestion of blood on the left side of the head. He was satisfied that the cause of death was the presence of blood on the brain, caused by the rupture of an artery. A blow from a fall or otherwise would be sufficient to cause such a rupture. - Charlotte Brunt said she knew the deceased and saw him in their house between five and six o'clock on the evening in question with a gardener named Roberts. The deceased did not come into her house after six o'clock, and she was present when the house was closed. Several men, named Nosworthy, Eden, and Charles Brooks were present when the house was closed. She did not recollect any of these who were there besides the men she had named. There was no public house near on the same side of the street. She was sure the deceased did not come in after six o'clock. - William Fragall, a plasterer, residing at Mason's Row, Torre, said he met the deceased at Oliver's corner on Wednesday night. He was walking along when he stopped witness and spoke to him. He was not tipsy, and was not much "out of the way". He went into Mr Brunt's house and might have stayed there half-an-hour. They went into the parlour and had two pints of beer between witness and the deceased. There were several other men there, and they all came out at ten minutes to eleven. Witness ordered the ale and Mrs Brunt drew one pint and the girl the other. Witness thought when the deceased came out from the public-house he had had quite enough to drink. He parted with BECK at Oliver's corner, and the deceased went down at the back of Brunt's towards his house. It was little after ten when he first saw the deceased at Oliver's corner. - The brother of the deceased, FRANCIS BECK, re-called, stated that he found no money on the deceased. Witness's son took out the deceased's tobacco-box and knife. The Coroner, in summing up, cautioned Mr and Mrs Brunt against supplying people with drink whilst the worse for liquor, and to take more notice of their customers in future. The Jury, of whom Mr R. C. Lemon was the Foreman, returned a verdict "That the deceased died from presence of blood on the brain, but how it came there, there was no evidence to show."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 22 August 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. - A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday afternoon on the South Devon Railway, close to the Torquay junction. For some few months past the work of widening the line, so as to admit of additional rails being laid for the Torquay traffic, has been proceeding. Only a short distance from the junction there is a bridge, and a man called JOHN PARNELL, of Totnes, was at work at the back of this bridge excavating the earth. He had been engaged at this for a rather long time, and was on the point of being relieved by another man, called John Perring, when the poor fellow saw some earth giving away, and began to run, but it caught his feet, preventing him further progress, and about a ton weight fell on him, crushing him very badly, and causing instantaneous death. Perring, who had a narrow escape, managed to get out of the way. Dr aye was telegraphed for, and he arrived shortly afterwards, but his services were of no avail. On the body being extricated it was removed to the Workhouse, where an Inquest was held on it Wednesday morning. Deceased was about 30 years of age, and married.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 12 September 1874
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident On The Paignton Road. - A carriage accident unhappily attended with fatal consequences, occurred on the road between Torquay and Paignton, near the Gas Works, on Saturday night. It appears that one vehicle was coming in one direction, and another conveyance was going in the other, that coming to Torquay having lights. The other had no lamps, and it was a very dark night. The occupants of the trap going from Torquay to Paignton were two men, two women, and an infant; and, as they were on the brow of the hill leading down to the Gas Works, the wheel of the one vehicle collided with the wheel of the other. The immediate effect of this was to frighten the horse in the trap going to Paignton, and the animal started off at a furious rate down over the hill. In the rush it seems to have drawn the vehicle close to the hedge, and that there the wheel struck against a stone with such force as to upset the trap and pitch the occupants out into the road. With the exception of the infant, they were all more or less injured, and one of the men - JAMES HUMPHRIES, a shoemaker, of Paignton, about 30 years of age - sustained concussion of the brain and died about six hours after the accident. One of the women was thrown out at the top of the hill when the first collision occurred. An Inquest on the body, which was lying at the Torbay Infirmary, where the unfortunate man was conveyed, was opened before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on Monday evening. Mr John Rowse was the Foreman of the Jury. All previous inquiries of this kind have been held in the Board Room of the institution; but, in consequence of a decision arrived at some time since by the governing body, the Inquest was held on Monday in a low, underground place said to be a consulting room, filled with the obnoxious and sickening stench of fresh paint. After the Jury had viewed the body, one of the Jurymen, complaining of the smell of the paint, asked if they could not hold the Inquiry in another room. The Coroner said he could not say anything in the matter. It was the decision of the authorities that they must come down there, and he supposed they must submit, although the decision was, to say the least of it, a very curious one. Still, if it was the wish of the Jury, he would adjourn to the Town Hall. A Juryman said he thought it was very uncourteous of the governing body of the Infirmary to relegate them to such a room as that. It was thought, however, that as the witnesses were in attendance the Inquiry should proceed there for that occasion. The Coroner then proceeded to take evidence. - William Warren, driver of the Torbay Hotel omnibus, was the first witness. He said the occurrence took place about forty yards from the gas house. He had been to Paignton, and was walking home, about quarter past eight, with a man named Foale and his wife. His attention was first attracted by hearing a noise as of two wheels meeting at the top of the hill. Then he heard a horse start, and a conveyance came down over the hill, and just as it got opposite them it upset and the occupants fell out into the road. There were two men, a woman, and a child. The horse went on, dragging the conveyance after it. The baby was crying, and he picked that up first, and gave it in charge of Mrs Foale after she had recovered a little from the fright. He next picked up the woman and placed her against the hedge. There were no lights in the vehicle, and it was very dark at the time. The woman did not speak for ten minutes, and then, when witness asked her where they were going, she whispered "To Paignton." The other vehicle, which had previously passed them on the way to Torquay, was a short distance further on. It had lamps lit; it was occupied by a lady and gentleman, and came from the Crown and Anchor at Paignton. Witness borrowed one of the lamps from this vehicle, and attended to the other sufferers, Foale also assisting. By this time, feeling giddy and being subject to heart disease, and other persons having arrived to render assistance, he left. The vehicle came down over the hill at a very fast pace, and in his opinion the horse had run away. He also thought the more immediate cause of the vehicle being upset was that the wheel came with great force against a stone by the side of the hedge. - William Foale, who looks after the Silkstone Coal Company's stores at Paignton, and who with his wife was in company with the last witness, said he noticed the Crown and Anchor midge pass them on the road to Torquay. It was being driven very steadily, not more than five or six miles an hour, by William Hesking. This vehicle had gone on about twenty yards when he heard a crash. Then he heard another vehicle coming down over the hill towards them at a fast rate, and as it was passing them it upset, and the people in it were thrown out. He picked up Mr Crute, manager of the Crown and Anchor. He came to his senses after the lapse of about eight or ten minutes. Witness then asked him how the occurrence had happened, and he said he could give no reason for it. Witness could not say whether the man was sober or not at the time. It was so dark that he could not see, when the vehicle approached them, who was driving; in fact he saw no persons distinctly until they were thrown out. The Coroner said this was the only evidence that could be called before the Jury that evening, except that of the wife of the last witness, and that would only be confirmatory of what he and Warren had already stated. He had received a medical certificate from Dr Goodridge, of Paignton, stating that William and Emma Crute, the most material witnesses, would not be well enough to attend an Inquiry for five or six days, and under these circumstances he thought the safer plan would be to adjourn it for a fortnight for their attendance. Mr Arthur Nicholson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said the deceased was admitted into the institution at half-past nine the previous night. He was insensible, and was suffering from a concussion of the brain and a scalp wound. He never recovered consciousness and died about twenty minutes past two on Monday morning from the injuries. A Juryman expressed a hope that the next Inquiry would not be held at the Infirmary, but at the Town Hall. The Coroner said in future all Inquests would be held at the Town Hall. They would have to meet and view the body at the Infirmary and then go to the Town Hall; then they should not be interfering with the arrangements of the Dispensary in any way. The Inquest was then adjourned until he evening of Friday next, the 18th instant, when it will be resumed in the Town Hall at quarter to seven.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 26 September 1874
TORQUAY - The Late Fatal Accident On The Paignton Road. Adjourned Inquest. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the fatal accident on the Paignton road, Torquay, on the evening of Sunday week, the 6th instant, was resumed at the Town Hall, last Friday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr John Rowse was the Foreman. The evidence given at the previous Inquiry was to the effect that, shortly after eight o'clock on the Sunday evening in question, two vehicles were on the Paignton Road, near the Gas Works, the one returning to Paignton and the other coming to Torquay. It was said to be dark at the time, and the vehicle going to Paignton had no lamps lit. When on the top of the hill the wheel of the one vehicle collided with the wheel of the other, and the horse started off. Almost immediately after the vehicle drawn by this animal struck against a stone and upset, and the occupants - Mr and Mrs Crute and MR and MRS HUMPHRIES and child, all of Paignton - were thrown out with some violence, and were more or less injured. JAMES HUMPHRIES, who was a shoemaker, and about thirty years of age, sustained concussion of the brain, and died six hours after the occurrence at the Torbay Infirmary. The following additional evidence was adduced:- Elizabeth Crute, wife of Wm. Henry Crute, said on the night of the accident she was riding in the dog-cart with her husband, who was driving. JAMES HUMPHRIES, and his wife and child, were in the vehicle with them. Witness was sitting in front with her husband. There were no lamps lit. They left Torquay about eight o'clock, and she did not consider it a dark night. Her husband was quite sober when they left; he went into one public-house (Swann's London Hotel), but he only remained there a few minutes. They were not in Torquay more than an hour and a half. On going down over the hill, near the Gas Works, she saw another vehicle coming, and as they passed it she felt a jerk, and was thrown out. She was not rendered insensible, and remembered the horse and trap passing her whilst she lay on the ground. She could then see that her husband and HUMPHRIES and his wife were still in the trap, which went on, but she could speak of nothing that happened afterwards. - William Henry Crute, manager of the Crown and Anchor Hotel, Paignton, (who had his head bandaged and his left arm in a sling), said on the evening in question he drove his wife and the deceased and his wife and child to Torquay, leaving Paignton at a quarter to six in a two-wheeled dog-cart. They went through Babbicombe and St. Mary-Church, and left Torquay for the return journey at eight o'clock. All he had to drink at the London Hotel was a bottle of ginger-beer with three-pennyworth of brandy in it. He had lamps in his cart, but he did not light them because he did not think it sufficiently dark. He had driven the same horse three times before, and it was a quiet animal. He saw the other vehicle coming as he was driving down over the hill near the Gas Works; he saw it was a fly, and he could make out distinctly that it was being driven by William Hosking, a man in his employ. He (witness) was driving at a trot at the time, about six or seven miles an hour. The fly was also coming towards him very slowly, and well on the left side. Just before he came to the fly the breeching of his harness broke, the mare jumped across the road, and his wheel struck the wheel of the fly. The effect of the sudden plunge was that his wife was thrown out. Then the animal bolted down the hill and the cart struck against a stone in the hedge; the vehicle upset, and he and the others, who were sitting behind, were thrown out. - William Hosking, ostler of the Crown and Anchor Hotel, Paignton, said he was driving two ladies from Paignton to Torquay on the Sunday night. He had lamps in his fly, but did not light them because it was not dark enough. As Mr Crute was passing him in his dog-cart his horse jumped suddenly across the road, and the wheel of the dog-cart struck against the hind wheel of the fly and Mrs Crute was thrown out. The horse then started off and ran against an embankment, and the wheel striking against a stone, the cart turned over, and one of the shafts was broken directly. He stopped his fly and, as soon as he could, helped the deceased into it and drove him to the Infirmary. The harness of the dog-cart was thoroughly sound about ten months ago, and he considered it perfectly safe to be used on the day of the accident. - Miss Emily Weston, residing at Olivet, Vansittart Road, Torre, who, with her maid, was being driven in the fly at the time, said she heard her driver call out twice, and immediately afterwards she heard a crash. The driver was perfectly sober and he was driving very steadily at the time. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, congratulated Mr Crute and his wife on having escaped with comparatively so little injury. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury exonerating the drivers of the two vehicles from blame.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 February 1875
TORQUAY - The Concealment Of Birth In Pimlico. Adjourned Inquest And committal For Trial. - The adjourned Inquest on the remains of the child found partially burned in the house of the woman Ireland in Pimlico was held at the Town Hall, Torquay, on Saturday, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner. The accused woman, Ireland, was present in custody during the Inquiry. - Mr Carter, sen., solicitor, attended on behalf of a young woman named Hooper, who he said was present and ready to make a statement concerning the case. - The Coroner first drew attention to the hearing of the evidence given at the previous Inquiry. He said the police-sergeant then proved the removal of the remains of the child from Ireland's house; Mrs Milton proved finding Ireland in an excited state on her returning home; and Mrs Skinner also proved being with Mrs Milton at the time the remains were found and handing them over to the police. Another witness, Mrs Clary, who lived in the house before Mrs Ireland, also stated that no child had ever been born in the house whilst she was there. Ireland, on being sworn, made a statement that the child was still-born in her house, the mother being a girl called ELIZABETH HOOPER, and that she kept the body in the house from that time until the day when the remains were discovered. The Coroner then asked what additional evidence was forthcoming, when Mr Supt. Vaughan said the young woman who was confined in Ireland's house was present and was ready to tell all she knew about the matter. ELIZABETH HOOPER then stepped forward, but prior to her making any statement, The Coroner said: It is my duty, before you are examined - although your solicitor says you are willing to state everything you know in this case - to warn you that whatever you say will be taken down in evidence to be used in any proceeding that may hereafter arise. Having warned you, do you still wish to give evidence? The witness replied in the affirmative, and, in answer to questions put to her by Mr Carter, she said: I am a single woman, 24 years of age, and I reside at Mrs Paterson's, Pinecliff, Torquay. I know Mrs Ireland; she lives in Pimlico. In 1873 I was in the family way, and was confined on the 10th of June in that year in Mrs Ireland's house. At the time I went there I agreed to give her 7s. a week. I remained there, and I paid her at the end. Mrs Ireland attended on me in my confinement. I was in her house about a fortnight before I was confined. I had not been in a very good state of health for some time previously. The child was still-born; I never heard it cry. I was very ill at the time and did not see the child, but I believe it was a female. I gave Mrs Ireland 10s. to bury the child in the Upton churchyard, and she promised she would get a box and bury it. I had provided baby linen and everything requisite for the child. Not requiring it, I gave some of the baby linen to my cousin Mrs Watson, and the rest I destroyed. I remained with Mrs Ireland a week after my confinement, being there altogether three weeks. I paid her £2 10s. before I left; that was for her trouble and attendance, for the three weeks' lodgings and 10s. for burying the child. I have not seen Mrs Ireland since nor been in her house; neither have I had any communication with her. - By the Coroner: I took no steps to find out whether the child was buried or not because I thought it was done. During the time I was in the house I slept in the kitchen with Mrs Ireland. There was a person living up over whose name was Clary. It was an illegitimate child, and the father - whose name I do not wish to disclose - had previously arranged with me to pay all the expenses. I saw no doctor during my illness. - By the Jury: The reason I was not confined at my mother's house was because my mother has been in an asylum once, and I thought it would upset her again. She knew nothing about my confinement, which took place last June twelve months. - The Coroner: Is this the only child you have ever had? - Witness: Yes, sir. - The Coroner: Then it is not true what Mrs Ireland said, that you were confined in her house in February, March, April, or May of last year? - Witness: No, sir; it is not true. By a Juryman: I was living at Fisher Street, Paignton, at the time this happened. I was in my present situation in February of last year; I have been there thirteen months last Saturday. - Dr Powell, recalled, was asked by the Coroner if there was any possibility of the body of the child found burned and that stated to have been born in 1873 being the same. - Dr Powell: I think it is possible, although I have no actual experience to guide me. I think that, had the body been partially burned shortly after birth, the skin, after a lapse of eighteen months, would have presented the same appearance as it did when I examined it. A Juryman: but wouldn't there be an offensive smell from keeping the body in a room? - Dr Powell: Certainly, if the body had simply undergone decomposition, there would undoubtedly have been a smell. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, remarked upon the painful nature of the case, and pointed out how in some respects the statement of the woman Ireland had been confirmed, although there were discrepancies in regard to the date of the birth of the child. both, however, stated that the child was born dead; and, as the Jury had no evidence before them to show to the contrary, they would have to return a verdict that the child was found dead, but whether born alive or not there was no evidence to show. Or, if they were satisfied with the evidence that the child was born dead, then they could return a verdict to that effect, and there the case would end. He should rather recommend them, however - the case being one of so much suspicion against the woman Ireland - to return an open verdict, for them, if thought necessary, the case could be brought before the magistrates. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict that the child was found dead, but there was no evidence to show whether it was born alive or not. The Coroner, remarking on the case, said it shewed that there had been existing in Torquay a house that ought not to exist anywhere. They had had it in evidence that this woman Ireland had been getting her living by fortune-telling, and that in this house poor young women had gone to be confined. He had no doubt that the mother of the child in this case was recommended there by those who had been there previously. They had also had evidence before them that infants born there had, at any rate once, been tried to be put out of the way in an improper manner. That such a kind of house had been existing in Torquay for some time past there could be no doubt, and he only hoped that the proceedings now pending would lead to a stop being put to it. The Coroner subsequently drew the attention of Sergt. Ockford to the remains of the burned child, and asked him how it was they were not taken to the Infirmary and placed in the dead-house. Sergt. Ockford said he took the remains to the Infirmary, but Mr Nicholson, the house-surgeon, refused to take them in. - The Coroner: What was the excuse? - Sergt. Ockford: He said he should have to call the nurses and open the dead-house, and it would be a lot of inconvenience. - The Coroner: Were the nurses gone to bed? - Sergt. Ockford: No, sir; the institution was all open. I took the remains up quietly about six in the evening. The body of the child found on the sands was taken up direct and put in the dead-house. These remains were brought to the police-station first and then taken up to the Infirmary. The Coroner: Did you show them to any doctor before going? - Sergt. Ockford: Yes, sir. to Dr Powell, who requested me to take them to the Infirmary. The Coroner: I consider this a shameful case. I do not know why the dead body of one infant should be taken in and not another. It looks very much to me as if the remains were refused to be taken in at the Infirmary because another doctor not connected with the Institution had something to do with the Inquest. Whether taken at a doctor's request or not, they are not bound to take a body in; but when there is a dead-house there it would prove, as I have before stated, a great convenience to the inhabitants in such cases as these. I consider it very strange, to say the least, that of two bodies taken to the Infirmary within a very short time of each other, one not having been seen by a doctor and the other having been seen by a doctor, that one of them should be refused admission. Notwithstanding all that has recently been said and written about the Infirmary, I shall certainly write and ascertain why this refusal was made. If bodies are not to be admitted when taken there by the sergeant of police, he had better not take any there again. - Sergt. Ockford: I have taken a good many there, but this is the first time I was ever refused. - The Crooner: Well, I hope it is possible that an explanation may be given. The Jury were then discharged, the Coroner expressing a hope that it would be a long time before he should require their services for a similar case again.

Torquay Times And South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 19 June 1875
TOPSHAM - Singular Death On The Exmouth Railway. - A most singular and fatal event took place on the Exmouth branch line on Saturday evening. On the departure of the 10.15 p.m. train for Exmouth, the acting guard, GEORGE RICHARDS, took his place in his van as usual. On arriving at Topsham, the attention of one of the porters was called by a first-class passenger, in a compartment some two or three carriages removed from the guard's van, to the fact that blood was running down the side of the carriage in which he was seated. A search was made for the cause, and on the top of the carriage the unfortunate guard was found quite dead, with the back of his head smashed in. It is supposed that he got on the top of the carriage for some reason, and was caught by the bridge which crosses the line about half a mile from the Topsham station. In the ordinary course of events he had no business on the carriage, and what he was doing there remains a mystery. The deceased, who was a married man with one child, resided in Exeter, and was very steady and well conducted. At the Inquest, held before Mr Coroner Crosse, at Topsham, on Tuesday, some curious and remarkable disclosures were made. One of the witnesses alleged that the deceased left his van to go on the top of the carriage for the purpose of seeing a female, but his statement was not confirmed. George Bath, the driver of the train, was asked by the Coroner if he ever saw a man on the top of one of the carriages. - Witness: I have heard of its being done. The Coroner: Did you ever see it? - Witness: I never did. - The Coroner: Do you know if it's possible for a man to look into a carriage? - Witness: yes, they can. They lay on their face and hands on the top of the carriage, catch hold of the chain which covers the lamp, and so securing their safety, lean over the side, and in that way look into the window. - The Coroner: So that is done is it. What is their object? - Witness: I don't know, nor do I know what was his object. I have been thinking since Saturday if he wanted to detect anyone cutting the cushions. - The Coroner: You have heard that guards have been in the habit of getting on the top of the carriages and watching and overlooking the passengers? Have you never heard the reason why they did so? - Witness: I don't know that I ever have. Of course I can think what their motive has been. He may have been spying on the people inside. - The Coroner: With what object? - Witness: To see what he could see, I suppose. - The Coroner: for the purpose of extorting money? - Witness: I can't say. - The Coroner: You have heard of its being done? - Witness: I have, sir. - The Coroner: This is a very sad state of things. - Witness: I have heard of its being done, but never did it myself. I should be very sorry. - The Coroner: do you believe it is done to extort money, or from curiosity only? - Witness: From curiosity, I should think. If I saw a man on the top of a carriage I should guess what he was there for. - The Coroner: He must have some object beyond watching, for there must be great danger in his position, and I should think there must be some other motive beyond curiosity to induce a man to incur so much risk. - Witness: Well, sir, its curiosity, but I assure you its curiosity I shall never carry out. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times And South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 3 July 1875
TORQUAY - A Quarryman Drowned Near London Bridge. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Davey's Railway Inn, Torre, this (Friday) morning, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of JAMES RICE, a labourer, thirty-two years of age, who was drowned near London Bridge on Thursday morning. Mr Jas. Blackmore was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The facts in connection with the sad occurrence will be gleaned from the evidence adduced. The first witness called was Thomas Winsor, a labourer, living in Church Street, Torre. He said he was foreman over the men working at Land's End quarry, just beyond the Imperial Hotel, and deceased had been working there for the past three weeks. On Thursday morning the deceased, instead of being at work at six o'clock, did not come until twenty minutes past seven , when witness told him he would have to lose a quarter day. Deceased said he didn't mind that, and sat down and had his breakfast. He had a little conversation with the other men, during which the deceased said something about how the women had served him. About five minutes afterwards witness heard the deceased cry out, and on going to see what was the matter he saw him just above the water, putting up his hands, and going down. They threw a rope to him, but it was no good; he had sunk before he could catch hold of it. Witness saw his clothes near, shewing the deceased had undressed. He sent for the police, and it was about an hour and a half before the body was recovered. He did not know whether the deceased could swim; none of the other men had bathed there. - By the Jury: He believed the deceased was terrified in mind because he had been robbed of his money and watch by some women in South Wales, from whence he had recently returned. When they threw the rope to deceased he was below the water and was too far gone to take hold of it. He must have walked into the water over the rubble heap made there. P.C. Edwards said he was on duty on the Strand about half-past eight, when he was told that a man had been drowned in the quarry near the Imperial Hotel. Witness went out, and found the deceased's clothes lying on the rubble under the cliff. He sent for a boat, and the coastguardsmen came with their grappling irons. Witness got into the boat and assisted, but it was about an hour and a half before he and a boatman named Tom Brown recovered the body, which they saw lying on its left side in the water, completely undressed. They took it in the boat and conveyed it to the deceased's lodgings at Torre. He searched the clothes of the deceased, and found an empty purse, two pawn tickets, and a knife. There were no marks about the body. - The Coroner said the evidence before the Jury was that the deceased went to his work, but that he did not begin work because he was under orders to lose a quarter of a day, and that whilst he was waiting about for the quarter to elapse he seemed to have undressed himself and gone into the water, and then, in the presence of his fellow-workmen, he sunk and was drowned. Some evidence had been given by the witness Winsor as to the state of mind of the deceased prior to his death, but he did not think this material to the Inquiry, as the Jury had no evidence before them to lead them to think that the deceased was insane at the time and that he drowned himself. The evidence was that he undressed before he went into the water, and that fact alone would almost point to the conclusion that the deceased went in to bathe and was accidentally drowned. The Jury returned a verdict to this effect.

Torquay Times And South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 1 July 1875
TORQUAY - Sad Occurrence At Edenhurst. Two Females Suffocated By Gas. - About mid-day on Sunday a report was circulated that two women had been murdered during the previous night at Edenhurst, Park Hill Road. Mr Livingston the owner of the house (who is at present staying in London), had removed to Sidney Lodge whilst Edenhurst was being renovated, under the superintendence of Mr H. Manley, house agent, of Victoria Parade. The report that a murder had been committed was happily not true, but a horrible and fatal occurrence had taken place, of which the following are the particulars:- A woman named MOGRIDGE, the wife of a shoemaker residing at 14 Higher Ellacombe Terrace, had been employed for some time past to sleep at Edenhurst every night. Being rather lonely her grand-daughter, ELLEN ANN MOGRIDGE, used to sleep with her. They left their home as usual on Saturday night to go to Edenhurst, but as they did not return at the usual hour on Sunday morning, MR MOGRIDGE began to get uneasy. He waited for some time and as his wife and grand-daughter did not make their appearance he sent his daughter to Edenhurst. On her arrival she found the doors and windows safely secured, and, not being able to gain admittance, became fearful that some accident had befallen her mother and niece. She returned immediately to her home, and described her visit . A young man named Friend, who lodged with MOGRIDGE, proceeded immediately to the house, and as he could not enter he sought the assistance of P.C. Bond. P.C. Bond mounted the ladder which Friend had put up, and opened the window for the purpose of gaining admission into the house. Directly he opened the window an immense quantity of gas rushed out, almost sufficient to knock him off the ladder, and he had to descend immediately to escape suffocation. Soon after Sergeant Board arrived, and learning what had occurred, made an entrance into the house by breaking open the window of the servant's hall. He at once opened the whole of the windows, and then broke open the door of the bedroom which the women occupied. He had to beat a precipitate retreat on account of the outpour of gas from the room, and it was many hours afterwards before the smell which pervaded the house decreased. As soon as possible an entrance was made into the room, when a frightful spectacle was beheld. The woman and girl were dead in bed, lying in about the same attitude. The woman was partially uncovered, and seemed to have had a struggle before death, but her grand-daughter had a peaceful expression on her countenance. MRS MOGRIDGE'S body seemed to be greatly charged with gas. She is about 56 years of age, and her grand-daughter 14. Dr Powell was called in by Sergeant board, and he stated that death arose from suffocation by gas. On Saturday Mr Fouraker, plumber and gas-fitter, of Victoria Parade, was at the house making an examination in the pipes, and from directions received he did not turn the gas off from the meter, but left it on, as there was a leakage, and he wanted to find it out. In the room where the deceased slept a gas bracket had been removed from the pipe and here the gas escaped.
The Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening on the bodies, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced. The first witness called was Dr Powell, who stated that on Sunday between one and two o'clock he was requested by Sergt. Board to go to Edenhurst. He went, and on going to the back of the house found a ladder placed against a window, which he went up and entered the room. He found the bodies of the two females on a bed in the room, lying on their backs quite dead. There being a strong smell of gas in the room he left. He afterwards entered the house from the ground floor, and the door of the room which was locked on the inside, was broken open, and some gas immediately rushed out. he did not see any marks of violence on the bodies, and death was evidently caused by gas. - ELIZABETH MOGRIDGE, the daughter of the deceased, stated on Saturday night between 10 and 11 o'clock she last saw her mother and the little girl alive. They left about that time to go to Edenhurst to sleep. Her mother was fifty-six years of age and her niece fourteen. Between ten and eleven o'clock on Sunday morning she went to the house and finding the key in the back door on the inside, she knocked, but did not get any answer. She then went round to the bedroom window and threw gravel up to it, but did not receive any answer. The deceased had slept at the house every night for two or three months. Witness went home and gave the alarm. They usually came home to their breakfast about nine o'clock. Friend returned to the house with witness. Her mother was cheerful when she left home on the Saturday night, she did not notice any change whatever in her, and when she left home she wished witness "good night." Her mother lit herself to bed with a benzoline lamp. She had slept with the deceased on one or two occasions, when she always put the lamp out. Witness received the key of the back door between six and seven o'clock in the evening of Saturday last from Mr Fouraker, and took it home to her mother. - Samuel Friend, a tailor, residing at 11 Ellacombe Terrace, said he lived with WALTER MOGRIDGE. He knew both of the deceased. ELIZABETH MOGRIDGE told him that about eleven o'clock she had been out to the house and did not find them there, and thought she had missed them. She left immediately, and about half an hour afterwards he followed her. Finding that WALTER MOGRIDGE was going, he told him he would go as he could walk faster than he could. When he got to Edenhurst he saw ELIZABETH MOGRIDGE, who pointed out the window in which she supposed her mother was sleeping. He threw up some gravel, but getting no answer he put up a ladder and went up. The blind was down and the window as not keyed. he knocked at the window, but got no answer. He then pushed up the window and pulled back the blind, and noticed a woman in bed dead. he did not smell any gas. he saw it was ANN MOGRIDGE. He at once ran for a policeman and found P.C. Bond. He returned with him and they went up the ladder together. he then smelt a strong smell of gas. Bond entered the room, and whilst he was there witness asked him if he saw a little girl there, and he replied "yes, and they are both dead." he then came out from the room and they both proceeded to the Town Hall. P.C. Bond stated that about quarter to one o'clock the last witness asked him to go up to Edenhurst as he thought there was a woman dead, because he could not get any answer from her. He returned with the last witness and found a ladder placed beside the window. He went up the ladder and when he opened the window he smelt gas very strong. On entering the room he found the woman and the girl dead. They were lying on their backs, the little girl had the appearance of being asleep. He looked around the room to see if he could find any place from whence the gas escaped, but could find none. The gas nearly choked him and he had to leave the room. He went and gave information to Supt. Vaughan who directed him to go and give information to Sergt. Board, and then fetch Dr Powell. He went to Dr Powell's house but that gentleman was not at home, and he afterwards found Sergt. Board had brought Dr Powell to the house, and found him in the room in which he found the bodies. - Sergeant Board stated that from information he received from the last witness, he was going to Edenhurst, and meeting Dr Powell on his way there, he requested him to accompany him. When he arrived there he was shewn a ladder by the witness Friend. He mounted the ladder, and smelled the gas very strongly. He put his head into the window but at once withdrew it. He told Dr Powell what he had smelt and he then went up to the window and said he did not think it safe to enter that way. He afterward broke a pane of glass in the window of the servant's hall, and lifting the window up entered the house and broke open the door of the bedroom. As soon as the door was opened he experienced a rush of gas, and they waited for about a minute before they entered. He found the bodies as described by Dr Powell. He could not find the place from which the gas escaped. He searched for poison but found none. He found a lamp placed on the washing basin in the room. There was a box of matches beside the basin. He found the clothes of MRS MOGRIDGE and examined the pocket, and found the letter, card, and purse produced. The purse contained 4s. 11 ½d., and several small items. The clothes of E. A. MOGRIDGE were on a chair at the side of the bed. he sent for Mr Fouraker and Mr Manley. He searched very carefully around the room to see if there was a plug but found none. He lived next door to the deceased and he never saw anything in her manner which would lead him to believe she was wrong in her head. He afterwards proceeded with Mr Manley and Mr Fouraker, and saw Mr Fouraker turn the gas off from the meter. If a plug had been in the room he might have found it and he gave directions to two females to look for it, but they had not been able to find it. He saw nothing about the pipe which would lead him to believe that it had been plugged. - WALTER MOGRIDGE, husband of the deceased woman, stated that the letter produced was in the handwriting of his wife, who ought to have posted it. - Mr H. Manley, stated that he was agent for Mr Livingston, the owner of the house, and went up occasionally at Mr Livingston's request, to look over the house. Mr Bovey had the contract for the painting, and Mr Fourakers the gas work. From directions witness received from Mr Livingston, he told Fouraker to make three new connections in the gas pipe, so as to get a better light. He should think it was done about five weeks since. There were no alterations required in the room in which the deceased slept. He went through the house on Saturday last, but did not enter the room in which the deceased died, as MRS MOGRIDGE kept the key. At Mr Livingston's request he went to the Gas Office, and directed them to disconnect the gas, as Mr. Livingston did not wish any gas to be on during the alterations. At his request the gas was put on Saturday morning about 10 o'clock. He believed Mr Fouraker was present when the gas was connected by the gas company's workman. Mr Fouraker, with him, examined two of the joints with a lucifer match, but could not find any leakage. Mr Fouraker went out, and took up a plank of the floor at the back landing, smelt about, and said to witness, "I'm glad to say it is all right." He knew that the gas was kept on during the night for the purpose of seeing if any leakage occurred. About the 24th of May he gave orders for every bracket to be taken off, so that the painters might proceed with their work. Some of the pipes were plugged with wood and white lead, and others with brass caps. He could never get into the room in which the poor females slept, as MRS MOGRIDGE kept the key. When the meter was disconnected the pipes were plugged temporarily. - A young man named Bowles was called forward and said he came with the deceased to the house on Saturday night, but did not notice anything strange in her manner. - Supt. Vaughan said he had examined all the rooms in which he could enter, and found all the pipes plugged in a proper manner. - Robert Norcombe, tin-plate worker and gas fitter, living at Torre, said he lately worked for Mr Fouraker. About two months ago Mr Fouraker gave him orders to come to this house and take down the brackets and pendants. Before he commenced to work he asked Mr Fouraker where the gas meter was, that he might turn it off, Mr Fouraker replied that the gas was disconnected altogether. As he took off each bracket he plugged it with wood and white lead. He remembered the room in which the women met their death, and took off the bracket which was about 18 inches above the bed. MRS MOGRIDGE was there and showed him the rooms, and the one in which they died was not locked. On the Monday following he came and put two brass caps to two of the brackets, to make them more secure. He had been in the house to work since then, but not about the gas. - By the Foreman: He was quite sure he plugged the bracket in the room in which the women were found. - James Fouraker, plumber and gas fitter, of Victoria Parade, said he received orders from Mr Livingston to do the gas in the house, and had since received orders from Mr H. Manley. He gave the last witness directions to take off the brackets and pendants. He considered the last witness able to do the work. He did not remember going over the room, nor had he been in the room where MRS MOGRIDGE slept since she had charge of the house. He put brass stops to those pipes where brackets were not to be placed again, and he knew that some months ago gas was laid on in this room, and that the gas was disconnected, but had been laid on again about half-past nine on Saturday morning. He turned on the gas and went with Mr Manley into the room where the brackets had not been removed, and found there was no gas there. He fetched the gas man to see if it was properly turned on, and he examined the meter and said "It is all free." He afterwards let some water out from the meter, and the gas came all right. He tried all the new connections. - The Coroner in summing up remarked that the cause of death was clear, and that he did not think there had been any criminal intention on the part of any one, but it was for the Jury to say if there had been gross carelessness on the part of some one. It was evident that carelessness had occurred, and he hoped it would be a caution to gas fitters for the future. - The Jury having consulted together for a few minutes, the Foreman (Mr Lambshead) said the Jury returned a verdict to the following effect, "We find that the deceased died from inhaling gas, and we think there was carelessness on the part of Mr Fouraker, in not making a particular examination of the room occupied by the deceased, but we do not think that it amounted to criminal carelessness. The Coroner cautioned Mr Fouraker to be more careful for the future. The Inquiry lasted from half-past six to nearly eleven o'clock. Mr F. Manley, accompanied by Captain Graham, a member of the Jury, made a close search of the room on Tuesday, and found a gas pipe plug on the floor, which suggests that it must have been blown out after the women had gone to sleep. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 24 July 1875
TORQUAY - The Alleged Death By Violence In Pimlico. - The Inquest upon the body of ELIZABETH CROKER was held at the Town Hall on Tuesday evening, when the following particulars were given before a Jury of which Mr John Brittan was the Foreman. After the Jury had viewed the body which was lying in Pimlico, Maria Tucker said, she resided in Pimlico, and kept a lodging-house. She knew the deceased who had lived in her house sixteen months with a man called BUCKPITT, a lumper. The deceased died on Monday at half-past two, but complained of being ill on Saturday evening. The witness advised the deceased to have a doctor, and went to Mr Tozer's to get an order for the doctor; Mrs Tozer would not let her have one, because Mr Tozer was not home, but told her to come again. Witness said the deceased needed the doctor immediately. She then sent for Mr Gamble, surgeon. She had seen her kicked and struck by Buckpitt. She saw him hit her across the face with his dinner of bread and meat in a cloth, and the deceased said, "Why did you do that for after my hard day's work?" She did not touch him. She had seen Buckpitt kick the deceased in her legs, and saw him knock the deceased on a Sunday. Witness did not think he would have inflicted any bodily injury on the deceased if he had not been in liquor. Buckpitt and the deceased lived pretty comfortably together, except at times when he was drunk. She sent the order which she received from Mr Tozer to Mr Gill about half-past one o'clock on Monday. He came about three, but the deceased died about half-past two. Witness did not think that Buckpitt ill-used the deceased who was a very hard-working and industrious woman. Witness gave the deceased some ginger and pale brandy, and put up a mustard poultice on her body. - Mary Dennis, the wife of William Dennis, a plasterer, stated that they had apartments at the back of Mrs Tucker's house, and had resided there about six weeks. She knew the deceased who died in witness's arms on Monday. About eleven o'clock on Monday morning the deceased complained to witness of a pain in her body. She again complained to witness on Sunday. Witness had not seen Buckpitt ill use her, but believed that they had a few words twice. Some time since, on a Sunday, she heard the deceased and Buckpitt have a few words, and he struck her in the face with his hand, knocking her down to the floor, she was helped up by Mrs tucker and some other woman. On Friday Buckpitt came home the worse for liquor. He complained to the deceased that his supper was not ready. The deceased replied, "How could I get your supper before, when I have been out all day hard to work." She never heard the deceased complain of being in want. A man named Harrington here stood up and wished to be allowed to speak, but the Coroner refused, saying he might want him to speak presently. - William Leat, a painter, lodging at Mrs Tucker's house, said on Monday morning, just before six o'clock, he saw the deceased in the stairs holding her side, and complaining of pain. He told the deceased that she might go up in his room along with his wife. Witness had not heard the deceased complain of being served badly. He thought that the deceased was afraid to go back into her own room, but it was only a supposition. The deceased had her dress on and was not crying. - Sarah Jane Leet, wife of the last witness, stated that she had known the deceased for a short time. The deceased came into witness's room on Monday morning, just before six o'clock, and laid down by the side of her bed. When witness asked the deceased if she felt any better, she said she had a pain in her left side. The deceased remained in witness's room about half-an-hour, but did not say what made her leave her own room. She had a short nap while in witness's room, but afterwards returned to her own, and was given a cup of tea by Mrs Tucker's servant. There was a large number of lodgers in Mrs Tucker's house. On Sunday the deceased complained that she felt very unwell on her inside. She had heard Buckpitt and deceased have a few words "such as man and wife would have." If there had been a great quarrel in the room of the deceased witness must have heard it. The Coroner here called the man Harrington before him, and he made the following statement: On Saturday night I was in Mr Pim's beerhouse, which is situated four or five doors from the house in which the deceased lodged. Buckpitt was there and four or five strangers - navvys employed on the sewerage words - were also present. The deceased was there, sang a song, danced and gave Buckpitt threepence. As she was going out the door she stumbled and fell. She got up and said "Look at my arm." Buckpitt said "Serve you right, good job if you'd broke your neck." I was drinking with Buckpitt all the afternoon, and he was between half drunk and drunk. The Coroner: Perhaps that is what I should consider drunk. - Catherine Harrington, stated that she and her husband resided at Mrs Tucker's house. She knew the deceased and Buckpitt. Witness slept in the same room as Buckpitt and the deceased, but saw very little of them except at bed time, as her trade called her out of doors a great deal. She never knew the deceased and Buckpitt to have a row in the bedroom. She did not know who went to bed first on Friday night last. The deceased first complained to her of the pain in her stomach on Sunday morning. On Monday morning the deceased was in bed when witness got up, and complaining of being very thirsty witness fetched her a cup of water. If the deceased got out of bed on Monday morning it must have been whilst witness was asleep, and she did not complain of being served bad by Buckpitt. On Sunday night when witness and her husband went to bed Buckpitt was in bed asleep. The deceased came into the room just after they went to bed. - By a Juror: I have never seen the deceased the worse for liquor. - Mr S. Gamble, surgeon, stated that about eleven o'clock on Monday morning he was called to see the deceased in a house in Pimlico. He found her in bed; she was quite conscious, but almost pulseless, and her hands and feet were cold. She was very sick, and suffered from ramping pains in the bowels. He asked her whether she had taken or done anything which would produce those symptoms. He requested Mrs Tucker to apply some poultices to the body of the deceased, and also to give her some brandy. Witness considered the deceased, who did not make any complaint of ill-treatment, to be in immediate danger. He made an external examination of the body to see if there were any external marks of violence, but found only a slight abrasion on one knee, which might have been caused by kneeling, or a fall. He believed the deceased was suffering from a rupture. He attributed the cause of death to English cholera and the consequent exhaustion. Buckpitt was here called forward, who, in reply to a question put by the Coroner, whether he would like to make a statement, said he did not, except that he did not think the deceased dangerously ill. - The Coroner addressing the Jury, said that they had several witnesses before them, who had proved that Buckpitt had ill-used the deceased, and as recently as Friday night he struck her in the face. On Sunday the deceased complained that she was unwell, and on Monday she died. The question before them was how the deceased came by her death. A witness sleeping in the same room as deceased and Buckpitt, distinctly stated that Buckpitt did not ill-use the deceased whilst in that room. Buckpitt had very properly not denied ill-using her. He (the Coroner) was sure the state of society in Mrs Tucker's house was very bad. If the cause of death had been ill-treatment of a recent occasion, marks of violence must have been found on the body. - The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes." The Coroner concurred in the verdict, and thought it was the only verdict under the circumstances that could have been returned. Buckpitt was then called forward by the Coroner, who cautioned him as to his future conduct. He believed he acted in a proper manner when sober, but his conduct when tipsy was very bad. If he (Buckpitt) should ever be allied to another woman he hoped he would treat her kindly. Mrs Tucker also received a sever caution respecting the conduct of her house, and the Coroner hoped she would manage it better for the future.

Torquay Times And South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 August 1875
EXETER - Distressing Suicide. - A painful case of suicide was brought to light at Exeter between four and five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. As a woman named Dunn was walking in the fields adjoining the river Exe, just above Salmon Pool, she found a girl's hat, and underneath it a letter, on the envelope of which the following words were written:- "To my dear mother, MRS BIDDER, Christow, near Exeter. I have an aunt living in Parr-street, St. Sidwell's; Cumming is her name." The woman took the letter with all speed to P.C. Clements, who immediately proceeded to Parr-street and found out Mrs Cumming. The latter opened the letter and immediately recognised the writing as that of her niece, ELIZA JANE BIDDER. The letter was couched in the most affectionate terms. The girl admitted that she had been leading a wicked life, and had proved a disgrace to her relatives; and for this reason she had determined to put an end to her existence. She expressed a hope that her parents would forgive her for the trouble she had caused them, and that her sister would turn out a better girl. Whilst the constable was thus employed, some men living near the Quay procured the drags and after a short search the body was recovered near Salmon Pool, and conveyed to the Port Royal Inn, where it awaits an Inquest. On the deceased being searched, a letter similar to the one above referred to was found in her pocket, which had the appearance of having been written some time. Subsequent enquiries lead to the conclusion that the statement made by the girl in the letter, to the effect that she had been leading a wicked life, is not without foundation. A few months ago her friends procured her a good situation at Torquay, but she left there, and it seems that it was only on Tuesday that her whereabouts was discovered. The presumption is that immediately she found out that her friends were on her track she ran away and committed the fatal act, which, to judge from the letter found in her pocket, has been premeditated for some time past. The deceased is 21 years of age, and daughter of a labourer residing at Christow. The deceased has lived in different situations at Torquay for several years past. The last place at which she resided was at Mrs Fowles', Kendall Villa, but she was discharged from there about a fortnight since. The Inquest on the body of the deceased was held at the Port Royal Inn, Exeter, before Mr Coroner Crosse, when, after hearing the evidence of the various witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased committed Suicide, whilst in an Unsound Mind."

Torquay Times And South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 October 1875
TORQUAY - Inquest At The Town Hall. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Monday evening, at seven o'clock, on the body of ERNEST, illegitimate child of JANE COOK, aged one year and nine months, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr Wakeham was the Foreman. - JANE COOK, dressmaker, the mother of the child, stated that she was a single woman, and resided at 1, Market Street. She was confined in the Union, and remained there a month after. She then put the child with Mrs Burridge, of 36 Higher Union Street, because she could not attend to it and her business. Mrs Burridge kept it over 12 months. Witness went to live at Mrs Sims, Hyde Park Terrace, Ellacombe, after she left the Union; there were three women living with her at Hyde Park Terrace, Ellacombe, but she did not care to let either of them have it. She nursed the child for one month- the time she was in the Union where she was confined. Then she gave the child - a boy - to Mrs Burridge. After that she gave the child to Mrs Vincent of Stentford's Hill, who kept it for a month. She took the child from Mrs Burridge because that person being a widow woman had to give it up to go to a situation. Mrs Vincent could keep it no longer as it was not convenient for her. Since April, 1874, she had been living at Mr Brocken's, hair-dresser, of 1 Market Street. After she took the child from Mrs Vincent, she put it with Mrs Setters, a widow of Ellacombe. That was about three months ago. She kept it about six weeks, and then the child was put with Mrs Uren, of No. 3, Pimlico. She paid Mrs Setters and Mrs Uren 3s. 6d. a week. The child was put with Mrs Uren on Tuesday, 14th September. She had only seen it twice since, viz., on Tuesday the 21st, and Friday last. There was nothing the matter with the child when she put it with Mrs Uren; but it was never a strong child. It was only recently that she thought the child was delicate. On Saturday morning at six o'clock Mrs Uren sent for her to come and see the child as it was ill. Before going to see the child she sent for Dr Powell. When she got to the child, it seemed to be dying, and she went to meet the girl she had sent for Dr Powell, who stated he could not come, and she then went for Dr Gill. She then went to her lodgings to get some money and returned to the child, which however died about ten minutes after she got there, and before the doctor came. Mrs Uren had one nurse child besides hers, and a little girl of her own about 10 years old. Although she resided only four minutes walk from where the child lived she did not see it for the whole week it was with Mrs Uren. - Annie Maria Uren said she was a widow, living at No. 3, Pimlico. She had the child a week and three days. The child was taken to her by Mrs Setter's daughter. Her son got 10s. a week. She received 3s. 6d. for one child, 4s. for the other, and 2s. from the parish. She had had 15 children, 10 of whom had died in fits, all of them under three years and nine months. The deceased child did not die of fits, but slept away. She fed the children on bread and milk. When the child was brought to her it could not stand. She believed the weakness of the child was in its back, and was caused by sitting. About 12 months ago an illegitimate child died in her house. Setters said she had kept the child for six weeks, and it seemed very weak in the back, and when she told the mother so, she gave her a pair of stays for it at once. JANE COOK, re-called, said the child had been weak since it was four months old. - Dr Powell stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the child. He found sufficient disease to account for death. He considered the primary cause of death to be tubercular disease and the secondary cause cerebral effusion. He found nothing to lead him to have any suspicion. The Coroner summed up. The child was one of these unfortunate ones which, unless the Coroner looked after them, nobody did. After the evidence of Dr Powell, they could only arrive at the verdict that death resulted from "Natural Causes". Verdict accordingly.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 January 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Monday afternoon, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of NICHOLAS TUCKER, who met his death under the circumstances narrated below. The first witness called was Mr John Billingsley Richardson, house-surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, who stated that on January 5th, the deceased was admitted into the Infirmary from Dartmouth. He saw the deceased soon after his admission and found him to be suffering from a compound fracture of all the bones of the right foot. It was necessary to amputate the foot the same evening, which was performed by Mr James Pollard, witness and Mr W. Pollard, Mr Huxley being also present. The deceased progressed favourably for the first 48 hours, and then haemorrhage set in, which was topped at the time. It came on continually after that, and it was probably due to ossification of the arteries. It became necessary that the leg should be amputated above the knee joint, which was done on Saturday last. It was successful as far as it went, but about an hour after he died from exhaustion consequent upon the loss of blood. - Samuel James Stevens, a labourer of Dittisham, said he knew the deceased, who was a labourer of Dittisham. The deceased was 59 years of age. On Sunday January 9th, he saw the deceased at the Infirmary when he told witness how he became injured. He said that he was on board a lighter laden with sand going to Kingswear and on reaching there the lighter ran against the jetty, forcing back the bowsprit which jammed his foot between the end of the bowsprit and fore-hatchway. The deceased was first taken across the river to Dartmouth, where Dr Soper saw him and ordered him to be taken to the Infirmary. The Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Taylor was the Foreman, returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The Jury gave their fees towards the funds of the Infirmary.

BABBICOMBE - Inquest at Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at the Globe Inn, Babbicombe, this (Friday) afternoon before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of BLANCHE SHARLAND, the illegitimate child of a woman named SHARLAND, residing at Babbicombe. It appears that the deceased, who was about two years of age, slept with her mother and was found dead in bed by her on Thursday morning. Dr Chilcote was sent for, but he found that life was quite extinct, and refused to give a certificate of death. The Coroner was communicated with, and under the circumstances ordered a post mortem examination to be made, which was performed by Dr Chilcote.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 March 1876
COCKINGTON - Sudden Death At Cockington. - An Inquest was held at Cockington on Monday afternoon, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of MARIA NORTHWAY, daughter of a labourer at Cockington. It appears that during Friday night the child was seized with convulsions, and died on Saturday afternoon, at two o'clock. Mr Pollard was called in, but his services were of no avail. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The deceased was five years of age.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 15 April 1876
PAIGNTON - Fatal Accident At Paignton. - An Inquest was held at Paignton, on Monday, by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, respecting the death of JOSEPH ROWE, carter, who died on Saturday from the effects of an accident that occurred on the previous evening. The deceased was returning from Staverton, whither he had been to fetch a new cart, and had nearly reached Paignton, when, whilst standing up in the cart, he turned to speak to a passer-by, overbalanced himself and fell out, breaking the spinal cord. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 22 April 1876
TORQUAY - Supposed Suicide. - A man named GEORGE COLE, was found in the stream, at the bottom of old Mill Lane, this (Friday) morning. He was lying face downwards, and is supposed to have committed suicide. The body was conveyed to the Rising Sun Inn, where an Inquest will be held.

TORQUAY - Sad Death Of An Old Lady In Torquay. - An Inquest was held at 4, Sunbury Terrace, on Tuesday morning, at ten o'clock, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of MRS ANN ELIZABETH BIGGAR, who met her death under the circumstances mentioned below. The first witness called was Mrs Emma Burge, wife of Mr T. Burge, builder, residing at 5 Sunbury Terrace, who stated that she had known the deceased about four or five years, and had been in the habit of seeing her almost every day. She last saw the deceased on the previous Saturday night about quarter to ten o'clock, at her house. She then appeared as well as usual and in perfect spirits. She often complained of shakiness and weakness in her foot, and the deceased told witness that she had recently met with an accident at Newton, falling and hurting her arm. The deceased lived in the house alone, with no one to regularly attend upon her. Witness scarcely ever saw the deceased on Sundays and she was not astonished at not seeing her on the previous Sunday. On Monday morning as she had not fetched her milk as usual, witness knocked at the door about ten o'clock. She knocked loudly three or four times, and not receiving any answer, she became alarmed, and sent to Mr Oliver's at the next house, and also sent for Mr Burge, and they called the police. There was nothing in deceased's manner to lead witness to think that she had committed suicide. Witness's impression was that the deceased fell in going up the stairs, her arm having given away. When the police broke open the door, witness found the deceased lying at the foot of the stairs, partly undressed, and quite dead. The husband of the deceased died about twelve months since. Witness did not think that the deceased had been to bed when found. - Mr William Powell, surgeon, stated that between twelve and one o'clock he was called to Sunbury Terrace by Sergeant Ockford. He found the deceased at the bottom of the stairs, life being quite extinct. The body was lying on the right side, with the face rather downwards. There was a graze on the forehead and also one on the bridge of the nose. By an external examination he could not tell whether the vertebrae was broken, but the neck appeared to be twisted a great deal. He thought that there was sufficient violence to cause concussion of the brain, and to render her insensible and the probability was, that, lying in the strained position she was, she very soon expired. The grazes led him to suppose that the deceased fell against the edge of the stairs, and he should not think that the blows were inflicted by any sharp instrument. By the Jury: He should think that the position she was lying was sufficient to stop her breathing. Sergeant Ockford stated that on Monday morning he received information from Mr Burge, who supposed that something was wrong at 4 Sunbury Terrace. He knocked at the door very loudly, but could get no answer. He found the doors and windows securely fastened, and had to break open two doors before he could get into the house. He found the deceased lying with her feet in the stairs, and her head resting on the mat at the foot. On the fourth stair he found a candlestick with the candle evidently having burnt out. By her side he found a satchel with patchwork in it. Her watch was fastened round the neck with a black guard, and the watch appeared to have stopped at half-past four o'clock. In her pocket was a purse containing 7s. 6d. in silver and some coppers, and some trinkets and a ring. He believed that the deceased came down for her satchel and then fell down. There were no marks on the body to lead him to believe that there had been foul play. The bed clothes had been thrown back and on the bed he found a box containing some bracelets and other jewellery. The body was quite rigid. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, of whom Mr Saunders was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 April 1876
TORQUAY - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the Rising Sun Inn on Friday evening on the body of GEORGE COLES, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner. It appears from the evidence adduced that the deceased, who is a labourer, 75 years of age, and very infirm, was found by George Morgan on Friday morning last in the stream which runs across the road leading to Cockington near the Devon Rosery. it is supposed that the deceased fell in whilst returning home. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr Samuel Lambshead, senr., was the Foreman.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 6 May 1876
ST MARY CHURCH - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Palk Arms, St. Mary Church, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN WAYMOUTH, a retired baker, residing at Lummaton Place. Deceased had for a long time been a great sufferer, and about a fortnight since broke his leg. This increased his suffering, and whilst his niece was at the surgeon's to obtain medicine to alleviate the pain he hanged himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 May 1876
NEWTON ABBOT - Suicide At Newton Abbot. - On Wednesday morning a waggoner named SKINNER, in the employ of Messrs. Pinsent and Sons, brewers and spirit merchants, hung himself in his employers' waggon-house. The unfortunate man rose about six o'clock and went to the stable to feed the horses, and two hours later his lifeless body was found by a fellow-workman suspended from one of the high beams by a piece of strong tarred rope. The act must have been very deliberate, for the beam could only be reached by standing on one of the carts, and the rope being properly adjusted, he probably made a spring from the cart. He leaves a widow and several children. Some months ago the poor fellow was under treatment from an affection of the head, and several times since he has shown symptoms of a return of the malady. Later on in the day an Inquest was held when these facts were deposed to, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 27 May 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident occurred on Wednesday at the Sewerage Works, in the No. 2 shaft at Hope's Nose. It appears that about ten o'clock on the morning of the day in question, a young man named RICHARD PAYNTER was descending the shaft when by some means the bucket in which he was descending hitched in the side of the shaft, and tipping over pitched out PAYNTER who fell heavily to the bottom. Just as the deceased reached the bottom the bucket unhooked and falling to the bottom of the shaft struck the deceased heavily, and either by his fall or the bucket his hip was broken as was also one of his arms. Assistance was quickly at hand and the deceased was hoisted to the surface and speedily removed to the Torbay Infirmary, where his injuries received every attention from the house surgeon, Mr J. B. Richardson. The deceased, however, expired about six o'clock the same evening. An Inquest will be held this (Friday) evening.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 3 June 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Navvy. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Friday evening last, on the body of RICHARD PAYNTER, a navvy employed at the sewerage works, who met his death under the circumstances recorded in our last issue. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Sudden Death On The Newton Road. - On Saturday morning a sad occurrence took place on the road between Newton and Torquay. JOHN HUNT, a carter, in the employ of Messrs. Vicary and Sons, wholesale tanners, of Newton Abbot, had been sent to Torquay to gather skins as usual, and was returning with his horse and waggon between three and four o'clock. He was accompanied by his little boy, seven years old, and when near Law's Bridge the man said to his son that he was feeling very bad. Almost immediately, and whilst the horse was going on, the man fell off his seat in the front part of the waggon to the ground. The boy stopped the horse at once, and several persons happening to be near took up his father, who was found to be dead. The body was removed to the Torbay Infirmary, where an Inquest was held in the evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner. The evidence shewed that the cause of death was heart disease, and a verdict to this effect was returned. The deceased, who leaves a widow and six children, lived in the Grove, Newton Abbot, and was 40 years of age.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 17 June 1876
TORQUAY - Found Dead. - An Inquest was held at the Country House Inn on Monday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of RICHARD LEMON, the infant child of MRS LEMON, of 28 Ellacombe Terrace. It appears that on Sunday, when MRS LEMON awoke she found the deceased by her side dead, and it is supposed that the child was over-lain by its mother. A verdict of Death from Suffocation was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 1 July 1876
TOTNES - Drowned In The Dart. - A man, supposed to be called STOCKMAN, and who is stated as belonging to Paignton, but who has been staying at Totnes for a few days, was drowned on Wednesday night while bathing in the Dart. He must have been able to swim, for having crossed the river he turned to come back, but was observed by some boys near the spot to sink suddenly. The river was dragged and the body recovered, after it had been in the water for an hour, and was taken to the Seymour Hotel, where an Inquest was held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

TORQUAY - Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at Ash's Commercial Hotel, on Saturday evening before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances of the death of ALICE JANE OWEN, a young lady, who met her death under the circumstances narrated below. The first witness called was Mr James Brown, residing at Sidmouth View, Babbicombe, who deposed as follows:- I have known the deceased some years. On Saturday morning I met her in the village some time before she went to bathe. She was going in the direction of Babbacombe, and I was going in a contrary direction. I had three nieces bathing, and about twelve o'clock, I was with my three boys sitting on the Babbacombe Down, waiting for my three nieces to come up. Whilst I was sitting there, I saw two ladies in the water. I could see the machines and beach perfectly. The two ladies came from one machine, and at first they were no distance out; apparently one was teaching the other to swim. I saw they had the ropes, and they were walking backwards, and at last they were out such a distance that I became alarmed, and said to my boys "They are drowning." The event occurred almost as quickly as I have related it, and they had apparently lost the rope. I saw a boy standing near a boat, and I shouted out "The ladies are drowning, put out the boat, quick." There were several persons on the beach, and I took off my hat and waved it, to draw the attention of those on the beach. The lad at first seemed to take no notice, and I still continued shouting, and then he went up to the house of the keeper of the machines, which is on the beach. I then saw him go back and put off the boat, and I saw another boat come in another direction. There was a lad on the downs on a pony, and he, at my request, galloped off for Dr Chilcote. I saw nothing more, and as fast as I could, I went into my house and got some brandy. When I got on the beach, the body was on a plank, and appeared to be dead. I don't know that there is any special arrangements for saving life, as far as I am aware of. - By the Jury: The bodies were not more than 40 feet off the beach. There did not appear to be any one in charge of the boat. The machine was not in the water at all. The tide was falling. The beach of my own knowledge is dangerous, unless persons know it. I should say the body was in the water three minutes. Drs. Steel and Chilcote were indefatigable in their attention and every remedy human nature could think of was applied. I remained with the body three hours, but animation could not be restored. - Elias Waymouth, deposed as follows:- The bathing establishment on Oddicombe beach belongs to me. I was there this morning and within a few minutes of twelve o'clock I let the machine to the deceased and her sister. I am not certain which I let the machine to. It was about five or six minutes after I let them the machine they went into the water. I let the machine down to the water, the front wheels being about a foot and half in the water. I have ropes about six fathoms long attached to each machine. I saw the two girls go into the water. I was in one of my own boats at the time. I may have been from 10 to 12 yards at the time they went into the water. After they went into the water I went off about 50 yards to a lobster pot which was quite abreast of the machine. My back was turned, and I heard someone shout, I pulled for the shore and saw one on the water, apparently to me, floating. I pulled direct to the lady, which was floating took her in my arms, and pulled to the shore. She was lying face downwards. The way the boat had made it touch the beach directly. I took up the lady, and I then passed it to my wife. It appears to me that one went without a hand line or both had hold of the same, as one line was on the steps. I picked up the line where I rescued the second lady. There were several ladies on the beach. My wife attends to the bathers, as well as myself. I was in attendance on this machine. My little boy - called Thomas - went with my wife to get a drink of water, and the boy who gave the alarm was a stranger. Supposing that I had been at the capstan to pull the machine in shore, I was not so far away at the lobster pot, and if I had to launch a boat I should not have got to the bathers as quickly as I rowed from the lobster pot. I consider it to be my duty to have a boat in attendance. I took the second body on shore, and was there whilst attempts were made to revive life, but they were unsuccessful. That body is that of the deceased. When I took up the bodies I called for medical aid. The ladies were bathing in a good part of the beach. They had bathed at the beach four seasons before the present, and were thoroughly acquainted with the beach. I have a life-buoy in the boat on the beach, and I rescued the deceased with a grapnel I had in the boat. The body was perfectly visible, and when I took her up she was alive, as she moved in the boat, and threw up a quantity of salt water. I should think the body was in the water three minutes. - Wm. Thomas stated as follows:- I was in the cottage on the beach when a little boy came up and said that one of the ladies was drowning. I ran down and pushed off the boat, but Mr Waymouth had reached the bodies before me. - John Thomas Hancorn stated as follows: I am a chemist residing at the Medical hall, St. Mary Church. The deceased is not any relation of ours, but is a friend. She is 15 years of age. I don't know MRS OWEN'S name neither do I know the name of MRS OWEN'S late husband. He was a captain in the merchant service. The deceased's sister is called ADA. They came to our house to spend the day, and they left about quarter to 12 to go for a bathe. About one o'clock a little girl, who went with the deceased, came and told me that the deceased and her sister had got out of their depth. She said she saw one brought in. About half-past one, I saw the body of the deceased on the beach, on a plank covered over with flannel. Medical men were there, and were attempting to restore life, but could not. One or other of them have been to my house frequently to bathe, and they know the beach well. - The Coroner in summing up, said that the evidence pointed to one conclusion, a conclusion which it was for the Jury to arrive at. He then directed attention to the different points of the evidence, and added that there was no direct evidence to shew how the deceased came by her death, the only evidence which could shew how the deceased came by her death was that of her sister, but she was in such a condition that it would be dangerous to call her at present. The evidence pointed out that it was a pure accident. Waymouth had given his evidence in a very straight forward manner, and he (Waymouth) considered he was in attendance, although he went some distance off. There could be no doubt that there has been no wilful neglect on his part, and that he did his utmost to save the life of the deceased. Waymouth was not doing what he ought to have done, namely keeping a boat in attendance on the machines. He would wish the Jury to tell Waymouth that if not legally, at least morally he would not be doing his duty if he did not have a boat in attendance. The Jury retired to consider their verdict, and on their return, the Foreman, Mr Robert Lear, said the Jury had returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They wished the Coroner to inform Mr Waymouth that he had not given proper attention in not having a boat and that he should be told to be more cautious in the future. The Coroner cautioned Waymouth in accordance with the Jury's request.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 July 1876
DEVONPORT - Another Murder At Devonport. - We are, unfortunately, again required to record a fatal quarrel between a man and his wife, resulting in the death of the woman from the effects of a fall, following on a blow. A shoemaker named THOMAS ELLICOTT, residing at Devonport, is now in custody on the charge of having caused his wife's death. An Inquiry into the circumstances will be held before the magistrates this morning, and the Coroner holds an Inquest this afternoon. - Plymouth Mercury.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 July 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Fall. - On Wednesday afternoon, a little girl, four years of age, named LEEM, whose parents reside at Upton, fell over the quarry at the rear of Prospect Terrace, Upton, and received such injuries that she died shortly after being admitted to the Torbay Infirmary. An Inquest was held on Thursday evening at the Town Hall, before Mr H. Michelmore, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The Jury were sworn in bare-headed in front of the dead house, not being allowed to enter the Infirmary, through the Governors refusing to allow Inquests to be held there after seven o'clock. The Coroner at the conclusion of the Inquest spoke in rather strong terms of this piece of red-tapeism, referring to the great inconvenience it would cause both to the Jurymen and Coroner alike.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 September 1876
DAWLISH - Bathing Fatality At Dawlish. - On Monday morning MR EDWARD WAY, of London, went with a friend to bathe at Dawlish. Shortly after entering the water he appeared in difficulty, and although help reached him before he sank animation could not be restored. An Inquest was held on Tuesday, when a verdict of "Accident Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 September 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident In Torbay. - On Tuesday evening an Inquest was held at the British Workman, No. 2, Vaughan Parade, on the body of GEORGE SCOTT, who was drowned in Torbay on Friday, September 8th. The Jury having viewed the body which was lying in a store on the Old Quay, the first witness called was WILLIAM SCOTT, father of the deceased. He stated that his son was in the 25th year of his age, and was a fisherman. He was drowned in the Bay on September 8th. Witness took a punt and paddled out with the deceased, to the barque Lizzie Fox, together with his youngest son, ALBERT SCOTT. Witness boarded the barque and the deceased steered the punt alongside the vessel, which, on his attempting to board, capsized with the force at which the vessel was going through the water. The deceased was thrown into the water, but the body was not recovered, although every exertion was made to do so. On Tuesday morning about a quarter to six, when abreast of Meadfoot Beach, he saw a body about a quarter a mile off the shore. He towed the body into the harbour, and recognised it as that of his son. Everything was done that could be done on board the barque and, with the exception that there was no boat ready to launch, he had no fault to find. There was a boat lowered in about three minutes. The deceased, when in the water, caught hold of the punt's keel, which was bottom upwards, and witness then assisted to lower the boat. After that was done he went on the poop to look for the deceased, and could not see him. He believed that when the punt righted it struck and stunned the deceased. Samuel Down, captain of the Lizzie Fox, of Brixham, stated that on 8th of September he was coming into the harbour. The father of the deceased came aboard and he agreed with him that he should assist him into harbour. Hearing a noise under the ship's quarter he left the wheel, and on looking over the side he saw the boat in the act of capsizing. He saw the deceased and his brother in the boat. Witness went over the ship's side and caught the brother by the collar and placed him on board the vessel. Witness was reaching over to the deceased when the boat's painter parted, and the boat capsized with the deceased under. The deceased rose to the surface and swam some distance. He did not hear him utter any cry for help. The life-buoy was thrown quite close to the deceased but he did not take hold of it although requested by his father to do so. The Coroner pointed out that there appeared to be no blame attached to anyone and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury fees were given to the widow of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - 30 September 1876
PAIGNTON - Fatal Fall At Paignton. Dr Pridham Censured By The Jury. - An Inquest was held at the Police-station on Thursday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of JOHN MICHELMORE, of Paignton. The Jury were sworn outside the Infirmary, and having viewed the body adjourned to the Police-station, where the following evidence was taken:- EDWARD MICHELMORE, father of the deceased, a labourer living at Paignton, stated that his son would have been thirteen years old on the 9th of October. On Saturday, September the 16th, he was called home to take his son to the Infirmary by the orders of Dr Pridham. His son said he went into an orchard with Mr Palk's son to pick some apples for dinner, when he fell off the tree and broke his arm. He took the deceased in a cab to the Infirmary. He had seen his son three times since the accident, but he did not vary in his statement as to how the accident happened. He saw his son on Monday morning and evening, and he was then very ill. Mr John B. Richardson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that on Saturday 16th of September, he received the deceased from his father. He had him placed in bed, but did not minutely examine his arm, as it had already been placed in splints by Dr Spurway. There were no other injuries. He did not open the bandages on the arm of the deceased for two days. On examining the arm on the 18th of September, he found a compound fracture of both bones of the arm. There was no fault in the manner in which the splints had been placed. He did not at first consider the deceased to be in danger, but, on the 22nd, he observed that he was dangerously ill. From that time he had very slight hopes that the deceased would live, and he died on September 26th, the cause of death being tetanus brought on by the fracture of the arm. Everything was, in his opinion, done to save the boy's life. - Frank Palk, son of Mr Charles Palk, butcher, of Paignton, stated that in company with the deceased, he went into his father's orchard to pick apples on Saturday, 16th of September. The deceased went up the trees to shake down the apples when the branch, which was rotten, upon which he stood, broke, and the deceased fell to the ground, with his arm under him, a distance of seven or eight feet. The deceased got up and said it had knocked the wind out of him, and after a while he said he thought he had broken his arm. A woman then took the deceased home. - Mrs Elizabeth Ann Fuge stated that seeing the injury the deceased had received, she took him to Dr Pridham. She saw him, and he told her to take the deceased to Dr Spurway, when she said she could not. Dr Pridham did not do anything to him. They waited there an hour and a quarter and then Dr Spurway arrived and he set the arm of the deceased, and put it in splints. - The Coroner said that he apprehended the Jury would have no difficulty in agreeing that the deceased met his death accidentally. The witness, Mrs Fuge, certainly deserved credit for obtaining medical skill for the poor boy, and he wished he could say the same of every person who seemed to have been acquainted with the accident. He did not wish to say more in the absence of a professional gentleman. Any person knowing the way, ought to render assistance, and, although not legally bound to do so, yet he thought they would all consider themselves morally bound to act. He could not understand why assistance was not earlier rendered, and it might have been that if assistance had been earlier given the poor boy's life might have been saved. The only person in this instance who could have rendered early assistance had refused for some reason or other to do so. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time passing a vote of censure upon Dr Pridham for not rendering earlier assistance. The Jury gave their fees to the father of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 November 1876
TORQUAY - Melancholy Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Mr Hatcher's, Vaughan Parade, today (Friday) at one o'clock, on the body of GEORGE CLAY RIX, son of MR RIX, of Nepaul, Torquay, who met his death under the following melancholy circumstances. The deceased was a member of the Leander Rowing club, and was present at the club supper held on Wednesday evening at Mr Hatcher's. After the supper, and shortly before ten o'clock, he was descending the staircase, preceded by Stephen Hatcher, when just before reaching the bottom, he hitched his heel, tripped, and fell to the bottom, striking his head against the wall, one of his feet being under him, and the other resting on the stair. He was assisted up, and placed on a chair, and slightly revived. Shortly after he was asked if he would go for a walk, and he replied "All right, Steve." Not seeming very well, he was taken upstairs, and put to bed. He was thought to be slightly stunned, and it was expected that after a little rest he would get better. He, however, never rallied, and about 12 o'clock a message was sent to his father that the deceased was unwell, and the father thinking his son might be ill, went to Mr Hatcher's and found him unconscious, apparently sleeping. Dr Gamble was speedily summoned, but before he arrived the deceased expired at quarter to two. Dr Gamble stated that the deceased died from a rupture of a blood vessel at the base of the skull, which was in a very congested state. It was a hopeless case from the first, and if medical aid had been called earlier the life of the deceased could not have been saved. The Coroner remarked that the deceased met his death purely accidentally. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was highly esteemed amongst a large number of friends, all of whom deeply regret his untimely end. The deceased will be buried tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon. The funeral will leave Nepaul at half-past two, and will be attended by the members of the Leander Rowing Club and the Italian Band.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 30 December 1876
TORQUAY - Fatal Fall. - On Wednesday night a woman named MARY ANN WOTTON, aged 51, the wife of ROBERT WOTTON, a plasterer, residing in Lower Union Lane, fell down stairs whilst in the act of retiring to bed. Her head was very badly cut and blood flowed freely. Her son was in bed at the time, and hearing his mother fall went to her assistance, and found she had received very serious injuries, and was quite insensible. Assistance was obtained and she was conveyed to the Infirmary in a cab, where her injuries received attention. She, however, never rallied, and died on Thursday morning at eleven o'clock. An Inquest will be held this (Friday) evening at the Town Hall.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 January 1877
TORQUAY - Fatal Fall From A Roof. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on Tuesday evening, on the body of JOHN TRICKEY. Mr Thomas Paish, lodging-house keeper, of Higher terrace, stated that on Monday last the deceased was repairing the roof when he fell to the yard below. Witness ran down stairs, and found the deceased lying on his back, and appearing quite unconscious, blood flowing profusely from the back of his head. There was a hammer lying near the deceased. The roof, which was slate, was rather flat. P.C. Fowler said that, having received information that an accident had happened, he went to 8 Higher Terrace, and found the deceased in a sitting position in the back yard. He called in Dr Lombe, who was passing, and he said that he was afraid that the deceased was dead, and recommended that he should be taken to the Torbay Infirmary. This witness did at once, but, when he arrived, Dr Richardson pronounced life to be extinct. Mr Richard Shinner said that the deceased had been in his employ for over twenty years. Witness told him to go and repair the roof on the previous week, and it was quite optional to him if he took a ladder to protect himself from falling off the roof. He examined the roof soon after the accident and saw marks which led him to believe that the deceased slipped from within two or three feet from the top. He believed that the accident arose from the wet state of the roof. Mary Stanlake, sister-in-law of the deceased, identified the body as that of her husband's sister's husband. He was 67 years of age, and she had never known him ill during the whole of his residence in Torquay. The Coroner in summing up, remarked that it was doubly dangerous during the wet weather for me to go on roofs, and expressed a hope that it would prove a warning to builders to caution men from going on roofs without proper appliances to keep them from falling. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 17 February 1877
TORQUAY - Killed By A Water Wheel. - An Inquest was held at the Torquay Police-station, on Tuesday evening, on the body of JAMES JOINT, a lad, who met his death under the following circumstances. James Rendell, a farmer, residing at Rocombe, stated that he knew the deceased, who was 14 years old. He took him out of the Newton Abbot Union 13 months ago, since which he had been in his employ. On Saturday, February 3rd, he was sent on an errand to Stoke, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. He afterwards received a message from a boy in Mr Bond's employ, who stated that the deceased was dead. Witness rode over to Stoke, and saw JOINT in a cart at Mr Bond's, quite insensible, and a man and woman attending to him. Dr Chilcote was sent for, but not being home, the deceased was removed to the Torbay Infirmary. Ann Pye, residing at Stoke-in-Teign-head, stated that on the afternoon of February 3rd, she saw the deceased standing near some machinery at Mr George Bond's linhay. The machinery at that time was not in motion. When she returned she saw the deceased lying in a linhay with a wound in his forehead, apparently in a dying state. George Mudge stated that about half-past three o'clock he was engaged in removing douse from the thrashing machine, and as he passed the linhay he saw the water-wheel stop, and the deceased coiled around the driving bar. A rope attached to the machinery became entangled around the boy and that brought the wheel up. Witness had the water stopped and the deceased was then taken from off the bar. The linhay was quite open, and, if children were playing about on the carts, they could easily reach the bar. He thought that the deceased got across the bar whilst in motion, and that his clothes became caught in the bar, because they had to cut his clothes before they could get the deceased off. Evidence was given by Mr Richardson, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, shewing that the deceased had sustained injuries to his skull, and also had both his thighs and two ribs broken, and that he died on Monday from the injuries which he had received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr Giles was the Foreman, and a recommendation was added that Mr Bond should be asked to cover in the machinery of the water wheel, so as to prevent like accidents in the future.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 14 April 1877
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - On Monday morning an Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of ROBERT SANDERS. It appears that the deceased, who was 57 years of age, was a carter in the employ of Messrs. Slade and Sons, and on Wednesday week last was delivering goods with a horse and cart at Kilmorie. Whilst returning, either from the noise of the engine near at hand, or from some other cause, the horse became frightened and started off, and the deceased either jumped or was thrown out of the vehicle. He sustained such injuries that he died on the following Friday morning at the Infirmary, where he had been removed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury, through Sergt. Ockford, gave their fees to the widow of the deceased, for whom a subscription is being raised, she being in very destitute circumstances. Messrs. Slade and Sons have given a subscription of £5, and they will be glad to receive additional subscriptions.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 26 May 1877
TORQUAY - Mysterious Death Of A Child At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Torquay Police Court, on Tuesday afternoon, before Dr Gaze, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY DONOVAN, a child, one year and eleven months old. Charlotte Rice stated that she was a widow, earned her living as a charwoman, and resided at Mrs Tucker's lodging-house. She had known the deceased for several months, the father and mother resided in the same house. On Friday, May 18th, she saw the deceased in the street, just before dinner. A short time after dinner, between one and two o'clock, she saw the deceased sitting in the stairs crying, and just then noticed that she was sick and appeared to be ill. Witness called the attention of deceased's mother to her condition. The child was crying very much and the mother came to the child. On Saturday morning she saw the child and it was then lying as if dead. The children of the DONOVANS were, as far as she had seen, well cared for and fed. - CATHERINE DONOVAN, mother of the deceased, stated that on Friday, about twelve o'clock, she gave the deceased her dinner of bread and meat, and tea, and Mr tucker gave her a baked potato. Having had her attention called to the deceased by the last witness, she went out to the stairs and found the deceased vomiting badly, and groaning very much. Seeing the condition of the child, witness asked some one standing near to run up stairs and see whether the child had been drinking something which had been left up stairs by a lodger. A person went up stairs and brought down a bottle which contained, she believed, spirits of salts, and she thought the deceased had drunk some of it, the cork being out. She then took the child to Mr Narrcott's, chemist, and he sold her two penny-worth of wine, which made the child sick. As it appeared to get worse about three o'clock, witness took the deceased to the Infirmary where it received attention, and the next morning about six o'clock she thought it was a little better. The deceased, however, never rallied, and died about one o'clock on Saturday morning. - John Hyalman, a wire-worker, stated that he kept a bottle of spirits of salts, in a tin case. There was a very small portion of salts in it, and it had not decreased in quantity during his absence. He kept his tools in a case under his bed; there were four beds in the room, and no lock to the door. It would be easy for a child to get into the room. - Mr Marsh, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, was the next witness examined. Mr Marsh: Before I give my evidence may I be allowed to ask whether I shall receive my fee. I have not been properly summoned, and I therefore decline to give my evidence. - The Coroner: I called at the Infirmary, and was told that Mr Richardson was ill and could not attend, and I then asked you to attend in the place of Mr Richardson. A summons is a mere matter of form, and I have not one with me now, and it is usual only tor quest the surgeon of an institution to attend. I have already summoned Mr Richardson, and you, I understand, come in his place. - Mr Marsh: I understand that when a person dies out of the Institution I am entitled to receive my fee. - The Coroner: When a person died in an Institution, it is not usual to give fees to house surgeons of such Institution who are the servants of the public, and I am not sure that it is in the present instance. However, I will take a note of your objection, and make enquiries, and if you are entitled to receive a fee, I will see that you get it, otherwise I am not allowed to give it, and if I paid it, I should pay it out of my own pocket. It might be rather hard, but it was one of the rules of the Institutions that house surgeons should not receive fees. Do you consent to give your evidence? - Mr Marsh: Yes, I do under protest. The witness then proceeded to state that the child was brought to the Infirmary on Friday afternoon. It was very cold, and had the appearance of having swallowed some poison. The symptoms were then such as to lead them to believe the child was suffering from acute bronchitis. Mr Richardson administered an emetic, which had the desired effect. The child was breathing very heavily, and getting very much worse, a poultice was placed at the back, and the child was then taken home by the mother at her own request. If the child had swallowed some of the spirits of salts, it would account for the great difficulty of breathing. It would depend upon the strength, but two drams of spirits of salts would be sufficient to cause death. - By the Jury: He believed that the secondary cause of death was acute bronchitis. He did see the child on Saturday morning, and the change was for the worse. Dr Campbell stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. The body was that of a well developed healthy child of about two years old. There were no external marks of violence, but there were patches of post mortem lividity over the trunk and limbs. The mucus membrane of mouth, tongue, and palate was shrivelled and softened. Both lungs were acutely congested - right vena cava and auricle destined with dark blood. The valves of the heart were healthy. The stomach showed patches of dark purple colour - externally - a ligature was applied below the pylorus, and another above the cardiac orifice, and the stomach dissected out. A small opening was made near the pylorus to examine the condition of the interior; the fluid was of the consistence of gruel - dark green in colour - the mucus membrane softened and coming off in patches, a ligature was again applied above the opening to preserve the remaining contents, and the whole stomach put into a jar and sealed. The liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, and large and small intestine were healthy, as was also the peritoneum. He did examine the brain. The appearance of the mouth, gullet and stomach were as such as might have been caused by taking such a poison as oxalic acid, or hydrochloric acid, supposing the poison to have been quickly vomited. Were the poison got rid of in this way, not so much local mischief would result as if it were retained for a length of time. The immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, which might have been produced by a dose of poison, not of itself necessarily fatal. Such secondary results are not uncommon. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, of whom Mr Gardener was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," caused by the accidental swallowing of some irritant poison, and recommended that in future all poisons essential for the performance of any business should be put in some place entirely without the reach of children. The Coroner, addressing the man Hyalman, said the Jury were of opinion that by allowing the bottle to remain on the floor he had been the cause of the death of the deceased, and he hoped he would be more careful in future. If there was a recurrence of any similar accident, he might depend that he would e visited by the penalty of the law, for leaving dangerous articles within the reach of children.

TORQUAY - A Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station on Tuesday evening, on the body of WILLIAM BOND, a little boy, aged three years, whose parents reside in Pimlico. Elizabeth Westaway, a laundress, residing at 1, Market Street, stated that about two o'clock she was in her bedroom facing the cliffs when she saw a little boy in a very dangerous position. The child appeared to be alone. She was for a moment absent from her room, and when she returned she saw a man carrying the child from the foot of the cliff. The child was outside the iron railings at the top of the cliff, having crept under. She was not sufficiently near to have cautioned the child. - Charles Snell, a whitesmith, stated that about two minutes after two, as he was returning to work, he was informed that a little child had fallen over the cliffs. Witness ran down the steps to the foot of the cliff, and, after searching about, he found the body of the child behind the buildings. When he picked it up it was breathing but died in his arms. There were some other children at the top of the cliff; the railings were about two feet from the edge of the cliff, and there was plenty of room for children to get through; it was a very dangerous place for children. A Juror remarked that it was 150 feet high. Mr Marsh stated the deceased was brought to the Torbay Infirmary shortly after two. It was then dead. On examining the body he found an extensive fracture of the skull, and there had been bleeding from the ear. There were no bones broken, and the injuries were such as would likely to result from a fall from such a distance, and quite sufficient to have caused death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Webber said there had been several accidents at the spot, and some better fence ought to e provided. Mr Butland quite agreed with this, and mentioned that the children were attracted to the edge by some kind of flowers which they wished to pick. Mr Pierce said the present fence was only a farce; there ought to be a wooden one.

KINGSKERSWELL - Sudden Death At Kingskerswell. - On Sunday evening MR and MRS ASHFORD, of Kingskerswell were out walking together, and then visited a friend's house. Soon after sitting down MRS ASHFORD complained of a pain in her chest, and fainted. Medical assistance was at once sent for; but before Dr Brown had arrived MRS ASHFORD had expired. At the Inquest held on Tuesday morning by Dr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, Dr Brown said he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found that there had been a rupture of one of the blood vessels of the heart, the walls of which were quite empty and dry. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 June 1877
TORQUAY - Suspicious Case Of Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, on Monday afternoon, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of a young woman, which was found in the water off the Torbay Road, on Sunday afternoon. The first witness called was - Thomas Ascott, a young man, who stated that on Sunday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, he observed a body floating in the water opposite the seats just past Sulyarde Terrace. The body was lying face downwards in about a foot of water. On seeing the body witness at once sent a companion, named Charles Harden, for a policeman, witness remaining opposite the body. A policeman soon arrived. The body was about six feet from the wall. - P.C. Trott stated that on Sunday afternoon his attention was called to the sea beach, a body being in the water. Whilst going for a boat, he saw one proceeding in the direction of the body, and it returned to the old quay with the body. He should think that the body was lying in about four or five feet of water, and was about seven or eight yards from the wall. - Daniel Skinner, a fisherman, stated that on Sunday afternoon seeing a crowd collected on the Torbay road, witness and two others rowed a boat to the spot, and the bow oarsman observed the dress of a female body floating in the water, being jammed between the rocks. Witness cast a rope around the armpits, and towed the body to the old pier. The body was in about two feet of water, and was about seven or eight fathoms from the wall. The tide was then on the ebb. The witness Ascott, in answer to the Coroner, stated that when he observed the body it was not, at the outside beyond ten feet from the wall. - P.C. Trott stated that, when the body was brought ashore by the last witness, he placed it in a shed on the quay, and ultimately it was removed to the mortuary at the Town Hall. The body was completely dressed, but there were no shoes on the feet, and the hair was hanging quite loose. He received from P.C. Adams the net produced. He had seen the deceased walking about the town on afternoons and evenings, and in company with a girl called Stockman. He was not aware of having seen the deceased talking to any men. he did not know the deceased by name, and did not know of any complaint having been lodged against her. - P.C. Adams stated that he found on Sunday afternoon a hair net and a piece of velvet on the wall just opposite the spot where the body was discovered. After having assisted placing the body in the shed, he returned to the spot and found the show produced at the foot of the wall in about six inches of water. - Sergt. Board stated that on Sunday afternoon he received information that a body of a drowned female had been recovered, and he at once sent for a medical man, and Dr Marsh arrived. He searched the body and found in the dress a pin, a photograph, a book and a pocket handkerchief. He could recognise the photograph of the young man. He also produced a hat which was left at the station by a person whom he did not know, but that hat had been identified as that belonging to the deceased. - The Coroner, in answer to a question from a Juror, stated that the book found on the deceased was a Biblical one, being the life of Mrs Hannah Moore. - JOHN POWLESLAND stated that he was milk seller at Barton. He had seen the body of the deceased and identified it as his daughter. She was eighteen years old and he last saw her alive on Saturday, June 9th, at Mr H. Lear's, St. Mary-Church, where she had been in service for the last two years. On Sunday morning, June 10th, he was told by Mrs Lear that his daughter had run away, but she did not come home to him. The deceased always appeared to be very steady, and was in the habit of coming home on Sunday afternoons. he was not aware that she was keeping company with any young man and had never seen her with one. He fancied that he had seen the features of the young man of the photograph produced, but could not state positively. he was not aware that the deceased had ever shewn any symptoms of insanity, and was not aware of her whereabouts from the time she left Mr Lear's. - Mrs Emily Lear stated that the deceased had been living in her employ about two years. On the Tuesday previous to Sunday, June 10th, witness gave the deceased notice to leave on the following Tuesday. The reason for giving the deceased notice was that in witness's absence she had gone away and left her children in the house alone, and when witness returned about half past eleven the children were greatly frightened. Witness did not speak to the deceased then but on the following morning gave her notice to leave. Of late the deceased had been in the habit of going out during witnesses absence. When witness gave her notice the deceased did not state where she had been, and witness did not ask her. She did not have any words with the deceased when she told her to leave. When the deceased went to bed at eleven o'clock on Saturday night, June 9th, she was in good spirits. She could recognise the hat and shoe produced as belonging to the deceased, but could not the photograph or the book. She had not observed anyone answering the description of the photograph around her premises. She was generally a cheerful girl, and her habits would not lead witness to believe that she was a person who would commit suicide. - William Worden, a shoemaker residing at Upton, stated that he had known the deceased about eight years, being related to her. The deceased did not come to his house very frequently, but on Friday night she came to the house. She said she had been to Messrs. Slade and Sons and got a place, and that her grandmother had told her to come there. She said she had been to her grandmother's at Exeter, and was going there on Saturday morning. The mother of the deceased died when she was young, and the deceased generally stayed with her grandmother. She said that she was going to the situation on the following Wednesday. Deceased had some supper and whilst doing so she took out a photograph, and said it was the likeness of her young man, that he drove a pair of horses for a gentleman, and was called JOHN DART, living on the Braddons. She chatted in a rational manner. On Saturday, when witness left for his work, the deceased was in bed, but she left during the day, stating it was her intention to return before she left for Exeter. She did not, however, do so. On Saturday evening he saw her in Fleet Street opposite the Dustpan. She turned up the street just before reaching witness, and seemed as if she wished to avoid him. He did not know a young man named John Nias. - William John Jeffery, a coach-wheeler, living at St Mary-Church, stated that he had known the deceased about two years. He did not keep company with the deceased, but had walked out with her. The last time he did so was on Tuesday evening, June 5th, and he left her at Mrs Lear's door, at about half-past eight o'clock. On Monday morning he saw the deceased looking in Messrs. Westley's window; she came over and pulled his coat, and he then walked up and down the Strand with her. On Saturday evening, about half-past eight o'clock, he saw the deceased in Fleet-street opposite the Brewing Company's offices. He stood talking with the deceased for some time, but did not go for a walk with her, she went up the street and he down. Later the same evening he saw the deceased talking to a young man named Nias. He could recognise the photograph produced as that of Niass. To his knowledge he had not seen the deceased with any other men. The deceased had never complained to him of anything, and never seemed down in her spirits or melancholy. - Susannah Godfrey, a widow, residing at 4, Temperance Street, stated that she could recognise the body of the deceased. On Monday night, after she had gone to bed, the deceased, and a young man named Robert Tregaskis, knocked at her door and asked for a bed. She thought it was a man and his wife, and if she had not been deceived she should not have left them remain there. The deceased had not slept in her house since. She never saw the deceased before in her life. She did not deny that she had any one sleeping in her house on Sunday night, but did deny having any weekly lodgers in the house. - Mr Edwin Addison Marsh, assistant house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, stated that on Sunday afternoon he was shewn the body of the deceased on the old quay. There were no marks of violence except a bruise across the eye brow. he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the general condition of the body was that of a healthy well nourished female. There was a contusion over the right eye brow, and which might have been caused by washing against the rocks. The lips were blue and bitten in one or two places, and the mouth closed and teeth clenched. The finger nails were also blue. There were no marks of sexual violence. On opening the chest the lungs were found very much congested, and there was fluid in the cavity. The cavities of the heart contained dark fluid blood, the substance of the heart being congested, but was otherwise healthy. He came to the conclusion that the deceased was not and never had been pregnant. He had no doubt the cause of death was drowning. When he saw the body, just after being taken from the water, rigidity was about commencing. - Robert Tregaskis was the next witness examined. He stated that on the previous Monday night he met the deceased at ten minutes to eleven, outside the London Inn. She asked him what he was going to stand, and he replied "Couple glasses of beer, if you like." She asked him to take her home to his lodgings, but he said he could not do that. The deceased then said "I have no place I can stop to." Witness then told her he thought he could find lodgings for her, and took her to Mrs Godfrey's where they were supplied with a bed. Since then he had not seen the deceased. - John Nias stated that on Saturday night about half-past ten he took the deceased home to her aunt's at Upton. He met her about eight o'clock. He did not see her on the Sunday. He never knew the deceased before Friday night, when he met the deceased on the Strand whilst the band was playing. he went home that night about ten o'clock and took the deceased to her aunt's at Upton. The deceased was strolling about on Saturday night and he met her again and went for a walk. He gave the deceased the photograph on Friday evening. he did not see her on Sunday and did not on Saturday night promise to meet her on Sunday. He left the deceased outside the house, when she told him it was her aunt's, but the door was not open when he left her. He did not see her go in, but saw a woman enter with a jug in her hand. - Mr Marsh, in answer to a Juror, stated that he could not tell how many hours the body had been in the water, but it was something under twenty-four hours. The body was quite limp when it was taken out of the water. - Nias, re-called, stated he gave the photograph in his own name. He walked with the deceased in the Public Gardens. The deceased gave him the name of Ellen Lear, and he went to the house at Upton, on Sunday evening to see her, but was told that no one of that name lived there. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that it was a melancholy case, and the evidence revealed a very sad history, one which he would rather not have enquired into, but was bound to do so in the interests of justice. The deceased was supposed to have been leading up to the previous Monday night a respectable life, as a quiet and steady girl, but the evidence before the Jury clearly showed that the poor girl had been leading a disreputable life. That being so, it might have been that the deceased, during the few hours that she was last seen alive, was so struck with the consciousness of her guilt for the life she was leading, that she was induced to drown herself. They had, however, no proof how she got into the water; she might have jumped in, and, although for one moment he would not lead them to believe that she had been thrown in by either of the two men called before them, yet she might have been thrown in the water by some of the other men who had doubtless become acquainted with her, or she might having been setting down on the steps, been overtaken by the tide, and accidentally drowned. There was no evidence to lead them to any conclusion, and he advised them to return an Open Verdict. - The Jury, of whom Mr Shinner was the foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how the body got into the water, there was no evidence to show." - The Coroner then called up the witnesses Tregaskis, Nias, and Godfrey, and told them that he hoped they would take a lesson from what had happened. Although they were not answerable for her death yet they had each done their share to ruin the poor girl, he did not mean to say that they had done more than that, but that they had ruined her there was not the slightest doubt. It should prove a warning to Godfrey; she was worse than the young men, in aiding and abetting, and if it was not for such women as she, her sex would not suffer as they did. The Coroner then said there had been great inconvenience prior to, and during the holding of the Enquiry, and which he felt it was his duty to bring before the notice of the Jury. The public mortuary at the bottom of the Town-hall had been so constructed as not to allow a post mortem examination to be made, and the body had to be removed to a public-house for that purpose. Such a state of things ought not to exist, as a mortuary to be of any use ought to be open for the purpose of making post mortem examinations; and he had no doubt, if attention was drawn to it in a proper way, that it would be remedied. It was painful to the parents and to the public to see a body carried about the streets as had that day been done. The Enquiry, which created a good deal of excitement, a large crowd assembling around the Town Hall, lasted nearly four hours.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 18 August 1877
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Meadfoot. - On Wednesday evening an Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, before H. Michelmore, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT PHILLIPS, a ganger, employed on the sewerage works. The first witness called was ELIZABETH PHILLIPS, the wife of the deceased, who stated that her husband would have been 58 years of age on the 4th of November. She frequently saw the deceased after his admission to the Infirmary, and he told her that he was in the act of throwing a bag when the skip caught him in the side, and threw him over the wall. The deceased never complained to her that it was through the carelessness of any person that the accident happened. - Mr Marsh, junior house surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that the deceased was brought to the Institution on Monday, August 6th, about seven o'clock in the evening. He examined the deceased and found him suffering from a fracture of the spine with a dislocation, and had lost all power and sensation of the body below the injury. The skin of the back was not broken, but there was a large swelling. There was a scalp wound at the back of the head, but that was not of much importance. The deceased died on Tuesday morning, August 14th, from an injury to the spinal cord, which would be caused by a fall. The deceased never recovered and his life was despaired of from the first. Mr Phillipps, the engineer of the works, stated that the deceased was a ganger and the men, over which he was foreman, were engaged in transferring gravel, by means of a steam crane, from the front of the sea wall, at Meadfoot, to the back. He would be standing on top of the wall so that he could watch the men working on either side. There were wooden skips used and they would hoist it on the outside and lower it on the inside. The deceased had been employed on the works about two years, and was a steady industrious man. The top of the sea wall was rough, but a man could stand on it. There was a good feeling existing between the deceased and the men. - William Gale, a labourer, stated that on the previous Monday week, he was working under the deceased at Meadfoot. The deceased was standing on the top of the wall with his back towards the sea, and his face towards the steam crane. The skip had just been emptied, and the deceased was in the act of picking up an empty bag when the crane was swung round. The deceased stepped back to get out of the way of the skip and fell off the wall, which on the inside was scarcely four feet high. Witness did not think that the skip touched the deceased. The distance deceased fell was seventeen feet. When on the ground, the deceased was resting on his hip, with his shoulders against a large stone. When the deceased was picked up, he complained that the lower part of his body was dead. Whilst in the cab being conveyed to the Infirmary, he said, "I'm finished, I shan't do any more work." He did not attach blame to anyone. - John Elliott, the engine driver, stated that he received orders from a labourer, named Shimmells, to start and stop the engine. He did not see anything happen to the deceased, until he saw him falling off the wall. - Edward Shimmells stated that when the skip came over the wall full, the deceased was not in the track of the skip, but before it returned he had moved forward in the track of the skip. Seeing the deceased was in the way, witness called out to the engine-driver, and the engine was immediately stopped. He saw the deceased lose his balance in trying to escape from the skip, and fall over the wall. - The Coroner said the deceased was in his proper place on the wall, and was discharging his duty, although the bags might be put in a better place. It appeared to be a pure accident. The Jury, of which Mr R. M. Bovey was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 October 1877
TORQUAY - Sad And Fatal Accident To A Coachman In Torquay. - Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Torbay Infirmary on Wednesday evening, on the body of JOHN ANDREW COAD, a coachman in the employ of Mr Remfry, of Firsleigh, who met his death under the following circumstances. The first witness called was MARY JANE COAD, who identified the deceased as her husband, and stated that he was in the employ of Mr Remfry, of Firsleigh, Higher Warberry road, as coachman. He was 37 years of age. She heard on Sunday night that the deceased had met with an accident, and on Monday she went to the Torbay Infirmary and saw her husband. He did not explain how it happened, and merely said "This is a sad job, my dear; never mind, I dare say I shall soon be better." He enquired as to who was looking after the horses, and she replied "A man." At the suggestion of Dr Smith, she wished her husband "Good morning." - John Marker, a gardener, stated that he had been acquainted with the deceased for about four or five years. He saw him on Sunday afternoon looking out of his bedroom window, and witness, at the urgent request of the deceased, went in and looked around the coach-house, stables and gardens. After that witness and the deceased went for a walk, and near St Matthias' Church met two men, named Josling and Freer. The conversation then turned on hunting. Witness remarked that that locality would not be a bad place for hunting, and then the deceased rejoined that there were no hares thereabout, and gentlemen would not care about hunting over such ground. With the same the deceased jumped in over a fence close by. The hurdle was about three feet from the spot from where they were standing, and there was a fall of about four feet. The deceased fell on reaching the ground, and at once exclaimed, "Marker, I've broke my leg." Witness replied, "Nonsense," and then the deceased said "I have." Witness and the other two men jumped down, and witness observing that the bone was protruding through his stocking took a handkerchief and bound up the leg. One of them ran down and fetched a midge, and witness gave him two glasses of water. The deceased was shortly after removed to the Infirmary. He did not think that the deceased hitched his foot in the gutter, but surmised that he fell in the gutter close to the hurdles and twisted his leg. The deceased was perfectly sober, and there was no wager or inducement made to the deceased to jump. He was quite sure that the deceased was not pushed as he jumped. - John Josling gave corroborative evidence, and said that the deceased jumped of his own free will. - Mr J. B. Richardson, house surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that the deceased was admitted to the institution on Sunday evening. On examining him he found that he was suffering from a compound fracture of the leg near the ankle. It was as bad a fracture as there possibly could be. Mr James Pollard, Mr William Pollard, and Mr Huxley also attended and amputation was decided upon. Mr William Pollard performed the operation, the leg being amputated about midway between the ankle and knee. Ether was administered to the deceased by Dr Nankivell, and he revived and rallied after the operation, which was successfully performed. Witness was called at half-past two on Monday morning, haemorrhage having set in. Witness topped this, but it again set in at eight o'clock and lasted until five o'clock. Messrs. Wm. and James Pollard were present, but all efforts proved useless to stop it. About five o'clock the deceased experienced a difficulty of breathing, and from then, until half-past eight, he gradually sank, and died. He believed that death arose from the shock of the accident and the amputation combined, the deceased being a person of weak and debilitated constitution, and had the deceased been of strong constitution he might have withstood the shock. It was impossible to re-set the leg, as the lining of the bone was gone. The Coroner having summed up, and the Jury, of whom Mr Wagstaffe was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 December 1877
EXETER - Sad Accident At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Christmas Eve on the body of MR JOSEPH NEALE, aged 42, the architect under whose directions the extensions at the Devon County Asylum have been executed. The case was watched on behalf of the Great Western Company by Mr Walton, the superintendent of the Bristol and Exeter section. Henry Martin, the guard of the 3.5 up (from Exeter) train on Saturday, stated that on arriving at St. David's he saw the deceased, who was perfectly sober, on the platform. He spoke to him, but the witness did not see MR NEALE again until the passengers were seated, and the whistle blown for the engine-driver to proceed. Just as the train commenced moving out, the deceased ran up to witness, and said, "Hold hard, I'm going." On blowing the whistle a second time, the driver shut off steam, and in another half-a-minute the train would have been brought to a standstill. When the witness blew the whistle secondly his back was to the deceased; but on turning round he saw MR NEALE attempting to jump into a first-class carriage, and, in doing so, he fell on to his side between the steps of the carriage and the platform, being dragged several yards whilst in this position. Every effort was made to save him, but they were unsuccessful, and the wheels of the carriage went over his right leg. Deceased was got out from under the train, and removed on a stretcher to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Deceased was in the habit of frequently going over the line three or four times a week. - By the Jury: Witness did not open the carriage door for the deceased; he believed that MR NEALE was possessed of a railway key. He was constantly in the habit of taking his seat at the last moment. - John Chapman, the platform inspector, corroborated. After the witness had started the train, he saw MR NEALE, and heard him say, "I must go." He rushed towards one of the compartments, and witness assisted him in trying to get in. Just as deceased had his hand on the door, he stumbled and fell on to one of the carriage steps, and was dragged some distance, but eventually he fell between the carriage and the platform, and the wheels went over his leg. When extricated he asked to be removed somewhere as quickly as possible, stating that he had hurt his leg. On the way to the hospital deceased was heard by Anstey - a porter - to say, "I blame no one; it's entirely my own fault." - Mr Cummings, house surgeon, deposed that when MR NEALE was received, he was in a state of almost complete collapse. The right leg was crushed to pieces below the knee, and there was a large wound on the thigh. There were also bruises on the front of the right arm, and a smaller one at the back of the head. Endeavours were made to restore the deceased, and witness had a consultation with Mr Bankart as to the advisability of amputating, but MR NEALE never recovered from the effects of the shock, and died at 12.30 on Sunday morning, from the injuries he had sustained. This was the whole of the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said the Jury would doubtless regret, as he did, that the deceased should have met with so untimely an end. It was for them to say whether there was any negligence on the part of any one, or whether the affair was purely accidental. In answer to the Coroner, Mr Walton said there was a certain amount of discretionary power permitted the employees of the Company in allowing persons to get into the carriages after the trains had started. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," considering that no one was to blame but the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 February 1878
PAIGNTON - Inquest At Paignton. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday evening at the Oldenburgh Inn, Paignton, on the body of a mason, named JOHN STEPHEN SKINNER, who was discovered by his brother on Sunday morning hanging by the neck in Langdon's Barn, near Goodrington. Mr Pridham, surgeon, said deceased had suffered for some three years from softening of the brain, which would render him unaccountable for his actions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 March 1878
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Child. Sir Lawrence Palk And His Roads. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, before H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on Monday afternoon, on the body of a child named ALFRED JAMES BASSETT, aged nearly six months, the illegitimate child of RHODA JANE BASSETT. The first witness called was the mother of the deceased, who stated that five weeks after her confinement she placed the child out to nurse with Mrs Coombe, of Oxton Road, Ellacombe. She arranged to pay her 3s. 6d. per week for the keep of the child, but she was to provide clothing. She paid the money monthly, and at the present time there was only a fortnight due. She last saw the child alive on Wednesday. It had been weakly ever since its birth, but on the day she saw it, it appeared better. On Saturday evening just before five o'clock she was called by Mrs Sidders to go to see the deceased. She asked whether it was dead, but the person would not tell her at first. When she got to the doorway, however, to leave, Mrs Sidders told her that Carry had let it fall, and that the child died after it got in the house. Mrs Coombe sent for the doctor before she arrived. Mrs Coombe had five children at the time she left hers, and Carry was the oldest. She was thirteen years of age, and the youngest was three months. - Sarah Jane Coombe, wife of a cab-driver, said she did not know the last witness until after her child was brought to her. She took it at Mrs Sidders' request. When the child was brought it was five weeks old. When she took the child, she had five children, the youngest being two and a half years old, but a month after witness was confined. The last time she saw the deceased before the occurrence was about three-quarters of an hour. She sent it about three o'clock on Saturday afternoon with her daughter, Carry, believing, as it was weakly, that it would gain strength. When the child was brought home it looked pale, and she bathed its head in cold water. She asked whether she had let it fall, and the little girl replied "No, but I fell with it. I fell over an iron pipe in the Cavern Road." Finding the child did not recover, she sent for Dr Wills, who came in about half-an-hour. - By Mr Chilcott: Her daughter was rather near sighted. - The Coroner asked Mrs Sidders, who was present, the reason why she sent the deceased to Mrs Coombe when she took in children herself. - Mrs Sidders replied that she had no child looking after, but as she went out to work, and her daughter was invalided, she did not think it advisable to take in another. - The Coroner: Was that your only reason? - Mrs Sidders: It was, sir. - Caroline Coombe, daughter of a previous witness, was called, but not sworn. She said that on Saturday afternoon, as she was walking up Cavern Hill with the baby in her arms, a place was open, and, not observing the iron pipe, she hitched her foot and the baby fell along the road. She picked the baby up, and took it home. - Matilda Squance, wife of a gardener, residing at Devonshire Terrace, Oxton Road, said she knew the pipe in question. It was a water pipe leading from the roof of a house belonging to a Mr Smith. The road was in a very bad condition. - Dr Wills said he had been attending the child for the last three months. When first brought to him it was in a most emaciated condition and suffering from sores. He saw the deceased on Saturday after life was extinct, but found no marks of violence on it whatever. He was told what had happened, and his opinion as to the cause of death was "Shock to the system." - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence to the Jury, remarked that he thought it clearly proved that the child's death was purely accidental. The accident happened in broad day light, and it was a point for the Jury to consider whether any person with ordinary care could go over the place without anything happening. He was given to understand the road was a private one and the only remedy, therefore, open to the Jury was for them to make a presentment, through him, to the lord of the manor, and, through him, get something done. A presentment from them might do some good. The road was in a most disgraceful condition. That was a strong word, but one not too strong. In consequence of the road being a private one, the Jury could not bring any one in culpable for the death of the child. - Mr Newton, a Juryman, said twelve months ago a woman broke her arm wrist almost near the same spot where this child had lost his life. - Mr R. Butland, the Foreman of the Jury, said he thought there could be but one opinion amongst them, and that was, that the cause of death was accidental. They had visited the spot and could only come to one conclusion, that the footpath was in a disgraceful condition, and it was evident something must be done. They had prepared a resolution, and its effect was: "That the attention of the lord of the manor and of the Local Board, be called to the dangerous condition of the footpath and of the necessity of its being placed in a proper state of repair, so as to prevent a repetition of such accidents." The Coroner said he should e very happy to convey the Jury's resolution to the proper authorities, and it would be for the members of the Jury to see that the authorities did what was wished. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was then formally returned. The Jury gave their fees to the mother of the child.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 30 March 1878
BRIXHAM - Serious Effects Of Excessive Stimulants. - On Monday Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Waterman's Arms, Higher Brixham, on WM. STONE, aged 36, a stonemason. From the evidence of Sarah Ann Green, with whom deceased lodged, it appeared that STONE came home on Saturday at eight p.m. very tipsy, and asked for a light, which was given him. He then went to the closet, and not returning for a quarter of an hour or so, Mrs Green sent her daughter to see what he was doing, and she found him lying insensible on the floor. She called STONE'S father, who was in the house at the time, and he was taken into the back kitchen, and placed on the floor, where he was allowed to lie until eight o'clock the following morning. As he then shewed no signs of returning consciousness, he was taken up and put to bed. Mr G. Searle, the parish doctor, was sent for, but on his arrival the man was dead. Deceased had, it was said, for many years been given to habits of intemperance. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from an apoplectic fit brought on by excessive drinking, and the Coroner severely censured the conduct of the lodging-house keeper, and also the father, for the gross neglect in allowing the deceased to lie on a cold floor so many hours unattended, either by them or any medical man.

TORQUAY - A Child Fatally Scalded. - On Wednesday evening, at the Torquay Police Court, an Inquest was held by Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, as to the death of NELLIE LIGHTFOOT, aged 2 ¼ years, the daughter of DANIEL and MYRA LIGHTFOOT, 7 Queen-street, Torquay. EMMANUEL LIGHTFOOT deposed that he was the uncle of the deceased, and on the 17th instant, the father and mother of the deceased had gone out to chapel. He was nursing the child in front of the fire when she suddenly "threw up its little hands, and threw over the saucepan," thereby scalding herself. He took the child to the doctor. - Dr Richardson said that she lingered until the 26th March. when she died from effects primarily brought on by the scalding - the scald in the inside of the mouth having extended to the bronchial tubes. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 April 1878
TORQUAY - Strange Fatality. - On Tuesday evening an Inquest was held, before Mr Michelmore, in the Torquay Town Hall, on the body of MARY PATTERSON, of Pimlico. Mr Thomas, boatman of Anstis Cove, deposed that he observed a body floating in the sea on the Babbicombe side of Hope's Nose. He saw it there all day Sunday, but he could not bring it to land until Monday. When the body was floating in the water on Sunday afternoon he could not launch his boat. Neither could he do so early on Monday. He could not reach the body, on account of the rough sea, until late on Monday. The wind was in the right quarter to keep the body in the vicinity where it was first seen. A daughter of deceased gave evidence that she left home last Thursday night at about nine o'clock, and she never saw her alive afterwards. It was nothing unusual for her mother to be away from home. Deceased, who was 53 years of age, had been for many years employed by house agents to take care of unoccupied houses, and it was supposed that she had gone out on such employment, and no special uneasiness was felt until it was found she did not put in an appearance on the Sunday. Mrs Shapcott, who keeps a shop in Torquay, for the sale of machines and brushes, &c., stated that she had known deceased for some years. A few weeks back MRS PATTERSON obtained some brushes as if for some one other than herself. The goods came to £1 10s. 5d. It appeared that the person named did not order the goods, and it had been intimated that an explanation must be given in order to prevent unpleasantness. Deceased did not call in as she promised. It was queried as to whether MRS PATTERSON was in straitened circumstances. On the Thursday night named, she was informed that she would not be required to do certain work at Mrs Stark's - such as fire-lighting, &c., at the Studio named, on account of the fine weather. She had been receiving 1s. 6d. a day. After a number of witnesses were examined, the Jury decided upon returning "An Open Verdict."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 April 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - A Peculiar Case. - An Inquiry was held on Friday before Mr Michelmore (Coroner), and a Jury, respecting the death of the infant child of ELIZABETH BRAY. - William Cater, labourer, 2 Lemon-road, Newton Abbot, deposed that ELIZABETH BRAY was his sister-in-law. He saw her at Newton on March 26th. She was at his house previously, and on that date. The last time he saw her was at about 7 o'clock on the morning named. She had been staying at his house for 13 weeks. He knew she had left when he came home from work in the evening. He had no idea she was enciente. Never once dreamt of such a thing. She did not pay him anything for her keep during the time she was in the house. It did not strike him as odd that she did not look for a place. She had said she was going to Bristol. When it was known that she had left, his wife sent his daughter to the Railway Station to try and find out where she was gone, but he heard nothing until he received information from the police in respect to the case now under consideration. - John Drew, the landlord of the "Star" public-house, deposed that on Tuesday 25th, ult., the woman now charged made an enquiry for a bed for herself, and she stated to his wife that she had just come by the last train from Exeter and was a stranger in the town. As they could not accommodate the young woman he told her so, and then, as she seemed very desirous to get a bed - it being 11 o'clock at night - he accompanied her, by the advice of his wife, along the street, until he saw young Croaker talking at the corner of the street with a man and two females. Croaker promised to look for a lodging for the young woman, and he accordingly left them. - The Coroner questioned witness as to the propriety of leaving the young woman in the care of a strange young man at that time of night. - Mrs Maria Croaker deposed that her husband came to her before she was up - about eight o'clock - and said that a young woman had been sleeping in the house. She had not heard anything after she retired between 10 and 11 o'clock the previous night. Her son usually got home at about 11 o'clock at night. Sometimes he came home earlier,. When she was called up in the morning she went down to the room where the young woman was, and she saw the body as described. Witness asked her why she did not call, and she replied that she could not. In reply to other questions, she said she had no brothers or sisters and no father or mother living. Witness did not ask BRAY what was her name, but, in reply to a question as to where she came from, she answered that she had no home. - Mrs Webber, daughter of Mrs Croaker, said that she had been married to a butler for two-and-half years. She had no family. She occupied two rooms in the house of her mother. On the night of Tuesday, 16th March, her brother called her up at about 11 o'clock and told her there was a young woman who had come by train and could not get a lodging. By the request of her brother, she got up and went down into the kitchen, where she made up a bed on the couch for the young woman. She left BRAY between 11 and 12 o'clock, and did not go down again until about eight o'clock next morning, when witness asked her how she had slept. The reply made was to the effect that a misfortune had occurred. Information was at once given to Mr Croaker, senr., and his son, and they acted as had been described., - Maria Cater deposed that ELIZABETH BRAY was her sister, and that she had lived with her for 13 weeks. Did not know why she left her last place, Mr Bowden's, draper, and did not suspect she was enciente until the last week she was there, then, from what she had heard rumoured, she taxed her sister, who denied the insinuation in toto. Witness's sister's leaving was without her knowledge, until a boy came for her trunk. She did not hear until the Monday after where she was going, and then she found out, to some extent, by accident, that her trunk had been labelled for Torquay via Torre. - ELIZABETH BRAY - who had been in a fainting condition during a great portion of the three hours' Enquiry - upon being asked whether she had anything to say, replied - "No" - whereupon she was allowed to retire. - Dr J. B. Richardson deposed that on March 27th he was called to attend at No. 4, Higher Braddons, as a woman had been confined there. On entering the room he saw a female lying on the sofa. She was still very weak, and would not be able to appear in court before this day week. In the evening of the 27th he examined the body of the child, and found that it was a fully matured, well-nourished female child. Blood had issued from the mouth and nostrils. On the neck were spots, and abrasions on the right shoulder, and on the left side of the neck there was an abrasion and two indentations, slightly abraded, such as would have been made by finger nails. The direction of these indentations were curved downwards. Whether the marks in the vicinity of its neck were accidentally caused or not, he could not say. It was quite possible they were the result of accident. The scalp was congested and the sinuses of the brain gorged. The tongue partially protruded, the heart was healthy. The lungs were mottled and crepitated, and by testing in water, they floated freely, evidencing that the child had breathed, and most probably had a separate existence, although it might have only taken one long breath of consciousness. It was possible it was not conscious, for the pressure might have been otherwise caused. His opinion was that the child died from exposure, accelerated by pressure upon the large vessels of the neck. - George Croaker, Army Reserve, deposed that he lived with his mother at 4, Higher Braddon Street. The first time he saw the woman was on the night of the 26th. He met her below the Castle Inn, in Union Street, at twenty minutes after eleven. She was talking with the landlord of the Star Inn, named drew, about a lodging. Witness said if the woman liked to go with him he would get her a lodging. He first took her to Mr Dear's. Accused said she did not care what she paid. Dear's place, however, was closed, and he said, if she liked to go home with him, no doubt his mother and sister would make up a bed for her. She consented. When witness reached home his mother and sister were gone to bed. He at once called up his sister, and she came down and made a bed for her on the sofa. Witness went to his own bed-room and left his sister with the girl. At eight the next morning his sister told him that there was something wrong, and witness went at once and gave information to the police. Never saw the woman in his life before he met her in the street on the night of the 26th. - The evidence of a butler, the husband of Jessie Webber, the sister of George Croaker, gave evidence, showing that when "young George" called witness's wife he at first objected to her going down to her brother, but he at length consented. In the morning at about seven o'clock he had occasion to enter the room to get his coat, and he did not notice anything that led him to suspect what since transpired. - The evidence of P.S. Board was recapitulated, and he stated that since the 27th he had made further enquiries, and found that the girl's real name was ELIZABETH BRAY. By direction of Mr Vaughan, Superintendent of Police, witness went to the railway station, and there found a common trunk. There was no address on it, beyond the railway label to Torre. Witness took possession of the box, and had since examined the contents. The woman had told him that she had left a box at the Station. It was not locked; but tied with a wrapper. There was no apparel in it for an infant,. Witness read over a list of wearing apparel, consisting of petticoats, chemises, stockings, skirts, gowns, boots and hats, cuffs, piece of lace, some photos, and four books. The books consisted of a bible, a prayer book, a novel, and something else. In one of the books was the woman's name - "BRAY." After that, on the 28th, he saw a man named JOHN BRAY, at the station. Witness asked BRAY if he could recognise the photos, and he said he could not. told him he had reason to believe that a sister of his was at 4 Higher Braddons, and asked him to go there with him; BRAY consented, and on being shewn the woman he would not at first identify her; witness caused the woman to show her face, and he then said, "That's LIZZIE, my sister." This was at seven o'clock in the evening. He said her name was ELIZABETH BRAY, and that she had been living with a sister, Mrs Cater, No. 2, Lemon Road, Newton. The woman whispered something to her brother, but witness did not hear what it was. Had since ascertained that it was correct. The girl had been living at Newton since Christmas out of service, and had left the night before. Witness charged her with concealing the birth of the child, and causing its death. When he found the body it was under the sofa, on a petticoat, and partly covered. Asked the sister about the girl's condition, and she said she had taxed her with being enciente, but she denied it. When he charged the woman with concealing the birth of the child, she said, "I did not kill it." Witness had already cautioned her that what she said might be used against her, and he cautioned the people in the house to that effect. - The Coroner summed up at about half-past eight o'clock, and in his doing so complimented the Croaker family on their kindness. - The Jury retired for consultation, and their private enquiry lasted for near upon two hours, at the end of which they returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" - attaching a rider to their verdict to the effect that the Croaker family had acted very humanely. At the Police Court on Saturday, before Mr W. Bridges, most of the evidence was given again. Prisoner was committed for trail on the charge of manslaughter.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 1 June 1878
TORQUAY - A Suspicious Death. - An Inquest was held at the Castle Inn on Thursday evening, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of SARAH ANN UNDERHAY, a young woman, 19 years of age, and living in Higher Union Lane with her father. Rose Courvoisor stated that she was a nurse, and attended the deceased during the last week, and on Wednesday deceased told her that she had been taking something which some man had given her and which made her ill. She died on Thursday morning at four o'clock. Dr Richardson stated that the deceased was under his care for inflammation of the bowels, and that he suspected something wrong. About a week since he received two bottles of liquid which he could not tell the contents of. The Inquest was adjourned until Thursday next at the Police Station. A post mortem examination was ordered, and the bottles of stuff were ordered t be analysed.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 June 1878
ST MARY CHURCH - Melancholy Death Of Two Little Sisters By Drowning At Oddicombe. - An Inquest was held at Westhill Farm, St. Mary-Church, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, on Thursday night at nine o'clock, concerning the deaths of DORA KATE TAYLOR and LILY MARGARET TAYLOR, aged ten and nine years respectively, daughters of the REV. N. S. TAYLOR, minister of the Free Church, St. Mary Church, which took place by drowning on the same afternoon, between Petit Tor and Babbacombe beach. Mr Jonas Honywill was the Foreman of the Jury. - WILLIAM SNEYD TAYLOR, 13 years of age, said he was the son of the REV. N. S. TAYLOR, incumbent of Furroughcross Free Church, St. Mary-Church, and brother of the deceased girls. He went that morning with his sisters to Petit Tor to sail boats. As he was trying to get the boat out he slipped into the water. He let fall his reel of cotton with which he was fishing with crooked pins attached, and he asked DORA to wind off his cotton on to another reel, and as she was trying to do so she slipped off the rock into the deep water. He did not see her fall, but heard the splash and heard her crying out. She did not sink, her dress seemed to be holding her up. He went into the water to try to help her out; she got hold of his arm and he was getting her in, when she called to his sister LILY, who had come to the top of the rock, to come and help her. He tried to prevent LILY coming, but she came to the edge of the rock which was covered with green sea weed, and slipped in also. Both of his sisters laid hold of him. He was trying to get to the rock and he got clear of them and swam into where he could stand. He went back to them again, but being very tired a wave knocked him down. He afterwards got to the top of the rocks. LILY was sinking then, and DORA was lying on her face on the water. He called to a lady and a gentleman and a boy, who were in a boat, and they came and took the bodies out of the water. He should think they were in the water a quarter-of-an-hour before they were taken out. - The Rev. Wm. Hamerton, senior curate in charge of Torre, deposed as follows: He hired a boat at a quarter to four at Oddicombe Beach and took his wife out, and the boy who had charge of the boat. He saw the last witness on the rock pointing down to the water. he told the boy rowing to hurry on. He saw a hat floating on the sea. On getting nearer he heard the last witness say "Little sister is in the water." They got about a boat and a half up between the rocks and saw a girl floating on her face. He kept the boat steady whilst the boy with him pulled her into the boat. On coming away he saw another body lying at the bottom. They got up the body with great difficulty. It was in six or seven feet of water. Witness told the boy to go round to Oddicombe beach, and he pulled round with the bodies. He got them out of the boat, took their clothes off, and had their feet and hands rubbed and put in hot water and put flannel bathing dresses on the bodies. There was not the least sign of returning animation. He sent for medical assistance and two doctors came, who after moving the bodies and applying hot water, pronounced life to be extinct. The doctors did not use artificial respiration. It was 10 or 12 minutes that the bodies were in the boat. The little boy looked half drowned. - The Coroner said the sad facts were very clear. He would not say that everyone should know the means to restore the apparently drowned which are posted up at every coastguard station, but had there been anyone at the beach who knew the proper mode of restoring life, and had used it, there might have been a different result. He trusted all in charge of boats would make themselves acquainted with the rules for restoring life, and that should anything approaching a similar occurrence take place, other means than merely rubbing the body would be resorted to. He believed the death was purely accidental. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death by Drowning. We believe that MR TAYLOR, the father of the children has recently come to St Mary Church from Ireland, having given up a good living there to take the incumbency of the Furroughcross Free Church. MR TAYLOR is himself very ill.

TORQUAY - The Suspicious Death Of A Young Woman. - The adjourned Inquiry into the death of SARAH ANN UNDERHAY, a domestic servant, was held on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, at the town Hall, before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr Jordan was Foreman. - Mr Richardson stated that since the last Inquiry he had made a post mortem examination of the body. There were no marks of violence. The brain, heart, and lungs were healthy. A hard ulcerated stone was found in the gall-bladder. He never heard of a similar case in one so young. The cause of death was peritonitis. She was not pregnant. - Mr Henry Snelgrove, surgeon of Newton, assisted at the post mortem examination, and he agreed with Mr Richardson as to the cause of death. He had never heard of a similar case in one so young. He believed the case to be unique. The pain must have been so intense that it must have killed her very quickly. - Miss Mary Murray, of 2, Woodville, had known the deceased for seven years. She heard of her illness in March last, and witness went to deceased's father's house in March. Deceased, in answer to witness, said she hoped she was not in the family-way. Witness did not like the woman attending deceased, and she sent Courvoisier to her. Witness said to the deceased that she hoped she had not spoken to anyone but the doctor about it, and she made no answer. On the morning of the day on which Courvoisier came in the afternoon she found two bottles, one a small bottle like that in which brandy is sold at railway stations, and which witness gave to Mrs Edwards, and a larger one like a light wine bottle which she sent to Mrs Edwards by the servant. The small bottle contained a dark brown fluid and was half-full; the larger bottle contained a much lighter fluid and was nearly empty. The deceased said to witness respecting the liquid in the larger bottle "Don't take it; it is poison; and don't let the doctor see it." Witness asked her where she got it, but she did not answer straight, and merely said it was a man. Nurse Courvoisier told witness where the man lived and who he was and she described him. Witness asked her if it was in her first or that illness that she took the stuff, and she replied that illness. Nurse Courvoisier told her in the presence of the deceased that deceased had taken something to put away her child. Deceased explained to witness that it was the stuff in the larger bottle that she drank. She did not ask deceased who the man was as she knew who lived next door but one. The man was called Train, but witness did not know what he was, although she heard he went about collecting ferns. - Mrs Lucy Edwards, wife of Mr Thos. Edwards, coach-builder of Union Street, had known the deceased all her life. The girl's father worked for witness's husband, and she was interested n the girl. Deceased always denied being in the family-way. Witness saw both the bottles in the girl's box. She secured the bottles in her own house on the Sunday, until Mr Richardson came for them on the following Tuesday, and were in precisely the same state when delivered to him as when received by witness. - Sergt. Ockford deposed to having received the two bottles, and the contents of the stomach in a bottle sealed from Mr Richardson, and delivered them in the same condition to Dr Blythe, County Analyst. - Dr Alexander Wynter Blythe, County Analyst, of Barnstaple, stated that he received two bottles on the 31st of May, - the one contained two drams or two teaspoonfulls of a rather thick, dark coloured liquid, which was rather mouldy. The other bottle contained seven ounces of an orange coloured liquid. He analysed the contents of the large bottle on the day he received it, and found that it contained three-fifths of a grain of soluble matter, but no poison - mineral or vegetable - whatever. The sediment he examined microscopically, and proved it to be some finely powered vegetable substance not derived, he believed, from any poisonous plant. The liquid in the smaller bottle was almost tasteless and contained a crystalline substance, which he found to be gallic acid in solution to the extent of 81.4 grains per pint. There was no other active ingredient. He did not think that would produce a dark secretion, nor would it stain the skin. It was not poisonous, but was often prescribed as an injection in certain diseases. Both those liquids were harmless, and would not have poisoned the girl. The contents of the stomach he analysed, and found it contained about three ounces of a chocolate coloured fluid; no mineral poison was detected; but there was a small quantity of morphia and some acid - both the constituents of opium - present. The stomach was perfectly healthy, there was no trace of inflammation; and had she taken a short time before her death any irritant poison it would have shown its effects on the stomach. The opium found was probably that which had been administered medicinally. - GEORGE UNDERHAY stated he was the father of the deceased. He had never seen the man Train in his house. He did not know what time his daughter came in at night. he did not know whether Train was giving anything to his daughter. - William Bridgman lived next door to the UNDERHAYS. He heard Train say that he and "Bill," his son-in-law, went out one day, and gathered some herbs for SARAH ANN UNDERHAY. Train said if she took them she would be well in a week. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the evidence was very clear and distinct. On the last occasion they had reason to believe that the girl did not meet with her death in a fair way, that she either murdered herself, or was murdered. The mystery had been cleared, however, by the doctors' evidence. The case was a curious one, in that the medical men had never known one like it. The poor girl thought up to the time of her death that she was two months gone with child, and she took some harmless stuff to do away with the child. She paid the money to the man for the stuff, and she was to have paid more. The Coroner hoped the case would not be lost on the man who had given her the stuff. If the man believed that the stuff he had given her would do what the girl wished, he would have been, in his own mind at least, guilty of wilful murder. In trying to get a little money from the poor girl he was very nearly guilty of a most serious crime. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

TORQUAY - Concealment Of Birth At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Thursday evening, before Mr Michelmore and a Jury of which Mr J. C. Watson was Foreman, on the body of the illegitimate male child of LOUISA HARDING, 27 years of age, a domestic servant living with Mr Bovey, builder, of 4 Woodland Grove, Babbicombe road, Torquay. - The Jury having viewed the body, Mrs Annie Bovey, wife of Mr E. P. Bovey, builder, said LOUISA HARDING had been in her employ as a general servant for five months and a fortnight. HARDING is a single woman and was confined last Wednesday. On that day she asked the servant what was under her bed, and she replied "Well, it was born dead." The girl was about her work in the scullery. She went with witness to her bedroom and unlocked her box, and took out something wrapped in linen and put it on the floor. When it was opened she saw a fine baby, which was dead. Witness asked her if she had any clothes and she said she did not know. Witness went for her husband who sent for the police. The police came. - Mr E. P. Bovey said he fetched Police Sergt. Ockford, who took the body away. Sergt. Ockford went to the house of Mr Bovey and found the girl HARDING looking very ill and weak, doing her hair. He charged her with concealing the birth of the child, and said it was very probable she might be charged with killing it. She said "I was alone; I have no friends; and I did not know what to do. My missus was always very kind to me; I wish I had told her of it." There was not a vestige of baby linen in the room. He took possession of the body of the child, and took the woman to the Infirmary. - Mr Richardson, house surgeon, Torbay Infirmary, said he had seen the body of the child, and he had made a post mortem examination. It was a fine child of full time. There was post mortem discolouration over the whole body. There were no external marks of violence and no fractures. The lungs were congested in places, but were crepitate. The child was undoubtedly born alive, it had a separate existence, and witness considered the cause of death to have been suffocation. In answer to the Foreman, Mr Richardson said as there were no exterior marks of violence he thought the child was left among the clothes and so died. If the woman had had the necessary attendance it would have lived. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the mother.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 June 1878
PRINCETOWN - A Convict Killed At Dartmoor prison. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at Princetown on the body of the convict who was crushed by a stone on the previous day. The chief clerk, Mr Turpin, said the deceased was B1,317 FREDERICK WHITTY, who was undergoing a sentence of penal servitude for forgery committed at Manchester 1875. He was now about 51. His friends had been informed of the accident and death. Mr John Hodge, principal warder, was the next witness. He stated that he had the general charge of the convicts employed in the particular district where the accident occurred. The prisoner was under the immediate charge of Warder Mayer, who called him when the stone caved in which occasioned the prisoner's death. He should think the stone was over a ton in weight. The depth of the hole in which the prisoner got crushed was not more than two feet deep. He was extricated within two or three minutes after the accident, and conveyed to the prison. Warder Mayer said the deceased and another man were employed in draining some waste land near Rundlestone. They were in the act of undermining the stone which caused the death of the prisoner, when the ground, which appeared perfectly safe, suddenly caved in, and the stone toppled against the prisoner. Dr Power, the surgeon of the prison, said the prisoner was received by him about half-past nine on the morning of the accident. he was severely crushed. Every attention was paid to him, but the injuries were such that no human aid could save him. He died fully conscious at about a quarter to nine the same night. The Inquest lasted over two hours, and at the close the Jury returned a unanimous verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the officers from all blame.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 27 July 1878
STARCROSS - Fatal Fall At Starcross Railway Station. - An Inquest was held at the Courtenay Arms, Starcross, on Thursday, by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, on the woman killed by the train on Tuesday. She was identified by MR BARTLET, saddler, of Kenton, as his mother. She was of eccentric habits, and has occasionally been known to enter and leave trains as if she did not wish to be seen. She took a ticket on Tuesday evening from Starcross to St. Thomas, and though the train remained at the station for three or four minutes, giving all who wished to do so ample opportunity of entering, she appears to have attempted to get into a carriage after the train was in motion. Two passengers by the train saw her slip, and the train was quickly brought up, and the poor woman extricated. The evidence fully exonerated every person from blame.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 28 September 1878
TEIGNMOUTH - The Mysterious Boat Accident Off Teignmouth. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Monday afternoon held an Inquest at the Mount Pleasant Inn, between Dawlish and Starcross, upon the body of SARAH STEER, aged 25, who was drowned in the boat accident off Teignmouth on the evening of Saturday, the 14th inst. It will be remembered that on the day named the deceased, in company with her husband (THOMAS STEER), Henry Hartnoll and his son, of Teignmouth, and two men named Staddon and Fowler, went in a boat belonging to Hartnoll from Teignmouth to Dawlish, and on the way back the boat capsized in smooth water in a most unaccountable manner, three of the occupants being drowned. STEER, on the body of whose wife the Inquest was held on Monday, was a widower with five children when he married the deceased. - THOMAS STEER, husband of the deceased, said his wife was 25 years of age. On Saturday, the 14th, he and some others hired a boat of Mr Henry Hartnoll, of Teignmouth. There were six in the party, the boat being quite competent to carry six. They sailed to Dawlish; there was little wind. They stayed at Dawlish a short time. None of them were tipsy. They subsequently left Dawlish to return to Teignmouth. There was half a gallon of ale taken on board the boat, but this was not touched. Witness was sitting by the side of his wife, when the boat upset suddenly, and all the occupants were thrown into the water. The sail was down, and they were just going to pull into Teignmouth, as the wind had dropped. He was looking over his left shoulder when the boat was upset, and he was thrown with the others into the water on the right side of the boat. He did not know that he was in the water until he rose to the surface. Deceased said "Oh, TOM, what is the matter?" She then sank, and witness did not see her again. The others clung to the boat, which turned over three or four times. They (the survivors) clung to the bottom of the boat until they were picked up. - Henry Hartnoll, owner of the boat used, said he had carried fourteen persons in the boat. He saw no drink on board, and knew none was touched. All the previous witness had said was perfectly true. Could not imagine how the boat had upset, as there was no "larking," and no one moved. Did not even feel the uplifting of the boat. - The Rev. H. Hutchins, resident at Teignmouth, said the boat used was a new one, and very good. - William Hartwell, farmer, said he found the body at about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday about half a mile east of Langstone Point. In company with a coastguardsman he brought the body to that house. This being all the evidence, the Coroner remarked that there did not appear to him to have been any impropriety upon the part of anybody in the boat at the time of the accident. The Jury had heard the evidence; they would now consider their verdict, and he would record it. It seemed to him that the occurrence was an accident, and God only knew how the boat was upset. - The Foreman (Mr Loram, of Dawlish) who has been a captain in the merchant service, remarked that he could only account for the upsetting of the boat by the rising under it of a large fish. He did not think a porpoise could have done it; though a "black fish" might have. "Black fish" had been known to upset a ship. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Magistrates Court Hall, on Friday evening last, before Mr R. Rodd, and a Jury, of which Mr John Pook was Foreman touching the death of the infant child of CLARA TOZER, aged 21, a domestic servant, which had been found under somewhat suspicious circumstances. After the Jury had viewed the body, Mr R. W. Clements, Fleet Street, Torquay, was called. He said CLARA TOZER had lived in his service about eight months, but left a year ago. She came back again on Saturday, the 14th inst. and asked Mrs Clements for a reference for the Queen's Hotel, but he and his wife thought she would be of service to them, and they asked her to come and live with them again, until she could get another place. She agreed, and came in that same night. About quarter past 11 on the evening of the 18th, a person told him there had been a case of concealment of birth on his premises, by CLARA TOZER. he asked her about it, and she said it was true, and told him where to find the body. He then gave information to the police, and P.C. Trot went with him to his kitchen where they found the body concealed under the shelves of the dresser. Mr J. B. Richardson said he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found it to be a female child; it weighed three pounds 13 oz., and measured 16 inches. The brain was healthy and there were no marks of external violence, it was a premature birth, and he attributed its death to that cause, and not to any neglect. This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner said it only remained for the Jury to say how the death happened. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony of premature birth.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 5 October 1878
TORQUAY - Sad Death From Poisoning. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary on Tuesday evening last before Mr H. Michelmore, Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr Robert Butland was Foreman, touching the death of JOHN HART, a young man aged 17, who was employed at the Brick Works, Lowe's Bridge, and who died at the Infirmary from the effects of poison. - The Jury having viewed the body, the first witness called was WILLIAM HART, father of the deceased, who stated that he was a labourer, and resided at Park Place, St. Mary-Church. He said that on Saturday last, between six and seven, he met his son on Hele road. He was then foaming at the mouth. Witness took him to a chemist at St. Mary-Church. On the road he said, "Father I have drunk some poison by mistake." Mr Hoyle, chemist, gave him some stuff to take, but as witness was not satisfied, he sent for Mr Finch. Mr Finch being away, his nephew, who was a surgeon, came in his stead, and he said that the stuff the chemist gave would neither do good nor harm. The doctor sent some medicine at once, and stayed with the deceased some time. On Sunday morning he came again with Mr Finch and told witness to take his son to the Dispensary, or he would die if an operation were not performed. Witness took him at once to the Infirmary, where he died shortly after nine on Monday morning. - Edward Norris, engine driver, at Lowe's Bridge, was next called. He stated that he saw the deceased at work on Saturday up to within a few minutes of the accident. He next saw him with the bottle produced (a black glass wine bottle) in his hand, and bending forward. Witness knew at once what was the matter, and he threw the bottle away and told the deceased to rinse his mouth while he went and got an emetic. The stuff the bottle contained was sulphuric acid, used for testing whether lime existed in the clay or not. After the deceased had drunk the emetic that witness had procured, he threw up what was apparently a lot of water. The deceased remained at the works about half-an-hour, and he was then taken home. Witness knew no one on the works who was in the habit of drinking anything from a bottle like the one produced; they always used cans for their tea, as no ale was allowed to be taken in. - In answer to a Juryman, the witness said that it was the manager's duty to test the clay with sulphuric acid. - Mr Albert Howard, manager of Messrs. Thomas's works, at Lowe's Bridge, said the deceased worked under him. He first heard of the accident about nine o'clock on Saturday evening. The sulphuric acid was always kept on the works, but never more than one bottle at a time, and was usually kept in the clay pit under the ganger who had charge of the clay catching. The deceased would not have the use of it in any way. He knew he was always a steady lad. A well was being sunk on the works, and he could only account for the accident by supposing that the lad thought the bottle contained ale, brought in by a man employed at the well to keep out the cold, and that being the case, he drunk it with so sad a result. There was not more than a wine glass full of liquor in the bottle at the time. The bottle was labelled "poison." - The father, re-called, said his son could scarcely read or write, and he should hardly suppose he would be able to read the word "poison." - Frederic Grainger, a clay catcher, said he had had charge of the bottle containing the sulphuric acid. Deceased worked at the cutting table inside, and he did not see him on Saturday with the bottle. Witness left the bottle concealed between some bricks not far from the well, on Saturday, intending to take it back to its place as soon as he could, but he was sorry to say he forgot to do so. - Mr E. A. Marsh, house surgeon at the Infirmary, was the last witness called. He stated that the deceased was taken in on Sunday morning, suffering from great difficulty in his breath, and his face was very dusky. Witness was told that the deceased had taken by mistake some sulphuric acid, and on examining his mouth found his tongue very much burnt, and scorched by the acid. Was unable to examine his throat, as he could not open his mouth sufficiently. His sufferings was so great that witness sent for Mr Huxley, and they opened the throat of the deceased, and found the glottis was very much swollen owing to the acid. A certain amount of relief was afforded, but the air was unable to get to the lungs, which were very much congested in spite of the operation. He would give as the immediate cause of death "Congestion of the lungs, produced by the effects of swallowing sulphuric acid." It was difficult to say whether life would have been saved if the operation had been performed sooner. The operation had been successfully performed, but, owing to the danger attending it, it was never resorted to until the last moment. - This was the whole of the evidence, and the Coroner summed up the case. He said that, so far as the evidence went, there was no blame to be attached to anyone. The question for the Jury to decide was, whether the deceased drunk the poison accidentally, not knowing what it was, or whether he drank it with the intent to kill himself. He thought it was accidentally done. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." All the witnesses belonging to the works, were then called into the room, and cautioned by the Coroner as to their future use of the sulphuric acid. Mr Howard replied that he had had a box made, and lock attached, wherein to keep the bottle, and that every precaution would be taken.

KINGSKERSWELL - Death By Misadventure At Kingskerswell. - On Monday week, MR CHARLES HENRY WILLS, of Kingskerswell died under circumstances which were detailed at a Coroner's Inquest held on the following day and on Monday last. It appeared that deceased had been in the habit for some time of taking sedatives for the purpose of allaying pain, produced by a fractured elbow, and inducing sleep. In the deceased's bedroom was found a box labelled "medicine - poison" in which were various medicines including a box of morphia pills, upon which was printed "Poison. J. W. Cocks, Torquay," and "Arthur H. Cox, Tasteless Pill Manufactory, Brighton." Mr Cocks stated that about three months back the deceased asked him to get a box of Cox's half-grain morphia pills for him, that he did so, and that he said to the deceased, "It is a full dose, captain," to which deceased replied, "I know it; I have been having such pills from Dr Brown (his own medical man), and I don't want to be constantly troubling him for them." Deceased always conversed like a man who knew a good deal of medicine. This evidence was supported by the deceased's uncle, who said that the deceased acted as doctor on board ship whilst taking a number of convicts to Bermuda. The Coroner, in summing up, characterised the case as a sad and important one. Mr Cocks, however, had satisfactorily explained the circumstances under which deceased purchased the pills, and had shewn that he had not sold them without giving proper caution. The evidence had been sufficient to shew that there was no reason for deceased's taking the pills with the intention of committing suicide. If the Jury thought that deceased took the pills unwittingly, and only for the purpose of alleviating pain, they would say so. After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict as follows:- "We find that the death of the deceased, CHARLES HENRY WILLS, was caused by an over-dose of morphia, contained in pills taken by him for the purpose of allaying pain and procuring sleep."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 19 October 1878
EXETER - Fatal Occurrence At Exeter. - A distressing accident, directly attributable to alleged recklessness, occurred at Exeter on Saturday night. About half-past eight a party of four men left the Buller's Inn, Alphington-street, in a trap, their destination being Haldon, some six miles distant. The driver was Richard Watson, the whipper of the pack of foxhounds Sir Lawrence Palk is "mustering" this season. The other occupants were James Killworth, the blacksmith, and Henry Coffin and Alfred Skinner. The horse was nearly thorough-bred, but had the reputation of being well-behaved. As soon as the party left the Inn, Watson used the whip pretty freely, and this, of course, provoked the animal into a furious pace, and the rate of speed seems to have attracted general attention. About a quarter of a mile out of Alphington-street stands the first turnpike-gate, and the female in charge, hearing the sound of a fast approaching trap, sent out her daughter BESSIE FLORENCE GOVIER, to open the gate. The girl, who is 12 years of age, proceeded to do so, but in the meantime the trap dashed up, and literally flew through the gate and continued it's mad career. Such was the force with which the vehicle came into contact with the gate, that the latter, although composed of the usually heavy woodwork, was completely wrecked. It was broken into two parts, the formidable rails on top and beneath snapping like carrots. Upon the body of the unfortunate child fell the debris with a crash, and the mother ran out to find her daughter lying there insensible, in a pool of blood, which was fast welling from her ears and mouth. A doctor was promptly sent for, and Mr Farrant quickly arrived on the scene, but the terrible injuries the child sustained caused it to expire within a quarter of an hour. Unaware of the melancholy results of his collision, Watson, it seems, continued his journey at the same furious rate. The blacksmith entreated him to go back and see what damages he had done, but he refused, and then Kilworth begged him to slacken his pace. He, however, did not do so, and the result of an altercation was that Kilworth got out, preferring to walk. He was induced, however, to remount, and the journey was continued to Alphington, where a stoppage was made at the Bell Inn. Here Watson mentioned that he had been in collision with the gate, and made some bravado remarks to the effect that he would drive through any turnpike gate. The trap was then taken on to Haldon. As soon as the child died P.C. Dymond procured a cab, and went in chase of the trap, but did not overtake it. As soon, however, as he reached Haldon he discovered who the parties were, and he at once went to Watson, and told him he had come about the gate. The man replied he knew he had done some damage. The officer then told him that not only damaged the gate, but that he had killed the girl, upon which the man seemed astounded, and burst into tears. He was then taken into custody. Since he has been in custody, Watson has stated that he was speaking to one of the men, and did not notice the gate was so near. The horse made a little bolt, and on his "pulling" it increased its pace. He knew he had damaged the gate, but had no notion the child was there. He was not intoxicated, as had been pretty generally rumoured. Captain Chichester, County Magistrate, attended at head-quarters on Sunday morning, and bail not being forthcoming, remanded Watson in custody pending the Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest was held at St. Thomas, Exeter, on Tuesday. Evidence was adduced in proof of the child having been struck down by the falling gate, which was caused by the furious driving of a horse and trap. - P.C. Dymond stated that he went in pursuit of the parties in the trap, and apprehended a man named Watson, Sir Lawrence Palk's whip at Haldon House. Watson stated that he was unaware of having done any damage to the toll-gate or to the child, and afterwards said "I know I have done damage to the turnpike-gate, but I know nothing about the poor child." He also stated that he was the sole driver of the trap, and that no one but himself took the reins. He appeared to be under the influence of liquor. - Mr Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, deposed that he attended the deceased, whom he found in the tollhouse perfectly insensible. She was bleeding freely from the ears, nose and mouth, and with the blood from the right ear came a quantity of brain matter. There was a contusion at the back of the head and on the forehead, and an incision on the right eyebrow. The skull was fractured, and the brain consequently lacerated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and stated that they could not exonerate the driver Watson from blame.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 November 1878
TORQUAY - A Young Man Burnt To Death In Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Mount Braddon this (Friday) afternoon, by Mr H. S. Gaye, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of MR JOHN JOSEPH MASSINGHAM, a tutor, aged 23, at Mrs Gregory's, Mount Braddon, Torquay. The Jury having viewed the body, the first witness called was George Caulder, coachman at Mrs Gregory's, who stated that he had known the deceased from the 8th of July last. Witness saw him about ten o'clock on Monday evening, when the housemaid said she thought something was wrong with MR MASSINGHAM, because she had heard him crying out in his own room for help. He then broke the door open, and found the deceased on his knees beside the door. He helped him up, but he said he could not see. Jane Lane, housemaid at Mount Braddon, gave evidence as to hearing him call out for help about 10 o'clock. She saw him in bed afterwards, and asked him how he got it done (meaning some burns), and he replied he could not tell. - Dr W. B. Dalby said he found deceased's right arm burnt up to the shoulder, and the right side and part of the chest, and the whole of the right side of his head, and the left partially. He attended him up to the time of his death, but he was never able to say how it happened. In his (witnesses) opinion, the deceased must have been leaning on the mantle piece, and in a fit fell down and so got burnt. The Coroner having summed up the case, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That death was caused through the deceased accidentally falling into the fire."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 18 January 1879
TORQUAY - Found Dead. - On Wednesday evening WILLIAM ROWETT, chief boatman at Babbacombe, took two pills and went to bed. Early next morning he was found dead. A post mortem examination has been made, the coroner communicated with, and an Inquest will be held at the Roughwood Inn this (Friday) evening.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 10 May 1879
TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, on Monday evening, before Mr Gaye, and a Jury of which Mr A. Barclay was Foreman, touching the death of WILLIAM KILMINSTER, a boy who died at the Infirmary, on Sunday morning, owing to wounds caused by falling over the cliff at Babbacombe on the previous day. The Jury having viewed the body, the first witness called was MICHAEL KILMINSTER, a plasterer, who said he lived at Torre. The deceased was his son. He was just over 13 years of age. - Mr E. A. Marsh, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said that on Saturday, May 3rd, deceased was brought into the house. That was shortly after two o'clock. Witness was told that he had been picked up at Babbacombe, having fallen over the rocks on to the beach below. He was perfectly insensible, cold, and had every symptom of concussion of the brain. There was a small wound on the scalp, on the front part of the head, and there were contusions on the face, and a great swelling on the right eyelid, and right side of the face; there were also some small cuts about the lips, which bled rather feely, and some slight abrasions of the hands, but nothing serious. There were no broken limbs. He did not recover consciousness at all, and he died on Sunday morning at seven o'clock. He thought the injuries the deceased had sustained might be caused from a fall over rocks. - Charles Campion, a gardener, of Babbacombe, said that on Saturday, about twenty minutes after one, he picked the deceased up. His attention was called to the deceased by some women, who said a boy had fallen over the rocks. He went and found the boy, who was quite unconscious. Witness and another young man carried him up to the top, and witness sent for a carriage and saw him on the way to the Infirmary. Witness thought the height of the rocks would be from 80 to 100 feet, though it would not be a clear fall of that. There were some flowers lying under the deceased at the time, which witness thought he had been gathering on the side of the cliff. Witness found a hat belonging to the deceased some 60 feet up on the cliff. The flowers under the deceased corresponded with those growing on the cliff. - Mr J. B. Guyer, chemist, of the Strand, said the deceased had been in his employ as an errand boy for two years or more. On Saturday last, at about 11.30, witness sent him to Babbacombe, and he did not see him again until after the accident, when he saw him at the Infirmary. - James Soart, a boy of 13, said he knew the deceased. On Saturday morning he was with him on Babbacombe Down. Witness met the deceased at about 12.35, and they both went together picking cowslips. The deceased got down on the side of the cliff and witness saw him fall over, and in his fall he slipped over witness, who had been plucking flowers just below him. The deceased did not stop in his fall at all. Witness called two men, but did not go down to the deceased himself. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the boy met with his death through having Accidentally Fallen Over the Cliff.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - A few days ago, MRS PINSENT, and MRS JOHN PINSENT, junr., of Newton, were driving in a pony carriage at Newton when, owing to a fright, the pony dashed away and ran through Devon Square and into Queen-street, where it collided with the wall of a house, and both ladies were thrown out with considerable violence, and were very badly injured. A hand-truck in the charge of two boys was on the other side of the square at the time of the accident, but both boys state that the pony had taken fright before it came in sight of their truck. On Saturday the younger MRS PINSENT died, and, at an Inquest held on Monday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner, Mr Gaye, reprimanded the boys for driving so fast down an incline, it being a very dangerous practice.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 5 July 1879
Distressing Suicide. - On Sunday afternoon, a middle aged married woman named HURRELL, whose husband is Foreman to Messrs. Watts & C., clay merchants, committed suicide by jumping into the river, at a point just below the railway bridge. Her husband was away at Teignmouth and she appears to have taken her three children out for a walk and suddenly left them for a time to gather some flowers. Whilst they were thus innocently engaged, their wretched mother walked to the river bank, took off her bonnet and jumped into the water. An Inquest was held upon the body of the woman on Tuesday afternoon and the Jury returned a verdict that she committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

TORQUAY - Sad Case Of Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Saturday last - before Mr F. J. Watts - touching the death of SAMUEL BIRD, dairyman, Hele, near St. Mary-Church. Mr Peter Thomas was Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was EMILY BIRD, who stated that she was the wife of deceased, and had been married to him for nineteen years. He was 45 years of age. She last saw him alive at six o'clock on the previous (Friday) morning. Deceased had recently been very much troubled about money matters. On the previous night he was greatly excited, owing to Mr Shinner (his landlord) and Mr C. Manning (auctioneer, Torre) visiting the house and demanding immediate payment of £5 due for rent of a field at St Mary-Church. Deceased had promised to pay them on the following Saturday, but they said they must have the money at once. This he told them was impossible but they continued going to and from the house, laughing and sneering at him, for upwards of an hour. In their presence deceased produced a rope and threatened to make away with himself, as the difficulty troubled him so much. In default of the necessary payment they locked up the field where the cows were and this preyed upon deceased very much. He said he would not have minded had there not been a cow amongst the lot which was not his. Upon going to bed he was quite hysterical and said:- "The treatment I have received from Mr Shinner weighs me down with grief; I feel I cannot bear up under it." When he got up at five o'clock next morning he asked his wife whether Mr Shinner could do anything to him if he milked the cows. She told him "No," and he went out in the usual way. About half-past five he returned, and going to his wife in bed, kissed her, and said he did not think he should come back any more. She replied that he must not think that, but come to her at Everton when she would try and do something for him. These were the last words that were spoken and the last she saw of him was as he was going down the road to Torquay, with his cans, as usual. Deceased was a very excitable man when he drank, but not at other times. He had not been drinking lately. Besides the field at St. Mary-Church, he rented two grass fields, and a small orchard with a linhay, at Cockington. The only rent he owed was £7 due at Midsummer last. - LILLIE BIRD said she last saw her father about six o'clock on Thursday night. As she saw his cans standing in one place throughout the next morning, she went to the linhay, thinking he might be there. She was afraid to go in by herself, and, looking through the door, caught sight of her father's coat. Soon after she got a man to go in, and he came out and told her that her father had hung himself. - George Green, gardener, Torre, said that about a quarter past two he was asked by his mother to go into the linhay and see if BIRD was there, as it was feared he had made away with himself. Upon going in he saw deceased hanging by a rope from a beam, and his dog licking his arm and trying to get him away. He was quite dead. - Robert Pratt, market gardener, Torquay, proved seeing the deceased about his usual work between eight and nine the same morning. - P.C. Bond said that about 2.30 p.m. on Friday, he was requested to accompany a man to Chelston Manor, where it was said another man had hung himself. He there found deceased as described by Green. The keys of the door were in his pocket and he seemed to have driven a staple in for the purpose of securing the rope. He appeared to have been dead for several hours. - The Deputy Coroner, in summing up the evidence for the Jury, remarked that there was no doubt whatever that the deceased died from hanging. Whether, at the time he committed the act, he was in such a state of mind as to know the difference between right and wrong was for them to say. If they thought he was insane at the time he committed this wrongful deed they would return a verdict accordingly, but if they thought he deliberately committed the act, whilst in his right senses, then they would return a verdict that was known as felo-de-se. - After a few moments' consideration the Foreman of the Jury said they were all agreed that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, which they considered was brought on by overwhelming grief, accelerated by the action of Messrs. Shinner and Manning; and the Jury further thought that these two men were deserving of censure for treating the deceased in such a manner, after he had promised payment by a certain date. - The Deputy Coroner: I quite agree with you, gentlemen; I think their conduct was very reprehensible. The sympathy of the Jury with the widow - who was in an almost helpless state during the Enquiry - was practically expressed by their unanimously handing over their fees for her benefit. Mr Blackwood, of Chelston Manor, also gave a donation.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 12 July 1879
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held at the Rising Sun Inn, Torre, on Monday morning last - before Dr Henry Gaye, Coroner - touching the death of EMILY JANE, infant daughter of MARIA and GEORGE CHURCHWARD, residing at Mason's-road, Torre. The circumstances under which the unfortunate child came by her death were as follows:- On Thursday afternoon the 3rd inst., the child, who was just over two years of age, was playing in a room with her mother. Suddenly she walked into an adjoining apartment rented by a Miss Buckingham, and, during the temporary absence of the occupier, in some manner upset the boiling contents of a tea-pot, which was standing upon the table. Her mother was attracted by a scream and at once ran to the assistance of her child. She found her rolling upon the floor, having severely scalded the front part of her body with the hot tea. The child was promptly put to bed, the wounds being first dressed with lime water and oil. On the following day she seemed to get worse and Mr Wills was called in. But he, hearing the skilful way in which the child had been treated, did not disturb her. At twelve o'clock that night the child died. The Coroner briefly reviewed the evidence and the Jury at once returned a verdict, "That the child died from the effects of having accidentally scalded herself." At the close of the Inquest Sergeant Ockford was requested by the Jury to hand their fees over to the mother.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 August 1879
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Somnambulist. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station on Thursday evening, before Mr F. J. Watts, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN PATRICK SAUNDERS, painter, of 1, Queen-street, aged 59 years. - RICHARD SYDNEY SAUNDERS, son of the deceased, living in the same house, said he last saw his father alive at five minutes past eight on Tuesday evening. About half-past eleven o'clock he heard his mother calling out "He's fallen over the stairs," and going to the spot he found deceased lying on the floor with his head towards the washhouse door. He thought he must be dead as he did not hear him breathe. His mother said deceased had been walking in his sleep. He had lived in the same house for eight years, and during that time deceased had been in the habit of walking in his sleep. Witness had found him several times and woke him up. Witness helped to carry his father back to his room. - Mr S. Gamble, surgeon, stated that he was called to the house about 12 o'clock, and found the deceased lying on his back, quite dead. Upon examination, he found that the deceased had sustained a fracture of the upper spinal bone, which was quite sufficient to account for his sudden death. The injury was what was commonly called a broken neck. Sergeant Ocford stated that he visited the house the same night, and found everything in order, the inmates sober, and everything perfectly satisfactory. After brief deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death through falling down stairs."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 6 September 1879
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident On The Quay. A Dangerous Footpath. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station, on Thursday morning, before Mr Henry S. Gaye, Coroner, touching the death of ALFRED JOHN KELLOND, a boy 13 years of age, who met his death by falling from the footpath behind the cabstand on the Strand to the slip below, on Tuesday evening last. Mr Daniel Coombes was appointed Foreman of the Jury, and the first witness examined was ELIZA KELLOND, who stated that the deceased was her brother. On Tuesday, about six o'clock in the evening, she was walking with him on the Strand. As she was going along the asphalt pavement on the harbourside, she turned round, and saw the deceased running and trying to catch her up. Suddenly his foot slipped, and he fell heard foremost on to the stone below. He was shortly afterwards taken home to his father's house at Luther Cottages, Ellacombe, but died within three hours. - John Brickwood, labourer, said he picked the deceased up. The boy had fallen about three or four feet, and witness was able to reach him easily with his arm. Deceased was only able to articulate "Oh my head." - Mr Smith, surgeon, said he was called in to see the deceased about a quarter to eight. He found him in bed, but totally unconscious, and breathing in a heavy manner. He had a small wound on the left side of his head, below the temple bone, which injury might have been caused by a fall such as had been described. He was of opinion that death was caused by fracture of the skull and effusion of blood to the brain. The Jury at once returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and desired that the attention of the Local Board should be called to the unguarded state of the footpath, leading from the slip to the Victoria Parade, at the back of the cab stand in the Strand. The Coroner promised that he would communicate with the proper authorities. The whole of the members of the Jury, through Sergeant Ellicott, handed over their fees for the benefit of the friends of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 September 1879
ST MARY CHURCH - Fatal Effects of A Fall. - An Inquest was held at the Fortune of War Inn, St. Mary-Church, on Saturday morning last, touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY WILLCOCKS, aged nine years, son of SAMUEL WILLCOCKS, saddler, North Tawton. From the evidence laid before Mr Henry Gaye, Coroner, it appeared that the deceased was on a visit (with his brothers) to an aunt named Mrs Jane Sims, who is a laundress living at Plainmoor. On Thursday afternoon he was playing at "Catch me Ten" with some other lads in the Torquay Road. When just opposite the above named Inn, the boy slipped and fell backwards, striking his head against a kerbstone. He got up, however, and merely complained of a headache, but immediately proceeded home. Very shortly afterwards the boy was sick, and suffering in other ways, and Mr Chillcote, surgeon, was called in. The poor boy, however, died at eight o'clock the same evening. Mr Chillcote gave it as his opinion that death ensued from concussion of the brain, resulting from the effects of the fall. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and at the suggestion of their Foreman (Mr L. Tucker) directed Sergt. Ellicott to devote their fees to the benefit of the parents of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 October 1879
TORQUAY - Sad Case Of Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station on Saturday evening, before Mr Gaye, County Coroner, to Inquire into the cause of the death of HENRY ADAMS, a mason, aged 56 years. The first witness called was JOHN ADAMS, mason, Ellacombe, who said: Deceased was my second cousin. I have known him for a long time and lately he has been working with me. I last saw him alive at ten o'clock on Friday morning, when we were both working for Mr Vanstone at South Town House. I did not notice any difference in his demeanour, except that he kept on drinking - as he had done ever since Whitsuntide. He had not been in constant work owing to his drunken habits. He was not exactly sober at breakfast time on Friday morning and he had been drinking all the previous afternoon. He was a married man, but his wife and children left him several months ago. he was a very quiet man and drink did not excite him. Jane Long, married, said: The deceased resided at my house since last July. He generally returned home drunk at night. He was very quiet; and all the time he was with me I thought him a strange man and was always nervous about him. He sighed and groaned a great deal. He returned home about ten o'clock on Thursday night and left before six on Friday morning. - Thos. Leaman, plasterer, said: I only knew the deceased by sight and did not see him until Friday when he was hanging. He was hanging by a sash line suspended from a roof. Mr Vanstone told me of the circumstances. - John Vanstone, builder, Torre, said: Deceased worked for me during the past two months. His drinking habits were often the cause of stopping his work. He was sometimes away for days together. He was working for me on Friday and part of the day before. When he came to his work I accused him of having been drinking. ADAMS first saw him hanging and then I called Leaman to cut him down. - JOHN ADAMS, recalled, said: Three of us were looking for him and a man called Thos. Woollacott first saw him and exclaimed "Here he is 'Stringed' up." - The Coroner remarked that he thought the Jury were now in possession of sufficient evidence to warrant their arriving at a just conclusion as to the cause of this man's death. They had two questions to decide. First how did this man come by his death, and what was the state of his mind at the time? Of the first he thought there could be no doubt that he committed suicide by hanging. But they would further have to determine whether at the time he destroyed his own life - which thus was, in the eye of the law, a criminal act, known as robbing her Majesty of a subject, he was responsible for the act. The Jury took some time to consider their verdict, and after the Court had been cleared for some minutes resolved that HENRY ADAMS committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. The Chairman (Mr R. Butland) strongly advocated the addition of the words "accelerated by drink," but the suggestion was only supported by one other Juryman.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 December 1879
TORQUAY - Suicide. - A sad case of Suicide occurred on Thursday morning last. From information received, Sergt. Ellicott, in company with Constable Charley, went to Temperance Street, and found SAMUEL WILLIAM CREWS, an old man, aged 80, lying in his bedroom in a pool of blood, with his throat badly cut. Dr Richardson was sent for, but the man died in a few hours. The Inquest was held this morning at the Police Court, and a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Standard Public House, Hele, on Monday last, touching the death of EDWARD JOHN NORRISH, an engine driver, in the employ of Messrs. Thomas & Co., St. Mary-Church. Mr H. S. Gay, Coroner, attended. From the evidence of the Foreman of the Brick Works, in which deceased was employed, it appeared that there was a hot water tank connected with the works, which tank deceased and witness were engaged in repairing on the 5th instant, it at the time containing hot water to the depth of two feet and a half. Part of the repairs being finished, witness left deceased for a few moments, being called away to another part of the works. In a short time one of the men told him that NORRISH had fallen into the hot water tank, and was nearly dead. He went and found the deceased in the boiler house, adjoining the tank, taking off his clothes. He said he had fallen in the water head foremost. Witness with the assistance of some other men undressed deceased, rubbed him with oil, and, wrapping him in blankets, took him to the Infirmary. In answer to a question from the Coroner, witness said he thought the accident was owing to the plank, on which deceased had to stand, slipping away, thus precipitating him into the water. The plank was placed across the cistern directly over the water, and to do the needful repairs it was necessary to lie down on the plank and witness supposed the plank 'canted,' and slipped away, as he found it floating in the water after the accident. - Charles Allford, brickmaker, stated that he was about 60 yards from the tank on the day the accident happened, when he heard a cry for help, and running up found the deceased in the boiler house, rubbing oil over himself. He said the plank had slipped away, and he had fallen in the water. Witness did not see the plank in the tank. The water was nearly boiling. - Mr Horace Lowther, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, stated that on Friday, the 5th instant, the deceased was brought to the Torbay Infirmary, between five and six p.m. He was very severely scalded on the arms, back and thighs. Witness asked him how it happened, and he said he had fallen into a tank of boiling water. Deceased died from the shock to his nervous system. - The Coroner then briefly addressed the Jury, saying that the deceased was engaged in his legitimate work at the time of his death, and it was for them to say whether he met his death accidentally or not. The Jury, after consulting privately, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" at the same time stating it as their wish that Messrs. Thomas & Co., should adopt such means as lay in their power, as would most surely prevent a repetition of the accident.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 21 February 1880
TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Country House Inn, on Tuesday last, touching the death of ANNIE BLANCHE LEMON, aged six years, who died suddenly on Sunday. A post mortem examination was made by Dr Midgley Cash, who certified that death was caused by infusion of blood to the brain, which might have been caused by a blow or a fall, and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was found by the Jury.

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held on Saturday last before Dr S. Gaye, at the Torquay Police Court, on the body of JOHN BARTER, fruiterer. Mr Richard Skinner was Foreman of the Jury. - John Francis, nurseryman, in the employ of Messrs. Curtis & Co., stated that the deceased had been a greengrocer until a short time before his death, when trade being bad he took to book canvassing. On the day of his death he called witness (who was in the Devon Rosery) aside, and told him that he was thinking of going to the asylum, or drowning himself. He also referred to some money which he owed witness, but witness told him not to mind that. Witness did not know whether he had been doing well as a canvasser or not. - George Oaks, manager of the British Workman, No. 2., stated that the deceased stayed at the British Workman for two nights, Tuesday and Wednesday. On Tuesday night the deceased was very restless, yelling the whole of the night. In the morning he said he had a little more work to do and then he should be better provided for. - Robert Pile, naturalist, stated that he was out near Corbon's Head, looking for specimens when he saw the deceased, quite dead, about 50 feet from the sea. It was nearly low water at the time, and the body had evidently been left by the tide. He at once gave information to the police. P.S. Ocford proved finding the body. He stated that he had known deceased for some years as an industrious, sober man. He was very charitable, giving away to his poor neighbours money he wanted for himself. A piece of shard was found in the pocket of the deceased, on which was written, "Speak to all why I left home." The Coroner asked Mr Oaks if the deceased had paid his lodging, and was told he had not. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 March 1880
TORQUAY - Inquest. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held on the body of MISS EMILY BAXTER, who died suddenly the Thursday before. In accordance with the medical testimony a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 7 August 1880
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last at about 10 a.m., JOHN CONLAN, an old man of 81, residing at 3, Geneva Cottages, was crossing the road near the shop of Mr Weeks, chemist, when he was knocked down by a pony and cart. His collar bone was broken and he was rather bruised. He was taken home and attended by Mr Stabb, but died from the shock on Wednesday afternoon. An Inquest was held at the Castle Inn before Deputy Coroner Watts and a Jury, of which Mr T. G. Stedham was elected Foreman. Mr W. W. Stabb said that on Saturday last, at about 10.30 a.m. he was sent for, but not being at home, he did not get the message until a little after one, when he immediately went and attended the deceased. He found he was suffering from a broken collar bone, and two bruises on the legs, the bruises were not of any importance. He attended him every day until Wednesday, when he died. The broken collar bone would not have killed a young man, but acted with the severe shock to the nervous system on so old a man. Mr George Perring, poulterer, of 30 Higher Union Street, said that on the morning of Saturday last at about 10 a.m. he saw deceased try to cross the road. He saw the horse and cart driven by Langworthy, and he saw the accident, and tried to save the poor old man, but in this he failed. Afterwards he picked the deceased up, and carried him to the pavement, got a chair, and seated him in it. Deceased was partially unconscious, but soon came to himself, and asked whether the pony had ran away. He told him he thought it had. Langworthy soon after returned, and took the deceased home in his cart. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Saturday last, on the body of a child, named ALBERT LUXTON, who came to his death by falling over the edge of the Quarry at the back of Palk's Arms. It was held under Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, and thirteen Jurymen. The father was examined and gave evidence to the fact that he saw his son at about three o'clock, and not again until after the accident. It happened about 400 yards from his house. Frank Atkins, carpenter, was the next witness examined. He said that at about eight o'clock he saw some children on the top of the Quarry, playing; something on Ellacombe Green seemed to attract their attention, and they ran to see what it was; as they were running, deceased tripped and came head first to the ground. He immediately ran to him, and, picking him up, carried him to the Infirmary; the boy was unconscious and did not speak. The place where the boy fell was a very dangerous part, the boys and girls got up from the street by a narrow winding path, at the back of Pembroke Villas. A Juryman proposed that the Local Board should be asked to dig away the earth at the bottom of the path, and so stop the boys from going up there; this was resolved upon. Mr James Almer, the house surgeon of the Torbay Infirmary, was then examined. He said he saw deceased at about a quarter past eight on Thursday evening, he attended him, and found he was suffering from a severe scalp wound and a fracture of the skull, he was not quite conscious, partly so, and shortly after became quite unconscious. After bandaging the head and applying hot water to the neck of deceased he sent for Dr Powell. The haemorrhage inside the head was very great, and could not be stopped; the skull was smashed in several places. The deceased died at a quarter to ten from concussion of the brain and the shock to the nervous system; he did not speak from the time of the accident to the time of his death. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The Jurymen's fees were collected and paid to the father of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 October 1880
TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening last at the Roughwood Arms, Babbacombe, on the body of ELIZABETH TERRY, wife of THOMAS TERRY, of the Mason's Arms, Babbacombe. The Coroner, Dr H. S. Gaye, attended. The evidence given by MR TERRY was to the effect that on the previous Friday night his wife went to bed in her usual health, which was very good. On the Saturday morning on calling her he found that she did not move and was nearly cold. He sent for a doctor. Mr Chilcott, surgeon, came, and pronounced MRS TERRY to be dead, saying that she had been dead about an hour-and-a-half. Deceased was not subject to fits of any kind and she had never once fainted during the whole time they had been married, nearly thirty years. About two years ago she complained a little of palpitation of the heart and was attended by Mr Chilcott. She had not complained of anything since then. Mr Chilcott said he found the deceased on Saturday morning quite dead, and it was his opinion that she died of congestion of the brain. He was afraid she would have had an attack about two years ago; but she did not. He treated her then for apoplexy. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 13 November 1880
BRIXHAM - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon, at Mr Hills, Commercial Inn, on the Quay, before Dr Gay, County Coroner, on the body of JAMES BUFFETT, fisherman, of Brixham, who was drowned on Sunday night. Mr W. Blight, was Foreman of the Jury. - Emily Bubeer said - I am daughter of JAMES BUFFETT; I last saw him alive about 7 weeks since. He is 64 years of age. Elizabeth Blatchford deposed - I am housekeeper at the Crown and Anchor public-house. I knew the deceased JAMES BUFFETT. I saw him alive on Sunday evening about 9 p.m. He came in with Mr Pack and others, and called for two or three pints of beer. He then left in company with the other men. He had not been gone over a few minutes before he called back, and said he had left his handkerchief behind. I took the light and looked for it. He then left the house; it was about 9.30. I did not see him alive after that time, he was quite sober. William Henry Pack stated - I was with the deceased on Sunday evening about 8.30. We went on board, and put the boat "Annie" out alongside the pier, so that we might go to sea early in the morning. We then came on shore and went into the Crown and Anchor. He called for some beer; we then left together. He said he had left his pocket-handkerchief behind. I did not see him alive after. I went on board on Monday morning, and found he had not arrived; I thought at once he must have been drowned. He was quite sober when I left him. Robert Bourneman said - I am gardener at Rock House. On Monday morning at eight o'clock, one of the Orphan Boys called me. I went down and saw the body of the deceased floating near the rocks. We got him up on to the rocks. I should think he floated to where I saw him. - EMILY BUFFETT, re-examined, stated - My father has lived apart from my mother for the last 13 years. I have paid rent for a room for my mother and him for the last six years, but he would never sleep there. Whenever he slept on shore he did so with a man called John Crispin. The Foreman: Had he any jewellery or anything of any value, which would have caused you to suppose that he might have been pushed into the water? - Witness: No; his children would have it if he had anything. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning." The Foreman (Mr Blight) suggested that there should be a Public Mortuary at the place where the accident occurred. Dr Gay said he thought there ought to be a place of the kind there, and he would write to the Local Board and embody the wish of the Jury.

EXETER - Suicide Of A Corporate Officer. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, Bartholomew Street, before Mr Hooper (City Coroner) relative to the death of MR ROBERT NORRISH LENDON, Inspector of Nuisances under the Exeter town Council, whose body was discovered in the Canal on the previous morning. MRS ELIZABETH LENDON, wife of the deceased, said her husband was a retired Builder and Inspector of Nuisances. She had noticed nothing strange about his habits other than he was at times a little low-spirited. He had been attended by Mr Webb for some slight illness. He left his home on Sunday morning about 9.30 after partaking of a hearty breakfast, saying that he was going to disinfect the house of a Mr Balkwill residing at Beedle's-terrace. She neither heard nor saw anything more of him until Monday morning, when information was brought her by a man, named Hamlyn, who said that her husband's hat and stick had been found on the Canal banks. His body was brought home the same morning about ten o'clock. - Walter Husson, residing at Salmon Pool, stated that on Sunday morning about ten o'clock he found a hat and stick on the bank near where Salmon Pool-bridge crosses the Canal. He took them to P.C. Cockram at Alphington. - Harry Hamlyn, deputy to the deceased, said that he left MR LENDON on Saturday at half-past nine, and saw him no more until the body was found near Salmon Pool-bridge. He was aware that deceased suffered extremely from a rupture. - Dr Henderson deposed to having examined the body which had the appearance of being in the water some time. He found the body perfectly rigid. There were no marks of violence upon it, and he concluded that death must have resulted from drowning. - In reply to a Juryman, Dr Henderson said that the pain which the deceased suffered would be sufficient to induce a state of temporary insanity, and, after a brief summing up by the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 November 1880
WESTMINSTER - Death of MR SIDNEY BROWNE. - The Coroner for Westminster (Mr Bedford) has just held an Inquest relative to the death of MR SIDNEY BROWNE, 18, son of MR G. BROWNE, Park Hill, Mannamead, Bedford Street, Plymouth. The deceased was a medical student at King's College Hospital, and on the 9th inst. mounted a ladder to witness the Lord Mayor's Show. The ladder broke in three places and MR BROWNE, jun., fell to the ground; he was found face downwards on some flagstones with two wounds on his head and semi-unconscious; he got worse and died on the 13th inst. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BRIXHAM - Death By Drowning. - On Monday Dr Gay, County Coroner, and a Jury (of whom Mr W. Howard was the Foreman) held an Inquest at the Queen's Hotel, relative to the death of ANN ELIZABETH BIRD, 53 years of age, who on Sunday morning last was found by a boy named John Bartlett lying lifeless between two rocks in Fishcombe Cove. Elizabeth Stapleton said- I am a married woman, living at Brixham. I knew the deceased very well; she has been living apart from her husband for the last three months, and during that time has been lodging with me. I last saw her alive on Wednesday evening, when she told me she should not be home that night, as she was going to nurse Mrs Stevens in the New Road. I know nothing of what became of her afterwards. Elizabeth Stevens said - I knew the deceased MRS BIRD. I had engaged her to attend me. I saw her alive on Friday evening, she told me that she saw her husband on Thursday night. I don't think that she was in want of anything. - WILLIAM WARNING BIRD said - I am a discharged soldier (pensioner), but now a policeman. I am the husband of ANN ELIZABETH BIRD; she left me on account of her daughter; they could not agree one with the other. She said she could do better by herself. I have seen her several times since. She told me on Wednesday evening that she was going to get a mason to white-wash my rooms. I have been living alone for the last three months. I fancy of late she has been rather low in spirits. - Elizabeth Stapleton stated - I am a married woman; my husband is a policeman. I am a daughter-in-law to the first witness. The deceased woman lived in part of the house with me. I saw her on Friday, she then seemed all right and in good spirits. She washed the entrance to the door, and on leaving the house about one o'clock wished me good morning. - Mrs Stevens, on being questioned by the Foreman, said that MRS BIRD told her that she was afraid to go home with her husband. - Eva Furneaux stated: I am the wife of Walter Furneaux, fisherman, living at New Road. I saw the deceased (MRS BIRD) on Friday morning. She told me that her husband wanted her to go back and live with him, but she could not do so. She often remarked that she had suffered a great deal by her husband's drunkenness. She seemed to be in a great deal of trouble, and said that she did not know what to do about going back to live with him, on account of his drunkenness. She added "I wish I had never seen him." - J. Bartlett stated, I found the deceased on Sunday morning about 12 o'clock, between two rocks, at Fishcombe Cove. Her bonnet and shawl were lying upon the rocks above. I remained by the body, whilst two boys went and fetched a policeman. - Thomas Pollard said - I am a Police Constable, stationed at Brixham. On Sunday morning about half-past twelve o'clock, two boys called at the station and said they had found a woman drowned at Fishcombe. I proceeded to the spot and found the body lying upon the beach; it had been removed from the rocks and placed upon the beach by some men. I searched the clothes and found a pocket handkerchief. The woman had two rings on one of her fingers. Her bonnet and shawl were lying on the rocks. The evidence having been thus concluded the room was cleared, and the Jury, after ten minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 27 November 1880
EXETER - Death In The Gaol. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Exeter Prison on the body of JAMES POPE, who committed suicide in that establishment. The deceased was at the last assize sentenced by Mr Justice Denman to seven years' penal servitude for stealing a pony at Northmolton. At the previous July sessions at Bideford he was convicted of stealing four bullocks, and was sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment; hence the severity of the sentence passed by Mr Justice Denman. The authorities of the prison refuse to give any information relative to the case; but it is believed that Pope contrived to strangle himself by twisting around his neck some strips of his bedding, which he tore up for the purpose. The Jury found that he committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

EXETER - Inquest. - On Monday an Inquiry was held relative to the death of WILLIAM RICHARDS, a baker, of Lapford. He was mounting the stairs of the down platform at St. David's Station with a bag containing a barrel of yeast with the intention of going over to the North Devon platform with it, when the bag swung out over the banisters, carrying deceased with it, and he fell to the ground, a distance of eleven feet. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found he had sustained a fractured spine and injuries to his lungs. He died on Sunday afternoon. Verdict of "Accidental Death".

EXETER - Inquest. - A second Inquest was held as to the death of a pensioner named HENRY WYATT, residing in Preston-street. Deceased complained on Saturday night of giddiness, and died the following morning about eight o'clock. Dr Perkins gave it as his opinion that convulsion was the cause of death, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 December 1880
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Torre. - On Wednesday night, an accident, which subsequently terminated fatally, occurred at Torre. It appears that about three o'clock in the afternoon, a labourer, named FREDERICK WHITE, 28 years of age, married and residing in Pimlico, while working at an arch which is being widened to suit the requirements made through the laying down of an additional line on the railway, was knocked down, and his head was seriously hurt by a falling plank. At that time, however, his injuries were not believed to be of a fatal nature, and although greatly stunned, he managed to walk home and went to bed. Several hours afterwards he became worse and was attended by the Surgeon of the Torbay Hospital, under whose direction he was conveyed to the hospital, but, although everything was done for him, he gradually sank, and died from concussion of the brain about seven o'clock Thursday morning. - Yesterday afternoon, an Inquest was held on the body in the Castle Inn, by Dr Gaye, Coroner. After the Jury had been sworn, they repaired to the Torbay Hospital and viewed the body. On their return, the first witness called was George Fay, joiner, residing at 2 Park View, Torquay. He said, I knew the deceased FREDERICK WHITE. He was a labourer about 29 years of age, and resided I believe at Pimlico. He was engaged working on the Railway at Torre, and I was present when the accident occurred to him on Wednesday. We were at the time engaged in lowering the bracing of an arch in Paignton Road, close to the Railway Station, and had previously succeeded in lowering two by means of a block and tackle. In all four men were engaged at the work. We had almost got one of the battens upon the ground when the deceased commenced to prize it with a crowbar, and just then the wall plate fell, and struck him upon the head. It knocked him down: I ran to his assistance, but before I reached him he was in the act of rising. He put his hand to his head, and I sent for 6d. worth of brandy, which he drank, remarking afterwards that he felt better. Some water was next given him and saying he felt better still he rose to resume work. I noticed him staggering so I told him to go home and return to work the following day. I sent my son afterwards to assist him home but he told the lad to go back, saying he did not require assistance. I understand that he reached home and went to bed. The accident happened between one and two o'clock. - Mr Lee, contractor, gave the Jury a description of the battens, and described how the accident would probably occur. - Henry Gilliard who was present at the time of the accident was also examined. - Mr Cumming, House Surgeon of the Torbay Hospital said that WHITE was brought to the Institution about ten o'clock on Wednesday evening in an insensible condition and never recovered consciousness, dying about eight o'clock the following morning. There were no external bruises on the head, but in his opinion death had resulted from concussion of the brain. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TIVERTON - At Tiverton Infirmary, an Inquest has been held on the body of JOHN WOLLAND, aged 23, who, dressed in female attire, took part in a "Guy Fawkes" celebration on November 5th, and was so severely burnt with a tar-barrel that he was removed to the Infirmary, where he lingered until he died. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 18 December 1880
TORQUAY - The Death Of A Torquay Bicyclist. - At Underwood, on Wednesday, an Inquiry was held as to the death of MR JOHN O. SMYTH, whilst bicycling on Monday. Dr Gaye, the County Coroner attended, and Mr J. Pook was Foreman of the Jury. - MR FREDERICK CAREW SMYTH, father of the deceased, said that his son was 21 years of age; he had only had his bicycle a week, and was learning to ride it when the accident occurred. - William Bowden, labourer, said he saw the deceased about 10 o'clock on Monday morning wheeling his bicycle up the hill at Watcombe. About an hour after he heard of the accident from the police, and went and identified the young man as the one he had seen wheeling his bicycle earlier in the day,. - John Curton, labourer, said that he and his son were going up the hill just past Solomon's Post, when they saw MR SMYTH lying close to the hedge with his bicycle near him. He was alive at the time, but died after the lapse of five minutes. He did not move or speak. He (witness) sent for some brandy and he drank a little, but did not rally. The mark in the road, made by the wheel of the bicycle, showed that MR SMYTH was riding down the hill, and instead of turning the corner where necessary, had gone straight across into the hedge. He must have come down the hill with considerable velocity and lost control over the machine. The mark showed that the front wheel had struck a small heap of earth at the side of the road, had gone over it and had struck against a large stone just behind. The handles of the bicycle were broken off. The road was a wide one, and had MR SMYTH been an experienced rider he could have turned the corner safely. - Dr T. H. Colt said that he saw MR SMYTH at twenty-three minutes past eleven; he was dead. He had evidently been thrown against a large stone which stood at the side of the road. His face was somewhat bruised, but there was not the slightest mark on the skull to point to the cause of death. He died from the severe shock caused by the fall from the bicycle. In summing up the Coroner said this was the first case f the kind that had come under his notice, and pointed out that there was no evidence of any collision, and that MR SMYTH was an inexperienced rider. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 1 January 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest. - On Tuesday Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner held an Inquest as to the death of a little boy, 2 ½ years of age, named WILLIAM BAKER, son of WILLIAM BAKER, a tailor, residing in Fairfield-terrace. It appeared that a fortnight since the child fell backwards into some hot water, so severely injuring himself that he died on Monday after suffering severe agony. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ABBOT - Death By Poisoning Of The Coroner's Wife. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday last, at Newton Abbot, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH EMILY GAYE, 42 years of age, the wife of DR. H. GAYE, Coroner, who died from the effects of taking carbolic acid on the previous night. The Inquest was held at the residence of DR GAYE, Devon-square. It appeared from the evidence of DR GAYE and his servants that on Thursday evening the doctor attended a dinner party. He left home just after seven o'clock, his wife being at the time perfectly well, and in very good spirits. The deceased lady retired to rest about half-past ten, and DR GAYE returned home about eleven o'clock. He went to his bedroom about quarter to twelve, when he noticed his wife, who was in bed, was breathing very short and peculiar. He spoke to her, but getting no answer he touched her, when he noticed she was unconscious. By the side of the bed was a tumbler which evidently had contained carbolic acid. DR GAYE, considering she had taken carbolic acid, sent for his partner Dr Scott, and in the meantime used the stomach-pump. Dr Scott was soon in attendance, and every means was taken that medical skill could suggest to restore the deceased, but all proved futile, as she died shortly afterwards, evidently from the effects of having taken carbolic acid. As nothing peculiar had been noticed in the conduct of MRS GAYE, the assumption was that she had taken the carbolic acid by mistake for a sleeping draught. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

LYMPSTONE - On Tuesday, at an Inquest held at Lympstone on the body of WILLIAM NORTHCOTE, a fisherman, of Lympstone, whose body was found in the River Exe on Christmas Day, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

KINGS NYMPTON - Fatal Affray at Kings Nympton. - A serious affray has taken place at Kings Nympton, five miles from Southmolton, in the course of which a man named RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, aged about 65, met his death. It seems that on Monday night some young men from the neighbouring parish of Romansleigh were performing as Christy Minstrels at Kings Nympton, and remained until about ten o'clock, when an altercation took place between them and some residents of the village. They left to go home, but threats were used towards them, and a short way out of the village they were waylaid by the Kings Nympton men, and a scuffle took place. The younger men of Romansleigh being nimble escaped, leaving MR BUCKINGHAM to follow; he, however, seemed to have been subjected to ill usage as he was found shortly afterwards by P.C. Blackmore in a dying state. He was taken back to Kings Nympton and died shortly afterwards. Although no marks of violence were found on his body, it is believed death was the result of an injury to the neck. Three men of Kings Nympton are suspected. The Coroner's Inquest was opened on Wednesday, and adjourned till Monday.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 8 January 1881
OKEHAMPTON - An Inquest has just been held at Okehampton, on the body of ANDREW HOWARD; it appeared that whilst suffering from heart disease, he fell down stairs and received a shock which ended fatally. A verdict was returned accordingly.

DEVONPORT - An Inquest was held at Devonport on Saturday on the body of WILLIAM SAMUEL WILLIAMS, a naval pensioner, who had committed suicide by hanging. The Jury found that the deed was done while the deceased was in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 January 1881
DEVONPORT - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at Devonport, relative to the death of ANN RADDON, 57 years of age, wife of a tailor living in Ordnance-row in that town. She met her husband with a telegram that had been sent to him to convey to some other person, and fearing that it contained news of the death of a member of the family, she became excited, complained of pains in her head and died from apoplexy. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 21 January 1881
ST MARY CHURCH - Inquest. Neglect Of An Old Woman. - At Brayley's Hotel, St. Mary Church, yesterday, before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, an Inquest was held touching the death of ELLEN AVERY, 56, who died under somewhat peculiar circumstances on Tuesday morning. From the evidence it appeared that MRS AVERY had occupied the room for about eighteen months and was in receipt of parish relief to the extent of 2s. 6d. a week. She had a son, a married man, at whose house she frequently took her meals. Mrs Pomeroy, an old woman, who lodged in the same house as the deceased, said that she (deceased) sometimes did a little needlework, but witness could not say whether she had had any animal food for the past five months. On Monday last the deceased appeared to be ill, and her son's wife, MRS JANE AVERY, visited her, lit the fire and fetched her some brandy. About ten o'clock the same night the deceased began making a noise, and Mrs Pomeroy went and told her if she did not keep quiet she would fetch the police. Deceased was then lying in a state of almost complete nudity, with her head on the floor and the lower part of her body on the bed. She did not call to her husband for assistance because the deceased was not dressed. She went to a neighbour for assistance, but she refused to come. A fire was burning in the deceased's room, and the witness put it nearly all out because the deceased had been burning paper. It was a bitterly cold night. The witness went to bed and during the night heard the deceased move about. The next morning, Tuesday, witness was about to send for MRS AVERY'S son, but he came before the message reached him. That was about half past eleven in the morning, and the deceased was found lying, naked, on the floor quite dead. The witness was too frightened to go and see the woman before. When asked by the Jury why she had not sent to MR AVERY, the deceased's son, for assistance on Monday night, as his residence was not five minutes walk from the house, the witness said she had none to send, although she admitted that her husband and two sons were in the house. MR AVERY said that when he found his mother, the room was very disordered, and there was a little blood on the floor, but he did not notice any bruises on the body of the deceased. - Mr J. N. Chilcott, surgeon, said that he had examined the deceased and in his opinion she died from congestion of the lungs accelerated by cold. - The Jury said they found that the woman died from Natural Causes, but they thought that Mrs Pomeroy had not acted as one woman ought to have acted towards another. As to her husband's false modesty they thought he was a great deal to blame also in the matter. He was an old man and ought to have seen to the deceased.

PLYMOUTH - Serious Affair At Plymouth. - On Wednesday a curious case was investigated by Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner. In November last a woman named MARY DAWE, living at King-street, Plymouth, dreamt that her niece was being injured, and, while dreaming, she jumped out of her bedroom window to effect a rescue. She received severe injuries, from which she has since died. The evidence showed that death was due to progressive weakness, combined with brain disease, accelerated by the injury. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 18 February 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Town Hall, the Deputy Coroner, Mr F. Watts attending. The Inquiry was as to the cause of the death of ARTHUR SMALE, a child, aged four years, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning. The father of the child is a coachbuilder residing in Mill-street. MRS SMALE, the child's mother, said that the boy had been ill with the measles, but she had not thought it necessary to have a doctor. On Tuesday morning seeing that the child was worse she went for a doctor, but the boy died before his arrival. Dr Midgely Cash said that the child died from natural causes, but had medical aid been called in sooner his life might have been saved. In summing up, Mr Watts said he considered that serious blame was to be attached to the mother for not calling in medical aid until the child was dying. The Jury after an absence of ten minutes returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from Natural Causes, but, whilst exonerating the mother from criminal neglect, they, nevertheless, considered that she had been guilty of great moral neglect, and she should be censured. Mr Watts informed MRS SMALE that the Jury had taken a very lenient view of the matter and she would do well to be more careful in the future.

DEVONPORT - Adjourned Inquest. - On Wednesday the adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of TIMOTHY O'LEARY, who was killed a short time ago by the fall of a wall at the new Police Hall in course of erection in Fore Street was held. When the Inquiry was first commenced an architect considered that there had been an error of judgment in the designs, and the Inquest was accordingly adjourned to give Mr Knight, architect, an opportunity of bringing forward evidence in support of his plans. Mr g. H. E. Rundle, yesterday, appeared on behalf of Mr Knight, and laid reports from eminent architects before the Court, while Mr Hine, architect, the gentleman who had expressed himself dissatisfied with the plans, was retained by the Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan). Messrs. Edward Adolphus Bruning, architect and surveyor, London, and John Watson, architect and surveyor, Torquay, were examined and both gentlemen considered the designs quite satisfactory and attributed the accident to the excessively wet weather. The Coroner, in summing up, gave it as his opinion that the fall of the wall was purely an accident, over which the parties interested had no control, and the Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating all concerned from blame.

PLYMOUTH - Burnt In A Caravan At Plymouth. - At the Plymouth Guildhall on Tuesday night, an Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES BISHOP, aged 88 years, who died from injuries received the previous day. Dr A. H. Bampton, house surgeon to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was received at the hospital on Monday, at 7 p.m. On examining the deceased, witness found him suffering from extensive burns on both legs recently sustained, also burns on the lower part of the back, abdomen and other places. Deceased gradually sank, and died within two hours after his admission. Witness attributed death to the burns, and shocks to the system which followed. - GEORGE WATERFORD, grandson to the deceased, deposed that the latter had been blind since Christmas 1879, and had been in the habit of living in a caravan, at Pottery Court, Coxside. Witness left the deceased alone in the caravan on the previous evening, for the purpose of fetching him some liquor, and on his return, which was within a few minutes, he found the caravan full of smoke, and heard the deceased say, "Oh, my! what can I do?" Deceased was sitting on a box close to a ship's stove, which they constantly used, when witness left him. Witness immediately groped about, and found the deceased lying on his back in the middle of the van. He then tried to lift him, but failed to do so, and thereupon obtained the assistance of two neighbours. Dr Greenway was called in, and he advised the removal of the deceased to the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 February 1881
DEVONPORT - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest Wednesday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of ROBERT COAKER, aged about 55 years, a labourer in her Majesty's Dockyard, who died on the 21st inst., from the effects of injuries sustained in the execution of his duties,. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM TINKIN WILLS, aged 44, who committed suicide on Tuesday, a telegram respecting which appeared in the Western Evening News of that day, was held yesterday, when the case was adjourned to give time for an analysis of the poison to be made.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 March 1881
DEVONPORT - Suicide Of A Young Lady. - EDITH RAPER, a young woman aged 21 years, whose parents reside at 3 Stopford-place, Stoke, committed suicide in the St. Aubyn Schoolroom, at Devonport, on Monday. So far as information could be gathered it seems that the deceased had been engaged in teaching one of the classes in the schoolroom that evening, and that after the class had finished she poisoned herself. Dr Wilson, who resides in the neighbourhood, was at once sent for, and on arriving found the young lady in violent convulsions. An emetic was administered, but it had no effect, and death ensued within fifteen minutes. The opinion of Dr Wilson was that death resulted from poisoning by strychnine, and in her convulsions the deceased mentioned the name of Mr Dyer, chemist, and said she had taken a dose of "vermin killer." In a purse in her pocket was afterwards found a packet of arsenic, and also a letter. The rumour was that the deceased had been subjected to remonstrances from a certain quarter, and that this had caused her to be very desponding and low spirited. At the Inquest held on Tuesday at Stopford Arms, Stopford Place, Stoke, before Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, evidence was heard at great length, tending to prove that deceased was depressed in spirits through religious matters. The Coroner briefly summed up, remarking that he could not see how a young lady, brought up in good society, and well educated, could have behaved as she had done in a sound state of mind. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

STONEHOUSE - Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, on Tuesday resumed the Inquest at the Stonehouse Police-court on the body of WILLIAM TONKIN WILLS. The facts of the case have already appeared in the Western Evening News. The Inquest was adjourned in order that an analysis might be made of the contents of the bottles that were found near the deceased on the day of his death. The following letter was read:- "Plymouth, February 28, 1881 - Sir, - The results of my analysis of the contents of the jar, cup, and bottle, which I received from you, through Sergeant Holwill, are as follows: - Jar - three-and-a-half drachms of cyanide of potassium. Cup - about half-a-drachm fluid contained two grains of cyanide of potassium. Bottle - Fluid contents, one pint "vomited", contained from twelve to fifteen grains of cyanide of potassium. - H. P. Hearder, M.P.S." - The Coroner, in summing up, said that now there could be no doubt that the deceased destroyed himself by poison, it would be for the Jury to say what state of mind the deceased was in at the time he took his life. It seemed to him (the Coroner) that he was not in a sound state of mind. He had rather a weak mind. The Foreman said that they had pretty well agreed on the state of the mind of the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide by taking poison whilst in an Unsound Mind."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 March 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest At Torquay. - On Tuesday, at the Infirmary, an Inquest was held touching the death of FREDERICK HEAD, a seaman, who was injured on Thursday last, whilst on board the brig George, now lying in the harbour. Mr F. Watts, the Deputy Coroner, attended, and Mr F. Grahame was elected Foreman of the Jury,. - The Captain of the brig (Mr Banyard), said that he came into the harbour on the 2nd March. The crew numbered six, and the deceased was mate of the vessel. The accident happened on the 3rd instant. It was necessary to move the vessel away from the quay, and four or five sailors manned the capstan which was a wooden one and were turning the handspikes when the pawl, the wooden block which fell into the cogs after each turn, flew out owing to the heavy strain, and the men could not stand at the handspikes. The capstan flew round swiftly and one of the bars struck the deceased on the head, knocking him down to the deck. There was an extremely heavy sea running at the time, which was too strong for the captain. When being removed to the hospital, the deceased said, "It is a bad job, and if it had not been for the harbour-master I should not have got this. It is not fit weather to move a ship." The deceased said that because the vessel had been moored in the first place at the South Quay, but they were ordered to move to the South East Quay by the harbour master. After removing, the sea became too heavy and the vessel was knocking her bottom out on the ground. It was necessary to prevent further damage to moor the vessel farther out although it was not fit weather. Damage to the extent of £100 had been done to the ship. - One of the seamen, named Lenney, who was turning at the capstan at the time of the accident, gave corroborative evidence, and said that the deceased had plenty of time to spring away out of danger. He (witness) called out "Stand clear, the capstan's going," and unshipping his bar, got out of reach, but the deceased still stood there for several moments, until the bar struck him, although he must have heard. - Mr Hamilton Cumming, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, said that when the deceased was first brought there his condition was not such as would lead to the supposition that death would ensue. He, however, never rallied, but sank gradually until Sunday morning, when he died. No fracture of the skull was observable, and although there was no doubt but that the deceased died from the effects of the blow, yet he (the house surgeon) would be glad if he were permitted to make a post mortem examination in order to ascertain the precise cause of death. Mr Watts said he would communicate with the house surgeon on the subject. The Jury said that there was not the least blame to be attached to the harbour master, and gave it as their opinion that the deceased died from purely accidental causes. They also desired the Police Sergeant to communicate with Mr Greenfield, the owner of the vessel, recommending him to have an improved capstan.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 April 1881
DAWLISH - The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death at the Inquiry held on Wednesday, at Ashcombe, touching the death of JAMES FARLEY, a carter, in the employ of Mr French, farmer, of Ashcombe. On the 24th inst. FARLEY was driving along the Ashcombe-road with a cart containing a plough, the property of his master, when, from some cause the horse bolted and the deceased, having but one arm, lost all control over the animal. The result was that the waggon capsized and the plough was smashed to pieces. The deceased was subsequently discovered dead under the implement.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 April 1881
DAWLISH - Inquest. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Dawlish, before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARGARET HARRIS, wife of a labouring man named JOHN HARRIS, who died on Friday evening. Maria Mildon stated that she was called by a little girl, and on going to the deceased found her lying on the floor. Witness assisted her into bed. About two or three hours afterwards she found deceased much worse, and sent for the doctor. Witness was present when she died, which was about ten minutes before he came. Mr Parsons, surgeon, said that he found no external marks on the body. Witness found the body of deceased well nourished. On opening the head, he found a large clot of blood over the left temple, pressing on the brain, which caused an apoplectic fit, and which, he considered, was the cause of death. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Neglect. - Mr Coroner Brian held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Golden Lion Inn, Bath-street, on the body of the illegitimate infant daughter of CORDELIA PEEK, which was found dead in bed on Monday. The mother was the first witness called, who, in answer to the Coroner, said she had been living for the last fortnight in a cellar of 5 Bath-street, with a man named Thomas Pascoe, a rag and bone merchant. The child, seven months old, was born in the street. She had been living with the man Pascoe for the last twelve months, but he was not the father of the child. After the birth of the deceased witness went to the Workhouse, having at the time no lodgings to go to. After remaining there a few weeks, witness left the house, and again lived with the man Pascoe at Lodgings in Pitt-street. The child was quite well and strong when she left. She (the mother) got sometimes no lodgings, and stopped all night in the street. After evidence had been heard at great length, Mr Manning, Coroner's officer, said he had examined the deceased, and for a child of its age it was very emaciated and small. It was in a very dirty condition. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from "Natural Causes, induced and greatly accelerated by the want of proper attention, warmth, and care, and the miserable condition in which the mother was living." The Coroner at the same time strongly censuring the man and woman.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident To A Tradesman. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday at St Paul's road, Newton, as to the death of CHARLES STRANGER, aged 27, a butcher, carrying on business for his mother in Queen-street. On Monday deceased attended a cattle sale at Parsonage Farm, Staverton, and left in the evening on horseback in company with a man named Sweetman, who was mounted on a horse he had purchased at a sale. Soon after leaving they urged their horses into a fast trot to test the speed of the horse Sweetman had purchased, and after going some distance he drew ahead, and on looking back saw STRANGER'S horse coming on riderless. Sweetman pulled up and went back when he found deceased lying on his right side by the hedge, unconscious and bleeding from the head. He was taken home and Mr Ley, surgeon, called, but deceased did not rally, and died early the following morning, from concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at the Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, on the body of ALBERT DOLTON ELLIS, three and a half months old, the illegitimate son of MARY ANN ELLIS, residing at 15 Glanville-place, Victoria-lane. Mr Whipple, M.R.C.S. and senior surgeon of the South Devon Hospital, said he had made a post mortem examination of the child. There were no marks on its body. It was well nourished and healthy, and there was every evidence of its having been well cared for. Death was caused by convulsions. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 May 1881
EXETER - The Exeter Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Royal Oak Inn, Guineastreet, on Wednesday, on the body of JOHN HOOPER, who died suddenly the previous day in the Royal Oak Inn. Mr Edward Steele Perkins, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from the failure of one of the large vessels in the neighbourhood of the heart. There were no marks of violence on the body, and there were no indications of the deceased having had a fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Town Hall, before Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of HARRY BROOM, an infant, five months old. CHARLOTTE BROOM, a single woman, of Teignmouth, and now residing at 5 Church cottages, the mother of the child, said that the child was staying at 8 Sandhill Road, Ellacombe with a widow named Farmer. Last Friday it was taken ill. On Saturday it was worse and on Sunday she took it to the Dispensary, where it was seen by Dr Cameron. She gave some nourishment which he prescribed, but on the Tuesday morning it died. Dr Wills saw it on the Monday night. Mrs Farmer, 8 Sandhill Road, Ellacombe, gave corroborative evidence and said that the mother seemed very fond of the child. The child died at her (witness's) house at about six o'clock on Tuesday morning. Dr Cameron, house surgeon at the Dispensary, said that the child was in a very weakly condition when he saw it. It was very delicate and he did not think with the greatest of care that it would live to a great age. It did not appear as if it had been neglected. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 May 1881
PLYMOUTH - Drowned At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, Plymouth, on Wednesday night before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY EVANS, who was found drowned in Cattewater yesterday morning, as reported in the Western Evening News of yesterday. Evidence was given as to the deceased being left on the smack, Oimara, in Cattewater, on Tuesday night, and to his body being found in the water, next morning. Deceased was a very good-tempered lad, and had been on friendly terms with the crew. Mr Damerel, quay constable, stated that he received the body when landed at the quay, and had it conveyed to MR EVANS'S house. The only things found on the body were two keys and a knife. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how, there was no evidence to show."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 June 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest. - On Wednesday Dr Gaye held an Inquest at the Castle Inn, Torquay, on the body of THOMAS MARDON, boatman, resident at St Mary Church, who was accidently poisoned. Evidence was given, from which it appeared that on Saturday MARDON had asked another boatman at Oddicombe Beach for a glass of water. He directed him to his boathouse, and sometime afterwards MARDON entered it. Immediately afterwards MARDON came running out of the boathouse with his tongue protruding and saliva running from his mouth. He was taken to St Mary-Church and attended by Dr Steele, who found that he had swallowed some corrosive liquid. MARDON was at once taken to the Infirmary and lingered on until Sunday night, when he showed signs of sinking. As a last resource his wind-pipe was opened, but MARDON, after a temporary recovery, relapsed and expired on Tuesday. He had apparently in the dark lifted a jar containing a strong transparent alkali known as Carson's Detergent, and the Jury, after returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," recommended that the Coroner should be requested to communicate with the makers in Glasgow, asking them in future to label their preparations "Poison," the liquid from its clearness and absence of smell being readily mistaken for water. The Coroner, at the close, again complained of the discourtesy shown by the Hospital Board in refusing to provide a proper room for the Coroner, and said that it was the only institution that had ever refused that favour.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 17 June 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - SAMUEL BENNETT, a clay cutter, about twenty-six years of age, who met with serious injuries by a piece of timber falling on him whilst at work in a clay-pit at Kingsteignton last Monday week, died at the Newton Cottage Hospital, on Tuesday in the evening Dr Gaye, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 24 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday at Usher's spirit vaults, Octagon-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of WILLIAM EDGCUMBE, a marine store dealer, living at 60 King-street, Plymouth, who committed suicide by hanging himself on Tuesday morning. Robert Pethick, a lad in the employ of deceased, stated that about a quarter past six that morning he went to his master's stable at the back of his residence. He found the stable door open, and observed a body, the back of which he only saw, suspended from the ceiling. Witness immediately ran into the house and told MRS EDGCUMBE that his master had hanged himself. She got the assistance of Mr Richard Smith, who went to the stable and cut EDGCUMBE down, when it was found that life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased Committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 July 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest At Torquay. - An Inquiry was held at the Castle Inn today before Dr Gaye, County Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM JAMES POPE, a tin plate worker, residing at Ellacombe, and which occurred on Wednesday night. Robert Warmington, a carpenter, gave evidence to the effect that deceased had gone up to the Broadlands, where a fire had occurred on Wednesday night, and was riding on the splinter bar of the fire engine. The engine was being taken back from the fire, drawn by men at a walking pace. The deceased suddenly fell from the bar between the wheels of the engine which passed over without touching him. When he was picked up blood was pouring from his mouth, but, beyond an exclamation of pain, he never spoke again. He was taken directly to the Infirmary. The house surgeon at the Hospital, Mr H. S. Branfoot stated that when the man was brought to the Hospital he was quite dead. The lower jaw was fractured in three places, and the upper jaw was smashed. He was covered with blood and death evidently ensued from haemorrhage, the bleeding from the nose and mouth. The deceased must have fallen with tremendous violence, but if he had fallen in a peculiar position it was possible that a fall of three feet might have caused the injuries. The verdict returned was "Accidental Death", and the Jury requested Mr Chilcott, the manager of the engine, to prevent overcrowding of the engine, and, more especially, to prevent anyone riding in the front of it on the splinter bar.

HOLSWORTHY - Fatal Accident At Holsworthy. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Fulford on the body of MR GEORGE WONNACOTT, of Oxenparks, Milton Damerell, near Holsworthy, farmer and shoemaker, who died on Tuesday from the effects of the injuries sustained on the previous afternoon, whilst in charge of two horses and a waggon at Thornbury. It appears from the statements of two children who were present when the accident occurred, that the horses suddenly started off, and on WONNACOTT endeavouring to stop them he was caught in the wheels and dragged for a considerable distance on the ground. Assistance was soon at hand, and the poor fellow was conveyed to his home, where his injuries were attended to by Dr Ash of Holsworthy, and that gentleman then pronounced them to be of a very serious nature. During the night convulsions set in and, before Dr Ash arrived to see him the next morning, MR WONNACOTT died. The deceased leaves a widow and seven children. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 July 1881
EXMINSTER - An Inquest was held at Topsham, on Tuesday, before Mr F. Burrow, touching the death of MR JAMES BAKER, a farmer, lately residing at Exminster, who committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. HARRIET BAKER, daughter of the deceased, stated that on Friday morning she heard her father, who was in his bedroom, groaning. She immediately raised an alarm and Mr James Ponsford came to her assistance. At that time witness did not know what had happened. James Ponsford, an acquaintance of the deceased, stated that the last time he saw him alive was on Saturday last, when he went to the house at the desire of the last witness. He found him in his room, upon the floor of which was blood. Jane Heales deposed that she accompanied the deceased on his way to the hospital. He complained of being restless and repeated the words, "Lord have mercy upon me and my children." When about two-and-a-half miles from Topsham he expired, and the body was consequently conveyed to his home. Dr Bothwell stated that when he examined the unfortunate man he found a deep gash on the right side of the throat. He sponged the throat and ordered deceased's removal to the hospital. A verdict was returned of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 July 1881
TOPSHAM - On Sunday afternoon a fisherman, of Topsham, named JOHN NORTON, went out with his wife, four of his children and two nephews for a sail. When a short way down the river the boat by some means capsized, and all the occupants were precipitated into the water. The man and his wife managed to save two of the children and get them on shore, but the other four sank before assistance could reach them. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday by Mr Borrows. JOHN NORTON, a mariner, residing at Topsham, stated that LAURA NORTON was his daughter, and WILLIAM and MAY NORTON his brother's children. On Sunday afternoon last witness and his wife went out in a boat, and were accompanied by seven children, belonging to himself and brother, including LAURA and CHARLES (his daughter and son) and WILLIAM and MAY (his brother's children). They rowed as far as Turf, and then got under sail about a quarter of a mile below Lympstone. The boat was then turned in order to make homewards. On reaching Backlake (just below Topsham) witness lost his hat. He put the boat about and called to one of the children to pick it up. When near the hat the children rushed to one side of the boat, which began to fill with water. Witness caught hold of MARY and ALICE and succeeded in bringing them near the shore. He told them to hold on to a paddle, and he then went to the rescue of his wife and son and brought them ashore. He proceeded to the scene of the accident a third time and brought another of his sons ashore, none of the others being visible. When he returned he found that MAY had let go her hold of the oar and had been in the water some time. Mr George Baldwin, surgeon, of Topsham, gave evidence to the effect that death resulted from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning," and, with one exception, gave their fee to the bereaved families. The ages of the children drowned were:- WILLIAM, 14 years; MAY, 6; LAURA, 6; and CHARLES, 3.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 August 1881
DAWLISH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the London Hotel, Dawlish, as to the cause of the death of MR JAMES COOPER COOPER, who had been residing at Piermont Place, Dawlish, for about a fortnight. From the evidence of MISS COOPER, deceased's daughter, who was much affected, it appeared that her father, whose age was 66, had resided at Torquay for about eight years. He was in feeble health; was a medical gentleman by profession, but did not practice. In answer to the Coroner, witness said that her father found himself better whilst at Dawlish. J. W. P. Peters, son of the landlady of the house where deceased resided, deposed that himself and others found him dead about 8.30 a.m. on Sunday. After hearing the evidence of Dr Parsons, the Jury at once returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Plymouth Prison, on the body of WILLIAM POOLEY, aged fifty-two years, who was committed to the above place for seven days, on Friday last, for nonpayment of a fine, and who died there on Tuesday morning. Mr W. Brewer, acting-governor of the prison, said that on Monday morning it was reported to him that POOLEY was ill and he was placed under the special care of the medical officer. Mr Sidney Wolferstan, surgeon to H. M. Prison, deposed to being sent for to attend POOLEY on Monday morning. He was in his cell in bed, and was suffering from an apoplectic attack. Witness, who knew at that time it would be fatal, gave instructions for him to be moved to the Infirmary. Witness saw POOLEY again the same evening, but there was not much change in his condition. The next morning he received a message, and on going to the Infirmary he found POOLEY was dead. In his opinion death resulted from cerebral haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 12 August 1881
TORQUAY - A Fatal Fall. - Last night at about eight o'clock a fatal accident happened to a sawyer, named JOHN HOBBS. The unfortunate man was returning to his house, Castle Buildings, Torquay, by the back way, which opens into Castle road, slipped in descending a steep flight of stone steps, and fell the whole distance to the bottom. He was found a few minutes later, but Dr Richardson, who was immediately in attendance, pronounced him to be quite dead. He had received such terrible injuries in falling - his head being almost smashed - that death must have been instantaneous. The Police have communicated with the County Coroner, Dr Gaye, and an Inquest will be held this evening.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 19 August 1881
TORQUAY - Distressing Suicide In Torquay. - Early Monday morning Sergt. Ockford was called to a house in Coburg Place, Torquay, where, it was rumoured, a woman had committed suicide. Arriving there shortly after eight o'clock he found the rumour, unhappily, too true. CECILIA DART, aged 54, a tailoress, had committed suicide by hanging herself by means of a neckerchief knotted to a piece of rope behind a door. The unfortunate woman had been living for some considerable time with a man named Pinkham, who left her about two months ago. She was then attended by Dr Powell for despondency, but did not seem to rally and has lately been in a very low and depressed state of mind. On Sunday night, although her manner had attracted attention, as it could not fail to do, there was nothing in her action to excite suspicion that she contemplated suicide, and she and her daughter who slept in the same room retired to rest at their usual hour. On awaking in the morning the daughter, a young girl of about fifteen, discovered that her mother had left the room. She had not heard any noise in the night and had not been awakened by her mother getting out of bed. Feeling some little anxiety, but, still, in no way alarmed, she rose and dressed, expecting to see her mother in the next room, as she concluded that she had risen rather earlier than usual and was engaged in getting breakfast. On entering the kitchen, however, she was horrified at seeing her mother hanging behind the kitchen door, quite dead and cold, her feet being some few inches from the floor. The daughter ran for assistance and a cabman, Henry Wills, cut the poor woman down. It was found that rigor mortis had set in and from this fact alone it was evident that the unfortunate creature had been dead some hours. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, on Wednesday. Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, conducted the Inquiry. Mr Robert Butland being Foreman of the Jury,. The Jury having viewed the body, Dr W. Powell was called as the first witness, and said that he attended the deceased about three months ago. She was then in a depressed melancholy state, although not suffering from any bodily disease. He had not attended her since that time. Deceased was in such a state as would not improbably lead to temporary insanity. Deceased had given domestic troubles as the cause of her depression. - MARY DART, daughter of the deceased, said that she last saw her mother alive on Sunday night between nine and ten. She slept in the same bed with her, but did not hear her get up in the morning. Witness rose about eight o'clock, and on going into the kitchen, saw her mother hanging behind the door. - Mrs Steel stated she knew the deceased well, and lodged in the same house with her. She had been in a nervous state for a long time, and on Monday morning last she saw her hanging behind a door, quite dead. She had not been in want previous to her death. She had been living with a man named Pinkham, who struck her about four months ago. He left her shortly after. - Sergeant Ockford's evidence was to the effect that he was called to see the deceased after she had been cut down. She had evidently stood on a box and swung off. She was quite cold when found, and had evidently been dead some hours. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had hung herself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. The Jury gave their fees to the daughter.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 26 August 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - The young man, GEORGE ELLIS, who was admitted into the Cottage Hospital on Saturday evening, suffering from very severe injuries sustained while at work in Messrs. Parker's quarry at Wolborough, died during Monday night. At the Inquest held on Tuesday, before Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 September 1881
EXETER - Suicide At Exeter - The Exeter Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest at Exeter on Monday touching the death of CHARLES CONNETT, a coachman, aged 63, and residing in Paul-street, who expired in consequence of wounds which he inflicted with a razor on Saturday night last. The widow of the deceased proved that of late her husband had been afflicted with rheumatism, and had been otherwise in failing health. On Saturday evening he went to bed and commenced reading a prayer-book. She left him, but on going into the room two hours later she found him lying on the bed with his throat cut, a razor having been used. He was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 September 1881
PAIGNTON - Inquest At Paignton. - Dr Gaye, the County Coroner for the district, held an Inquest at the Gerston Hotel, on Saturday, on the body of THOMAS UNDERHAY, a gardener, of Preston, 65 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a shed on the previous day. The evidence showed that, after an alarm had been given by deceased's wife, a neighbour, named Langdon, cut him down, after he had been suspended about twenty minutes or half-an-hour. It was stated that the deceased had been very depressed and complained of pains in the head, during the last month. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 October 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - Found Drowned At Newton Abbot. - On Wednesday morning Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of RICHARD MARTIN, whose body was found in the mill leat near Bellamarsh Mills, Kingsteignton, on the previous day. The deceased, who had been engaged as a roadman, in the employ of Mr Cole, Kingsteignton, leaves a wife and six children. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 November 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest. - At an Inquest held at the Castle Inn, Torquay today, before Dr Gaye, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM ESCOTT, seaman, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased lost his balance whilst furling the topsail yard of the Ellen Widdup, a vessel lying in the Torquay Harbour, and fell a considerable distance, sustaining a compound fracture of the skull. He lingered several days in an unconscious state, and died yesterday morning at eight o'clock.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 December 1881
TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, on the body of WM. JOHN WILLIAMS, son of a rag and bone collector, of Pimlico, Torquay. It appeared that the lad, who was fifteen years of age, was out with his father on Saturday last when he was suddenly taken ill. He was rapidly driven in a cab to the Hospital, but died on his arrival. The house-surgeon, Mr Bransfoot, who had made a post mortem examination, said that the boy's lungs were affected, and death evidently had resulted from natural causes. A verdict to this effect was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 December 1881
EXETER - The Fatal Accident At St David's Station. - An inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn Tuesday, before Mr Coroner Hooper, concerning the death of WILLIAM HENRY FOOTE, a young man, aged 22, residing with his parents at St. Thomas, who was employed in the contractor's department at St David's Station, and killed whilst performing his duties. The Great Western Railway Company was represented by Mr Supt. Green. The witnesses called were Robert William White, foreman at the mileage department at St. David's Station, who said on Monday week they were working the ten-ton crane, and whilst he was standing looking at them he saw them lift a piece of bulk 40 feet in length. When the timber was about three or four feet above the truck it fell and caught the deceased on the thigh, and after knocking a narrow gauge truck it rebounded and struck him again, and also broke the ribs of Thomas Salter, who was at work with FOOTE. FOOTE was picked up and conveyed to the Hospital. he had seen five tons lifted by the same crane. It was not the crane which broke; it was the nippers of the chain that snapped asunder. George Hill, who was assisting to lift the timber, said the chain broke, and he saw Salter struck by the timber. Much heavier pieces had frequently been hoisted. They were lifting the timber from a broad gauge to a narrow one, and in circling it round the chain broke. Mr Arthur George Blomfield, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said when deceased was admitted at quarter to four on Monday, December 19th, the right thigh was broken, and he was suffering from other severe injuries which caused such a great shock to the system that he died from exhaustion on Christmas Day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - An Officer Drowned. - The body of Captain ELPHINSTONE-HOLLOWAY, retired from the Ordnance Department, and residing at Tamerton Foliott, was found in the water under Plymouth Citadel on Tuesday afternoon. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, when a verdict to the effect that deceased fell into the water and was drowned was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 17 March 1882
PLYMOUTH - Inquest At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday on the body of ELIZABETH CONNOR, aged about seventy. Sarah Bennet, married woman, living at 4 Bath-place, gave evidence as to the nature of the woman's death, and the Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from the Visitation of God."

NEWTON ABBOT - Suicide. - Inquiry was made at Mr Rendell's farmhouse, Buckland, near Newton, on Monday as to the death of SAMUEL MOXEY, who was found on Sunday morning in Buckland-lane with part of his head shot away. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 April 1882
TORQUAY - The Fatal Fall Over Babbacombe Cliff. - The Inquest on MRS ELIZABETH FIRTH, the lady who was killed by a fall from one of the Babbacombe cliffs on Sunday, was held on Tuesday at 10 York-terrace, where she had been residing for a month on a visit to her friend, Mrs Thompson. Mrs Thompson's evidence showed that the deceased had come to Torquay for her health; that her strength had much increased during her stay; that she had been much depressed at breakfast time on Sunday, but that the depression had quite passed away before she left the house. She left to go to All Saints' Church, and had made an arrangement to return and go for a walk with her friend Mrs Thompson, who was going to Furrough Cross Church. It had been ascertained that she was at the first forenoon service at All Saints', and the following shows that she must have left almost immediately after and gone to the neighbourhood of the flag-post on the Downs. - Jonathan Thomas, a fisherman, said he had particularly noticed the lady (whom he sufficiently identified) between a quarter to and a quarter after twelve, because she seemed uneasy and suffering; so much so that he felt half disposed to go over and ask her what was the matter. Her behaviour also attracted the attention of Mrs Sutton, of Prospect-terrace, who gave her evidence very clearly to the effect that the lady moved so feebly and slipped about so much that when she fell on one occasion she feared she would hardly be able to get up again. She did, however, get up again and regain the top of the Downs, and walked towards the flag post. This was the last she saw of her, and it would seem the last that was seen of her alive. - Sergeant Ellicott proved to having received information of her being missing, and having organised a search for her which resulted in the discovery of the body among some bushes considerably above the beach. Her watch, which had not run down, had stopped at a few minutes to one. It is presumed it had been stopped by the jerk of the fall, and therefore that it indicates the time at which she fell. After a long consultation and a visit to the place the Jury gave the verdict that "MRS ELIZABETH FIRTH died through a fall from the cliff, but whether the fall was accidental or suicidal there is not sufficient evidence for the Jury to determine." Mr Matthews expressed his intention of asking the Local Board to place railings at the edge of the most dangerous parts of the cliff.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Castle Inn, yesterday by Dr H. Gaye, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM RENDLE, aged 47, a labourer, lately employed by the Torquay Brewery Company. It appears that on the 22nd of March last he was engaged with another man in putting some patent liquid cement on a large cask, and having a lighted candle, it appears that the gas in the cask ignited, and before he could get out he was badly burnt. The man-hole through which he had to pass was ten feet high, which was got at by a ladder, and which was the only way of exit. He was taken to the Torbay Hospital, where he remained under the care of the house surgeon, and lingered there until the 12th inst., when he died. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased was a steady man, married, had a family, and resided at Pimlico. Mr Perry, Foreman of the Jury, said he should use no more of the cement.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquiry was held on Monday at the Castle Inn, Torquay, by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, as to the death of RICHARD FORD, cabman, aged 57, whose death resulted from injuries he received in falling from his cab in January last. Evidence was given by a cabman, Stanley Dart, to the effect that he saw the deceased, whose cab was on the stand at the time, step down from the driver's seat on to the wheel, and his foot slipping off he fell to the ground breaking one of his legs. He was at once taken to the Torquay Hospital. Mr Bransfoot, house-surgeon at the hospital, deposed that the deceased was brought in suffering from a broken leg. He was put to bed and a day later was attacked with delirium tremens. He never rallied, and was in so low a state that it was not deemed advisable that amputation should be resorted to. He lived twelve weeks, and died on Saturday last. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 28 April 1882
TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide By Poison. - On Tuesday evening at Luton, a village about three miles from Teignmouth, an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN MAJOR, aged 70, blacksmith, who was found on Sunday morning in a state of unconsciousness. He and his wife had been ejected from a house which they had been taken in by neighbours. A proposal to take the poor man to the Union appears to have preyed on his mind, and from the evidence given at the Inquest, it appears that he bought some laudanum on Friday, and must either have taken an overdose by accident or must have wilfully poisoned himself. The Inquest was held by Sidney Hacker, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr James Vooght was Foreman. A post mortem examination was made by Dr Watson, of Chudleigh, who stated that deceased had died of narcotic poison. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was agreed upon. The deceased had lived in the village of Luton all his life, and was respected by all his neighbours.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser Friday 19 May 1882
TORQUAY - Inquest. - Before Mr H. Gaye, Coroner, an Inquest was held at Letheren's Upton Vale Hotel, on the body of a little child called CHARLES R. HEAD, nine months old, who died suddenly whilst being nursed by Annie Spicer. The child was weakly from birth. No Doctor had seen him lately. After due deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of death by "Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser Friday 9 June 1882
TORQUAY - Boating Fatality In Torbay. Two Torquay Young Men Drowned. Inquest At The Town Hall. The Coastguard Censured. - A sad accident, and one which is felt severely in Torquay, occurred in Torbay on Sunday afternoon. Two young men, both well-known and generally respected, MR FRED EDWARDS, son of MR EDWARDS, coachbuilder, and MR HENRY PARKER, manager at Mr Trelease's clothing establishment, went out for a sail on Sunday morning, starting from the Torquay harbour at eleven o'clock. The boat belonged to MR EDWARDS, and from its peculiar shape forward was called "The Ram." She was a three-tonner and a staunchly built, good sea boat. She had, however, a heavy keel and there was a lot of ballast on board. She was decked fore and aft, and could carry an immense pressure of sail. MR EDWARDS, who was a year younger than his companion, 23 years, had made frequent sailing excursions in her. The weather was squally with a strong west-south-west breeze blowing, and there was a heavy lop on in the bay. The boat was watched by several persons, and fishermen remarked upon the great quantity of sail run up. At about mid-day two men on Paignton Beach saw a boat carrying a good deal of sail suddenly capsize and disappear off Paignton Head. They reported the matter to the Coast Guard at Paignton, but no effort was made to assist the drowning men. MR THOMAS EDWARDS, becoming uneasy, went out to see if he could discover anything of the boat, and on reaching Paignton heard the story from the coastguard. After a long and fruitless search MR EDWARDS returned home at about twelve at night, and communicated the sad news to his parents, who are completely prostrated by the occurrence. MR GEORGE EDWARDS, who was in the boat on Saturday last, says that there was nothing on board that could possibly float but the long paddles. MR PARKER is a native of Bromley, Kent, and his relatives have arrived in town. - Operations were actively carried on night and day on Monday and Tuesday for the recovery of the bodies or the finding of the sunken yacht, but no success attended the efforts made until Wednesday morning when, the weather proving fine, elaborate preparations were made, and the start from the harbour was timed at three o'clock. It had been thought by some, the thought springing evidently from the wish, that it was just possible the whole story was without foundation, and that the two young fellows had been carried in their vessel out of the Bay; but Wednesday proved that the published accounts were only too true, and that the two ill-fated young men had met with a watery grave. On Tuesday the diver on going down discovered that what was thought to be the sunken yacht was but an old anchor half embedded in the sand. On Wednesday morning Messrs. Brown, brothers, boatmen, got up steam and went out with their launch, and another boat, to where they supposed the vessel had gone down, reaching the spot at about 5.30. They had constructed a long line, nearly a mile in length, with a bull-taw (conger-line, carrying a great number of hooks) in the centre. This was weighted down, and the bottom of the Bay was dragged for some hours without success. Meanwhile, the two steam launches from Paignton, Mr Dendy's, came out, and after a considerable time the yacht was discovered by MR T. EDWARDS, apparently standing upright, on the bottom, and being scarcely half-a-mile from the shore. Judging the set of the tide and the wind, Messrs. Brown at once commenced dragging for the bodies in a new direction, and at ten minutes to eight, and at a distance of about fifty yards from the yacht, the hooks caught something, which after a momentary resistance came, on the line being hauled in, easily to the surface, and proved to be the body of MR PARKER. No bruises or marks of blows in any way were perceivable, but the fingers were half-clenched and the attitude of the body indicated a desperate struggle for life. The body was taken on board, and, after a short but fruitless search for the other, which it was thought might be found near the same spot, was brought ashore, and conveyed, covered, on a waggon to the mortuary at the Town Hall, when it was searched by P.C's Glyde and Trott. One of the Messrs. Brown remained with the body, and the other two continued their search for the other. It was about 9.20 when the body reached the mortuary and the search was made by the constables; amongst the articles found were a scarf pin, pipe, pocket knife, scissors, tobacco pouch, several keys, watch and chain and a ring, the last-named being on the third finger of the right hand. The watch had stopped at exactly half-past twelve, which was about the time the boat was seen to capsize. One of the hooks of the bull-taw caught in the back of the coat, so that deceased was evidently lying on his face at the bottom. - The search for the other body for some hours proved unavailing, but at 10.30 Mr Brown hooked something when dragging about a hundred yards from the yacht, and a little leeward of the spot where the first body was found. On hauling up, the coat of the deceased came first, on a hook some yards from the body of MR EDWARDS, which followed, caught by the shirt sleeve. It was at once brought ashore and deposited in the mortuary by the side of the body of MR PARKER. The search by Sergt. Bastin and P.C. Glyde revealed ten shillings in silver, sixpence three farthings in coppers, and a large old copper coin. His watch had stopped at seventeen minutes twenty seconds past twelve, and amongst the trinkets on his watch chain was a locket, faced with a lion shilling. The fact of the coat being off would suggest that the deceased, when he found himself in the water, endeavoured to remove his clothing in order that he could swim more easily, but was exhausted and sank before he could do so. - The Inquest: - The Town Hall, Torquay, was densely crowded on Wednesday night, as by six o'clock it had become generally known that the Inquest on the bodies of the late MR F. EDWARDS and MR H. PARKER, who met with death by drowning in the Bay on Sunday last and whose bodies were recovered yesterday, was to be held at seven o'clock. Mr J. A. Hacker, Deputy Coroner, of the firm of solicitors, Messrs. Michelmore and Hacker, conducted the Inquiry, and the names of the Jury were as follows:- Messrs. Graham (Foreman), Hart, Rolestone, G. Fradd, Pridham, Joyce, Cozens, Westley, Hall, Hill, Walland, Porter and Mugford. Capt. Medley, senior officer of the coastguard stationed at Torquay, watched the case, and Mr E. Vivian, who had made an admirable sketch of the Bay, as far as concerned Paignton Head and the scene of the accident, was also present. During the hearing of the case strong expressions of disapproval of the manner in which Mr Hacker's questions were answered by the coastguard were heard from the body of the court and in some instances from the Jury. - The first witness was Mr Richard Trelease, outfitter, Union-street, who stated that he knew both the deceased young men. MR PARKER was his assistance, and he last saw him on Saturday night at about half-past twelve when he heard him invite two friends, Mr Dodsworth and Mr Sharp, to accompany him and MR EDWARDS, on the following morning. MR PARKER had frequently been out before with MR EDWARDS. - MR THOMAS EDWARDS, coach-builder, Union-street, father of the deceased, deposed that he last saw his on alive on Sunday morning at breakfast, and he then said he was going out in his boat. He had been out many times before, and knew well how to manage the yacht. Witness, who was greatly agitated and appeared stunned, was not pressed with questions and retired. - Mr Charles Tomlinson, 13 Roundham cottages, Paignton, stated that he was a butler and on Sunday morning last was sitting on a seat on the south side of Paignton pier with a companion, Wm. Earle. That was about twenty minutes past twelve, and he was watching a yacht that seemed to be leaning over. He said to his companion, "That boat seems as if it is going to capsize." he watched it and he saw it go over, and he and his friend at once ran to the coast-guard to inform them of what had occurred. That was about twenty-three minutes past twelve. The boat had a double-reefed mainsail and a jib. It was taking in water when he saw it first, and drew his companion's attention to it. Half-a-minute after that she went down. The wind was gusty, and the weather rather squally. The officer on hearing the story said he had been sitting at his window writing all the morning, and he did not believe the boat could go over without his seeing it. Witness told him he was positive the boat had gone down, but he said he did not think so. Witness stayed there about ten minutes, and still persisted in what he said that the boat had gone down; but the coastguard did nothing, and would not lower a boat and go out. The officer went outside and asked a coastguardsman if he had seen anything, and he said he had seen a boat pass along by Paignton Head all right. There were about a dozen men round, and they thought witness must be mistaken. Finding he could do no good, witness went home, telling the story to several people he met. He was in Torquay in the afternoon and spoke of the occurrence to several friends. In reply to the Foreman, witness said that the spot where the boat went down could be seen from the coastguard station. Cross-examined by Capt. Medley: Q.- When you went to the officer did he appear to understand that the boat went over? - A.- Well, I impressed it on his mind with all in my power. Q.- How is it then that he did not believe you? - A.- I can't say. Q.- Did you say "My God, won't you go and save the lives of these people"? A.- I might have, I was excited. - Mr Wm. Earle, hair-dresser, Winner-street, Paignton, gave similar evidence, and said the boat was not half-a-dozen seconds in going over. From where he was he could see nothing floating after she sank. The coastguard said that the boat they had seen go over had gone round the head all right. They stood there, he and his friend, and told them most distinctly that they saw the boat go down. Witness told several men, and also the coastguard; but they did not believe it. Witness stood there for a quarter-of-an-hour, and at last thought he must be mistaken, because the men and the coastguard were so positive that the boat had not gone down. The coastguard did nothing, and did not trouble to find out whether the boat had really gone down. - Cross-examined by Captain Medley: Q.- Are you sure about the colour of the sail? - A.- I thought it was a tan sail, as it looked dark. Q.- To whom did you report it? - A.- There was a chief officer and a coastguardsman. - Mr George Greet, chief coastguard, stationed at Paignton, said he was on duty on Sunday last. He was in the watch-room in the morning, and had a view of the Bay from the window. There were three boats in the Bay, a schooner from Torquay, which afterwards anchored, a small boat from Paignton which came in and another larger boat. He watched the last as he thought it curious that, blowing hard as it was, the boat should be cruising about the Bay. The wind was west-south-west and squally. He watched her till she went round the point out of his sight. Q.- Were you informed of the accident? - A.- Mr Tomlinson came and said a boat with tan sails had disappeared from him. I went out and looked round, and sent the watchman round the head, but he returned and said he could see nothing. Q.- Mr Tomlinson was there reiterating his statement, was he not, some time? - He said a boat had disappeared from him. Q.- Would it not be possible for a boat to get from the station to the scene of the accident in a quarter-of-an-hour or twenty minutes? - A.- No: we could not have got out there in less than an hour. [This statement was received with expressions of incredulity by the Jury.] - Q.- Did Tomlinson lead you to believe there had been an accident? No: he led me to believe that a boat had disappeared from his sight. Q.- You mean to say that he was with you for ten minutes, and all that time you did not understand there was an accident? - A.- I did not think there had been an accident. Q.- Did you understand that he wished you to understand an accident had occurred? - A.- I did not think there had been an accident. Q.- I want to know what you understood from Tomlinson's words. Did you understand from Tomlinson's words that he wished you to understand that the boat had gone down? - A.- No sir. Q.- When you sent the man round the head did he find the boat? - A.- No. Q.- Then where did you think the boat had gone? - A.- I thought it had gone to Brixham. By the Jury: How is it that you say you saw the boat go past the head, and now you say you can see the place from your station where she sunk? - A.- Because she had altered her tack and was coming back, standing in. Q.- Did you take any steps eventually? - A.- No. Q.- To launch a boat? - A.- No. Q.- What kind of information do you require before you take action? [The witness did not answer this question.] Q.- Did not Earle tell you of the accident? - A.- I do not know that I saw Earle. [The Jury characterised this answer as an evasion.] Examined by Capt. Medley: Are you quite sure that only one person came to you with regard to that yacht? - A.- I am certain, sir. - Albert Pitman, coast-guardsman, Paignton, corroborated Mr Greet's evidence, and added that he heard Tomlinson repeat his words about a boat being capsized about 100 yards off the Black Rock. He could not see, when sent, the boat that had gone round the head, and thought it had gone to Brixham. The boat could get to Brixham in about a quarter of an hour. He did not understand that there had been an accident, nor did his officer lead him to suppose so. - Mr Tom Brown and William Brown deposed to finding the bodies, and the latter said there had been suspicions as to the boat's stability amongst those who knew her. He did not think either of the deceased was well up in sea service in case of difficulties. The spot at which the boat sunk was about half-a-mile from the nearest shore. By the Coroner: How long would it take to go there in a boat from the Paignton shore? - A.- I could get there inside a quarter of an hour. The Jury: The coastguard says it would take over an hour. Mr Brown: It would not take that time in my opinion. - The Coroner in summing up, said that the accident was only seen apparently by two persons, who ran at once for help. It did not matter whether the officer of the coast guard could see the accident or not, but the men were bound when they were informed there had been an accident, by two persons or even one, to act upon it, and that information should have been sufficient to induce them to man a boat and give what help they could. (Applause). - The Jury, after an absence of about a quarter-of-an-hour, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased were "Accidentally Drowned," and added that they were "unanimous in censuring the coastguard officer for gross negligence of duty." - A large crowd had assembled round the Town Hall and did not disperse for some considerable time after the verdict became known. It was thought that some action would be taken by the crowd against the coastguard, and the latter did not walk down through the street, but went up Abbey road, a couple of constables following them for a short distance. No violence was attempted, however, and the crowd quietly dispersed.
[A description of the funeral arrangements followed.]

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 23 June 1882
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Student,. Plymouth, Wednesday. - At Widey Cottage, near Plymouth, this morning an army student named JENKINSON, who yesterday received news of successfully passing an examination, shot himself dead. At an Inquest held in the evening, the Jury found that death resulted from the accidental explosion of a revolver.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 June 1882
TORQUAY - Sad Case Of Suicide At Torquay. - On Monday afternoon, a woman named AUGUSTA MARIA WOOD, living at Normount, Middle Warberries, committed suicide by hanging herself. She was forty-two years of age, and had been an invalid, bedridden, for some fourteen and fifteen years. Her husband, JOHN WOOD, who is in the employ of Mrs Gamble, of Normount, left her in her usual health yesterday, and on returning again shortly after four found her hanging quite dead to the bed-post in her own room. A doctor was called but his services were too late to be of any use. Deceased is supposed to have fallen into a very low state of mind, consequent upon her illness. - Inquest. - At Normount, Torquay, on Wednesday, an Inquiry was held by Dr Gaye, Coroner, and a Jury, touching the death of AUGUSTA MARIA WOOD, wife of the head gardener employed at Normount. It was stated that the deceased was not in the employ of Mrs Gamble, but lived in a building detached from the house. Deceased had been a great invalid for some years, and had stated to Mrs Mary McDonald, the housekeeper, who used to visit her frequently and read to her, that she was assured she would never get any better. None of the witnesses had ever heard her make any reference to taking her own life. She had recently taken to her bed, being unable to walk about. On the day in question, Monday, she was left by her daughter in the afternoon in her usual health and state of mind. She was by no means of a desponding nature. Shortly after four, her husband on going to her room found the door locked, and on obtaining admittance found deceased on her knees by the side of her bed, with a piece of rope twisted tightly round her neck, the other end being looped over the bed-post. Dr A. Deeley, who is managing Mr Gamble's practice during his absence, said that MRS WOOD was quite dead when he arrived, the cause of death being strangulation. In such cases it was by no means unusual for persons suffering as deceased had to have an attack of temporary insanity, and that in his opinion was what had occurred in the present instance. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was given.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 July 1882
TORQUAY - Inquest. - At the Hesketh Arms, Torquay, on Tuesday, an Inquest was held on the body of MARY LOUISA EALES, domestic servant, Kinlet Villa. From the evidence it appeared that deceased had died from the effects of being burnt about the lower part of the body. It will be remembered that the clothes of the deceased caught fire, and, before they could be extinguished, the young woman had received the injuries which on Monday resulted in her death. A verdict of Accidental Death was recorded,. Dr Thompson had attended the unfortunate girl, but from the first it was apparent that she had but little chance of recovery.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 August 1882
BRIXHAM - An Inquest on the body of GEORGE FARLEY, aged 16 years, who was drowned from the fishing smack "Ariel," on Friday morning last, in Torbay roads, and whose body was found on Saturday morning, took place at the Bolton Hotel on Tuesday evening, before Mr Sidney Hacker. Mr R. Drew was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The skipper, Mr G. B. James, the third hand, Mr G. Blackmore, and Mr J. P. James, who found the body, gave evidence as to the accident and recovery of the body. A verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning," was returned. The Jury recommended the skipper, and every other skipper, to carry life buoys on deck, in a place where they could easily be got at.

PAIGNTON - Sudden Death At Paignton. - Mr Hacker, the newly elected Coroner for the Eastern Division of Devon, held his first Inquest since his appointment on Saturday evening, at the Pier Inn, Paignton, on the body of a little boy named ANDREW WILLIAM PATTON, aged five years, son of MR ANDREW PATTON, master mariner. Death occurred suddenly on Friday afternoon. The little fellow left school about four o'clock. Before leaving he complained that he had a headache, and on reaching his home he told his mother that he had a headache, and that a boy named Sidney Knight had knocked him in the head and stomach. His mother took him upstairs and laid him on a bed. He died a few minutes afterwards. Mr Goodridge, surgeon, who had made post mortem examination, stated that in his opinion deceased had died from concussion of the brain, which might have been caused by a blow on the head, although there was nothing to show that a blow had been given. The lad Sidney Knight, a bright intelligent little fellow of four years old, was brought into the room but, being so young, nothing could be elicited from him. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Natural Causes.

TIVERTON - Sudden Death Of A Medical Man. - An Inquest was held in Tiverton Town Hall on Tuesday, before Mr Coroner Mackenzie, concerning the death of GODFREY ROHRS, who expired suddenly on the previous day. Deceased was assistant to Dr J. P. McNeill, and had been in the habit of dispensing medicines. On Sunday night about 11 o'clock deceased told Dr McNeill that he had had too much to drink, and added - "Ought I not to take something to prevent the effects of the drink?" Dr McNeill in reply told deceased to go to bed and deceased went. Early in the morning deceased was found unconscious in bed, having vomited and he died about half-past four on Monday afternoon. The housekeeper said that in the course of the previous evening she had seen the deceased take something in a bottle from a shelf containing poisons. Verdict, "Death by Misadventure."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 August 1882
EXETER - A Man Drowned At Exeter. - Mr Coroner Burrows held an Inquest at Exeter on Wednesday on the body of CHARLES PRESTON, aged 46, whose dead body was recovered from the River Exe on Tuesday. It appears that on Monday morning last, deceased, who was a waggoner in the employ of Messrs. Chaplin and Horner, went out with his waggon as usual, and nothing more was seen of him until his body was found in the River Exe, near the Dipping Steps, in Okehampton street, St Thomas, Exeter. Deceased was said to be a very steady man. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and recommended the fencing of the Dipping Steps.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 August 1882
DAWLISH - Sad Occurrence At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Dawlish, on Saturday evening, by Mr Hacker, Coroner, touching the death of a young gentleman, which took place on the beach after mid-day on Saturday. - The first witness called was deceased's brother, NIXON CHETWODE RAM, who said - Deceased [STOPFORD EDWARD RAM] was 18 years of age last December. We are living at No. 10 Strand, Dawlish. My brother was studying for the University of Cambridge. My mother and sisters are also visiting Dawlish. My brother and myself got up about eight o'clock on Saturday morning and we all ate a hearty breakfast. Deceased was reading until 11 a.m. I went on to the Gentleman's Bathing Cove, and he came to me there. After we had been in the water about a quarter of an hour, my brother said he felt ill and giddy, and remarked that everything looked black, and he said his heart was beating fast. We then came ashore, dressed, and proceeded towards where my mother was sitting in the Ladies' Bathing Cove opposite Cliff House. He told my mother what he had just told me. He might have sat there two minutes, when he said "I am getting giddy again." He then fell down on his side on the shingle, and I ran for the doctor. Dr Parsons came in about ten minutes. In answer to a Juryman, witness said is brother was a very good swimmer. - Mr A. D. Parsons, physician and surgeon at Dawlish, said - When I saw the deceased he was perfectly cold, and I considered he was dead. I tried to restore respiration at once, and then had him conveyed to his home, where I tried restoratives for about an hour. He got what may be termed artificial respiration, but he was virtually dead, pulseless, with no action of the heart. I examined the body externally. I am of opinion that death was caused by heart disease - syncope, hastened perhaps by sunstroke whilst on the beach. If he had a stimulant earlier he might have rallied. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was given.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 October 1882
TORQUAY - Sudden Death At Torquay. - On Saturday GEORGE DICKER, about 60 years of age, who was employed by Mr Manley, coal dealer, as cellar man, was engaged in his work when he fell down apparently in a fit. He was conveyed in a cab to the Torbay Hospital, where it was found that he was dead. The body was taken to the house of the deceased in Melville-street. At the Town Hall on Monday afternoon, Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of GEORGE DICKER (59), cellarman, who was in the employ of Mr Manley, coal merchant, and who lived at 1 Melville Place. On Saturday the deceased was at his work, and during the morning he complained to Alex. Saunders, the foreman, that he did not feel particularly well, but thought it would pass off. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon Saunders found him lying on his back on the ground, breathing but very little and seemingly speechless. Help was obtained, and the man was conveyed in a cab to the Infirmary. Mr Harris, assistant-surgeon, saw him and pronounced life extinct; consequently the body was taken to the house of the deceased. Mr Cumming, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the cause of death to be heart disease. DICKER had complained of illness on the day previous to his death but he was generally considered a healthy man. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 December 1882
DARTMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of CHARLES FREDERICK BURT, able seaman, of H.M.S. Britannia, who fell into the water and was drowned whilst engaged in painting the star-board quarter of the Hindostan, attached to the Britannia. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 December 1882
BRIXHAM - The Loss Of A Boat Off Brixham. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Commercial Inn, Brixham, on the body of THOMAS FLETCHER, who was drowned by the sinking of the lugger Minnie, on Thursday last off Berry Head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

TORQUAY - The Manslaughter Of A Landlord In Torquay. - There died at Exminster Asylum on Monday, MR WILLIAM DEAR, landlord of the Golden Lion Hotel, Union-street, Torquay, whose death is due, according to present circumstantial evidence, to injuries which he received on the night of September 2nd, at the hands of a person named Ernest Stephen, described as an artist at the Watcombe Terra Cotta Works. It appears that on the date mentioned, about 11.30 p.m., MR DEAR was in his cellar, turning off the beer taps, when he heard an altercation in his bar. He went up and found Stephen and a man named Henry Land. His mother was refusing to serve them with any drink, saying that it was after hours. Stephen was drunk and demanded to be served because the door was open. MR DEAR ordered the parties to leave, whereupon Stephen used bad language. The landlord at length commenced to turn the man out. He resisted, and while MR DEAR stood on the doorstep he struck him on the face with a cane. The blow fell on the eye ball and MR DEAR cried out that the man had blinded him. He managed to secure his assailant, but afterwards allowed him to be taken away by some persons who knew him. On October 19th, MR DEAR appeared at the Torquay Police Court to prefer a charge against Stephen of violently assaulting him. From the date of the attack up to that time his eye had troubled him very much, a blow on so sensitive a part naturally causing extreme agony. The defendant Stephen, upon whom the summons had been served by P.S. Ellicott, did not put in an appearance, and the Bench, finding the case of so grave a nature, determined not to proceed further without having the accused before them,. Consequently there was issued a warrant for his arrest. Before it could be executed, however, Stephen decamped and has not since been heard of. After the injury to his eye MR DEAR evinced great anxiety as to his condition. The fear that he would not only lose the sight of the organ which had been hurt but of both his eyes so preyed upon his mind that his brain was quite upset, and it became evident that he was not accountable for his actions. Any doubt which might have been entertained of his condition was dispelled on Friday week, when his madness took the shape of violent acts which imperilled the safety of himself and friends. With a good deal of difficulty MR DEAR was controlled and a few days after his dangerous outbreak he was removed to Exminster Asylum. There it became apparent that there was no hope for him. Rapidly he grew worse, and died on Monday as stated above. The facts as they stand at present show that DEAR died through injuries inflicted by Stephen and consequently there is a prima facie case against that person of manslaughter. The actual whereabouts of Stephen are not known. Nevertheless the police entertain the idea that they may be able to find him. - The Inquest: - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Police Station last evening into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM DEAR, landlord of the Golden Lion Inn, Union-street, Torquay, the particulars of whose death we have already reported. - Elizabeth Ann Harris, wife of Benjamin Harris, employed at the Golden Lion, identified the body. She stated that the deceased was 45 years of age and unmarried. On September 2nd, at night, she was in the smoke room when two men, Ernest Stephen and Henry Land came in. It was after hours and the deceased coming up from the cellar, told them to go away, adding, after some words had passed, that if they did not go out he would put them out. Eventually he pushed Stephen out but he attempted to come in and struck MR DEAR across the shoulder and then on the face with a cane. He struck violently both times. DEAR called out "Oh you blackguard; you're no Englishman; you've blinded me." She saw his eye afterwards; it was much hurt. She had known him four years prior to this time and had never known the deceased exhibit any sign of insanity. After the hurt to his eye he complained much about it and was afraid he would go blind. He said he was able sometimes to see a little with the injured eye. MR DEAR was taken to the Asylum last Monday week and she saw him taken away. - In answer to a Juryman witness said that DEAR did not strike Stephen. The name of the man who was with Stephen was Land: this man did not strike DEAR. He said to DEAR, however, "Why are you striking that man" (meaning Stephen) "like that for?" A crowd took Stephen away after the occurrence. - Samuel Gamble, surgeon, practising in Torquay, said the deceased was a patient of his but he had not attended him for two or three years prior to September 2nd, when he came to him at twelve at night with his left eye very much swollen and the eyelids gorged with blood. Witness examined him and found a lacerated wound on the inner side of the eyeball which must have been produced by violence. He told witness he had been struck with a stick. The sight at the time was wholly gone, the eye being then merely a mass of coagulated blood. After suffering considerable pain there was a little improvement. Later on he found the sight was permanently injured. Towards the end of October DEAR complained of pain in the sound eye, and witness recommended him to see an oculist at Exeter. Subsequently he told witness he was sure the sight of his other eye was going, and it worried him. On the 14th of November there were symptoms of mental disorder and they increased. On the 27th he was removed to the Asylum. He attributed his patient's condition indirectly to the injury the eye received. He was much troubled about his state and he was also very anxious about pecuniary matters. When witness saw DEAR first he was not suffering from any injury likely to cause death. He was a man of very nervous temperament. On a man of strong nerves and of strong will the effect would not have been the same as upon the deceased. The insanity was induced by worry and anxiety consequent upon the injury to the eye. It was his opinion that the injury to the eye did not affect the brain. - Robert Leonard Rutherford, physician at the Devon County Asylum, Exminster, said the deceased had been under his charge since Nov. 27th. He was brought in with his hands and feet tied. He had no power to recognize anyone and did not understand where he was. During the time witness saw him he never heard him speak a sensible word. He was sleepless, excited and objected to take food. What he did take he vomited. He died on December 4th. The cause of death was general paralysis of the brain and fatty degeneration of the heart. He made a post mortem examination and found no acute inflammation of the brain such as would result from an injury. Death could not be attributed to any hurt to the eye. He could not say what produced his madness and did not think that the blow on the eye accelerated his death. Any trouble or worry might have produced the same effect. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner summed up, alluding chiefly to the medical testimony, and expressing the opinion that unless the Jury thought death was due to blow on the eye, which they scarcely could do unless in contradiction to the evidence, they would return a verdict of Death from Natural Causes. If not they must find a verdict of manslaughter. The Jury consulted for an hour and a quarter and returned into Court with the written verdict, read by Mr T. Graham, the Foreman, - "Died from Insanity, produced by worry, chiefly accelerated by anxiety as to his probable loss of sight, from the effects of a blow." - The Coroner said the Jury had not fulfilled their duty by the verdict. They had not found by it the manner in which the deceased came to his death fully. If they attributed the death of the deceased to the effects of a blow it was their duty to find who inflicted the blow and state it in their verdict. He must ask the Foreman to ask the Jury to state in the verdict whether the deceased died from natural causes or whether they wished to attribute death to a blow. He must have a verdict one way or the other and it must be a verdict of manslaughter or death from natural causes. The Jury retired again, the time being 10 o'clock. - At 10.30 the Coroner sent a message to the Jury asking whether there was any probability of their agreeing within the next five minutes. There was an almost unanimous "no," and Mr Hacker directed that they should come into Court again. He told them that if they could come to no conclusion that night he must adjourn the Inquest. - After some conversation it was said there was a possibility of twelve of the thirteen Jurymen agreeing on a verdict, and the Coroner intimating that a verdict of twelve was sufficient, recommended them to retire again. This they did and returned in five minutes with the verdict that the death of the deceased was due to Insanity and that his death was accelerated by the blow given by Stephen. - The Coroner said that that was a verdict of Manslaughter. There was some dissent to this, and the Coroner asked twelve of the Jurors, one by one, if they agreed that the death of the deceased was accelerated by the blow given by Stephen. They replied in the affirmative and the Coroner drew up the inquisition and it was signed by the twelve. The verdict was one of Manslaughter and the Coroner's warrant for the apprehension and committal of Stephen will be issued in the ordinary course.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 December 1882
TORQUAY - Inquest At Babbacombe. - An Inquest has been held at the Globe Inn, Babbacombe, on the body of THOMAS EDWARD HODGSON, a retired master mariner, aged 72, who was on a visit to his sister, MRS STOCKMAN, at Babbacombe. On the evening of the 20th, MRS STOCKMAN retired to rest about ten o'clock, leaving the deceased in the dining room smoking and reading by the light of a paraffin lamp. An hour afterwards, hearing a noise, Mrs Stockman came down and found her brother at the bottom of the stairs - his clothes were on fire. She extinguished the fire and sent for Dr Chilcott. Before his death, which happened a day or two before the Inquiry, the deceased explained how the accident occurred. On leaving the room he did not perceive the candle and matches left for him and took up the paraffin lamp. In going upstairs the lamp slipped and he fell back against the door. Dr Chilcott gave evidence and attributed death to exhaustion and fever caused by the burn. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 February 1883
NEWTON BUSHEL - Child Suffocated. - An Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at the Seven Stars Inn, Newton Bushel, on Saturday evening on the body of an infant belonging to a labourer, named HENRY SKINNER. The evidence went to show that the child was suffocated through overlaying, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 10 March 1883
PAIGNTON - Supposed Concealment Of Birth. - The body of an infant child was discovered on Saturday in a box in a house in which a young woman named SARAH ANN TOOLEY lived, at Paignton. TOOLEY, who was formerly in service in North Devon, has recently kept house for her father at Barnshill, Paignton. She was taken ill last Saturday morning, but not much notice was at first taken of the matter, as for years past she has suffered from spasms of the heart, which at times made her very ill. A younger sister was with her in the house, and thinking her sister's illness to be more than of the ordinary nature, she thought it advisable to fetch a married sister who lives near by. On the arrival of the latter she for the first time suspected that TOOLEY was enciente. She taxed her with being about to give birth to a child, but she denied it. She was left for about ten minutes, and on returning the married sister suggested sending for a doctor. This TOOLEY declined. She left her again and on returning found her in bed. About three o'clock the younger sister observed traces which led her to suppose that her sister had been confined. She ran for a neighbour who came to the house and found the dead body of the child in a box in the bedroom. Dr Goodridge will make a post mortem examination, and an Inquest will be held. - On Tuesday Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner for the district, held an Inquest at the Victoria Hotel, Paignton, on the body of the newly-born illegitimate female child of SARAH TOLLY or TOOLEY, which was found in her bedroom, at Barnshill, on Saturday morning. Mr John Parnell was Foreman of the Jury. Messrs. Eastley and Jarman, solicitors, attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the mother of the child. - Ann Ellis, an elderly woman, said she was called to the assistance of the mother by her sister HARRIET on Saturday morning. Witness went to see the mother at her father's request. On going into the bedroom the mother was in bed, and from witness's examination of the bed she considered that a child had been born. She asked the mother where the baby was, but she denied having had one. Witness visited the house a second time some hours afterwards and expressed to the mother her determination to know what had become of the baby, adding that unless she was satisfied in five minutes, she would go further. Witness looked round the room, and after a few minutes the mother confessed that the child was in a box near the bed and just within reach of it. Witness lifted up the cover of the box, and there found the child entirely wrapped up in a flannel petticoat. Witness carried the child to the foot of the bed, and saw that it was quite dead. After telling the mother that she "had done a fine thing for herself," witness sent for Dr Goodridge. - Dr Goodridge said that when he called in the evening he at once saw that the child had been born some hours; and as it had not been properly attended to he refused to certify. He made a post mortem examination, and had come to the conclusion that the child was full grown. There were no external marks of violence on the body. Making experiments to ascertain if the child had breathed, he placed the lungs in a basin of water and found that they floated. He was of opinion that at the time of the child's birth it was alive, and had a separate existence. He was further of opinion that the child died of haemorrhage, in consequence of the cord not being tied. If a medical man or some experienced nurse of midwife had been called, the child would probably not have died. - Evidence confirmatory of the statement of Mrs Ellis was also given by HARRIET TOLLY, sister of the child's mother, after which the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the mother of the child, SARAH TOLLY, by her culpable and negligent omission, caused its death. This amounted to a verdict of Manslaughter, and later in the day the Coroner issued a warrant for the committal of the accused, who will be brought before the Magistrates when she is sufficiently recovered to allow of her appearance.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 31 March 1883
TORQUAY - Sad Accident In Torquay. - On Monday morning, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Upton Vale Hotel, Torre, on the body of HARRIET VAUGHAN MELHUISH, aged 49, wife of MR WILLIAM MELHUISH, tallow-chandler, of Parkhill-road, Upton. The evidence showed that on Saturday week the deceased and her husband went for a drive in a two-wheel trap, from Torquay to Paignton. On the return journey, and when the horse was proceeding at a slow walk down the hill, near Livermead cottage, it slipped up and fell on its side, MR MELHUISH being thrown out on the right side of the horse and his wife on the left. He jumped up very quickly and went to his wife's assistance, dragging her clear from the horse, which was struggling on the ground. The animal just afterwards got on its feet and ran off, with the broken shafts attached to the harness, and MR MELHUISH assisted his wife to walk into Livermead Cottage where her bleeding and bruised forehead and face were bathed. At first she was unconscious, but after MR MELHUISH had placed her in a carriage he had fetched she regained consciousness, and asked to be taken to the residence of Dr Powell, at Torquay. This was done, and after the doctor had examined the deceased she was taken home and put to bed. Her nose was very much injured, her eyes were blackened, her teeth were knocked in, and she was suffering from concussion of the brain. She was attended by Mr Powell, but, although she seemed to rally a little at first, she soon relapsed, and, after intervals of consciousness, she died on Thursday. It was the opinion of Dr Powell that the cause of death was effusion on the brain, consequent upon the injuries the deceased sustained by being thrown on her head and face into the road. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and both the Coroner and Jury expressed their deep sympathy with MR MELHUISH in his bereavement.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 26 May 1883
TORQUAY - Suicide Of A Gentleman In Torquay. - On Tuesday afternoon the body of MR C. H. BULTEEL, of Plymouth, was found in a wood at Cockington, under circumstances which left no room for doubt that he had committed suicide. The deceased was of unsound mind, his condition being such as to necessitate for him the constant supervision of an attendant,. The whole circumstances will be found in the report of the Inquest which follows:- Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest in the Townhall, on Thursday forenoon, into the circumstances attending the death of CHRISTOPHER HARRIS BULTEEL. Mr W. B. Smale was chosen Foreman of the Jury, Mr Harris, solicitor, of the firm of Harris and Baker, Plymouth, attended the Inquiry on behalf of the relatives of the deceased. - The first witness called was James West, the deceased's attendant, who lived with him at Kincorran, Bampfylde Road. He identified the body as that of MR BULTEEL, who was a private gentleman, 37 years of age. Witness was engaged as his attendant in August, 1882. MRS BULTEEL resided at Kincorran. It was witness's duty to be always with MR BULTEEL, to wait at table, and to sleep in the same room with him. He was not in his right mind and was not allowed to go out alone. He saw him last alive on Tuesday morning. After breakfast on that day witness left him with MRS BULTEEL and his sister, MISS BULTEEL, who was visiting him. These ladies had occasion to leave the room, so that MR BULTEEL was left alone. Subsequently witness was told that he was missing and went in search of him in the direction of his usual walks. He was unable to find him, and returned to the house. Later on he went into the Cockington lanes, but with no better success, In the evening, about seven o'clock he heard that a man had been found hanged in Cockington woods, and came to the conclusion that he was MR BULTEEL, making inquiries which confirmed his fears. In the deceased's pockets there was only a pocket-handkerchief; witness was always careful to see that he was not possessed of anything wherewith he could injure himself. The strap with which deceased hanged himself was not known to witness; he had no idea how MR BULTEEL came by it. MR BULTEEL was suffering from nervous depression, and he had talked of poisoning himself. By a Juryman: Deceased had been known to wander from home before, but he returned voluntarily. - MISS BULTEEL, the deceased's sister, said that after breakfasting with him on Tuesday morning, she observed him go upstairs and finally saw him at half-past ten, when she left him in the room, with MRS BULTEEL. She believed that he left the house some ten minutes later. She had never seen him with any strap in his possession. MR BULTEEL had been in an asylum. - James Webber, gardener, Compton Marldon, said on Tuesday evening he was passing along a road skirted by a piece of coppice known as Cockington wood, when he had occasion to go over the fence. He immediately saw a man's neck and head, without a hat, and making further examination, found the deceased's body, with the feet lightly resting on the ground, hanging by a strap from a small branch. The strap was carefully tied, as if by a man who understood the manner of trying particular knots. Witness convinced himself that the gentleman was quite dead, and then went for assistance, afterwards seeing the body cut down. In the meantime, the police were communicated with and P.C. Taylor arrived, and took charge of the body. - Mr Gordon Cumming, physician, gave evidence of having seen the deceased three weeks ago in regard to his mental condition. He found him suffering from profound melancholia. Next he saw him at the mortuary, when he appeared to have been dead several hours. His opinion was that MR BULTEEL died from injury to the spine, caused by hanging - not from strangulation. The spinal cord was damaged. - Thomas Stanbury, Shiphay Collaton, a farmer's son, proved cutting the body of the deceased down. The hat of the man was placed some distance from the spot, in the hedge. - P.C. Taylor said that on searching the deceased he found a handkerchief and a new leather strap; also a pair of gloves. [The strap found in his possession was similar to that which he had used to hang himself.] The witness had the body removed to the mortuary. This was all the evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was only one question for the Jury to consider, and that was the state of mind of the deceased at the time this act was committed. There was no evidence either that the deceased came to his death by the intervention of any other party, or accidentally. He reminded them of the evidence which had been given tending to show that the deceased was not responsible for his actions. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 2 June 1883
Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday evening a little boy named EDWARD HENRY HOBLEY, the son of MR HOBLEY, cook, residing at Mr Callard's restaurant, whilst playing, climbed on to the balusters, and fell to the bottom of the landing, receiving such injuries that he died about three hours after. Dr Pollard was called in, but could do nothing for the child. An Inquest was held yesterday, and a verdict in accordance with the facts returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 June 1883
ST MARY CHURCH - Suicide At Barton. - Last Sunday, at about seven o'clock in the evening, the body of ANN FOGWELL, aged 75, the wife of NICHOLAS FOGWELL, a retired gardener, residing at Barton, St Mary-Church, was discovered by her husband hanging to a beam in a wash-house on the premises. It appears that she was in the front room with her husband a short time before, and about seven o'clock she went out, and as she did not return her husband went in search of her, and found her hanging in the wash-house. He did not cut her down, but ran off for a man named Nicholas Godfrey, who was near by, who came and cut her down. Dr Finch was sent for, but the woman was dead before he arrived. - The Inquest. - The Inquest for the purpose of enquiring into the death of ANN FOGWELL, residing at Prospect Cottage, Barton, was held at the house of the deceased, before Mr Thomas Edmonds, Deputy Coroner. Mr J. S. Waymouth acted as Foreman of the Jury,. - NICHOLAS FOGWELL, husband of the deceased, identified the body as that of ANN FOGWELL, 75, and said that he last saw her alive on Sunday, 3rd June, at about 10 minutes to 7. She was seated in the front room with him reading. About 7 o'clock she got up from the table in which she was seated, and went out, he asked where she was going, and she said "Only into the kitchen." As she did not return, he went in search of her, but could not find her in any of the rooms of the house. On passing out, however, to go into the garden, he looked into the wash-house and saw his wife hanging to a beam where he usually hung pigs after they had been killed. The rope with which she had hanged herself was always there, but was twisted around the beam, which was about 12 feet high. The knees of the deceased were two or three inches from the ground. He could not say how she reached the rope, but there were several things, such as a form and table in the house. He was too frightened to cut the body down, and he ran off to get assistance, and seeing Nicholas Godfrey in his garden, told him what had happened. Medical assistance was sent for immediately, but when the doctor came life was found to be extinct. His wife had been attended by the doctor for some time but had never before even hinted self-destruction. Nicholas Godfrey, gardener, deposed that on the night in question he saw MR FOGWELL running down the road in a very agitated state, and as he passed he said his wife had hung herself. Witness immediately ran up to the deceased's house and went into the wash house and cut the body down. The knees were resting on the ground. There were no visible signs of life to be seen. Close by he noticed a table with a pail turned upwards on it, but he could not say whether the deceased had reached the rope by means of these. Dr Finch, St. Mary-church, said he had been in attendance on the deceased for some months previous but the last time he was there was the Monday previous to the day in question. She had been suffering from softening of the brain and melancholia. On the previous Monday he called in to see her and found she was much worse and cautioned her husband to watch her. He was called on the Sunday night in question and on his arrival at the house he examined the body and found there was no trace of life. There was a blue mark around the neck caused by the rope. Death was caused by strangulation. He did not think the knees could have been on the ground as the former witness had stated as he had examined the height of the beam. The rope had been tied in a very peculiar manner and death would have taken place in about three minutes. He had never heard that the deceased had attempted any rash act previously. The Deputy Coroner in summing up said that no blame could be attached to anyone. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Boating Fatality. - A boating accident occurred in the Hamoaze, Plymouth, on Sunday last, which resulted in the drowning of LOUISA RAWLING, the daughter of a shipwright in the dockyard. She was one of a party of five persons who had engaged a boat for a pleasure trip. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Coroner expressing a hope that in future the boatman (Francis) would not allow youngsters to hire boats in stormy weather.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 June 1883
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Monday on the body of MR GEORGE DELVES, chemist of High-street, who was found dead in bed on Saturday. MR DELVES was of intemperate habits, and when suffering from the effects of drink he was in the habit of taking bromide of potassium and a saline draught, one of the ingredients of which was prussic acid. In his room were found bottles of the mixture, and Dr Henderson expressed an opinion that MR DELVES met with his death by taking an overdose of prussic acid. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death through Misadventure."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 June 1883
TORQUAY - Singular Death Of A Woman In Torquay. The Inquest. - A Coroner's Jury assembled at the Castle Inn, Union-street, on Tuesday evening to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ANN ELIZA BOWDEN (31) wife of JAMES BOWDEN, landlord of the White Lion beerhouse, Temperance-street. The Coroner (Mr Sydney Hacker) and the Jury, of whom Mr R. Shinner was the Foreman, having viewed the body, - Annie Dist, 14 years of age, Temperance Place, daughter of Joseph Dist, said she knew MRS BOWDEN and saw her on Saturday at the head of the stairs at the White Lion, having gone there to change a shilling. The deceased was unable to do so, and witness left. This was between one and two o'clock in the afternoon. She believed MR BOWDEN was upstairs because she heard him tell his wife to "come back." She saw that MRS BOWDEN had been crying, and when she came in heard MR BOWDEN "jawing" her. The woman's hair was hanging down. She used to mind the baby at the house and had seen quarrelling and fighting between MR and MRS BOWDEN. When quarrelling they used to throw things about, and she saw MR BOWDEN smack his wife's face. She left about a month since and had not noticed any quarrelling since that time:- By a Juryman: She did not know if they quarrelled a week ago. - In answer to further questions the witness said MRS BOWDEN was not the worse for drink when she saw her on Saturday. MR BOWDEN used to get tipsy, but MRS BOWDEN did not. While witness worked at the house she had seen MRS BOWDEN crying. - Stephen Gay, 38, Union-street, bird dealer, deposed that he knew the deceased well for 14 years. He saw her on Saturday in her own house at 10 o'clock at night, and she served him with some ale. At that time she was in as good health as ever he saw her. No traces of crying were apparent to him. Deceased's husband was sitting at witness's side. He stayed there up to closing time. No words passed between the parties. When the house was closed deceased said "Now Jem, don't stand yarning outside a long time; its past eleven." That was the last he heard of her. BOWDEN'S reply was "All right LIZE," and that was all witness knew. When he left, BOWDEN was standing outside chatting with some persons. BOWDEN had had some drink, but he was very "comfortable," and "in no ways wranglesome." - By a Juryman: Deceased did not speak in an irritating way to her husband. Witness further said that though the deceased might have been a little "out of the way" he could not call him intoxicated. He never saw that MRS BOWDEN was any the worse for liquor on Saturday night. - By a Juror: His private opinion was that MRS BOWDEN was occasionally the worse for liquor. MR BOWDEN was sometimes "wranglesome." He was pretty friendly with MR BOWDEN. - The Coroner: A boon companion of yours? - Witness: No, Sir. - The Coroner: I thought this was a temperance house. - Witness: No, Temperance-street. The witness had seen MRS BOWDEN with bruises on her face, but had never seen BOWDEN strike her. Generally at closing time on Saturday nights BOWDEN was not so "comfortable" as on the night in question. He knew that MRS BOWDEN had had to "fly" out of the house at midnight because of her husband's violence. When he left BOWDEN he was talking to two men named Briggs. He had occasionally prevented BOWDEN striking his wife by crying out to him when he offered to do so. He knew that during the past winter MRS BOWDEN had been kept out in the street at night. The woman had complained to him on several occasions of her husband's violence, and said that he accused her of being drunk. - A Juryman: Do you consider that MRS BOWDEN was what might be called a "little muddled" when you left on Saturday night? - Witness: She might have been muddled, and I might have been muddled also. Witness added that he thought it was two or three weeks back when MRS BOWDEN last complained to him of her husband's behaviour. Deceased and her husband were more than ordinarily quiet on Saturday night. - A Juryman: Was there any dispute between the parties as to the changing of a sovereign? - Witness: That was between a customer and MRS BOWDEN and MR BOWDEN put the matter right. He was not aware that BOWDEN said to his wife "You've no right here; you're not fit to give change." - Mary Cummings, 14 year old, Lower Union Lane, daughter of Robert Cummings, was once a servant at MRS BOWDEN'S, whom she saw on Saturday morning. She saw her again at dinner-time, and had dinner with MR and MRS BOWDEN and their four children. After dinner BOWDEN lay on the sofa and MRS BOWDEN went downstairs. She never heard any quarrelling, nor did she notice that MRS BOWDEN had been crying. All the week she was there she never heard any quarrelling. When she left at 10.30 the woman was all right. In the afternoon MRS BOWDEN complained to her of a pain in the back. She never heard such a complaint from her until that day. The deceased, in addition to speaking about the pain in her back, placed her hand frequently on her chest as though she was also in pain there. At night she did not appear to have taken anything to drink and was in her usual spirits. Witness went out on an errand about tea-time. - Ellen Shears, 4 Temperance-street, dressmaker, wife of John Shears, saw the deceased alive last at noon on Saturday. About one on Sunday morning, after she had gone to bed and to sleep she was awoke by a noise in the street, as though someone was crying "Help." She spoke to her husband, and he said he expected "they were turning out." A little later she heard a knock, but her lodger told her not to go down, because it was a young fellow from next door who had the "blue-devils." The cries of "Help" were continued in a man's voice, and she heard the words "What shall I do; will no one help me?" The cries were certainly not in MRS BOWDEN'S voice. She threw up the window and asked what was the matter and the reply was from a woman, "For god's sake come down, there's something the matter at BOWDEN'S." She ran to BOWDEN'S house and saw MRS BOWDEN lying on the stairs, with BOWDEN standing beside her, crying aloud. "Oh it can't be true! it can't be true!" A Mr Harding, plumber, was there, and a Mrs Gerring. The feet of the deceased were very near the door, and her head was on the second stair. She should think that the body had to be moved before the street door could be opened. She believed her hands were crossed on her body. Her dress was a little raised. Upon her cheek was a mark as though she had struck a stair in falling. - At this point of the Inquiry, a Juryman asked for permission to leave for a few moments, "Somebody" had been taken ill. - The Coroner: A member of your family? - The Juryman: No, it's a horse. (Laughter). The Coroner said he could not allow the Juror to leave on this account. - Witness, continuing her evidence, said she noticed that something appeared to be wrong with the deceased's teeth, and that she looked much older. She waited until a doctor came, and heard BOWDEN say that he fell asleep over the newspaper and that when he went downstairs he found his wife lying there. BOWDEN was in his usual dress. He was very much agitated. Nothing led her to the supposition that BOWDEN had been drinking. When she touched the body she found it was "three-parts" cold. Witness had heard many rows in the parties' house, but had never seen BOWDEN strike his wife. She called the disturbances "nagging." - By a Juror: She did not hear the woman shriek about one o'clock. She would not swear positively that it was a man's voice she heard, but was almost sure it was. She had seen the deceased the worse for drink. On the previous Thursday the witness was speaking to MRS BOWDEN, when she pulled out some false teeth and said "Look here; they're broken and if I'm not careful they'll choke me; I nearly swallowed them the other day." - Mr Gordon Cumming, M.R.C.S., practising in Torquay, said he was called to the case on Sunday morning at 1.30 and found MRS BOWDEN lying at the bottom of the stairs dead. The body was lying almost at full length, with the head on the third or fourth step. On examining the corpse he found the limbs sound, and so far as he could then see there were no marks on the head or face, with the exception of a scratch on the nose and a line across the left cheek, which he believed was a post mortem mark made by the face having rested against the edge of a stair. The body was slightly warm, and the face calm. Probably it had lain in the pace he found it for half-an-hour. On the following day he made a further examination with a view of discovering any bruises which might exist, but found none. His attention was then drawn to the presence of some false teeth which had dropped from their place to the back of the deceased's mouth. On Monday morning he made his post mortem examination. Having removed the scalp he found no marks at all about the head. On opening the body he found that fatty degeneration of the heart was commencing, and that organ had the appearance of being affected. The liver was enlarged. He opened the windpipe from below and found that the teeth had not passed back into the pipe and were not the cause of death. His opinion was that the condition of the heart may have been the cause of death. The liver had the appearance of an organ belonging to a person who took alcohol. The kidneys were not healthy, but not much diseased. The heart was one which a person might have who died under the administration of chloroform, and in regard to whom a medical man could not state before a Coroner that the heart was actually diseased. His impression was that the woman did not fall down the stairs; she might have fallen back against the stairs. There was no displacement or bruise such as would in all likelihood result from a fall down the stairs. - By a Juror: The false teeth would very likely fall back to the throat when the subject was dead. If his opinion of the cause of death were correct the woman would have died without a struggle. He did not think the body had been dragged about. Besides there was very much difficulty in lifting a dead body. - Mr R. Butland, one of the Jurors, remarked that a man dropped dead beside him not long since, and he found no great difficulty in raising and placing the body on his knees. - P.C. Way said that on Sunday morning about 12.45 he was on duty in Union-street, when he heard cries for help in a man's voice, and proceeded into Temperance-street. He found JAMES BOWDEN in the street outside his house, the door being partially open. Being asked the matter he said he thought his wife was dead. Witness proceeded into the house and found the woman on the stairs. He brought Dr Cumming to the place. The position of the body was not changed while he was away. BOWDEN told him that about half-past ten he had a few words with his wife over changing a sovereign, and he then told her she was a bigger fool than ever she was, little thinking these would be the last words he would ever speak to her. He went upstairs just after 11 to get his supper and then took up the newspaper to read. He fell asleep and when he woke up he went to his bed, but not finding his wife there, he went down stairs and fell over something at the bottom. Lighting up the gas, he found his wife lying there, and, thinking she was in liquor, as she had been before, took her up in his arms. She fell back helpless and on looking at her he thought she was dead, and ran out into the street. - JAMES AUSTEN BOWDEN, the husband of the deceased, was then called. - The Coroner, addressing him, said it was his duty, before asking him whether he would give any evidence, to inform him that he was not obliged to make a statement, inasmuch as this might turn out to be a serious inquiry, but if he wished to make any statement, he might do so. Such statement, however, would be taken down, and might be given in evidence against him on some future occasion. - BOWDEN said he had no desire to make any statement whatever, but any question they wished to put to him he wished to answer straightforwardly. Any light that he could throw upon the matter he would. - The Coroner: do you wish the Jury to take your evidence as to the cause of death? - BOWDEN: I don't know the cause of death. - The Coroner: Do you wish to be sworn, and to give evidence? - BOWDEN: I do. - Having been sworn, BOWDEN, who laboured under some emotion while he spoke, said: I live at the White Lion in Temperance-street. I am a mason by trade, and a beer-house keeper. The cause of the death I don't know. The only thing I can say is this. At 20 minutes past 11 last Saturday night, the date of which I forget, she left me in her usual strength and spirits to go down stairs to wash the glasses and get my supper. I took a paper to read, and I heard her go down the stairs as distinct as ever I heard in my life. I never heard her afterwards. While she was away I fell asleep over the paper. After some time I woke up and found my wife wasn't there. And then I thought she was gone to bed. I jumped up and turned out the gas as usual, as I have done before when I have been over-tired, and went into the bedroom to go to bed. I looked round and saw my wife wasn't there. I called her three or four times, "LIZA, where are you?" I went down over the stairs, and put my foot against her. I shook her and tried to wake her and said "Come to bed." I took her up and I thought there was something wrong, something unusual. I lit the gas in the passage, and she was dead. I called for assistance. That is all I have to say. I don't know any more. I could not bring myself to believe it. - The Coroner shortly summed up the evidence, and the Jury considered their verdict. The Jury found, after a few minutes deliberation, that the deceased died from Natural Causes, as described by the medical man. The Jury added to this an expression of opinion that the house was not fit for the business carried on in it, and further that it appeared to be unnecessary for the neighbourhood. The case excited considerable interest, and a number of people collected outside the inn awaiting the verdict.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 July 1883
KINGSWEAR - The Suicide In The Harbour. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry on Monday at the Royal Yacht Hotel, Kingswear, into the cause of the death of CAROL HEINRICH BENJAMIN HARNACK, the German sailor who committed suicide by hanging himself on board the German cervette Niobe. Mr James Paddon was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and the proceedings were watched by Lieut. Von Heiringen on behalf of Capt. Koester, and Mr J. H. Cumming acted as interpreter. Several witnesses were examined, and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of Suicide, but in what state of mind the deceased was there was no evidence to show.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 July 1883
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of Manslaughter was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Plymouth, on Tuesday evening, against a labourer named Robert Matthews. Matthews on Friday last was struggling with another labourer called FRANCIS DRAKE in a room in Middle-lane, when a paraffin lamp in the room was overturned, and so severely burned DRAKE that he died in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on Monday from the injuries so received.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 27 July 1883
ASHBURY - Sad Death Of A Devonshire Magistrate. - Intelligence reached Okehampton during Monday of the death of MR HENRY WOOLLCOMBE , of Ashbury, eldest son of the Venerable Archdeacon WOOLLCOMBE. No definite information could be obtained as to the cause of his death, but it was rumoured that last week he sustained a slight sunstroke, and that he was found dead with a gun lying near him. The deceased, who was married, and has a family, was heir to the Ashbury Estates, which are rather extensive. He was a Justice of the Peace and took an active part in the Okehampton Board of Guardians, Highway Board and other local bodies. Another correspondent states that about ten o'clock on Monday morning John Blatchford, the gamekeeper, was going his rounds, when he was horrified at finding his master lying on his left side in a gateway, to all appearances dead, with a double-barrelled gun near him. One barrel had been discharged, the charge having entered the mouth. MR WOOLLCOMBE had lately been suffering from insomnia, for which he had received medical treatment. On Monday, however, he rose at the accustomed hour, and in accordance with his practice, saw his men, giving them their orders for the day. He then appears to have fetched a gun from the gunroom, and left the house. This proceeding was quite in accordance with his usual custom, as he very often went out with his gun before breakfast. Nothing more was seen of him until he was found as described. On Sunday the deceased attended the parish church at Ashbury, and read the lessons for the day. At the Inquest the Jury found that the deceased committed Suicide in a fit of Temporary Insanity, induced by sunstroke.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 August 1883
PLYMOUTH - MR TOLHURST, cashier of Messrs. Glyn, Mills, and Currie's Bank, Lombard-street, London, while staying at the Farley Hotel, Plymouth, on Tuesday night, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. At the Inquest held on Wednesday evening the Jury found that the deceased died by his own hand, but that there was not sufficient evidence as to the state of his mind at the time. It was stated, however, that on his arrival at Plymouth on Tuesday from London he seemed somewhat depressed in spirits.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 August 1883
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held in the Town Hall on Tuesday morning for the purpose of Enquiring into the circumstances attending the death of an infant child named ELIZA MARTIN HANLEY, daughter of SUSAN HANLEY, who resides at Perrott's Buildings. - SUSAN HANLEY stated that she was a widow. The child, which was hers, was named ELIZA MARTIN HANLEY, and was ten weeks old. She usually put it out to nurse from eight o'clock in the morning to six in the evening. She was employed at the marine stores in Temperance Street. On Saturday a woman who was named Ann Shields, came to her and told her the child was not well. Witness knew that it had not been well since its birth. She put the child to bed at six o'clock, but it awoke about nine and she took it to bed again at half-past ten. It was alive at two o'clock in the morning, but at half-past four when the father of the child (WM. MARTIN), who was going fishing, got up, she (witness) was aroused and on kissing the child, found that its face was cold. She told the father to fetch some one, and one of the neighbours came in and the child was found to be dead. - Mr Gordon Cumming stated that he made a post mortem examination of the body of the child and found that it had been suffering from inflammation and consolidation of the left lung. The stomach was empty and as the child before death had been suffering from sickness and diarrhoea he should say that was the cause of death. The child was very small but moderately nourished and there was nothing to show that it had been neglected. Ann Shields stated that she was the nurse and that the child had regularly been given good. She noticed that it had been poorly and the mother stated that she should take it to the doctor. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 31 August 1883
ILFRACOMBE - Suicide Of A Devonshire County Magistrate. - An Inquest was held on Monday at Ilfracombe, on the body of MR NATHANIEL VYE, county magistrate, who committed suicide on Sunday by shooting himself with a revolver. The evidence went to show that the deceased had been suffering from melancholia since the death of his sister a few months ago, and a constable discovered him dying, with a bullet wound through the roof of the mouth. "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was the verdict returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 September 1883
KINGSTEIGNTON - Sudden Death At Kingsteignton. - An Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at Kingsteignton, yesterday, relative to the death of MR THOMAS PHILIP KNOWLES, butcher, 27 years of age, who died on Tuesday night very suddenly. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased was apparently in his usual health up to the time of his death, but Mr Ley stated that MR KNOWLES had suffered for some time from severe affection of the heart, and in his opinion death resulted from syncope. The Jury, of which the Rev. P. Jackson was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 October 1883
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Torquay Lodging House Keeper. - At the Avenue Inn, Belgrave Road, on Wednesday morning, an Inquiry was held before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr T. F. Graham was Foreman, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES WADE (72) lodging-house keeper, of Stonehall, Belgrave Crescent. The first witness called was LOUISA WADE, wife of the deceased, who gave evidence of identification. She added that she saw her husband about an hour before the accident happened - between 11 and 12 o'clock on Monday morning - when he went upstairs as usual to clean some windows. While she was in the scullery she heard a fall and when she looked out found her husband lying close to the door, insensible. She then sought assistance. Death ensued about four o'clock in the same evening. Witness thought her husband was in the habit of passing from one window to another when engaged in cleaning them. He had done this work for years, but she had always a horror of it. Apparently he had fallen from the staircase window. - Alfred W. Lewis, living next door to the last witness, said on Monday morning he was called by MRS WADE'S servant, and on going out he saw the deceased lying in the area with his head in a corner. He went for a doctor, and afterwards took the man inside, going again to seek for a medical man. After going to the residences of half-a-dozen he found Dr Midgley Cash. He noticed that the deceased had an open wound at the back of the head and was also bruised. He thought WADE had come into contact with some projecting slates in the fall, because they had been broken away and some pieces lay in the area. - Mr J. B. Richardson, surgeon, said he saw the deceased soon after the accident. He was suffering from a severe wound on the side of the head and a contusion on one of the temples. Dr Dalby and Dr Cash were also present. They did all they could, but WADE gradually sank and died about four o'clock. The cause of death was fracture of the skull and compression of the brain. There was nothing to show that the deceased had had a paralytic stroke or anything of the kind. Probably the injury to the head was caused by a fall on the slates alluded to. The Coroner having briefly summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 19 October 1883
TORQUAY - Distressing Fatality In Torquay. - On Wednesday afternoon a most distressing accident occurred in Torquay, exciting much sympathy on account of the fact that the victim was well-known and popular in the town and also because his life was lost while engaged in so simple a matter as recovering a blown-off hat. MR F. T. ROLPH, confectioner, of Victoria Parade, son of MRS ROLPH, widow, was walking on Daddy Hole Plain, when the high wind which was blowing carried away his hat. In attempting to reach it he seems to have lost his footing, and though the lacerated condition of his hands shows that he struggled hard to recover himself, he fell down a precipice 200 feet high, and was instantaneously killed. The full particulars of the sad affair will be found below. - The Inquest. - The Inquest on the body was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at the Infirmary yesterday afternoon,. The evidence was as follows:- Walter Phillips, 6 Abbey Road, banker's clerk, identified the body as that of FREDERICK THOMAS ROLPH. He proceeded (speaking with emotion): I was with him yesterday. We went for a walk on Daddy Hole Plain about a quarter after three. There was no one else with us. We went towards the cliffs to look at a vessel underneath. We saw her go about, and we turned to come back again. In turning round, deceased's hat blew off. We had gone down the grass slope by Major Bridson's wall about 100 feet; there is a precipice at the end of the slope. People walk on this slope. His hat went over the cliff some distance further off, down to the beach under Daddyhole. There was a very high wind blowing at the time. He went to the edge of the cliff to see the hat fall; took his over-coat off, and put his stick down, saying "Take hold of my coat." I said "Don't go down there," and called to him twice to come back. I saw him, as I leaned over the cliff, disappear around the ledge of a rock below, and then I saw him tumble and fall on a rock underneath where I was,. I never heard him call out. I didn't see him climbing. He pitched on his shoulder after falling about 10 feet, and then he glanced off and fell amongst the rocks. I ran across the Plain and went down by the path. When I got to the place I found him lying at the foot of the cliff, dead, amongst the rocks. He was above high water mark. I think he must have been dead when I got to him. He was lying on his back. He did not tell me he was going to fetch the hat, but I understood that such was the case. I believe Daddy Hole was a favourite resort of his. I called to the coastguard for help as I was going down and also to some other men and they came down after me. I got some water and put on his face, but he made no movement. I saw the body placed in a cab and driven away, I am not aware how he came to slip. The wind might have taken him down; it was very high. - By the Jury: I think he was accustomed to climb about the cliffs. The hat has since been found by a man named Harley. It is about 200 feet from the place deceased fell to where he was found. - Felix Edward Haarer, brother-in-law of the deceased, said MR ROLPH was a cook by occupation. He was 22 years old last birthday. Witness knew nothing of the particulars of the occurrence, but saw the deceased when he reached the Infirmary. - Joseph Neno, a coastguard of the Torquay Station, said:- About a quarter to four on Wednesday afternoon I was standing about 100 yards from the coastguard station at Daddyhole, when Mr Phillips cried out to me that a man had fallen over the cliffs. I ran after him, down the zig-zag path. When I got to the body Mr Phillips had his hat full of water, washing the blood off the face. There were two foreign persons also present. We four lifted the body into an easier position and Mr Phillips asked me if I thought he was dead. I said I thought he was. His mouth was full of blood and his head was bleeding. I ran for more hands to help him up the cliff and more coastguards went down with some sacking, while I took a cab and went for Dr Dalby. I afterwards drove to Mr Huxley and to Mr Pollard and Mr Cumming, but none of them were able to come. So I drove back to the Plain, and put the corpse, which had been brought up by this time, into the cab, and went to the Infirmary. The face of the cliff, looking up from where the body was found, is nearly perpendicular. There is no foothold for a human being. I should think he fell 200 feet. The top of the cliff is much frequented, and there are rails in order to prevent persons going over the cliff. The occurrence took place just on the left of the flagstaff. Deceased must have got over the rails, and I think that either his foot slipped or the wind sent him over. Anybody going down there who made the slightest slip must go to the bottom. You might walk down about 40 yards before the cliff becomes sheer. - Frederick Thomas Thistle, house-surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, said: I saw the deceased after he was brought to the Infirmary, about 4.45. He was then quite dead. I examined the body. The chief injury I found was a fracture at the base of the skull. The hands were scratched a great deal. No limbs were broken. - The Coroner then summed up. He remarked that the case was a very distressing one, but the duty of the Jury in regard to it was very simple, inasmuch as the evidence was so clear as to the accidental nature of the occurrence. There was nothing to show whether the deceased missed his foothold or was blown over, but that was a matter of detail which would not affect the result. The Jury knew the nature of the ground where the accident happened, and if they had any recommendation to make they could make it. - A Juror said that the Local Board had already done all that was necessary for the protection of the public on the Plain. The Jury immediately found a verdict of "Accidental Death." - At the conclusion of the proceedings the Jury expressed their deep sympathy with MRS ROLPH in her sad bereavement. The funeral of the deceased takes place on Monday at the Torquay Cemetery, at 11 o'clock.

TORQUAY - Suspicious Death Of A Woman In Torquay. - At Giles's Torbay Inn on Monday morning, Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of HELEN CROKER, of 5 Brunswick Terrace, Torre, in regard to which the following evidence was given. - JOHN BROWN, Wellesley Cottage, Ellacombe, labourer, identified the body as that of HELEN CROKER, who was his wife's sister. She was 42 years of age; widow of EMMANUEL CROKER, a labourer. On Friday evening witness saw the deceased, who had lately lived with a man named Robert Gale, at his house, where she had been working for his wife. This was the last time he saw the woman alive. He knew that Robert Gale had served the deceased badly, and she had left him, but he had gone and brought her back. She was pretty cheerful on Friday, but in the early part of the week she had been very unwell. It was witness's opinion that starvation and ill-usage caused the woman's death. He believed that Gale was present when death took place. He was not aware that she suffered from anything but starvation and ill-usage. - By the Jury: He was not aware that any bruises had been found on the deceased's body. - Ann Dally, 5 Brunswick Terrace, who lived in the same house as CROKER, said the deceased occupied a room for which she paid 1s. 9d. per week. Gale did not pay the rent, but the deceased always did. What meals she had she took in her own room. Witness thought she had not been well of late. Some little time since she found MRS CROKER unconscious and frothing at the mouth. Witness thought the woman was subject to spasms. On Monday and Tuesday week she remained in bed, but on Wednesday she was able to go to work. A woman named Jane Hill, living in the same house, paid some attention to deceased. She had seen nothing take place between Gale and the woman. The former had been away, and came back on the 2nd instant, after which time he did not leave the house, as the police had a warrant out against him in connection with a drunken case. Witness did not hear the parties quarrelling all the time they were in her house. On Saturday morning last the man Gale came down about 8 o'clock and called to witness, asking her to come upstairs because "she had dropped down." When she got up she found the woman lying on the floor at the foot of the bed, unable to speak, and just breathing. She was not frothing at the mouth as on the previous occasion. Witness got her into bed and attended to her. She remarked to Gale that she thought the woman was dying, to which he replied "Oh nonsense, she's not dying." She then summoned the sons of the woman, and sent for a doctor. When Mr Wills came she was almost gone. The witness saw her die - about 8.15. From the first to the last she never spoke. There were no bruises upon the body. No money, no papers, or effects of any kind were left in the room. - Mr W. Wills, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased at 8 o'clock on Saturday morning. She was dead when he arrived, and had probably been so about five minutes. There had been no convulsions or perspiration denoting a death struggle. An external examination showed no traces of ill-usage. Gale told her that she had got out of bed to dress, fell down, and died. The cause of death, he had no doubt, was heart disease. Three or four days previous he had been asked to come and see MRS CROKER, but did not do so. The Coroner summed up the evidence, saying that in the first instance the case had appeared a serious one and attended by suspicious circumstances, but the Inquiry had shown pretty conclusively that there had been no ill-treatment of the woman by Gale, and that death had resulted from Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 7 December 1883
TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. - Mr Sidney Hacker, the district Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Townhall on Friday evening into the circumstances touching the death of ELIZABETH ROBERTS, widow, of No. 1, Bethel Cottages, Ellacombe, whose body was found on the morning of the previous day on Torre Abbey Sands, as reported in last week's Torquay Times. - WILLIAM ROBERTS, coachman, residing at 19, Market-street, identified the body as that of his mother. She was a widow, 58 years of age, and supported herself by doing a little sewing. He last saw her alive on the previous Sunday morning. She was then rather excited. Of late she had been suffering from cancer of the mouth and throat. - Thomas Priston, boot and shoe maker, residing at No. 5, Victoria Terrace, Ellacombe, stated that he saw the body between eight and nine o'clock on Torre Abbey Sands. The water was washing over it. The body was lying face downwards. With assistance he pulled it out. The face had several cuts and bruises. - James Williams, gardener, Cavern-road, Ellacombe, corroborated the last witness's evidence. - P.C. Trott stated that, from information he received, he went, in company with two other constables, to the Torre Abbey Sands, and found the body of the deceased. They conveyed it to the mortuary. The only thing that was found on it was a pocket-handkerchief with the initials "E.R." on it. A jacket had been found on the sands, but it had not been identified as belonging to the deceased. - Mr Gordon Cumming, surgeon, stated that he had examined the body, and found several bruises and cuts on the head, and scratches on the fingers. The fact that the blood was on the face was remarkable, as this would not have occurred after death. His opinion was that the cause of death was drowning. The appearance of the body led him to the conclusion that the woman had fallen on some rocks and fainted, and ultimately been drowned. - Eliza Gidley, residing at No. 1, Bethel Cottages, Ellacombe, stated that the deceased lodged at her house. She saw her on Wednesday night last. She had been in a very desponding state. Dr Powell came to see her on Wednesday evening, and witness gave her medicine at a quarter-past nine, and did not see her after that time. She found in the morning when she came down that the back door was open. Nothing in her room was disturbed. - Dr Powell said he had known the deceased for several years. When he last saw her she complained of a severe pain in her head. She was in a weak, nervous condition; but not suffering from any positive disease. Hannah Fogwell recognised the jacket as that of her sister, ELIZABETH ROBERTS. The last time she saw her wearing it was on Saturday week. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 18 January 1884
NEWTON ABBOT - Child Murder. - Before the Newton magistrates, on Saturday, REBECCA LOVERIDGE, wife of a horse dealer, was charged with the murder of her child at Kingsteignton. The evidence showed that the woman knocked at a gipsy's van in the market place, and on being admitted said she had drowned her child, the body of which was subsequently found by the police. She was wet through and the solicitor who appeared for the defence cross-examined the witnesses to ascertain whether she might not have got in this condition in bringing the child from the deep part of the pond to the bank near which it was discovered. Nothing was elicited to warrant the presumption that the unfortunate woman attempted to commit suicide. The case was adjourned. At the Inquest was opened in the evening the husband stated that he had lived happily with his wife, but on Thursday he called her lazy, and this appeared to weigh heavily on her mind. The prisoner was subsequently committed for trial at the Assizes.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 January 1884
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of An Epileptic In Torquay,. - Mr Sidney Hacker, the district Coroner, held an Inquest at Motton's Country House Hotel, Ellacombe, on Friday night on the body of WILLIAM JEFFREY HARRIS, an imbecile, who died suddenly under circumstances which were briefly related in last week's Torquay Times. - SAMUEL HARRIS was the first witness called. He said he lived at 4 Orchard Cottages, Ellacombe, and was a cow keeper. The deceased was his brother and was 40 years of age last birthday. He was incapable of following any employment and had been dependent for support upon the witness for nine years and three months. He was an imbecile and perfectly helpless in every respect. No moneys had been received for his keep from any person and the witness had not applied to the authorities of his parish (Staverton) for relief on his behalf. The deceased had been always subject to fits and they had come upon him more frequently than usual during the last six months, he having been free of them for two or three years anterior to that period,. Mr Pollard was the medical man who attended him and he visited him last about three-and-a-half years ago, upon which occasion he said there was nothing to be done for the patient when he was seized with a fit, but to bathe his head and keep him cool. Generally speaking HARRIS'S appetite was good and he occasionally took a little exercise, but never went into the streets, witness preventing this because he feared that the boys might tease him. Answering the Coroner, the witness said he had never taken his brother out for a walk; he was very feeble and unable to move about without assistance. His death took place on the previous Tuesday morning. Witness saw him alive last about 4.45 a.m., at which time he was in bed. His wife remained up with him during Monday night because he appeared unwell, having had a slight fit. On that morning he asked his brother how he was, and he made no answer at the time, but afterwards said he was poorly. Before leaving, witness advised his wife to send for a doctor. About nine o'clock his son came to tell him that his brother was dead, and he ceased work and went home. On arriving home he found WILLIAM dead in bed. No medical man was then present, but ne had been sent for. - In answer to further questions from the Coroner, witness said that his wife had charge of his brother and supplied his wants. He had never expressed any wish to go out. At no time had he any occupation, but passed the time away in looking at pictures and books. - MARY ANN HARRIS, wife of the last witness, being first asked as to Monday's occurrences, said the deceased was in bed all day on that date. It was her practice to dress him only two or three times a week. He was not too unwell to get up on that day, and he did not say he wanted to remain in bed; however, she did not get him up. During the nine years the deceased had been with them he was mostly in bed, being unable to dress himself. He was up last on the previous Saturday. On the Monday he ate heartily of boiled rice and milk and oatmeal. At twelve o'clock at night he called for some drink, and was supplied with it. witness did not see him have any fit on Monday evening. She saw him next a little after four o'clock on Tuesday morning, and as he did not then seem very well, she made him a cup of tea, which he drank, eating at that time a piece of bread and butter. A little after eight o'clock she saw a change; he was convulsed and died. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said that when they received the deceased into their home he had no property of any kind. There was another brother besides her husband, and a sister in London. Her husband took him merely because he should not fall into other hands. Deceased's father was a person who was incapable of taking care of himself, and he died in a similar manner. Deceased was in the habit of coming downstairs at one time, but he had not been down within the last twelve months. He was unable to walk without assistance. - The evidence of Mr Richardson, surgeon, was that he visited HARRIS'S house so soon as he could find it, and examined the deceased. He was one of those unfortunates who suffer from chronic water on the brain and who are liable to epileptic fits. His opinion was that the man had an attack of indigestion which produced an epileptic fit from which he died. There were no marks on the body and considering its deformed condition, it was fairly well nourished. The deceased appeared to have had ordinary care paid to his wants. - Mary Ann Ireland, a neighbour, gave evidence to the effect that she never saw the deceased until the morning of his death, when MRS HARRIS called her into the house. She saw the man dead in bed under the circumstances related by MRS HARRIS. The Coroner summed up the evidence, observing that no blame seemed to attach to deceased's relatives and the Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 February 1884
TOTNES - Sad Fatality At Totnes. - On Tuesday afternoon, Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Totnes Guildhall, on the body of MRS ELLIS, who met her death on the previous Saturday by a tree falling on her whilst going home from Totnes market in the terrific gale which prevailed that afternoon. Mr Windeatt, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the friends of the deceased. The Jury, of whom Mr F. G. Putt was chosen Foreman, having viewed the body at the Kingsbridge Inn, proceeded to the scene of the accident and then to the Guildhall. - MR RICHARD LANGWORTHY ELLIS, residing at Parson's Park, Harbertonford, identified the body as that of his wife, SOPHIA ELLIS, who, he stated was 39 years old. He deposed to being at Totnes market on Saturday with deceased, and of their driving away together to go home. Just after passing Highfield House, they saw a trap coming towards them with two men in it, and directly after passing them, he heard a tree crack, which fell immediately upon them and they were buried. As soon as he recovered himself he saw the horse was dead and found his wife was crushed under the heavy top of the tree. The two men came back and helped him out and then they tried to extricate his wife, but this could not be done until some further assistance was obtained and the branches of the tree cut away, when they found she was dead. He was struck in the hip and in the eye. - George Tucker, living at Bowden Turnpike Cottages, and in the employ of Mr Killock, of Highfield, gave evidence of the position in which the deceased was lying under the tree, and that a heavy branch appeared to have struck her on the head and shoulder. He assisted to get the body out, and had since examined the roots of the two trees which fell. There was nothing to show how they came down, and the roots were not decayed. - By Mr Windeatt: He had not noticed any signs of weakness in the trees, nor during the past five or six years had he received any intimation to take down any of the trees on account of being dangerous. - Mr R. Telley, surgeon, Totnes, next deposed to being called to the spot, and found deceased quite dead on his arrival. She was struck on the base of the skull and her ribs were fractured, which caused instant death. He considered these trees dangerous and about two years ago there was one blown across the road near the same spot. He added that at Follaton and other places there were many trees which were unsafe, but, in reply to the Coroner, he said he had not before made any complaint, as he did not consider it within his province to do so. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury retired, and after a short time returned with a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider recommending that the owners of the trees on both sides of the road be requested to examine them, and take down any that were found dangerous. - Mr t. C. Kellock, the owner of the property from which the tree fell causing the death of MRS ELLIS, said no one regretted the occurrence more than he did. He thought it was right to say he had never received any intimation of the roots of the trees being unsound. He had on more than one occasion - as one of the Jury (Mr Foster) could testify - examined the trees on his land, and any that had been found dangerous he had had them taken down. Mr Kellock added that Mr Foster and himself would see that the trees standing were sound or have them removed.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 February 1884
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - On Monday evening, Mr S. Hacker, the District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devon Arms, Torquay, on the body of HAROLD GILPIN, aged nine weeks, who died suddenly under circumstances which called for Inquiry. - WILLIAM THOMAS GILPIN, of 3 Madrepore-road, carpenter, the father of the deceased, said the child caught cold on the previous Wednesday. During the early part of Thursday it became worse, but at night rallied. His wife and himself remained up until one o'clock with it, and some medicine was administered. The child was then put to bed, and appeared to be sleeping naturally, but the witness having been awakened by his wife about seven o'clock on Friday morning, found the little one dead. Dressing himself he went to call Mr Richardson. - In answer to the Coroner, GILPIN said that two other young children of his had died - one at three months, and one at ten months of age. - ANN GILPIN, the mother of the child, said it had been a fairly healthy child from its birth. When she saw it was suffering from a cold she applied the usual remedies,. On the Thursday she administered some medicine which she had procured from a druggist, and sleep ensued. During the night she awoke twice, and saw on each occasion that her child was sleeping. In the morning, however, she found it dead as described by her husband. She was positive she had not overlain it. - Mr J. B. Richardson, surgeon, deposed that he was called to the case. Inasmuch as he had not seen the child during life he could not give a certificate. By the direction of the Coroner he had since made a post mortem examination. The body was that of a well nourished child between two and three months old. On opening the chest he examined the lungs, and found that with the exception of a small portion of the apex of the left lung the whole was consolidated. The lower half of the right lung was in the same condition. Inflammation of the lungs was the cause of death. The case had some medical interest from the circumstance that it demonstrated that lung inflammation might be as rapid in causing death as poison, and be unattended with any serious symptoms. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Dodge was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," accompanied by an expression of opinion that the parents of the child had not failed in their duty under the circumstances.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 February 1884
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - Mr Edmonds, solicitor, of Totnes, acting for Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Motton's County House Hotel, Ellacombe, on Wednesday forenoon, touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY HONEYWILL, the infant son of ELIZABETH HONEYWILL, who died suddenly on Saturday last. - Dr Midgley Cash said he attended the child last on January 14th, when it was suffering from a cold but was not seriously ill. On Saturday last he was informed that it had died, and in pursuance of instructions from Mr Edmonds he made a post mortem examination. The body was well nourished, devoid of any external marks. There was congestion of the membranes of the brain and of the large veins inside the skull. Otherwise the organs were healthy. In the absence of other evidence he was of opinion that death resulted from the congestion of which he had spoken, which would arise from natural causes. - ELIZABETH HONEYWILL, general servant, whose natural child the deceased was, said the baby was five months old and had been taken care of by a woman in Ellacombe, whom she paid for its maintenance at the rate of 4s. per week. She called Dr Cash in to see it a month ago but since that time the child had been in good health. She saw it last on the Friday evening and on Saturday noon she was informed that it had died in a fit. The baby was seen by her once a week. Mrs Lane, who had charge of it, always attended to it to her satisfaction. - Rose Lane, wife of Thomas Lane, 9 Garfield-terrace, said she had taken charge of the child for seven weeks, during which time it was never in good health, being very subject to chills and so on. On Saturday it appeared to be in remarkably good condition, but about 12 o'clock, while she had it upon her knees, a fit came on it and sudden death resulted. She did not send for a doctor because it was her custom first to let the mother know if anything was wanting and the mother had sent the doctor when necessary. - The Coroner in summing up, pointed out that it was evident that death had come about naturally and said no blame was attached to the mother of the child nor to its nurse. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 21 March 1884
TORQUAY - A Woman Drowned At Babbacombe. - At the Globe Hotel, Babbacombe, on Saturday evening, an Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of EMMA REED, aged 30, who was found drowned on Oddicombe Beach by Mr C. Lawton, on the previous night. From the evidence of Mary Ann Heath, deceased's landlady, and ELIZABETH MAYO, deceased's half-sister, of Hele, it appeared that REED was in a low, desponding state, arising from physical weakness, brought about by a fall over some stairs when she was 15 years old, and this had affected her brain. She scarcely ever went out of doors. She was last seen alive on the previous Thursday night, when her landlady took her her supper in bed. In the morning the front door was found unlocked, and deceased was missing. Search was made for her, and on the evening of Friday, Mr C. Lawton, who is staying at Babbacombe, discovered the body on Oddicombe Beach, where it had been washed in by the waves. - The evidence of Dr Chilcott, of St Marychurch, who had attended the deceased, went to show that she was always in a low, desponding state, and that death had resulted from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 18 April 1884
TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. - Mr Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry in the Townhall yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD BENNETT, carpenter, aged 59 years, who resided in Bedford-row, Stentiford's Hill. - EDWARD JOHN BENNETT, son of the deceased, said the last time he saw him alive was on Monday morning. On Tuesday evening he went into a little outbuilding, about half-past six o'clock, where he is in the habit of working occasionally, and there found his father hanging from a beam. He cut him down, but believed he was dead. The body was warm. Witness then sent for assistance. The deceased had been out of employment since last August, and he was afflicted with a bad arm. These circumstances preyed upon his mind. More than twelve months since he tried to hang himself behind his bedroom door, but was prevented. He did not say on that occasion what made him attempt to take his life, although he was asked to do so. Between that time and this he had appeared more cheerful and had made no further effort to destroy himself. Deceased's wife did some laundry work to help support him. He was a fairly temperate man. Witness did not know where he obtained the cord (a very thin one) with which he hanged himself. Fourteen years ago he went away, leaving his wife and family, and remained absent nine years. He had been subject to fits, and rheumatism had troubled him. - MARY BENNETT, wife of the deceased, testified that he conducted himself as usual on Tuesday, excepting that he was rather irritable. She saw him between six and seven o'clock in the kitchen, and he then went out without saying where he was going, smoking his pipe at the time. His arm had been more painful than usual during the day, and he said it was so bad he could hardly bear it. No quarrel had taken place between them. She did not recognise the cord produced. When he attempted to take his life twelve months ago he accounted for it by saying that he was suffering great pain. She was not aware the deceased had any intoxicants to drink on Tuesday. He frequently had epileptic fits. She believed that her husband tried to destroy himself on still another occasion, but she did not know the particulars. - Mary Ann Lethbridge, Bedford Cottage, Stentiford's Hill, said that she was at work at deceased's house on Tuesday. BENNETT was there, and complained of much pain in his arm and leg. She saw him leave the kitchen about six o'clock; he went off in a pettish way, but he was sober. She did not think he was always in his right mind. - Mr E. A. Dalby, surgeon, said he found the deceased in bed at his house. Life was quite extinct. Death was caused by suffocation. Deceased's infirmities would tend to affect his mind. - P.C. Webber said on Tuesday evening about 7.20 he was called to Bedford Row and found the deceased lying in his son's arms. A pipe and tobacco box and some small articles were found on his person. He was shewn the place wherein BENNETT hanged himself; the beam was about 6ft. 6in. high, and it appeared that his feet must have touched the ground. - The Coroner in summing up, and in allusion to the possibility of a verdict of felo de se being returned, reminded the Jury that the law had been altered so that the body of a person who committed suicide might receive burial in the ordinary way instead of being interred without religious rites between nine and twelve o'clock at night. It was well that Jurors should know this. The Jury found that BENNETT hanged himself while in an Unsound State of Mind.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 2 May 1884
BLACKAWTON - Sad Occurrence Near Blackawton. - On Tuesday morning the wife of MR HUGH C. SHORTLANDS was found drowned in a pond belonging to her father, MR W. PERCY DIMES, of Oldstone, near Blackawton. As far as can be ascertained the unfortunate lady was last seen alive on Monday, about noon, when she returned to her father's house from her usual ride, after which she took a walk, as it is supposed, around the grounds, having with her, her favourite dog. The animal returned to the house shortly afterwards, and it was noticed that it was wet. No alarm was, however, felt, as MRS SHORTLANDS very often visited her sister, MRS JOHN SHAPLEY, at Cotterbury, about half-a-mile distant. As evening drew on MRS SHORTLANDS did not return, and a messenger was sent to MRS SHAPLEY, but it was found that she had not been there, neither had she been seen during the day. Anxiety about her grew, and at daylight workmen were sent to search for her. Their efforts were soon successful, and MRS SHORTLANDS was discovered in the large pond about a quarter-of-a-mile from the house, situated amid a number of trees. When discovered the unfortunate lady was in a perfectly upright position, with a fearful mark on her forehead. The body was immediately got out, although with great difficulty, as the water was very deep and the mud at the bottom extremely thick, and conveyed to MR DIMES'S house. MRS SHORTLANDS had then been apparently dead for several hours. It is supposed that she threw something in the water for the dog to fetch, and overbalanced herself and fell in. She had her riding-hat, boots and gloves on, and it is thought that she received the blow in falling which stunned her, and on account of the thick mud at the bottom she was unable to get out. The deceased lady was only married about three weeks ago to MR HUGH C. SHORTLANDS, who it is stated, left ten days ago for New Zealand. The morning of her death MRS SHORTLANDS received a letter from her husband, posted at Brindisi. Much sympathy is felt for the family in the neighbourhood and especially in Dartmouth, where the deceased lady was well-known and respected. She was in the town on Saturday last, and was then in good spirits and health. On Wednesday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 May 1884
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Monday at Ilfracombe on the body of MR JAMES SHIPWAY, who died under suspicious circumstances and was believed to have been poisoned. The medical man, however, attributed death to Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

PLYMOUTH - Inquest was also held at Plymouth on the body of JOHN TOWELL, farm hand, who died from injuries received through falling from a ladder.

EXETER - At Exeter an Inquest on a girl named SEARLE, who was terribly burned by the upsetting of a paraffin lamp.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 23 May 1884
BRIXHAM - Inquest At Brixham. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Churston Hotel on Monday, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of MATILDA WILLIAMS, living at Galmpton Warborough. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". The evidence showed that no doctor was present at the birth nor at any subsequent time up to the infant's death. The mother was in service, the child being looked after by the grandmother and a daughter. Six people were huddled together in a small room. The Jury considered the case demanded the attention of the sanitary inspector, and requested the Coroner to write him on the subject.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 27 June 1884
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the Seven Stars Inn, Newton Abbot, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of JAMES FENNELL REYNOLDS, aged 21, who met with his death early in the morning by being run over by a luggage-train in the station-yard. - WILLIAM HENRY REYNOLDS, having identified the body as that of his brother, - William Norman, railway packer, said he saw the deceased crossing the line used for goods traffic near the engine shed with a wheelbarrow containing coal. He saw he was in danger as the trucks that were being shunted were approaching him, and witness called out "Let go the barrow." He did not seem to take any notice of it, and immediately afterwards the steps of the goods van came on him and knocked him down. His back was towards the trucks at the time. - Samuel Carr Cole, inspector of the permanent way, also gave evidence. - George Sleeman, goods porter, said he did not see anyone on the line when he gave directions for the engine to push back the trucks. - Emmanuel Churchward, permanent way fitter, said there was no other way for the deceased to have crossed the line. - William Sampson, switchman, said when he gave directions for the luggage train to come back, deceased was standing still on a waste piece of land beside the line. - Dr Ley said he saw REYNOLDS just after the accident. He was then dead, and both his legs were frightfully crushed. Witness was of opinion that he died from the shock to the system, and not from haemorrhage. - At the close of his evidence, Dr Ley called attention to the fact that the town was not provided with a public mortuary. He thought it was a growing scandal, as evidenced in the present instance, for some time elapsed before a place cold be obtained where to lodge the body. The Coroner, in summing up, endorsed the opinion expressed by Dr Ley with regard to the want of a mortuary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that the Local Board should be requested to provide the town with a public mortuary.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 July 1884
TORQUAY - The Fatal Fall Over A Cliff. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Gasking's Cary Arms Hotel, Babbacombe Beach, on Saturday evening, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM PYM, who was killed by a fall over Walls Hill cliff on the previous day. Mr J. H. Pope was Foreman of the Jury. The body, which lay in an outhouse near the beach, having been viewed, the following evidence was taken:- WILLIAM PYM, 5, Bethel Cottages, Ellacombe, stone-barge master, identified the body as that of his son WILLIAM PYM, aged 23 years last birthday, who worked with him as mate on board the "Thomas and John" coasting vessel. Witness knew nothing of the circumstances of his son's death. He was in charge of his vessel when the accident happened. His son, who was a single man, lived with him, and he last saw alive on Thursday. He intended to have taken the deceased with him on his journey in the stone-barge on Friday, but he was not ready, having been absent on Thursday night - where, witness did not know. They were on good terms, and there was no reason why his son should have been away on Thursday night. He thought he slept at Boston Fields. - John P:otter, Warberry Cottages, Plainmoor, mason, working for Mr Horn, gardener, said he knew the deceased, who was in his company from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday. Deceased kept company with witness's daughter. They went out on Walls Hill together, and the deceased left him to go down to the quarry, where his father was. On the way out they called at Brunt's hotel, and PYM had a glass of beer. The elder PYM was loading his boat below, and for half-an-hour they watched him from the top, near the shooting butts. Witness at length went home to dinner, deceased going part way with him, and telling him that he was going to Exmouth with his father in the barge. PYM had only two glasses of ale during the time witness was with him. - By the Foreman: They both leaned out over the precipice to look into the quarry, lying flat down to do so. The grass was slippery about there. - By the Coroner: PYM was in his usual health when he left him, and was laughing and joking. No wind was blowing. - Alfred Stiggins, Fore-street, Babbacombe, fisherman, knew deceased by sight. On the previous day he saw him about 1.30 on the Downs, going towards the third (Walls) hill. He passed close to him, but did not speak to him. - William Eales, 3, Exmouth Terrace, Babbacombe, quarryman, at Babbacombe Quarry, said he was at his employment on Friday, loading the elder PYM'S vessel, which left at 2.40 p.m. for Exmouth. The men went into their shed for dinner, and witness was about to join them when he heard a noise which caused him to look up, and he saw a man falling, who struck the cliff about a third of the way down, and then dropped directly to the bottom into the quarry, on his back. As he touched the ground, his head struck a stone. He fell three or four yards from the base of the cliff. When witness went to him he was quite dead, with his head split open. A policeman was sent for, and the body was conveyed to Babbacombe beach. The witness found deceased's hat on the top of the cliff, quite close to the edge, but could form no judgment as to whether it was placed there or had got there accidentally. He did not see anybody on the top of the cliff during the morning. The height of the cliff was about 200 feet. - Police-constable Julius Meech, stationed at Babbacombe, said that on Friday, about three o'clock, the witness Eales gave him information which sent him to Babbacombe beach. He obtained a boat and men, and proceeded to the quarry, where he found the deceased, who had lost a large quantity of blood, and was terribly hurt on the left temple. On the body was a tobacco pouch, and 6s. 2d. in money. The body was brought to Babbacombe beach, and the man's friends were communicated with. The witness had examined the place from whence the deceased was supposed to have fallen, but found no mark or evidence of any kind of a struggle or such traces as anyone clutching at the grass might leave. The grass was dry and slippery. At this time of the year many persons walked around that way. The precipice was steep, and a person falling had no chance of stopping himself. The hill was in the occupation of Mr J. Salter Bartlett, of Ilsham Farm, who rented it from Lord Haldon. - The witness Eales, addressing the Coroner, said the quarry was rated by the St. Marychurch Local Board, the owner being Mr Davy, of Countessweir. Twelve months since a man working there was nigh killed by a stone thrown from the top, and it often happened that stones fell down there because there was nothing to show the public that anyone was working below. On the other hand, the public had no protection at the top, and the men had often to shout up to persons walking there in a dangerous way, but generally they were only laughed at for their pains. - The Coroner in summing up the evidence, said it might be that the deceased fell asleep on the top of the cliff - as had been suggested by his father - or he might have got up hurriedly to go down into the quarry in order to go on board his boat and missed his foot-hold. Nothing, however, had transpired to show the affair was aught but accidental. The Jury would have noticed that several of the witnesses had spoken of the very dangerous state of the cliff in question. It was not the case now, as it might have been fifteen or twenty years ago, that few people went there. On the contrary, there was a path around there, over which the public were constantly walking, without protection, although the cliff was in some places perpendicular. In some spots the ground shelved down, and there was nothing to prevent a person from sliding down and going over. Inasmuch as the place was almost a public thoroughfare, it was for the Jury to consider whether it was not somebody's duty either to put up a fence or railing, or to set up a notice board warning persons not to go inside. Perhaps a notice board alone would not have much effect. They had heard that Lord Haldon was the owner of the property, and he supposed the St. Marychurch Local Board had authority in the neighbourhood. - The Jury withdrew, and after a short consultation, found that the deceased met with his death Accidentally. They asked the Coroner to call the attention of the owner of the hill to its unprotected state, with a view to the erection of notice boards warning the public of the dangerous places, and also cautioning persons not to throw stones into the quarry. - Mr Pope, the Foreman, said no doubt the publication of the verdict in the Press would act as a warning to persons visiting the Babbacombe Hills.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 July 1884
TORQUAY - A Supposed Poisoning Case In Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Torquay Police Station yesterday afternoon on the body of EDA ALICE WAY, aged 11 years, daughter of SUSAN WAY, 8 Market-street, wife of ROBERT WAY, bootmaker. The mother stated that her daughter had not been well lately, her symptoms being frequent sickness. She went to the chemist about her, but the child continued in a delicate state. Last Sunday, however, she was in her usual health, ate heartily and played about in good spirits. On Monday, however, she was unwell again, but took breakfast and afterwards lay down. During the whole of the day she was seized with fits of vomiting, and a bed was made up for her on the sofa at night. She administered a powder which she got from Mr Ness, chemist, on Monday morning, but the stomach rejected it, and she then obtained another powder, giving her daughter four doses. At night she made the girl comfortable, and retired to a room close by. The vomiting fits occurred at least seven times during the night, and witness attended her daughter on each occasion. On Tuesday morning, seeing a change, she sent for a doctor - to Mr Richardson - but he did not come, and as she was much alarmed about her daughter, who seemed very ill, she sent to other medical men, but she could get no one until after the death of the child, which took place at half-past twelve. A month ago all of her children suffered from similar symptoms to those exhibited by the deceased. She knew of nothing wrong with the drains in her house, in which she had lived four years. - Mr A. Dalby, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Tuesday, whom he found dead. He saw the powder she had been taking - lemon and sherbet. Since then he had made a post mortem examination, assisted by Dr Richardson. The body was that of a fairly well-nourished child, with most of the organs healthy. On examining the small intestines he found them perforated by an ulceration. There was another ulceration present. Peritonitis was the cause of death. There were no signs of an irritant poison. It was remarkable that the child should have appeared in such good health while suffering from disease. The ulceration proceeded from constitutional weakness. - Hannah Richards, a neighbour, gave evidence that the child had complained to her of pain in the stomach and head. - The Coroner said the case was one for Inquiry, as the symptoms were those of poisoning, but the result of the post mortem examination was such as would lead them to the conclusion that death came about naturally. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 August 1884
DAWLISH - Drowning Case At Dawlish. - On Tuesday morning, shortly after eight o'clock, the body of MR ALBERT COTTON, master bootmaker, a native of Dawlish, was discovered floating on the surface of the mill leat near Barton Gardens, West cliff. Mr Wollacott, general dealer, and Mr Wills, dairyman, who first saw the body, immediately brought it to the bank, and sent for the police and a medical man. Mr F. M. Cann shortly afterwards arrived and pronounced life to be extinct. The body was, however, quite warm, for the deceased only left his home at Manor Row a quarter before eight. The body was conveyed to deceased's home to await an Inquest. The deceased's wife, who was with a daughter at Bath, was immediately telegraphed for, and she arrived in the afternoon. It appears deceased's head was only partly immersed, the face being downwards and the back part of the head as well as his coat being quite dry. At the Inquest a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 August 1884
TOTNES - Bathing Fatality At Totnes. Dangerous Pits In The Dart. - The District Coroner (Mr S. Hacker) held an Inquiry at the Steam Packet Inn, Totnes, on Monday, touching the death of the two young men, DYMOND and FISHER, who were drowned in the river Dart whilst bathing on Saturday evening last. Evidence was given by Edward Ball, the young man who was bathing in company with the deceased, Edward Sims, boatman, John Potter, cooper, Mr R. Jelley, surgeon, and Mr L. Harris. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, thought there would be no difficulty in finding the cause of death; but it was the duty of the Jury to also consider whether any recommendation might be made which would be of public benefit and tend to obviate a recurrence of such a case for the future, particularly as there appeared to be no warning of any danger at these places to non-swimmers. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider to the effect that the attention of the Dart Commissioners be called to the danger of dredging pits, especially in those parts of the river frequented by bathers; also that boards should be placed warning people where the water is of uneven depths, and that the Town Council should provide a suitable place for bathing. - The Coroner observed that doubtless the Press would give publicity to the recommendations of the Jury, and Mr Hains said, as a member of the Town Council, he would assist in furthering the proposal for having a proper bathing place. The deceased young man DYMOND was known in Torquay, having served his apprenticeship with Mr Ward, builder.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 15 August 1884
BOVEY TRACEY - A Child Scalded To Death At Bovey Tracey. - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday, at Challabrook Farm, Bovey Tracey, on the body of a male infant, 15 months old, the son of MR GILLEY, who died on the previous day from the effects of a scald. It appeared from the evidence that MR GILLEY and his wife were on a visit to MR HAMLYN, father of MRS GILLEY, who resides at Challabrook Farm. About half-past nine the deceased was in the kitchen holding on by his mother's dress, but letting go his hold he fell into a pan of hot milk which was on the floor, and was so severely scalded that, despite the medical skill of Dr Goodwin, who was called in directly afterwards, he died on Monday morning. Dr Goodwin was of opinion that death did not arise so much from the scalds as from the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 August 1884
TORQUAY - Sad Bathing Fatality In Torquay. - Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Rising Sun Inn, Torre, yesterday morning, on the body of a young man who met his death while bathing at Corbyn's Head on Tuesday. Following is the evidence:- William F. Easterbrook, carpenter, 26 Fleet Street, identified the body as that of EDWARD JOHN VIGGERS, aged 22, carpenter, lately residing in London, at 64 Bassingpark-road, West, and who had been spending his holidays here since Saturday last. On Tuesday morning witness and his cousin arranged to meet VIGGERS to bathe at Livermead, but he did not keep his appointment. However, as they were returning, they met him near Tor Abbey and went back to the rocks near Corbyn's Head to wait while he bathed. VIGGERS undressed and dived from a rock, where witness himself had often dived. He disappeared, and came up again, but witness saw him going out to sea with his head under water. He called the attention of his cousin (J. W. Easterbrook) to him, and then took off his coat and rushed into the water, which was not more than 3ft. 6in. deep. Having got hold of him, witness lifted his head, and VIGGERS called "Reuben, I'm done," (supposing him to be witness's cousin.) When they got him ashore he told them he was unable to move his head or legs, and they rubbed him at his request to endeavour t restore him, but without success. A policeman, who happened to be near, helped them to carry him to the beach. VIGGERS made a statement to the effect that he had knocked his head, but said he could not account for the hurt to his back. Witness noticed a scar on his side, but no injury to his head. There were a number of rocks at the place where the deceased dived in. A cab was obtained and VIGGERS was taken to No. 8, Bath Terrace, where his mother lives. Witness, in answer to a Juror, said he warned the young man that it was dangerous to dive from the rock where he was standing. The rock was level with the water. Deceased was in the habit of diving very deeply. - Auther Prestwood, police-constable stationed at Cockington, said that on Tuesday morning, at 8.15, he was near Corbyn's Head, and noticed the last witness and his cousin standing on the rocks. Just afterwards he saw deceased dive into the water, and a few moments later observed that he was being pulled out by his companions. Witness ran down and found VIGGERS lying on his back. Asking him whether he had cramp, he replied, "No; I struck myself in diving." He saw VIGGERS was unable to move his legs, and so partly dressed him and took him to the beach. In accordance with deceased's request, some brandy was got for him, and a cab afterwards obtained. Witness saw a mark on deceased's left breast. - Mr J. B. Richardson, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased on Tuesday morning about half past nine. He was suffering from paralysis of the lower extremities due to concussion of the spine. VIGGERS told him he had struck his head, but there was no external fracture of the skull, and at that time no head symptoms. About six in the evening symptoms of compression of the brain set in, and he died at half-past ten, the immediate cause of death being compression of the brain, brought about by a blow on the head. Witness had no doubt that the man had struck both his head and back. - The Coroner having shortly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 September 1884
GOODLEIGH - Fatality To A Torquay Ex-Police Constable. - The Barnstaple Coroner (Mr J. F. Bromham) held an Inquest on Saturday at Goodleigh, on the body of an ex-policeman named PATRICK GEORGE MOUSIER CULLEN, who was formerly in the Torquay Police Force, and who was found dead in the road on the previous night. Sergeant Allin, of the Devon Constabulary, deposed that on Friday evening, about half-past seven, he was on the highway at Snapper, near Goodleigh, and met deceased, who told him that he had been fishing, and that he was going to see Mr Henry Chichester, of Tree. About three hours after that he was at Goodleigh village, where he met a horse and cart conveying the dead body of the deceased to a public house, but which he directed to be taken to the deceased's house close by, witness going on first to break the news to the wife. The deceased had been in the Devon Constabulary and also in the Metropolitan force; but at the time of his death he represented Singer's Sewing Machine Company. He was thirty years of age. Joseph Vickery, a farmer, of West Buckland, stated that while proceeding home he came across a riderless pony, grazing by the side of the road. He took hold of the pony, and on going a little further he found the body of the deceased. His feet were in the hedgerow, and his body across the road. Mr Chichester, and two gentlemen with him - one being a doctor - came and saw the body. The medical gentleman pronounced him dead. Mr Chichester sent one of his men to fetch Dr Laing from Barnstaple. When he found the pony he noticed that the stirrup-iron was gone from the off side. The body was conveyed in Mr Chichester's cart to the deceased's home. Mr Henry Chichester, of Tree House, stated that on Friday night, about half-past nine, the deceased called on him on business. As it was late he asked the deceased to call on him one day in the following week. He shook hands with him and went into the house, and the deceased went away. He was sober when he saw him, and he had nothing to drink at his house. Dr Laing said that when he examined the body he found a bruise over the left eye-brow and another bruise on the other side. The neck was not broken. He was of opinion that the deceased had fallen from his pony and died from the effects of concussion of the brain. He did not think that he died from heart disease, as he was a man of active habits and generally in pretty good health. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH - Sudden Death At Dartmouth. - PETER LAMBLE, 71 years of age, a shipwright, and for many years Town Crier of Dartmouth, died suddenly on Monday. It appears he had been making a packing case for the Rev. J. R. Bennett, Wesleyan minister, who is removing to Wales, and went to his home in Silver-street about half-past eleven. He complained of feeling unwell, and shortly afterwards was seen to fall. On the people at the house going to him they found him quite dead. The Inquest was held in the evening at the Guildhall, before Mr Prideaux, Borough Coroner. Mr T. Dunning was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MISS BESSIE LAMBLE said her father came into the kitchen and said he felt quite done up. Shortly afterwards he fell and died before medical assistance could be obtained. He had been carrying the heavy packing case home up a slippery causeway. - Dr Dawson said he found LAMBLE lying on his back in the kitchen. He was quite dead. Witness considered he came by his death through the exertion of carrying the box up a steep hill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 12 September 1884
TORQUAY - Sudden Death In Torquay. - Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Torquay Townhall on Tuesday afternoon on the body of ELIZABETH BLANK STONE, who died suddenly on Saturday night, and into the circumstances of whose death it was necessary to enquire inasmuch as she had not previously been attended medically. - HANNAH PYM, wife of Robert Pym, fisherman, identified the deceased as her mother, ELIZABETH BLANK STONE, who lived at No. 2, Pimlico, and was a widow. She was aged 68 years. On Saturday night just before eleven o'clock she was in witness's kitchen, but made no complaint excepting that she felt a sinking in her inside. In fact she was in much better spirits than usual. When MRS PYM and her husband went to bed they heard a noise as of a fall, and the former, going into her mother's room, found the deceased lying on the floor. Witness's husband's mother also slept in the room, and with her assistance they placed her in the bed. A doctor was sent for although witness was sure she was dead. Mr Finch came, and pronounced life extinct. The woman had been ailing for a long time, and had been treated at the local dispensaries. - Elizabeth Pym, widow, and mother-in-law of the last witness, said she slept with MRS STONE on Saturday night. MRS STONE appeared in good health and spirits, and they laughed and talked before they went to sleep. Soon afterwards she heard a fall, got out of bed, and found deceased, who she thought had fainted, on the floor. After she had been put into the bed witness went for a doctor. - Mr T. Finch, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased just after 12 o'clock on Sunday morning. He found her lying in bed quite dead. From the circumstances of the case he imagined that the cause of death was heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Frightened To Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Exeter, by Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of MARY LEE, a widow, aged seventy, who died suddenly on Sunday evening under somewhat curious circumstances. Deceased's son keeps the Elephant and Castle, and on Sunday afternoon he went out, leaving her in charge of the house. A terrier dog, which was kept in a stable, was making a noise, and MRS LEE ordered her servant to unloose it. On the dog being set free it flew at the girl, biting her severely in the legs. MRS LEE went to her assistance, and having pulled the girl away from the dog, immediately afterwards became hysterical, and subsequently died. The medical testimony was to the effect that death resulted from heart disease brought on by fright. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SOUTH NORWOOD - The Sudden Death Of A Torquay Gentleman. - An Inquest has been held at South Norwood by Mr Hicks, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MAJOR THOMAS WILLIAM KINDER, aged 66, retired from the militia, whose home was at Beaumont, Lincombe Hill-road, Torquay, and whose sudden death was reported in last week's Torquay Times. Major Wood, of the royal Artillery, identified the body of the deceased, whom he had known for eighteen years. He knew the deceased had suffered from heart disease. He had been abroad a great deal. For three years he was governor of the Mint at Hongkong, and for five years director of the Mint of Japan, he then being employed under the Japanese Government. About eight or nine days ago he came up to Town on some business and had to go to South Norwood to arrange about some property, of which he was trustee, the owner being the widow of an old friend of his. Witness believed he was only in Norwood one day. - Inspector Moon, of the London, Brighton and South-Coast railway, said that on Tuesday night the deceased entered Norwood Junction Station and inquired of witness the time of the London trains, and after he had been told he went to the time-bill to compare it with a card he had with him, and whilst thus engaged he fell forward and died, without a murmur, in witness's arms. - Dr Churchward said he had made a post mortem examination, and found that deceased died from syncope of the heart. The liver and kidneys were much diseased, no doubt from long residence in a hot country, and the heart disease was secondary to the disease of the kidneys. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 October 1884
TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. The Inquest. - On Tuesday last a painful occurrence took place at Babbacombe, when MRS JOHN GREENSLADE, a woman 59 years of age, whose mind has failed of late, escaped from the custody of a nurse, and jumped over the cliff, sustaining injuries which resulted in her death a few hours later. - The Inquest was held on Wednesday night, at 6, York Terrace, Babbacombe, the residence of deceased's husband, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner. Mr A. W. Blackler being Foreman of the Jury. For some unexplained reason it was sought to exclude reporters from the Enquiry, not, of course, by the Coroner, but by MR GREENSLADE, whose behaviour was most extraordinary, and by his son, an indiscreet youth, who was acting presumably under the direction of his father. The boy, standing in the hall, endeavoured to obstruct the passage of the reporters, but being kindly but firmly set aside, the elder GREENSLADE made an appeal to the Coroner to exclude them. He was told by Mr Hacker that he had no power to exclude the representatives of the press, but he persisted in his application until peremptorily stopped by the Coroner. Abandoning his hostility then, he proceeded with much ostentation to provide accommodation for the reporters, and having shaken hands effusively with the Jurors, quieted down. Evidence was taken as follows:- JOHN GREENSLADE, 6, York Terrace, Babbacombe, said: The person lying dead is my wife, JANE GREENSLADE, who was 59 years of age. She left her residence yesterday morning about 10.30 in company with her nurse, who has been attending upon her for about six weeks. MRS GREENSLADE has required a nurse for about seven months. She has suffered from hysteria and weakness of nerves for some years. - The witness here made an irrelevant statement about the nurse, who, he said, had been discharged from an establishment at Wonford, but whom, he said excitedly, he would not have "impeached." Continuing his evidence he said: I joined them on Babbacombe Downs shortly after they left here, and found them resting on a seat. I conducted them to another seat opposite Malwa House, about 14 feet from the edge of the cliff. I left for a few minutes walk, and when I got to the end of the downs I turned and saw that my wife had disappeared. When I ran back a lady told me a woman had thrown herself over the cliff. I sent messengers for doctors and policemen, and went for some brandy. There were some people about, but they made themselves scarce directly. I saw my wife being brought up from the cliff; she was living and recognized me, and drank some brandy. I was present when my wife died. She had been brought here, and died in the bed in which you have seen her. Death took place about three o'clock in the afternoon. She was brought here about 11.30. - By the Coroner: Deceased had not suffered from excitement lately. She had been suffering from softening of the brain. I have had two of the best nurses for her that could be got in Devonshire. I had intended to send her to Totnes for a change. She did not know where she was going. I told her she should go somewhere, but did not tell her where. - Eliza Lathiby, of 4 Swithin-street, Exeter, single woman, said: I have been living here from August 21st., attending deceased. Yesterday I took MRS GREENSLADE for a walk according to my usual custom. We went to Babbacombe Downs. MR GREENSLADE being with us for a short time. She was talking to MR GREENSLADE, but nothing exciting took place. MR GREENSLADE moved away for a moment and deceased turned to me and said, "Do you see father" (GREENSLADE) coming." I turned my head, and she got up and ran. I followed her, but she went down the slope and over the cliff. All the other seats were full of people. It was impossible for me to catch her. I went down a narrow path, and found the woman in a bramble bush. She appeared to have fallen down the cliff, and then to have rolled. I don't know how far down she was. I can't say if she would have fallen further if the bush had not been there. A gentleman helped to pick her up and then said he would go for a doctor. She walked up over the cliff, and at the top she asked what she had done. She walked across the Downs to a donkey-chair, and in that she was brought home. We put her to bed and a doctor was sent for. Mr Chilcott came. All the woman said to me on the top of the cliff was "What have I done?" When her son was helping her up over the stairs of the house she said she had slipped her foot. Lately MRS GREENSLADE has been rather better than usual. She did not lead me to think she was disturbed because she was going away. - By a Juror: Had not noticed any symptom of insanity. She had been on the seat about 20 minutes before the accident happened. The seat is the nearest one to the edge of the cliff. That was the only seat we sat on that morning. - Mr Herbert N. Chilcott, surgeon, Babbacombe, said: The deceased was a patient of mine. I saw her yesterday about 12 o'clock. She seemed insensible and was suffering from shock. I saw no bruises about her or marks of any kind. I saw her when she was dying; she was still insensible. She died about 3.15. My opinion is that death was caused by shock. She was in a weak state, and an occurrence such as has been described would be sufficient to cause death. I have attended her on and off for 14 years. For the last seven months she has suffering from softening of the brain. She did not suffer from any mania; she was quiet and harmless. She has been under the delusion that she was unable to swallow. - Police-Sergeant Nott, stationed at St. Marychurch, said: With the witness Lathiby I went to Babbacombe Downs today, and was joined by P.C. Boughton. We measured the distance from the seat to the spot the woman fell over, and found it to be 40 feet. It is only 14 feet to the edge of the cliff, but the route the woman took was 40 yards. The woman must have fallen 26 feet to a ledge, and then have rolled 10 feet to the bramble bush. She must have had a clean drop of 26 feet. Had not the bush been there, she would have gone further. - Nurse Lathiby, recalled, said she could give no idea of the distance from the seat to the edge of the cliff. She showed the sergeant where the woman went over. Had she gone straight from the seat she could not have fallen over, but she went round to a steeper place. - The Coroner summed up the evidence, saying that he thought the Jury must, after the evidence which had been given, first find that the deceased was of unsound mind, and then it would be their duty to say whether she intentionally jumped over the cliff, or whether the occurrence was accidental. - The Jury found that the woman Committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind. Some discussion took place as to the desirability of fencing the cliff on Babbacombe Downs, but the Jury did not make any recommendation.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 24 October 1884
BRIXHAM - Shocking Accident At Brixham Station. - A shocking accident occurred at Brixham station on Monday. A train was being moved from one platform to another and the brake had been applied to stop it when the stoker, JAMES SNELL, tripped and fell off between the train and the platform. The carriages were not stopped until one of the trucks had passed over the spot where the unfortunate man fell, and on being taken out he was found quite insensible and terribly injured. His left forearm was crushed dreadfully just below the elbow, and the hand only remained attached by the sinews. His right arm was also dislocated, and his right ear cut completely off. His head and neck were badly cut. Dr G. C. Searle, who happened to be on the platform, at once attended to the injured man, bandaging and strapping his wounds together and then ordering him to be at once sent to the Torquay Infirmary, which was done, Dr Searle accompanying. SNELL was about 27 years of age, and a native of Exeter. He had passed the examination for the post of driver, and had been many years in the service of the company. After his admission to the hospital, he seemed for a time to be going on favourably, but early on Wednesday morning he died. - The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Castle Inn yesterday morning at 9 a.m. before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES SNELL, 27, fireman, living at Brixham in the employment of the G.W.R. Co. Mr W. Watson acted as Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was George Way, engine driver, residing at Brixham. He said the body he had seen was that of JAMES SNELL who had worked with him for the past two years. Deceased was not married. On the day of the accident about four minutes to three he was engaged at Brixham in shunting the train from the fish platform to the passenger side. They were running tender first and when he last saw the deceased before the accident he had his hand on the brake to stop the engine. Witness was looking over the right side of the train and on hearing a shout he looked around and saw that deceased was gone. He immediately reversed the engine and the train came to almost a dead stop. The name of the engine was the Taurus and witness in company with the deceased had been driving her for the last three week. The construction and fencing of the engine were the same as all through the line. Deceased had been perfectly well and in good spirits during the day. When found he was lying between the engine and platform. He was sure there was no jerk of any kind to cause the deceased to lose his balance. He could not say whether SNELL fell over the rail or through the small gangway made for the purpose of getting into the engine. When the deceased was laid on the platform he recognised and spoke to witness. There were no turn-tables at Brixham or Churston which would enable them to turn the engine. - John Rowe, engine cleaner, residing at Brixham, stated that he was standing on the platform on the 20th about five minutes to 3 and saw Way put steam on the engine and shut it off to stop again. Saw deceased go to the brake, he was standing on the foot-plate which was fixed about a foot from the edge of the engine. SNELL turned round to look for a signal from a porter on the platform. He saw the deceased suddenly fall through the gangway, head first. His left hand was on the brake at the time. Witness called to the driver to reverse the engine, which was instantly done, and he jumped down and saw that one of the wheels of the fish truck was on deceased's arm. The engine was put back and deceased was lifted to the platform and examined by Dr Searle, of Brixham, and immediately taken to Torquay. - John Trust, fish-hawker, Brixham, corroborated the former evidence. - John Tonkin Fortescue, locomotive superintendent of the South Devon district, said the engine was of the same construction as those used on the Great Western line. he had been at the work for 25 years and had never before known of such an accident. - Mr F. W. Thistle, house surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, said the deceased was brought to the hospital about 3.45 p.m. on Monday last. He was suffering from a severe fracture of the left fore arm which was nearly severed from the body, the right arm was crushed near the shoulder, the right collar bone was broken and the lung injured, the right ear was nearly torn away as was also the left side of the scalp. It was found necessary to amputate both arms. The deceased rallied on the following day, but died on Wednesday morning about 2 a.m. There was no doubt that death was caused by the injuries received. - A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 12 December 1884
TORQUAY - Supposed Suicide Of A Nurse. - The body of FELICE CHAMPFLEURY, a Frenchwoman, about thirty years of age, was found on Monday afternoon by a fisherman named Rowden, between some rocks near Watcombe, between Maidencombe and Labrador. The deceased, for the last eight years, had been in the service of General Lucas, of Dunmoor, Shaldon, as nurse and during that time had deposited most of her wages in the bank. She left her master's house on Saturday morning, about half-past ten, with a parcel for someone at Teignmouth. She delivered it to a ferryman to take to Teignmouth. She was afterwards met by a man going towards the sea coast at Labrador, but he suspected nothing unusual. As she did not return to her master's house that day the inmates became uneasy, and inquiries were instituted respecting her whereabouts, but to no purpose until Monday afternoon. Near where the body was found were discovered the deceased's hat and umbrella. An Inquest was subsequently held, the verdict being that the woman committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 26 December 1884
BISHOPSTEIGNTON - The Bishopsteignton Drowning Case. - The mystery surrounding the disappearance from Bishopsteignton of MARY ANN FEY, some weeks since, has just been cleared up. An Inquest has been held at Eype, near Bridport, on a body washed ashore at that place, and which was identified by MR WILLIAM FEY, of Bishopsteignton, as that of his daughter. The body could only be identified by its clothing, as it was in an advanced state of decomposition. The flesh and hair were entirely gone from the head, and the flesh from the hands as far as the wrists. After having heard the evidence of P.S. Harrard and the father, the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 January 1885
TORQUAY - Death By Poisoning In Torquay. - A death occurred in Torquay yesterday under very sad circumstances. MR JOSEPH MURCH, a well-known cab-proprietor, who resided at Braddons Hill, had for some time past been suffering from palsy. Dr Richardson has attended him, and, in the ordinary course, prescribed medicine for him. Unfortunately his medicine bottle seems to have been kept near some poisonous lotion, for on Tuesday MR MURCH swallowed some of the lotion under the impression that he was taking his medicine, and subsequently showed alarming symptoms. The efforts which were made to remedy the mischief proved of no avail, however, and the patient died at half-past two yesterday morning. The Coroner has been communicated with and an Inquest will be held.

TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. - On Sunday evening last, SAMUEL WILLIAMS, cabinet maker, 2 Pembroke Terrace, Cavern-road, who upon that day attained his 54th year, committed suicide by hanging himself. - An Inquest was held upon the body on Wednesday morning by Mr T. Edmonds of Totnes, Deputy Coroner, at Mr Motton's Country House Hotel, Ellacombe. - The evidence of deceased's widow, which was taken at her residence owing to her indisposition, was to the effect that her husband had been attended by Dr Powell, who found him suffering from a diseased brain, and who seemed to be of opinion that it was scarcely likely the patient would recover. His mother died insane and deceased inherited the disorder. WILLIAMS had been depressed in mind for some time. - Henry Clapp, 1, St. Leonard's Terrace, said that on Sunday evening the son of deceased called his attention to the occurrence. He entered the house by the front door, and found the man suspended to a hook in the ceiling by the rope produced. He cut him down, but life was extinct, deceased having been hanging, witness thought, at least an hour. The feet were about a foot from the ground. A chair was close by, and he had evidently made use of this to accomplish his purpose. Witness knew WILLIAMS very well, and had seen him lately, but did not notice anything peculiar about him. The witness sent for the police. - Mr T. Finch, surgeon, said that a little after nine o'clock on Sunday evening he was called to see deceased, whom he found quite dead. There were marks of a rope around his neck, and he had evidently been stifled. Witness had never attended deceased. Having regard to the statement made by deceased's widow, witness said it was likely that WILLIAMS should have committed suicide. - The Coroner said the Jury would probably gather from the evidence that the man had taken his life while in an insane condition. The Jury found a verdict to the effect that WILLIAMS hanged himself while of Unsound Mind.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 23 January 1885
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last in the Court House, before Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CASPALL, sailor, aged 37, who died on the previous morning in the Torbay Hospital, from the effects of a fall on board the Thursby. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - The Torquay Poisoning Case. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening last in the Court House, Torquay, before Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of MR JOSEPH MURCH, aged 63, cab proprietor, Underwood Cottage, who, as reported last week, died from the effects of poisoning. The first witness called was MRS MURCH, who deposed that her husband had for some time been suffering from palsy. On Tuesday about noon she was called by her daughter into his room and found him vomiting very much. She asked him what was the matter, and he replied that he had taken the wrong medicine. She looked round and found that he had been drinking from a bottle containing a poisonous lotion. She sent for the doctor immediately. Deceased had appeared very feeble that morning. Occasionally he had fits of dizziness, and after eating his sight was sometimes defective. - Dr J. R. Richardson stated that he had been in the habit of attending the deceased, and on Monday ordered him a lotion composed of one ounce of liniment of aconite, and one ounce of liniment of belladonna. Deceased was a sufferer from what was known as trembling palsy. Witness saw him on Tuesday afternoon when he was suffering from the effects of poisoning. For some time he was at the point of death, but under treatment he partially recovered in two hours and a half. At 9.30 that night he was fairly well, and the next morning he had recovered consciousness. Witness then asked him how he came to make such a mistake, and he replied, "I don't know how I came to make such a mistake." Between 5 and 6 o'clock on Wednesday evening, he was progressing capitally, but at one o'clock on the following morning failure of the action of the hart had again set in, and death took place at 2.30 a.m. In witness's opinion death resulted from poisoning, the patient being in a weak nervous condition at the time. The only wonder was that death did not sooner follow the unfortunate mistake. The dose taken of either of the two poisons was quite enough to kill an ordinary person in good health outright. - The Deputy Coroner pointed out that the bottle containing the poison could not have been more completely labelled. Probably the mistake was made in a fit of dizziness. There seemed no alternative but to find that the deceased died from accidentally taking the poisonous lotion. The Jury returned a verdict in the spirit of the Deputy-Coroner's summing-up.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 13 March 1885
PAIGNTON - Singular Fatality At Paignton. - On Wednesday morning a man was found dead in a field at Preston, near Paignton. It appears that the deceased, whose name is WILLIAM HUGHES, who is 29 years of age, and is a brushmaker, engaged on Monday evening in company with a man named Frederick Wyatt, to row some French sailors from Torquay Harbour to their trawler, which was moored some little distance off. When they put the Frenchmen on board, HUGHES and Wyatt were asked on deck, where they partook of some brandy, having been drinking before. When they left to return to Torquay they were both drunk, HUGHES worse than the other. In attempting to row in they lost their paddles and the boat drifted on to Preston beach. Here they scrambled ashore, HUGHES being only able to walk to the field in which the artillery guns are placed, being so drunk that Wyatt left him. On Tuesday inquiries were made, but he did not turn up at his mother's, who lives at Stentiford's Hill, Torquay. Whatt and MRS HUGHES visited Paignton on Tuesday night, and on Wednesday morning they went to the spot where Wyatt had left HUGHES. About 100 yards above this place in the same field he was lying on his face and hands in a ditch having a few inches of water. He was quite dead, having evidently fallen into the ditch and been suffocated. - The Inquest on HUGHES took place last night at the Manor Inn, Preston, before Mr Sidney Hacker. After hearing the evidence of the mother of the deceased; of the young man Wyatt, who was in the boat with deceased when they went on board the French smack, Mareo; P.C. Smith; Mr J. Goodridge, surgeon; and one of the French fishermen, the Jury found that the deceased came to his death by Accidental Suffocation by Drowning.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 April 1885
TORQUAY - Shocking Death Of A Torquay Tradesman. - A Coroner's Jury, of which Mr Crockwell was Foreman, sat at the London Hotel, Torquay, on Thursday afternoon for the purpose of Inquiring into the circumstances under which DAVID PYKE (61), dairyman, 72, Fleet-street, came to his death. - Mr Sidney Hacker, the coroner, said his information was that the subject of the Inquiry was found dead that morning under circumstances which rendered an Inquest necessary. The following evidence was taken:- SUSANNAH BRAY, 10 Lucius-street, said: I identify the body as that of DAVID PYKE, my step-father. He was a greengrocer and dairyman. I saw him last alive a fortnight since last Monday. He was then rather stupid from drink. I was his housekeeper for 12 years, but left him because of his bad conduct. For the last six years he has been drinking heavily. He took whiskey and gin, which he kept in a "dark dungeon." During the last six months I was with him he was unbearable. He had delirium tremens and used to throw things about at night so that we could not sleep. He used to drink alone and did not go to public-houses. A fortnight before I left he fell over the stairs and was in his bed for four days. I found him sitting on the stairs when I came down in the morning; he then being the worse for drink. He used to get drunk two or three times a week within the last six months. - By a Juryman: I don't know why he commenced to drink unless it was because of the failure of the West of England Bank. He had money there that his wife and I did not know about. - Mr H. C. Cumming, surgeon, said: I have made an examination of the body of deceased. There are no external marks of violence, except one of an old wound on the head. An internal examination showed a considerable disease of the heart; there was great congestion of both lungs, especially the right, and some recent congestion of the brain, but there was no other affection of the brain. The cause of death was heart disease and congestion of the lungs. I think he must have been ill for three or four days from the appearance of his lungs. The symptoms of drinking were not marked; they were not those of a man who had been a hard drinker for six years. It is strange that he should have been so heavy a drinker and yet have so sound a liver. His death is not attributable to hard drinking. The exertion of mounting the stairs was sufficient to produce death in the state in which the heart was. - Anna Tunkin said: I have been living at MR PYKE'S as a servant with a little girl named Mary Vincent since last Monday, when the housekeeper (Miss Jones) left. MR PYKE used to attend to business when he was sober, but he was drunk all the time after the housekeeper left. I saw him last night about eight o'clock in the kitchen, scalding milk, and asked if I should turn out the gas, but he said he would do it himself. I came down afterwards and turned out the gas, but did not speak to him. We heard nothing during the night. At a quarter past six this morning we came downstairs and found MR PYKE sitting on the stairs leading into the kitchen, with his head leaning on his arm. We called him but could not make him hear, so we asked a man driving a coal cart to come in and he told us he was quite dead and that we had better send for a policeman. He did not complain of illness to me. He had not been in bed for two nights, and was nearly always in the dark room where he kept his drink. - P.C. Nicholls stated that he was called to the house at 6.30 a.m. PYKE was sitting on the stairs, dead. The body was cold and stiff. With assistance he conveyed the body to a bedroom. He searched the body, but found nothing of importance. In the kitchen there was a chair before the fireplace as though someone had been sitting in it, but there was no liquor about. - The Coroner having briefly summed up the evidence, the Jury found that deceased died from Heart Disease and Congestion of the Lungs and that his death was accelerated by excessive drinking.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 April 1885
TORQUAY - Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Town Hall, Torquay, on Wednesday evening, touching the death of EDMUND SHILSON SCOWN SAUNDERS, aged one year and eight months, who was found dead beside its mother, who lives in Queen-street, on the previous Monday morning. Dr Thistle having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Convulsions."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 24 April 1885
LITTLEHEMPSTON - On Sunday last a child named FRANK KING, aged about 21 months, met its death at Littlehempston, near Totnes, in a singular manner by being attacked by a game cock. The child appears to have run after the fowl, which flew at him, causing him to fall to the ground and then the bird spurred him behind the ear. medical aid was obtained, but the child died from the effects of the blow on the head. An Inquest was held on Monday evening by Mr Hacker, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 9 May 1885
SHALDON - Sad Accident At Shaldon. - A most distressing death has occurred at Shaldon, near Teignmouth. On Friday evening DR FREDERICK PHILIP PHELPS, of Exeter, who has been lodging for some time at 7 Gloucester-terrace, Teignmouth, went with his wife and six children on a pleasure trip to the rocks near Labrador, and after being there some time MR PHELPS started for the boat near the Ness, which had previously conveyed them to Shaldon, with the understanding that his wife and children would follow him. On the arrival of the latter to the beach it was found that the doctor had not been seen. A search was instituted, but was not successful until about twelve o'clock on Saturday, when the body was seen by a coastguardsman in a cavity of the rocks near the Ness. The deceased, who had received terrible blows on the forehead and the head, was afflicted with heart disease, and it is surmised that whilst in a fit he slid down the hole, and whilst unconscious the tide came in and drowned him. At an Inquest held on Monday a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 16 May 1885
LUSTLEIGH - The Fatal Accident At Lustleigh. - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on Monday at Lustleigh touching the death of the woman WILCOCKS, who was killed whilst going over a level crossing near Lustleigh on Friday afternoon last week. It was shewn that the deceased was crossing the line, and that the driver of the train, on seeing her, blew his whistle, which the deceased failed to hear, through being deaf. The front of the engine struck her and she was killed instantly. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death and recommended that some bushes near the spot should be taken down so that persons using the crossing might be able to see an approaching train.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 23 May 1885
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Young Woman In Torquay. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Mr Motton's Country House Hotel, Ellacombe, on Tuesday, into the circumstances attending the death of ALICE TRIPP (23), domestic servant, who died on Saturday, after having given birth to a child on the previous Wednesday. - Deceased not having been attended by a medical man, the doctor who was called in just prior to her death, withheld his certificate, and so an Inquest became necessary. - CELIA TRIPP, who lives at Weston-super-Mare, identified deceased as her daughter, ALICE ANN BROWN TRIPP, who lived as servant with Mrs Chubb, and was a single woman. She had been in Torquay for four years, but had worked for Mrs Chubb only a few months. Witness saw her daughter last Wednesday, having received a telegram stating that she was ill. She found her daughter at the house of Mrs Ball, 18, Lower Wellesley-road. She was confined there. Witness did not know previously that anything was wrong with her daughter. In the afternoon she returned to Weston-super-Mare, leaving the young woman to all appearances progressing favourably. Witness understood that her daughter left her situation on the previous Saturday. She seemed to be very comfortable at Mrs Ball's, who treated her very well indeed. Deceased had a child some three or four years since, which was kept by Mrs Ball. The child born on Wednesday died. - Mr W. Wills, surgeon and parish medical officer, said that on Saturday morning he received by post an order from Mr Tozer, Relieving Officer, to attend the deceased, and called on her about 11 o'clock. She was then dying, and upon inquiring of her friends why the order had not been sent earlier, he was told that they thought it most convenient to put it in the post. The woman was suffering from puerperal fever and the child was already dead. it was such a doubtful case that he conceived it his duty to communicate with the Coroner. At four o'clock, on returning to the patient, he discovered she was dead. having made a post mortem examination, he found some contraction of the lungs, but death was due to puerperal fever. It was an unusual thing for a woman to die so soon after confinement from puerperal fever. Possibly death came about through insufficient attention, but there was no medical evidence of neglect. It was his opinion that if the order of the Relieving Officer had reached him so that he might have attended her earlier the patient would have recovered. Deceased must have been dreadfully ill from the moment she was confined. - Elizabeth Howe, 32, Victoria Park, who was the nurse called in, said that her patient went on all right up to Friday afternoon, when she complained of pain in her side. Witness said she must have a medical man, but the young woman said she could not afford one. She then saw the Relieving Officer and got an order for medical attendance, which she handed over to Mrs Ball, who said she would send it to Mr Wills that night. The witness tried to get the attendance of Mr Smith, surgeon, about nine o'clock on Saturday, but was unsuccessful. Mr Smith was the medical man who certified the death of the baby. - Sarah Ball, widow, said she had known deceased for twelve months, having taken care of her child for about that time. She left her situation on Sunday evening and on Tuesday, witness, being suspicious of her condition, sent for Mrs Howe. She advised the girl to have a doctor, but she refused. Witness posted the Relieving Officer's order to Mr Wills, not understanding that a doctor was wanted immediately. She had no one to send with it, and could not go herself. She had been told that the woman was in a critical state, but did not try to obtain the attendance of Mr Wills the same night. On Friday morning Dr Wills ordered some medicine; Mrs Howe sent a child for it, and it arrived at half-past four in the afternoon. - Dr Wills remarked that a lame child from Boston Fields fetched the medicine. - This being all the evidence, the Coroner summed up, pointing out that it appeared that neither Mrs Howe nor Mrs Ball knew that deceased was in a critical state until Friday afternoon, and that it was for the Jury to say whether or no Mrs Ball was to blame for not sending immediately for the doctor instead of posting the order. The Jury returned a verdict, after consideration, that the deceased died from Natural Causes. Mr Satterford, a late Juror, who had been fined by the Coroner, had the penalty remitted on apologizing for and explaining his absence. The fees of some of the Jurors (seven in number) were given to the mother of the deceased.

TORQUAY - Accidental Death In Torquay. - An Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker on Thursday evening at the Upton Vale Hotel, Torquay, upon the body of JANE TICKELL (60), who died from injuries accidentally received. - SAMUEL TICKELL, 4 Park Cottages, labourer, stated that the deceased was his wife. On Tuesday last, about seven o'clock, she left the kitchen for an instant, and he, hearing a call, ran out and found her lying on her back at the bottom of some steps leading to a stable. He picked her up and found that she was bleeding from the top of the head and also from the mouth. He asked how she came to fall, and she replied "I didn't fall." A doctor was sent for, and Dr Powell attended. Deceased died about six o'clock on Wednesday evening. The witness added that his wife was in the habit of leaning upon the rail protecting the steps. One of the rails was now broken, but he could not say how it happened. With the exception of a bad leg his wife enjoyed good health. On the night in question she was in particularly good spirits. - Emily Bright, who lives in the same house, said that on the date in question she heard a child calling her, and, going out, saw MRS TICKELL lying at the bottom of the steps. Deceased had not been walking down the steps, or witness would have seen her. The child told witness that deceased (her grandmother) fell on her head, and then turned over. The rail which was broken was all right half-an-hour previous to this occurrence. Witness thought deceased was resting her foot on the rail. She made no statement to witness as to how the occurrence happened. - Mr Powell, surgeon, said he attended MRS TICKELL after the accident. She was suffering from a lacerated scalp and concussion of the brain. He thought the base of the skull was fractured and that there was internal haemorrhage. These injuries caused death and would be accounted for by a fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added a recommendation that the steps should be effectually protected.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 20 June 1885
DEVONPORT - MR THOMAS LAKIN, who has been public librarian at Devonport for some time, was found drowned in the Hamoaze on Tuesday morning. An Inquest was held in the afternoon, and the evidence went to show that the mind of the deceased had been effected and a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 4 July 1885
BRIXHAM - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening, at the Shotover Inn, High St., Brixham, by Mr Sydney Hacker, as to the death of NELLIE ORDON MOORE, aged two years, daughter of THOMAS MOORE, sawyer. The child died on Thursday last. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and in a rider reprimanded the parents for not obtaining medical aid, knowing the child to be in a sickly condition.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 29 August 1885
BRIXHAM - Inquest. - The County Coroner, Mr Sidney Hacker, held an Inquest on Tuesday evening, touching the death of MARY MAY FARLEY, who died on the 24th instant during childbirth. The Jury returned a verdict of Death through Natural Causes, and reprimanded the midwife, Mrs Vinnicombe, for her tardiness in calling medical aid.

TORQUAY - A Child Suffocated In Torquay. - On Thursday evening Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Torquay Police Station into the circumstances attending the death of a child found dead in a house in Pimlico. - SUSAN DREW, wife of JAMES DREW, a hat cleaner, lodging at the house of a Mrs Martin, in Pimlico, made a statement to the effect that the deceased, JOHN DREW, was her child and was ten weeks old, being the last born of thirteen. On Wednesday evening it appeared in good health, and about 11 o'clock was fed with boiled bread and sugar. Witness had a married daughter named BASSETT living with her, who had a child ill. MRS BASSETT sent for witness to come to her house to assist in looking after the ailing child, and she went there, taking her own baby with her. She remained for the night and lay down on a bed in the room with her own child, and two other children of her daughter MRS BASSETT, who also occupied the room with her husband. The baby was at her right side when she went to sleep, and she observed nothing wrong with it. About four o'clock next morning, however, MRS BASSETT awoke her and called her attention to the child and she then found it dead and cold. The leg of one of MRS BASSETT'S children was across its head. The witness was quite confident that she did not overlay the child. She said, in answer to the Coroner, that she did not insure the lives of her children. - GEORGINA BASSETT, daughter of MRS DREW, and living at No. 8, Pimlico, said she had occasion to get out of bed about 4 o'clock on Thursday morning to attend to her own baby, when she noticed that the leg of one of her children was across deceased's head. She went to move it and found that her mother's baby was dead. - Mr T. Finch, surgeon, said he was called just before seven o'clock on Thursday morning to see the deceased. The child had been dead some hours and was quite cold. There were no marks on the body. In his opinion death was caused by suffocation. After hearing the evidence of the mother he thought it was possibly the case that one of Mrs Bassett's children had crawled over the deceased and somehow stopped its breath. It would take very little to suffocate a child so young. The child was clean and well kept. - In answer to a Juryman, the witness said that boiled bread and sugar were bad things to feed a baby on, and that while the child's stomach was loaded with food of that sort it would suffocate the easier. - The Jury, after some consideration, said the only verdict they could all agree upon was an open one, inasmuch as there was no clear evidence as to the cause of the child's death. - The Coroner said he would rather not take an open verdict if there were any possibility of the exact cause of death being got at, and therefore he would adjourn the Inquest until the next evening, in order that Mr Finch might, in the meanwhile, make a post mortem examination of the child. - At the adjourned Inquiry last night, Mr Finch said he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that the cause of death was suffocation. All the organs were healthy. In answer to a Juryman the witness said that the overcrowded state of the room had nothing to do with the child's death. There was nothing to lead to any suspicion that the death was other than accidental. The Jury found that deceased was Accidentally Suffocated.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Saturday 5 September 1885
DAWLISH - Dreadful Occurrence At Dawlish. Fall Of Cliff. Three Persons Killed And Three Injured. - On Saturday a frightful accident occurred at Dawlish, whereby a party of visitors, seven in number, was buried by the fall of a large quantity of rock, three persons being killed on the spot and three out of the remaining four being severely injured. The place where the accident occurred is close to the western end of the tunnel which leads from the railway embankment to the gentlemen's bathing-place. The path from this tunnel is partly overhung by the sandstone cliff, which has been scooped out at the base into a shallow cavern. A fall occurred on the shore side of the path a few months ago, several huge blocks coming down and smashing the masonry of the wall which supports the path, but no one was injured on that occasion. The slip on Saturday was on the seaward side of the wall, the material which fell coming away from the projecting part of the rock. A fall has been expected for a long time, and so well understood was the dangerous condition of the cliff that lodging-house keepers have almost invariably warned their visitors from venturing too near it. The Local Board were distinctly aware that something required to be done, for the protection of the public, and correspondence has passed between them and the Great Western Railway Company on the subject, but nothing has been done (beyond the erection some time ago of notice boards, which have since been removed), both parties declining the responsibility and refusing to undertake the cost. The accident occurred just before noon. The seven persons referred to were sitting upon the beach close to the projecting and overhanging piece of rock, and within a dozen feet of the further end of the bathers' tunnel. They were MISS ELIZABETH RADFORD, aged 41, companion to Lady Graves-Sawle, of Ashford House, Honiton, and MISS MATTHEWS, a lady in charge of the WATSON family, staying with them at 2, Portland-terrace. The five other members of the party were MISS ELIZABETH KEEN, aged about 34, nursery governess, who had under her charge a little girl named VIOLET MARY WATSON, aged 9, her brother, a lad about two years older, and a baby - the children of parents whose home is at Honiton, but who are now in India; and a MISS WATSON, their aunt. The WATSONS had been in Dawlish about a week and it had been their custom to spend a good deal of time on the beach. On Saturday morning, after the children had amused themselves for an hour paddling in the pools of water among the rocks and hunting for shells and specimens of seaweed, the party sat down, as already stated, near the base of the cliff. At a quarter to twelve a young man, who was strolling about at some distance from the cliff noticed a slight fall of rubble from the face of the rock near where the unfortunate people were grouped. He shouted to warn them of their danger, and the younger ones immediately ran to the open; but before they had gone more than a step or two an immense mass of rock came crashing down upon them, burying the whole seven, either totally or partially. Mr F. W. Short, of London, Mr George Bond, of Brook-street, and several others at once went to their assistance, and soon succeeded in extricating MISS MATTHEWS, MASTER WATSON, his aunt, and the baby. All except the infant were badly injured, the poor boy's legs being broken, while his sister and MISS MATTHEWS were sadly cut and bruised. The baby, strange to say, was scarcely hurt at all, a few slight scratches being the only perceptible injury it had sustained. The rest of the victims were buried under such heavy masses of rock that it was almost impossible to hope for their recovery alive. It is stated that one of MISS KEEN'S hands was seen to move and that she was heard calling faintly once or twice, but when the bodies were extricated, after a couple of hours' hard work, life was found to be extinct. Directly the accident became known scores of men hurried to the spot with pickaxes, shovels and crowbars, and under the direction of Mr J. S. Delbridge, surveyor to the Local Board, the work of getting out the bodies was carried on with the utmost expedition. Messengers were despatched for doctors, and within a short space of time nearly all the medical men in the town were on the scene. Among those in attendance were Dr F. M. Cann, Dr Lestock Cockburn, Mr Fortescue Webb, and Mr de Winter Baker. The dead bodies were placed for the time being in an empty house in Portland-place. They were frightfully mutilated, the features of the governess being crushed and battered out of all recognition. The bodies of MISS RADFORD and MISS VIOLET WATSON were both terribly knocked about. - Hundreds of people visited the scene of the accident during Sunday, the morning bathing train and the afternoon excursion being crowded.
INQUEST. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MISS VIOLET MARY WATSON, aged 9 years; ELIZABETH KEEN, nurse, aged 34; and ELIZABETH RADFORD, lady's maid, 41 years, who met with their death on Saturday last by the fall of the portion of a cliff in the gentlemen's bathing cove, Dawlish, was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, at the Assembly Rooms of Mr Ball's Royal Hotel, Dawlish, on Monday afternoon. A very large number of persons, besides the relatives of the deceased, were present to watch the proceedings. Most of the members of the Dawlish Local Board, including the chairman, Mr F. Lee, attended. Mr Friend, solicitor, of Exeter, watched the proceedings on behalf of the relatives of all three of the deceased persons; MR WATSON, barrister, of London, represented COLONEL WATSON, a relative of his; Mr J. S. Whidborne, clerk to the Local Board, attended in the interest of that body. - In opening the proceedings, the Coroner observed that the Jury had been summoned to investigate the circumstances of a sad occurrence. They had to ascertain, if possible, whether anyone was responsible for the death of the three persons who were killed on Saturday. - The bodies having been "viewed" and identified, and the Jurymen having stated that they did not wish to visit the scene of the disaster, as they were all acquainted with it, evidence was called. - Frederick W. Short, of 17 Bloomsbury-square, London, deposed that he was on a visit to Dawlish. On Saturday, about 1.30, he was in the gentlemen's bathing cove when he noticed a group of people sitting under the cliff, and shortly afterwards he heard a low rumbling sound, and looking in the direction of the ladies, saw a portion of the rock falling. The mass was very large, and it fell on the whole of the party. He did not notice any train passing at the time, but one might have passed without his observing it. As soon as he noticed the accident he ran over and pulled out Miss Matthews, who was partially embedded, and in doing so portions of her dress had to be left behind. A little boy named WATSON, about 9 years of age, was lying across MISS WATSON (his aunt) whose head and shoulders only were noticeable. The boy was not covered with earth. As soon as he had extricated Miss Matthews, two gentlemen came and assisted in getting MISS WATSON out. The lady was very much injured, and some time elapsed before she could be liberated. After she was taken out, he assisted her to her home. He had observed notice boards on former occasions cautioning the public against going too near the cliffs, but he did not notice any at that time. The tide was very high and nearly reached the edge of the cliff. The ladies were sitting down under the cliff and the children were running about. - By Mr Friend: It might have been twelve months or two years ago when he last saw the notice boards there. - ELIZABETH CAROLINE WATSON, the next witness, said she resided at Upper Winchester-road, Clapham, London. She accompanied the deceased persons to the cove, and noticed the cliff fall just after a train had passed. She was only a few yards off at the time, and her husband was also standing near. She saw a large piece of rock fall on the boy WATSON. Just after the accident another train passed, and then another small piece of rock fell from the cliff. Her husband assisted in extricating those embedded whilst she watched to give alarm in case any more of the cliff should fall. She had been staying at Dawlish since last Saturday week, and during that time had frequently visited the cove. Had looked for notices cautioning people, because she had heard there were some, but could find none. The weather was very rough at the time. - George Bond, boatman and fisherman, of Dawlish, said he saw the cliff fall. The giving-way commenced at the bottom and gradually went upwards. He saw a lady partially embedded, and he went to her assistance when she cried out "Oh." After getting her out he assisted in getting out others. Had this summer seen notice boards cautioning the public not to go too near the cliffs, but they had been destroyed by boys throwing stones at them. Noticed a train passed before and one just after the accident occurred. Remembered a cliff falling in 1880 - In answer to questions, the witness said the accident occurred above high-water mark. At spring tides the water would reach up to the foot of the cliff. One of the notice boards was knocked down when some cliff fell in the gentlemen's cove in March last. - P.C. Stapleton gave evidence as to the rescuing of the injured and the recovery of the deceased persons from the debris. He took no notice of the slip last March, as slips are frequently occurring. He would not have taken any notice of the present one but for the fatal consequences. - Robert King said he was superintendent of No. 2 Bathing Cove for seven years. He resigned in April 1884. Remembered seven years ago notices against the cliff in the cove to the effect that it was dangerous to sit under the cliffs, but there had not been any there for the last four years. At the entrance to Cow's Hole Cove Mr Friend had put one up at the beginning of this year. It was as dangerous to walk under as to sit under the cliff. (Slight applause.) After this they had built a wooden bridge to walk into the lion's mouth. (Renewed applause.) There was a great slip just as some one entered the bathing cove five or six years ago. Since then there had been one inside of the railway and another near, and forming one of the main props to the Cow's Hole Cavern. Since then again another had occurred, resulting in the knocking down of the wall built for the convenience of bathers. He did not believe it was the action of the sea that occasioned the slips, but rather the action of the water on the earth (which was nothing but rotten red sand stone), and the shaking produced by the passing of trains. He had repeatedly warned the members of the Local Board of the dangerous state of the cliffs, and they would ever remain so unless they were sloped away. (Applause). Had the Bathing Association held their opening breakfast a day or so later a short time ago, they would have run risk of meeting a similar fate to those poor people, for the debris fell on the very spot where the Committee sat. - The Rev. R. H. D. Barham was next called. He said there had been no fewer than three big cliff slips within the last six months. As soon as the slip took place near cow's Hole Tunnel a notice board was again put up, cautioning the public that it was dangerous to go under the cliff, but very shortly afterwards the Ratepayers Association actually constructed a wooden bridge leading people into the very danger the notices warned them of. He wrote to the Local Board, as the guardians of the public, pointing out the absurdity of the two things. - Dr Cann gave evidence to the effect that the girl WATSON died from suffocation, while ELIZABETH KEEN and ELIZABETH RADFORD, had sustained bodily injuries sufficient to cause death. - Mr W. S. Whidborne, clerk to the Dawlish Local Board, deposed that he did not think it would come within the power of the Local Board to stop the erection of the bridge. He spoke on the authority of the district auditor, who at the last audit said if the Board expended any money in the matter he would surcharge them with the amount laid out. The Board might, it was true, have laid a complaint before a higher authority against the erection of the bridge. He did not know what body of persons erected the bridge, but he understood that it was the Ratepayers' Association. The Board did not give their sanction to the bridge being erected, but said they would not oppose the scheme. - Joseph Delbridge, surveyor to the Dawlish Local Board, said he was in the habit of often visiting the place where the accident occurred. Four or five days since he was there, but did not observe any unusual indication of impending danger. The Local Board considered that they had no authority over the beach, nor any jurisdiction where the accident occurred. He understood that the place belonged either to the Railway Company or to the Woods and Forests Commissioners. - The Coroner having made a few remarks on the evidence, the Jury after three quarters of an hour's deliberation, returned a verdict of Accidental Death, accompanied with a recommendation to the Local Board to make inquiries with a view of ascertaining the owners of the cliff in question and to compel them to do what was necessary to prevent future accidents occurring, and pending such inquiry to erect notice boards warning people of the danger of the locality.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 October 1885
TORQUAY - The Fatal Fall From A Cliff At Babbacombe. Inquest. - On Monday an Inquest upon MR C. R. S. ADAMS, who resided and carried on business as a jeweller &c., at Fore-street, St. Marychurch, was held before Mr Sidney Hacker, the Coroner, at the Crown and Sceptre Inn, St. Marychurch. The deceased fell over a cliff on Babbacombe Downs on the previous Wednesday and sustained serious injuries from which he died two days afterwards. The Jury, with Mr Thomas Croft as foreman, after being sworn, proceeded to the residence of the deceased, to view the body, which had been removed there from the Torbay Infirmary. The following evidence was taken:- JOHN WATSON BOVEY said the deceased CHARLES RICHARD ADAMS was his son-in-law. Witness saw him the day previous to the accident when he believed he was in his usual health and spirits. He did not see him again till the Thursday in the Infirmary, where he found him quite conscious and in reply to witness the deceased said he was better. - Richard Henry Bird, quarryman, said that on Wednesday he was engaged in company with another man quarrying at Walls Hill. About four o'clock witness heard a slight fall of rubble, and looking up could see a man lying down and looking over into the pit. Witness called to him to go back or he would be falling over, when the person called out, "You can't heave up that stone; shall I come and help you up?" Witness called to him again to go back, and instantly the deceased came over head first, and in the fall alighted upon a ledge of rock about halfway down, and then bounded off and fell to the bottom, his hat remaining on the ledge of rock. In reply to the Coroner, witness said he believed the deceased was only chaffing in calling out what he did. Witness did not know what caused him to pitch over, but the wind was certainly very rough at the time. - John Turner, quarryman, said he heard deceased call out as described by the last witness, but so many persons come that way and stay about, that witness did not pay much attention. The next thing he saw was the deceased falling over. There are large breaches in the wall which was erected to prevent cattle from falling over. The deceased in falling struck twice before reaching the bottom. When he picked him up he appeared to be quite unconscious. The quarry was rented by Mr Drake. There had been a shooting competition going on at the Walls Hill range during the day. - James H. Wilcox, innkeeper, Babbacombe, said that on the day of the occurrence deceased called about a quarter to four and inquired whether the Dawlish team were down shooting, as he wanted to see one of them. Witness advised him to go to Walls Hill to find the party. After remaining a quarter of an hour he left and went in that direction. He had not taken any thing to drink at all in his house, and witness believed he was perfectly sober. - Harriett Tuckett, residing at the house of the deceased, said in reply to the Coroner, that nothing occurred at breakfast time that morning, and deceased lived quite happily at home. - James Heath, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on Wednesday about 4.30 suffering from concussion of the brain and serious abdominal injuries. Witness attended him till his death on Friday morning. The immediate cause of death was peritonitis. In reply to questions from witness, the deceased appeared to have quite forgotten how or when he fell over the cliff. - P.C. Thomas (Babbacombe), who took the deceased to the Infirmary, stated that he was quite unconscious whilst being conveyed there. - MARY E. ADAMS, the widow, who was assisted into the room and appeared to be almost helpless, and was evidently in a very delicate state of health, in reply to the Coroner stated that she saw her husband the night of the accident in the Infirmary, but he was too prostrate to speak to her. On the following day she asked him to explain to her how the accident happened when he replied "It slipped under me and I fell." She could not say whether he referred to the rubble as slipping or to his foot. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, and addressed the Jury, the following verdict was returned, "That the deceased came by his death by Falling Over the Cliff at Walls Hill quarry, such fall being purely Accidental." At the close of the proceedings, Mr Bovey, the father-in-law of the deceased, asked permission to express on behalf of the widow, her warmest thanks to the House Surgeon, Matron and attendants at the hospital for the marked kindness they one and all had shown to her under the very painful circumstances. The Jury's fees were given to the widow and her children.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 December 1885
TORQUAY - Death From Poisoning In Torquay. Suicide Of A Herbalist. - Considerable sensation was created on Tuesday in the neighbourhood of Warberry Vale cottages on it becoming known that an elderly man named JAMES UPHAM had been discovered in a dying state in his bedroom, there being strong indications that he had taken poison, either intentionally or by accident. It appears that the old man had resided for years at No. 6, Warberry Vale Cottages, where he occupied two rooms, carrying on a small business as herbalist. Some eighteen months since he lost his wife, and since that time he has indulged pretty freely in an old habit of drinking to excess, which appears to have affected his mind considerably. The Inquest was held before Mr S. Hacker, the Coroner, on Thursday afternoon at the Police Station. - Mr Wm. Motton was the Foreman of the Jury, and the following evidence was taken:- Mary Anne Ching, residing in the same house as deceased, said that UPHAM had for seven years occupied rooms in their house, paying 3s. a week rent. There was now three months arrears due; deceased did but little business, and was mostly in his own rooms alone. About 12.30 on Tuesday last just as witness was going out she heard a groan, and fearing her child upstairs was ill she ran up and found that the noise proceeded from the bedroom of deceased. Running in, she found him lying on his back on the bed either groaning or vomiting. Taking hold of his wrist and seeing the state he was in, she called her husband to run for assistance. A neighbour and the doctor were there in the course of a few minutes. She noticed a strong smell in the room, and a tumbler (produced) that was in the window contained about a teaspoonful of dark liquid, which smelt exactly like the odour which filled the room. Deceased did not want for anything; there were provisions in his cupboard, and he had not left the house since Wednesday, when he said he was going to see a chemist. Some time since his parish pay, 2s. 6d. a week, was stopped, and that had troubled him very much. - William Ching, husband of the last witness, said he heard his wife call out, and went for a policeman, and for a nephew of deceased, who is footman at Stitchill House. The day previous to the occurrence he had spoken to deceased and asked him for some rent, and he replied that he was giving up housekeeping and was going to sell his furniture and pay all up. Deceased had his parish pay stopped because he "went boozing". - Mr Heath, surgeon at the Hospital, who was called to see deceased, said he found him in bed quite insensible. From the symptoms and appearance of deceased he believed it to be a case of poisoning. He had since examined the body, which was well-nourished; the stomach was very much corroded and there were traces of poison. In the opinion of the witness the cause of death was carbolic acid poisoning. The phial and tumbler produced both contained that acid in an impure state, and might very likely be used in the course of deceased's business as a horse and dog doctor. - Mr Tozer, relieving officer, was called by the request of the Jury, and said that in consequence of the irregular habits of the deceased, and his refusal to go into the "House" or to fetch his "pay" from the Town Hall, although well enough to fetch his beer, the Board stopped his weekly allowance some three months since. - BESSIE COLOMBO, daughter of deceased, residing at Okehampton, said she had not seen her father for 18 months, but wrote to him every week sending him a small sum to help him. She knew from what he wrote her that the stoppage of his "pay" had upset him very much; she had urged him to go to the Town Hall and fetch his money. He had always drunk pretty freely, but was quiet with it. Police-Sergt. Bright, who examined the rooms occupied by deceased, proved finding the glass and bottle containing the acid. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury after retiring for a short time found the following verdict: "That deceased came by his death by Poison, taken whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 18 December 1885
TORQUAY - Determined Suicide In Torquay. - Quite a sensation was caused in the town on Saturday last by a suicide of an unusually determined character. A man named JOHN SAMUEL BALSOM (55) a mason's labourer, residing at 45, Victoria Park, St. Marychurch-road, after trying first to hang himself and then to cut his throat, threw himself into the sea near Meadfoot Beach. He had suffered much from mental depression, and had been under medical care, but no one expected that he contemplated self-destruction. On the body being found on Sunday, it was removed to the mortuary at Torquay. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held at the Town Hall before Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner. Mr W. B. Smale was Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was MARIA BALSOM, wife of the deceased. She said her husband had for some time been in low spirits and poor health, being subject to fits. He had been out of work for nearly two years, and the fact had preyed upon his mind. She with her boy had been compelled to support him. They had had parish relief, and Dr Wills had attended deceased for his health. Last week deceased was much worse than usual, but nothing serious was expected. He complained greatly of his head, and kept in bed all Friday, but got up at a quarter to two o'clock on Saturday morning. Becoming much worse all at once, he complained of pain on the top of his head, saying it was like someone tearing his hair off. He said, "I can't stay here." She replied, "Nonsense;" but he got out of bed, and half dressed himself. She wanted to prevent him from going out, telling him that it was too late, but he would go. She then called her son, WILLIAM JOHN HARROD, and told him to accompany deceased. Nothing was said that suggested that he was going to do himself any harm, but she did not like him to go out alone at such an hour. Soon afterwards they came back, the husband first. On going downstairs she found the deceased with a table-knife in his hand. She flew at him and took it away, the blade being in his mouth at the time. He went into the yard, and she ran to fetch assistance. He took the knife with him. Mr Lock came in at her request, and tried to pacify the deceased, but all to no purpose, for he would go out again. Mr Lock tried to prevent him, but could not prevail. He went out, and she had not seen him since. - In reply to the Coroner, the witness said deceased had been in a low state of mind for twelve months, but worse for the last month or so. - In reply to a Juryman, she said he had received parish relief for three weeks, and she had made application for it to be continued another three weeks. - WILLIAM JOHN HARROD, labourer, stated that it was on deceased complaining of hearing noises and having pains in the head, that the last witness asked him to get up. When going out the first time, deceased said he "wanted to see the doctor." He afterwards said it was too early for that, but went out, witness following. He walked as far as the Copse and then to Farrier's plantation, where, becoming annoyed at witness watching him, he tried to kick him. Deceased then took a rope from his pocket and tying one end to the bough of a tree, he endeavoured to hang himself, but he made the drop too long, and came to the ground. while he lay there, witness took the rope from him and put it in his pocket. Deceased then endeavoured to choke himself with his hands, and the witness was bitten in trying to stop him. He afterwards got up and ran away home. On arriving in the house, witness learned that deceased was in the back yard with a knife, and on making search witness found him in the closet trying to cut his throat. Witness took the knife away, and saw that deceased had inflicted a wound from which blood was flowing. Deceased again tried to choke himself with his hands, and afterwards seized the poker and endeavoured to put it down his throat. Mr Lock then came in and did all he could to coax the deceased, but it was no good. Going out again, all efforts to prevent him from doing so proving unavailing, deceased went through the copse and through Mr Bartlett's farm up to Kilmorie. Witness followed in company with a brother. They tracked him amongst the rocks and bushes, but all of a sudden they lost sight of him. They waited and listened, but neither saw nor heard anything. At a quarter past five o'clock, thinking deceased had made for home, they came away, it being still dark. On Saturday afternoon witness went out again to look for the deceased, but could not find him. - In reply to the Coroner the witness said that, although he saw two policemen when out with the deceased when he first went to the Copse, he did not seek help, as nothing wrong was expected. Deceased had never threatened to do himself any harm. After deceased attempted to hang himself, witness saw no one from whom he could get help. Even on Saturday afternoon it was not thought that deceased had done anything to himself. - In reply to the Foreman, the witness said that deceased was not violent. When begged to go home after trying to hang himself, he said he "he would have his revenge." There had been no quarrel. Witness did not speak to the deceased at all when he went to Kilmorie. Deceased was deaf. - Replying further to the Coroner, the witness said it "out of his conscious" to tell the police of deceased's disappearance; he was so worried that he did not think of doing such a thing. - John Lock, of 43 Victoria Park, stated that MRS BALSOM aroused him about three o'clock on Saturday morning. He found the deceased in the kitchen and asked what was the matter. Deceased said he was "bad in the head," and "none of the doctors could do him any good." He refused to allow witness to make him some tea, and would not listen to advice to go to bed. Witness told HARROD to watch him, and went to try and meet a constable. He ran as far as St. Marychurch, and on returning found the deceased and HARROD gone. It was very dark at the time. - George Cumming, of 9 Victoria Park, stated that on Sunday morning he went to Ilsham in search of the deceased. He looked all about the place until about one o'clock, round about Anstey's Cove, Kilmorie and Meadfoot. Whilst standing near Kilmorie, two boys drew his attention to the body of a man in the water about two or three feet outside two rocks and lying on his back. The water was about a foot and a half deep. Witness jumped down and got the body by the collar, and found it was the deceased. Witness secured help, and the body was removed. - Mr William Wills, surgeon, stated that he had attended the deceased for about a month on relieving officer's order. The complaint was fits, tending to derangement of the mind. Witness reported him to the Board as suffering from fits and very crazy. Witness saw nothing of suicidal mania, and would not have expected deceased to become a suicide. Witness judged that deceased had destroyed himself in a fit of insanity. When calling at the house of the deceased on Sunday, witness learned that he had not been seen for two days, and that he had no doubt as to what had become of him. - In summing up, the Coroner said he did not think he had ever had before him a more determined case of suicide. If help could have been got at the proper time, the man might have been put under restraint, but unfortunately there was no apprehension that suicidal symptoms would be developed. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased Committed Suicide by Drowning himself while in a State of Unsound Mind.

Torquay and South Devon Advertiser - Thursday 24 December 1885
TORQUAY - Singular Discovery In Torquay. A Corpse Found In A Cellar. Inquest And Verdict. - A singular discovery was made on Saturday last in a villa situate in St. Marychurch-road and known as Springhill. Mr Memery, auctioneer and appraiser, was engaged in making an inventory of the goods in the house, and in a packing case in one corner of a cellar he found a lead coffin containing the remains of a child in an advanced state of decomposition. Information was given to the police and the Coroner informed of the discovery. Inquiry led to the conclusion that the contents of the coffin were the remains of a child of MRS R. G. SUTTON, the tenant of the house, but who was absent from home, in fact lecturing on phrenology and giving character delineations at Plymouth under the style of "MRS PROFESSOR SUTTON." - Yesterday morning an Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of the child was held at the Town Hall before Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, Mr T. F. Graham being Foreman of the Jury. - In opening the proceedings, the Coroner said the body was found under very peculiar circumstances, and it was the duty of the Jury to investigate the matter and say whether the child came by its death properly or not. He ventured to think, judging from the information he had received, that the Jury would be satisfied with the explanation that would be given. - The first witness called was Mr Memery. He said he was last Saturday engaged with an assistant in going over Springhill for the purpose of making an inventory and valuation of the goods. A piano was on hire, and the object was to ascertain whether there were goods sufficient to pay for it. The witness continued:- The house was occupied by MRS SUTTON who rented it furnished of Mrs Reed. We had nearly finished when Mrs Reed appeared and asked if we had seen a large packing case that was brought in a few days ago. On our replying "No," she searched for it, and going to the cellar said she had found it. I said the case seemed to be empty, but Mrs Reed said she thought it contained something valuable. With my assistant I opened the chest and found inside a coffin wrapped in a coarse wrapper. We could see the lid with the glass hand-piece. I went and told an old lady, a MRS SUTTON, who was in the house at the time and she said the coffin must be an empty one. Examination showed that there was a child in the coffin, and I went and told the old lady so; she was in the house with two servants and two children. Mrs Reed, who was standing near, thereupon said, "I will not allow it to stay in the house; you must get it moved." I said, "We must not meddle with it. You had better call the police." The police were then fetched, and they took the coffin away. There was nothing else in that cellar. The lid of the case was nailed down. The body was in a wooden shell with a lead coffin over it. The lead coffin had been cut open and closed again. - In reply to Jurymen: The case was large enough for half-a-dozen such coffins. There was no smell emitted. - P.C. Bond stated that on Saturday afternoon about five o'clock, he was informed by Mr Memery's assistant that a coffin had been discovered. With P.S. Bastin he went to the house. The coffin was in a large coal-cellar, and in the case were some old rags and articles of clothing, as well as some straw. There were also two newspapers, the one of January and the other of April this year, and two wreaths of flowers which were quite dry. MRS SUTTON was not in the house, having gone away on Monday week. Witness conveyed the corpse from the house to the mortuary. - Mr J. B. Richardson, surgeon, said: I have made an examination of the body. The child was lying in an elm coffin or shell, encased in lead with a face glass. The lead had been cut open. The coffin lid was loose, having no signs of nails or screws. The body was clad in a calico chemise, and dead leaves were strewn upon it. The coffin also contained saw dust, and the ordinary fittings. It fitted the body accurately. On external examination, the body presented the appearance of a well-nourished, well-developed child in an advanced state of decomposition. So far as could be ascertained there were no signs of external violence. The height was three feet; but the sex I cannot swear to owing to the state of decomposition. My opinion is that it was a female, but it is impossible to swear. The hair was light-brown and long. The colour of the eyes could not be determined. There were ten teeth in each jaw. The age I consider about three years. The tongue and mouth were much decomposed, but showed no signs of an irritant poison. On examination of the cranial cavity, there was no sign of injury to the skull, and the brain was reduced to a mere pulp by decomposition. On examining the chest I found the larynx considerably decomposed, and I could form no opinion as to any condition there. The windpipe was in a healthy condition; the bronchial tubes showed signs of congestion; the left lung was healthy, but the lower lobe of the right lung was deeply congested. The gullet was healthy, also the heart and pericardium. The stomach appeared empty. The liver, spleen, and kidneys appeared healthy, also the various blood vessels. The bladder and parts adjacent were much decomposed. I should say the child had not been dead less than nine or ten months, and not more than two years. Where the air is excluded the process of decomposition is slow, and in this case the air was partially excluded. The internal organs were not so much decomposed as would have been expected from the advanced state of decomposition of the parts from which the air had not been entirely excluded. The congestion of the base of the right lung probably had something to do with the death of the child, although it was hardly enough of itself to cause it. I am unable to form any absolute opinion as to the cause of death, but whatever the actual cause, the child died from some acute disease. The well-nourished condition of the body shows that there was no wasting disease. There was no indication of death being from other than natural causes. - In reply to the Coroner: Unless such a body was kept entirely away from air, it must e an injurious thing to have in a house where people are living. - MRS RHODA GERALDINE SUTTON was next called. The Coroner told her she need not give evidence unless she wished; she need not criminate herself. MRS SUTTON said she wished to give evidence, and, having been sworn, she deposed: I am the wife of EDGAR CHARLES AUSTIN SUTTON, of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada West, farmer and printer, and professor of phrenology; but as he is expected in England, and should have arrived last week, I can hardly describe him as of Canada. The body lying in the mortuary is that of my son, CHARLES GERALD HERBERT SUTTON. He died on the 19th April at Bath, of bronchitis and diphtheria. He was aged 19 months and 9 days, and was a very fine child. We were lodging at 5 Dorchester-street, Bath. The death was registered at the time at Bath, and the body was buried on April 28th at Lansdown cemetery, 3 miles from Bath. I was under the impression that the child had been buried in a state of coma, and was out of my mind about it, and wished to have him exhumed. I was under the belief that he had not died, had not ceased to exist, and I could not rest until I saw him. I did not see him put in the coffin, having come home very ill, after catching diphtheria from him. Indeed, I knew nothing of the funeral until it was over, when I was informed that his appearance in the coffin was not that of a dead child - and that when he was put in he was limp and warm. I wanted the child up again, and on making inquiries was informed that the Home Secretary would give permission. I wrote and the reply was that the Chancellor of the Diocese, or the Bishop of Bath and Wells, would grant me a faculty. I also wrote to the Queen, and received a similar reply from Sir H. Ponsonby. After much trouble and going to great expense, I obtained the faculty on May 30th, and the child was disinterred on June 1st. - The Coroner: You got the faculty the month following the death. What was the good of it then? - Witness: Application was made for the faculty in the week the child died, but there was all that delay. I wished even then to see my child to see if he had struggled or recovered consciousness. - The witness continued her evidence: The child was in three coffins - one of polished oak, one of lead and an elm shell. He was taken to the house of a friend of mine at Bath, and I made up my mind that having got my child I would not part from him again. The outer lid was opened by the undertaker. The face of the child was mildewed, which it ought not to have been seeing that the body was in lead. The coffin was afterwards taken to Teignmouth and I had the outer coffin buried in St. Nicholas's Churchyard in accordance with the terms of the faculty. I took out the lead coffin and the shell, feeling unable to part with the child. The interment at Teignmouth took place a few days after I arrived there, the coffin being filled up with bricks by myself, in the presence of the servant girl named Clara Underhill. I sent word about the interment to Mr Wrenford, the clergyman, and almost at the last moment, I filled the coffin with bricks. We idolized the child; he suffered such a terrible deal before death. I screwed down the coffin that was buried. There was no burial service read, but a few words were said by the clergyman. I kept the shell at Teignmouth, no one knowing but the girl and myself, not even my mother in whose house I was then living. For some time the shell was not opened - not for some weeks at any rate. It was opened early one morning out in the garden. I cut the lead myself. Before it was opened the body was kept in a large cupboard in my own room, and we used every day to look at it and put flowers on the coffin. I used to go every day and stay for an hour or two with my child. The box in which the coffin was when found at Springhill was bought for the purpose. It was securely fastened down. - The Coroner: So you did not re-inter the body in accordance with the faculty? - The Witness: I thought re-interring the coffin was carrying out the conditions. - The Coroner: Your ideas of carrying out the faculty are rather peculiar. It refers to the body, not the coffin specially. Have you lost any other children by death? - The Witness: No. - The Coroner: Have you any other children? - The Witness: I think that it is immaterial to the evidence. - The Coroner: You don't wish to answer that question? - The Witness: I don't wish. - The witness further deposed that when she first came to Torquay she lived in Warren Road, and the box in which the coffin was stood outside the house for some time. She complained of Mrs Reed having directed attention to the box and had it opened. During a good part of the time she was under examination the witness was crying. - Clara Underhill, domestic servant at the house of MRS SEYMOUR, mother of MRS SUTTON, at Teignmouth, said she saw MRS SUTTON in the coach-house before the day fixed for the re-interment. Witness asked her what she was doing, and she replied: "I am going to take the poor little fellow out and fill the coffin up with bricks." Witness saw the child when living as well as when dead, and recognized the corpse as his remains. She helped MRS SUTTON to take the body upstairs and put it in a cupboard. Witness did not put any of the bricks into the oak coffin, but helped MRS SUTTON to carry it into the house when she had filled it. She was at MRS SUTTON'S when the child died. It was a tall child. A Juryman: Did anyone in the house know of what took place in the coach-house. The Witness: No one knew it but me and MRS SUTTON and God, sir. - In summing up the evidence, the Coroner said: Gentlemen of the Jury. You have the evidence before you, and I think you will hardly consider it satisfactory in a certain way as an explanation of the case. you will no doubt agree with me that the circumstances are very extraordinary and that a careful investigation is quite justified. You will all know that no one can as in this case keep a dead body in the cellar of a dwelling house without laying himself or herself open to an Inquiry as to how the body got there and how the deceased came by his or her death. Anyone doing such a thing is brought under suspicion which can only be allayed by proper Inquiry. You have heard the evidence of MRS SUTTON, which is the most important as giving an account of the death of the child. MRS SUTTON gave her evidence clearly, and I think you will take it that it has been corroborated by the other facts which have come before you. It will be for you to consider whether there is any doubt to be thrown upon that evidence. MRS SUTTON has told you that the remains lying in the mortuary are those of her child, who died from natural causes on April 19th, and was buried on the 28th of that month. Duly qualified medical men were in attendance, and had it not been for proper certificates the child could not have been buried. So we may take it that the child died from natural causes, and that all was correct so far. The child was buried in due course, and a short time after, for reasons that have been stated to you, MRS SUTTON desired to have it disinterred, and made application and obtained a faculty from the Bishop of Bath and Wells. That faculty orders that the child may be disinterred upon condition that it shall be re-interred at St. Nicholas in accordance with the application, and the faculty was granted on that condition. The body was disinterred and taken to Teignmouth and you have heard what happened there. From some sentimental reason, MRS SUTTON, after having arranged for the burial of the child, proceeds just before burial takes place, to take the child out of the oak coffin. She takes the child into the house, and fills the coffin with bricks in a very extraordinary way; and she allowed that coffin so filled with bricks to be buried by the Vicar of Shaldon, and the child was afterwards brought to Torquay. The main point in the Inquiry is the identification of the child, and if you are satisfied that the remains in the mortuary are those of CHARLES GERALD HERBERT SUTTON, which were disinterred, your duty would be discharged by your bringing in a verdict that the child died from natural causes. It would also be for you to consider whether under the circumstances you should not add some rider of censure or recommendation to the verdict, for the case seems to me to call for something besides a verdict of death from natural causes. So far as the law goes, I may say that there is no power compelling any person to bury a body in any particular way, as long as there is no infringement of the sanitary laws. By the Public Health Act no body is allowed to be kept in any dwelling-house if it is likely to be prejudicial to health. Dr Richardson has stated that the body in this case was in such a condition as to be prejudicial to the health of the inhabitants, and I shall therefore at once make an order for the burial of the body in pursuance of the powers given by the Public Health Act. Unless MRS SUTTON undertakes within two days to have the body buried, the order will be carried out by the relieving officer, and she will be charged with the expenses. - After a quarter of an hour's deliberation the Jury returned the following verdict: We are of opinion that the child in the mortuary is the son of MRS SUTTON and that it died from natural causes. We consider that MRS SUTTON gave her evidence in a very satisfactory manner. We are of opinion that her action has been very indiscreet, and would recommend her, should she be similarly situated at any future time, to act more in accordance with the general custom.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 January 1886
TORQUAY - Sudden Death Of A Child. - On Sunday morning last, WILLIAM HENRY ADAMS, aged two years and three months, died suddenly at his mother's house, 24, Market-street. An Inquest into the circumstances was held on Wednesday evening at the police station, before Mr Sidney Hacker. The mother, ANNIE ADAMS, said the child had always been weakly. On Saturday night it was taken unwell. Acting on the advice of a neighbour, she applied two poultices and gave the child some castor oil. Later on it began to breathe heavily. She gave it some brandy, and getting worse it did at 3.30 on Sunday morning. She thought it was too late at ten o'clock to send for a doctor. - Mrs E. Gay deposed to being present at the child's death. She was of opinion that the child had suffered from bronchitis, as it was always tight on the chest. She saw it shortly before its death, and, as far as she could tell, everything possible was done for it. - Mr Wills, surgeon, said he attended the child about ten months since, when it was suffering from consumption of the bowels. It was very delicate and badly fed. He had seen the child since its death, and it was much improved, and appeared well cared for and well nourished. It had apparently died from bronchitis, but he thought it was an error not to send for a doctor. What was done was proper, except the giving of the brandy. The child's former complaint and the delicacy of its constitution were the causes of its sudden death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the Coroner remarking that any medical man would at any hour of the night have attended a dying child.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Saturday concerning the sudden death on Christmas night, of a married woman named RIED. It was stated that deceased partook very heartily in the day of goose, plum pudding and nuts and the doctor affirmed that death was due to the effects of over-eating.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 January 1886
ST. MARYCHURCH - Inquest At St. Marychurch. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JANE FROST, at the Havelock Arms inn, St. Marychurch, on Saturday afternoon. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased fell downstairs at her house, and her head coming in contact with the bottom step, she sustained injuries from the effects of which she died. Dr Finch, who had been attending the deceased, gave evidence leading to the inference that the deceased fell while in a fit of giddiness. The Jury, of whom Mr Lee was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 February 1886
TORQUAY - Death From Blood Poisoning At Ellacombe. - On Monday evening at the Country House Hotel, Ellacombe, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of JOHN LAWRENCE (55), brewer's labourer, living at 2, Wellington-road, who expired on the previous day under very distressing circumstances. For some fifteen years the deceased had been in the employ of the Torquay Brewing Company. While at his work on Tuesday of last week he put forth his right hand to prevent a cask from falling, and in doing so injured the back of one of his fingers by knocking it against an iron hoop. The limb swelled, and blood poisoning supervened, from which the unfortunate man died. Mr Motton was Foreman of the Jury. - The widow of the deceased was the first witness. After stating that the small wound on the knuckle continued to become more painful every day, she said that on Saturday last, when it was greatly swollen, she poulticed it. On the following day, in the afternoon, Dr Haddow, assistant to Dr Gamble, incised the hand. The operation was performed in the front room, and when the doctor had left, the deceased wanted to be in his usual bedroom. For three nights he had had no sleep, owing to the pain, and after the operation he seemed a little lost, and wanted to get out of bed. Through his moving about the bandages became undone, and she wrapped a blanket round the arm. But she could not stop the bleeding, and he died at 4.45, about half an hour after the bandages came off. The place was "like a slaughter house" on account of the loss of blood. When the bleeding began, she sent for Dr Gamble. Dr Haddow came about 5.30, three-quarters of an hour after the deceased breathed his last. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that the deceased pulled the bandages off; through weakness, owing to the loss of blood, he hardly knew what he was doing. He was a healthy man. Asked if the deceased was temperate in his habits, the witness said he was allowed three pints of beer a day, and he consumed that and sometimes perhaps a glass or so more. - John Stoneman, carpenter, St. Marychurch, a friend of the deceased, said he told him how it was that he hurt his hand. Trying to prevent a cask from falling, he caught his hand against an iron band, and knocked the skin off one of his knuckles. The wound was not more than a quarter of an inch in size. The deceased did not speak of any pain on the Tuesday, but on the Thursday the hand was swollen, and he complained of much pain. On Sunday the deceased showed the limb to the witness, and it was swollen very much, there being bladders over the hand and up the arm. In the afternoon Dr Haddow incised the back of the hand in two places and the arm in one place. They bled freely, and after the bleeding seemed spent the doctor bandaged hand and arm. Half an hour afterwards the deceased became delirious, threw his arms about, and partially fainted. When he had recovered, he was taken into his own bedroom. The deceased removed the bandages by pulling at them and throwing his arms about. The wife and daughter bound up hand and arm with towels and flannels, but they could not stop the bleeding. At this time deceased said to his daughter, "Hold me up; I am going to die." The witness then went for Dr Haddow, but found he was not at home. He went on to Dr Gamble, who said he could not go, but his assistant would call at 5.30. Witness said the case was a serious one, whereupon Dr Gamble repeated his assurance that Dr Haddow would be in attendance at 5.30. It was about 4.45 that witness was at Dr Gamble's, just at the time LAWRENCE is said to have died. - George Brown, a man employed with the deceased, gave evidence as to the manner in which the wound on the finger was caused, adding that it bled very little at the time. - Dr George Haddow, assistant to Dr Gamble, "club doctor" to the deceased, deposed that on Thursday night he was called to see the deceased. He found the hand very much swollen, and wanted to make an incision, but this the deceased would not consent to. The witness told the deceased to remain in bed until his visit on the following day. On going, however, on the Friday, the witness found that the deceased had gone to work. On the next day, the witness received a message requesting him to see the deceased again, and on going he found him delirious. The witness again pressed the deceased to let him open his hand, erysipelas having set in and blood poisoning being also indicated. The case was then, in the opinion of the witness, a hopeless one, as the heart was failing rapidly. But the deceased would not allow the hand to be touched, although the witness explained to him that his only chance lay in the hand being opened, and that chance was then not a great one. Returning to Dr Gamble, the witness informed him of the nature of the case, and Dr Gamble agreed that there was nothing to be done if the patient refused to allow an incision. The witness called again on Sunday afternoon, and the deceased then let him open the hand and arm, but it was too late. The bleeding after the operation was profuse. Witness did not bandage too tightly, because he wished to allow the poisonous matter to run out freely so that it might not become absorbed in the blood. The deceased was rambling at the time. Having waited half an hour, the witness left the house at ten minutes past four. He then went to see other patients, not returning to his residence until half-past five, when he was informed that he had been sent for to see the deceased again. On arriving at the house, he found him dead. Dr Gamble knew the man was dying when the messenger waited on him, and he thought that the statement that the case was serious meant that the patient was delirious. The witness was of opinion that death resulted from erysipelas and blood poisoning. The loss of blood might have accelerated death, but not much as the man was dying before the operation. Death could not be attributed to the loss of blood consequent upon the deceased taking off the bandages. The deceased had "taken a lot of beer in his day." It would have been better if the wound had bled more freely at the time it was sustained, as then there would have been less likelihood of matter being generated. - The Coroner briefly summed up the evidence, directing special attention to the fact that death did not result from loss of blood consequent upon the removal of the bandages by the deceased, but from blood poisoning which had so manifested itself on the day before death as t lead Dr Haddow to believe the man to be in a dying state. One of the Jurymen, Mr Cox, chairman of the branch of the club of which the deceased was a member, remarked that there could be no imputation as to want of attention on the part of Dr Gamble, as his attendance upon club patients left nothing to be desired. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that Death resulted from Blood Poisoning.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 19 February 1886
PAIGNTON - Death By Poisoning At Paignton. - At an early hour on Monday morning, MR HENRY WIPPELL, aged 53, formerly a stationer and bookseller carrying on business on Victoria Parade, died at his residence, 3, Torbay Terrace, Paignton, from the effects of drinking carbolic acid. On Tuesday an Inquest into the circumstances of the death was held at the Gerston Hotel, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr G. S. Bridgman was Foreman of the Jury. The first witness examined was the widow, MRS EMMA MARIA WIPPELL. She said that for some time past her husband had lived at Paignton, where she had carried on a fancy business. On Sunday night the deceased went to bed about half-past nine, retiring earlier than usual, as he had complained during the afternoon of pains in the head. At a quarter to ten she went up to the deceased and asked him if he would have some coffee, but he refused, appearing to be in a distressed state. She went to bed about eleven o'clock, and shortly after midnight she was awoke by the deceased suddenly getting out of bed and going downstairs. He soon returned, holding in his hand a glass, the contents of which he drank as he came into the room. He then put the glass down on the drawers, jumped into bed, and said, "I've done it now." Witness asked him what he had taken, and he replied, "Some of your disinfectant stuff; some of Condy's fluid, I believe." She immediately aroused the governess, and went herself for a doctor, who directed her to give the deceased some olive oil. She did so, but he was unable to swallow it and death ensued about half-past one on Monday morning. The carbolic acid was taken from a bottle, and was purchased by her last summer for disinfectant purposes. She had suspected that her husband's mind had been affected for some time past. He had frequently been unreasonable and erratic in his actions. He had also been addicted to excessive drinking for several years past, and had suffered from delirium tremens to such an extent that it had been found necessary to watch him, and take charge of him for days together. On one occasion he threatened to jump over the pier. During the past few months he had become involved in pecuniary difficulties. He had taken very little food lately, and on Sunday afternoon he talked a good deal about his troubles, and appeared to be more than usually depressed. - Dr Alexander deposed that shortly before one o'clock on Monday morning, he was called by MRS WIPPELL, who expressed to him her fear that her husband had taken poison. He immediately went to 3, Torbay-terrace, where he found the deceased lying in an unconscious state and frothing at the mouth. An attempt was made to produce vomiting, but without success. The stomach pump was also applied, but ineffectually, owing to the deceased's gullet having become so contracted by the corrosive action of the fluid he had swallowed. The witness made a post mortem examination, and found nearly a quarter of a pint of carbolic acid in the stomach. - MR GEORGE WIPPELL, ironmonger, of Exeter, brother to the deceased, said the latter had been greatly troubled by his pecuniary affairs for some time past. He had also been occasionally given to heavy drinking, and witness felt quite sure, from what he had heard from time to time, that the deceased's mind was greatly affected through the excessive use of alcohol. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the effects of carbolic acid poisoning by his own hands, he being at the time of Unsound Mind.

ST. MARYCHURCH - Sudden Death At Watcombe. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, at the Palk Arms inn, St. Marychurch, touching the death of JAMES GAYLER, 67, who was found dead on Saturday at the bottom of a flight of steps leading from Watcombe to Maidencombe. Evidence of identification having been adduced, and to show that the deceased had complained of suffering from giddiness, a lad named George Tully was examined. He said he was on the road to Maidencombe on Saturday afternoon, when he saw the deceased lying on the ground dead. P.C. Ware deposed that the man lay with his head down the hill, and his feet towards the steps. There was a cut at the top of his head which had bled a little, and there was also a scratch on the right side of his face. Dr Finch gave evidence, indicating that death was from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 March 1886
TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. - On Sunday morning the body of MARY ANN AGGETT, aged 59, wife of EDWARD AGGETT, cab-driver, 5 Princes-road, Ellacombe, was found on the Torre Abbey Sands by a seaman named Richard Middleton. The deceased, who had been in a low way for some time, appears to have left home on Saturday evening, and jumped over the sea wall and drowned herself. On Monday evening an Inquest was held at the Town Hall before Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner. Mr William Motton was Foreman of the Jury. The husband of the deceased deposed that he last saw his wife alive on Saturday morning when he left home about half-past seven. In the evening, finding that his wife did not come home, he went in search of her, but could not discover her whereabouts. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that the deceased had worried a good deal, owing to one of her sons not being "just what he should be." Charles Tozer, who resides in the same house as the AGGETTS, said that on Saturday evening the deceased opened his door, and putting her head inside remarked that she was going to see CHARLIE, meaning her son, who was unwell. She then left the house. The witness knew that the deceased had suffered very much in her head, on one occasion she complained that her brain felt as if a man was stirring it up with a stick. - Thomas Medland, cabman, who assisted in removing the body from the rocks on to the slip, gave evidence as to the finding of the body, and P.C. Gidley testified as to the condition and position of the body. - Dr Richardson stated that he had made a superficial examination of the body. He found a compound fracture of the leg above the ankle, a large red mark, a bruise along the forehead, and other slight marks on the hand and wrist. The injuries were inflicted before death, but were not in themselves sufficient to cause death. His opinion was that the deceased came by her death from drowning. If she fell or jumped from the wall and broke her leg, she would probably fall forward causing the bruise on the forehead, and becoming insensible would be drowned whilst in that condition. He had known and attended the deceased for some years, and at one time she had shown unmistakable signs of insanity, but he thought that had quite passed away, and that she had recovered. The Coroner having reviewed the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 9 April 1886
TORQUAY - Inquest. - Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Torbay Hospital on Saturday, relative to the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL STOCKER, 45, carman, of Ellacombe, who had died from injuries sustained in an accident on March 12th. The deceased was driving a horse and waggon down Market-street, when the horse shied and bolted, and in trying to get off the waggon, STOCKER got his legs entangled in the wheel and had one broken. He was taken to the Hospital, where amputation was found necessary and from the effects he died. The Inquest was adjourned till yesterday, when the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence. STOCKER has left a wife and nine children.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 April 1886
TORQUAY - Sad Boating Fatality. - A sad fatality occurred in Torbay on Monday afternoon. It appears that JOHN HENRY BANKHEAD LAVIS (14), son of MR WM. HENRY LAVIS, hairdresser, Strand, Torquay, with Henry Halliwell, (21) assistant to MR LAVIS, hired a boat, named the Freda, from Messrs. Browne Bros., Victoria Parade, for the purpose of having a row. They pulled into the bay, and were taken in the direction of Corbyn's Head, where, finding the sea dangerously strong, they made for the beach, but were driven towards Livermead, where the boat was capsized. There was a short struggle in the water, after which young LAVIS disappeared, Halliwell being soon afterwards rescued in an exhausted condition. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday morning at MR LAVIS'S residence, before Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, Mr W. Pridham being Foreman of the Jury. MR LAVIS identified the deceased, whom he last saw alive about two o'clock on Monday afternoon, when he said he was going out. MR LAVIS added that he did not know his son was going boating. He was not in the habit of doing so. - Robert Browne, boatman, of 3 Palk-street, Torquay, said that on the afternoon of Monday, the deceased, who was with Mr Halliwell, asked for a boat called the Violet. He told them that the Violet was in the loft, but they could have a stiffer boat called the Freda. The Freda was 19 feet long, with 4 feet beam; it was not an outrigged boat. He saw them leave the harbour. They started at a quarter past three. It was a safe boat, and had been used all the winter. There was a heavy swell at the time with breakers on the shore. The sea was safe except for the breakers. It was the rule for him, and his order to his men, to caution everybody against the breakers, whether visitors or townspeople. He could not say whether his man cautioned the deceased or not; witness was busy at the time with another lot of people. He heard his man cautioning everybody that went out. Witness was told afterwards that the boat was floating bottom upwards, and his brother went to secure it. The boat had no sail, but two oars and two paddles. There were scores of other boats in the bay that afternoon. People were cautioned against the west shore, because it was not safe there. - Theordore Browne, boatman, of 3 Rock Walk, and brother of the last witness, said he was standing at the Pier Head when he was told that one of their boats was upset in the surf. His brother was then coming back, having been down to warn a party off the surf. He jumped into the boat and pulled away with his brother to the West side of the bay. There they saw the Freda floating bottom upwards. They could see nothing else. His brother landed to make inquiries, and after waiting on the surf for two hours, he returned for the purpose of getting grappling irons. He then changed his wet clothes and afterwards, on reaching Livermead, saw Mr Manley who called out "here is the body." He helped to secure the body and communicate with the police. All the boats kept in the harbour were out that afternoon. The boat Violet the deceased asked for was only ten feet long, and the Freda which was let to him was nineteen feet. - Robert Prowse, cabdriver of Upton, said that whilst coming back from Paignton, he saw the boat capsize when between Livermead and Corbyn's Head, at about ten minutes to four. The boat was only fifteen yards from the shore, where there was a heavy surf. The man and lad seemed to be trying to protect themselves against the surf, and the boat was broadside on. If it had been otherwise he thought there might have been little danger. He jumped off his cab, and ran down to the beach, and caught one of the two by the hair as the wave was beginning to take him back again. Just then he saw the deceased sink, having been probably struck on the head by the boat. The deceased did not rise again after he first sank. - Frederick Manley, coal merchant of Vaughan Parade, said he went out to Livermead on Monday afternoon, to watch for the body, which he saw washed ashore at twenty minutes past seven. He helped to secure it, and it was afterwards taken to the deceased's place of residence. - Edward Harley, boatman, in the employ of Browne Bros., deposed to letting the Freda out on Monday afternoon last. It was a safe boat - one of the largest of Browne Bros. fleet - and had been in use for the past two years, summer and winter, with one gentleman. He cautioned everybody, including those to whom he let the Freda, against the west side of the bay. He could not particularly remember the Freda, but he was quite sure that he cautioned every boat that went out against going near the breakers. - Henry Halliwell, assistant to MR LAVIS, who was visited in his bedroom where his evidence was taken down, said he went out in a boat with the deceased on Monday afternoon. They were not cautioned at all, Mr Browne being busy at the time, and the man who let them have the boat never saying a word to them. If any caution was given, he did not hear it. They went out, and finding that the sea was washing very fiercely over the new pier they got near the east coast. They got parallel with the end of the pier opposite the Imperial Hotel, but they only saw one boat out east of them, and the sea was tossing it very badly; and seeing many boats move to the west they endeavoured to get near them. They turned the boat quietly to prevent her getting broadside on. Witness was rowing and deceased was steering. When the boat's head was turned towards the shore, he saw that it had turned MASTER LAVIS'S head and he was sick. He then tried to get back as soon as he could, and pulled with one oar only, but he found they were too far out to get into the harbour. Finding that he could not get back, although he pulled as hard as he could with one oar, he endeavoured to make for Torre Abbey Sands, with the intention of landing there. They made for the boating place at Torre Abbey Sands, near Corbyn's Head. Witness was pulling with one oar all the time, and deceased was steering, but could not do much, being very sick all the time. Notwithstanding his greatest efforts, the waves washed the boat to the west, and they soon found themselves on the Livermead side of Corbyn's Head. Finding it was impossible to get round the head he took out a second oar and made straight for the shore, pulling very hard with all his strength. When about twenty yards from the shore a tremendous wave swamped the boat and turned its head to the railway on Torre Abbey Sands, and another wave came almost at once and capsized the boat. He came up under the deceased, who exclaimed, "Oh God; Lord have mercy on me." He pushed the deceased towards the boat and saw him get on it. When some distance out, witness sank and did not see deceased any more. He struggled hard, and a heavy wave carried him on to the shore, where he was helped by several people. He asked "where is he?" and he heard someone say "he is gone," "don't tell him." He was afterwards conveyed home. They were not standing up in the boat at the time. No one ever warned him, or he should only be too ready to have attended to it. - The Coroner then summed up and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Foreman said he could not see there was anyone to blame, but he only regretted that the young men had not had more experience before going out. Both the Coroner and the Foreman commended the action of Mr Manley and the cabdriver, to the latter of whom the Jury gave their fees in recognition of his prompt and humane conduct. - Amongst the many expressions of deep sympathy with MR and MRS LAVIS have received, accompanied by very handsome wreaths, may be mentioned those of Dr Alabone (London), the Pupils of Torquay Public college, and Miss Mackenzie, Livermead. The funeral takes place this afternoon, Rev. W. Emery conducting the service.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 21 May 1886
TORQUAY - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday afternoon, ELIZABETH NOSWORTHY, 47, wife of THOMAS NOSWORTHY, mason, residing at 18 Daison-cottages, left her house and went into the residence of a neighbour named Jane Hurson. While there she declared that her leg had burst, and she died within six minutes. Dr Tyrrell was sent for, but the woman had expired before his arrival. An Inquest was held this morning, when a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

ST. MARYCHURCH - Concealment Of Birth At Babbacombe. - JEMIMA CANN, aged 20, domestic servant, employed at 6, Sydenham Terrace, Babbacombe, the residence of Mr Hatch, was on Saturday night last delivered of a male child, which she concealed by burying it in the back-yard. On Tuesday, being very ill, she was sent home. She was then attended by Dr Steele, to whom she divulged the fact that she had given birth to a child, which she had buried in the place mentioned. The police were communicated with, and the body was found on Wednesday, and removed to the house of P.S. Nott. - An Inquest was held last evening at the St. Marychurch Town Hall, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner. Mr S. Hanbury was Foreman of the Jury. In opening the proceedings, the Coroner referred to the peculiar circumstances under which the body was discovered. He informed the Jury that their first duty would be to ascertain whether the child was born alive, because, if it was not, their duties at once ceased. If, however, it was born alive, they would have to ascertain how it came by its death. - Dr. W. S. Steele deposed that he was called on Wednesday morning by JOHN CANN, a fish hawker, to see his daughter, who was ill at his house, 1, Fore-street, Babbacombe. The father had told him his suspicions as to what was the matter, and after examination, witness told the young woman that he could come to no other conclusion than that she had recently been delivered of a child. She then said, "I think I had better confess; it is so. I have been confined." He then asked where the child was, and she said "I had it by me all night; you'll find it in the back yard of No. 6, Sydenham Terrace, under a tin." She also said, "I never heard it cry." Witness then went and fetched P.C. Richards, and with him went to the back yard of the house mentioned, where he saw a tin, which on being removed disclosed some recently-disturbed earth. About four inches under the surface they found a brown paper parcel tied with string. It was removed to an outhouse and opened, and found to contain the body of a child wrapped in a white calico cloth. Witness had made a post mortem examination that day at P.S. Nott's house. The body weighed 8lbs. and measured 18 inches in length. It was that of a fully-developed child; it bore no mark of violence, but the umbilical cord was only half an inch long, and was torn and not cut, and had not been tied. The body presented a pale and bloodless appearance. Examining the lungs he applied the water test, trying them separately and in small pieces, and ascertained that the process of respiration had been fully established. His opinion was that the child had been born alive, and had breathed, and had had an independent circulation. The empty condition of the heart had led him to believe that death had ensued from haemorrhage, in consequence of the umbilical cord not having been tied. He had seen the mother that day, and she was in a state of nervous excitement, though not seriously ill. - Mr W. Hatch, of 6, Sydenham Terrace, said that JEMIMA CANN had been in his service for the past six weeks. She complained of cold, and saw Dr Chilcott three or four times. She was well in appearance, and so far as could be seen, nothing was the matter with her. She was about all day on Saturday and Sunday, and on the latter day cooked the dinner. - Mrs Hatch, wife of the last witness, corroborated. On Saturday afternoon CANN was in her bedroom rather long, and went out to see the doctor at six o'clock, returning at eight. On Sunday morning, in response to inquiry, she said she was better, and witness noticed no difference in her condition. On Monday, CANN washed her own linen, and on Tuesday morning the laundress, Mrs Medland, came to the witness and told her that the sheets were covered with blood. Witness then told CANN that she was not in a fit state to work, and made her go home. She was the only servant in the house at the time. - Mrs Eliza Medland, laundress, of Babbacombe, said she had known CANN for some years. She taxed her on Monday week last with being enceinte, but the imputation was laughingly denied. On Monday last she noticed her altered condition, and JEMIMA said "I am all right now." She looked weak and frail. On examining the clothes received from Mrs Hatch, she noticed two sheets covered with blood, which fact she communicated to Mrs Hatch. - MRS CANN, mother of JEMIMA CANN, said she knew nothing whatever of her daughter's condition until Tuesday morning, when she was sent home by her mistress. On Wednesday morning, becoming alarmed, witness sent for Dr Steele, to whom she admitted having given birth to a child. She afterwards said she had dropped down faint as soon as the child was born, and had not done anything to it. She said that when she came round it was lying on the floor, and had not cried nor moved. She took it up and laid it by her. - ROSINA CANN, sister to JEMIMA, said her suspicions were first aroused on Wednesday early, and she communicated them to her mother, advising her to send for a doctor. - P.C. Richards deposed to accompanying Dr Steele to the back yard of 6, Sydenham Terrace, where the child was found buried. - P.S. Nott also gave evidence, and said he searched the bedroom of JEMIMA CANN, but could find no trace of any baby-linen. He saw her on Wednesday afternoon, and charged her with concealment of birth, as to which she declared "before God," that she never heard the child cry. She said she was confined soon after retiring to rest on Saturday night. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Steele said the young woman would not be well enough to appear for a week or ten days, and, in order to enable her to attend, the Inquest was adjourned for a fortnight. As soon as CANN is sufficiently recovered, she will be brought before the magistrates on a charge of concealment of birth.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 June 1886
ST MARYCHURCH - The Babbacombe Concealment Of Birth Case. Adjourned Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the male child whose body was found on May 19th, in the back yard of the house No. 6, Sydenham-terrace, Babbacombe, was held yesterday afternoon at the St. Marychurch Town Hall, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr Sampson Hanbury was Foreman of the Jury. The Inquest had been adjourned from the 20th May in order to allow of the attendance of the mother (JEMIMA CANN) who was until lately in the employ of Mrs Hatch, as a domestic servant. Dr Steele had given it as his opinion that the child had been born alive, but that it died shortly after birth from haemorrhage, the result of inattention at the time. The evidence of the various witnesses was now read over in the presence of JEMIMA CANN. The Coroner briefly addressed the Jury who, after five minutes discussion, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 27 August 1886
NEWTON ABBOT - Sad Death Of A Kingskerswell Lad. - A heavy cloud has hung over the village of Kingskerswell during the past few days. A son of MR SAMUEL ANDREWS, an old and respected inhabitant, came home a few days since on short leave from H.M.S. "Impregnable." On Thursday evening last week he went into Newton to see some shipmates, and spent the night there. In the morning, with one of his shipmates, he went to the river Teign to bathe, but he had no sooner entered the water than he was seized by the cramp, and notwithstanding al the efforts of his mate to save him, he was drowned. The body was recovered and taken to the mortuary at Newton, where an Inquest was held and a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" returned. On Saturday the remains of the poor lad were brought to his father's home. The funeral took place on Monday. The coffin was carried by sailor lads, shipmates of the deceased. It was taken first into the Baptist Chapel, where a short service was held, and thence to the churchyard. The attendance of the public was very large. Rev. J. Thompson, resident Baptist minister, officiated.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 October 1886
TORQUAY - Horrible Discovery At Torre. A Widow Lady Found Dead. - On Saturday afternoon last, a shocking discovery was made in a house in Avenue-road, Torre. For the past few years the dwelling-house, No. 2, Avondale-villas, has been in the occupation of MRS MARY REA, a widow, aged about 70, who has lived in entire isolation, and held little or no intercourse with neighbours. She was of somewhat eccentric habits, and had been, known to go away from home for short periods without informing her few acquaintances of the fact; so that, when days passed from the 1st to the 16th of October without anything being seen of her, no great surprise was felt, and nothing like alarm was entertained by the residents in the locality. Further, while nothing was seen of MRS REA by her neighbours, there was a recollection in the minds of some that on the very day when she last showed herself, it was to make inquiry respecting the time, apparently with a view to catching the train for some distant place; and as the window blinds were down, her non-response to the ring of callers was readily explained by the assumption that she had gone on a journey. Among the callers was Mr A. H. Dymond, of Exeter, and his clerk, whose business was the collection of rent. Calls having been made on three successive Saturdays without answer, Mr Dymond became suspicious as to the cause of MRS REA'S non-appearance, and communicated with the police, who promptly took the matter in hand. On Saturday afternoon Detective Bond and Mr Joseph Chave, carpenter and builder, who lives close by, entered the house by means of a ladder, through an unfastened upstairs window; and in the kitchen they found MRS REA lying on the floor dead, and in such a decomposed state as to leave no doubt that she had been dead many days. Indeed, all things being taken into consideration, it seems clear that she breathed her last on the night of October 1st, shortly after having answered the door to receive some things from the errand boy of Mr J. S. Bridgman, grocer. Her bed was found to be unruffled, a newspaper pushed under the door on the morning of the 2nd instant was found to be untouched, and all the circumstances pointed to the conclusion that the aged lady expired while at supper on the night just specified, and, as medical examination has shown, from rupture of the heart, which was in a diseased state. So she lay dead in the house for fifteen days before being discovered.
Inquest And Verdict. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held at the Clarence Hotel, Torre, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr J. E. Edwards was Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness was Mr Joseph Chave, who lives at 4 Avondale-villas. Having given evidence of identification, he said he had known the deceased for five years. Since 1882 she had lived in the house in which she died. She had lived quite alone, never having a servant. The last time he saw her alive was on the last day of September. At times she had been away from the house, and himself and his wife thought that she had left home at the beginning of October, for on the 1st instant she asked Mrs Chave what was the time, as it was believed with a view to catching a train. Not hearing or seeing anything of the deceased, they thought she had gone away, and were daily expecting her to return. Being questioned by P.C. Bond on Saturday last, the witness said he thought something should be done to clear the matter up. He and P.C. Bond put up a ladder and got into the house through one of the upstairs windows, which was an inch or two open at the bottom sash. Nothing was found in the bedrooms, but the stench down over the stairs aroused suspicions. In the kitchen they found the deceased lying on the floor dead. In reply to a Juryman, the witness said that the deceased had frequently complained of being unwell, but she had never had medical advice. He had more than once heard her say, "Don't you be surprised if you one day find me dead." - Ernest Pidgeon, errand-boy in the employ of Mr J. S. Bridgman, said he saw the deceased on the night of Friday, the 1st instant, about eight o'clock. He went to her house with half a dozen of ale, and the deceased opened the door and took the ale. She remarked that the witness was rather late, but said no more. - P.C. Bond deposed that on Saturday last Mr Dymond, whom he took to be the owner of the house in which the deceased lived, called at the police station, and asked if some one could be sent to make inquiries about MRS MARY REA, as no one had seen her for some time. About a quarter-past five o'clock he went, saw Mr Chave, and then examined the doors and windows, after which he borrowed a ladder and with Mr Chave entered the house. In the front bedroom he found the bed-clothes a little turned back, but no one had been into the bed since it was made. Downstairs they examined all the rooms, and coming last to the kitchen they found the deceased. All the rooms were straight and everything except the one window through which they got, was locked on the inside. The deceased was lying on her left side, the head towards the window, and the face rather inclining towards the floor. She was near the table, and just behind her was a chair from which she seemed to have slipped. There was a plate and a knife and fork on the floor; the plate was broken, and had apparently been used at the meal which was spread on the table. There was on the table a glass partly full of beer, a dish with some meat on it, a lamp which had burnt out, and nearly a pound of butter. The deceased was perfectly dressed. Later on, the witness helped to search the place, and found a bag in a drawer with twenty-one sovereigns quite loose, and a purse containing one sovereign and some smaller coins. In a front room downstairs there was a chest with some plate in it, and there was also a watch and chain on the mantel-shelf; but everything was perfectly straight. There were several letters in the door, and the oldest date was the 2nd of the present month. In a letter of October 2nd, there was a Post Office order for £4 3s. 6d. In answer to the Foreman, the witness said that there were no stains of blood about; the deceased appeared to have died without a struggle. - Dr Richardson stated that on the 17th instant at three o'clock he went to the house, 2, Avondale-villas, and in the kitchen found the body of the deceased lying on the floor almost face downwards. The body presented the appearance of a plethoric female about sixty years of age. There were no signs of any struggle about the room. The body exhibited a considerable degree of decomposition, especially about the head, the position of which doubtless accounted for its condition. Opening the chest, he found that the covering of the heart was distended with blood in clots. The heart itself was large and fattily degenerated. There was a small rupture in the centre of the left cavity. The cause of death was rupture of the heart; and if an opinion might be hazarded as to the circumstances of the deceased's end, he inclined to the belief that, having knocked the plate off the table, she stooped to pick it up, and that that effort, after a heavy meal, induced the rupture. Death would be instantaneous. - MR JOHN WILLIAM REA, of 86 Regent-street, London, nephew of the late WILLIAM REA, husband of the deceased, stated that he had not seen her for four or five years. He thought she had no name besides MARY and that she was quite seventy years of age. She had no private income, but he had been allowing her a guinea a week, which had been sent monthly by his solicitors. The last remittance fell on the day of her death. He had not heard of any illness of the deceased, except that she was troubled with bronchitis. In a few words of summing-up, the Coroner pointed out that a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence would be one that the deceased died from rupture of the heart in a natural way. He added that he saw no ground of suspicion. A verdict to this effect was returned by the Jury without hesitation.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 19 November 1886
BUCKFASTLEIGH - MR SAMUEL CHURCHWARD, head of the well-known firm of woollen manufacturers at Buckfastleigh, went out rabbit shooting on Saturday on some land in his occupation. He did not return, and in the evening a search was made for him, with the result that his body was found lying near a hedge. The upper portion of his head was blown away, and his brains were scattered. It is surmised that in getting over the hedge his gun was accidentally discharged. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - MR CHARLES WINDEATT BOVEY, rate collector in St Andrew's Ward, Plymouth, committed suicide on Wednesday evening by taking prussic acid. At the Inquest in the evening a verdict of "Suicide in a Temporary fit of Insanity" was returned.

ST MARYCHURCH - Suicide At St. Marychurch. - A sad suicide has been enacted at St. Marychurch. On Sunday evening last MRS ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, aged 72, a widow, residing at Castle View, Teignmouth-road, cut her throat with a table knife, inflicting a wound from the effects of which she died on Tuesday morning. For some time past the deceased had been suffering from melancholia, the death of her husband about a year ago having greatly affected her. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending MRS WILLIAMS'S death was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, at the Havelock Arms Inn, St. Marychurch, on Wednesday morning. Mr J. Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was Elizabeth Elson, niece of the deceased, who resides at 1 Braddons Terrace, Torquay, but for the past few weeks has been living with her aunt at Castle View. The witness stated that on Sunday evening last, a little before eight o'clock, the deceased left the room, and after a short time the witness began to feel uneasy at her absence. Leaving the room in which she had been sitting the witness found the deceased standing at the back door, and the deceased told the witness to go indoors again, which she did. After a short time, however, the witness again went to the back door, and found that the deceased was still standing there. As it was very cold, the witness asked her aunt to go indoors, but she refused. When the witness went out a third time, the deceased had disappeared, and becoming alarmed, the witness went into the back garden, where she heard groans. The witness immediately called for assistance. She did not anticipate that her aunt had destroyed herself as she had never shown any symptoms of so doing. Deceased's manner was not different on Sunday from what it had been on other days, beyond the fact that she complained of a slight headache. witness knew of nothing that had recently happened to trouble her aunt, and she had not heard her complain. Two knives were used on Sunday, and one - a table knife - was identified by the witness as belonging to her aunt. Only one knife was used at tea-time, and when the tea-things were cleared away by the witness after tea, she did not notice the knife. - William Pearce, gardener, who lives in the under apartments of Castle View, deposed that on Sunday evening about eight o'clock, he heard Miss Elson calling for assistance, and on hearing groans proceeding from the bottom of the garden, he went there, and found the deceased on her knees with her throat cut. He got the deceased upon her feet, and with his assistance, she walked into the house. He remained with the deceased until medical assistance arrived. He thought that the deceased had been depressed and in low spirits for the past few weeks, as she did not speak to him as she had been accustomed to. - William James Elson, dairyman, nephew of the deceased, stated that he had just returned from feeding his cattle on Sunday evening, when on passing his aunt's house he noticed a light in the garden, and heard someone calling for assistance. He went into the garden, and there found his aunt with her throat cut, the wound bleeding profusely. He assisted Mr Pearce in removing the deceased from the garden to her house, and he afterwards fetched Dr Steele. Some time after, in company with Dr Steele, witness went into the garden to search for the knife, and found it stuck into the ground about six feet away from where the deceased was found. He did not know of any cause for the act, nor did he think that the deceased was depressed in spirits. - Dr Steele, of Babbacombe, said that he was called on Sunday evening about nine o'clock, and asked to go to Castle View, where he was told that MRS WILLIAMS had cut her throat. He found the deceased lying on the sofa with a deep wound in the throat, but the bleeding had ceased. On examination he found that the windpipe had been divided, and the gullet behind the windpipe was also divided. He believed the wounds to have been caused by at least two cuts, and it was probable that the end of the knife was afterwards inserted in the wound. He sewed the wounds as far as it was safe, but saw from the first that the woman could not survive. She appeared to be perfectly sensible, but could not speak, as the cut was below the organ of voice. The groans which the previous witnesses had referred to, could be accounted for by gurgling caused by blood running down the windpipe. He saw Mr Elson pick up the knife in the garden; it was very sharp and capable of inflicting the wounds in the throat, and causing death. - P.C. Hugo stationed at St. Marychurch, deposed that he went into the garden attached to Castle View, and saw marks of blood but no signs of violence. - Elizabeth Elson and William Pearce, were re-called, the former stating that her aunt died on Tuesday morning, at half-past four; while the last named deposed, in answer to the Coroner, that deceased's dress was not disarranged when she was found. - In summing up the Coroner said that the only point was in reference to the deceased's mind, which the witnesses, with the exception of Mr Pearce, had thought to be perfectly sound. - At this stage of the proceedings, a Juror drew the attention of the Coroner to the fact that Dr Finch was present and could probably throw some light on the matter in regard to the deceased's mind. - Dr Finch, of St Marychurch, was accordingly sworn, and stated that the deceased had been a patient of his for twenty years. Since her husband's death, which took place about twelve months since, the deceased had shown signs of intense nervousness. He had learnt that as she had felt very lonely, she was persuaded to live with her nephew in the Braddons, but was so restless and fidgety that she was compelled to go back to her own house to live. For the last three months she had shown signs of depression. On Saturday last about half-past seven, the deceased came to his house, and complained to him of severe pains in the head. She then related to him an occurrence which had befallen her on the previous day. She said that she had left her house with the intention of going to the butcher's, but without her knowledge she found that she had wandered to Maidencombe Beach. When she came to herself, she found that she was sitting by the sea, and that she was drenched with the water. She further told Dr Finch that she believed she must have swallowed a great quantity of salt water, as she felt a great pain in her stomach. Dr finch said he could not vouch for the truth of the deceased's story, but that was what she had related to him. After hearing that he told the deceased not to go out alone again under any circumstances, and said that he would visit her at her own house. Dr Finch went on to say that he should decidedly attribute the strange actions of the deceased to melancholia. Whilst she was telling him of what had occurred, she appeared to be perfectly rational, but for many months her mind had been far from sound. On Sunday evening he was called upon to go to the deceased, but was just on the point of visiting another patient, so he requested the messenger to go to his son, or to Dr Steele. He arrived at Castle View about twelve o'clock, and found the wounds in the deceased's throat to be such as Dr Steele had described. She could not speak, as the organ of the voice had been separated from the lungs. - The Coroner said that he had no idea that Dr Finch could throw so much light on the matter, and expressed himself very grateful for the medical testimony that he had given. He said that the task of the Jurymen was now very simple. - A verdict of "Suicide, whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity," was accordingly returned.

TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth on Tuesday touching the death of EMMA SANDERS, a married woman, aged 52, who died under circumstances which gave rise to rumours of negligence. Evidence was given by BESSIE BOLT, daughter of the deceased, who stated that she had attended to the wants of her mother, and had provided such nourishing food as was ordered by the doctor. - Mr Owen, the surgeon at the Infirmary, stated that he had been visiting the deceased, and that she had succumbed to an attack of bronchitis. - The Coroner did not consider there was any evidence pointing to negligence on the part of the deceased's friends, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - A shocking state of things was revealed at an Inquest held at Barnstaple on Tuesday on the body of REBECCA HILL, a milliner. The evidence shewed that the deceased - who received 5s. a week from her husband, residing at Plymouth - had been of dreadfully intemperate habits, and had allowed her house and herself to get into a disgustingly filthy state. She was found dead in bed on Monday morning, dressed. There was nothing on the bed save a mattress, and the room was quite devoid of furniture. A quart whiskey bottle was found under the bed. A verdict to the effect that death was caused by a complication of ills brought on by intemperance was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 26 November 1886
SOUTH BRENT - An Inquest was held on Monday by Mr Hacker, at South Brent, on the body of MR STEPHEN GOODMAN, of Lutton, farmer, who died from the effect of a fall. Mr Gillard, surgeon, was called in, and by the order of the Coroner, made a post mortem examination. He found extensive valvular disease of the heart and fracture of the upper part of the spine. He was of opinion that death resulted from fracture of the cervical vertebra, causing pressure of the spinal cord, and considered that syncope caused the fall. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 December 1886
DEVONPORT - An Inquest has been held at Devonport, concerning the death of First Class Staff-Sergeant RALPH JACKSON, of the Commissariat and Transport Corps, whose body was found floating in the Hamoaze on Sunday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", the whole of the evidence being opposed to the idea that the deceased committed suicide.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest on the body of MAUD ISAAC, who had been suffocated in the Cobourg-street fire at Plymouth, was held on Friday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated," and added a rider that the bakehouse oven should not have been placed at the bottom of the house, and that better exits ought to have been provided for a house tenanted by so many people.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 December 1886
TORQUAY - Death of ELIZA NECK. - ELIZA NECK, one of the servants of the late Miss Keyse, at Babbacombe, and an important witness at the trial of John Lee, died suddenly at the Glen late on Sunday night. Since the time of the well-known tragedy, ELIZA NECK and her sister JANE NECK, have been living in the house, being maintained by gratuities received from curious strangers who visit the now celebrated spot. - An Inquest into the circumstances of the death was held on Tuesday evening before Mr S. Hacker at Gasking's Cary Arms inn. Mr J. Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who "viewed the body" at the Glen. The Coroner observed that owing to the fact that the deceased died suddenly and had had no previous medical attendance, it was necessary to hold an Inquest, but the Jury would have little more to do than return a formal verdict. There were only two witnesses called. The first of them, JANE NECK (72) said that she was sister to the deceased, who was 74 years of age. They had lived in the Glen for the last fifty years, and since the murder of Miss Keyse they had remained in the house alone. A little before 10 o'clock on Sunday night, her sister went upstairs to her bedroom, and, when witness followed her a few moments afterwards, she was undressing. After deceased was partly undressed, the witness noticed that she was leaning against the bed, and shortly afterwards witness heard the deceased fall. She crossed the room, and tried to move her, as she was lying in a strained position, but the deceased screamed out "Don't." The witness sat down on a box beside her, and waited half an hour, when she discovered that the deceased was in what she thought was a sweet sleep. She spoke several times to her without obtaining an answer, and then, on trying to move her head, thought something must be the matter. So she went for a neighbour, Mrs Stiggins, who was waiting up for her husband, and then they made sure that life was extinct. Mr Gasking, landlord of the Cary Arms was told, and he went off for Dr Steele. In reply to questions from the Coroner, the witness said that deceased had eaten a fair supper, had seemed in excellent spirits, and was for her in very good health. Two years ago deceased had had what was supposed to be a slight seizure and Mr Chilcote had attended her, and also since then for rheumatism. They had had no doctor since Mr Chilcote's death. Dr W. S. Steele said that that afternoon he had made a post mortem examination. The liver was enlarged and the kidneys diseased, but there was no appearance in the stomach of anything likely to cause death. The heart was small, very weak and flabby, and there was much fatty degeneration. He had no doubt that the deceased had died of cardiac syncope, or fainting, brought on by strain. Deceased must have died without any pain. The Jury promptly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 17 December 1886
EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter on Monday returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" in the case of ELIZABETH HUTCHILL, who was found hanging by the neck dead in her kitchen on Saturday. Deceased was wife of a porter, was 57 years of age, and had been confined in the county asylum.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 31 December 1886
DUNKESWELL - An Inquest was held at Dunkeswell Abbey, near Honiton, on Tuesday, on the body of SARAH ANN CORRICK, aged 30, sister of the school-mistress of the place, who died on Christmas eve. Deceased was enceinte, and her husband seemed concerned at the fact. He, however, made no preparations for her confinement, nor did he inform the neighbours of his wife's condition. The Coroner strongly remarked on the husband's conduct, and said he was morally responsible for his wife's death. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - A Coroner's Jury at Budleigh Salterton on Monday returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane in the case of a gentleman named ASTON, who was found shot in a plantation at Knowle Hill.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 January 1887
EXETER - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at Exeter on the body of WILLIAM PARRISH, late foreman shunter at St. David's, on the Great Western Railway. Deceased was 35 years of age, and lived in Toby's buildings, Lower North-street. On Saturday evening he was riding on a truck that was being shunted from the mileage line near the Exwick crossing. On passing the engine-house he fell. The driver pulled up, but the wheels of the trucks passed over his body and shockingly mutilated it. Death must have been instantaneous. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased leaves a young widow and five children.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 21 January 1887
DEVONPORT - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at Devonport in reference to the death of the male child of a woman named GLOYN, who gave birth thereto in Devonport Park last Friday, and induced a grave-digger at Devonport to bury the same on Saturday morning. The medical testimony was to the effect that the child was stillborn. The Coroner condemned the action of the authorities in allowing an illiterate man to have charge of the grave-yard.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 February 1887
EXETER - On Saturday afternoon a young woman named EVELEIGH, an in-patient of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, was found dead in the courtyard behind the chapel. The deceased came from Budleigh Salterton, and was being treated for an injury to her foot. She must have fallen out of a window about forty feet above the court-yard. An Inquest has been held. It appears that inside the window there was a kind of bench where persons might kneel up and look into the green. The deceased might have been looking out, and, being seized with a fit, overbalanced and fallen out. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that some protection should be put to the window to prevent a similar occurrence in future.

PLYMPTON - Police Sergeant HENRY COLES, stationed at Plympton, has died under singular circumstances. On the 9th January, he was roughly handled in trying to arrest Private Clensey, R.A., stationed at Effort Fort, who, with two companions, was causing a disturbance. For the assault on Sergeant COLES, Clensey had a month's imprisonment, three weeks for assaulting Samuel Jordan, and a week for drunkenness. One of his associates was also fined. Up to the 19th January Sergeant COLES was on duty, but complained of being unwell. He consulted Dr Stamp, who found a severe sprain in one arm, and the officer's general health far from good. Symptoms of blood poisoning afterwards shewed themselves, but no immediate danger was apprehended. On Saturday morning last a change for the worse took place, and Sergeant COLES died in the evening. Residents were greatly shocked at hearing the sad news, for the sergeant was highly esteemed for his genial manner, and for the thorough, yet unofficious way in which he discharged his onerous duties. An Inquest was opened on Monday and adjourned. The deceased had only been married three months.

STOKE GABRIEL - The village of Stoke Gabriel has been greatly excited by a strange affair that has recently been enacted. It appears that on Tuesday, January 18th, a woman named LEVER, aged 46, in the employ of the Rev. J. H. N. Nevill, vicar of the parish, as housekeeper (her husband also being employed by that gentleman as gardener) died, and on application being made to the district registrar of deaths, Mr Rossiter, of Paignton, for a burial certificate, it was refused on the ground that a medical certificate had not been first obtained. It appears that the deceased had been ill for some weeks, but that no medical man had seen her. A further application for a certificate was made to Mr Rossiter on Friday, January 28th, when, the registrar again declining to grant it, the clergyman decided upon interring the remains on the following day, without compliance with the legal requirements. He was promptly notified that his action would be altogether irregular, and told that an Inquest into the circumstances of the death would have to be held, but he insisted upon burying the corpse. The facts were in due course communicated to the Registrar-General, and to Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, who on Thursday last week visited the village for the purpose of holding an Inquest. The church gates were found to be locked, but in the presence of a large crowd of people, the Coroner got over the wall and had the gate opened, afterwards giving orders for the body to be exhumed. A post-mortem examination was subsequently made, and after formal evidence had been taken the Inquest was adjourned until the following day. - The Inquest was resumed on Saturday last, Admiral Dawkins being Foreman of the Jury. Mr T. C. Kellock, solicitor, of Totnes, attended on behalf of the vicar. Dr Lalande Hains and Dr Fraser, both of Totnes, the medical men who made the post mortem examination, were also present. The first witness was HENRY LEVER, husband of the deceased. He stated that he was present at his wife's death, which occurred about 7 a.m. on Tuesday, January 18th. A nurse was also in the room when she died. Mr Nevill was there occasionally, but not exactly at the time of death. He had been in the room an hour previously. Deceased died in a convulsive fit, and was insensible at the time. She was insensible some hours before, but not on the previous evening, when she said she did not think she should get over it. At two o'clock on the morning of her death, the deceased had a prolonged convulsive fit, accompanied by twitching of the limbs, and the convulsions continued more or less up to the hour of her death. She had been ill for years, and had many heavy attacks before they came to Stoke Gabriel, which would be five years ago next March. Her last illness commenced three months before her death, and he understood that she suffered from an abscess on the liver. They had been married many years, and lived on the best of terms. He took her out in a chair three times during her illness. She had eggs, new milk, oatmeal, oranges, and everything she fancied or asked for. She had no strong liquids. He believed she took a little intoxicating drink before taking to her bed, but he never saw her anything the worse for it. He did not think she was so near her death until she had the fits in the morning when she died, as before she had improved a great deal. She had no medical attendance, and although he considered her seriously ill, when she took to her bed, he did not call in a doctor because he thought she did not require his attendance, and that there was sufficient in the house. - The Coroner: What do you mean by sufficient? - Witness: She had medicine from different places. - Where did she get that? - Now it is come to the point, I suppose I must tell. - Of course you must tell me what you know without my having to ask you for everything. - Well, she had medicine from Mr Nevill. - An that's the reason you did not call in a doctor? - Yes, and because I thought the attendance she had was sufficient. - When she had these convulsive fits, and you thought she was going to die, why didn't you call in a doctor then? - It thought it was not necessary. She went off quicker than I thought she was going to. Witness added that Mr Nevill gave deceased her medicine up to the last. She was sick, and vomited two or three days before her death, but he did not know how long this occurred after her previous meal. The witness, continuing, said that the deceased did not complain of any pain, only of weariness. He did not know what she died of, and she never told him what she was suffering from. She did not waste much, except in her legs and arms and around the shoulders. In reply to Mr Studdy, a Juryman, the witness said that he was perfectly satisfied with the treatment his wife received at the hands of Mr Nevill, and that she could not possibly have been treated better or more kindly. In reply to Mr Kellock, the witness added that he remembered Dr Curry seeing the deceased two years ago, and also Dr Kingdon, of London, about the same time. Dr Kingdon was of opinion that she had confirmed liver disease, and was likely to "go off" at any moment. "Dr" Wallace, of London, also saw her two months ago. During her last illness she was attended by Mrs Bull and two nurses from Torquay. One came in December and stayed with the deceased until the day before her death, and the other was there at the time, so that she was never left. Sometimes the deceased was in dreadful agony, which she described as burning pains in her side. This, however, was not in her last illness, but twelve months ago. She never expressed a wish for any other attendance. - Ellen Bull, wife of a fisherman, and charwoman at the vicarage, gave evidence to the effect that the deceased was well looked after and that her death was sudden. - Alice Penzer, trained nurse from St. Raphael's Home, Torquay, said she was with the deceased at Mr Nevill's request nearly three weeks, from the 29th of December to the 17th of January. She found the deceased in bed very ill. She was supposed to be suffering from cancer of the liver. Witness took charge of her at night, and sometimes saw her during the day. She was sick during the last week, and had a convulsive fit, during which she became insensible, and the pupils of her eyes were dilated for ten minutes. There was occasionally vomit of a green colour, as though from the liver. Deceased had cramp in her legs, and her feet were swollen. When she had a convulsive fit it would commence with the drawing of her mouth and the twitching of her eyes, after which she would go off into a deep sleep. Witness administered medicine to her which she obtained from Mr Nevill. She did not know what the medicine was. Deceased gradually got much weaker. There was no doctor in attendance. - The Coroner: Did you not consider her so dangerously ill as to necessitate the sending for a doctor? - Witness: No, I did not. I was working under Mr Nevill, and he was working under Mr Wallace, of London. - Admiral Dawkins: When you saw these serious symptoms did you not suggest that it would be better to have the advice of a local medical man? - Witness: I did not think anything about it. When I am sent to a case I work under whom I am placed. I left it to Mr Nevill. Witness added that she had been a trained nurse five years, and had never had a similar case before; in all other instances a doctor had been seeing the patient. The deceased was taken out in the day without her approval but she was not the worse for it. Had she been there she should have protested against it. She was satisfied that the deceased had every attention and requirement. She left the day before the deceased's death, and she did not then consider that she was in a dying condition. - Isabel Paterson, trained nurse, also from St. Raphael's Home, Torquay, stated that she came to attend on the deceased on January 15th, the Saturday previously to her death. She thought the deceased very ill. She gave her medicine once on Sunday night, and Mr Nevill administered two does between 5.30 p.m. on Monday and 7 a.m. on the following morning, when she died. She had food every hour on Monday night, and took it. At 2 a.m. on Tuesday she vomited gruel she had taken an hour before, and she soon afterwards had convulsions. Witness was a trained nurse of twelve years experience. In answer to questions, the witness said that a doctor could have done no good in the case. - Elizabeth Jane Durant, a lady residing at Sharpham, near Totnes, gave evidence briefly to the effect that she saw the deceased on the 26th of December, and had been in communication with Mr Wallace about her. - Joseph Wallace, of 1, Oxford-mansions, Oxford-circus, London, next gave evidence. He described himself as a medical scientist. - The Coroner: Are you a qualified practitioner? - Witness: No, thank God. He proceeded to say that he was on a visit to a patient in Torquay on the 16th of November last, when Mr Nevill, who he knew was coming, waited upon him and drove him to Stoke Gabriel to see the deceased. Witness had been consulted about her case previously by Mr Nevill, and had been giving advice as to her treatment. When he saw her, on the 16th of Nov., she was in bed, very much prostrated, and with no power of movement. He expressed his opinion that deceased was seriously ill, and that there was no chance of her recovery, except by a miracle. With ordinary treatment she was likely to die in ten days, but with very careful nursing she might last for two months. He formed the conclusion that she was suffering from chronic disease of the liver, and also cancerous habit of the body generally. He saw her again the next day and prescribed for her. Mr Nevill was a pupil of his, and knew how to treat patients. Witness prescribed two of his own patent medicines, called No. 2 and No. 3, and also malt extract. He had been in communication with Mr Nevill as to the state of deceased every few days up to the day of her death. He was not surprised at her death, but rather that she lived so long. He did not send the medicines: Mr Nevill prepared them himself. - Lalande John Cary Hains, physician and surgeon, Totnes, was then called upon to state the result of his post mortem examination of the body, in which he was assisted by Dr Fraser. He said that he had had to send some portion of the organs to London for analysis. The witness said that he made the examination on Thursday, on the body being exhumed in the churchyard, ten days after death. As to the external signs, decomposition was well marked and rigor mortis was almost absent. Dr Hains gave a detailed account of his examination, but declined to say what was the cause of death, until he had been made acquainted with the results of the analysis of the internal organs. - Mr Rossiter, registrar of births and deaths, made a statement as to what he considered to be his instructions in regard to the circumstances under which he should grant a certificate for burial, and also as to what transpired between himself and Mr Nevill, when the latter called for a certificate. - The Inquest was adjourned until Monday next.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 February 1887
PLYMPTON - The Inquest touching the death of P.S. COLES, of Plympton, who died under circumstances reported last week, was concluded on Monday, the verdict of the Jury being that the deceased died from Blood-poisoning, the result of an injury to the arm, but that the evidence was insufficient to show hoe or by whom the injury was caused.

TEIGNMOUTH - On Monday morning the body of JAMES BROWNING, the fisherman who had been missing since Jan. 11th, was picked up near the pier at Teignmouth by William Soper, another fisherman. It will be remembered that the deceased left a public-house in the evening in order to proceed in his boat to Shaldon, but was not further heard of. The body was in an advanced state of decomposition. A Coroner's Jury has returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

STOKE GABRIEL - The Strange Affair At Stoke Gabriel. The Inquest Concluded: The Vicar Censured. - The Inquiry at Stoke Gabriel, into the circumstances attending the death of SELINA LEVER, late housekeeper to the vicar of the parish (Rev. J. H. N. Nevill) was concluded on Monday before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. The vicar was again in attendance, with his legal adviser, Mr T. C. Kellock, of Totnes. About fifty of the villagers were also present, and manifested much interest in the proceedings. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that the Inquest was adjourned from the previous Saturday week for the purpose of allowing an analysis to be made of the internal organs of the deceased. Dr Hains then said there was disease of one of the kidneys, but owing to the congested state of the organs and other appearances, he did not like to take upon himself to give an absolute opinion as to the cause of death. The Coroner further said that he had since received a communication from Dr winter Blyth, of London, the county analyst, to the effect that nothing had been found which would lead to the supposition that the deceased came to her death by poison or that she died anything except a natural death. Under these circumstances the Jury would be able to proceed by taking the completion of Dr Hains's evidence, and also that of the vicar - if he had anything to say. - Dr Hains had his evidence read over, and he was then asked by the Coroner whether, having regard to the fact that the analysis had not disclosed any suspicion of death by poison, he could give an opinion as to the cause of death? - Dr Hains replied that he could from the symptoms which had been described and the post mortem examination. He believed the cause of death to be chronic kidney or Bright's disease, followed by uraemic convulsions. A person suffering from this disease should be kept warm and given medicines that should act on the blood. Good, nourishing, light diet should also be furnished, consisting of milk, eggs, white fish, game, or white flesh, and, if the patient was known to have been addicted to excessive drinking, a little light wine should be given. To take such a patient out of doors was must injudicious, especially if the weather was cold. - The Coroner: Can you say whether improper treatment of the disease would be likely to accelerate or cause death? - Dr Hains: So far as this Inquest has gone, I have yet to learn what the treatment has been. - The Coroner: I am asking it as an abstract question. In a disease of this kind would improper treatment be likely to accelerate death. - Dr Hains: Of course it would. If a person has Bright's disease, and the treatment is not such as should be given for that disease, of course it would accelerate death. Witness added that he considered proper treatment in such a case would be inhalations of chloroform, hot baths, hot fomentations for the loins, and strong purgative medicines. - Dr Donald Alexander Fraser, Totnes, who assisted Dr Hains in the post mortem examination, corroborated his statement as to the cause of death. He considered the congestion of the liver to be due to the convulsions, and not to disease. He should have expected to find a different appearance of the organ if the deceased had had liver disease for two years. - At the conclusion of Dr Fraser's evidence the Coroner asked Mr Nevill whether he wished to give evidence. He did not compel him to do so. Mr Nevill replied that he was quite willing to give evidence, but he suggested that the next medical witness should first be called, as he would rather not appear "amongst the prophets" until afterwards. - Dr J. Currie, parish medical officer, of Totnes, said he had been asked to give evidence of what he knew of the deceased, which was two and a half years ago. He stated that he attended the deceased in April 1884, when she was suffering from a liver attack, and he prescribed for her. He then considered that she was not a healthy woman. He agreed with the other medical men as to the cause of death being kidney disease. The attack for which he treated the deceased, was probably caused by alcoholic influences. Ample cause of death had been shown, and he did not see how her life could have been prolonged. He considered that she was treated rightly so far as diet was concerned, and that nothing more could have been done for her. - Admiral Dawkins: Don't you consider it very severe treatment to put a patient on vegetable diet and stop all meat and alcohol if you knew that she had been in the habit of taking these things? - Dr Currie: As a matter of treatment I should stop alcohol, and, as far as meat goes, I don't consider that milk and eggs are vegetable diet. If, however, the patient could have taken it, I should have no objection to meat; but in Bright's disease the powers of digestion are so weak that the simpler the diet the better. - The Coroner asked the vicar whether he wished to give evidence. Mr Nevill replied that he did not wish to force his evidence on the Court, but he had no objection to giving it. - The Coroner, in reply to Mr Kellock, admitted that Mr Nevill had been summoned, but it was his duty to intimate to him that he could refuse to give evidence if he pleased. If he thought there were any insinuations, or anything of that sort, against him, he should not compel him to make a statement. Mr Kellock said Mr Nevill had nothing to keep back. - Mr Nevill then proceeded to state that he had known the deceased since 1876, and that she entered into his employ in March 1882, being then in a very delicate state of health. The witness produced a long written statement which he had prepared, giving a history of the case, but after he had read a portion of it the Coroner expressed a wish that Mr Nevill should give his evidence from memory. Mr Nevill seemed reluctant to comply, asking the Coroner, who had advised him to put the manuscript into his pocket, whether he wished to suppress it. Continuing, Mr Nevill said that in 1882 the deceased was suffering from kidney disease. She had taken brandy to stop sickness in her illness, but he did not think she took intoxicating drink habitually, and he had never seen her affected by it. After she was placed under Mr Wallace's treatment she got better, there being a great expulsion of drugs, of which she had taken gallons. Witness gave her medicine prepared according to Mr Wallace's direction. Had been treating her for two years previously under Mr Wallace for disease of the kidney. She had had numerous abscesses of the liver. Mr Wallace saw her on the 16th and 17th of November, and he said life was just flickering. - Had you been treating her for cancer of the liver? - No. - Did you diagnose the case yourself? I formed my own opinion, but I acted on what I was told. - In the medicines you gave did you act on your own opinion? Under Mr Wallace's instructions. - What medicines did you give her? Chiefly specifics numbered 2 and 3 and sometimes No. 1. - Where did you get them from? I prepared them according to Mr Wallace's instructions. - Did you prepare them? I prepared some, and some I got direct from Mr Wallace. - What were those medicines? - Specifics Nos. 1, 2, and 3. - If you prepared them, what was the preparation? - They were specifics. - Do you know what drugs they are composed of? - that's nothing to do with it. - Do you know what drugs you administered to the deceased? - I administered no drugs at all. - Whether drugs or herbs, do you know what they were? - I knew what I was doing. - Did you know what you were administering? - Specific medicines, called 1, 2, 3. - What were they composed of? - You had better ask Mr Wallace. - But I must ask you? - I don't know every ultimate analysis nor anybody else. - Mr Kellock: Who supplied the materials for them? - Mr Wallace. - Mr Kellock: They are patent medicines, are not they? - Yes: - The Coroner: And you mixed them? - I prepared them according to Mr Wallace's instructions. Continuing, the witness said that Mr Wallace saw the deceased on the 6th November and was of opinion that she was suffering from disease of the liver and cancerous habit of body. - Were you of the same opinion? - Yes. - Were you satisfied to leave her under the case of some one who had not seen her for two months? - I was more than contented, because I consider that under his treatment her life was greatly prolonged. The witness continued that he had studied chemistry himself for several years. Three weeks before the deceased's death he expected she would die. He did not consider it necessary to call in any medical man besides Mr Wallace. - The Coroner: Did it not occur to you that it was desirable that some other medical man should be called in, apart from one who was in London, and who had not seen her for two months? Mr Nevill replied that he agreed with the nurses that it was not necessary. He had seen many deaths from this form of disease, but in none had he seen life prolonged to such an extent. Two years ago he told the deceased's husband that Mr Wallace was not a qualified medical practitioner. From his own medical knowledge, he should have stopped the administering of chloroform and strong purgatives. After handing in to the Coroner medicines similar to those given to the deceased, Mr Nevill said when he called on the registrar for a certificate, he gave cirrhosis of the liver as the cause of death, this being the opinion of Dr Kingdon, of London, two years before. He considered that he was justified in burying the deceased, as he not only received a certificate, but signed it. In reply to the Coroner, however, witness admitted that after receiving the certificate, on the registrar expressing doubt as to whether he had done right, he immediately handed it back, and it was therefore not in his possession at the time of the burial. - Admiral Dawkins, whilst assuring Mr Nevill that he had not the slightest suspicion on the point, asked him to clear up the doubt that existed by stating what the medicines were composed of. - The Coroner, however, advised the Foreman not to press the question. - Mr Nevill concluded his evidence by stating, in reply to Mr Kellock, that the deceased never applied for anything she was not supplied with, and that every care and attention were shewn her. - Mr Joseph Wallace, of No. 1, Oxford Mansions, London, was recalled. he said he was not satisfied to accept the responsibility of the case, as attendants might give the patient intoxicants, but it would have been impossible for him to have come from London to attend it. As, however, the deceased had an organic disease which was incurable, it would have been no good to have called in any other medical man. He had confidence in Mr Nevill preparing the medicines under his instructions. He prescribed No. 2 for general cancerous condition of the body; No. 2 for periodic prostration; and No. 1 for restlessness and inability to sleep. - The Coroner: What are the ingredients of No. 1? - Witness: I decline to answer that question. My fee is £100 and my pupils are under a penalty of £10,000 not to divulge it until published. - The Coroner: Of the three medicines, how much would be sufficient to cause death? - Witness replied that he really could not say, adding that he gave homoeopathic doses. He caused some laughter by offering to take a drachm of No. 1 and a quantity of the other medicines in the court. - Mrs Bull, charwoman at the vicarage, was also re-called, and questioned by the Coroner as to the statement she made, after giving her evidence on the last occasion, to Mrs Soper and Mrs Kelland, that "if she had told all the truth, she could have said a great deal more." What she meant was that she took in "a little drop of drink" to the deceased unknown to anyone. She paid for three threepennyworths of port wine out of her own pocket and gave to the deceased. As when she originally gave her evidence, the witness said that the deceased had had no drink during her illness, she was severely censured by the Coroner. She further denied having said that the deceased was not supplied with proper nourishment. - HENRY LEVER, husband of the deceased, said his wife was 46 years of age, and that he was married to her 29 years ago, so that she was married when she was between 17 and 18 years old. He did not know, until her death, that Mr Wallace was not a qualified medical practitioner. - George Rossiter, district registrar at Paignton, explained the circumstances under which he issued a certificate of burial to Mr Nevill, who afterwards (by request) handed it back to him. He had no suspicion of poisoning, but he told the vicar that he should report the matter to the coroner, and he thought he was perfectly justified in doing so. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that the principal question with which the Jury had to deal was whether the death of the deceased was natural or whether it was accelerated by actions or omissions of duty on the part of any responsible person or persons such as to render them criminally liable. - The Jury retied for consultation, and after an absence of an hour and a quarter they returned with a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Foreman added that the Jury were of opinion that blame attached to Mr Nevill for not calling in further medical aid, and that the Jury had also passed a vote of censure upon the nurses for not suggesting the calling in of medical aid. - Addressing Mr Nevill, the Coroner said that he fully concurred in the rider of censure. The Jury had not referred to a matter which it was his duty to allude to - why his order to have the body exhumed was not complied with. A gentleman in Mr Nevill's position - a clergyman of the Church of England - should not have obstructed the Coroner and Jury, but should have aided them, as he was bound to do by law. He hoped this case, and the scandal which it had caused, would be a lesson to Mr Nevill as to the way in which he performed his duty in the parish in future. The trained nurses were then addressed by the Coroner, who said he quite concurred with the vote of censure passed upon them by the Jury. - Mr Nevill, addressing the Coroner, said he had acted with a strict sense of duty, and he believed he was not mistaken in taking the course he had. He should do the same again under similar circumstances.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 18 February 1887
EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter on Tuesday Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of ALFRED BARRETT, single, aged 30, a native of Dartington, near Totnes. The evidence showed that deceased was formerly a steeplechase rider, but for the past six months had assisted Mr Heath, veterinary surgeon, 47 Southernhay, Exeter. He had suffered from concussion of the brain, the results of accidents on the racecourse, was rather deaf, and was absent-minded at times. On Sunday last he visited his brother at Newton Abbot. He was then indisposed. On Tuesday morning, about eleven o'clock, he partook of a cup of tea while in bed. Later on he was found in a condition which suggested that he had taken poison, and in a few minutes he expired. Death was proved to have been due to the taking of prussic acid. "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was the verdict of the Jury.

EXETER - An Inquiry was held at Exeter on Friday last concerning the death of CHARLES GEORGE, a labourer, lately employed in Mr Sampson's brickyard, Newtown. The evidence showed that a large quantity of clay fell on the deceased and broke several of his ribs and his collar bones, besides inflicting other severe internal injuries. The thawing of the clay by the sun was said to have been the cause of the slip. Deceased was described as a sober, respectable man, aged 39, and married. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 4 March 1887
BRIXHAM - At Brixham, on Tuesday, at a Coroner's Inquest conducted by Mr Sidney Hacker, the Jury censured a MRS SHERIFF for having fed her two months' old baby upon biscuit, medical testimony being to the effect that it is well understood that such nourishment is unsuited for so young a child.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 March 1887
DARTMOUTH - On Saturday morning the fireman (Fredk. Roper) and one of the deck hands, named George Radford, employed on board the Railway steamer dolphin, at Dartmouth, saw a body rise to the surface of the water about a dozen yards out abreast of the Dartmouth pontoon. They immediately procured a boat and brought the body ashore, when it was handed over to the police and conveyed to the mortuary. Here, although the features were, owing to decomposition, totally unrecognizable, the clothes and watch were identified as those of MR WILLIAM CUTMORE BAKER, farmer, of East Down, near Blackawton, who disappeared under the following circumstances. On the 24th January (Monday) MR BAKER visited Dartmouth to see his wife off to London, and afterwards, in company with Mr Richard Stranger, of Dartmouth, went into the King's Arms Hotel. The latter gentleman left the hotel about half-past six by the front door, and directly afterwards MR BAKER went out at the side door, which abuts on a slipway leading to the edge of the river. He went down this slip, and was never seen again alive. The river had been dredged, but without success, and it is probable that the body caught in the moorings of the pontoon, near which it rose. The watch of the deceased had stopped at nearly half-past six o'clock. The Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead In The River," but as to how deceased came there, the evidence was insufficient to show. On the recommendation of the Foreman (Mr W. H. Sparks) the Jury asked the Coroner to call the attention of the proper authorities to the state of the public mortuary, and also to the immediate necessity of lighting the lower section of the Embankment from which deceased evidently fell into the water.

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - A sad case of suicide has occurred in the neighbourhood of Budleigh Salterton. MR ALBERT FAIRWEATHER LUKE, solicitor, who had been many years in practice in Exeter, resided at Exmouth, with his wife and seven or eight children. On Thursday morning, last week, he did not go to Exeter, as was his wont, but expressed his intention of walking over the cliffs to Budleigh Salterton. He asked his wife to meet him in the evening, and, in pursuance of this arrangement, MRS LUKE proceeded in the afternoon some distance over the cliffs. Her husband, however, did not put in an appearance, and, a thick fog coming on, MRS LUKE returned home, having, however, no suspicion that anything was wrong. As MR LUKE had not returned at a late hour grave apprehensions were entertained, and information was given to the police, the coastguard being also apprised. Search was made next day along the cliffs and in woods in the direction of Budleigh Salterton, but it was fruitless. On Saturday bills were issued offering a reward of £5 for information concerning MR LUKE. About noon a lad named Rough, in the employ of Admiral May, residing in the neighbourhood, was searching a wood near Knowlehill, through which there is a short cut on the road to Salterton. Here he came upon the dead body of MR LUKE, which was lying on the ground not far from a quarry. A bottle was beside him. This had contained chloroform with which the deceased had poisoned himself. An alarm was given, and on assistance arriving the body was removed to the Rolle Arms Hotel, at Budleigh Salterton. A letter was found upon MR LUKE, giving certain directions to his son, and wishing his wife and children "good-bye." An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict was returned of "Death from Chloroform, taken by deceased while in an Unsound State of Mind." The Jury expressed their heartfelt sympathy with the widow and family and their friends.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 15 April 1887
PAIGNTON - Sad Drowning Case At Paignton. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Paignton, on Saturday evening, touching the death of WILLIAM GEORGE HUXHAM, aged 5 years, who was drowned on Good Friday afternoon whilst attempting to walk round the Redcliffe Tower footpath, and who either fell off into the sea or was swept away by a wave, the sea at the time being high and very rough. The Jury inspected the place where the deceased was last seen, and were unanimous in the opinion that the footpath should be railed round, it being a very dangerous place for children. The principal witness was Susan Ann Battershill, eleven years of age. She said that on Friday afternoon she was playing on Preston Beach, near the Redcliffe footpath, in company with the deceased and several other children. When she last saw him he was on the footpath crying, and she told him not to go that way, but to go up the lane. He said he did not know the way up the lane, and continued to walk on the path. Shortly afterwards she saw him in the water, being washed in and out by the waves. She tried to pull him out, but could not on account of the splashing of the waves. GEORGE DENBOW HUXHAM, father of the deceased, stated that from what he heard he ran to Preston Beach on Friday afternoon. He did not see anything of his child until about a quarter to eight o'clock when he saw the body floating on the water close to the shore. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and added the following rider:- "The Jury strongly recommend to the Local Board that a rail be erected round the Redcliffe footpath, for the protection of the public, as they consider it a most dangerous place, more especially for children."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 April 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - The Inquest on the body of ROBERT HINDOM, found on the beach near Labrador, as previously reported, was concluded on Thursday last week at Teignmouth, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, when Mr Kernick, of Dawlish, attended, and stated that he saw deceased near the Town Hall, Dawlish about a quarter past six on the evening of the day on which he left his home. Mrs Morrott, of Chapel-street, Teignmouth, deposed that she saw deceased on the Friday following his disappearance in a field near Maudlin-hill, on the Haldon-road. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT - A verdict of Suicide while of Unsound Mind was returned on Monday by a Coroner's Jury who Inquired into the death of WM. HEYWARD, 74 years of age, of Sandygate, near Newton. The deceased, who had been ill for some time and suffered from delusions, cut his throat on Saturday night with a penknife.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 May 1887
ST MARYCHURCH - Fall Into A Lime-Kiln. - On Monday afternoon GEORGE BENTLEY, aged 25, residing at St. Marychurch, met with a dreadful accident at Lummaton Lime-kilns. He was standing on the edge of one of the kilns, which was full of burning stone, watching the progress of the fire, when he suddenly had a fit and fell in on his face and hands. Some of the quarrymen who were at work close by saw the occurrence, and he was immediately helped out of the kiln, but not before he was very severely burnt about the body and arms. He was conveyed to the Torbay Hospital, where he received every attention at the hands of the house surgeon, but on Wednesday afternoon he succumbed to his injuries. - Yesterday morning, at the Upton Vale Hotel, Mr S. Hacker conducted an Inquiry into the circumstances of BENTLEY'S death. - The first witness was MISS POLLIE BENTLEY, residing at Babbacombe, sister of the deceased. Having given evidence of identification, she said that the deceased was engaged as a painter at the Long Park Pottery Works. She saw him on Monday at the Hospital, and he told her that while he was standing on the edge of the kiln he had a fit and fell in. The witness added that the deceased had been subject to fits ever since his 16th year. - The second witness was William Glanville, lime burner, engaged at the Lummaton Lime-kiln. He deposed that he lived at St. Marychurch and the deceased lodged with him. On Monday the deceased came to the kiln, and leaving him standing by a low wall about four feet from the kiln, which was at the time filled with burning stones to within eighteen inches of the top, the witness went below to attend to the flue. The witness had not been absent more than five minutes when he heard some one call out that BENTLEY had fallen into the kiln. Without a moment's delay the witness went to the top of the kiln, and found that the deceased had got out again, and was standing up. His clothes were burnt, as were also his hands and face. Having procured a cab, the witness conveyed BENTLEY to the Hospital. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that BENTLEY was sober at the time. - The next witness was Thomas Snell, a quarryman, living at St. Marychurch, and employed at Lummaton Quarry, near the Lime-kiln. He stated that he smelt something burning on Monday, and on looking at the kiln, he saw somebody struggling in the fire. Witness shouted to a lad, who ran to assist the deceased out of the kiln. Witness also went down, but when he arrived, the deceased had got out. - Charles Jervis, a lad, also employed at the Quarry, stated that on hearing Snell shout, he ran to the kiln, where he saw the deceased. Before witness could get to him, however, the deceased had managed to struggle out of the kiln. Witness had seen BENTLEY at the Quarry previously to the occurrence, but he had not spoken to him. - Mr G. T. Eales, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted on the 2nd May about 1 p.m. On examining the deceased he found him to be suffering from severe burns on the face and neck, the whole of the right fore-arm, the bottom of the back, part of the abdomen, the right leg and foot, and part of the left leg. Witness attended him while in the Hospital, but on the Monday afternoon he had several fits and was in a state of collapse. He rallied a little on the Tuesday, but sank suddenly and died on Wednesday afternoon. Witness was of opinion that the deceased died from shock consequent upon sustaining the burns, and also from exhaustion from the fits. The burns were not deep, but extended over a large portion of the body. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 13 May 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at Teignmouth on Monday evening, concerning the death of EDWARD GEORGE HENRY CROYDON, aged 20, eldest son of MR GEORGE HENRY CROYDON, of Regent-street, printer, who died on Saturday last from inflammation of the brain, caused by an accident. Whilst returning from Torquay on Saturday, April 23rd, the horse attached to the dogcart in which MR CROYDON was riding, stumbled, and he was thrown out, pitching on his feet. This caused an injury to the spine which reached the base of the brain, which became inflamed. MR CROYDON did not feel any serious effects from the accident until several days after it had occurred, when the symptoms were such as to cause great anxiety to his friends. MR CROYDON was well known and highly respected, and much sympathy is on all hands extended to his relatives in their bereavement. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - At the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday JANE BROWN, very respectably dressed, was charged, upon a Coroner's warrant, with the Wilful Murder of her male infant in January last by suffocating it. The body of the child was found in St. James's-road on the 3rd January, but at that time the mother was not known. Medical evidence at the Inquest showed that death was due to suffocation, and the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person then unknown. The police have since been making careful inquiry, and on Wednesday morning Inspector Short arrested the prisoner at 13 Richmond-road, where she was in service. Short told her that he had information which led him to believe that she was delivered of a child whilst at Mrs Vile's in Oxford-road. She exclaimed in reply, "Oh, what a lie! I will swear I have never had a child." Dr Bell said she had undoubtedly been delivered. The prisoner then began to cry, and said, "I did not put it in the road." She was remanded.

ST MARYCHURCH - Sudden Death At St. Marychurch. - On Sunday morning a woman named ELIZABETH SMALL, 53 years of age, who has been in the habit of accompanying her husband in hawking fish, died suddenly at her residence, Coombe Park, Teignmouth-road, St Marychurch. As no medical certificate could be obtained, an Inquiry into the circumstances of her death was held at the Havelock Arms inn, St. Marychurch, on Tuesday afternoon, before Mr Sidney Hacker, district Coroner. Mr James Lee being chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was CHARLES SMALL, husband of the deceased. He said he had lived with his wife at Coombe Park for thirty-three years. The deceased had, he said, been subject to fits for the last seven or eight years, but otherwise she enjoyed very good health. On Sunday morning just before seven o'clock, she went downstairs and lit the fire, and shortly afterwards witness also went downstairs. He went out into the garden for five minutes for the purpose of lacing up his boots, and when he returned to the kitchen he found the deceased lying on her face and hands. Thinking that she was in a fit, he placed her in a more comfortable position, and went to a neighbour's for assistance. He came back in less than five minutes, but the deceased was apparently dead by that time. Previously to going downstairs, she complained of being poorly, and requested the witness to help her to prepare the breakfast. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that the deceased partook of supper at half-past ten on Saturday night, and retired to rest at eleven. To his knowledge, she had had nothing intoxicating to drink since Saturday dinner-time, when she had one glass of beer. - George Milford, labourer, residing at Coombe Park, said that on Sunday morning he was asked by the last witness to go to his house as his wife was in a fit. On reaching the house, he found the deceased lying on the cement floor, to all appearance quite dead. The witness told MR SMALL that he had better send for medical assistance, and he did so. - Mr Thomas Finch, surgeon, St Marychurch, said that he visited MR SMALL'S house on Sunday morning at half past eight o'clock, and found the deceased sitting in a chair, life being quite extinct. The features were placid and pale, and there were no marks of violence. From the evidence of the other witnesses, he should have thought that the deceased died from an epileptic fit, but as there was no distortion or discolouration of the features, he had come to the conclusion that she died through failure of the heart's action. There was nothing to show that the deceased had not died a natural death. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 May 1887
ST. MARYCHURCH - Sudden Death At Barton. - Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Schoolroom, Barton Village, on Monday morning, into the circumstances of the death of ANN TARR, a widow, 74 years of age, who was found in an insensible condition in the roadway at Barton, by Miriam Short, on Saturday evening. Before medical assistance could be obtained, the deceased expired. Dr Steele having pronounced death to have resulted from heart disease, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

ST MARYCHURCH - Singular Death At St. Marychurch. Inquest and Verdict. - A man named WILLIAM ROWDON, aged 63 years, a tailor by trade, died under circumstances of a singular character on Friday evening last at his residence, 5 Regent's-terrace, Hele. He had for a few days been under the care of Dr Steele, who, however, refused to certify the cause of death. An Inquest into the circumstances attending ROWDON'S death was accordingly held, on Monday morning, at the Royal Standard inn, Hele, before Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner. Mr H. P. Jarman (Eastley and Jarman), solicitor to the Torquay Licensed Victuallers' Protection Association, watched the proceedings on behalf of Mr W. Eddles, landlord of the Crown and Sceptre inn, St. Marychurch, one of the witnesses in the Inquiry. - In the course of some opening remarks, the Coroner said that the deceased died from injury to the stomach, and that it was the duty of the Jury to Inquire into the circumstances under which that injury was inflicted. He pointed out that if the evidence should prove to be such as to show that the injury was inflicted by a second person, very serious questions might arise as to the responsibility of that person for the death of the deceased. - The first witness called was SARAH MILDRED STONEWILLOTT, a married daughter of the deceased, residing at Lawes Bridge. She stated that the deceased had a wife and four daughters; his wife lived by herself. The deceased, she said, expired at half-past five on Friday afternoon, and she was with him at the time. Just before his death, the deceased made a statement to the witness; he said that he knew he was dying, and he attributed his impending death to a kick in the stomach, inflicted by a man whom he named. He did not tell the witness how long ago the kick was inflicted. The deceased had been confined in the Exminster Lunatic Asylum, but had been out five weeks previously to his death. For the first three weeks after he was let out, he was in the habit of wandering about, and was excitable and made strange statements about his wife, but three days previously to his death, he was quiet and less excitable. - SARAH ROWDON, 5 Regent's Terrace, Hele, deposed that she was the wife of the deceased. Her husband had been in the asylum six months, and was let out for a month on trial. Since he had been out, he had not been right in his mind. He was taken ill on Thursday, the 5th inst., and at that time the witness was staying with her daughter at Babbacombe. On the Saturday following, she went home to her husband and found him very ill. He complained of a pain in his stomach, which he said was caused by a kick. The witness added that she saw two marks on the stomach of the deceased. - Dr William Stott Steele, of Babbacombe, stated that about a fortnight ago, the deceased came to him and told him that he had been to the asylum, and that he was on probation for a month. He requested the witness to grant him a certificate which he was required to forward to the asylum authorities, and although he was rather talkative, he appeared to be perfectly rational, and the witness therefore granted the certificate. On Saturday, the 7th inst., MRS POLLARD, a daughter of the deceased, came to the witness's house, and said that her father was in an excited state. The witness sent some medicine, and told MRS POLLARD that if her father was not better after taking it, she was to return, and the witness would go and see him. As he did not hear from MRS POLLARD on the Sunday, the witness concluded that the deceased was better, but the witness visited the deceased of his own accord on the following Monday, and found that he had been vomiting very much; but he did not then say anything about the injuries which had been inflicted quite recently. The witness visited the deceased again on Tuesday the 10th, and found him downstairs, and evidently much better. On the morning of the day of his death the witness visited the deceased again; he found him vomiting violently, and in a critical condition. It was not until then that the deceased told the witness that he had been kicked. Witness examined the deceased before his death, and found a small discoloured mark below the navel. Death took place on the Friday afternoon. On Saturday, the witness made a post mortem examination of the body and found the peritoneum and the bowels much inflamed, while the liver and other organs were tolerably healthy. He attributed death to peritonitis and inflammation of the bowels. The witness added that peritonitis would result from a violet blow, or from a bad cold. The mark which the witness observed before death, disappeared after the deceased expired. The bruise must have been produced by some external blow, and would result either from a blow from a blunt instrument or from a fall. The inflammation of the bowels might have been set up by other causes than a blow. Answering a question by P.S. Nott the witness said that he did hear the deceased complain of a blow on the head, and he could find no mark there. - ELIZABETH SUSAN POLLARD, daughter of the deceased, who resides at 2, St. Dennis's, St. Marychurch, said that either on Tuesday or Thursday week, she did not remember which day, the deceased visited her house and made a statement to her, and in consequence of that statement, she went to a Mrs Luxton's, St. Leonard's Terrace, Babbacombe, and asked her if her husband had got a hat which did not belong to him. Mrs Luxton produced a hat which the witness identified as belonging to the deceased, and she brought it away with her. The witness then left the house in company with Mrs Luxton and after they had proceeded a short distance they met the deceased, who, after having shaken hands with Mrs Luxton made the same statement to her, as he had previously made to the witness, which was to the effect that he had been kicked in the stomach by Mr Luxton. - William Eddles, landlord of the Crown and Sceptre inn, St. Marychurch, deposed that on the 2nd inst., about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, the deceased and a man named Charles Luxton were amongst the company in the bar. Luxton said to the deceased, "Hullo, old man! you're out again, are you?" The witness thought that Luxton referred to the asylum. The deceased was offended at the remark, and "sparred up" to Luxton, but the witness having said that he would not allow any of that in his house, the two remained quiet for a little while. The witness left the bar for a few minutes, and when he returned he found Luxton and the deceased getting up from the floor. Both hats were on the floor, and witness picked up Luxton's in mistake, and placed it on the head of the deceased and sent him home. The witness had supplied the deceased with a bottle of ginger beer, as he did not drink intoxicating liquors. - By P.S. Nott: Witness did not hear the deceased say "Mr Eddles, I am in your house, and I claim your protection, as I don't want anything to do with that man Luxton," but he remembered himself saying to Luxton "Stop that, Charlie, or leave my house." - The witness added that he saw no blow struck, nor did he see either of the men kick. - Charles Saunders Bailey, poulterer, St. Marychurch, stated that he was in the bar of the Crown and Sceptre inn on the 2nd instant, and he heard a little "chaffing" between Luxton and the deceased. Luxton said "What's the good of saying anything to him, he's only a lunatic," whereupon the deceased retorted that someone had been "sowing carrot seeds" in Luxton's face, and that he "had been on his back, and someone with nailed boots on had walked on his face." The deceased made use of bad language, and challenged Luxton to fight or wrestle, at the same time taking off his coat. The deceased went nearer to Luxton, and eventually took hold of him, struck him, and kicked him. After a little tussle, both men fell, the deceased falling on the top of Luxton; they got up, and again fell on the floor, and then the witness helped to part them. Not a blow was struck by Luxton, but the deceased struck left and right, and kicked Luxton several times. - After a little pressing, the witness admitted that Luxton took hold of the deceased, and challenged him to "show toe," a term used in wrestling. - William Bovey, carpenter, 28 Fore-street, St. Marychurch, Thomas Guest, and Saunders Wilson, travellers, and George Innes, 11, Western-terrace, St. Marychurch, all gave evidence relating to the fracas in the bar of the Crown and Sceptre inn, which was corroborative of the statement made by the witness Bailey. - Charles Luxton, mason, residing at 1 St. Leonard's-terrace, Babbacombe, was then sworn. He admitted that, when the deceased came into the bar, he made use of the words mentioned by the witness Bailey, and he corroborated Bailey's evidence relating to the scuffle. The witness declared that he did not strike the deceased, nor did he kick him. - P.S. Nott stated that he had himself taken a deposition from the deceased, but no statement had been made in the presence of a magistrate; the reason for this was that there was little time from when he received information about the affair, to when the deceased expired. Arrangements were being made by the police for the attendance of a magistrate at the time of the death of the deceased. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that there was no actual evidence to connect the cause of death with external injury; and he pointed out that according to Dr Steele's statement peritonitis and inflammation of the bowels would result from a cold as well as from a blow. After a few minutes' deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Inquiry lasted over three hours.

ST MARYCHURCH - Fatal Accident At Plainmoor. Inquest. - On Wednesday afternoon a very sad accident occurred in the St. Marychurch-road, Plainmoor. WILLIAM BOVEY, 32 years of age, carpenter and joiner, Fore-street, St. Marychurch, was running in the road, having hold of the handle of a closed cab, which was being driven towards Torquay, seemingly to get inside the vehicle, when he suddenly fell, and the hind wheel of the cab passed over his chest, inflicting injuries which a few hours afterwards proved fatal. - Yesterday evening, at 28 Fore-street, St. Marychurch, the residence of MR J. W. BOVEY, father of the deceased, an Inquest was held before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, as to the circumstances of the fatality. The Coroner, in the course of his opening remarks, drew attention to the fact that the deceased was one of the principal witnesses at the Inquest touching the death of William Rowdon held only three days previously at St. Marychurch. - MR JOHN WATSON BOVEY, commission agent, father of the deceased, gave formal evidence of identity. - George Cumming, mason, 9 Victoria Park, stated that on Wednesday at the time of the accident, about 2.30 p.m., he was on a ladder at work house painting. He saw a closed cab come up by the White Hart inn, and stop about half-an-hour. Two men then went to the cab, and got in, and ask the vehicle began to move the deceased came round the corner. The deceased ran after the conveyance and caught hold of the door, keeping up for about five or six yards. The witness saw him fall down flat on his back with his head under the body of the carriage, and his legs towards the path. The hind wheel passed over the deceased's chest. The witness called out several times to the driver to stop when he saw the deceased trying to reach the carriage, but he was some distance from the conveyance, which was coming towards him, and to all appearances the cabman did not hear his calls. He did not see the unfortunate man attempt to get into the carriage. When the accident occurred, the witness jumped down, partly picked up the deceased, and together with Mr G. P. Short, who was one of the occupants of the carriage, helped him to get into the conveyance, to which, with assistance, he was able to walk. - Elizabeth Hutchings, single-woman, Boston Fields, deposed that she was going to Victoria Park at the time of the sad occurrence. She noticed the cab standing beside the White Hart inn. When Mr Short and his companion (Mr W. Eddles, of the Crown and Sceptre inn) were seated inside the conveyance, she heard Mr Short say to the cabman "Drive on! drive on!" The cabman did not seem to go quickly, and Mr Short hurried him. She saw the deceased hold on to the door of the conveyance. Mr Short was holding the door to prevent him from getting in; he was sitting back to the horse facing the deceased. She was the other side of the carriage, but could see through the window. The deceased rolled as he fell. - In reply to questions put by Mr Short, the witness stated that she did not know if the window was up, but she could see through. She could not say what part of the door Mr Short was holding; on being pressed, she said that she could not swear that Mr Short was sitting with his back to the horse. - The witness Cumming was recalled, and, in reply to Mr Short, said that he saw that Mr Short and Mr Eddles were both sitting facing the horse, but the former gentleman was nearest the deceased. - Mr George Parker Short, veterinary surgeon, related what had happened up to the time of the accident. He and Mr Eddles and the deceased had been in company for a short time, and the deceased had ordered luncheon for himself at the Union Hotel, St. Marychurch-road. The witness and Mr Eddles parted with the deceased, and were driving back to Torquay, he being in a hurry as he had to keep an appointment. Looking casually out of the window he saw someone's hand on the carriage door, and he immediately called out to the driver to stop. Before the driver had time to pull up, the witness felt the conveyance go over something. He jumped out, and saw the deceased lying on his back on the ground. He said "Whatever induced you to do this?" to the deceased, who replied "I don't know." The deceased was able to walk with a little help, and he did not seem much hurt. The witness and Cumming placed the deceased in the cab, and he ordered the driver to take him home. As he was anxious, he waited for the return of the cabman, from whom he learnt that medical aid had not been sent for, nor had the cabman told the father of the accident. The witness then went to MR BOVEY'S house, and told him, and advised that if the deceased got worse, medical aid should be sent for. The deceased was a little excited, but was not intoxicated. The deceased had his hand on the handle of the carriage door, and in his opinion it was impossible for anyone on the other side of the cab to see that. He, as was his custom, was playing with the window strap. - William Wilson, cabman, South-street, Torquay, gave corroborative evidence. He did not hear Cumming shout at all, and had not been ordered to drive on regardless of the deceased, whom he did not know to be following. - Dr W. S. Steele was the last witness. He stated that on being fetched to the deceased he found him lying on the sofa, unconscious, deadly pale and moaning. He gave him some brandy, and with help put him to bed. He examined him, and found seven of the ribs broken. He applied hot water to the person of the deceased, who became conscious for a little time, but complained of no pain on being asked. The deceased soon again sank into a state of collapse. The witness left him, but returned shortly. He again left him after a little while, but hardly had he done so when he was fetched, and found the deceased dead, death having taken place at about 6 p.m. In his opinion death resulted from internal haemorrhage. There was no doubt that some internal organs were injured, either the liver ruptured or injury done to the lungs. The Coroner remarked that there were slight discrepancies in the evidence of Miss Hutchings and Mr Short, but no doubt the Jury would be able to see their way to a decision. After a short deliberation a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

The Inquiry at Hele into the circumstances of the death of the man WILLIAM ROWDON, ended in the only verdict warranted by the evidence, although it is unquestionable that the evidence fell short of fully accounting for the poor man's death. Peritonitis, it was pointed out, might have been set up by a blow, or have supervened upon a bad cold. There was not a scintilla of testimony as to the deceased having suffered from a cold, but there was testimony to the effect that he had consistently explained his illness by saying that he had been kicked in the stomach. Conclusive testimony was very much to be desired, but unfortunately it was not forthcoming.

ST. MARYCHURCH - Yesterday a second affair of a sad nature was investigated by a Coroner's Jury at St. Marychurch, and a verdict had to be found on evidence which was not altogether satisfactory. The two Inquests are related as to their details. The man ROWDON, before his death, alleged that he had been injured in the Crown and Sceptre inn, dept by Mr W. Eddles, in which he certainly had a "set to" with a man named Luxton; the young man BOVEY, the circumstances of whose death were yesterday Inquired into, was a witness of the fracas in the bar of the Crown and Sceptre inn, and it has now to be reported that at the very time poor Rowdon's remains were being interred in Torquay cemetery, BOVEY himself was crushed beneath the wheel of a carriage in which Mr Eddles was sitting, and in that crushing sustained injuries which quickly proved fatal.

TEIGNMOUTH - A distressing case of Suicide by hanging occurred on Monday morning at the Public Baths, Carlton-place, Teignmouth. MR F. CLEMENT and his wife have been the attendants at the baths since they were opened about four years since. On Monday morning MRS CLEMENT was up as usual busying herself about her work, and leaving her husband in bed. As he had not arrived downstairs by about half-past nine, she went up to call him, but not finding him in his bedroom, she looked about the building, and found him in one of the bathrooms, suspended by a rope attached to the ceiling. MRS CLEMENT immediately rushed into a neighbouring house and gave the alarm; the body was quickly cut down by Mr Pring, builder, of Exmouth, who was near at hand, and Drs. Johnson and Rudkin, whose residences are close by, were speedily in attendance. Life was, however, found to be extinct. No cause whatever can be assigned for the unfortunate occurrence, as during the whole of Sunday MR CLEMENT was in his usual good spirits. A Coroner's Jury on Tuesday found a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

HALWELL - A fatal accident which had befallen GEORGE BOND, a farm labourer, employed by Mr John Irish, of Pulson Farm, Halwell, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry by Mr S. Hacker, on Monday. It appeared that the deceased, who was 52 years of age, in returning from Totnes fair on Thursday evening last week, mounted behind Mr R. Irish on a mare that was a very spirited one. Mr Irish, a practised steeplechaser, was unable to keep her in, and the deceased was thrown off, sustaining concussion of the brain from which he died on the following day. The deceased was sober at the time of the sad occurrence; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased has left a widow and several children.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 27 May 1887
TORQUAY - Sudden Death. A Lesson For Mothers. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Upton Vale Hotel, before Mr S. Hacker, touching the death of a child named SIDNEY LAVERS, who died suddenly on the previous day. Aged only three months, and the son of GEORGE LAVERS, tailor, Myrtle-place, Upton, the child was on Wednesday taken ill in its mother's arms, and within a few minutes it expired. MRS ELIZABETH ANN LAVERS sated that she was nursing the child and playing with it on Wednesday afternoon when suddenly it seemed to be taken unwell and died in the course of ten minutes, as she believed in a fit. The witness added that she had had nine children, of whom only five were now living. One of the other children she lost went off in a very similar manner. Dr Thistle, who was called in after the death of the child, also gave evidence. He said that from the appearance of the corpse, he judged that death resulted from convulsions. The Coroner, addressing the mother of the child, remarked upon the mistake that she had made in feeding so young a child with boiled bread and biscuits. He advised her to profit by the lesson conveyed in the doctor's evidence, and to tell her neighbours and acquaintances that young children should be fed on milk. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 June 1887
TORQUAY - Sad Fatality. - On Monday last about noon, at Galmpton, a little boy named HERBERT BROWN, aged six, who was going to a Sunday school treat, was knocked down by a runaway horse and waggon, and sustained such serious injuries that he was removed the same afternoon to the Torbay Hospital, where he died yesterday morning. This morning an Inquest was held at the Hospital, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. The evidence having been heard, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

CHARLETON - A Coroner's Jury at Charleton, near Kingsbridge, has returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" in the case of MISS GERTRUDE ELIZABETH MAYE, whose body was found in the sea at Prawle under mysterious circumstances on Saturday last. On the previous Thursday afternoon MISS MAYE went out for a walk, and as she did not return inquiries and search were made as to her whereabouts. On it becoming generally known in the village of Prawle that MISS MAYE undoubtedly went in that direction, the villagers volunteered their assistance in the search, and a large party explored the vicinity of the seashore and rocks, and the body of the young lady was found on Saturday evening on the sand, almost entirely covered with seaweed. It is thought to have been washed into the place where it was found, as one shoe was missing, as well as her hat, otherwise the body did not appear to have been knocked about. Amongst those who found her was a brother of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 June 1887
TORQUAY - Fatality At Petitor. A Young Woman Found Drowned. - Early yesterday morning the body of a young woman was found in two feet of water on Petitor Beach. It proved to be that of ADELINE CHUDLEY LEAR, 28, of 1 Austin's Place, Hele. The deceased was formerly a domestic servant, but latterly has kept an infants' school. On Wednesday afternoon about half-past four o'clock, she left her home, having kissed her widowed mother, and having said that she would not be late in coming home. As she went up the road she waved an adieu. She went to see a lady at Babbacombe, and appeared in good spirits. Nothing more was seen of her till two fishermen discovered the body yesterday morning on Petitor beach. - This morning an Inquest was held at the Royal Standard inn, Hele, before Mr D. A. Fraser, Deputy County Coroner. The first witness was ELEANOR LEAR, mother of the deceased. She stated that on going out on Wednesday, her daughter seemed to be in very good spirits; she had suffered from rheumatic fever several times, and her heart was affected. She was subject to giddiness. As her daughter had not returned at 10.30 p.m., she made inquiries, and afterwards gave information to the police. - William Taverner, fisherman, Babbacombe, deposed that yesterday morning about 7.30, he and a companion were rowing in a boat coming towards Babbacombe. He saw something on the Petitor beach, and called attention to the object. They rowed towards it, and found it to be the body of a woman resting on the ground, the waves only just covering it. There was nothing strange about the body, which they carried above high-water mark. There were kid gloves on the hands, which were not clenched. They reported their discovery to the police. - P.C. Richards, Babbacombe, stated that he examined the clothing of the deceased which was covered with sand, but not torn at all. He conveyed the body to the residence of the deceased's mother. - P.C. Thomas deposed that he had been and examined the spot where the body was found. There was hard-by a rock where people often sit reading, and from which a person might drop into the water. - Mr Thomas Finch, surgeon, St. Marychurch, deposed that he made a careful examination, but found no evidence whatever of the body having fallen from a height. There were slight abrasions on the face and on the head, which might have been caused by the washing of the sea. No bones were fractured, nor was there any laceration. Death in his opinion had not taken place before entering the water, but from drowning. - The verdict was one of "Found Drowned."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 17 June 1887
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquiry was opened at Plymouth on Wednesday evening concerning the death of the infant child of the wife of a seaman named STRATFORD. Medical evidence showed that the child died from the effects of some corrosive liquid, probably sulphuric acid, taken shortly after birth. The Inquest was adjourned for a fortnight.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 24 June 1887
TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - On Wednesday, at half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, the body of a woman was discovered in the sea, just beneath Daddy Hole Plain. On being brought on shore it was identified as that of SOPHIA ANN FISHER, 23 years of age, wife of a coastguardsman stationed and residing on the Plain, who had, it seems, gone to the town in search of the deceased. The chief boatman (Mr Nevan) and a few coastguardsmen did all in their power to restore animation, but their endeavours proved ineffectual - Last evening, in the Watch-house of the Coastguard Station, Daddy Hole Plain, an Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, into the circumstances of the death of the deceased. - Mr J. M. Bovey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - After the body had been viewed, the Coroner and the Jury inspected the place where the deceased had been found. The first witness called was FREDERICK JOHN FISHER, husband of the deceased. He deposed that the deceased had for the last six months complained of pains in her head, and for the past fortnight she had been exceedingly strange in her manner, and had wandered about the house apparently not knowing what she was doing. On Tuesday morning last she went out into the hot sun attired in a heavy ulster, and the witness remarked to a neighbour that there was something the matter with the deceased. On Monday she wrote to her parents, who live at Bath, and invited them down to see her. The last time he saw the deceased alive was on Wednesday about one o'clock, when she was lying on the bed to rest. The witness asked her to come down to dinner, but she refused. Seeing that she was more strange in her manner than she had usually been, he went and asked for leave, so that he might look after her. On returning he found that the deceased had left the house, and he went in search of her in the direction of the town. She had not made any remarks that led him to think that she was going to take her life. - On being questioned by the Coroner, the witness admitted that the deceased had said on the Tuesday that she had "found a spot," but he had taken no notice of the remark, as she had said many strange things lately. The deceased had not been attended by a medical man. The witness added that a brother of the deceased was at present confined in the Wells Asylum, and that her mother had been an inmate of an asylum. - Emma Howes, a neighbour, said that she had known the deceased since November, and since that time they had been very friendly. On Wednesday about half-past one o'clock, the witness saw the deceased standing at her doorway, attired as though she was going out. She asked the deceased if she was going away, and she replied that she was, and requested the witness to take care of the children. As the deceased had gone away in the same manner on the previous day, the witness did not suspect that she was going to put an end to her life. The witness added that she had been in the habit of visiting the deceased at her house, and during the last fortnight she had frequently complained of pains in her head. The deceased was reserved in her manner and of a quiet disposition until latterly; on Tuesday, however, the deceased shut the door in the face of a neighbour who had previously been on very intimate terms with her. - Alice Maude Newman, a little girl, deposed that on Wednesday, at 1.30, she saw the deceased walking very rapidly across the Plain in the direction of the cliffs. - Thomas Howes, coastguardsman, said that just before two o'clock on Wednesday, he was on duty near the edge of the cliffs, when he saw what he thought was the body of a little girl floating in the water about fifty yards from the shore, the tide being at quarter-flood. He immediately reported to his officer what he had seen, and then went down to the beach where he was joined by several of his fellow coastguardsmen and the chief boatman. The witness undressed and as there was a nasty easterly roll on, he had a line fastened around his waist, and then swam out and recovered the body. After the body was brought on shore, the usual methods for restoring animation were adopted, but without success. The witness further said that he had since examined the place near the spot where the deceased was found, and he had come to the conclusion that the deceased must have got into the water at the Quarry Point, as that was the only place near by where there was keep water. If she had attempted to throw herself off at any place but the Point she must have been badly marked by falling on the rocks. - Mr R. Pollard, surgeon, said that he was called upon on Wednesday, about 2.45, and from the information he received, he went to the beach underneath Daddy Hole Plain, where he found the coastguardsmen engaged in trying to restore animation, but on examining the deceased he found that life was extinct, and to all appearances death had resulted from drowning. The only marks about the body were two very slight abrasions, which might have been caused before or after death. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said that from the evidence that had been given, and from the fact that there was hereditary insanity in the family of the deceased, he should judge that she was insane. - A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was accordingly returned. The Jurors gave up their fees to the husband of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 July 1887
SHALDON - Mr Hacker held an Inquest at Shaldon on Saturday touching the death of THOMAS CHARLES BRYANT, who was drowned on Friday last while returning from Coombeinteignhead to Shaldon. The deceased was in the company of three young men named Poland, Searle and Meas, and had been to the Jubilee Celebration at Coombeinteignhead. On the way home larking was indulged in, and the boat was upset. A man named Westlake was near at hand, and, after a great deal of trouble, as his boat was loaded with passengers, he succeeded in rescuing the three lads who were with BRYANT, but the deceased was missing. E. BRYANT, father of the deceased, stated that his son was 18 years of age, and he last saw him alive on Friday evening, when he left Shaldon in a boat with another lad named Searle to go to Coombcellars. About half-past ten o'clock the witness was called up by some woman, who, asking if TOM was in, and being told that he was not, said "Then he's drowned." The witness dressed, and with another man, went up the river in search of his son, and about three o'clock they found the body lying on the mud near Archebrook. Searle, one of the deceased's companions, said they had a quart of beer among four of them at Coombe. On the way home, the deceased got up in the boat to take a flag from witness, and on his (deceased's) sitting down the boat overturned. The witness and the other two were saved by a passing boat, but BRYANT sank and witness did not see him again. William Westlake having given evidence, the Jury found a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and most of them gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 July 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was concluded on Wednesday night at Plymouth on the body of a newly-born child supposed to have been poisoned. The mother admitted that she saw her own mother (MRS BUCHAN) pour a teaspoonful of corrosive down the child's throat and that it died soon after. A verdict of Wilful Murder was returned.

EXETER - At the Exeter Hospital on Friday last, Mr Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SARAH ANN PATIENCE COLES, aged 42, wife of the landlord of the New Inn, Alphington. The husband stated that on the previous Tuesday his wife, who was upstairs, called to him for a glass of port wine. Before he could take it to her some customers entered, and he was serving them when he heard the deceased groaning. He ran upstairs, and caught her in his arms as she was falling. He asked her what was the matter, and she said "It isn't port wine - I thought it was," at the same time pointing to a bottle labelled "Saxum's Sanitary Fluid." He had never seen the bottle until that time, and he did not know it was on the premises. Deceased always carried the key of the cupboard where the port wine was kept. the deceased was of temperate habits; she had not been well lately. Mr Blomfield, house surgeon at the hospital, said the deceased died from failure of the heart's action, accelerated by acute inflammation of the stomach, which must have resulted from drinking the sanitary fluid. In his opinion it contained carbolic acid, although advertised as "non-poisonous". He did not think the deceased could have lived many weeks under any circumstances. The verdict of the Jury was that the deceased died from the effects of the fluid, taken in mistake.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 22 July 1887
BRIXHAM - About seven o'clock on Sunday morning last a little boy, seven years old, was found drowned in Brixham harbour near the eastern end of the fish market. His father, MR GEORGE JOHNS, ship-smith, sent him home from his workshop just before five o'clock on Saturday evening. Instead of doing as his father desired, he must have gone to the end of the fish market to play in the trawlers' boats that are kept moored at the spot on Saturdays. Some of the fishermen say that they drove him out of their boats about half-past five. It is supposed that he either returned to the boats or accidentally fell from the quay. An Inquest was held on Tuesday before Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner. A verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned, with a recommendation that the narrow footway adjoining the Fish Market, from which it is supposed the deceased fell, should be stopped up as it is highly dangerous.

DARTMOUTH - On Friday morning last JAMES TOZER, a retired shipwright, 64 years old, living alone in rooms in Newport-street, Dartmouth, was found dead on the kitchen floor. The evidence given at the Inquest showed that the last time the deceased was seen alive was on the afternoon of the previous Thursday, when he seemed in his usual health. About nine o'clock on Friday morning, not hearing him on the move as usual, a Mrs Chadder, who lives in the same house, went to his rooms, when she saw him lying on the floor. She called his sister, MRS DUMMONDS, and both went into his room and found that he was dead and probably had been so for many hours. The posture of the deceased was as though he had slipped from the chair to the floor, with his back against the window bench. His bed had not been slept in. There were slight bruises on the right side of the chest and face and on the right arm, such as would be caused by a fall. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 5 August 1887
TIVERTON - Murder Near Tiverton. Desperate Struggle With Poachers. - A terrible murder was perpetrated by salmon poachers in the river Exe, near Tiverton, in the early hours of Saturday morning. The victim was ARCHIBALD REED, a water bailiff in the service of the Tiverton Fishing Association, and living at Water-lane. He had charge of the lower waters, extending from Tiverton to Bickleigh, and owing to the reduced volume of water running through the river he has been troubled by illegal netting of fish at night. He had been endeavouring by close watching to capture the poachers that have infested his district, and night after night he had patrolled the river's bank in the performance of his duty. On Friday afternoon he was called upon by Mr W. J. Llewellyn, a member of the Executive Committee of the Tiverton Fishing Association, with whom he had a conversation relative to the liming of the river that had been practised lately. He was authorised to get assistance in watching the stream, though he did not do so on Friday night. He had, it appears, received information that four men intended "working" the pools under Collipriest that night, and accordingly he left home about eleven o'clock, saying to his wife that in all probability he would return between six and seven in the morning. Nothing was heard of him until a quarter to six on Saturday morning. At that time Mr George Davey, gamekeeper to Mr Sidney Stern, was returning to his home in St Andrew-street, after night duty in Collipriest Woods, and whilst walking up Collipriest walk he saw a body in the water opposite. It was lying in a part of the river known as the "Rag," a few hundred yards below the spot at which the stream of Westexe Mill joins the Exe. Seeing that something was amiss - though not perhaps realising at the moment that a desperate crime had been committed, Davey communicated with P.C. Raymond who also lives in St. Andrew-street, and told him of the body being in the water. The two proceeded to the river together, and brought the body, which turned out to be that of REED to the bank. It presented a ghastly appearance, and on the bank there was every indication of a desperate struggle having taken place. A casual glance was sufficient to tell that poor REED had fought most bitterly for his life; and, judging from the ferocity with which he must have been assailed and the wounds he sustained, it is presumed that his assailants numbered more than one. It is certain that his life had been taken before the body was thrown into the river. The fatal injury was a gash across the throat, extending from ear to ear, and almost severing the head from the body. As may be expected, there are different theories as to the method of the foul crime. The most probable, perhaps, is that, which credits REED with having been watching from near the main road that skirts the field, and seeing men leave the bed of the river after having committed an offence, he approached them: that he was a bold and fearless man everyone who knows him testifies, and it is concluded that he at once made his presence known, and with the result that he was set upon and murdered. Whatever may have been the precise circumstances of the terrible affair, it is beyond question that there was a severe struggle, for REED'S stick was found broken and splintered and stained with blood as if the head of someone had been broken. It was evident, too, that the knife had been resorted to. Both hands of REED were cut and lacerated; and both thumbs were on the inside cut to the bone, from which it would seem that the knife had been seized by the blade and then wrested away by being drawn through the hand. Moreover, beneath an elm tree in the meadow bordering the river, and near the first seat on the Exeter-road, were found three deep pools of blood, a trail from which reached to the river. By the pools were found a lamb-foot knife, covered with blood, and hair, two pipes, and a neckerchief. Further towards the river a dead trout was discovered, and lying parallel to the trail of blood was a rope with a noose in it evidently belonging to a net of some kind. The trail seems to have been caused by the body having been dragged towards the river after the deed, as the deceased was found lying in the bed of the river on his face alongside the bank, with his head down stream. The water at the spot was at the time about three inches deep. A glance at the body was sickening: the wounds were confined to the head and hands. Below cuts on either side of the face the throat was hacked from ear to ear. The deceased's hands were covered with punctured and lacerated wounds, nearly all of them cut from the flesh to the bones. The body was as soon as possible conveyed to the deceased's house in Water-lane, where Dr Cullin examined it. The effect of the awful crime upon the deceased's wife was painful in the extreme; the poor woman was so overcome that she had to be removed by sympathising neighbours from the house. The antecedents of the unfortunate man show him to have been steady and reliable. He had been in the employ of the Association only for one season, having previously been a keeper with Mr W. L. Unwin, of Hayne. He was by trade a stonemason; and had for some years been in the Army. About 35 years of age he was a man of fine physique, being broadly built, and having a muscular development denoting considerable strength. He was of medium height, possessed a pleasing and genial countenance, the lower part of his face being concealed beneath a bushy brown moustache and beard. it was almost three years ago that he married MISS MARY ANN ELLIOTT, who up to that time had been for nineteen years in the service of Mr E. M. Winton. He leaves no family. Whoever the murderer or murderers might have been, they have eluded detection up to the present time. Mr George Davey, in the course of an interview with a representative of the press, stated "On Friday night I was in the Country House Inn drinking a pint of beer when the deceased entered, and I asked him to have a drink. He said, 'No, no, not now,' and added, 'Here, Georgie, I want to have a word with 'ee.' I went out with him into the skittle alley, and he said, 'I expect some trouble tonight; they are going to lime the river' I replied, 'Well, ARCHIE, I shall be glad to help you any time I can, if you only let me know.' The deceased then left. I myself had some bother some time ago with a gang of four of them, and chased them three miles down the river, but they got off. I told him of this, and deceased replied, 'yes, Georgie, I know all about it - the devils were liming the river.' On Monday an Inquest was opened and adjourned. The Tiverton Town Council has declared that no expense shall be spared to find the murderers. The Council has offered £100 reward and headed a subscription list for REED'S widow with £20. Private subscriptions are also being raised. The Tiverton Fishery Association has decided to offer a reward for the arrest of the murderers. REED'S remains were interred on Wednesday. The police have found that a piece of rope picked up where the murder was committed was obtained at a public-house, the landlady of which knows who took it from her premises.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 12 August 1887
TIVERTON - The adjourned Inquest touching the death of ARCHIBALD REED, recently murdered at Tiverton, was held on Monday, when a verdict of "Wilful Murder by some person or persons unknown" was returned. The evidence threw considerable light upon the fish poaching which takes place in the neighbourhood. No direct clue to the murderer has, however, yet been discovered. A man has been admitted to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital suffering from a broken arm and various other injuries. He explained to those who questioned him that he had sustained these injuries through a fall while in a fit, but there were many discrepancies in his statements.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 19 August 1887
DEVONPORT - At Devonport on Tuesday an Inquest was held upon the body of ELIZABETH GLEEN, an in-patient of the Royal Albert Hospital, who died on the previous morning. The evidence showed that deceased took some morphia, which had been left in her ward, and the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 September 1887
TORQUAY - Fatal Street Accident. - On Wednesday morning in last week as AGNES AVERY, 62, widow, was crossing the road in Brunswick-square, Torre, she was knocked down by a pony belonging to Mr G. D. Bindon, butcher, 25 Higher Union-street, which was being ridden by the owner's son. The woman sustained serious injuries, and was removed to the hospital, where she expired on Saturday afternoon. - An Inquest into the circumstances was held before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on Monday evening in the hospital. MARY SCOTCHBROOK 14 Prospect Place, Upton, gave evidence of identification. The deceased was her mother, and had lived with her. - Arthur Ash, errand boy, stated that he witnessed the accident. The pony was coming from the direction of the railway station, and was being ridden at a sharp trot. The deceased was in the act of crossing the road, having at first halted and then gone on again, when the pony knocked her down. The animal tripped, and rolled over on its back, its rider being thrown. The boy who was on the pony had tried to pull up, and the witness expected that the deceased would have got out of the way before the pony came up. - Similar evidence having been given by William Hill, Albert-terrace and by William Best, carter, George Drew Bindon was called. He stated that the pony, which was being ridden by his son Frederick George at the time of the accident, could only go five miles an hour, and was "little bigger than a Newfoundland dog," being only 10 ¾ hands high. - Mr G. Y. Eales, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, deposed that when the deceased was admitted, she was suffering from a bruise on the left shoulder, and a fractured rib on the left side, as well as a punctured wound on the head. In his opinion the broken rib had perforated the lung. The deceased had suffered from chronic bronchitis, and that was the immediate cause of death, accelerated by the injury to the lung and shock to the system. The Coroner remarked on the habit of fast and furious driving prevalent in Torquay. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, of which Mr Matthew Wicks was Foreman.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held by the Borough Coroner at the Plymouth Workhouse on Tuesday, a verdict of Manslaughter was returned against JULIA HERD, wife of a seaman in the navy, the evidence showing that she was very much addicted to drunkenness and had so neglected her child that it died from starvation. The woman was subsequently arrested.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 23 September 1887
TORQUAY - The Fatal Accident At Torre Station. Conflicting Testimony. - An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon last at the Country House inn, Ellacombe, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of THOMAS JOHN SCOTT, aged 44, who was killed on Wednesday night at Torre Railway Station, by being run over by a train. Mr H. Harding was Foreman of the Jury. Mr E. Ward, from the office of Messrs. Whiteford and Bennett, Plymouth, solicitors to the Great Western Railway Company, watched the proceedings, and Mr John Northcott, district inspector, and Mr G. F. B. Pullen, station-master at Torre, were present. - Mr Wm. Motton, landlord of the Country House inn, was the first witness. He identified the body, saying that the deceased was his brother-in-law. He lived in Florence Villa, Petitor-road, St. Marychurch. He was formerly an inn-keeper, but had recently been following his trade as a joiner. He was 44 years old last birthday. - John Searle, letter carrier, St. Marychurch, stated that he was in the company of MR SCOTT at Newton on Wednesday evening. He met him on the railway station, and talked with him while waiting for the train; but they did not make the journey in the same carriage. It was the last ordinary train; on its arrival at Torre, the witness got out before the deceased, the train being perfectly still at the time. Just as he was moving to leave the station, the witness saw the train jerk, and the deceased fell down. He was standing on the sideboard of the carriage, the door being open. The deceased did not step on to the platform, but fell from the sideboard as the train moved backwards. The porters warned the people to keep their seats while the train, which had over-run its course, was being put back a little; but he did not hear any warning given until after the deceased had fallen under the train. The witness got out on the slope at the end of the station, and several other people did the same. The carriage in which the deceased was did not over-run the platform. He had his hand by the side of the carriage, but whether he had hold of anything the witness could not say. The deceased was standing against the end of the carriage, and fell down by the buffers straight on to the metals. As soon as he fell, the witness cried out and told the engine-driver, or stoker, he did not know which, to keep the train still, as there was a man underneath. He then went and looked under the carriage, and on the train being stopped saw the man removed from under it. In his opinion the cause of the deceased falling was the jerking of the train. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said that the deceased was in good spirits - merry and jovial like everybody else - at Newton, and had nothing to drink on the station. The witness went down on the line and recognized the deceased, who said, "Oh, my God! Oh, my God!" He lived only a few minutes. - Mr F. T. Thistle, surgeon, stated that he saw the deceased at about a quarter past nine o'clock lying on the space between the two lines of rails. He was just living, his pulse being scarcely perceptible. He had sustained a compound fracture of the left thigh, and also of the right leg. The muscles and skin were all torn away from the left side, from the hip to the ankle. The deceased died about ten minutes afterwards, the immediate cause of death being shock consequent upon being run over. - Mrs Mary Sarahs, wife of John Sarahs, living in Swan-street, stated that she saw MR SCOTT get out of the train after it had stopped. She was in the same train, in the next carriage, going on to Torquay. The deceased stood on the platform for some time talking to someone in a carriage; his right arm was on the door, which was shut, but he had not got hold of the handle. She was sure he stood on the platform, not on the sideboard. As the train began to move backwards, he loosed his hold and fell. The deceased was talking to a female, standing sideways, with his back to the engine. The witness had previously told a friend that she was afraid that the man would fall over if he did not leave go the door; but he continued talking, and as the train moved quietly backwards he walked with it, still talking to the female in the carriage. Fearing that there would be an accident as the man's foot was so near to the edge, the witness called out to him. Twice she said, "I wish you would get away, and wait until the train stops," but she did not think the man heard her. At last, after walking a short distance with the train, he made a lurch, and fell over. There was no jerk, and she could not say what caused the fall. He slipped a long way before he came to the end of the carriage; falling into the opening between the first and second carriages - and not between the second and third. The witness was very explicit on this point. She also declared that she heard the porters call out twice, telling the people to stand clear and keep their seats. She felt no shock when the train shunted. The witness afterwards told the lady-friend of the deceased that it was very wrong of her to keep him talking so long. - George Mitchell, sick-berth steward, in the Royal Navy, stated that he travelled in the same compartment as the deceased on the evening in question; he entered after the witness was seated, and was alone. On the way the deceased was rather uproarious in his behaviour. He started singing, and although not in a smoking compartment, lighted his pipe and smoked. All of a sudden too, while the train was in motion, he started up and wanted to leave the carriage. Speaking the plain truth, the witness would say that the man was under the influence of liquor. The witness stopped him from getting out of the carriage, whereupon the deceased threatened to punch him in the face. The witness stood up in the carriage, with his hand on the hat-rail, as the train entered the station, so as to prevent the deceased from making another attempt at leaving while the train was in motion. The majority of the passengers in the carriage got out at Torre and the witness (who was going to Dartmouth) and a lady were left in alone. When the deceased got out, the witness said to him: "Old man, you had better be careful, or you will get into trouble." A few minutes later the witness heard that a man had fallen on the line, and looking out of the carriage, he recognized the man as the one who had just left his company. - In answer to questions, the witness said that he saw the deceased walk away from the carriage as if he was leaving the station. He was not aware that he talked to anyone. The carriage in which they travelled was the third or fourth from the engine. The train moved backwards very slowly; the witness noticed no jerk. The deceased first threatened to leave the carriage between Newton and Kingskerswell. He offered to purchase for £5 the red cross off the arm of the witness's jacket, and among other things said that he did not care whether he lived through the night. - John Thomas, guard of the train, stated that Newton Abbot was left at 8.57; it was the 8.30 train from Newton to Kingswear. Torre was reached at 9.12., and owing to the metals being a little slippery and the train being a very long one, the platform was overrun by the first two coaches. When the main body of the passengers were out, and the Torre luggage had been taken out of the van, the witness walked down beside the train, calling out "keep your seats," and "keep clear, while we put back." The engine was blowing off steam, and the witness had to go close up to the engine to give the order to put back the length of two coaches. Porters also called out to passengers to keep their seats and stand clear. Directly the train moved, the witness was told that a man was under the train, the third carriage from the engine; and going between the carriages, the witness put the man's legs in the middle of the line. Afterwards, with assistance, the witness removed the man to the space between the up and down lines. - In answer to questions, the witness said that he did not notice the deceased when he passed along the train; there were many people on the platform, and certainly the deceased was not at the time leaning on a carriage. When the witness was giving the order to the engine-driver to put back, he could not see the length of the train, as there was a curve in the course. There was, however, time for the man to go to the door while the witness went quite up to the engine to deliver the station-master's instructions for the train to be put back. There was no jerk when the train started back; such a thing as a jerk was impossible under the circumstances, for going backwards was going up hill, with the full weight of the train on the engine. - Henry Tuckett, district representative of the Western Morning News, who was in the front part of the train, deposed to having heard the guard and porters request passengers to keep their seats; the warning was so clear and effective that not one person got out of the compartment in which he was. As to the backward movement of the train, it was gradual and without any jerk. - Mrs Sarahs was recalled. In reply to the coroner, she said that she saw the deceased get out of the compartment in which the woman sat with whom he was afterwards in conversation. - In summing up the evidence, the Coroner pointed out the great difference between the evidence of Searle and that of the other witnesses, and told the Jury that if they could not reconcile the conflicting statements they would do well to give superior weight to the more reasonable and consistent version. Putting aside Mr Searle's evidence, he thought that there was coherency in what had been stated; Mrs Sarahs and Mr Mitchell not only gave their evidence well, but they agreed as to the fundamental facts. Having analysed the testimony, the Coroner said that there was ground for supposing that, having walked away from the train, as Mr Mitchell said he did, the deceased went to the carriage in which the woman was sitting, and entered into conversation with her. Indeed, the deceased may have got into the compartment in which the woman was sitting, and have got out when Mrs Sarahs was looking out of the window, and then have stood against the carriage door, as Mrs Sarahs had stated. The question was whether anyone was to blame in the matter of the injuries to which the deceased succumbed. - After some consideration, the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, adding as a rider a recommendation that, in cases of long trains extra precautions should be taken by the officials of the Railway Company in order to prevent accidents occurring through passengers approaching too closely to the carriages just before the trains are put in motion. The Foreman explained that the Jury did not wish their recommendation to imply censure, as they were of opinion that the Company was in no way to blame in the matter of the fatal accident into which Inquiry had been made. - The Jury gave their fees for the benefit of the children of the deceased. The two brothers of the deceased who have been home on a visit from Australia, and who were with him in his last moments on the railway station, left Torquay for Plymouth just before the Inquest was held, in order to return to Australia, in pursuance of arrangements made prior to the unfortunate occurrence.

PRINCETOWN - On Wednesday at Princetown a Coroner's Jury Inquired into the cause of death of the young convict WILLIAM ROBERTS, which occurred on the 12th inst., whilst blasting operations were being carried on at the quarry. It was found that death was accidental but a rider was added recommending that a set or regulations be framed for the guidance of persons using explosives in quarries, and that such regulations should specify the tools to be used.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 November 1887
TORQUAY - Inquests In Torquay. - Two Inquests were held in the town by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, on Tuesday. The first was at the Torbay Hospital into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN GILBERT HARVEY, 21, labourer, who, it will be remembered was buried in a fall of earth and clay at Messrs. Webber and Stedham's Brickworks, Newton-road, on Thursday, October 13th, when he received serious injuries. Mr Wm. Watson was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was SARAH ANN HARVEY, wife of the deceased, residing at 21 Victoria Park, St. Marychurch, who gave evidence of identification. - James Hocking, labourer at the Brickworks, living at St. Marychurch, deposed that on the afternoon of October 13th, he was, with deceased and another man, engaged in digging clay at the foot of a bank about ten or twelve feet high. Suddenly the deceased shouted "Look up," and then a great mass of sandy clay broke from the middle of the face of the bank. Deceased being in the centre was caught by the falling substance and buried, but witness and the other man, who were working at the sides, escaped. About two tons of clay fell, and witness thought the slip was caused by the rain which fell on the night previous to the occurrence. Witness helped to rescue the deceased, but after his head and shoulders had been cleared, the top portion of the bank fell, and again the deceased was buried. Eventually the deceased was got out, and conveyed in an insensible condition to the Torbay Hospital. - William Lock, who was labouring with the deceased at the time of the occurrence, gave similar evidence. - James Bellamy, foreman to Messrs. Webber and Stedham, residing at the works, said that he had since examined the place where the slip occurred, and found a bed of sandy clay in the centre of the bank, which ran in about ten or twelve feet. It was the sandy clay which fell first, and then the tough clay, being much weakened, fell afterwards. Witness inspected the headings of the pits twice a day, to ensure the safety of the men. On the day of the accident, he had twice visited the place where deceased was working, and on going there the second time witness saw no cracks at the top which would lead to the supposition that the clay was about to fall. - Mr George Young Eales, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said that the deceased was admitted to the institution about four o'clock on the afternoon of the 13th of October; he was bleeding from the right ear and the left nostril, and had a bruise above the left eye. Further examination showed that the deceased was suffering from a fracture of the base of the skull. After remaining insensible for nine days, the deceased came round, and last week he became quite clear and collected, and conversed with his friends. Last Friday, however, the deceased got worse, and on Monday he passed into a state of coma, and died in the evening. Witness was of opinion that the indirect cause of death was injury to the skull, but the immediate cause was coma. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

The second Inquest was held in the evening at Rowland's Clarence Hotel, Newton-road, for the purpose of Inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of VICTOR REGINALD SNOW, aged four months, who died at 3, Avenue Villas, Paignton-road, on Monday morning. Mr Thomas Taylor was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - CHARLES ALBERT SNOW, leather merchant, living at 65 Fleet-street, said he was the father of the deceased. He had been a weakly child from birth, but did not appear sufficiently ill to warrant a medical man being sent for. Witness had had nine children, of whom three only were living, most of them having died a few weeks after birth. For some time the deceased child had been put out to nurse with Mr and Mrs Webber, who live at 3 Avenue Villas, as there was not sufficient accommodation at his business premises in Fleet-street. On Monday morning Mr Webber informed witness of the death of the child. The deceased was not insured, in fact none of his children were. - Edward Webber, private lunacy attendant, 3 Avenue Villas, stated that the child was placed in charge of his wife about a fortnight after his birth. At that time the deceased appeared to breathe with difficulty, and there seemed to be something the matter with his throat. The child had been well fed and up to within the last fortnight, had slept in the same room as witness and his wife, but since that the child had slept in an adjoining room. He had been authorised by MR SNOW to get medical assistance whenever the child required it, but as he had seen no change in the child's health he did not trouble. The deceased had recently been vaccinated by the public vaccinator, as Dr Richardson was unable to do it at the time MRS SNOW required it to be done. Witness thought that the public vaccinator would know if the child was too weak to be operated upon. On Sunday night witness's wife went as usual into the room to give the child a bottle of milk, but on going to him on Monday morning she found the child dead. Witness then fetched Dr Richardson. - Mr J. B. Richardson, physician, said he had examined the child and found it to be well nourished; there were no marks on the body, and nothing whatever to show that the child died from anything but natural causes. In his opinion the child apparently died from inflammation of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 25 November 1887
TORQUAY - Sad Fatality To A Torquay Innkeeper. - A melancholy accident which terminated fatally, happened to MR FREDERICK WILLIAM DAY, landlord of the Globe Hotel, Higher Union-street, on Friday evening last. It seems that MR DAY was riding a young horse along Fleet-street, and when he got to the Devon Arms, he saw a friend and called to him. He dismounted, and after a few minutes conversation he re-mounted, and rode off. When he had proceeded about five yards he was seen to fall from his horse, and his head coming in contact with the stone crossing, he was rendered quite unconscious. He was conveyed to his home, and lingered until Sunday evening, when he expired. MR DAY was 32 years of age, and leaves a widow and three children to mourn their loss. He was the only son of MR SAMUEL DAY, who for many years carried on the business of aerated water manufacturer in this town, and who has quite recently returned to England from Africa, after an absence of about seven years. - On Monday evening at the Torbay Inn, Torre, Mr Sydney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of MR DAY. Mr G. M. Tripe was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was MR SAMUEL DAY, father of the deceased, who, after giving evidence of identification, said that deceased had been used to riding horses ever since he was ten years of age. Witness added that the animal deceased was riding at the time of the occurrence had been kept in a stable for three weeks, and it might have been rather fresh; it was somewhat young, but on the whole was a quiet animal. - Thomas dunning Cross, plumber and gasfitter, residing at 2 Westbourne-terrace, deposed that he was walking along Fleet-street about quarter to six o'clock on Friday evening last, when he saw the deceased, who called to him. Witness went over by the side of the horse that deceased was riding, and after a brief conversation, MR DAY dismounted in front of the Devon Arms, and the conversation was resumed in the bar of the Devon Arms, the horse being left in charge of a lad. The conversation, which related to some business matters, lasted for about six or seven minutes, and then witness and deceased left the public-house. Deceased went over to his horse, seized the reins, mounted and rode off, saying "All right; good night Tom." Witness saw the horse begin to plunge and after it had proceeded a few yards, he observed that deceased lurched on one side, and thinking there was something wrong, he tried to get up to him. Before he caught up to the animal, however, the deceased fell back over its quarters, and his head and right shoulder pitched on the road crossing, in front of the Torquay Horticultural Depot. Deceased was taken into the Devon Arms, where restoratives were applied, but as they had no effect, he was conveyed to his home in a cab. The deceased was perfectly sober, and while talking with witness he was as concise and as shrewd as ever he was. Witness did not notice whether the deceased had his feet in the stirrups when he rode off, or whether he wore spurs or carried a whip, and he saw nothing in the animal's path to frighten it. - Mr William Powell, surgeon, stated that he saw the deceased on Friday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, and found him suffering from concussion of the brain. There was a small abrasion on the right side of the back of the head, and he was quite insensible. On Sunday the deceased became completely comatose and in the evening he died. Witness attributed death to the injury to the base of the brain, caused by a fall. After a few remarks by the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 2 December 1887
CHUDLEIGH - The body found in the river Teign at Chudleigh was identified at the adjourned Inquest as that of CHARLES WOOD, aged 41, commercial traveller, in the employ of Messrs. D. Sykes & Co., brewers, of Bristol. He was married and has left a widow and five children. Evidence was given that he was wrong in his accounts and had absented himself from his duties. A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 30 December 1887
OKEHAMPTON - MR ARTHUR WELLINGTON, son of the postmaster at Okehampton, died at the railway station there on Tuesday immediately after depositing the mail bags in the 9.8 train. He had hurried up the hill to the station. At the Inquest subsequently held before Mr W. Burd, Dr Young stated that heart disease was the cause of death, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned. Deceased was 22 years of age.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 January 1888
TORQUAY - Suicide In Torquay. The Duty Of Medical men. - On Christmas Day, THOMAS GILLARD, 69 years of age, a retired Inland Revenue Officer, was found at his residence, 1, Highbury Villas, Ellacombe, with his throat cut. Medical assistance was immediately sought, and MR GILLARD lingered, under the treatment of Drs. Gardner and Cook, until last Monday evening, when he expired from exhaustion. - Yesterday morning at twenty minutes past eight o'clock, Mr Sydney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the residence of the deceased. Mr T. F. Graham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was MARY GILLARD, widow of the deceased, who, after giving evidence of identification, deposed that her husband had been an Inland Revenue Officer, but retired from the service about seven years ago, and had since lived at Torquay. For the past four years he had suffered from a disordered brain, and had not been outside the house for three years. On Christmas Day witness took the deceased his dinner as usual and left the room, as he would never eat before any one. Shortly afterwards she re-entered the room, and after a brief conversation, again left the room taking the dinner things with her. After she had been upstairs for two or three minutes, she heard the deceased groaning, and immediately ran downstairs and found him in his room, sitting on the floor with his throat bleeding, a knife lying by his side. The deceased never used a knife or fork, but witness thought she must by mistake have taken a knife in to him on the dinner tray. She did not remember having done so, but thought that such must have been the case. Witness called her brother and his wife, Mr and Mrs Edwards, who were staying in the house at the time, and Mr Edwards went for medical assistance. The deceased died about eight o'clock on Monday evening last. He had never before attempted to destroy himself, or threatened to do so, but any little matter was sufficient to worry him. Witness added that a week before Christmas, the servant who had been with her for seventeen years, left her through illness, and it seemed to greatly affect the deceased, as he had an idea that the work would fall upon her (witness). - Lucy Edwards, sister-in-law of MRS GILLARD, stated that on Christmas Day, she and her husband went to dine with MRS GILLARD. After dinner she heard MRS GILLARD descend the stairs very quickly and heard her call. On entering a room on the ground floor she found the deceased sitting on a cushion on the floor which he seemed to have put there for the purpose. His throat was bleeding and his back was leaning against the sofa. Witness could not conceive how he got possession of the knife, unless MRS GILLARD accidentally conveyed it to him on the dinner tray. Deceased had spoken to witness about the servant's departure, and remarked how lonely his wife would be. - Thomas Edwards, coachbuilder, 46 Union-street, stated that he fetched Dr cook. When he left the house he was not aware that the deceased had inflicted any injuries upon himself. - Mr P. H. Gardner, surgeon, deposed that about three o'clock on Christmas Day he received a message that he was wanted at 1, Highbury Villas, and on going there he found the deceased with a wound in his throat six inches long. The instrument used had severed the top of his windpipe and entered his gullet. The deceased had lost a great deal of blood, and was still bleeding when witness first saw him. The wound might have been self-inflicted, and the knife produced [a small but very sharp table knife] would have been sufficient to have caused the injuries. Three days after the occurrence the deceased told witness that the injuries were self-inflicted, and that he was sorry for what he had done. The deceased further said that at the time he felt that he was bound to jump out of the window or do something, and added that for the past two years he had experienced an inclination to do himself some harm. In reply to the Coroner, witness said that no communication was made to the police until January 3rd. - The Coroner remarked that it would have been wise of Mr Gardner if he had given information to the police immediately after he had become acquainted with the occurrence, and moreover it was his duty to have done so. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide, whilst in a state of Unsound Mind." - The Coroner called Mr Edwards, and pointed out that he had been very imprudent in not giving information to the police until eight days after the occurrence. It was the duty of the friends of the deceased to have immediately communicated with the authorities, and equally the duty of the medical man who had charge of the deceased. Their action had been a breach of duty, and it might have been a breach of law.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held on Monday evening by the Plymouth Coroner on a publican named NEAL, who committed suicide by taking laudanum, it transpired that laudanum was sold in the neighbourhood without being labelled, and it was intimated that the police would take action in the matter

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 13 January 1888
BRIXHAM - A Brixham Trawler Run Down. Loss Of Four Lives. - Intelligence was received at Brixham on Friday of the loss of the fishing smack Nimble and four hands. The Rescue, at six o'clock in the morning was on the fishing ground, the Start light bearing N.W. by N., distant fourteen miles, when the crew observed the masthead light of another trawler, the only one near them. Directly afterwards the light disappeared, and a steamer was on the spot blowing her whistle. The head of the Rescue was at once put towards the steamer, and on nearing her the captain requested the skipper of the Rescue to lower his boat and search for the crew of a fishing smack which he had run down. The request was at once complied with, and the steamer, lying dead and blowing off steam, launched her second boat, she having already one rowing about the scene of the collision. About this time a faint cry was heard on the water, and the boats pulled with all their might in that direction. They then discovered the boy of the fishing smack clinging to a portion of the wreckage. He was picked up by the steamer's boat, and taken on board the steamer in a very exhausted condition. He was speedily stripped and every effort was made to restore him, with eventual success. The captain refused to let the boy go on board the fishing smack Rescue, considering that his critical condition could be better alleviated on board his vessel, where more comforts were available. After searching about for a long time and seeing nothing remaining of the ill-fated fishing smack, or of her crew, the boats were hoisted on board, and the steamer proceeded up Channel. She was the screw steamship Swansea, of London, bound to London with cattle. On the news being received at Brixham there was great distress upon the quay, where many persons had congregated anxious to hear if there was any hope for the four missing hands, all of whom were much respected in the town. They were WILLIAM SHEARS, skipper, age 24; HARRY MYLES, second hand, 23; WILLIAM HOCKING, third hand, 18; and CHARLES MUNDAY, fourth hand, 17. SHEARS leaves a wife and one child, and was for three years skipper of the fishing smack Sea Belle, this being his first voyage in the Nimble. MYLES who was with SHEARS the whole of the time in the Sea Belle, joined the Nimble with him. He buried his young wife three weeks since, and leaves a child an orphan. The other two men were unmarried, and were both sons of fishermen of the town. The Nimble was owned by Mr John Bovey of Bolton-street, Brixham, and was insured in the Brixham Fishing Smack Insurance Society for £550. The skipper of the Rescue says that the captain of the Swansea did every thing in his power to save the crew of the Nimble, having two boats pulling about in all directions in search of them. The body of WILLIAM SHEARS, the skipper, was afterwards recovered and brought to Brixham where an Inquest was opened on Monday morning. G. Parnell, skipper of the Telegram, deposed to picking up the body and bringing it to Brixham. The witness stated that he distinctly remembered that the morning of the collision was very clear, the moon having risen about midnight. Thomas Gardiner stated that he was cook on board the ketch Nimble. They went to sea from Brixham on Thursday and fished, heaving up their trawl on Friday morning about half-past five. WILLIAM HOCKING, third hand, then took charge of the vessel. The crew went below and witness went to get the breakfast. While doing so HOCKING called the skipper to "jump on deck." All hands responded, the witness being in the cabin ladder when the steamboat struck the trawler. He immediately jumped overboard being a good swimmer, and kept himself afloat by clinging to wreckage for a quarter of an hour, when he was picked up by a boat from the steamer. He felt someone touch him in the water and thought it was the skipper. The steamboat went right through the trawler, the former going, as the master afterwards told him, 12 knots an hour. The 'Nimble' had a bright light burning at the mast head. The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Monday next.

ST MARYCHURCH - Shocking Fatality At Babbacombe. The Inquest. - A sad occurrence happened at Babbacombe on Tuesday evening, which resulted in the death of MR SAMUEL DARE, 53, chief boatman in charge at the Babbacombe Coastguard Station, through his falling over a cliff to a distance of about 80ft. into a quarry beneath. It appears that the deceased left the station in company with a fellow coastguardsman, for the purpose of going his rounds which extended over Walls Hill. The night was exceedingly dark, and a thick fog hung over the common, so that it was with great difficulty that the two men found their way. The deceased took the lead, and after going through a gap in the wall which marks the boundary between the two manors, the other man suddenly missed his companion, and discovered by looking over the wall that he was in close proximity to the large quarries. After calling once or twice he heard groans and then knew that the deceased had fallen over the cliff. Assistance was procured and the unfortunate man was conveyed to his home, where he expired from the terrible injuries he had received about twelve hours after the occurrence. - The Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, on Thursday morning at nine o'clock. Previous to that hour, however, the Coroner, accompanied by members of the Jury, visited the spot where the sad occurrence happened. The Inquiry was attended by Mr J. T. Nevin, commanding officer of coastguards of the district, and Mr W. D. Bowden, Surveyor to the St. Marychurch Local Board. Mr Alfred Harris was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was JANE DARE, daughter of the deceased, who gave evidence of identification. She said that she lived with her father at the Coastguard Station, Babbacombe. On Tuesday evening about a quarter to seven o'clock, the deceased left home with Mr Webber, another coastguardsman, for the purpose of going his rounds which extended to Hope's Nose. He was brought home unconscious about thirty minutes afterwards, and died the next morning at four o'clock. - John Webber, coastguardsman, stationed at Babbacombe, deposed that on Tuesday night himself and the deceased left the station for the purpose of going through their western guards, which extended over Walls Hill. When they had got on to the second hill they made for the wall on the opposite side, knowing there was a gap in it. The night was exceedingly dark, there was a thick fog hanging over the common at the time, and they could not see ten yards ahead. As witness came to the wall, he observed a gap which he took for the one that he always passed through when on that round. The deceased was on the right of witness, and being nearest to the gap he took the lead, witness following him about two yards behind. After going through the gap deceased suddenly disappeared, and he could not imagine what had become of him. Witness called twice and then went over to the gap and felt over the wall with his stick. Finding that his stick touched nothing on the other side, he called again, and then heard a groan, which appeared to proceed from some distance down the cliff, and then he knew that he was near the quarries. Taking the lamps in the road for a guide witness went around and descended to the road and proceeded to the quarries in company with two men whom he had acquainted with what had happened. By feeling about witness found the deceased lying at the bottom of the quarry quite unconscious, but faintly groaning. The deceased must have fallen at least 60ft. without coming in contact with any rock and then fallen another 20ft. Witness despatched the two men for assistance and remained with the deceased until it arrived. The deceased was subsequently taken to his home in a cab. When found he was lying on his left side on a piece of sloping ground. The gap where the deceased went through was, in the opinion of witness, about 100 yards to the left of the gap which it was usual for him to go through. There was no road within 50 yards of the track which they took. - James Hayter, coachman, 12 Haredown-terrace, Babbacombe, deposed that on the night in question he was passing the Walls Hill Quarries when he heard a noise as if something was falling from the cliffs. He waited for a moment and saw the last witness descend into the road. Webber told him of what had occurred, and they went together and discovered the deceased at the foot of the quarry. The dark night and thick fog made it impossible for witness to see the sheds in the quarry. - Mr W. T. Boreham, physician of Torquay, stated that he was called to the residence of the deceased on Tuesday night and found him in bed, suffering from severe scalp wounds, a broken arm, a bad cut on the right leg, and a fracture of the base of the skull. The deceased was unconscious, and could only be roused with difficulty. The nature of the wounds indicated that the deceased pitched on his head, and it is wonderful that he had not dislocated his neck and been killed on the spot. The direct cause of death was the fracture of the skull, as the other wounds would not have been sufficient to have caused death. - Mr W. D. Bowden, surveyor to the St. Marychurch Local Board, said that the common on Walls Hill on the Babbacombe side was a public recreation ground and was under the jurisdiction of the Local Board as that body rented it from Mr Cary. The wall and the quarries belonged to Lord Haldon, and the wall separated the two manors. There were no bye-laws to regulate the public. About four or five years ago the Board had taken steps to get the gaps in the wall repaired, but the stones had again been torn down. Witness had no doubt but that the Local Board would take advantage of the new Quarry Fencing Act which came into force on the 1st of January, and compel the owner to put up proper fences. - William Henry Drake deposed that his father was the lessee of the quarry where the accident occurred. Witness was not acquainted with the working of the quarry, but simply attended the Inquiry on behalf of his father, who was ill. - The Coroner requested the witness to tell his father that the quarry must be enclosed, in compliance with the Quarry Fencing Act, 1887, and also to inform him that he had been acting illegally since the beginning of the year, which was excusable in consequence of his having been ill during that time. - The Coroner then addressed the Jury, and remarked that from the evidence that had been forthcoming he had no doubt they would be able to conclude as to how the deceased came by his death. It did not appear to him that the owner of the quarry would have been legally responsible for the occurrence previous to January 1st, as the quarry was, as had been shown in the evidence, more than twenty-five yards from the roadway, and thus there was no actual breach of the law. A law came in force at the beginning of the year which read as follows:- "Where any quarry is dangerous to the public, or is in an open or unenclosed land within fifty yards of a highway or place of public resort, dedicated to the public, and is not separated therefrom by a secure and sufficient fence, it shall be reasonably fenced for the prevention of accidents and unless so kept shall be deemed to be a nuisance liable to be dealt with summarily in a manner by the Public Health Act, 1875." Mr Drake had been allowed to act contrary to law since the Act came in force, but his inability to attend to business through illness during the time would probably be a valid excuse for his non-compliance with the Act. - The Jury retired for a few minutes, and returned with the following verdict: "The Jury is of opinion that the deceased came to his death through the injuries received from accidentally falling into the quarry, having missed his path through the darkness and thickness of the fog. They recommend that the Coroner calls the attention of the Local Board to the dangerous state of the place, and to point out the desirability of their enforcing the erection of suitable fences without delay."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 January 1888
DARTMOUTH - Suicide Of A Police Sergeant At Dartmouth. - A very painful sensation was caused at Dartmouth on Sunday, upon its becoming known that Police-Sergeant ALLIN, who had been stationed there for three years, and was much respected and esteemed, had that morning committed suicide by taking poison. On Saturday Captain Yardley (superintendent of the division) visited the deceased and gave him information that for some alleged neglect of duty he would be reduced to the rank of constable and transferred to Ilfracombe where he had previously been stationed. Later in the day the police-sergeant when leaving the constables of the town wished them good evening and told them of what had occurred. He was then in good health, although greatly depressed in spirits. On the following morning about seven o'clock his landlady (Mrs Fogwell) heard a strange knocking which seemed to proceed from his room, and she asked her husband to go and see what was the matter. He did so and found the sergeant throwing about his arms and appearing as though in very great agony. Dr A. K. Crossfield was sent for, but the unfortunate man expired about an hour afterwards. He was conscious for some time after the doctor arrived, but nothing could be done to save him. On a table near at hand was a paper which had contained strychnine, with which the deceased must have poisoned himself, while in a glass close by were the dregs of some liquor in which the poison had evidently been mixed. The police were at once communicated with and the sad news wired to Captain Yardley and the deceased's sister. - An Inquest was held on Monday before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, and the evidence showed that the alleged neglect of duty was a complaint made as to the deceased not having taken out a warrant against a man who was suspected of incendiarism, and who had in the meantime left the town. It was, however, stated that on the day when the fire occurred, the deceased was engaged upon a long case at the police court. ALLIN had been in the force upwards of twenty years and it was admitted by Captain Yardley that there had never previously been any complaint made against him. Deceased's landlady stated that when ALLIN received information of his being disrated and removed to Ilfracombe, he said "I am sold like a bullock at Smithfield, and how can I go back where I came from with the stripes taken off my arm." - The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide by Strychnine Poisoning whilst of Unsound Mind; and they attributed the deceased's state of mind to the unjust treatment received at the hands of his superior officers, relative to his conduct on the occasion of the fire at Dr. Davison's house, and particularly in sending deceased back to Ilfracombe, where he was formerly in charge, which the Jury considered to be arbitrary, cruel and unjust, and they endorsed the statement of the Coroner as to the deceased's exemplary character and efficiency.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 February 1888
DENBURY - P.C. BEER, 24 years of age, of Denbury, a small village between two and three miles from Newton, was on Friday afternoon shot dead. Deceased, after having his dinner, went into the back kitchen of his house, saying he intended to go into the garden to try to get a shot at a bird. His wife taking their little child with her, went upstairs. Hearing shortly afterwards the report of a gun she came down, and on going into the back kitchen found her husband there shot dead, his face being dreadfully disfigured by shot wounds. By his side was a discharged gun. Deceased was at one time stationed at Torquay, whence he went to Moreton, and from there was sent to Denbury. At the Inquest a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORQUAY - Sad Fatality In Torquay. - An Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, at the Town Hall, on Monday evening, on the body of ELIZABETH BOW, aged 78, who died at 3 Alma-terrace, Braddons-hill, on Sunday, from the effect of injuries sustained through burns received on the 15th inst. - PHILLIP BOW, a retired farmer, and a cripple, husband of the deceased, whose evidence was taken at the house, deposed that on Sunday, the 15th inst., he was sitting with the deceased in front of the fire. The deceased's apron accidentally caught fire, and witness, being a cripple, was unable to go to her assistance, but called for help. - ELIZABETH PARR, daughter of the deceased, said that the deceased and her husband occupied two rooms in her house. On the evening of the 15th, witness gave the deceased her supper, and having placed her near the fire, went downstairs. After ten minutes had elapsed, she heard a noise as if something had fallen, and someone was calling for help. She went upstairs and found the deceased sitting on the floor near the fireplace with her apron on fire, and her dress smouldering. witness and her husband extinguished the fire, and the latter went for medical assistance. Deceased lingered until Sunday, when she expired. She had not been in her right mind for some years, and her conduct was such as to necessitate Dr Powell being called in about eighteen months ago. - William Charles Parr, gardener, husband of the last witness, adduced similar testimony. - Mr William Powell, physician, stated that he was called to the residence of the deceased on the 15th instant, and found her very much burnt on the left arm and side. Witness gave directions as to her treatment, and subsequently saw her from time to time. The injuries were not such as would cause death to a strong person. The deceased died from shock to the system. Witness saw the deceased about eighteen months ago, and discovered that she was suffering from mania, but she showed no suicidal tendency, and had since become imbecile. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 10 February 1888
LONDON - Suicide Of A Late Torquay Printer. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held in London on the body of HENRY G. S. AGNEW, aged 39, a compositor in the employ of Messrs. Cassell & Co., the well-known publishers, who committed suicide by shooting himself. Previously to his going to London, deceased was for several years employed in the printing office of the Torquay Times, and was much esteemed by his fellow workmen, and by all who knew him. - The widow, who identified the body, said two years ago her husband was attacked by some men, who tried to rob him as he was going home late at night. He was badly hurt about the head, and several of his teeth knocked out. Since then he had complained of pains in the head, and they had affected his reason. There was nothing to lead him to take his life. - Edwin Shinner, reader at Messrs. Cassell's establishment, deposed that about five o'clock on Friday afternoon he found the door of the lavatory secured from the inside and on its being forced open the deceased was discovered in a dying state on the floor, and bleeding profusely from a wound in the head. He had a revolver by his side, and had evidently shot himself with the weapon. - Edward Hinde, a compositor, deposed to finding a letter in the lavatory, in the deceased's handwriting, as follows: "Dear Mr Shinner - Please excuse my leaving without the usual fortnight's notice; but I have received a peremptory summons to go to heaven to set the title-page of the Book of Life. - Yours H.G.S. AGNEW." - Mr Lyndon, house surgeon, deposed that deceased lingered until half-past eleven at night, when he expired. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while suffering from Temporary Insanity.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 24 February 1888
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Exeter Workhouse on Monday respecting the death of JOHN BOWDEN. The evidence shewed that the deceased was admitted into the institution on Saturday and died a few hours afterwards. He was stated to be a stableman aged 38, and a native of a village near Torquay. The deceased was given a warm bath on entering the house, as is customary, and it was stated that in passing from the bath into the receiving ward the deceased had to go into the open air. Dr Woodman said deceased complained of a pain in the chest whilst in the bath, and added that passing from the bath into the air was dangerous, and might give a cold. The Jury condemned this arrangement and recommended the guardians to effect an improvement.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 16 March 1888
TORQUAY - Singular Fatal Accident In Torquay. Refusal To Permit A Post Mortem Examination. - Last week we reported the death of MR CHARLES ABRAMS, of Hollydale, Teignmouth Road, who was found dead in a water butt into which it was supposed he had accidentally fallen, and from which being paralysed, he was unable to extricate himself. The Inquest was opened on Friday evening before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. - MRS ABRAMS, the widow, stated that her late husband was formerly editor and proprietor of the London Courier, and that for the last three years he had suffered from paralysis of the left side, so that he was only able to get about with difficulty. He also suffered a good deal from headache. During Thursday morning witness and deceased had been sitting together in the dining room, and just before one o'clock he went out for the purpose of going into the garden. She expected him in to dinner at half-past one and as he did not come she went to look for him. Just before two o'clock she found him in one corner of the garden with his head in a cask of water, which was partially sunk into the ground. Being very fond of flowers, the deceased had had the cask put there for the purpose of watering the plants, and he was in the habit of dipping water out of the cask with a can. He walked with a stick, which was found on the pathway near the cask. Deceased frequently slipped and fell, through weakness, owing to the paralysis. - Florence Short, domestic servant, stated that on being called by her mistress she went to the garden and found the deceased with his head, arms and shoulders in the cask. His knees were touching the ground, as though he had fallen over. The water-can and two flower pots, containing hyacinths, were by the side of the cask, and the deceased's hat was behind it. - Thomas Wollacott, gardener, who also came to the spot just afterwards, said the deceased's knees were on the ground. The cask was three parts full and the water covered the deceased down to the middle of his back. Witness had some difficulty in getting the deceased out, as his shoulders filled the mouth of the cask. The deceased often used to fall, and when he did so he called for help, as he could not get up alone. Deceased was cheerful when he last saw him alive on the previous day. - Mr Karkeek, surgeon, deposed to having been called to the deceased, whom he considered had been dead about one hour. The body had the appearance of a person who had been drowned, but he would not vouch for this. Having received the Coroner's warrant he went to the house with another doctor to assist him, for the purpose of making a post mortem examination. He was however refused admission, and, as the message given him by the servant was that the examination would not be allowed, he had to go away. Mr Karkeek added that he sent the servant in to her mistress three times with urgent and kindly messages, but he was not permitted to see her. - MRS ABRAMS recalled, in reply to the Coroner, said she understood from Dr Huxley, who had been her husband's medical attendant, that there was no necessity for a post-mortem examination. - The Coroner replied that Dr Huxley could know nothing as to that. The Jury had to decide whether the deceased came to his death accidentally by drowning, by natural causes, or in any other way, or in a violent manner, and in order to come to a decision they wanted the best evidence they could have. Therefore when MRS ABRAMS refused to allow his order to be obeyed, she put herself in a wrong position, and the Jury had to ask for an explanation. - Mr Beadson, brother to MRS ABRAMS, who accompanied her into the room, assured the Coroner that she had not wilfully disobeyed his orders, and that what had happened was owing to her not understanding them. - The Coroner asked MRS ABRAMS if she had any particular reason for her refusal, and she replied that she thought there was no necessity for the post mortem examination, as Dr Huxley had seen the body on the previous night. Ever since they had resided in Torquay Dr Huxley had been attending him. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said they had evidence before them, and he left it for them to say whether they would be able to satisfy themselves from it as to the manner in which the deceased came to his death, or whether they would like to have the Inquest adjourned for a day or two to allow Mr Karkeek to make the examination and give them his report. - The Jury consulted in private for about ten minutes, when the Foreman announced that they attributed MRS ABRAM'S refusal to ignorance and her relying on her own medical attendant. their unanimous verdict was that the deceased was found Drowned in the cask, but that, as to how he came there, there was not sufficient evidence to show. - The Coroner: Well then, not having sufficient evidence, hadn't you better have more? - It is no good bringing in an open verdict when you can have other evidence if you like. I should not advise you to return such a verdict as it leaves the case open to any construction. It would be much better to have all the evidence you can and I therefore think it would be better to adjourn the Inquest. - The Foreman: We were almost unanimous on a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." - The Coroner decided to adjourn the Inquest until Tuesday evening, at the Torbay Inn, Torre, and he directed Mr Karkeek to make the post mortem examination. He added that he thought there would be no difficulty now, but if there was he must apply to the sergeant of the police, who would see that the order was carried out. The body could be removed to the mortuary for the examination if it was not allowed to be performed in the house. The Inquest was accordingly adjourned. - The adjourned Inquiry was held at Giles's Torbay Inn, on Tuesday evening. - Mr P. Q. Karkeek deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. There were no external signs of injury or violence of any kind. The lungs were such as he would expect to find in a case of drowning; the heart was healthy. On the right side of the brain he found a softened spot indicative of a previous attack of apoplexy, and in the vicinity of that witness found a small fresh clot. Witness inferred from those that the deceased was seized with a slight apoplectic stroke whilst standing near the tub, and consequent on the giddiness and unconsciousness which would ensue, he accidentally fell into the tub, and thus perished from drowning. - After questions had been asked of Thomas Wollacott, gardener, Florence Short, servant, and MRS ABRAMS, widow of the deceased, in regard to matters of detail, the Coroner, in addressing the Jury, remarked that they would be able to come to a conclusion better than at the first Inquiry owing to the additional evidence they had heard. After commenting upon the medical evidence, the Coroner observed that it showed the importance of having a proper examination. After a brief consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 6 April 1888
TORQUAY - Sudden Death In Torbay. - Whilst SAMUEL PECKINS, a fisherman forty-six years of age, and a widower, was out fishing in Torbay on Good Friday, he suddenly expired. Deceased was second coxswain in the Torquay lifeboat; and his family of four children are left unprovided for. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Hospital on Saturday afternoon by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr J. C. Watson was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - ELIZABETH PECKINS, sister of deceased, said she kept house for him at 3 Bedford-row, Stentiford's-hill. During the past ten years she had never known him have a day's illness, but within the last fortnight he had complained of a cold. Deceased had four children living. - Richard Bishop, fisherman, deposed to going out oyster-catching with deceased in the latter's boat (Dorcas) about seven o'clock on Good Friday morning. They went to Babbacombe Bay, the wind blowing hard, and had two or three dredges down. Deceased asked witness to warm some tea, which he drank, and ate some bread and cheese with a dozen oysters, which was a usual thing for him to do. After that the dredges were hauled up, this being very hard work for both of them. Sail was then set and they hugged close to the shore on account of the wind. When off Hope's Nose he saw deceased fall forward and clasp his body with his arms. Witness jumped abaft and put the tiller hard starboard to prevent their getting on the flat rock. In about five minutes, during which time he saw deceased gasp twice, they cleared the Thatcher rock, and witness trimmed the boat to attend deceased. He got deceased's head on his lap and called "SAM, SAM," as he thought he had a fit and might come round. Deceased made no answer, and although quite warm, he was certain that he was dead, as his eyes, which were open, began to close. He continued on to the Torquay Harbour, which he reached in about an hour's time. Deceased was a sober, industrious man, and there was no drink aboard. Theodore Brown, boatman, also gave evidence and Albert Lisle, assistant house-surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, deposed that deceased was brought to the hospital about 4 p.m. on Good Friday. He was dead when admitted and a post mortem examination showed the heart to be severely diseased, which would account for his sudden death. The disease was of long standing, and the end might have been brought on by exertion following a meal. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 13 April 1888
TORQUAY - Sudden Death. - On Monday at the Torbay Inn, Torre, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of a child named HAROLD CHOWN, 6 months of age, whose parents reside at Chester Place, Torre, and who was found dead on Sunday morning. The child had been in fairly good health up to Wednesday night, when it became unwell, and died on Sunday morning. Dr Thistle attributed death to inflammation and congestion of the lungs and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 April 1888
TORQUAY - Sudden Death In Torquay. - On Friday evening last, a gardener named JOHN THORNE, 77, who had been residing at 4 St. Michael's-terrace, Market-street, with his wife and daughter, expired suddenly, and his death was the subject of an Enquiry held at the Police-station early on Monday morning, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr Wm. Mutton being chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence showed that the deceased went to work as usual on Friday, at Waltham House, Chelston. On returning home in the evening he complained to his wife that he felt very tired and that his back ached. Deceased had his tea and went to bed shortly after nine o'clock, his wife, who had been sitting up sewing, following him about two hours later. As the deceased did not, as was his custom, speak to his wife upon her entering the bedroom, she allowed the light to fall upon his face and then discovered that he was pale, and upon placing her hand upon his forehead she found that it was cold. MRS THORNE then called Mrs Raymont, who resides in the same house, and the latter's husband went for Mr P. H. Gardiner, surgeon, Abbey Road, who arrived about half-past eleven o'clock, and found that life was extinct. The bed clothes were not disarranged and there were no signs of a struggle. The daughter of the deceased, aged seven years, was found to be sleeping soundly when MRS THORNE entered the bedroom. According to the medical evidence there was nothing to indicate that death occurred from anything but natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 27 April 1888
TORQUAY - Fatal Boat Accident. Two Young Ladies Drowned. - A painful interest was excited in Torquay on Thursday evening on its becoming known that a boat had been capsized in Torbay, and that of its four occupants two had been drowned. It appeared that in the course of the afternoon Mr Albert Hill, son of a lodging-house keeper of Glenfinnan, Belgrave-road, who was accompanied by three young women, hired a boat for a row, and it was resolved to cross the bay to Paignton. The strong easterly wind which prevailed at the time caused rather a heavy swell, but in the hands of properly qualified boatmen no difficulty would have been experienced on this score. The party comprised besides young Hill, his sister Nellie Hill; NELLIE MUGFORD, 21 years of age, of 14 Bath Terrace, Torre, and ALICE KEY aged 30, maid to Miss Bagshaw, at present lodging at Glenfinnan. On approaching Paignton Pier, an attempt was made to land, but unhappily the boat was upset in the heavy surf which was setting in upon the shore, and all the occupants were thrown into the water. Major Harlowe Turner, J.P., who witnessed the disaster, immediately raised an alarm and several boats promptly put out to the rescue, and succeeded, in a comparatively short space of time in bringing all four to land. Albert Hill, who is a member of the Leander Rowing club, of Torquay, behaved well in the water and succeeded for a long time in supporting his sister and her companion. MUGFORD and KEY were, however, unconscious when landed, and, notwithstanding the persistent efforts of Drs. Alexander, Vickers, Mudge and Goodridge, they could not be restored. The two Hills were conscious, the brother quickly recovering, while the sister was put to bed and is now rapidly progressing. P.C. Pope was promptly on the spot and in the evening communicated with the Coroner, Mr Sidney Hacker, at Newton. - A Paignton correspondent writes:- The water was as smooth as a millpond at starting, but as the young man rowed towards Paignton it became much rougher - far too rough for so small a boat with four persons in it and rowed by an amateur. Whether the boat was capsized by the somewhat heavy roll near the shore with an eat wind blowing, or whether they were intending to land at Paignton Pier, cannot at present be ascertained, but just about five o'clock shrieks from that direction called the attention of persons on the Esplanade to the boat, which had capsized and four persons were seen struggling in the water, just at the end of the Promenade Pier. As quickly as possible three fishermen's boats put off from the harbour, which is about a quarter of a mile distant and was quickly followed by the coastguard's boat. It was, however, fully a quarter of an hour before the boats could reach the scene of the accident. All four of the party clung for some time to the boat, but before assistance came two of them - MISS MUGFORD and MISS KEY - lost their grasp and sank. Mr Hill and his sister retained their hold and were rescued by the boatmen, but the other two were taken out of the water dead. Word had been sent to all the medical men of the neighbourhood on the first alarm being given, and almost as soon as the boats landed Drs. Vickers, Alexander, Mudge and Goodridge were on the spot. It was soon ascertained that the MISSES KEY and MUGFORD were quite dead, and although every means of resuscitation was tried, it was in vain. The bodies were removed to the mortuary to await the Inquest. The two survivors were much exhausted but quite sensible, and they were removed to cottages near the harbour and put to bed. They were too overcome with grief to be able to give any intelligible account of the cause of the accident. - Another correspondent says the sea was so rough that it was exceedingly dangerous for so small a boat with four persons in it to attempt to cross the bay, and that an experienced boatman would have turned back. To the bravery displayed by young Hill, and the promptitude with which assistance was rendered, are due the fact that two of the party survived the disaster. We shall publish a second edition this afternoon, containing a full report of the Inquest.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 May 1888
TORQUAY - The Alleged Attempted Burglary. Death Of The Injured Man. - As reported in our last week's issue, an attempt was supposed to have been made to break into Devonia, Vane-hill, the residence of Mrs W. H. Taylor, on Wednesday night, the 2nd instant, and it will be remembered that the police found a man named JOHN BADCOCK lying in one of the paths, with severe injuries to his head. He was assisted to the Torbay Hospital, where he lingered until Saturday morning, when he expired. - An Inquest was held at the Hospital on Saturday evening, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr W. B. Smale was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and P.S. Bright represented the police. - Anna Brown, wife of William Brown, boatman, 2 Marine Cottages, Rock Walk Steps, was the first witness called, and she deposed that the deceased was her step-brother, and he was forty-eight years of age. Deceased was formerly an officer's servant in the 9th Lancers and since he had been discharged, through an accident, had been wandering about the country earning a livelihood by rendering assistance in stables. Witness last saw deceased about eight days previous, and he told her that he had just walked from London. She ass surprised at seeing him as four years ago it was reported he was dead. Deceased told her that he was going to Teignmouth, as he thought it probable that he might get something to do in connection with the Yeomanry. Witness added that deceased had been reckless from his youth, and that drink had been his ruin. - Edith Mary Tritton, governess, at Devonia, stated that on Wednesday night she had retired to rest when she heard noises outside her bedroom window. Then she heard a noise as if a window was being opened, and saw a man advancing towards her bedroom window from some bushes. Witness's room was on the ground floor, and there was no blind to the window, therefore she could see quite distinctly. Mrs Taylor's two children were sleeping in the same room, and witness took them upstairs and awakened the rest of the inmates. Just as witness got to the top of the stairs, she heard the back-door being pushed very violently, with such force, in fact, that had it not been for the bolt it must have been broken in. Witness then opened an upstair window, and rang a bell, being under the impression that someone was attempting to break into the house. At the first sound of the bell she heard two men swear, and saw them disappear towards the dining and drawing-room windows. Assistance soon came and a man was afterwards found in one of the walks. Blood had been found on the scullery window-sill. - P.C. Way stated that on the 2nd inst. about 11.20 p.m., he was on the Strand in company with P.C. Richards, when he heard a bell and a whistle. On going to the house referred to, witness made a search of the grounds, and in a dark narrow path leading to the back door found a man's shoe, and six feet further down discovered the deceased in a sitting posture with a small stick in his hand. BADCOCK had apparently walked over the embankment about six or seven feet high, and in falling struck his head against some rockery-work on the opposite side of the path. Witness said "What do you do here?" and deceased answered, "Who is it?" Witness replied, "A policeman," whereupon deceased said "I'm not here then," adding that he supposed that he should have bread for life. Deceased was greatly injured about the head and witness assisted him to walk to the Hospital. No tools or house-breaking implements were found upon deceased. - Mr George Young Eales, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said that the deceased was admitted to the institution about half-past twelve o'clock on Thursday, the 3rd inst. On examination witness found deceased suffering from a lacerated wound on the back of the head, half-an-inch in length and extending down to the bone. There were other small wounds and bruises. On admission to the Hospital, deceased was in a semi-conscious state, and witness was therefore of opinion that he was suffering from concussion of the brain. The following (Thursday) morning deceased regained consciousness, and was perfectly rational, but in the evening he became irritable, and gradually passed into a state of profound insensibility, expiring that (Saturday) morning. In witness's opinion, death resulted from concussion of the brain, and judging from the wound, deceased must have pitched on his head. Deceased was very reticent on being questioned as to why he was at Devonia, and how he received the injuries. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Very Rev. Canon WOOLLETT, D.D., Vicar-General of Plymouth Cathedral, was found dead yesterday in the Bishop's House. At the Inquest the Jury found that death arose from Natural Causes. Canon WOOLLETT'S age was 70.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 1 June 1888
TORQUAY - Inquest. - A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" in the case of a lad named FRANK MORRIS HANNAFORD, aged nine years and the son of a quarryman living at 20 Daison Cottages. The lad had received no medical assistance for the past three months, and the medical evidence showed that he died from consumption.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - At Plymouth on Monday evening a middle-aged woman named GRACE STEPHENS, the wife of a gardener, was returning along a wooden bridge to the window of her room, when the structure gave way, and she fell about forty feet to the courtlage below, sustaining such injuries that she died almost immediately. An inspection of the bridge showed that the wood was rotten. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", but censured the landlord for neglecting to keep it in repair.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 15 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of Manslaughter against some person or persons unknown was returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth on Monday evening in regard to the death of a little boy named WILLIAM ALFRED DELAFIELD. The evidence showed that the boy had been stripped of his clothes and apparently pushed over an embrasure of the citadel ramparts into the road below, a depth of twenty-four feet. Suspicion attaches to a girl who was observed to enter the citadel gates with a child, and immediately after the accident was seen running down the road leading from the citadel to the town.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 29 June 1888
TORQUAY - Sudden Death At Ellacombe. - An Inquest was held at the Police-station at half-past eight o'clock on Monday morning, by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of AGNES EDDY, 87 years of age, widow of JOHN EDDY, a coastguardsman, who suddenly expired on Friday evening last, at her residence, No. 2, Bethel Cottages, Ellacombe. Mr Samuel Wyatt was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner having explained that the Inquiry was rendered necessary by reason of the deceased not having been attended by a medical man for upwards of twelve months. - MRS LANDER, daughter of the deceased, who with her husband, live at 2, Bethel Cottages, and in whose care the deceased was, deposed that her mother had been failing for some years past, but had been able to get about the house up to within two or three days of her demise. On Friday deceased did not go down stairs but sat in a chair in her room. She had her meals as usual, which were given to her by witness, having her tea at half-past five o'clock. An hour later witness went upstairs and found the deceased almost insensible, being unable to speak. Witness called in a neighbour, and shortly afterwards her mother expired. - Sarah Hole, the neighbour called by the previous witness, gave corroborative evidence. - Dr Richardson said he had examined the body of the deceased, and there was nothing to indicate that death resulted from other than natural causes. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 20 July 1888
PAIGNTON - Sad Fatality At Paignton. - Yesterday morning as MISS ETHEL ALEXANDRINA HILL, of Mount Dallas, was bathing on the Sands at Paignton, she is believed to have been suddenly seized with syncope, arising from weak action of the heart, and when rescued from the water was found to be dead. - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on the body last evening at the Gerston Hotel. - WILFRID ST. MAUR HILL, of Merryfield, near Torpoint, Devonport, said the deceased was his sister. She was called ETHEL ALEXANDRINA HILL, and lived with her mother at Mount Dallas, Paignton. He saw her entering the water at a quarter to nine and afterwards on the beach dead, but did not know it was his sister till Dr Alexander told him. The tide was exceptionally low and deceased could not swim. She had not bathed before this year, but talked of doing so only that morning when early at church. She had been in ill-health lately, and complained of pains near her heart, fainting occasionally. It was not known that she was going to bathe that morning, for the deceased had had no breakfast, though she had her usual cup of tea in bed. - Henry James Buckingham deposed t attending to the machine from which deceased bathed. riding on horseback, he took the machine to the water, a distance of one hundred yards, and saw her enter the water. After pulling up another machine, on looking round after five minutes' interval, he saw something in the water, which he found to be deceased, floating face downwards, with her head and body immersed in less than three feet of water. - Sarah Ann Potter, bathing attendant, corroborated, and said it was the first time deceased had bathed. - George Cooksley, shipwright of Churston, saw deceased bathe. She entered the water, and went about three or four yards, and after an interval of a few minutes she fell forward with her hands as if she was going to swim. She continued floating till rescued. - Chas. Perryman, carpenter of Brixham, whilst working on Paignton Green, saw deceased bathe. She went out forty feet, had a dip, rose again, and then brushed her hair back. The water reached her waist. She then fell backwards as if floating, as he had seen others. After an interval of seven minutes she was rescued by Buckingham. Dr Alexander said he was summoned to attend deceased, and though he and Dr Vickers tried artificial respiration their efforts were unsuccessful. His impression from the appearance of the body, &c., was that death was due to the failure of the heart's action and not drowning. There was nothing more dangerous for persons with feeble heart than to bathe before breakfast, and that had been the cause of several cases of mortality. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes", in accordance with the medical evidence, was returned by the Jury, of whom Captain Twynam was Foreman.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 3 August 1888
EXETER - Painful Suicide. - CAPTAIN HODGE, of Exeter, late of the 12th Lancers, had with Mr John Soltau been fishing at Dartmoor, and both gentlemen were lodging at the Saracen's Head Inn, kept by Mrs Smith, at Two Bridges, near Princetown. On Saturday night CAPTAIN HODGE retired to rest, and then appeared t be very cheerful. On Sunday morning he was found dead in his bedroom, having shot himself. At the Inquest on Monday, Mr Soltau said deceased was restless, and had stated to witness that he was miserable and did not care what became of him, that when he had money he did not know the value of it, and now he did he had none. Deceased left behind him two letters, one addressed to his wife and the second to another lady. The Coroner handed the letters to the Jury to be read by them in private. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 14 September 1888
TORQUAY - Inquest At Upton. - Dr Fraser, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner for the district, held an Inquest on Wednesday morning, at the Upton Vale Hotel, Upton, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY BOWDEN, an infant, twelve months old, the son of GEORGE BOWDEN, formerly a working jeweller, and now a fish dealer, of Meadowside Cottages, Upton. Mr George Alsop was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MARY BOWDEN, mother of the deceased child, (and who was much affected), said he had always been very delicate. he had convulsive fits, and bronchitis six weeks ago, at the time of teething. Dr Cook then attended the child, and he got better. She described how deceased was taken ill on Sunday and that on Monday evening she sent for Dr Cook and Dr Thistle, but that the child died before either came. Dr Frederick Thomas Thistle said the immediate cause of death was convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 21 September 1888
ST MARYCHURCH. - Sudden Death At St. Marychurch. - A young man, named SAMUEL JONES, twenty-eight, who had been suffering from lingering consumption. He came out of Newton Abbot Union on Saturday, and fell down suddenly before the fire on Tuesday afternoon, whilst staying at Bowden-cottages, St. Marychurch. An Inquest was held at the Palk Arms public house by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, at half-past eight o'clock yesterday morning to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL JONES. Mr John Waymouth was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner in opening the proceedings, said that the deceased came by his death under sudden circumstances and it was necessary that the Jury should be satisfied as to the exact cause of his demise. - ANNIE JONES, who resides at 1, Cambridge-terrace, St. Marychurch, said that the deceased, who was her brother, was a single man, twenty-eight years of age. He was formerly a footman, but had been ill for years, suffering from consumption. At the wish of herself and her sister-in-law, he left the Newton Abbot Union on Saturday, and went to live with Mrs Clements of Bowden Cottages, who was going to take charge of him, his brothers having undertaken to contribute towards his maintenance. On Tuesday last witness was called to Mrs Clements's house where she found her brother lying on the floor quite dead. - Mrs Harriet Clements, living at Bowden Cottages, said she had arranged to take charge of the deceased, and he had lived at her house since Saturday, when he came from Newton about eight o'clock. He went out for a walk on Monday, but on Tuesday morning he appeared to be ill, and she assisted to dress him. He came downstairs, but did not eat his breakfast which had been prepared. He asked for some water to bathe his eye, and told witness that he thought he should either have a fit, or was going to die. He then slipped down, and having asked for his brother, JOHN, who was in Wales, he expired. - Mr Thomas Finch, surgeon, deposed to having been called to see the deceased on Tuesday, and on going to the house of the last witness, he found him lying on the floor quite dead, having apparently died from exhaustion caused by the disease from which he was suffering, he being in the last stage of consumption. - Mr Robert H. Cawse, master of the Newton Abbot Workhouse, said the deceased was first admitted to the Union on June 5th, 1885, but since then he has left and re-entered on several occasions. He had been in the infirmary all the time. The reason for the deceased leaving on the last occasion was in consequence of a letter having been received from his sister applying for his discharge, and asking for out relief. He left on Saturday last at five o'clock and appeared as well then as he had been for twelve months. Without retiring the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

ST MARYCHURCH - The Cliff Accident At Babbacombe. - The Inquest on MAJOR DURELL BLAKE, who was killed through falling over the cliffs at Babbacombe on Thursday of last week, was held at the Roughwood Hotel on Friday afternoon, by Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, of Totnes. - The first witness called was Dr Ramsay who identified the deceased as MAJOR THOMAS DURELL POWELL BLAKE, fifty-three years of age, single gentleman, who had been living with him for fifteen months. He came there for his health, which had improved since his stay. Deceased was suffering from a mental derangement which had affected his bodily health, but he had never shown signs of suicidal or homicidal tendencies. He was very cheerful at breakfast and was looking forward with great pleasure to an excursion on the moors. He went out alone for a walk as usual, about twenty minutes to eleven. His favourite walks were Babbacombe Downs, Ilsham, and the New Cut. Deceased had been a major in the West Kent Regiment, and had been abroad a great deal, but had never had a sunstroke or complained of giddiness. - Elijah Hearn, chief officer of the coastguard station at Babbacombe, who was the last person to converse with deceased, gave evidence as to the condition of the deceased while talking to him a few minutes before the accident. - Francis Eales, quarryman, said he was working with three others in the Long Quarry, when his attention was called to the top of the cliffs through the falling of some small stones. He saw something falling just about twenty feet from the top, and after descending another sixty feet, it struck a ledge, and then fell to the base. Deceased pitched head foremost, and on witness going to him life was found to be extinct. - William Eales, quarryman, son of the last witness, gave similar evidence to that adduced by his father. After the accident witness went to the top of the cliffs, and found the deceased's stick, which was lying with the handle towards the edge of the quarry, which had the appearance as if someone had slipped. - P.C. Symmons, stationed at Babbacombe, deposed to having found the body of deceased in the quarry and to having had it conveyed to the Roughwood Hotel. Witness had since visited the top of the cliffs, and measured the distance from the rails to the edge of the cliff, and found the widest part 7ft. 6in., and the narrowest part 6ft. 3in. There were two wires, the highest being 4ft. 2in., and the lowest 8in. from the ground. The lower one was broken at some parts. - Mr S. H. Craig, surgeon, taking charge of the practice of Dr Steele, said he examined the body of the deceased and found two cuts on the head, one more than two inches long, and the other a little more than an inch long. The left thigh was fractured to pieces, and the joint of the third finger on the left hand was also fractured. The right eye was blackened but there were no other apparent injuries. - The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" but were of opinion that the quarry was not sufficiently fenced at the spot where the deceased fell over.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 28 September 1888
TORQUAY - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MABEL MARY, an infant, aged three months, daughter of JOHN HATHERLEY, cowkeeper and jobbing gardener, of Cary Cottage. Dr Thistle gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was convulsions, produced by feeding the child with gruel, to which it had not been accustomed. The Coroner commented on the danger of giving infants of tender age unsuitable food, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 2 November 1888
DEVONPORT - Fatal Accident on H.M.S. Lion. - In Consequence of the stormy state of the weather at Devonport on Sunday, signals were made from the flagship Royal Adelaide for all vessels in harbour to strike their masts and yards. In carrying out this order on board the Lion, training ship for boys, MR WILLIAM MATSON, first-class petty officer, went aloft, and while crossing he slipped and fell into the sea, striking heavily against the woodwork as he fell. Two boys belonging to the ship, named John Pepperell and Thomas Hindley, jumped after him and kept him afloat until a boat put off and conveyed him on board, when it was found that besides having sustained a severe fracture of the skull one of MR MATSON'S legs was nearly severed from his body. He did about two hours afterwards, and at an Inquest subsequently held at the Royal Navy Hospital a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury highly extolled the bravery of the two boys and the Coroner promised to make a representation of their conduct to Lord John Hay, the naval commander-in-chief at Devonport.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 9 November 1888
TORQUAY - Sudden Deaths. - Two cases of sudden death were the subject of Inquiry by Mr Hacker, County Coroner, yesterday. The deceased were MRS SARAH BROWN, aged 78, widow, living at Meadfoot-lane, and SARAH JANE WAY, aged 34, single woman, living at Torre, who being subject to fits was discovered dead in bed.

ST MARYCHURCH - The Discovery Of A Body In Babbacombe Bay. Inquest and Verdict. - An Inquest on the body of a man who was found in Babbacombe Bay under circumstances reported in last week's Torquay Times, was held at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, on Friday afternoon, by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner. Mr F. Matthews was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said he understood that the body had been identified as that of a man who had been missed from Paignton since the previous Friday, but did not think that sufficient evidence would be forthcoming to enable the Jury to arrive at an opinion as to how the deceased came by his death, as the police had not had time to get witnesses. Therefore it was possible that the Inquiry would have to be adjourned. - The first witness called was P.C. George Pope, of Paignton, who gave evidence of identification. He said the deceased was JOHN AMERY, 65, a market gardener, who formerly kept a greengrocer's shop in Torbay-terrace, Paignton, but who had lived in lodgings in Winner-street since his wife's death, which took place about five months ago. Two nights previous to his being missed he left his lodgings in Winner-street, and stopped at the Railway Hotel. Witness received information that the deceased was missing on October 26th, and on November 1st, upon hearing that a body had been found at Babbacombe, he went to Oddicombe Beach, and identified it as that of JOHN AMERY. Deceased had a nephew, who is weak-minded, and was allowed so much a week from some relatives in London for taking charge of him. - Charles Morrish, farmer, Blagdon, near Paignton, said he was a third or fourth cousin to the deceased, and saw him last alive on Oct. 24th, at the Commercial Hotel, Paignton. Previous to that deceased had told witness's wife that if he was missing at any time to tell witness to write to Clayhidon, on the borders of Somerset, which was deceased's home. Since his wife's death, he had been very strange in his manner, and had given way to drink. At one time he was very well to do, but lately had been in low circumstances, but did not want for anything, as money was often sent to him from London for taking charge of his nephew. Witness had heard that quite recently, deceased had received £5 note from his brother, and believed that he had been drinking on the strength of it. - Jonathan Thomas, fisherman, deposed to having found the body of the deceased on the previous day while out fishing. It was floating on its back, with the ebb tide, towards the Big Rock, and when first seen was about two miles off Maidencombe Cove. Witness secured the body and towed it in to Oddicombe Beach and gave it in charge of the coastguard. The body was quite naked with the exception of a pair of stockings and a wristband of a woollen shirt on the left arm. - P.C. Elliott deposed to having had the body conveyed from the beach to the place where it then was. A search had been made along the coast but no clothing had been found. - P.C. Pope was recalled, and in answer to the Foreman of the Jury, said that he had seen in the paper that a boat had been found at Livermead and knew that there was one missing from Paignton. - The Coroner instructed the witness to make further inquiries about the boat and ascertain whether it was connected with the circumstances of the deceased's death. - Dr Richardson said he had that afternoon examined the body of the deceased and found that the head showed signs of decomposition, and the scalp was wanting in places. There were bruises on the front of the body and on the legs. He should think that the body had been in the water over six days and under ten. From the external examination he had made he attributed death to drowning as there were no external injuries sufficient to cause death. The body was well nourished. - The Coroner said from the evidence that had been given, the Jury would hardly be able to arrive at an opinion as to how the deceased came by his death, and therefore he proposed to adjourn the Inquest until Thursday afternoon. - The adjourned Inquest was accordingly held yesterday afternoon. - The first witness called was Mrs Sherwell, widow, 17 Winner-street, Paignton, who said she had known the deceased for over seven years. He came to lodge with her in the latter part of June, and remained with her up to Tuesday before the Friday when he was missed. He left on Tuesday in pursuance of a fortnight's notice she had given him to leave. She did not see him after that. Witness knew of nothing to account for his death, although he certainly had been dejected since the sudden death of his wife. When deceased left witness's house, he owed her £1 5s., but that had since been paid by his nephew. - Joseph Lavers, landlord of the Railway Hotel, Paignton, said deceased came to his house on Tuesday, Oct. 23rd, and lodged there the night and the two following nights, leaving with his nephew on Friday morning between eight and nine o'clock without paying for his lodgings. Witness did not see him after that. The nephew returned in the afternoon and inquired for his uncle, saying he had been for a walk and missed him. - George Millman, keeper of the New Pier Inn, Paignton, said he had known deceased since 18878. Saw him on Friday, October 26th, when he came to witness's house about quarter past twelve. There was no one with him. Deceased had his pint of beer, and after remaining about twenty-five minutes, went out. Deceased was perfectly sober, and talked quite rational, but he looked very unwell and his eyes had a peculiar appearance. - P.C. Pope was recalled and deposed that on November 3rd he went to Roundham Head to search for the clothing, and found a portion of it on the rocks beneath some stones. The coat had the right arm sleeve turned inside out and was found below high water mark. The trousers of the deceased were found some little distance from the coat. Witness also found a linen under-coat belonging to the deceased which also had the right arm sleeve turned inside out. The waistcoat, one boot, the shirt, and the hat of the deceased were not discovered. - By a Juryman: Deceased could have been very easily cut off by the tide, if he had gone round by the cliffs. - The witness Millman, recalled, said he believed it was high tide at eleven o'clock on the Friday morning on the day deceased left witness's house, and therefore he could not have been hemmed in by the tide during daylight. - Jane Morrish, wife of Chas. Morrish, a farmer, of Blagdon, said that three weeks after the death of the deceased's wife, there was a sale of his goods. Witness was present and saw that he was very strange in his manner. He told her that if anything occurred to him and he was missing they were to write to a Mrs Ayres, at Clayhidon. At that time he was very much affected over his wife's death. - Dr Richardson deposed that he made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased on November 3rd, and found the nasal bones broken, as was also the neck. The brain was in a normal condition, and the internal organs, with the exception of the stomach, were generally healthy. There was a pint and a half of fluid in the stomach, which he considered was sea water. Witness attributed death to drowning, owing to the fluid in the stomach, and the distended condition of the lungs. He thought it possible that the neck and the nasal bones might have been broken by the action of the sea after death had taken place. At the same time it was possible for a person to jump from a cliff into shallow water, and break his neck and nasal bones, and then die from a combination of drowning and the injuries caused by the fall. - Mr John Taylor, chemist of Lucius-street, deposed to having made an analysis of a portion of the stomach and found nothing to account for death by poisoning. - After the Coroner had briefly summed up the evidence, the Jury retired, and after a short consultation, returned with a verdict of "Found Drowned," but by what means there was not sufficient evidence to show.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 23 November 1888
TORQUAY - Inquest. - Last evening, Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Police Station into the circumstances attending the death of GERTRUDE LEWIS HARVEY, aged three months, the illegitimate daughter of GERTRUDE ANN HARVEY, a young woman residing at 2, Devonshire-terrace, Ellacombe. The mother stated that on Tuesday night she took the child to bed, and on rising the next morning she found it dead by her side. There were no signs of convulsions. Dr Powell stated that he saw the dead body of the child on Wednesday morning and from appearances he came to the conclusion that it had had a fit, which had caused its death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 7 December 1888
TORQUAY - Inquest. - The Coroner, Mr Hacker, held an Inquiry at the Half Moon Hotel, Lower Union-street, on Saturday evening, respecting the cause of death of the illegitimate child, twenty-four days' old, of SUSAN EASTERBROOK, of Pimlico. The child was found dead. Dr Cook, who made a post mortem examination, said the body was fairly well nourished. The child died, apparently partially through suffocation and partially in consequence of wind in the stomach having forced the lungs out of place. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 28 December 1888
KINGSKERSWELL - Fatal Accident To DR SYMONS Of Kingskerswell. - Quite a melancholy gloom was cast over the Christmas festival at Kingskerswell by a fatal accident which befell DR SYMONS, who was thrown from his trap on Friday evening last and received such serious injuries that death resulted the following morning. Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held the Inquest on the body on Monday morning at deceased's residence, Pen-y-Craig, the Vicar, the Rev. A. H. Walker, being the Foreman of the Jury. Major Lewis Edward Bearne, residing at Edginswell, identified the body as that of his brother-in-law, who was thirty-two years of age, and unmarried. Deceased was unconscious from Friday evening till five the next morning, when he died. - Edward William Luxton, page in deceased's service, said that about half-past three on Friday afternoon he was with his master, who was driving home from Coombe in a two-wheel dog-cart. The horse, a young one, which deceased had not driven long, bolted on the top of the hill. He did not know why the horse was frightened, but just after it started DR SYMONS told him to throw away the umbrella he was carrying as it was swaying and would frighten the horse more. He did so, and deceased tried all he could to pull up, but the horse galloped down the hill till near the bottom, when a shaft broken, and the swaying trap over-turned, deceased falling over witness, who was not much hurt. DR SYMONS was bleeding, and his head was bathed. - William Tuppin, of Penn Inn Gardens, near Newton, stated that just after the storm he saw a horse and trap coming down Milber Down hill at a very rapid pace - about twenty-five miles an hour. He ran out in the road and found deceased and the previous witness on the ground and the trap overturned. DR SYMONS' head was bleeding terribly. He told his boy to go for a doctor, but deceased said he did not think it was necessary, adding, "I shall be all right; it is only a few flesh wounds," and inquired whether his page was hurt. - Mr H. A. Davis, surgeon, of Newton, said he found deceased sitting in a chair quite conscious. There were two scalp wounds on his head, but they were not serious. He got the deceased home as quickly as possible, and on the way DR SYMONS told him that the horse was frightened by the flapping of the umbrella, which he told the boy to throw away, but he was unable to pull up. Deceased walked into his consulting room and went to bed. Milk was given him, but he became sick, and soon afterwards urgent symptoms of compression of the brain began to manifest themselves. Dr Ley, of Newton, was sent for, and Drs. Scott and Chamberlain were also in attendance, doing everything they could for deceased. It was, however, of no avail, for he died of compression of the brain, due to internal haemorrhage, the result of the fall on his head. Witness left at midnight, deceased being then in a hopeless condition. Beside the scalp wounds, there was an extensive fracture of the skull, but this was not obvious till a portion of the skull had been removed to relieve the brain from the haemorrhage. The Coroner having summed up, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 11 January 1889
SOUTH TAWTON - Wife Murder At South Tawton. Attempted Suicide Of The Murderer. - A shocking case of wife murder and attempted suicide took place on Saturday last at South Tawton. The man, named ARSCOTT, has been working as hind for Mr Heard, of Jacobstowe, and he lived at a place called Taw Mill Farm. For a week or so his conduct has been so strange that the wife was afraid to stay in the house with him, and on Friday night went to sleep at her daughter's house near by. She returned on Saturday morning to get some food, when a disturbance took place. ARSCOTT seized a razor and in the presence of some children attempted to murder her. He wounded her, and she ran out of the house across the yard in her anxiety to escape, falling down three times. ARSCOTT, on coming up to her the third time, threw her down, and then murdered her. The children had meantime gone off to get help from the nearest neighbours. ARSCOTT after the crime returned to the house. Three or four neighbours soon came on the scene and attended to the woman, but were afraid to enter the house. A messenger was sent to North Tawton for the police and a doctor, and on the police arriving, nearly two hours after the murder, it was found that ARSCOTT had cut his throat. Jealousy is said to be the motive of the crime. The deceased woman had had fourteen children, eleven of whom are living. On New Year's Day there was a family party at the mill, when forty of the prisoner's children and grandchildren were present. At the Inquest on Monday a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned against the husband, who, however, died from his injuries on Wednesday.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 February 1889
ST MARYCHURCH - Sudden Death At St. Marychurch. - A sudden death occurred at St. Marychurch on Monday which subsequently formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry. JOHN HILL, 63, tailor, was found dead in his bed at his lodgings, 3 Park Place, St Marychurch, about one o'clock in the afternoon, by Mark Webber, of Paignton who had come to the house on a visit to the persons with whom the deceased was lodging. Dr Finch was immediately called in and pronounced life extinct, and not being able to grant the usual certificate stating the cause of death, the police were informed of the matter and the Coroner was communicated with. An Inquest was accordingly held at the Havelock Arms on Tuesday morning by Mr Sidney Hacker, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the evidence of Dr Finch being to that effect.

TORQUAY - The Suicide Of A Lady At Wellswood. - On Friday last, Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Montcoffer, Kent's-road, Wellswood, concerning the death of MISS SYBELLA CATHERINE PECKHAM, 56 years of age, who died on the previous Wednesday evening from self inflicted injuries, as reported in last week's Torquay Times. Mr John Crocker was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Mr G. H. Hext watched the proceedings on behalf of the relatives and friends of the deceased. - The first witness called was MISS MARY SYBELLA PECKHAM of Perry Hill Lodge, Worbeston, Guildford, who identified the body as that of her sister. She was fifty-six years of age, and resided with witness at Guildford. Deceased came to Torquay in October last, witness arriving on the 27th December. Miss Keighley rented the house, and she boarded at the house with her sister, who was in a very weak state of health, having suffered from bronchitis for seven years. On Sunday last deceased came downstairs at noon into the dining room, having had her breakfast in bed. They each read in a book, and after a little while laid them aside. They conversed as usual, and said that as it rained they could not go out, and must walk around the room, which they did. The table was laid for lunch, and witness, after examining some pictures, turned round from the sideboard and saw deceased with a large table knife in her hand in the act of cutting her throat. She caught hold of her by the right hand, but by that time she had made two cuts as "quick as lightning." She took the knife away, and having thrown it on the floor called for assistance. Deceased had suffered from sleeplessness during the past few days. There was nothing on her mind except her weakness, her only suffering being physical disorder, pain in the head, and sleeplessness. She was not under restraint, and was so weak from physical causes that she might have fallen. - Corroborative testimony having been adduced by Emma Lang, housemaid, in the employ of Miss Keighley. - Dr Gordon Cumming was called, and deposed that he had attended deceased for three winters for chronic lung disease. She was worse this winter, and about a month ago he was called to attend her after an epileptic attack. She complained of pain in the top of her head, and did so constantly, and of sleeplessness up to Sunday week last. The attacks he had mentioned produced profound melancholia, and she was never the same after. She was not maniacal, and was so emaciated and weak that nothing was feared. After the wound in her throat she could not speak, and wrote on the slate asking for forgiveness, and saying that no one could ever know or understand what her depression and suffering had been. - Rose Jeffery, nurse, was also called, but before giving her evidence, the following rather unusual incident occurred:- Mr R. Smerdon, a Juryman, expressed the opinion that Dr Boreham as the first to arrive on the scene should be called, and he repeated his opinion subsequently and in so decided a manner that the Coroner observed: "I prefer to arrange the evidence as I think, and it is for you to consider it when it is put before you." The Coroner further observed that that was all the evidence he intended to call. If the majority of the Jury wished for further evidence it could of course be added. The practice was to call one medical man only, unless there was any doubt or obscurity, and then two or three could be called. In the present case he should not saddle the county with the extra expense, without an expression of opinion from the Jury. - The Foreman then said he thought that Dr Boreham should be called, and on putting it to the Jury, there was a unanimous answer in the affirmative. - Dr W. T. Boreham was then sworn, and deposed to having been called to deceased, and stitching up the wounds. He considered the epileptic fit deceased had a month ago was an indication that she would be likely to do injury to herself and commit suicide. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a Temporary State of Insanity. The Jury gave their fees to the Torbay Hospital.

Torquay Times and South Devon Advertiser - Friday 8 March 1889
TORQUAY - JAMES ROOK, cab driver, aged 50, of Lower Union-street, Torquay, was found dead in his