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Help and advice for Inquests 1860-1864 - from the Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1860-1864

Articles taken from the

Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included: Abbott; Abraham; Abrams; Adams(2); Addiscott; Alford; Algar; Alin; Allen(3); Alsop; Anderson; Andrews(3); Angove; Anstey; Antonie; Archer; Auburn; Avent(2); Avery; Axworthy; Ayland; Ayres; Babbage; Bailey; Baker(3); Ball; Barnacott; Barnes; Barrett; Bartlett(2); Basley; Bastow(2); Battershall; Bayly; Beable(2); Beal; Beale; Beaton; Beer(2); Bell; Bennett(5); Bestable; Bickford; Bidgood; Bingham; Bishop; Blacker; Blake(2); Blamey; Blatchford; Blight; Bond(2); Bone; Bootyman; Bordman; Bourke; Bourne; Bovey; Bowden; Bradford(2); Bray; Brewer; Brian; Brice; Bridgeman; Brown(3); Browne; Browning(2); Brownson; Buckley; Bunker; Burge; Burn; Burnett; Burnman; Burns; Butt; Callaway; Cann; Cardell; Carew; Carne; Carnell; Castle; Chamberlain; Champernowne; Channens; Chistle; Chubb(2); Chudleigh; Church; Churchill; Clampet; Clatworthy; Cleave; Clements; Clifford; Clissold; Coad; Cober; Cock(2); Cockram; Codner; Cole(4); Coleman(3); Collings(2); Collins(3); Commings; Coniam; Connibeer; Connors; Cook(4); Cooke; Coombes; Coombs; Cooper; Corber; Cornelius; Cornish; Cory(2); Cotton; Couch; Cowles; Cox(2); Crabb; Crimp; Critchett; Cross; Crump; Cunningham; Curtis; Dacey; Daniel; Darby; Darch; Davey; Davies; Davis(2); Daw(2); Dawe(4); Day; Dayment; Densham; Diggins; Dingle; Doble; Dodd; Doddridge; Dodridge; Doidge; Donovan; Down(5); Downey; Downing; Drake(2); Drew(3); Duke; Dunn; Durham; Dyas; Earl; Easterbrooke; Edgcumbe; Edmonds(2); Edwards(7); Edwin; Elliott(2); Emmett; Endicott; Evans; Evens; Farrant(3); Farrier; Ferris; Fews; Finch; Fishe(2); Fletcher; Floud; Fluellin; Foale; Foot; Ford; Fox(2); Fredrick; French(3); Friend; Frithay; Furze; Gale; Garry; Geach; Gee; Gerry; Gibbs; Gidley; Gill(2); Gillard; Goad; Godfrey; Goffin; Gooding; Goodyear; Goss; Gransdale; Green; Greenslade(2); Grey; Grills; Gulley(2); Haddy; Haggarty; Hains; Hall; Hamlyn; Hancock(2); Harding; Harrill; Harris(3); Harrison; Hartdingle; Harvey(3); Hatherleigh; Hawken; Hawkins(2); Haydon; Hayman(2); Haynes; Head; Heath; Heaton; Hedder; Hele; Hemer; Henderson; Henna; Henwood; Herbert; Hews; Heydon; Hicks; Hill(3); Hillman; Hingston; Hockway; Hodge(2); Hodges; Hole; Holland(3); Holmes; Holsgrove; Honeywill; Hookway(2); Hooper(2); Hopkins; Hore; Horn; Horrell; Horswell(2); Horswill; Horton; Hoskin(2); Howe; Howell; Hoyten; Hulme; Humphrey; Hunt(2); Hurrell(3); Hutchings; Hutchison; Irons; Isaacs; Jacobs; James(3); Jarvis(3); Jeffery; Jenkins; Jerman; Jewell(2); Jillard; Johns; Johnson; Jones(3); Jordan;  Keast; Kelleher; Kelley; Kelly; Kelynack; Kendell; Kendle; Kennard(2); Kent(2); Kerslake; King; Knapman; Knight(2); Knowles; Lacey; Lake; Landry(2); Lane(2); Langford; Langman; Lanschiet; Laskey; Laundry; Lawrence(3); Leach; Ledson; Lee(3); Lemon; Lewarne; Lewis; Lillicrap; Lippet; Lismore(4); Little; Lloyd; Loraine; Lovering; Lowndes; Luke; Luscombe; Mackay; Madge; Magor; Magrow; Mahoney; Manicom; Manning(2); Martin(6); Matthews(2); Mattocks; May(3); McCarthy; McClare; McVay; Mears; Menheniak; Mickle; Miller; Milton; Mitchell(3); Moore(4); Morell; Morgan(2); Morgate; Mortimore; Moses(2); Mowett; Moyle; Mugford; Mugg; Muir; Murphy; Murray(2); Navan; Netherton; Newson; Newton; Niass; Nicholson; Nolan; Norcombe; Norman; Norsworthy; Northey; Oatey; Orchard; Osborn; Osborne; Paddon(2); Palmer(2); Parfit; Parminter; Parratory; Parsons; Passmore; Patchcott; Pates; Payne; Pearce(2); Peardon; Pearse(3); Pellow; Pendle; Penery; Penny; Penwill; Perring; Peters; Phelp; Phillips(3); Pick; Pike; Pill; Pinhorn; Piper; Pitcairn; Pitcher; Pitts; Plymsell; Polack; Pollard; Pomeroy; Pope; Pote; Potter; Powell; Prance; Pratt; Prinn; Prout(2); Prowse; Pullen; Purcell; Pyle; Pyne; Quaintance; Quick; Quint(2); Rackley; Rains; Reay; Redwood; Reeby(2); Reed; Reeves; Repath; Rice; Rich; Richards(4); Rickard; Ridd; Ridge; Ridgeway; Roach; Robertson; Robins(3); Robinson; Rogers; Rolstone; Rook; Rowe(3); Rowland; Rowse; Sanders(2); Sandford; Sargeant; Sargent; Satchell; Saul; Saunders(3); Scheltms; Scott; Seldon; Sheppard(2); Sherman; Shields; Shilstone; Shortland; Simmons; Simons; Simpson; Sincock; Skinner; Sleeman; Sloggett; Smale(3); Smallridge(2); Smeardon; Smeatham; Smillie; Smith(7); Snell; Snodgrass; Snow; Sotheby; Southcombe; Sowden; Sparks; Sprague(2); Spurling; Spurrell; Squires(2); Stanbury; Stancombe; St Aubyn; Steer(2); Stephens(3); Stettiford; Stevens(5); Steward; Stocker; Stokes; Stone(2); Storey; Streeton; Strong(2); Sullivan; Sussex; Sutton; Sweeney; Syms; Tall; Tancock; Tarr; Taylor(5); Theyers; Thomas(4); Thompson; Thorne; Tooze; Topham; Towl; Townsend; Tregelgis; Treliven; Tremellan; Trenaman; Trent; Trew; Trounsell; Truscott; Tucker(2); Turner(2); Turpin; Vicary; Vill; Vosper; Wakeham; Walke; Ward; Warren; Waterman; Way; Webb; Webber; Wedlake; Wedlock; Werrin; Werton; Westcott; Western; Westlake; Wetherall; White(4); Widger(2); Wilcocks(3); Willcocks; Williams(7); Willing; Wilson(2); Wilton; Winn; Winnicott; Winsborough; Winsor; Winter; Woodmass; Wooton; Worth; Wotton; Wreford; Wright; Wyatt(2); Yardley; Young; Ziskofen; 

[NOTE: No newspapers in the Archive from 1855 - 1859]

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 January 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In Strand Street, Stonehouse. - Mr Allen Bone, the Coroner for the Borough, held an Inquest on Saturday last at the Vine Inn, on the body of MARY JANE PILL, a servant lately in the service of Mrs Rundell, of Strand-street. Mrs Rundell stated that the deceased was about 23 years of age, and a steady, sober girl. On the previous day witness had occasion to go out for half-an-hour, and at about 11 o'clock a.m., she left the unfortunate woman in charge of the house, and it was arranged that the bedroom windows should be cleaned that day. On the witness's return she found several people round her door, and was told that deceased had fallen from her bedroom window into the gutter of the Broadway, a height of about 14 feet. Josiah Gover, a waterman at the Admiral's Hard, deposed that he saw the deceased sitting out of the bedroom window cleaning the glass, and to do so she sat on an iron rod placed outside the window frame (to keep children from falling out.) She had not been there long before one end of the rod became unfastened, and she was thrown out, falling on her head and knees, into the stone gutter of the street. He ran and picked her up and carried her into the kitchen of the house, but she only gave a slight shudder and a Surgeon of the Marines on seeing her declared that she must have died immediately, as her skull was frightfully fractured. Mrs Earl, who resided in the same house as the deceased was employed in, was also examined, but said she did not see the accident. the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 January 1860
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Crown Inn, Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., jun., on the body of the young man ANGOVE, whose death we have already noticed. Evidence was given by Captain W. Godden, and two of the miners employed at North Robert Mine, to prove that the deceased was killed by a mass of rock about a ton weight, falling on him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 January 1860
PLYMOUTH - Inquests On Infants. - Two Inquests were held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, last night, by Mr Edmonds, the Coroner for the Borough, for the purpose of Enquiring into the deaths of COURTNEY CHARLES SOUTHCOMBE, aged three months, and ELIZABETH JANE BARTLETT, aged nine weeks. - The first Enquiry was touching the death of ELIZABETH JANE BARTLETT. From the evidence of the mother, MRS ELIZA BARTLETT, of No. 7 Looe Street, it seemed that the deceased child had been healthy from her birth. Witness went to bed between 12 and one on Saturday night, having previously suckled the child. On getting into bed she took it in her right arm, and did not wake till six o'clock in the morning, when she found the child cold and dead beside her; a neighbour was called in, and a doctor sent for, but the child was quite dead. Mary Crocker said she was called in, and the child seemed to have slept right off. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Found Dead." The Jury proceeded to investigate into the death of COURTNEY C. SOUTHCOMBE, late of No. 2 East Street. The mother, MRS SOUTHCOMBE, said the child was four months old, and was a seven months' child, he had been healthy, but subject to some rising in his throat. She went to bed on Saturday between 12 and one o'clock, and took the child on her left arm, and he feel to sleep whilst at the breast. Witness did not wake till about seven on Sunday morning, when she rose and went downstairs to let the servant in, and when she returned to bed and took the deceased in her arms, she found him quite dead. She thought he died from the rising in the throat from which he suffered. In this instance also, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 January 1860
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held an Inquest last night at the "No-place Inn," Eldad, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of DAVID EVANS, a first-class Petty Officer, in the Royal Navy, who had been lately invalided, who was found dead in a water-closet on the previous evening. It appeared from the evidence of Mrs Sophia Smee, the first witness examined, that the deceased lodged at her house, in Wyndham Place, East Stonehouse. He had lived at her house, for the first time, two years ago, when he was there four months. He was the captain of the afterguard, on board the Alert, but was invalided, and was to have returned to Her Majesty's ship Impregnable. He was invalided from the Alert in the Pacific. He was about 54 years old and was unmarried. He was invalided for rheumatism, but he had been in apparent health up to the time of his death, only complaining of his stomach when he drank. The last time she saw him alive, was at half-past four, and when he went out into the garden. Witness's husband then went into the garden about seven, when he found deceased in the water-closet, seemingly asleep. Thought deceased was only asleep, and left him, but returned again at nine, when he found deceased was dead. Mr J. C. Snell, the next witness, stated that he found the deceased in the water-closet at about seven, lying down in the corner, and that he had been vomiting. The witness went for a light into the house, and returned to the deceased and spoke to him, but received no answer. He thought that deceased was asleep, and then went back to the house. About ten minutes to nine, witness again went to look to deceased, when he found that he was dead. He attributed the death to former drinking. Richard Opie said he saw the deceased, and thought he was recovering from a drunken fit. Some Jurymen considered that the man should have been removed from the closet into the house. Thomas Jackson, of the Alert, said he was a shipmate of the deceased and that deceased enjoyed good health, with the exception of the rheumatism. He drank grog on every opportunity he could get it. Mr Thomas Pearse, surgeon, stated that he was called in to see the deceased on the previous evening, and found there was a slight smell of drink about his body. In his opinion, he died from some affection of the heart; disease of the heart was in a great many cases owing to rheumatism, drinking habits would aggravate and bring on death. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased's death was almost sudden, and that he died from a disease of the heart, probably accelerated by excessive drinking.

EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - In our impression of Friday last, we mentioned that a man named CHARLES CUNNINGHAM, a messenger in the Customs, had left his home and had threatened to commit suicide. On Saturday the body was found in the canal about a mile and a half from the Custom House, his hat floating near. The body was brought to Exeter, and on Monday morning an Inquest was held at Pike's Royal George Inn, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when evidence was given, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 January 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at the Devonport Workhouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the labouring man who was picked up near Milehouse on the previous Wednesday evening, the particulars of which were published in the Western Morning News of Saturday last. It appears that the man was a pensioner, named JAMES RIDGE, residing in Stonehouse; that he had been dismissed from the army owing to being subject to fits, &c. It was supposed that he died while in a fit, and a verdict in accordance with these facts was returned.

TOTNES - The Fire At Totnes. Further Particulars. - The damage done by the fire at Totnes on Friday morning, is estimated by a correspondent at £2,000, which amount is covered, or very nearly, by insurances in the West of England and Norwich offices. The houses of Mr Hayman and Mr Hill were completely gutted, and the wine and spirit stores of Mr W. Bentall and the Freemasons' Lodge destroyed. The home of Dr Derry was thought to be in imminent danger, but fortunately escaped. The furniture and fittings of the Freemasons' Lodge, which were entirely destroyed, are estimated to have been worth about £300. The body of HODGE, who fell from the engine into the Dart, and was drowned, was recovered some distance down the river, and a Coroner's Inquest was held thereon on Saturday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 January 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, on the body of E. B. RICKARD, the man who was found in the canal at Morice Town, on Sunday last, the particulars of which we published in the Western Morning News, on Monday morning. Deceased, it appeared, was about 44 years of age, had a wife and family in Callington. When found, the lower portions of his body were embedded in the mud, and he was standing perfectly erect. Deceased's watch was still ticking when taken out of the water. - Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 January 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide In H.M. Dockyard. - An Inquest on the body of GEORGE WETHERALL, was held yesterday afternoon, at three o'clock, at the Clowance Inn, Clowance-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner. It appeared that the last time the deceased was seen alive was about half-past 10 o'clock on Wednesday morning, by a labourer named Whitfield, but there seemed nothing then remarkable in his conduct so as to attract attention. At about 20 minutes to 12 o'clock a man named George Crocker, in company with Alexander Saunders, had occasion to go to a place where certain apparatus was kept, just between the two rope-houses, when they saw a man's hat and on examining further found deceased hanging to a piece of projecting timber. On being taken down and carried to the surgery, it was the opinion of the medical gentlemen present that he had been dead for an hour; the limbs, however, were not quite rigid. Had it not been for the noticing of the hat, it is said that deceased might have remained in the position in which he was found for several days, as the pile of timber completely hid him from view. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

EXETER - Painful Enquiry At Exeter. Censure Upon A Medical Man. - We noticed yesterday the sudden death of MRS LANE, the wife of a dairyman residing in Paris-street, Exeter, and stated that there were rumours afloat as to the refusal of two medical gentlemen to attend the deceased when called upon to do so, the facts of which would no doubt come out at the Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest was held at Burt's Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, yesterday morning, when nineteen gentlemen were sworn on the Jury, Mr W. E. Jackson being Foreman. - The Jury having viewed the body of the deceased, the following evidence was taken:- JOHN LANE, said, deceased was 36 years of age last May, they had been married about twelve years, and had five children living and at home with him, the eldest of whom was about 11 years of age. Deceased used to carry the milk round the town mornings and sometimes evenings, whilst he supplied the barracks. She had had a cough for some few months. At the time of her death she was pregnant. She was last out of doors on Tuesday morning, when she went round with the milk. When she returned, she complained of a pain in the face, and at that time was seated by the fire, he advised her to go up into her mother's room which was warmer, and he did not see her again until he went to bed about half-past nine o'clock, when she said she was easier. She did not appear restless during the night but between four and five o'clock he went to work, but deceased did not come downstairs for that day. He went to bed about a quarter to ten at night, when she said she was about the same, but felt uneasy. She was restless during the night, and about twelve o'clock she asked him to call her mother to get her a cup of tea. He did so, and she had it. He went to sleep, and was awakened by her about four o'clock and again asked for a cup of tea, which she had; but as she continued in pain, she asked him to get out and dress himself and go for the doctor, and her mother suggested Mr Perkins - he understanding that she meant Mr Samuel Perkins, of St. Sidwell's. He had not been spoken to before by anyone to hold himself in readiness to attend upon her. He went to Mr Perkins' house about half-past four o'clock, and having rung the bell, Mr Perkins put his head out of the window, and witness said to him "Is that Mr Perkins?" He replied, "Yes, is that LANE?" and he answered "Yes, sir!" He said, "What's the matter?" Witness replied "My missus is very ill indeed sir, will you please to come directly?" He did not say to Mr Perkins that his wife was in labour, as he did not know it. Mr Perkins said "No, you had Dr Roberts last," and witness said "Sir, it was at your request, because you could not attend." Mr Perkins made no answer to that, but shut the window. Mr Perkins had been her medical man for some years, and he had paid him at least a hundred pounds: this was up to his wife's last confinement, when she was attended by a midwife. Mr Perkins had attended his children, who were ill in the hooping-cough and smallpox, about three or four weeks since; he had not sent in a bill since Christmas, but his wife had paid him for medicine and attendance every day as he came; did not owe Mr Perkins anything that he knew of; he had been insolvent, and at that time he owed Mr Perkins a bill, and he put him in the schedule. When Mr Perkins said he would not come, witness went home and told his mother-in-law and Mrs Bulley so, and the latter said get somebody or other, and he then went for Mr Hunt, of St. Sidwell's. He rang the bell, and very quickly he put his head out of the window and said, "Who's that?" Witness replied, "LANE, sir, of Paris-street." He said "what's the matter?" and he replied "My missus is very ill indeed, and I wish you would come as quick as possible." He said, "I don't attend your missus, and I can't come." He shut the window and witness came away. Mr Hunt had attended his house, it might be a twelvemonth since, but he could not say what for. Did not know whether he had been paid anything, his wife used to pay everything. witness then went for Mr Roberts, and after telling him that his wife was very ill indeed, he replied "I will be there in a few minutes," and he came almost immediately. He went upstairs, and on coming down again, he told witness his wife was dead. This was just after five o'clock. - By a Juror: Mr Hunt called at his house to attend the child of a lodger. It was not for any member of his family. He went to Mr Perkins first because he always looked upon him as his family medical man. - JOANNA COUNTER, the mother of the deceased, who lived in the same house, deposed that deceased was in the family way, and had had a slight cold for some time, and since Tuesday her face and lip had swollen. She advised her not to go round with the milk that day, but she did go as there was no-one else. She continued worse, and on Thursday morning witness got up twice and gave her some tea, the last time, about four o'clock, when she was worse, and witness said, "ELIZABETH, let JOHN rise and go for Mr Perkins," and deceased replied "He won't come." After this, deceased got out of bed, when witness called servant and Mrs Bulley, who lived in the same house. One of the children who slept in another room coughed and deceased said, "SUSEY is crying; she's got the hooping cough." These were the last words deceased uttered, and she died within a second or two afterwards, but could not say whether she died before LANE came back from Mr Perkins. - Louisa Bulley, a widow residing in the same house, deposed to being called to the deceased on Thursday morning about 25 minutes past four o'clock, at the same time she was apparently near death, but breathed once or twice after, and died in witness's presence. She was sitting by the side of the bed then, and a nurse was sent for, upon whose arrival deceased was lifted on to the bed, and it was discovered that she had been delivered of a dead male child. When LANE returned from Mr Hunt's, deceased was dead and had been so about a quarter of an hour and was so before the nurse came. - Mr Lionel Roberts, M.R.C.S. deposed to being called by LANE just before five o'clock on Thursday morning, and on going to the house he found that deceased was dead lying on the bed, and on a table was the body of a newly-born child; could not say if the child had been born alive; considered the deceased must have died from exhaustion, consequent upon premature labour, but not from haemorrhage. - By a Juror: If a medical man had been present half-an-hour before, the woman would not have been removed from the bed, and the blood would have gone back to the heart quicker. He had attended the family about six or seven years ago, at the request of Mr Hunt. - The Coroner, in answer to a Juror, said it was not legally compulsory for a medical man to attend when called; whether he was morally bound was another thing. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said that during the time he had held office a more painful case had never come before him. Mr Perkins had certainly refused to come, why, he (the Coroner) did not know, therefore he had endeavoured to get out from the witness LANE a reason. In his opinion Mr Perkins was morally bound to go. Mr Hunt had also refused to go, and great praise was due to Mr Roberts for the promptitude he exhibited in going to the deceased when called upon. With regard to the two gentlemen who had refused, he wished it had been otherwise. In a legal point of view a medical man was not legally bound to go, although he was morally. Some men stopped to enquire whether they would be paid, but there was the County Court open, and with the cheap law at their disposal they could easily recover. - Mr Roberts thought it due to the other medical men to say; that LANE did not tell him that his wife was very ill. - The Coroner read the evidence of LANE, in which he stated that he had told both Mr Perkins and Mr Hunt so, and then proceeded to read the evidence and remarked that it was a very painful case, and it would have been better if both the medical gentlemen had gone when called upon. - The Jury were then about to return their verdict, when Mr Bird (one of the Jury) suggested that as there had been a serious accusation made against Mr Perkins, that gentleman should be sent for, in order that he might have an opportunity of giving an explanation, if he had any to give. At any rate, before the verdict was returned, the Inquiry should be adjourned, so that Mr Perkins might be present. - The Coroner said that Mr Perkins might have been present, if he had thought proper. It was not his (The coroner's) duty to send for anyone. - The Jury then returned the following verdict: The Jury are of opinion that the deceased died from exhaustion, caused by premature delivery, but they cannot separate, without expressing their approval of the highly praiseworthy conduct of Mr Roberts, in attending directly he was called upon; and their disapprobation of the great and unfeeling neglect exhibited by Mr Samuel Perkins, as the medical man of the family, in refusing to attend the deceased when asked to do so. - The Coroner said it was a very proper verdict, and he quite concurred in it. - Just as the Jury were about to leave the room, Mr Perkins entered, and said he had just been told in the street that the Enquiry was going on, and he thought it right that he should attend and explain to the Jury that he was not the medical man of the deceased's family. He had only attended them once for seven or eight years. The reason of his not attending was, that LANE had not paid him an account which was owing, and also that Mr Roberts had been in attendance on the family. He had been very much engaged during the Wednesday night, and got to bed about one o'clock, and about four in the morning he was aroused by LANE. Upon hearing from him that his wife was ill, he made enquiries as to what was the matter, and on being told by LANE, he told him "to go to Mr Roberts, he's your medical man," and LANE replied "Very well." He (Mr Perkins) wanted to know why he should go without being remunerated. He had not been paid an account which had been owing for seven or eight years, and he only attended the children recently - at a very low charge - upon the earnest solicitation of MRS LANE, who could not get anyone else. In an extraordinary case, or in case of an accident, he would be one of the first to attend; but he would put it to the Jury, as tradesmen, whether they would like to part with the goods from their shops to a person who had not previously paid them their accounts. If LANE had told him that his wife was in danger, he would have gone at once. - Mr Kenshole and several other Jurors after this explanation wished the verdict to be modified, as Mr Perkins had thrown quite a different light on the matter. - Mr Bird informed Mr Perkins that he had endeavoured to obtain for him an opportunity of making an explanation before the verdict was given, but that the Coroner said it was not his duty to send for anyone, and that Mr Perkins might have been present if he had wished it. - The Coroner said that was quite correct, and with reference to the explanation of Mr Perkins, he had endeavoured to get from LANE in his examination a reason for that gentleman's refusal to attend. LANE had admitted that he had been insolvent, and that at that time he owed Mr Perkins an account which had not since been paid. - One of the Jurors having remarked that LANE said he had paid Mr Perkins £10 at different times, that gentleman said he should be glad to take £20 for it; and added that when the Enquiry was about to come on, he thought he should be sent for. - The Coroner said it was not his duty to send for anyone. Before the Enquiry closed he had asked if there was any other person who wished to be examined, and no one came forward. However, Mr Perkins had given his explanation, and in justice to that gentleman, no doubt the reporters would publish it. This terminated the Enquiry.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 February 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Devonport Workhouse, on the body of HENRY TROUNSELL, 60 years of age, under the following circumstances. Deceased was at Morice Town, on Sunday last, and on being told the way to Devonport, went immediately the contrary way, and walked over the canal. He was taken out alive and conveyed to the Workhouse, where he died on Wednesday last. - Verdict, accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 February 1860
SOUTH BRENT - The Fatal Railway Accident Near Brent. - W. A. Cockey, Esq., the Coroner for the district, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Anchor Inn, South Brent, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES PENNY, whose body was found on the previous day lying on the South Devon Railway, with the head severed from the body. - From the evidence of the first witness, JAMES PENNY, the father of the deceased, a porter in the goods department of the South Devon Railway terminus at Plymouth, it appeared that the deceased was 17 years of age on the 24th of last May. He was an apprentice to his grandfather, a carpenter, of Brent. On Sunday last, the witness went from Plymouth by the first up-train, and was joined by the deceased at Plympton, from whence they went to Totnes. They returned from Totnes and walked back to Rattery, where they had dinner at the house of a friend, and after remaining some time there they walked over to Brent. They there had one glass of brandy and water each at a public-house, and the deceased walked to the station and saw his father into the train for Plymouth, which left at about half-past eight. When he parted from his son, he seemed in excellent spirits and was sober. - The next witness examined was J. Patrick, ganger of packers. He stated that on Sunday he was in company with the deceased after he had seen his father in the train. They remained together till about ten o'clock and deceased went to see him part of the way home, and left him about a mile on the road towards Rattery. That was the last time he saw him alive. - A man named Shapton, of Teignmouth, who was employed as a smith on the line, deposed that on Monday morning he was walking along the line from Brent towards Rattery, where he found the body of the deceased lying on the rails with his head quite severed from the body. He went to Rattery and obtained assistance and the corpse was then removed to Brent. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict, the Inquiry having lasted a considerable time.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 February 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Suffocation From Gas. - On Saturday last a gas-fitter named OSBORNE, employed by the Devonport Gas Company, was engaged at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, in carrying some gas fittings to different parts of the house, and on making a junction with a pipe leading from the meter, the rush of gas was so great that the poor fellow inhaled a large quantity, from the effects of which he became stupefied, fell from the ladder on which he was standing, and shortly afterwards died. An Inquest was holden on the body the same afternoon before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 February 1860
TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held on Monday before W. Cockey, Esq., at the Town Hall, Torquay, on the body of NICHOLAS LUSCOMBE, aged 73, who cut his throat last Saturday. The particulars of which appeared in the Western Morning News, of Monday last. - David Pike, on being sworn, said: I know the deceased NICHOLAS LUSCOMBE, I live opposite his house. He was a man of independent means, but rather of penurious habits; I never saw him the worse for drink; the last time I saw him before this happened was about three or four days ago, and he then looked in a wild state. He was not in a passion, but seemed to be in a deranged state. Last Saturday morning, about twelve o'clock, I was called by deceased's daughter; she was agitated, and could only say "come over." I went over, and proceeded up stairs, and in one of the bedrooms, I saw deceased on his knees, with his head over a receptacle, and with both his hands to his head. I tried to pull away one of his arms, thinking he had a fit, but seeing that he had cut his throat, I felt alarmed, and immediately left him, and sent off for some medical men. I think I saw a razor on the table, but was not quite sure. I have seen deceased very melancholy lately, but not so much as I did on the day to which I previously referred. - William Pollard, surgeon, said, on Saturday, about twelve o'clock, I was called to attend deceased. When I reached the house, I found him sitting in a chair, with a cloth round his neck. I was told that his throat had been cut. I examined him, and found that it had been cut very severely; and it appeared such a cut as a man could easily inflict on himself. I did all that was necessary, and dressed the wound. I found the windpipe cut through, but no large blood vessel injured. He died on Tuesday from the effects of the wound. I found that his mind was deranged when I first saw him. - Martha Hoskings, a neighbour, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness, as to deceased's unsoundness of mind. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict that deceased had cut his throat whilst labouring under a Temporary Fit of Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 February 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the "Dolphin Inn," Granby-street, Devonport, on the body of GEORGE FOX. It appeared that deceased was in the employ of Mr Knapman, white-ale seller, Granby-street, and on Sunday week deceased was engaged in carrying a musical instrument upstairs into the upper part of the house, and in doing which, either from the weight of his load or other cause the poor man fell back some several steps and very much injured his head and other parts of his body; he was immediately taken up and put to bed, and lingered until Thursday last when he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 February 1860
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident On Board The Gilmour. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM BELL, a seaman belonging to the Gilmour, now lying in Plymouth Sound. It appeared from the evidence that on Saturday the deceased was on the foreyard for the purpose of bearing the sail clear off that yard, when the whip of the hallyards - which so late as Saturday last had borne much heavier strains - broke, and the sail falling he went down, his head striking the cat-tail, thereby killing him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 February 1860
BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held a few days since at Brixham, on the body of a child named EARL, aged four years, who had, according to the evidence, been overlaid by the parents. A verdict in accordance with this was adopted.

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 February 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest on the body of JAMES WHITE, a bombardier, belonging to the Fife Militia Artillery, taken from the Stonehouse Pool, on Wednesday, (particulars of whose death we published on Thursday morning), was held at the Military Hospital Inn, yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 March 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Pack Horse Inn, St David's, Exeter, on Saturday, on the body of ESTIN BUCKLE HUTCHISON, a little boy aged 3 years and 8 months, whose death took place under the following circumstances. On the Friday fortnight previously, the deceased was crossing the road at the top of Southernhay, when he was knocked down by a carriage, and the wheel passing over his hand, it was so much injured as to cause amputation of one of the fingers necessary. He recovered considerably under the care of Mr Wilson Caird, surgeon, but a few days since he died of lock jaw, and was buried; but the circumstances coming to the knowledge of Mr H. W. Hooper, the Coroner, he ordered the body to be disinterred, and hence the present Inquest. Evidence having been taken in corroboration of the above facts, the Inquiry was adjourned to Wednesday. The parents of the child are in India, having sent their son to be educated under the care of some relatives in this country.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 March 1860
KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held at the King of Prussia Inn, Kingsbridge, on Tuesday, on the body of RICHARD GILLARD, who hung himself on Sunday morning last. Deceased, who was a bargeman, had been in a low desponding way for some time past, and in consequence of his drinking habits had lived unhappily with his wife. His daughter found him in his bedroom on Sunday hanging by a rope attached to the bedpost. The man must have been thoroughly determined to destroy himself, for the noose was not above four feet from the ground, and he was stretched with his legs on the floor, so that the slightest effort would have enabled him to release himself. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 30 March 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at Stonehouse, on the body of JOHN TAYLOR, second class boy, belonging to H.M.S Flying Fish, lying in Plymouth Sound, who lost his life on Monday last, under the following circumstances. The officer of the watch directed the boatswain to pipe the boys aloft to slacken the stays; and this having been done, the signal was given for them to descend, when a race commenced as to who should be down first. The deceased, it appeared, when about to descend, told another lad near him that he would be down first, and the challenge having been accepted, the two set off at full speed. The deceased had not gone more than two or three steps before he slipped and fell on the deck, and fractured his bones. The surgeon of the Flying fish was absent; the surgeon of the Trafalgar, however, was immediately in attendance, but could render no assistance. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident to A Coal Porter. - An Inquest was held yesterday evening, at the Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM MANNING, a coal porter, lately in the employ of Mr Mead, coal merchant, of Sutton Wharf, North Quay, and who met with an accident at about 4 o'clock on the previous afternoon, from the effects of which he died about 6 o'clock. It appeared from the evidence that on the previous afternoon the deceased, with two other coal porters, was engaged in removing the weighing gear of the store, for which purpose he was standing on a ladder that rested against the partition, within which some coals were stored. Suddenly the partition gave way, and the poor fellow was thrown from the ladder against the wall, and a large piece of timber fell on his back. He was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital as soon as possible, but about two hours afterwards died from the injuries he had sustained. He was about 50 years of age, and had been employed by Mr Mead for some time. Mr Mead was called and examined, and said the partition was a strong one, and at times there had been 50 tons more coals in it than when this unfortunate occurrence took place. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held yesterday morning at the Mechanics' Inn, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a respectable Jury, on the body of DANIEL AVERY, a boy aged 12 years; the particulars of whose death have already appeared in the Western Morning News. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner cautioned the man who had charge of the horse that occasioned the accident to be more careful in future, and prevent boys riding it.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 April 1860
TORQUAY - Last Saturday afternoon the County Coroner, W. A. Cockey, Esq., made an Enquiry into the death of an old man, named WILLIAM DOWNING, who had been found dead the previous afternoon in his potato-garden. As it appears that the deceased was subject to the heart-complaint, the Coroner did not think that the circumstances would justify him in holding the Inquest.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 April 1860
PLYMOUTH - Determined Suicide In Plymouth. - A shoemaker by the name of CAREW, about 60 years of age, residing in Basket-street, was discovered suspended by a rope to his bedstead, about 6 o'clock on Wednesday evening. He was cut down, but life was extinct. The unfortunate man had been for some time in the habit of drinking to excess, having buried his wife a month previously. He had sold some of his clothes to gratify his ruling passion, and about a quarter of an hour prior to the committal of the rash act, had been drinking in the White Horse, Basket-street. On Thursday evening an Inquest was holden at the Guildhall, when a verdict was returned that the deceased had committed Suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity, brought on by excessive drinking.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 April 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide Of A Soldier Of The 10th Regiment Whilst On Guard. - A determined suicide took place on Friday evening last, committed by the sentry on duty at the Army slaughter-house, near the Admiral's Hard, Stonehouse. It appears that a young man named WM. ARCHER, belonging to the 10th Regiment, was placed on guard at eight o'clock, by Corporal John Barrett, of the same Regiment, who on going the rounds again at nine o'clock, found the poor fellow lying on the ground at a short distance from the sentry-box dead. His rifle with the bayonet fixed was found close by, and it seemed that the deceased had shot himself; the ball passing through the jaw, to the right temple, inflicting a fearful wound, and blowing away part of the shako and its peak. On the cartridge box being searched it was found that one round of ball cartridge was missing, and the empty case of it was found on the ground, near where the fatal occurrence happened. It appears that the deceased effected his purpose by fastening a boot-lace, or piece of leather round the trigger of the rifle, and making it into the form of a loop, into which he had put his foot and thus pulled the trigger whilst at the same time, he kept his head over the muzzle - from which he had not removed the bayonet. The only reason that can be assigned for the fatal step is the fact that for some military offence, he had been confined for 48 hours in the cells, and had had his hair cropped. This, it is stated, had a great effect on his mind, for he had been very desponding ever since and was heard to say that he would make away with himself. He had only been in the service a few months. The body was removed to the dead-house of the Royal Naval Hospital where it now awaits the Inquest, which will be held by A. Bone, Esq., at the Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, this day (Monday).

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 April 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Fore-street, before A. Bone, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM ARCHER, the private of the 10th, who shot himself whilst on guard, last Friday night. - Corporal John Barrett deposed to posting the deceased as sentry on Friday night a few minutes after eight p.m., at the commissariat store, Strand-street. He was then fully equipped. About an hour afterwards witness went the rounds and found deceased on the ground with his head resting on the wall and his body in front of the sentry-box. He at first thought he was asleep, but on sending for a light found he was dead. - Joseph Moore, a butcher, residing near the Victualling yard, stated that he saw the deceased about half-past eight, standing by the side of his sentry-box looking out on the water, by the Admiral's Hard. - Joseph Nowell, a private in the 10th Regiment said, that during Friday, deceased and himself were together in the guard-room, and in the course of the day deceased told him that he had been punished for a few days' absence - that he had never been confined before, since he had enlisted in the service, and that he thought his punishment was heavy for the offence he committed, and seeing also that other men who had offended time after time, had got off cheaper than he had. The punishment he received was 48 hours in the cells, pay stopped for four days, 10 days drill and 14 days confinement to barracks, and his hair cropped cell fashion. He appeared cheerful during the rest of the day. - Sergeant Hogan, Devon County Constabulary, was examined, and deposed to having had the body in his charge, and its being removed to the hospital. Examined deceased's rifle, and found a piece of leather round the trigger, which seemed to have been a boot lace. He produced a letter found on the body, which was from deceased's parents, informing him his sister was very ill. The letter was dated the 16th inst., and was directed from 9 Sussex-place, Hounslow, Middlesex. - George White, private of the 10th, said he knew the deceased who was his chum; he knew him at Hounslow, where he worked at the powder-mills, and from whence he enlisted in September last. On Friday deceased came on guard and gave witness his tobacco-box, pipe and tobacco, saying he should not want them any more as he was going to save his bit of money and go on furlough, when his time came. He added that he received a note from his parents on the previous morning and seemed in much distress about it, and cried for an hour after going to bed. He always appeared ashamed since he had his hair cropped, and said he could not walk into the town again with pleasure; he only went out once since, and did not seem the same man afterwards. He always seemed to take great care of his hair, and it annoyed him to have it cropped. - James Crook, a seaman on board H.M.S. Donegal, deposed to hearing the report of fire-arms a few minutes before nine, on Friday night. - Sergeant Kelly, 10th, said the deceased was placed in the cells at Mount Wise barracks, where he was put to hard work. It was a practise for all prisoners to rise at six, allowing one hour for washing, &c.; at seven they went to shot exercise, which consisted in removing shot from one place to another, and was generally a useless employment; from nine to 10 they were put in marching order, and from 10 to 11 put to shot practice, from 12 to five stone breaking, &c., from five to six heavy marching order, from six to half-past six supper and from then till eight confined in separate cells till bed time. - Sergeant Hughes, paymaster-sergeant of deceased's company, deposed that he always appeared ready to comply with any commands given him. He was 23 years and six months of age. - The coroner laid down at some length the law relating to homicides, and directed the Jury to return a verdict according to their conscience. After consulting the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 May 1860
ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday a fatal accident occurred to MR JOHN GIBBS, mason and sexton of the parish church. The deceased was at work on the stable at Langley College, the residence of the late W. Chanter. He had stepped, it is reported, from the ladder to the roof, when his foot slipped and in falling he struck against a linhay, which precipitated him with such violence on his head as to fracture his skull in a very dreadful manner. Death was instantaneous. The body was taken home in the forenoon to his distressed family in the town. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday. He had been sexton of the church many years. Singular is the state of the official staff at this church just now; the vicar is at Nice for his health, the clerk is confined to his house ill, the organist has become insolvent and is no est, the schoolmaster was buried last Saturday, and the sexton who dug his grave is now a mangled corpse.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 May 1860
KINGSTEIGNTON - Suicide. - Early on Saturday morning last, the body of a man was found suspended to a beam in the Linhay, near Kingsteignton Church. On examination, it was found to be the body of a man named COUCH, of that village. He had been drunk for several days, and was, no doubt, under the influence of drink when he hung himself. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday (Monday) before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 May 1860
PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. G. Edmonds, Esq., Deputy Coroner, to Inquire into the death of a man by the name of JOHN BAKER, whose body had been discovered that morning under the Hoe. The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to the dead-house in Westwell-street, where the body of the deceased was identified by his brother. The unfortunate man was about 47 years of age, and resided at No. 22, King-lane. On Monday evening, he was at the house of William Adams, No. 10 Summerland-place, where he drank two pints of porter. While in the house he was heard to wish himself dead, saying he did not like to go home to his lodgings, because he owed 10s.; he also said his three children would be better off in the Workhouse, as they had not sufficient to eat. He left about nine o'clock, apparently in low spirits, and was seen no more alive. About seven o'clock on the following morning, Mr Bennett, superintendent of the West Hoe Baths, was standing by the gentlemen's entrance, and saw something black on the sea-wall, at first he took this to be sea-weed, but on closer examination found it was a waist-belt. He then looked over the wall, and saw the body of a man wedged in between two rocks. It was then removed to the beach, and soon afterwards consigned to the care of Kessel, the Hoe Constable. When found the dress was in a state of disorder, and Mr Bennett stated his impression to be that the man climbed over the wall for a particular purpose, and on being seized with a lightness in the head, missed his footing and fell into the water. These facts having been taken in evidence, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the man was Found Drowned, but how he became drowned was unknown.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 May 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last at the Swan Inn, Cornwall-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of BENJAMIN LAUNDRY, who was found drowned at North Corner on Friday morning last, under circumstances detailed in the Western Morning News of Saturday morning. From the evidence now adduced there was no doubt of the deceased being very much intoxicated on the night of the occurrence, he having been drinking at a beer-shop in Marlborough-street, and at another in Cornwall-street, and had purchased a half gallon of beer at each house. He was seen in Cornwall-street as late as twelve o'clock on the night previous to his body being found in the water at North Corner the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 May 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Exposure To Cold And Want Of Food. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad named RICHARD ISAAC PAYNE. JOSEPH PAYNE, the father of the deceased, said that his son was about 14 years of age. He had not seen deceased since Thursday week, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, until Friday evening last, he having stopped away from his father's house for eight or nine days. His wife was the mother-in-law to deceased. From the further evidence of witness it appeared deceased had been for some time past in the habit of stopping away from his house several days together. On Friday last, at noon, the deceased was at home leaning his head on the bed. His wife and another woman were in the room at the time. He asked deceased what the matter was; who replied "nothing father." He was afterwards put to bed. When witness left work, shortly after eight o'clock the same evening, he found deceased in bed. Witness asked what the matter was, he said he had a pain in his stomach. He gave deceased a cup of tea, but he vomited it up again about five minutes' afterwards. About 10 o'clock he ate something. About 11 o'clock witness went to bed, and about 20 minutes past one o'clock the next morning he said "Father, will you give me a drink?" Witness then gave him some cold tea, which he drank. Witness again went to bed until between four and five o'clock, when he went to look at deceased and found that he was laying on his back dead. - By a Juror: He did not send for a medical man because he did not think he was in danger. - John Street said that he was going to work on Friday about six o'clock, when he saw deceased in a doorway in Mill-street, urging violently, and he considered that he was dying; his eyes were shut, and writhing as though in considerable pain. Witness took him by the arm and asked him what was the matter? but he was unable to reply; and witness thought that he was dead. With assistance witness led him to the workshop of Mr Marshall, St Aubyn's street. Deceased had not strength enough to walk. His clothes were torn to pieces and he was shivering very much indeed. As they went along deceased asked to be allowed to remain in witness's shop until four o'clock in the afternoon. Witness lighted the fire, gave deceased some coffee, and bread and butter. Deceased sipped the coffee, but ate nothing, and said he was dying. He complained very much of the conduct of his parents towards him. He said his mother-in-law and father ill-used him, which caused him to stop away from home, and if he went home they would again treat him brutally and he should die. Witness proposed to send for Dr Bishop, but deceased wished to lie down, saying he had had no sleep for five weeks. Witness took him to a loft, and laid him on some hay, when he slept almost immediately, and remained there until nine o'clock when he became restless. Witness then, after some time, took him to the station-house, deceased saying he would rather go there than go home to his parents, as they would ill-use him. About 12 o'clock in the day witness went to the station-house to see him, but he had been taken home to his parents. Deceased had also told witness that his mother-in-law beat him very much with a large stick, and on one occasion he had jumped down the water closet to escape a beating, but the neighbours were told that he had fallen into the closet, and also that if he went home he should be dead before the next morning. - Several other witnesses were examined, who deposed to have seen marks and bruises about the head and body of deceased, which were said to have been inflicted by the father and step-mother. Deceased had also been seen to pick up cold potatoes in the streets and eat them. P.C. Bryant deposed to the deceased being in a very exhausted state when brought to the station-house, and that he was suffering from diarrhoea. The step-mother was also examined, and stated that she was not aware that deceased was so ill as he was, or she should have sent for medical assistance. - Mr Delarue said he was the parish surgeon, and was at the police station-house yesterday morning, when he saw deceased resting his head on his hand, and appeared faint. He ordered him to be immediately taken home, and have medical assistance. About twenty minutes past four this morning, MR PAYNE called upon witness and requested him to come to his house to see his child. Witness went to the house in Pembroke-street, and on going into the bedroom upstairs, he saw deceased lying on his back on a bed quite dead, life having been extinct for two or three hours. From inquiries, he considered that deceased had died from diarrhoea. He subsequently examined the body, and found five small bruises about the size of a 4d. piece. If the statement of the witnesses were correct as to the symptoms exhibited by deceased, he should think the cause of death to be diarrhoea, arising from exposure to cold, and the want of food. It was most essential that the boy should have received medical assistance, without delay, when he was taken to his house on Friday morning. Speaking from medical experience, he believed that prompt medical assistance might probably have saved his life, and the absence of such assistance would be likely to accelerate death; he might, however, have died had such assistance been procured. - Wm. King said he kept the Albion Inn, beer-shop, No. 18 Pembroke-street. PAYNE, and his wife, lived in the house with him. Yesterday morning he saw the deceased brought home, when witness remarked to him, "Well, you bad boy, what causes you to go away?" he said, he did not know. He then said that he had some bread to eat the previous day. Witness then saw deceased wash himself in the wash-house. He had never seen the boy ill-used, nor did he ever hear deceased complain of want of food. - This being the whole of the evidence. - Mr Bone summed up the case, remarking that there was no legal evidence of positive ill-treatment, and therefore, notwithstanding all that had been said on that point, that portion of it must be set aside. The only material point for the consideration of the Jury whether there had been any culpable neglect on the part of the father, or step-mother in procuring medical assistance when the deceased was taken home on Friday morning. If they had clear evidence that sufficient notice and information had been given to those having charge of the deceased, of his state, and that he required medical assistance and they neglected to procure it, they would be answerable for his death, if they had not such evidence before them the parents would not be thus liable. The Coroner then minutely went through the evidence, at the conclusion of which the Jury, after a brief consultation, found a verdict:- "That the deceased died from diarrhoea and bilious vomiting, arising from exposure to cold and want of food; death also being accelerated from neglect in calling in medical assistance." - The case occupied about five hours, and great interest was evinced in the proceedings, a large number of persons being present during the whole of the Enquiry.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 May 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide. - CORNELIUS SHEPHERD, a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Albert, having leave of absence, a few days since went to lodge at an eating house kept by Mrs Jenkins, in Cornwall-street, Devonport. About 2 o'clock yesterday morning SHEPHERD told another man in the same room that he wanted some water to drink, and he went downstairs as was supposed for the purpose of getting it. About half-past 4 o'clock when some of the inmates arose from bed they found the deceased suspended to a beam at the foot of the stairs, by his pocket handkerchief. He was at once cut down, but life was extinct. An Inquest will be held on the body this afternoon. Deceased is a married man having wife and family residing in Hampshire.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 May 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide By A Seaman. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Portsmouth Passage-house-Inn on the body of CORNELIUS SHEPPERD, who committed suicide by hanging himself with a pocket handkerchief to a beam at the foot of the stairs of the beer-house in Cornwall-street, Devonport, where he had been lodging; the circumstances in connection with which were stated in the Western Morning News of yesterday. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 1 June 1860
PLYMOUTH - Death Of MISS LUKE. The Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANN LUKE, who died on Wednesday evening, from injuries she sustained by jumping out of a window, on the previous afternoon. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- William Radmore, Foreman, Messrs. B. May, Frank Goulding, Charles S. Skardon, G. B. Eyre, John Holmes, Henry Reed, W. Jeffery, E. Polinghorne, Henry Maynard, junr., G. Ryall, George Temple, J. Wills, C. Ellett, W. P. Baker, Robert Long, E. Norrish, John Bovey, Nicholas Barter. - The case having been much talked about during the day, there was a large crowd in and around the Guildhall. The hall itself was completely filled, as were also its approaches, and there were hundreds in the street who could not get in. - The Coroner addressed the Jury, and said they were called together for the purpose of Inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANNE LUKE. This investigation was of considerable importance, not only on account of the station of the deceased, but also as to how far the fatal occurrence was attributable to the conduct of the father. By the rule of the law, a parent might chastise his child properly, but that must not be done violently. It seemed from what he had heard - but they would have the evidence by and bye - that this young woman the deceased was violently beaten with a rope and that she fled in consequence from her father, and jumped out of a window. By law, if one person, under a well-grounded apprehension of violence from another, had to resort to such means as that by which this young woman met her death, he who had caused it was held responsible. This portion of the Inquiry would, therefore, require the most careful investigation, as it might be a most serious affair for the father of this young woman if such were proved to be the fact. But he had a most able advocate in Mr Beer, who attended to watch the case for him. The first part of the Jury's duty would be to proceed to the house in Union-street where the body of the deceased was now lying, and on their return they would examine the witnesses. - The Jury then adjourned to the house in question, to which the representatives of the press were refused admission by the policeman. On the re=assembling of the Jury, one of the reporters informed the Coroner that the representatives of the press were denied admittance to a view of the body, and the Coroner said he regretted that such had been the case, and that it had not been done by his directions, but he was always glad when publicity was given to these cases. He had not seen any of the reporters when he gave orders to the policeman that only the Jury should be admitted. - When THOMAS LUKE, the father of the unfortunate girl came into the court, he was received with one of those yells from the assembled crowd, that will unnerve the firmest resolution, and the display of intense feeling against him was with difficulty restrained. He appeared deeply affected, and at the commencement of the examination of his wife said "I can't stand this it is no use," and retired to the quietest corner he could find. - Mary Abbott, the first witness called, was examined, and said - I am a widow, and reside at MR THOS. LUKE'S house, 30 Union-street. MR LUKE and all his family reside there. I am employed by him as housekeeper. The deceased was his daughter and was single; her age was 18 and she was a healthy girl, except during the last few months. Her employment was keeping her father's business and selling boots and shoes. MR LUKE has a wife and five other children, the deceased being the eldest. All the family lived in the house with the exception of MR LUKE and the eldest son, who took their meals at one of the other shops, MR LUKE having four in different parts of the town. All the family slept at the house in Union-street. At two minutes to nine, on Tuesday night last MISS LUKE came home to the shop with her mother, having been at the establishment in Bedford-street, all the afternoon where she went with her father. They appeared to be good friends. She went up to her bedroom which was two stories high to take off her bonnet and shawl. She came down again on her sister calling her, and went out into the kitchen. Her father was there and spoke to her, her mother and her sister were also there - the foreman was not. He asked her the [portion here very blurred and unreadable] - replied that was not the foreman's place, as the shop girl kept the books, and he had no right to do so. He insisted on an explanation, but she said she could not give it, and her father then slapped her face with his hand. He might have given her two or three slaps, but I cannot say. She cried, but said she could not give any explanation. Her father then took a piece of line and struck her [the "line" was handed to the Coroner. It was apparently a piece of clothes line, about the thickness of a small finger; as it was exhibited a roar of execration burst forth from the densely crowded court, which the coroner appeased by requesting the crowd to desist from any exhibition of feeling, whatever their thoughts might be.] Her father went into the yard and cut it from a clothes line. He held it in his right hand when he came in, and the deceased was standing up - no-one had hold of her. I think the line was once doubled, and her father struck her with it on the arm. I do not think more than two or three blows were struck. She held up her arm, receiving the stripes on it, and said "Don't father." He ordered her to her bed, and she went. That was instantly after he struck her the last blow. She was crying then, but not much, and left the room quickly; no-one followed her. The kitchen door was then shut. When MR LUKE ordered his daughter to bed he threw the rope down on the floor; he did not threaten to beat her again, but sat down and she ran upstairs, and I stood at the kitchen table. We heard the deceased's window thrown open, and her sister EMILY screaming that deceased was out of the window. I ran into the court with MR LUKE, and there we found her on the ground quite insensible. She was lying on her back, with her head thrown on one side. She was removed indoors, and I went for a surgeon, Mr Whipple. Deceased died at ten minutes after eight o'clock last night. Deceased spoke yesterday, and she was attended by Mr Whipple and Mr Square. - By the Foreman: I have lived with MR LUKE'S family five years next August. - By a Juryman: Deceased was asked several times for an explanation by her father, but said she could give none. Three years ago deceased's father struck her. Deceased was in the habit of going out for half-an-hour mornings and evenings. The shop girl had several times complained to me of an intimacy between deceased and the foreman, but I told her she should complain to MR LUKE. Had never heard MISS LUKE express a wish that she could live elsewhere than in her father's house, or say that she was unhappy. Her father was too fond of her for that. I am quite sure MR LUKE did not follow deceased upstairs. When I laid deceased out I saw some black marks on her wrist. - By Mr Beer: MR LUKE'S treatment of deceased was that of the best of fathers, and he appeared fonder of her than of any other of the children. The foreman was discharged on the day of the fatal occurrence between twelve and one o'clock. Deceased stood before her father looking steady and before he struck her, she had her hand placed on her hip, and he asked her if that was the way to stand before him. - Mr Whipple surgeon, was the next witness examined. On Tuesday evening, he was called to attend the deceased, and found her in the kitchen lying on a sofa. Deceased was lying on her back, and there were two wounds from which blood was flowing - one in the temple and one in the forehead. Blood was also flowing from both nostrils. He enlarged one of the wounds for the purpose of minutely examining the skull, and then found that a portion of the frontal bone had been separated and driven down on the brain. Being satisfied that the case must terminate fatally he sent for Mr Square, as in case any grave charge should be brought against any individual it would be satisfactory to have evidence of two medical men. He told MR LUKE there was no hope, and he appeared quite distracted and stated that he had chastised her severely - very severely. Witness attended the case, and deceased died the previous evening. She was never sufficiently conscious to be examined by a magistrate, she could answer yes or no, but was not capable of reflection - a person jumping out of a window of 20 or 25 feet high, in case of the head coming to the ground, would be likely to receive such injury as the deceased did. The cause of death was fracture of the skull and laceration of the brain. Since the death he had examined the body and then found several contusions produced by the fall; on the left arm near the shoulder there were three or four stripes, similar to what would be produced by blows of a stick or a cord. They were not very severe, and the skin was not broken. - The next witness was the mother of the deceased, MRS MARY LUKE, who was allowed a seat whilst she gave her evidence. She said she was in the kitchen, and heard her husband ask the deceased some questions respecting the shop. The reply of the deceased was "I can give no explanation." Saw her husband slap her once in the face, and she (witness) withdrew upstairs. The deceased cried when her father struck her. Soon after witness left the kitchen, she heard her daughter running up to her bedroom very rapidly. Her husband was very kind to the deceased; he almost adored her. - The mother's countenance was as motionless as a marble statue, and she gave her evidence in a firm though melancholy tone of voice. Not the slightest sign of emotion was perceptible, but the weight of sorrow with which she was overwhelmed appeared too great for tears. - EMILY LUKE said she was sister to the deceased, and was about 14 years of age. She detailed the particulars of the altercation in the kitchen, and said that when her father ordered deceased to her room, he shut the door; and, going back by the fire, sat down. Witness went out into the garden, and before she thought it possible for her sister to have reached her bedroom, she heard the window thrown up. She looked upwards, and saw her sister spring out. The next instant she was lying on the ground, having fallen on her head. The witness also testified to the kind manner in which the deceased was invariably treated by her father. In answer to a question as to how some glass became broken, she said her sister leaned against the window while her father was beating her, and the rope struck one pane of glass and broke it. She could not remember the time when her sister had been punished by her father before Tuesday evening. The words used by deceased to her father in the kitchen were - "I've nothing to say; what can I say?" The Coroner, assuming this witness had concluded her evidence, told her she could withdraw, whereupon she said she had something "particular" to communicate. She was requested to proceed, and made the following extraordinary statement:- About ten days or a fortnight before this happened, my sister showed me a bottle of oxalic acid and a bottle of laudanum, saying, "I shall take it if father is told." I understood her meaning to be that she and the shopman had not been acting as they ought. On Tuesday evening just after she came home, father sent me up to her room to request her to come down to him. She then said "I took a large dose of oxalic acid in the dinner-time, and I am surprised that it has taken no effect." This was before father thrashed her. I saw a bottle of poison taken from her pocket after she jumped from the window. I then told the nurse what my sister had just before told me, and she said that would only make the matter worse. There was such a bustle about then, that I do not think the nurse quite understood my remark. I searched my sister's drawers yesterday, and found a bottle of oxalic acid and a cup of laudanum. The oxalic was about three-quarters gone from when she showed it to me the first time. The witness underwent a lengthened examination from the Jury, but she adhered to this statement. - Mary Ann Avent deposed: - I am a shopwoman with MR LUKE, at 30 Union-street. On Tuesday morning I complained to MR LUKE that I was not comfortable in his shop, and gave him notice to leave. I have seen the foreman and deceased eating together in the shop, and thought it improper. On Tuesday morning I told deceased of it in the presence of her father, and she said nothing. The man came into the shop, and MR LUKE discharged him on the spot, promising him his regular wages if he would call the two following Saturday nights. About a fortnight before, the man had sold a pair of old shoes, value 2s. The money was brought to the shop. They sent for two half-pints of cocoa-nut oil, which they shared between them. I have been in MR LUKE'S employ nearly two years. I understood the foreman to be married. I complained to MR LUKE about the foreman remaining to make up the book with his daughter, as I considered it was taking my place. I thought deceased made too free with the man, her position being superior to his. I told her I should leave, and her reply was, she thought it the best thing I could do. I had frequently told her I should tell her father of her being so friendly with the foreman, and she said I was quite at liberty to do so. It was MISS LUKE'S birthday last Monday; she then completed her eighteenth year. She told her father of it in my presence. He said "Well, dear, what will you have?" She replied "I should like to have a pair of nice kid gloves." He promised her she should have them, and the gloves were bought. My telling her father about her on Tuesday morning was the cause of this unfortunate affair. - Mr W. F. Finemore said: I am a chemist and druggist, residing at No. 28 Union-street. I have known MISS LUKE three years; she was a cheerful, lively girl. On Tuesday evening, in consequence of the information I received, I went into MR LUKE'S kitchen, and saw deceased lying on the floor, with her head supported on her father's knees. I asked MR LUKE how this occurred, and he said "some villain of a fellow kept her in the house after the shop was closed, and I have severely chastised her; she then rushed upstairs and threw herself out of the window." I had her placed on a sofa, and when Mr Whipple came, I saw him take from her pocket a small phial, containing a dram and half, or 90 drops of laudanum. At MR LUKE'S request I went into my house and on making inquiries I found that on Thursday, [Portion unreadable]. When I saw her, there were no symptoms of her having taken oxalic acid or laudanum. If she had taken the acid, it must have shown itself in about half-an-hour. Boot makers use a deal of oxalic acid in the business. - Mrs Long said she lived in the adjoining house, and knew MISS LUKE as a young woman of lively disposition. Heard violent screams and crying as if from a person grown up. On going out to see what was the matter, she saw a window lifted, and instantly afterwards heard someone fall on the court. She inquired what was the cause of the disturbance, and the answer was "Nothing is the matter." MR LUKE appeared very calm for the occasion, and on someone suggesting that a surgeon should be sent for, he said, "a doctor! oh, yes, send for half a dozen of them." - Mr Whipple was recalled. He thought there was no necessity for a post mortem examination, the deceased shewed no symptoms of dying from oxalic acid or any other poison. The cause of her death were the blows on the head, and nothing more. - Sylvester Miners, a sailor, said he was in the house at the time and saw deceased lift up the window, and swing herself out. He entreated her not to jump; she made no answer, held on to the sill as it were but an instant, and then leaped down. - It was now after ten o'clock, and the worthy Coroner, amid breathless silence, briefly summed up. He reviewed the facts of the case, telling the Jury that if the father, instead of sitting down after ordering her to her room, had pursued her upstairs, then it would undoubtedly have been their duty to return a verdict of wilful murder against him, and he would be obliged to answer the charge at the bar of criminal justice. But inasmuch as the evidence distinctly stated that he did not pursue her, it was for the Jury to say how far he was the cause of his daughter destroying herself. But, whatever might be their verdict, it would not remove the odium of the charge against the father of having improperly beaten his child. - At twenty minutes after ten the Jury retired to consider their verdict. - The Court broke up into noisy groups and an excited and eager multitude thronged the various approaches to the Guildhall, in fact, it was some time since Whimple-street presented such an animated appearance, that thoroughfare being crowded almost from end to end. While the Jury were deliberating, the father of the deceased, apparently overwhelmed by his situation, affected as he must have been by the oppressive heat of the Court, essayed to leave the court, but was persuaded to remain inside. After an absence of half-an-hour the Jury returned into Court with the following verdict:- "That on the 27th day of May, in the year of our Lord 1860, the said MARY ANN LUKE, having been severely beaten by her father, THOMAS LUKE, of Plymouth, at No. 30 Union-street, within the Borough, became excited and whilst labouring under Temporary Derangement, jumped from the bedroom window of her father's premises and fell on the ground below, whereby her skull was fractured and brain lacerated. That she languished, therefrom, at 30 Union-street, aforesaid, until the 30th day of the said month of May, and then and there died of the said fracture of the skull and laceration of the brain, and the Jury further say that her said father's conduct towards the deceased was marked by undue severity." - During the time the Foreman was reading the decision of the Jury, LUKE made use of some incoherent expressions, and then sank forward on the desk weeping like a child. - Great Excitement: The crowd around the Guildhall was reinforced as the evening advanced, and when the Inquiry was brought to a close every person leaving the hall was narrowly scrutinized, but in consequence of the excitement THOMAS LUKE was induced to remain in the hall. After a time the crowd clamoured for his appearance, and some of the more excited made their way to his house in Union-street, and there, after sundry calls and the chalking of irritating sentences on the shutters, an attack was made, some of the shutters were removed and several squares of glass broken. The police interfered, and succeeded in somewhat pacifying the mob by telling them LUKE was at the Guildhall, and the shutters were again put up. - The crowd, however, had not dispersed at two o'clock this morning; up to nearly that hour we were informed that LUKE still remained in the Guildhall for safety.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 June 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death Of MR JOHN LANGMAN. Coroner's Inquest. - At half-past six on Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held before A. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Forester's Arms, Stonehouse, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN LANGMAN, photographic artist, of 81, Union-street, who died on Thursday last from being poisoned by laudanum. The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, after which the following witnesses were called. - JOANNA LANGMAN: I am the widow of MR JOHN LANGMAN, who was about 48 years of age. He had been ill for about ten weeks before his death on Thursday. Mr Whipple was his surgeon, and he was attended occasionally by Mr Stephens, who assists Mr Whipple. My husband kept his bed for several weeks. I did not stay up with him on Wednesday; he appeared free from pain, and he said it was not necessary for me or anyone else to stay up by him, because if there was a chance of getting a little sleep he should be disturbed perhaps. He was in the habit of taking opiates to procure sleep; and during his severe illness two men regularly remained up by him every night, but for the past fortnight or three weeks no one has stayed up with him. About half-past ten o'clock on Wednesday night, I left him in bed. I slept in an adjoining room. About half-past five on the following morning I heard his bell ring, and I went to him. He asked for a cup of tea, and I directed the servant to get it and take to him, which she did. When he asked for the tea he said he felt sick, and that was the reason why he wished to have it. About a quarter after eight I went up to his bedroom and found him asleep. I was so glad to see him asleep that I would allow no household work to be done that would possibly disturb him. During the forenoon I went at intervals to his room, and on each occasion found him asleep. About half-past 11 I went up, and again found him asleep. I looked upon him a second or two and he did not appear to be living, then I heard a gurgling noise in his throat and I became alarmed. I went to Mr Snell, the chemist, who came and looked upon him, and recommended that he should have medical attendance. I sent for several surgeons, and Mr Stephens was the first who came. I should think that was about an hour after I heard the gurgling in his throat. He died about eight o'clock that evening. About half-past nine on Wednesday morning deceased asked me for 5s., saying he was going to Plymouth to see Mr Whipple. It was nearly twelve o'clock when he returned, saying he had seen Mr Whipple, and had been to the barber's to get himself shaved. It was nearly ten o'clock on Wednesday night when he went to bed. He had not taken any medicine for some days before his death. He had been in the habit of taking an opium pill at night; but on Wednesday night he had none. He said he wished he had. Some time ago he had a bottle of chlorodyne from Mr Pearce, surgeon. For ten weeks he has always been in great agony, not being able to procure sleep. He went to London twelve weeks ago yesterday (Friday). As he was leaving his room to go to bed on Wednesday night, I saw a small bottle on the dressing table like that produced. The small glass graduated measure produced I took from the dressing-table or the mantle piece. He has frequently complained of being in constant and severe pain. On Wednesday morning when he went into Plymouth, he appeared out of pain, and I was glad to see him so. - The witness was deeply affected, and gave her evidence with much emotion. - George Hambly: I am a chemist and druggist, residing at 69 Union-street. On Wednesday morning deceased was passing my door, and I inquired after his health. He said he was very weak and pointed to his head and stomach as the parts in which he suffered pain. He said, "I can get no sleep; it's a wretched thing for me. I have been taking opium pills with two grains in each, and I have taken as many as fourteen of a night - is it not a great quantity?" I said it was. He then said "Which would be the stronger, opium in pills, or laudanum. I mean which would have the quickest effect." He either said quickest or greatest effect. I believe he said quickest. I understood he referred to the alleviating of his pain. I said I can't tell you; under such circumstances you ought to apply to your medical adviser. He then alluded to a remark which Mr Whipple had made to him regarding an internal disease under which he suffered, and said - "But it's all here in my head." I thought there was a peculiar glazed appearance about his eyes; they looked dark and sunken. - By the Jury: This was between 11 and 12 in the forenoon, and deceased was coming from Plymouth towards his house. - William Bray Stephens: I have attended deceased occasionally, for Dr Whipple, for the past five or six weeks. He was suffering from a sub-acute internal disease. About half-past twelve on Thursday last, I was called by his brother and found deceased in a semi-conscious state. He was drowsy, and on shaking him violently he looked vacantly at me. I gave him an emetic, but it did not act, so I endeavoured to apply to stomach-pump tube, but was unable to get it down his throat. I got him out of bed, but still was unable to get the tube down. Mr Bulteel, surgeon, came in; he tried, and also failed, but in our endeavours to pass the tube, moderate vomiting was produced. I had him removed to the adjoining room, where two men walked him up and down. He could not walk without support. I continued with him an hour and a-half, until Mr Whipple arrived. He was then in a half sleepy state, and had vomited once or twice. At Mr Whipple's order, champagne and other stimulants were repeatedly administered and his hands were beaten with pieces of wood, to check drowsiness. Mr Whipple asked deceased where he got the poison - at Mr Snell's or Mr Finemore's? He answered, "At Mr Parrott's." Mr Whipple enquired where that was, and he said, "Next to Mr Mills's; it's a dreadful crime." He continued in a varying state until eight o'clock, when he died. The last time I saw him was about a quarter to seven, when I left him. He was then walking about. Whilst doing so, his sister searched the pockets of the coat he had worn the day before, and found the bottle label - "Laudanum; poison. - T. Parrot, chemist, &c., Buckwell-street, Plymouth." It appeared to have been on the bottle, and taken off again. I am distinctly of opinion that the deceased died from the effect of laudanum, opium, or some other narcotic. - By the Jury: My object in using the stomach-pump was to eliminate the poison, as the messenger gave me to understand that he had taken laudanum. - Harry Beingham Snell: I am a chemist and druggist, residing at 92 Union-street. I have known the deceased many years, and formerly employed him to build my house. He has been a photographic artist about two or three years. About two months ago he sent for me, saying he was suffering from an alarming bleeding at the nose. I attended him, he was bleeding from the nose profusely, and I should say he lost about a quart of blood. When it was stayed, I inquired the cause of it, he said he had caught a cold in London, and had been dreadfully ill ever since. A fortnight afterwards I went to him, he having sent for me; he said he was suffering horrible agony (witness described the disease). He said, "I take opium every night, about four grains each night." I saw him again within a few days, he was in bed, and said "I am dying; I have taken an overdose of opium, I must have taken fourteen pills, my pains were so excruciating." I examined him, and told him he was not under the influence of opium. He was not satisfied, but sent for Mr Stephens, the surgeon. The next time I saw him he said he had been to Mr Pearse, for he was not satisfied as to whether he should not die. He said, "He recommended me to abstain from opium, and to take morphia, or what was better still, as I was very nervous, to try a bottle of chlorodyne, and take it when I felt pain." He visited me almost daily, invariably complaining of excessive pain. On Wednesday morning about eleven o'clock he called at my shop, I congratulated him on his appearance, and told him I thought he was looking better. I advised him to occupy his mind and engage in some business. He said, "I am unable to control my mind, I cannot sit still, I can't read, I can't listen to reading, it drives me nearly frantic." The next time I saw him was on Thursday at noon, he was in bed, lying on his back, sleeping tranquilly, breathing easily, apparently in a profound sleep. It occurred to me that he had taken an overdose of opiate, so I asked him if he had taken anything, and he muttered "laudanum." I lifted his eye-lid; the pupil was insensible to light. I shook him violently, upon which he started up and exclaimed, "Jesus preserve me; I am dying!" I called his wife, and told her he had taken an overdose of narcotic poison. Messengers were despatched for medical men, and Mr Stephens came in about twenty minutes. During that time I kept him awake by such applications as I thought necessary. I saw deceased several times during the evening. I went in about seven o'clock, and he was being walked up and down the room by two men. He was evidently sinking, and I gave him some champagne, and ordered quantities of hot coffee. I remained with him until half-past seven, when I left. About a quarter of an hour afterwards I went into his room again; he was sitting on a chair, faintly gasping. His pulse had nearly ceased, and his heart only beat once or twice. - Elizabeth Callacott, the servant, said she took deceased a cup of tea in the morning, about a quarter after six. He did not speak, but was sitting up in bed. She gave it into his hand, and left the room. - THOMAS LANGMAN: I am son of the deceased, and am about seventeen years of age. On Thursday night, about an hour before my father died, I found this bottle produced, a little way up the chimney of my father's bedroom. The bottle could not have been placed there by my father whilst in bed; he must have got out of bed to put it there. - John Harris Stephens: I am a chemist and druggist, successor to Mr Parrott, residing at 16 Buckwell-street, Plymouth. About 11 o'clock on Wednesday morning deceased came into my shop alone, and said he wanted some laudanum. I asked him how much he wanted, and he replied, "About sixpenny worth." I asked him what it was for. He said it was for himself. I told him it was rather a large quantity, when he said, "I have been taking opium eight or ten weeks." I asked him if he could prescribe for himself? He said he could lately; originally the doctor had ordered it. He wished to have a change of laudanum, as opium had lost its effect upon him. I said, as he had been in the habit of taking opium he had better begin with 25 drops, and told him he ought to get a measure and increase the dose five drops until he arrived at the dose which would do him good. He said he could do without the measure; but I told him to be sure and measure his doses, and not guess them. I put up an ounce phial, and labelled the bottle, "Laudanum - poison." The bottle produced is the one, and the label has been taken off. The label is also from me. He complained of severe pain, and said he should like to take a little at once. I then mixed 25 drops in an ounce of camphor mixture. He drank it. I wrapped up the bottle, and gave it to him and he left the shop. He was perfectly rational, and complained of his great sufferings. - The Coroner asked the witness if he was acquainted with the recent Act of Parliament relative to the restricted sale of poisons by druggists, and he said he was. - In answer to the Coroner, Mr Stephens, surgeon, said, to a person unaccustomed to opium, one-sixth of the quantity which might be contained in that bottle would be sufficient to destroy life. He (Mr Stephens) believed deceased took it in two does - one on the Wednesday night, the other early on Thursday morning, and in that case it would be more dangerous than if taken at once. On finding that 25 or 30 drops were not sufficient to assuage his pain, he went on accumulating until he arrived at what proved the fatal dose. - In answer to Jurors, Mr Stephens, druggist, said that about 21 or 22 does of 25 drops would be contained in that bottle. - Peter Hughen said he was apprentice with Mr Snell, and knew the deceased. Saw him come into the shop on Tuesday last, about two o'clock in the afternoon. He wondered that his dose of pills had not taken a fatal effect. I told him I read from Materia Medica that habit had a great effect, and the greater the pain, the more opium could be taken. He said that was his case. - Mr Snell said, about three weeks ago, deceased was excessively alarmed at having taken an over-dose of opium. He examined him, and assured him he was not under the influence of opium. He said "does opium produce death by throwing one into a sleep?" Mr Snell replied it did. - The Coroner read over the evidence, commenting upon portions of it as he proceeded. - The Jury, after deliberating three quarters of an hour, returned the following verdict:- "That on the 31st of May, the said JOHN LANGMAN died from the effect of taking an excessive dose of poison called laudanum, but with what intention there is not sufficient evidence to show." - Mr Bartlett, the Foreman, said the Jury were surprised to find that the chemist supplied such a large quantity of poison to any person without knowing who he was.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 June 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In The Hamoaze On Sunday. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Military Hospital Inn, near Stoke Church, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of a corporal of the 10th regiment, named ANDERSON, who came by his death on Sunday, by the upsetting of a boat in the Hamoaze, when, after hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - Mysterious Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Inn, last evening (Monday) before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL HOOKWAY, coppersmith, aged 58, who had died the previous day under the following circumstances. - It appeared that on Monday, a neighbour and a member of the Jewish persuasion, named Jacobs, gave to the deceased's daughter, who is ill, a small quantity of dressed gurnet, of which the deceased, his wife, and other members of the family, partook. On the following day his wife complained of illness, and the deceased fetched the surgeon (Mr Webb) to attend her. Mr Webb immediately saw MRS HOOKWAY, and shortly after he had left the deceased also complained of being ill. He did not appear, however, to be seriously affected, for on the same day he proceeded to the North of Devon to work. He remained there until Thursday, when in consequence of having a sore throat, sickness, vomiting, and violent purging he was compelled to return home and take to his bed. These symptoms became so alarming that it was considered necessary to consult Dr Budd, physician, and the deceased was attended by these gentlemen and Mr Webb up to his death, which occurred on Sunday afternoon. MRS HOOKWAY and a grown child, who had also eaten of the fish, and a family named Maunder, living next door, and to whom Mrs Jacobs had given fish, are now ill, apparently from the same cause. It was stated at the Inquest that Mrs Jacobs and her neighbours were on the best of terms. The fish had been fried in olive oil and eggs, with a sprinkling of flour. After the Inquiry had continued three hours, it was adjourned until this day for further evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 June 1860
PLYMOUTH - Woman Drowned At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the death of SUSAN SMITH. Mr Harris, printer, of Bilbury-street, was Foreman of the Jury. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased was the wife of an excavator, and that both husband and wife were hard-working, well-conducted, and in their station in life, respectable persons, residing in Moon-street; that she was 69 years of age. She was seen by her neighbours about 10 o'clock on Monday night, and appeared then to be in her usual cheerful condition. Nothing more was heard or seen of her until one of the sailors belonging to a Jersey vessel, lying off Commercial Wharf, saw the body of a woman floating in the water alongside the wharf. He at once secured the body by a rope alongside the vessel, and brought the police acquainted with the circumstance. The body was shortly afterwards removed to the dead-house in Westwell-street. It bears no marks of violence of any kind, and there was no evidence to show how she came into the water. The Jury having inspected the body, and heard the evidence of several witnesses to the above effect, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 June 1860
EXETER - The Supposed Poisoning Case. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of SAMUEL HOOKWAY, was resumed on Tuesday evening. It appeared from the further evidence adduced that members of several families had been taken seriously ill, in consequence of having eaten small quantities of meat and fish which had been given them by Mrs Jacobs, but that with one exception they had considerably improved. The only testimony which bore directly upon the case of SAMUEL HOOKWAY was given by the medical gentlemen, who attended him shortly before his death, and had since made a post mortem examination. They stated that the symptoms manifested by those who had been suddenly attacked with illness, were like those produced by eating putrid fish or meat, though the inflammation was much more severe. There were also symptoms such as would be produced by an irritant mineral poison; but the witnesses (Dr Budd and Mr Johnson Webb) could say nothing as to the cause of death other than that it arose from some acrid matter taken into the stomach, producing inflammation; but Dr Budd expressed his opinion that death was caused by animal matter in a partial state of decay acting as an irritant poison. After some consideration the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from eating fish in a partial state of decay, and thereby poisonous.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 June 1860
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough, on the body of MARY ANN BRADFORD, who died suddenly on Wednesday afternoon last, in Bilbury-street. The Jury having viewed the body, which was lying at the dead-house, returned to the Guildhall, and the evidence was proceeded with. - It appears that the deceased was about 34 years of age, and unmarried and went out charring. She had received parochial relief at the rate of 2s. 6d. per week, and subsequently 1s. 6d., and had until some time since been living at her father's. Three weeks ago, however, she went to reside with a Mrs Crocker, in Bilbury-street. She had not wanted for anything while she was there; but for two days before her death had appeared very ill, and had been spitting blood. On Wednesday afternoon, she went out, and on getting into the street was attached with a violent bleeding from the nose and mouth. She was assisted into the shop of Mr Fryer, a chemist in Bilbury-street, by Mr William Moorshead, who was passing at the time, and every care paid to her, but expired almost within a minute after she was taken in, having broken a blood-vessel in the region of the heart. When first seen, she seemed quite calm and collected and there was no appearance of her being excited. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from the rupture of a blood vessel. - Mr Fryer, before leaving the court, begged publicly to express his thanks to Mr Moorshead for the great kindness and attention he showed to the poor woman, as also for the assistance he rendered on the occasion.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 June 1860
OTTERY ST. MARY - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the Greyhound Inn, in this place, to Inquire into the cause of death of EDWARD CARNELL. It appeared that deceased was about thirty-three years of age, and was working on the railway. Mr John Webber stated that on the 2nd of June he saw deceased wade into the river to catch some bars of wood which were floating by. Deceased's wife was looking at him. He cautioned deceased and told him that he would be drowned, but he still persisted in trying to get hold of the wood. On seeing him struggling in the water he obtained a pole, and went up to his knees in water in order to put it out to deceased. Deceased grasped the pole but he (witness) had not strength to hold it and deceased was forced down the stream. He turned the pole, which had a nail at its top, and endeavoured to take hold of the bank with it, but failed to do so. There were several persons present but no one attempted to assist him. Had they done so he believed that the man might have been saved. He followed for some distance but could not see anything of him. The body was found on Monday farther down the river. The water was very high and flooded. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

ASHBURTON - An Inquest was held at Holne on Thursday last, before M. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JACOB PARSONS, aged 16 years. The deceased was in the service of J. H. Williams, Esq., Holne Cot, by whom he was sent on Wednesday last to see if some labourers were at work in one of the drives. Not finding them he crossed the Dart river at New Bridge, and went to a mine in the neighbourhood, and thence, accompanied by a little boy, he proceeded to a place on the river where a plank is laid for the purpose of crossing. He ventured on the plank and jumped on it to show its safety. Unfortunately his foot slipped and he was precipitated into the river and drowned. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.' The Coroner strongly urged the necessity of either making this plank more convenient, or of removing it entirely.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 June 1860
TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. The Inquest. - We have already given the particulars of a case of suicide at Torquay which happened last Saturday, the unfortunate man being P. A. B. SCHELTMS, a servant in the service of his royal Highness the Prince Frederick of the Netherlands. An Inquest on the body was held at the Maritime Inn on Tuesday night, before the Coroner, W. A. Cockey, Esq., when the following evidence was adduced:- Andrea Keline, a courier in the service of the prince, stated that deceased was a lacquey in the suite, and had served as such for the last 15 years. His royal highness and party left Torquay on Saturday for town. It was the duty of witness and the deceased to see the luggage taken to the railway station; deceased, however, endeavoured to lag behind by fumbling about the hat-stand in the vestibule. They left, however, with the two drays at half-past nine o'clock. When he came to Meadfoot Cross, witness suddenly missed the deceased. It was thought that he might save the train; but when the party arrived in London, deceased was found to be still absent. Telegraphic messages were despatched to the housekeeper, who remained in Torquay, and also to the sergeant of police, to institute a search. Witness heard nothing more until Monday night, when he was ordered to return to Torquay and he arrived here on Tuesday afternoon. The two bottles of wine produced and found on deceased, were given to him for the use of four men servants on their journey. The gold watch, rings, snuff-box &c., he recognised as deceased's property. Deceased was on board wages, 5s. per day, and witness did not believe that he could have had more money than was found upon him, £3 7s. The servants were married men, and their wives had an allowance made them at home. The cavalry sword found by him belonged to the aide-de-camp, Capt. Nepvean, and which deceased was ordered to take to the station. A marked difference had been observed in deceased's appearance within the last few weeks; his eyes were hollow, face thin and altogether he had a wild and haggard appearance. On Friday night he got up several times in the night, washed his face and hands, spoke incoherently, and was evidently troubled in his mind. Witness had read the letters found on the body, they were from his wife and sisters, and were written in the most affectionate of terms. He was forty-four years of age. - Richard Tozer, a mason, states that as he was walking along the carriage path to go to work at St Anne's he saw man hanging among the shrubbery bushes. He felt frightened, and called tow fellow workmen, and they then found that the deceased was hung up by a silk handkerchief: he was in a sitting posture, and quite dead and cold. There was a sword by his side. Several parties had passed in and out but had not noticed the body. It was the opinion of witness that deceased had destroyed himself, for there were no marks of struggling on the ground, and he had on his cap. - Mr Superintendent Baird, of the police, enumerated and produced the various articles found on the deceased. He added that from the position in which deceased was found, and from the fact that the handkerchief was passed twice round his neck it was evident that it was his own act. - The Coroner summed up briefly and the Jury, without hesitation returned a verdict that the deceased hung himself while in an Unsound State of Mind.

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM GOODING, a navvy, who was killed by a quantity of earth falling on him whilst at work on the Exeter and Exmouth line, which is now in course of construction. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 June 1860
NEWTON FERRERS - A Melancholy And Distressing Death At Newton Ferrers. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last, the 16th inst., at the National School-room, Newton Ferrers, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH PITTS, who was found dead under the very painful circumstances subjoined:- On Wednesday afternoon, the 13th inst., about four o'clock, she left a neighbour's house whom she had been visiting, and retired to her own dwelling. An hour afterwards, her little girl, between seven and eight years of age, coming home from school, discovered her mother lying with her face on the fire, and tried to remove her, but being unable, gave an alarm, when a neighbour went in and lifted her off and found life was quite extinct. There was not much fire in the grate - her face and breast were scarred; but having on a stuff dress, her clothes were not much burnt. On the hob was a tea-kettle of water; the chair was about five feet from the fie-place, and on the table was her needlework. There appeared no signs of struggling, even her fingers were not soiled. The Jury returned a verdict - "Found dead on the fire, occasioned by suffocation," but a strong opinion prevailed, that a fit was the cause of her fall, but as no person saw her living after she retired to her house, the Jury returned an Open Verdict for want of evidence. MRS ELIZABETH PITTS, above alluded to, was about 42 years of age, the widow of the late MR WM. PITTS, formerly a very respectable yeoman of the parish of Newton Ferrers, but at the time of his death, about five years' since, he was filling a responsible situation as clerk, in a Commercial establishment in London. She has been for a great many years subject to fits, but for two years previous to the distressing event, we have stated, she has had no fits by day, but several times has told her friends she thought she had attacks in the night. About 10 or 11 years ago, while residing on a farm with her husband, she had a fit and fell into the fire, when she was so much burnt that her life was despaired of, the effects of which never left her; and from an incurable wound in the head, she suffered much. She has left four children living, one son and three daughters, to lament her loss.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 June 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, on the body of a lad, named DANIEL SAUNDERS, aged five years. The poor little fellow had fallen into the leat, near the river Exe, and was drowned. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 July 1860
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - A man named EDWARD PALMER, aged 71, a resident of St. Thomas's, was killed on Wednesday afternoon, whilst crossing the railway at the Bristol and Exeter station. The poor man was driving a wheelbarrow over the crossing and some trucks were being shunted, which the poor fellow did not appear to see, notwithstanding several persons having shouted to him. The barrow was caught in the end of the truck, and the unfortunate deceased was thrown down, and the wheels of the truck passed over the back part of his head and shoulders, causing instant death. An Inquest was held at the Red Cow Inn, St David's, yesterday, (Thursday) and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 July 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening at Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad named TRENAMAN. We gave the particulars of this case yesterday to the effect, that the boy, who was 12 years of age, was playing with some other boys in a boat lying in the canal, Morice Town, when he fell overboard and before assistance could be obtained was drowned. His body was, however, shortly afterwards recovered. After hearing the evidence, a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 July 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Papermakers' Arms on Saturday morning, before the Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of a little boy named WEBBER, who was drowned in attempting to cross the Head Weir. The poor little fellow, with others, had taken off his stockings and shoes, and had gone some distance over the weir when his foot slipped and he was carried down the stream and drowned. Verdict - "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 July 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham. - An Inquest was held at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JOHN BONE, who came by his death at the Keyham Yard, Morice Town, on Saturday afternoon, under circumstances fully detailed in this paper yesterday. Deceased was a smith, and passing near the place where some condemned boilers were breaking up a piece fell upon his breast and crushed him to death. The Inquiry was adjourned to Friday in order to allow the Jury to inspect the place where the accident occurred.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Frightful Suicide In Stonehouse. - We yesterday gave a few particulars of the suicide of a man named ROBERT KEAST, the keeper of a house of no good repute, residing at No. 15 Hobart-place, Stonehouse. The Inquest on the body was held at eleven o'clock yesterday forenoon before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at St. George's Hall. The Jury having proceeded to view the body, the following evidence was called:- Emily Richard said: I have lived in the house of MR KEAST about three months, and usually slept in a room above that occupied by MR and MRS KEAST. The last time I saw the deceased alive was about twenty minutes to one on Saturday morning last, when he was quite sober. He asked me to turn off the gas, as he wanted to go to sleep. About half-past five the young woman, who slept with me, saying, "Hark, how MR KEAST is groaning," I listened, and heard him groan twice, but not attaching much importance to it, I fell asleep again. About half-past seven I was awoke by the servant, and on going downstairs I saw the body of deceased lying on the floor. A razor stained with blood lay on the table. There was a quantity of blood on the floor. There were blood spots in the passage, and on the door handle. Deceased was given to drink very much, although last week he did not drink so much as his custom was. He told me an action was brought against him for having called Mr Leaman a convict. This appeared to weigh heavily on his mind, and I have heard him say he would rather cut his throat than go to prison. About four o'clock on Wednesday or Thursday morning he came into my bedroom and said he wished to have a doctor, as he was almost going out of his mind. He said he felt his head cracking, and looked very wild. He remained in bed that day until six o'clock, when he went for a walk and was evidently better. I heard him say about a fortnight ago that he had made over all his property to his wife. - MARY KEAST: I am the widow of the late ROBERT KEAST. He was 39 years of age in September last. We have occupied the house about one year and three months. He was addicted to drinking, and on two occasions has suffered from delirium tremens, the first time was two or three years ago, and the last time was in December 1859. He had a dread of an action which had been brought against him by a man named Leaman, a beer-housekeeper in Bath-street. He had called my husband a sponger, who in return called him a convict. He was served with the writ about seven weeks ago, and he then said, rather than Leaman should have anything from him, he would go to prison and destroy himself. For a fortnight after the writ was served, he was in a constant state of agitation, and in the course of the night he would frequently get out of bed, thinking there were persons in the room to carry him away. As he had wished me to go to London for a few days, I left on the 29th June. I came home on Saturday night about twelve o'clock, having been telegraphed for. When I went away I locked up his razors, as he has not shaved himself for six months past. I also used to put away the knife-box every night. When the writ was first served, I have known him sit down and cry for ten minutes at a time. I locked the cupboard where his razors were and took the keys with me. I should not have gone to London if he had not particularly wished me to do so. - Sarah Ann Quint, the servant, said she was 13 years of age, and had lived in the house about four months. For the past few weeks her master had been in a very desponding state. Her testimony was a corroboration of the first witness. - John Bolt, the policeman, produced the razor, which was one with a white handle, and much stained with blood. He described the wound in the neck of the deceased as being on the left side, three to four inches in length, two in breadth, and one in depth. - The witness Quint was re-called and said that on Friday morning she saw him come into the parlour where she was, and he bade her go for the doctor, as he was afraid he should not live long. She saw him burst open the cupboard in which the razors were locked, alleging that he wanted some breakfast. - Another female named Annie Lukey was called, but she added nothing new to the evidence already adduced. - Thomas Step deposed to having been in the Hobart Arms with deceased on Friday afternoon. He looked strange, and said he had got over that d.... rogue, as the action was settled. Rather than go to Exeter he said he would rather cut his b.... throat. The Coroner briefly summed up and the Jury immediately returned a verdict to the effect that he destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 July 1860
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - An accident attended with fatal results, happened at Highweek, Newton Abbot, on Monday evening. MR THOMAS EDWARDS was engaged with his spring waggon in removing the furniture of Captain Charles Wise, R.N., from his residence at Highweek to the railway station, for conveyance to Sheerness, he having recently received the appointment of Superintendent of the dockyard there. The waggon had been loaded by MR EDWARDS and another, and being ready for removal the horse was put in; but as it refused to pull, the drag was taken off the wheel and MR EDWARDS himself took the shafts, intending to move it down the steep hill leading from the lawn to the road. But almost as soon as the waggon was in motion, its weight overcame the resistance MR EDWARDS was able to offer, and ran down the hill with great velocity, which so increased in its descent that at the bottom it passed over the high curb, and knocked down the wall of two feet in thickness, breaking the shafts, and killing poor EDWARDS on the spot. - This sad affair has thrown a feeling of gloom over the town, as the deceased was well known and very generally respected. He has left a widow and five young children. At the Inquest yesterday, before Mr W. A. Cockey, Esq., County Coroner, a verdict in accordance with the above facts was found.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 July 1860
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, Horsebridge, on Saturday last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of RICHARD HANCOCK, a child about four and a half years old, the son of a carpenter residing at Sydenham. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased left home with other children in the morning for the purpose of playing and not returning in the evening, a search was made for him, when he was discovered the next day in the river Tamar. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 July 1860
HOLBETON - On Tuesday afternoon, July 10th, an Inquest was held at the George Inn, in the village of Holbeton, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS GEE, a lad between 10 and 11 years of age, who was killed on Saturday last, the 7th inst., under the following distressing circumstances - he was employed on Brownson Farm in carrying hay, and in proceeding from the field to the rick he had to go along a part of the highway. While so employed he was missed, the horse returning to the field without the boy who had been driving. Search was made and he was found lying in the road with his neck broken. A medical man was at once sent for, but on his arrival he said that death must have been instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The employer of the poor lad has shown much kindness and liberality to the friends of the deceased in this distressing event.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 July 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Accident At Keyham. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN BONE, who came by his death at the Keyham yard, on Saturday last, by the breaking up of some boilers, the particulars of which have already been published in this paper, took place at the Guildhall, Devonport, yesterday afternoon. The Jury had since Monday last, visited the place where the accident occurred, and having obtained additional information, they have returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Drowning Of A Soldier. - At half-past 11 o'clock yesterday forenoon, an Inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOHN CONNORS late Lance-corporal in Her Majesty's 36th Regiment of Foot, now stationed at Raglan Barracks, Devonport. The Inquiry took place at the Royal Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, Devonport, and the following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- Mr Charles Sumpter, Foreman; Messrs. T. P. Warne, J. Tucker, W. Dodridge, R. Rundle, W. T. Arnold, R. Wyer, J. H. Dunn, E. Pawlyn, H. Murray, T. Martin, and W. Rogers. The Coroner and Jury then proceeded to the dead-house of the Military Hospital, there to view the body of the unfortunate man, which from the length of time it was in the water, aided by the great heat which has prevailed during the past few days, was in a very advanced state of decomposition. On returning to the Hospital Inn, the following witnesses were examined:- James William Martin said, he was about 14 years of age, and lived with his parents at No. 25 James-street, Devonport. About half-past ten o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, he was playing at "jump-back" with several of his companions on Mutton Cove Quay, when he saw the body of a man dressed in soldier's clothes floating down the Hamoaze. It was then about six boat's length distant from the shore, and two of the boys put off in a boat and towed the body to Mutton Cove. - John Richard Tobin deposed that he was Assistant-Surgeon to the 36th Regiment. On Wednesday, the 11th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of information received, he proceeded to Mutton Cove where he saw the body of a man dressed in the uniform of a lance-corporal in the 36th Regiment, floating on the surface of the water and tied by the leg to a waterman's boat. He instantly recognised it as the body of JOHN CONNOR, who was missed from his quarters on the 25th June, and had it placed in a boat and conveyed to the Royal Military Hospital. The body was perfectly dressed with the exception of the cap and belt. Two buttons half way up the jacket, as well as the lowest button were unbuttoned in front. The rest of the clothes was done up in perfect order, and there were no marks of violence on the body. The witness minutely described its appearance, and gave it as his opinion that the deceased came to his death by drowning. - Sergeant-Major Ormond said, on the 25th June he gave deceased a pass, authorising him to remain out that night until 12 o'clock. This was about half-past three in the afternoon in Raglan Barracks, when he appeared quite well, and had on his belt and forage-cap. Witness never saw him afterwards alive. He had been in the service 16 or 17 years; had been a lance-corporal three or four months, and had a good conduct badge. He was a man of good disposition, but when put out of temper, appeared rather disposed to be sullen. Two or three days after he disappeared, his forage-cap, marked with his number, was brought to the barracks by a boy, who stated that it was picked up on Cremyll beach. It was wet, but not otherwise injured. On Sunday last, his belt was brought to the barracks by a waterman, who discovered it at low water in the mud at Mutton Cove. - Elizabeth Penfound stated that she lived with her parents at the "Little Carlton" beer-house, Mount-street, Devonport, and knew the deceased well. He came to the house in the afternoon of Monday, the 25th June, and wished her mother, herself and other members of the family to accompany him to Mount Edgcumbe Park, but they declined. He returned to the house at 10 o'clock the same night, apparently intoxicated. He went into the back parlour with some more company and called for a pint of porter, which her mother at first refused to supply, but complied on his insisting on it. He merely tasted the porter himself and passed it round to the company. He said his pass ran till twelve o'clock, and about ten minutes from that hour he left the house to go away. He appeared perfectly comfortable, and had on his belt, cap, and gloves. When he got outside the door instead of going to the barracks, he went down Mount-street, in a direction towards Mutton Cove. The witness, on seeing this, called out to him, saying - "That's not the way to go to the barracks," to which his reply was, "All right!" and he continued in the same direction. The deceased was a well-conducted man, Miss Penfound stating that she never heard an unbecoming word proceed from him. - FINTON CONNORS, brother of the deceased was called, and said he was in the same regiment, and they had always lived very happily together. His brother's age was about 32. - After a brief review of the facts of the case by the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was found dead in the water, but how he came by his death there was no evidence to show.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 July 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Paper Makers' Arms, before the Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) on the bodies of two young men, named PRINN and WILSON, who were drowned whilst bathing at the Head Weir on Saturday last. It appeared that PRINN had taken WILSON across the river on his back, and was returning, when PRINN, who appears to have been seized with cramp, sunk, and the other unfortunate fellow clinging to his neck, they were both drowned. A verdict was given in accordance with the above facts.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident To A Seaman Belonging to H.MS. Emerald. - On the 14th of July inst., as H.M.S. Emerald was coming into port, a sailor, named WILLIAM DAWE, was employed with others in furling sails aloft, when he unfortunately fell a considerable distance, receiving severe injuries. He was removed to the Royal Naval Hospital, and lingered on till about eight o'clock last Saturday night, when he died from the injuries he sustained. An Inquest will be held before the Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., this day, at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 July 1860
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the First and Last Inn, on the body of the man DOWN, whose death by drowning in the river Tavy on Saturday morning lat has been already noticed. The evidence produced went to prove that death resulted as already stated, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, touching the death of WILLIAM DAWE, a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Emerald. The following are the names of the Jurymen:- Mr Henry Hope Chimmo, Foreman; Messrs. W. G. Williams, W. W. Bridgeman, J. Woolf, C. W. E. Randle, W. Henry Stowell, T. Orpheus Rogers, Thomas Seymour, J. Saunders, W. R. Chapple, Joseph Taylor, and T. James Gosden. The Jury having viewed the body, which was lying at the hospital, they returned to the inn, when the following evidence was adduced: - Mr Dennis McCarthay examined: I am assistant-surgeon serving on board H.M.S. Pearl, now lying in dock at Keyham. On the 4th July inst., I was at sea in her, and between the hours of 11 and 12 in the forenoon deceased was brought to the Sick Bay. I examined him, and found him to be suffering from paralysis of the lower extremities, from a difficulty in swallowing, and from nervous depression, and he was unconscious. There were no external injuries excepting a very slight abrasion of the skin just below the shoulders, and which was scarcely perceptible. He was undressed and put to bed, and every attention paid him. At one o'clock I again saw him, and found him still suffering from prostration; but he recovered the power of swallowing. The ship came into the Sound about five o'clock p.m., the same day, and deceased was taken under my charge to the Royal Naval Hospital, where he was delivered to the care of Dr Nettleton. - Mr Richard Carter, 1st Lieutenant of the emerald, deposed, that on the day in question, the deceased, an ordinary seaman of the ship went aloft with other seamen to furl topgallant sails, and royals; his station was on the fore-topgallant yard. When the sails had been furled, witness saw the men coming down to the deck. He was on the port side of the quarter-deck. At the time it was reported to him that a man had fallen from aloft. - John Shawl, leading seaman on board the Emerald, was the next witness called. He said: Deceased was his messmate, and was a fore-topgallant yard man. On the 4th July last, witness was on the foreyard arm, and saw the deceased on the fore-topgallant yard in the act of furling the sails. Did not see anything more of him till the order was given to lay in and come down from aloft, when the captain of the top called to witness to overhaul the topsail sheet. He then saw deceased in the act of falling against the fore-topgallant studsail tack, from there he fell to the hammock netting, and on to the deck, falling on his back. Should say the height deceased fell was 50 feet. - Staff-Surgeon Mackay, of the Royal Naval Hospital, said he saw deceased the day he was brought into the Hospital. He was placed in sick ward No. 2, and was suffering from paralysis of the lower part of the body. Witness attended to him up to the time of his death, which occurred on the 14th inst.; the cause of death was fracture of the spine. - Charles Henry Davis, a man of colour, examined: Was an able seaman on board H.M.S. Emerald, and when the accident occurred was on the royal yards. The deceased was on the quarter of the fore topgallant yard. As witness was going down to the deck, deceased fell past him, touching his shoulder with some part of his body. In his fall he made attempts to save himself by catching at the rigging. - After some further evidence had been given, the Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 July 1860
ERMINGTON - The Accidental Drowning At Ermington. - The Coroner's Inquest on the body of the poor man PENWILL, whose death by drowning was noticed in yesterday's Morning News, was closed with a verdict of Accidentally Drowned. A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner, publicly commended the conduct of the mower Gill, for his gallant efforts to rescue PENWILL.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Soldier. - Yesterday at two o'clock, an Inquiry was opened at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD GRANSDALE who came by his death by shooting himself the previous day. there was a double Jury empanelled, and after viewing the body the first witness called was Henry Bowles Franklin, who deposed: I am the regimental surgeon of the 10th regiment of foot. I saw the deceased yesterday morning about a quarter to 10 o'clock at his house in Canterbury-street, lying on the floor of his apartment on his back dead. The body was dressed in the regimental clothing of a private soldier of the 10th regiment, except that one boot was off; his clothes open exposing a gun-shot wound about three inches below the breast, and a little towards the middle line of the body. I found the action of the heart was stopped, and life quite extinct. The size of the wound was like that made by a conical bullet, such as is now commonly used in the army. I saw no other marks on the body then. On examining the body today I saw a wound in the back, just below the blade-bone of the left side, which leads me to believe the bullet entered the body in front and came out at the shoulder. I have no doubt of deceased having died from the effect of the said gun-shot wound. I should think the deceased must have been in a partially recumbent position. - By the Jury: The ammunition of a soldier is not generally given up when going off duty. The deceased ceased to breathe three minutes after the shot was fired. - ANN GRANSDALE said: I am the widow of RICHARD GRANSDALE (deceased). I have two children living with me by a former husband. I had been married to GRANSDALE since June 1859; we were married at the roman Catholic Chapel at Brompton. Yesterday morning, between two and three o'clock, I awoke and found my husband crying. I asked him what he was crying for; He replied that he did not know, he could not help it. He had gone to bed sober. He told me the night before that he could not do his duty as a soldier, as he had been a groom all the time he had been in the service until about four months ago; he had never done a day's duty until then. On the first day's drill he ever had, about four months ago, he said that should be the last day's drill he would do; and, taking the rifle in his hand, said that it should be his end. When I saw him crying, I said, "Do not fret, for we will get out of it," as I had written to my mother for money to buy him out of the service, and I hoped to hear from her soon. It would cost £21 to do it. I went to sleep, and did not awake again until about eight o'clock. Deceased was then in bed with his trousers on; he said to me, "Will you get out and light the fire?" He should have been at his duty at half-past five. I thought he had been to Barracks. I said if you have been in barracks you have time; will you light the fire? He said there is no wood. I proceeded to light the fire, and asked him if he had not been to drill; he said "No;" there is the b....y guardhouse for me, and there shall be no more b......y drill for me. He then took his regimental clothes and threw them on the fire; I said do not be so silly as to burn your clothes as I shall have to work and get more. I took his clothes from the fire as well as some meerschaum pipes he had thrown there; he then came four times and kissed me and the children. Shortly afterwards he took the rifle in his hands; I thought he was going to clean it. I sat with my back towards him blowing the fire. I then heard the report of the rifle. I turned round and he fell in my arms, and afterwards to the floor. I made an alarm, when someone came to the door. I afterwards saw the sergeant-major and the surgeon. He had five days' extra drill about a fortnight ago for being late as guardsman. He had several times after a field day or other duty came home and thrown his things down, and said he would never go any more for he would blow his brains out. He was a sober man in general. He has often complained of ill health. He went into the hospital about a month since, ill of fever and ague. He had been in the service two years last January, and always in the same regiment. He has often taken his rifle in his hand, apparently with the intention of loading it, saying "I will shoot myself, for a soldier I cannot be." - By the Jury: I have told persons of his strange conduct, but never said anything to his comrades or superior officer. We lived on very good terms, - very comfortable and happy together. He was a labouring man before he enlisted. He worked for my father, who sent me away to London as he did not approve of my marrying the deceased, and I did not see him for several years. - Five or six witnesses were examined, the purport of which was to show that deceased was extremely jealous of his wife. Among the witnesses was a man named Holford, of whom it was alleged that he frequently visited deceased's wife, and went to walk with her, and which he admitted, as did also the widow, who was recalled and cautioned by the Coroner as to what she should say, as her evidence respecting deceased's dislike to the drill was not the sole cause of his committing suicide. In cross-examination, deceased's wife admitted being a few days since at Mr Bazley's public-house, Prospect Row, Devonport, when Holford entered, on which deceased rose and insisted on his wife following him. to which she replied that when he had any claim upon her then he could command her, intimating it was supposed that as they were both Protestants and had been married at a Catholic chapel, the marriage was not valid. Deceased then carried his wife out of the house. Other witnesses proved that Holford and the woman were frequently together, and the belief was expressed that the act was committed through jealousy. - At the conclusion of the evidence the Jury consulted for a few minutes, when they returned a verdict to the effect that the act was committed while in a state of Temporary Insanity. some of the Jury afterwards stated that they wished to have added that insanity was occasioned by jealousy. The Inquiry did not terminate until half-past six o'clock.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Death Of Two Persons By Drowning At Exeter - Two Inquests were held yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., the Coroner, on the bodies of the boy GEORGE WESTERN and SERGEANT TREW, of the South Devon Militia. It will be remembered by our readers that we gave a short account of the facts on Monday last. - From the evidence of Mary Lang, who resides on the Haven Banks, near the spot where the unfortunate persons were drowned, it appears that on Saturday, about noon, three brothers named WESTERN, were on a piece of timber, endeavouring to catch some small fish, when one of the younger boys fell into the water, upon which she endeavoured to reach him with a stick, but he was too far out, and she did not succeed, upon which she screamed for assistance, and Sergeant WILLIAM TREW, who was crossing the Basin-bridge, ran up and jumped into the water to rescue the boy. He caught hold of him, and the boy clung to him, and got on his back, and from thence reached to the piece of timber, and was taken out of the water by a man named Leonard Garry, who had also run to the spot upon hearing the cries. The two other boys were also in the water. The unfortunate man had then sunk, as well as the other boy who was drowned. The eldest boy, who had also caught hold of the timber, was then taken out of the water. She did not think the poor man could swim. - Leonard Garry, a labourer at the Gas-house, stated that he ran to the spot as soon as he heard the cries with two of his fellow labourers; when they arrived they saw the unfortunate deceased in the water and three boys, they succeeded in getting out two of the boys, and the other sank; they then lost sight of the sergeant and immediately after grappling irons were brought and thrown into the water near the place where deceased was last seen. Presently he saw the body of TREW moving about under the water and caught him by the coat and brought him to land, he then appeared quite dead. Witness endeavoured to open his eye and saw that life was not extinct; he, with the others, then commenced rubbing and rolling the body. He should think the sergeant was in the water, after sinking, about three minutes, and the poor boy was not taken out until three or five minutes afterwards, when life was extinct. Witness then went back to the gas-house, and shortly after Mr Edwards came there and asked Mr Williams permission to bring the Sergeant into the gas-house by the fires, which was done. Dr Marchant then arrived, and ordered the clothes of deceased to be immediately removed, the body to be wrapped in blankets, and proceeded to use every means for restoring animation. Every one rendered as much assistance as possible. The surgeon remained nearly two hours and a half until the poor man expired. He appeared to be recovering about half-past one o'clock. - RICHARD WESTERN, aged 12 years, the eldest of the three boys, stated that they were on the plank named when his younger brother fell into the water and he and his other brother (the deceased) were so frightened that they fell in also. He saw the sergeant run up and jump into the water, and then saw his brother on the sergeant's back. This witness corroborated the evidence of Garry with regard to taking him and his brother out of the water. He was sure his brother was drowned by accident, and not pushed into the water. - Mr W. R. Marchant, the surgeon, then stated that he reached the spot about half-past twelve, when he saw some men carrying TREW to the gas-house, where he was placed near the door; he examined him and found that his breathing was very feeble, as also his pulse. He ordered the immediate removal of his clothes, and blankets were wrapped around him; friction was applied to his les and body, and witness then commenced Dr Marshall Hall's method for re-producing artificial respiration; hot stones were placed to the feet, and an apparatus containing hot water was applied to the surface of the body; mustard poultices were also put on the calves of the legs, chest and back of the neck: witness also dashed cold water on the forehead and ammonia was applied to the throat and under the hose; and improvement in the breathing was perceptible, but never perfectly established. He was quite insensible and struggled very much, which witness considered were efforts to breathe; his groans were loud and he died after he (witness) had been attending him two hours. - The Coroner observed that it must be very satisfactory to the public, as well as to the whole of them, to know that every means were used to restore animation. - P.C. Harris, of the County Constabulary, removed the body of the boy from the banks to the Plymouth Inn. - The Coroner did not wish to make any remarks to the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" in the case of the boy. - It was now necessary for the Jury to view the body of the sergeant at the gas-house, which was done. After an absence of about a quarter of an hour they returned, when the Coroner said that the evidence in the last case was all that could be required, and the Jury at once returned a verdict of "Drowned while Endeavouring to rescue the boys." - Mr Williams, of the Exeter Gas Works, complained of the length of time the body had been kept, but the Coroner stated that he was attending the funeral of his brother's child, near Bridgwater and that only one day had been lost; he appealed to the Jury present as to his willingness to attend immediately in cases of accident, all of whom concurred. - A subscription has been set on foot for the benefit of the widow of the sergeant and his five children, and the Jury have resolved to give their fee of 2s. each for their benefit; the Coroner also gave 5s. - SERGEANT TREW was buried in St. Thomas's churchyard yesterday afternoon at four o'clock, with military honours. The 9th Lancers preceded the band of the First Devon Militia. The Dead March was played; and several of the Militia followed the corps. A Military salute was fired over the grave.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 July 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday evening, shortly before six o'clock, the van belonging to Mr Derry, railway contractor, Plymouth, came down Navy-row, Morice Town, at a rather fast pace, when a little child named WILLIAM HENRY PEARSE, and residing at No. 25 Navy-row, ran in front of the van, and the hill being rather steep the van could not be instantly stopped and it threw down the child and the wheel passed over its head producing instantaneous death. It was immediately taken up and conveyed to its home. The driver's name is Edward Tucker. The father of the child is a labourer in Keyham-yard. It is probable the Inquest on the body will take place today.

EXETER - The Accident On The Railway. An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday evening, on the body of the little boy named COLEMAN, who was run over by a locomotive on the Exeter and Yeovil line, near the station, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 July 1860
HORRABRIDGE - On Thursday morning Mr A. B. Bone, the Coroner, held an Inquest at the London Inn, respecting the death of MRS JANE AYRES, aged 65 years, who died from injuries which she had sustained by being run over by a horse and cart. The evidence went to prove that the horse was frightened by a fowl flying against his head, and he being a high-spirited horse, ran off at a furious rate, striking the deceased with the wheel of the cart in the back, thereby breaking six of her ribs from the junction of the back-bone, causing almost instant death. The Jury, after a lengthened and careful investigation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - On Friday the deceased was buried; she was very much respected in the village, she and her progenitors having lived there for more than a hundred years.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 August 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Burning. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Clarence Inn, Catherine-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, named FREDERICK BORDMAN, who came by its death under the following circumstances:- It appeared that on Monday last, shortly after twelve o'clock, the child who was about three years of age, was brought home from a walk, and seeing some victuals near the fireplace, it went to reach it when its clothes caught fire, and burnt the child so very severely that it died shortly afterwards. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Haemorrhage. - An Inquest was held at Mr Medland's Prince of Wales Inn, Queen-street, Devonport, on Wednesday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY HENDERSON, a pensioner. It appeared from the evidence of MRS HENDERSON, that on Saturday night last, between nine and ten o'clock, she saw some blood on the floor, her husband sitting a short distance therefrom preparing to go to bed. Supposing the blood to come from a room above, she went thither to see, but found no blood there, and it was not until she perceived some alteration in the features of her husband, that she perceived that the blood was issuing from deceased's leg. She made an alarm, and a neighbour was despatched for a medical gentleman, who, after calling on five or six surgeons, returned without one; another messenger went for Mr Butcher, surgeon, who fortunately attended, but the deceased died within half an hour afterwards. Death ensued from loss of blood, by the rupture of a blood-vessel in the leg. The surgeon stated, had anyone had the presence of mind to have stopped the blood until some medical gentleman arrived, most probably his life would have been saved. The Jury found a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from the loss of blood as above described, and from the want of proper attendance.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 August 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From A Fractured Leg Caused By Wrestling. - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held in the Guildhall, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JOSEPH ROBINS. This is the case to which, it will be remembered, reference was made at the Commissioners' meeting on Friday last, when some questions were asked the Governor as to whether he had refused the deceased admission into the Workhouse, for the purpose of undergoing an operation, and to which the Governor answered in the negative. Since the operation the deceased gradually wasted and expired on Tuesday last. - On the first witness being called (William Hollow), the Coroner remarked that he was not bound to say anything to convict himself, the law being that if one man was fighting with another, and death ensued, the man who inflicted the injury would be responsible; but if parties were struggling in a friendly way, without intending to injure each other, and one sustained an injury so that he died, the other would not be responsible. - William Hollow then said: I am a painter's labourer. I live at No. 3, Princes-street, Devonport. The deceased JOSEPH ROBINS lodged with me. He was a married man, but his wife and children are living in Guernsey. Deceased was a boot and shoemaker, and worked at his trade, and slept in a room adjoining my own. He had lodged there between three and four years. Four weeks last Wednesday, I came home from my work about a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening. I got my tea ready, and asked deceased to have some with me. He was alone, and lying on his bed. He said he would not have any tea as yet. He had been drinking. After a few minutes I went to him again. He was then sitting on the stool at which he usually worked ready a newspaper. He again refused to have some tea. I then sat down by his side as usual. I talked with him some time, and he began speaking about Cornish and Devonshire wrestlers and their mode of wrestling. He then asked me to try a round, and he got up and caught me by the collar, and I did the same by him. He tried to throw me, and in doing so he made a slip and fell to the ground, and I with him. He cried out, "My leg is broken." I said, "It can't be." I was perfectly sober, as I do not drink anything. He got up and showed me his leg, and I said that his ankle was turned out of the way. I said I would go and fetch the doctor. He asked me to wait whilst he went into the courtlage, and he went out and came in by himself in a few minutes. I went to fetch Mr Bennett, surgeon. He said he could not come for an hour, or until nine o'clock. I told him that deceased's ankle was turned out of its place. It was then about eight o'clock. When Mr Bennett came he examined deceased's leg and set it, and then told me to come to his surgery for some medicine, which I did. I staid up nearly the whole of that night, and attended upon him. My wife also attended him up to the day of his death, on Thursday last. Last Friday a nurse from the Devonport Workhouse came and attended to him. The room was about 10 or 12 feet square and seven feet or eight feet high, and is situated over a stable. - By the Jury: At the end of the room in question is a pit for the soil of the stable. Mr Bennett was the surgeon of deceased's club. - Mr Bennett, surgeon, was sworn. He deposed: I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, London. On the 5th July last, at about eight o'clock in the evening, the last witness came to my house in George-street, Devonport. He reported to me that the deceased had injured his leg, and I understood that the man's ankle was dislocated. It is desirable to reduce the fracture as speedily as possible. I said I would be there as speedily as I could, as I had patients in the surgery whose cases would not admit of delay. About nine o'clock I went to the room of deceased in Princess-street; he was in bed. He complained of great pain in the ankle. I reduced the dislocation and placed the leg in its proper position in about half an hour. I do not think any damage accrued to deceased by the delay in setting the limb. I attended upon him up to Tuesday last, the time of his death. The room of deceased was close and unventilated. I continued my attendance upon him for three weeks, when I found the skin over the inner ankle ulcerated, which laid it bare to the bone to nearly three or four inches, subsequently the inflammation extended into the joint and produced a discharge. Consequent on the discharge of matter, it very much debilitated the system. I am satisfied he had all the nourishment his case required, but the crisis arrived when I proposed to him that his leg should be amputated. He consented, but on one condition that chloroform should be given to him. I told him the room was very unfavourable to the operation, so much so as materially to diminish the probability of his recovery after amputation. I called in Mr Laity to see deceased, and we agreed that it was desirable to remove him to the workhouse. Mr Butcher and myself went to the overseer's office to get an order for his admission there. Mr Chapple, the assistant-overseer, after some hesitation, gave me an order for his admission into the house. He had not at this time received any relief as a pauper. Mr Butcher and myself went to the workhouse and saw Mr Delarne, the surgeon of the house, and also Mr Gruzelier, the Governor, and we represented the circumstances of the case to the Governor, who doubted whether, as a club patient, he should be admitted into the house. I produced the order from the overseers. The Governor enquired who was to perform the operation. I said myself; he then said, he thought this was an unusual case for admission to the house, and the better plan would be to remove the patient to the South Devon Hospital. I told him I did not wish to send him there, but desired to perform the operation in the workhouse, having obtained Mr Delarne's permission so to do. The governor then ordered the ambulance car, but afterwards said, on reflection, he could not admit the man, if he did it would be an illegal act, and contrary to the Poor-law Board Act. I said, if it is so, it is useless for me to say anything further. I stated the result of this interview to the patient, who said he was very sorry. I said the only course then was to perform the operation in the room. Mr Laity and Mr Cutcliffe expressed dissatisfaction at the man's not being admitted into the workhouse, and advised that he should be removed to the house in opposition to the Governor's views. I objected thinking we had kept the patient in sufficient suspense already, it being now five o'clock. I administered chloroform successfully, and I amputated the leg while he was insensible. I completed the operation satisfactorily. The first day after the amputation, the patient appeared remarkably well; subsequently, however, diarrhoea came on, which disturbed him very much, and speedily other injurious symptoms exhibited themselves, and he gradually sunk to the time of his death. On the day of the amputation, the 25th July, I was with the deceased nearly the whole of that day. - Mr Gruzelier, the Governor of the workhouse, was next sworn, and gave a similar statement to that he made before the Commissioners on Friday last, and which has already appeared in this paper. He denied having refused admission to the deceased into the house, but he simply suggested his being removed to the South Devon Hospital. - Other witnesses were examined, at the close of which The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," observing that it was their opinion that the Governor of the workhouse should have admitted the deceased into the house when applied to do so by Mr Bennett. - The Inquiry lasted about four hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 August 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident On Board The Himalaya. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last, at the Military Hospital Inn, Lower Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of a private of the 12th regiment, named WM. HENRY JAMES. It appeared that shortly before the Himalaya, steam troop-ship, arrived in the Sound on Tuesday last with the 12th regiment on board, a seaman on board the vessel threw the lead, as is usual, to ascertain the speed at which the vessel was going, when it struck deceased across the head, which at once rendered him senseless and he died a few hours afterwards, although the skull did not appear to have been broken. It was said that the lead weighed about fifteen pounds. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 August 1860
EXETER ST SIDWELL - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Acland Arms, St. Sidwells, yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, by the Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of a poor man named HENRY LANE, aged 63 years, who died suddenly whilst at work in Messrs. Rew and Sons tanyard, on the same morning. It appeared that the poor fellow had been suffering for some time from disease in the chest, and had been in the Dispensary under the care of Dr Drake. He went to work as usual about six o'clock in the morning, and in consequence of his not returning to his breakfast, his wife went and made enquiries for him at the tanyard, when he was found lying on his face and hands quite dead, in a loft where he had been at work. A verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 August 1860
PRINCETOWN - Sudden Death. - An awful event has lately occurred at Princes Town. Two men who had been drinking pretty freely, entered the Albert Hotel, kept by Mr Kissell, and after having some beer, requested permission, as it was time to close, to remain for the night in the tap-room. This was granted, and in the morning it was discovered that one of the men, whose name was JOHN WILLIAMS, of Rundlestone, was dead. He was supposed to have been suffocated while sleeping. An Inquest was held on the following day, and a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 August 1860
BUCKFASTLEIGH - On Friday the remains of the young man WILLIAM COLE, who met his death by being thrown from a horse (the property of P. Yates, Esq.), on Monday last, on the Totnes-road, were conveyed to their final resting place. The 9th Devon Volunteers of which he was a member, attended the funeral, and the officers desired in accordance with the general wishes of the Corps, this respect should be shown. At the Inquest on the body a much to be regretted unpleasantness arose from the fact that a gentleman who took a great interest in the unfortunate accident, desired the medical attendant to call in the assistance of a second professional man, this however was strongly objected to by the Doctor on the simple ground that he refused to meet in consultation his brother professional. The gentleman having stated these facts to the Coroner at the Inquest, severe recriminations were exchanged totally unwarranted, especially at such a time. There is not the least doubt that all the medical skill in the world would have been unavailing, and we should not have given publicity to the above, were it an isolated occurrence with the medical profession, in this neighbourhood to refuse meeting each other.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 August 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest On The Bodies Of Two Artillerymen. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was commenced at the Military Hospital Inn, Lower Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of BENJAMIN LLOYD and JAMES PAUL CHISTLE, who fell overboard on the 6th inst., as they were proceeding in a boat to Cremyll Beach, the boat having come into collision with a barge called the Two Sisters. - Samuel Cotton said, I am mate of H.M. Steam-tug Zephyr. On Saturday afternoon last I was coming down the Hamoaze on board the said steamer, and when abreast of the Bacchus, coal vessel, I saw the body of a man dressed as an artilleryman. I and two others picked up the body and it was taken to North Corner, and subsequently to the Military Hospital. The body appeared to have been in the water for several days, it being much deformed and the face almost entirely gone. I did not observe the clothes torn; the deceased had his boots on. - George Atkins said, I am a private in the Royal Marines, serving on board H.M.S. Impregnable. About half-past five on Sunday morning last I saw the body of a man dressed like an artilleryman floating at the stern of the Impregnable in Hamoaze. The body was made fast to the accommodation ladder. - Wm. Ferris, seaman on board H.M.S. Impregnable, deposed: I took charge of the body in question from the last witness and gave information thereof to the police. - Robert Indar said, I am battery Sergeant Major of the Royal Artillery now stationed at the Plymouth Citadel. I know the bodies in question as being BENJAMIN LLOYD and JAMES PAUL CHISTLE, who were gunners in the Royal Artillery. On the 6th of August inst., about half-past eight in the morning, I started in a boat with the deceased and other artillerymen, amounting to 41, seven of them being the boat's crew. We embarked at the Admirals' Hard, at Stonehouse, in a dockyard boat; we were crossing to go to Cremyll Ferry, and were about half way across the river, when we saw a barge coming down upon us at the rate of 10 or 12 knots an hour, she having a three-quarter wind; she was coming into the harbour. When we first saw the barge she was from 150 to 200 cloth yards from our boat; the wind was blowing strong at the time. When she came within about 50 yards I hailed her, shouting "barge a-hoy, luff." I should think and believe they could hear me. I saw a man at the helm, and another man in the bow. When I shouted they did not alter their course. When the barge arrived within about five yards of our boat, several voices shouted to her and begged the bargemen to "luff". The helm was then put hard to leeward, by which means the barge came into our bows, the shock being so great that the two deceased men were knocked overboard. Bombardier James Campbell also fell overboard, but he was pulled into the boat again. A fourth artilleryman got on board the barge. I saw both of the deceased sink in the water, one of them almost immediately, and the other made some effort to swim, and a boat hook was thrown to him, but he was drowned. The sea was rough at the time. A boat belonging to the barge was cast afloat to endeavour to save the men, but the barge proceeded on her course and never halted at all. We turned our boat and came back again. The boat was about 45 feet long; the same number of men had often gone to Cremyll in the same boat. The target we had with us was taken to pieces, and formed seats lengthways just under the gunwale of our boat; the men were all quiet and steady at the time. The concussion of the boat was so violent that it broke the tiller in two pieces as the coxswain was about to push it from him. The coxswain of our boat did all he could to prevent a collision. - The Coroner observed that the whole point was whether any blame was attached to the bargemen. If they had notice of the danger, and did not use ordinary care and caution, of course they were responsible for the accident; therefore it was necessary to be very particular about the bearing of the boats, the state of the weather, and other circumstances. - A Juryman: did the men in your boat cease to pull when you called out "luff"? I do not know whether the boat slackened her speed or not on first calling out. I believe the men continued to pull, as we thought we should get out of danger before the barge came up to us. - No one belonging to the barge being present, nor the coxswain of the artillery boat, and other important witnesses, the Coroner said it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquiry, and it therefore stood adjourned to Thursday next at one o'clock at the Guildhall, Devonport.

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 August 1860
EXETER - Two Mysterious Cases Of Drowning. - We have to record two cases of drowning in Exeter and which are at present involved in mystery. Yesterday morning (Wednesday) the body of a man was seen floating on the water in the Basin, and assistance having been procured, it was taken out and removed to Scott's Buller's Arms Inn, St. Thomas, where it was afterwards identified as the body of a man named WILLIAM BAILEY, a native of Norfolk, who had been at work as a labourer on the railway. It appears that the unfortunate fellow was last seen at the Double Locks Inn, about a mile from Exeter, on Wednesday, August 15th, where he had been drinking, and that a cap had been picked up some days ago near the Basin, but nothing whatever was said about it until the discovery of the body yesterday morning. An Inquest will be held today (Thursday) at eleven o'clock.

The second cased is that of a private of the 9th Lancers, whose body was picked up in the Exeter Canal on the same morning. From the decomposed state of the body it appears that it must have been in the water some days; and a letter found in the pocket of the deceased which he had received from his mother showed that his name was ROBERT IRONS. Ten shillings and a tobacco box were also found in the deceased's pockets. At an Inquest held before H. W. Hooper, the City Coroner, at the Custom House Inn, at six o'clock last evening, the following facts were sworn to:- The deceased was a fine young man, and was known to be generally steady. There appeared to be a heavy blow over the left eye. - Troop-Sergeant-Major Orson Lyrett, of the 9th Lancers, identified the body, and stated that deceased (ROBT. IRONS) was a private in the 9th Lancers, and was quartered at the Artillery Barracks. The deceased was 29 years of age, and had been in the regiment since September 1858; he enlisted at Maidstone; he had been reported absent from his regiment since the 15th of this month. Deceased was generally of good conduct, and was a well educated man. Deceased was a native of North Shields, and had two leach marks on his chest; he was a chemist and druggist previous to his enlistment. - Henry Williams, a labourer, proved that he first saw the body of the man about ten o'clock. Witness was on the Quay near the water's edge, when he saw the head of a man above the water, and the body was in an upright position. He called a man named Pope to his assistance, when they got into a boat with two other men, and succeeded in pulling the body into the boat; the body was about 12 feet from the bank; when they took it out of the water he (witness) then saw that deceased had on regimentals; he also observed a red mark under his eye. A vessel had left from the spot in the morning, and no doubt the motion of the water, caused by the removal of the vessel, caused the body to rise. - Hannah Smith, aged 16, stated that she was with the deceased on Wednesday, August 15th. That in the evening she went with him to an eating-house in South-street, and had some supper. She had known him three weeks, and last saw him on Wednesday, when she met him on the Topsham-road with a soldier called Boyce. There was another girl named Baker with witness, and when they met the two soldiers they went to the Windmill public-house; where they had a quart of ale. they left there about eight o'clock, and proceeded to Crabtree's eating house, which they left at a quarter past nine o'clock. They had four bottles of ale with their supper. They afterwards returned to the Windmill public-house, where they first had half a pint of rum and shrub, and deceased had something to drink afterwards; he was intoxicated. They then left the Windmill together, and went towards Topsham-road; witness followed them to the deceased with the other soldier (Boyce); went into the Artillery Arms Inn, witness waiting outside with the other girl, and after about ten minutes they came out, and Boyce endeavoured to persuade the deceased to get into a fly to take him to barracks, but deceased refused to get into it, and after endeavouring to persuade him to go home, or to go to a bed into the Windmill Inn, they left him about ten o'clock, and Boyce returned to the barracks. - Mary Jane Baker corroborated the statement of the above witness. - A medical man was sent for, and having examined the body, Dr Perkins, of South-street, stated that he had examined the body, and could not discover any marks of violence. In unfastening the clothes of the deceased, a leathern purse, containing three sovereigns, was found, and a letter from his mother, imploring him "to be steady, and not to be absent from duty without leave." - It was ultimately agreed to adjourn the Inquest until today (Thursday) at eleven o'clock, in order that Boyce, the other soldier, may be had to give evidence on the Inquest and that Dr Perkins might further examine the body.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 August 1860
EXETER - The Two Cases Of Drowning At Exeter. - At the adjourned Inquest on the body of ROBERT IRONS yesterday, George Boys, a private in the 9th Lancers, who was in company with deceased and the two girls, who gave evidence on Wednesday, was examined, and corroborated the statements of the other witnesses. On leaving the Windmill public-house witness hired a fly, and tried to induce deceased to go with him to the barracks, but he refused, and said he would not go, and was irritated. This was the last time witness saw him. It was about eleven o'clock when witness returned to the barracks after leaving the deceased. The deceased, who was generally a steady man, was fond of playing at bagatelle and billiards. - Mr Salter, landlord of the Country House, stated deceased had his letters addressed to his house. He received a letter on the evening of the 14th, with an order for £5 in it. Witness offered him £5 for the order, but he did not take it. - Dr Perkins was again called, and stated that he had the clothes removed from the body of the deceased, and that he had made a further examination, but was still of opinion that there were no marks of violence on the body; there was a blow just over the nose, which appeared to have been given before death, and his face appeared as though he had fallen on some gravel; the body was very much decomposed and he (witness) should think it had been in the water some days. He repeated his evidence with regard to the things found on him last evening; and was of opinion that death was caused by drowning. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Inquest On The Body Of WM. BAILEY. - At an Inquest, held at Scott's Buller Arms Inn, St. Thomas, before the County Coroner, R. R. Crosse, Esq., yesterday (Thursday), on the body of the man named WILLIAM BAILEY, who was taken out of the water on Wednesday morning, from the Basin, it was shown that deceased, who is a native of Norfolk, had been at work on the South Devon Railway, and that on Wednesday, August 15, it being a very wet day, the poor fellow was at the Double Locks Inn drinking; he remained there until dusk, when he left to return to his lodgings at Exeter; he was intoxicated, and had nearly a mile to walk along the banks of the Canal; he was not seen by anyone after leaving the public-house until the body was discovered in the Exeter basin on Wednesday morning last, when it was immediately taken out of the water and removed to Scott's Buller's Arms Inn. The Jury was of opinion that it was not necessary to call medical assistance, as there were no indications of any violence on the body of deceased, and at once returned a verdict of "Found Dead in the waters of the Exeter Basin." It is rather remarkable that both these unfortunate men should have fallen into the water on the same night, and that no inquiries were made respecting either of them; and again that their bodies should be discovered on the same morning within a few hours of each other. This is the fourth case of double-drowning within the last two months. The unfortunate man IRONS was, we understand, respectably connected, and was constantly in receipt of letters with remittances, from his friends, and the letter from his mother imploring him to be steady, was only received by the poor fellow on the evening preceding the night of Wednesday, the 15th. Another letter was received by the landlord of the Country House Inn, and was handed over to Sergeant-Major Lyrett, on Wednesday, the 22nd. The whole of the money, &c., found in the pockets of deceased was also handed to the Sergeant-Major.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Adjourned Inquiry On The Bodies Of Two Artillerymen. - The Inquest commenced on Monday last at the Military Hospital Inn, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the bodies of BENJAMIN LLOYD and JAMES PAUL CLISSOLD, two Artillerymen, who were drowned by collision with a barge, as reported in the Western Morning News of Tuesday, was resumed yesterday afternoon at the Guildhall, Devonport, when the following additional evidence was taken:- J. Beer, Esq., solicitor attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the War Department. - Edward Pool, bombardier R.A., and coxswain of the boat containing the artillerymen, was the first witness examined yesterday, and proceeded to state that the wind at the time of the accident (6th August) was blowing very fresh westerly, and then stated the circumstances of the accident similar to that detailed on Monday evening, viz., that he saw the barge coming in from the Sound in the direction of Mount Wise, and continued: I saw the barge at first about 200 yards from the boat, running on her port beam. When she came within 100 yards, Sergeant-Major Indar shouted out, and when she came within about 20 yards the barge had not altered her course. I shouted out also. I had no way on the boat, not even steerage way. I did not give any directions to alter the course of the boat. The barge kept her course until within about 100 yards from us, and then the barge was "luffed" up to the wind. The barge then struck the boat about four feet from the bow, the consequence was the men was knocked overboard; but one was picked up. I should think the men on board the barge could have heard us call to them, and then by "luffing" or wearing could have cleared us. We had no means of avoiding the collision, but there was plenty of time for the barge to have cleared away from us. - James Campbell, bombardier, R.A., said: I am one of the crew of the regimental boat in question. I was standing in the bow; CLISSOLD was sitting in the bow, on the boat-hook, which lay across the gunwales of the boat; LLOYD was sitting on the gunwale of the boat, and both of them retained their positions until within a moment or two of the collision. When I first noticed the barge she was about 15 yards or 20 yards off from us, coming down rapidly. I think if the men in the boat had backed water immediately I saw the barge 15 or 20 yards distant the boats would have cleared each other. The concussion turned the boat round, but did not stove it in. I think if the men drowned had been sitting down in the proper seats of the boats they would not have fallen overboard; the men sat on the boat-hook because the seats were dirty. CLISSOLD was 20 years of age, and LLOYD 28; the latter cold swim. The boat was making very little way; the tide being against us. - By a Juror: I never knew as many as forty men to go in that boat before. - By the Coroner: There did not appear to be any danger from the number in the boat. - The Coroner said he should wish to have some evidence as to whether the artillery boat was too much crowded for the state of the weather, when Wm. Ferris, coxswain of a jolly boat of H.M. Ship Impregnable, was sworn, who stated that forty men could safely go in a boat of 24 feet long and seven or eight feet wide, if the weather was moderate. - Campbell, examined by Mr Beer, said none of the men had their legs overboard. Another man named Campbell, who was sitting on the gunwale of the boat, was knocked overboard, but I pulled him into the boat again. I jumped out into the water and had hold of CLISSOLD. I held him up as long as I could, but no boat coming to me, and there being such a strong current, I was obliged myself to make for the boat. - The Coroner here remarked that he expressed he was sure the feelings of the Jury and all present, when he spoke in terms of admiration of the good feeling and courage which this witness had displayed in attempting to save the lives of others. He (the Coroner) was the more anxious to take that opportunity of thus expressing his feelings, as he understood it was not the first time that he had endeavoured thus to save life, and in several instances had been most successful in his endeavours, and at the present moment he observed that he (Campbell) wore on his breast a medal from the Emperor of the French, indicative of the courage he had displayed on similar occasions, as well as commemorative of events in which he had been instrumental of saving life under circumstances analogous to those arising out of the present Inquiry. He (the Coroner) was certain that all who were aware of those facts must entertain a high regard and esteem for one who had thus exerted himself; and he hoped he (Campbell) would find lasting satisfaction in his own mind for what he had done. - The Coroner here enquired of Police-constable Davey if he had served summonses on the men in the barge at the time - Thomas Cowl and John Lyon, - as he did not see either of them present. - Davey said he had left the summonses at their residences. - The wife of Lyon here came forward, and said that her husband was at St. Germans, and was expected home in a day or two. The daughter of Cowl said her father and mother were with the barge, taking cargoes to Torquay, Lyme, &c., but were expected home in a few days. - Campbell re-examined by Mr Beer: The length of the boat is about 26 feet. There was not an unusually large number of men in the boat. - John Manning, a gunner, Royal Artillery, said - I am of No. 5 Company, and one of those in the boat at the time in question, and was sitting on the opposite side of the two men drowned; I was sitting with my legs in the boat, and close by LLOYD. I hailed the barge when she was about 20 yards off. About 10 yards from us she altered her course; if she had not done so she would have struck us in the centre. If the barge had altered her course when first I first saw her she might have cleared us. There was a large quantity of straw in the barge, and consequently I do not think the helmsman could see ahead. I jumped on board the barge, when I asked the man at the bow what was the reason he did not try to get out of the way of our boat. He said he could not help it, he thought the boat would have cleared her. The men in the boat left off pulling just before the collision took place; if they had not done so the barge would have struck the boat in the centre. I have been in the habit of crossing the ferry in the boat, and there was nothing unusual in the number of men in the boat, and there was no danger from the weather. - By Mr Beer: When the helmsman got into the small boat, a woman took the tiller [A woman in court here stated that the wife of Cowl sometimes went to sea in the barge with her husband]. - Pool, was recalled, and said he kept his helm down as hard as he could, until the collision occurred, the force of which broke the tiller. The men did not cease pulling until just before the collision, and then the starboard oars bucked. - Ferris was recalled, and said, under the circumstances which had been detailed, he should have thought it the duty of the artillery boat to have got out of the way. In case of a vessel under sail, going nearly before the wind, and a boat pulling in a direction across her bows, it is the duty of the coxswain of the boat to endeavour to avoid the vessel under sail, and the coxswain of the boat is to judge whether he can cross the bows of the vessel under sail, or not; he is the best judge. - By a Juror: Where there are two vessels, one under sail, and the other pulling, it is the duty of the coxswain of the boat to get clear of the one under sail. - By the Coroner: I think that at a distance of eight or ten yards from the boat, the helmsman of the barge by luffing to the wind, might have avoided the collision. - By Mr Beer: In the case of a boat proceeding slowly across the bow of a barge, the helmsman of the barge would be better able to judge of the course he should take if the boat kept on her course. If he had been in the barge and saw he was so near the boat as likely to come into collision, he should have put the helm down hard to have endeavoured to avoid it. If this had been done at fifteen or twenty yards from the boat, he should think the collision might have been avoided. But still he thought it the duty of the boat, in the first instance, when the barge was about fifty or one hundred yards off, to have endeavoured by some means to have kept clear of the barge. - After a few other statements in cross-examination, and by the Jury, the Inquiry was further adjourned to Tuesday next at one o'clock, when it is expected the bargemen might be present.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 August 1860
HARBERTON - The Suicide Of The REV. CHANCELLOR MARTIN. - The usually quiet little village of Harberton was yesterday thrown into a state of considerable excitement and great sorrow in consequence of its having become known that the esteemed vicar of the parish, the REV. GEORGE MARTIN, Chancellor of the Diocese of Exeter, had committed suicide. The Rev. Chancellor preached in the parish church on Sunday morning, and read the prayers at the afternoon service. In the evening he conducted family prayers in his own house, as was his wonted custom, and retired to bed at the usual hour. He is said to have exhibited considerable uneasiness throughout the night, so much so, indeed that MRS MARTIN endeavoured to prevail on him to have medical advice. This he refused; and MRS MARTIN went downstairs yesterday morning, leaving him in the act of dressing. But after some time, finding he did not come down, and that nine o'clock, the time for morning prayer had come, and her husband had not come down, MRS MARTIN went up to see the reason for the unusual delay. On opening the door of his dressing-room, she was horrified to behold him laying on the floor partly dressed, weltering in his blood, and with his throat cut. - Alarm was instantly given, and a messenger despatched to Totnes, a distance of two miles, for medical aid. Mr Owen and Mr Harris, surgeons, of Totnes, were promptly in attendance, but their services were of no avail, as the rev. gentleman lived only about five minutes after their arrival; indeed, they pronounced the case to be hopeless at the first sight. - The cause of this dreadful close of a useful life is unknown, but it is said that his family have on more than one occasion of late observed something unusual and peculiar in his manner. The deceased was a canon residentiary of the Cathedral, and chancellor of the diocese. He was in residence at Exeter five months in the year, and the other part of the year he generally resided in his vicarage at Harberton. He was made canon in 1816 and chancellor in 1820; was married twice, and leaves four grown-up children by the former wife, and four by the present MRS MARTIN, and a large family circle and troops of friends to lament his most untimely and mournful end. In him the poor of Harberton have lost a good and charitable clergyman and the Bishop and clergy of the diocese a wise councillor and a sincere friend. - It is expected that an Inquest as to the cause of death will be holden today.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 August 1860
HARBERTON - Inquest On The Rev. CHANCELLOR MARTIN - The intelligence of the suicide of the Rev. Chancellor MARTIN, had been received everywhere with surprise and sorrow. The sorrow is the most poignant at Harberton, Totnes, and Exeter, where the deceased was best known. The parishioners of Harberton mourn him as a father and a most kind friend. The ecclesiastical knowledge of the deceased was profound, and highly appreciated by Churchmen of all ranks. Out of the many hundreds of cases in which he acted as judge, we believe that there were only two instances in which his decisions were appealed against, and out of these even, only one was reversed. - As we have already stated, the deceased preached on Sunday morning, and it was said by some who were present, that in the course of the impressive address he delivered, it was observable he exhibited a strange nervousness, and worked his hands about in a somewhat remarkable manner, and in the afternoon he baptized an infant. - Soon after the suicide became known, a telegram was dispatched to the eldest son, a barrister, but who at present is engaged in banking at Worcester. At the time of the unhappy affair all the sons were away, and a few months ago one of MR MARTIN'S daughters was married, and left England for India. - At the time of his decease, the unfortunate gentleman was rather more than 69 years of age, having reached that term of life at the beginning of last week. There can be no doubt that the deceased committed the fatal act whilst suffering from a morbid state of excitement brought on by a groundless fear that his affairs were involved, for which we are assured there was not the slightest reason. We believe that Mr Thomas Kellock, the family solicitor, was engaged yesterday morning in arranging the affairs of the deceased. - Mr Cockey, the Coroner for the County, was communicated with on Monday night, and he sent word that he had engagements to attend to at Teignmnouth and another place, but that he would arrive in Harberton as soon as possible. A good deal of doubt existed as to whether or no he would come last night at all, but he arrived by train in the course of the afternoon, and the Inquest was held at the Vicarage House, where the body of the deceased lay. The proceedings did not commence till between seven and eight, and were kept as private as possible, and the following were the Jury:- R. Tucker, E. Tucker, T. R. White, R. Fairweather, W. Soper, R. Collins, W. Worth, J. B. Paige, H. Taylor, H. Bartlett, J. Samble, C. C. Dormer, Foreman. There were also present:- MAJOR MARTIN, brother of the deceased; his two nephews; the REV. R. MARTIN, and MR CHARLES MARTIN; the Rev. Richard Champernowne, Mr T. C. Kellock, and Mr Frederick Kellock, the latter assisted the Coroner in taking the evidence. - The Coroner addressed the Jury, and instructed them their only duty would be to consider whether at the time when the deceased destroyed himself (of which they would not have any doubt when they had heard the evidence), he was in a sound or unsound state of mind. - The first witness called was MRS RENIRA HENRIETTA ALDEBURGH MARTIN, who said the deceased was my husband; lately he has not been so strong, but his general health has not been bad during the last three weeks; he has been very nervous; I remarked it seriously about that time ago; he said he felt himself much overdone by business. He was Rector of this parish, Chancellor of this diocese, Canon of Exeter Cathedral and was much engaged in ecclesiastical duties. On Friday there was a parish meeting, about which he was very much disturbed. Mr Kellock, solicitor, attended that meeting. On Sunday last, deceased preached in the morning, read the prayers in the afternoon, and baptized a child. He came home in the evening, and was very low; he retired to rest about half-past ten; he did not disturb me during the night; he had not slept well for many nights, nor did he do so on Sunday night. On Monday morning he got up about eight o'clock. When he awoke, he said he had a spasm through his heart; he partially dressed himself, and then shaved and put on his boots. I was in and out of his dressing-room every minute, and was very much frightened because he seemed so much unlike himself. I was in the same room with him, but separated from him by a partition, and I got close to the doorway; I heard a noise, and was satisfied he was dressing; but suddenly he stopped, and I heard a violent pouring of something gurgling; I ran into the room, and found him kneeling with his arms over the foot pan, and I saw he had cut his throat on both sides; he was not quite dead; I poured brandy down his throat, and sent for Mr Owen, who arrived from Totnes in about forty minutes; he came while MR MARTIN was still living, but gave no hopes of his recovery; I should think he lived about twenty minutes after Mr Owen came; that was about an hour after he cut his throat, but I cannot say exactly. - Samuel Varder, the butler, deposed finding the deceased in the position described by MRS MARTIN. When that lady gave the alarm, he adopted prompt measures for stopping the blood, previous to the arrival of the doctor. In answer to Mr Paige, a Juryman, the witness said he had heard the deceased was distressed about his circumstances. - Grace Ellis said:- I am housemaid in this establishment. On Monday morning last, I went into my master's dressing room, and found he had cut his throat, and afterwards on emptying the foot-pan. I found the razor. I believe that was the instrument with which he cut his throat. - T. C. Kellock, Esq.: I am a solicitor in Totnes: I knew the deceased intimately, and for some time resided in his parish. I have been in the habit of seeing the deceased very frequently, and he has been in the habit of speaking to me about parochial matters connected with the church of the parish. I had something to do with the charities for some time - in the first place as a parishioner, and afterwards as solicitor, and what I undertook to do was directed by an order of the Court of Chancery, which I received from my London agent last Friday morning. The matter which so disturbed the deceased was that, a special return of the charities having been asked for by the Charity Commissioners, a mistake occurred in the account sent up, the sum of 3s. 2 ½d. being stated as expended, instead of carried forward. He showed me a long letter which he purposed sending to the Charity Commissioners to explain to them that he had no motive in signing the document in which the mistake occurred. He was so miserable about it that I was satisfied he did not exhibit his usual strength of mind that I had previous known him to do. At my earnest solicitation, and that of MRS MARTIN'S, he left out those sentences which related to his motives. I said to him "Do, Sir, dispel every idea of this kind from your mind," and he said, "Oh, Sir, I have signed the document, I should have been more careful, as now I shall be disgraced." About the same time he came to me respecting another matter. There had been a certain division in the parish; the parish church having been built in Harbertonford, and he had conveyed the incumbency to Rockford, as the site of the new incumbent, Mr Luscombe. Since then he said to me that he did not think it was right to convey an old house to the incumbent, and he would therefore convey it free from dilapidation and give £200 for the purpose. But it was considered by the surveyor who was called in, that a much larger sum should be laid out. It was necessary to obtain the sum of money on mortgage, and the papers for it were drawn up and I went with deceased to Exeter, when the Dean and Chapter approved of the documents, and I was appointed the nominee to receive the money by the Bishop, the Dean and Chapter, the deceased, and the incumbent. At every interview since that time the deceased pressed me to take the £200 that he was going to give in addition to the £300. He said he wished to get it out of hand. Last week he rushed into my office in a very excited manner, and not at all like himself, and wished me to take a cheque for the money. The alteration in him, in matters of business, was very striking, and at last he rushed away from me, saying he should be too late for the train, and then hurried off. Last Wednesday I again called, and had a long conversation with him about the 3s. 2 ½d. and the charities. He again said he should be disgraced, and that he had received no answer to the letter which he had sent to the Charity Commissioners. He then went on to speak about the contract for Rockford, and said he did not like the way in which it was being carried on for he should be drawn into great expenses. He then spoke of the parish meeting respecting the re-seating of the church, and a large seat for the parishioners. I left him promising to see him again; I did not see him Thursday, but on Friday I came here and brought the Order of Chancery with me, thinking it would be a solace for him to know that all we had been trying to do had been approved of by the Court of Chancery, but, to my surprise, he did not ask to look at it. MRS MARTIN was with him, and his mind was so absent that all who were present on the occasion, asked him to give up the idea of visiting the church, and I asked him not to go to the meeting, and nothing was done at it, because only the two churchwardens attended, and I returned and remained with him in his room until about ten o'clock in the evening. He kept returning to the same question, and was very uneasy in his mind. I saw him next on Sunday afternoon when I rode over to Harberton Church; I saw him for a minute just before the commencement of the service, and he shook hands with me, and said in an anxious manner, I shall see you after the sermon. When he came back, MRS MARTIN and myself asked him if he would go for a walk, when he said with an air of indifference, "Just as Mr Kellock likes." He kept his hand on his shoulder and then took off his gown, which he threw into a chair. I saw there was a great alteration in him. I went into his study, and as soon as I got there he began to talk about money matters. He said he was not satisfied about the £200, and asked if a cheque drawn on Sunday would be good? I said that if it would be any comfort to him I would take the money, and then had it. He asked for it back again, and I understood him to say he would call on me and bring it. He then began to discuss money matters generally, and he did so in a very incoherent manner, and said you know that a man with my establishment could not have a large balance at his bankers to put his hands on. I said he would not want it, and that the £400 raised on mortgage and the £200 he was to give, would be more than ample for the required outlay, and would leave a balance to hand over to Mr Luscombe. He said he would give up the living, and go away into some place where he would not be known, and then went back to the subject of 3s. 2 ½d. He was so excited that I left him, but after a few minutes I saw him through a window, with his brow knitted, and his hands clenched, and he looked so wretched and uncomfortable, that I went in and asked him to go for a walk or come into the garden, and I said what a blessing it would e if the weather would hold up and we had a fine harvest, but I got no answer. He went into the garden and paced up and down, and began to tell me that his expenses were too much, and they must be reduced - the carriages put down, and the horses sold, and so on - and I then tried to divert his mind. He said he had been elected president of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and ought to be in Exeter on Tuesday (yesterday) at the anniversary sermon, and he thought he would write a note and put it off, but he allowed the post time to go by. He told me of many other engagements, and said figures worried him, and he would give up the agency of the Savings' Bank, and would not go to Convocation; and immediately afterwards added, that he would give up the living, the canonry, and the Chancellorship. He was very much excited, and had been in a low, dejected, and desponding way. I met Mr Owen, the medical attendant of the family on Thursday, and hinted my suspicions as to the condition of the deceased's mind. - Thomas Edward Owen, surgeon of Totnes, the last witness called, said that he was sent for to attend the deceased on Monday morning, and on arriving found that his throat was cut. He was then breathing, but pulseless. Witness applied lint to the wound, but deceased died about twenty minutes afterwards. The cause of death was haemorrhage from the bleeding of the wound. - Here the Coroner was interrupted by the Jury, who said they did not require any more evidence. - The Coroner addressed the Jury, and after a short consultation, they found that the "Deceased Destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At The Breakwater. - We yesterday stated that on Sunday afternoon a number of boys belonging to H.M.S. Impregnable, were taken in charge of a petty officer for the purpose of taking recreation on the Breakwater. some of them ascended to the cage, and as one, named JOSEPH HENRY DAVIS, was coming down, he happened to place his foot on one of the steps which had been slightly broken away, and missed his footing, whereby he fell to the Breakwater, pitching on his head. His companions ran to his assistance, but the blood was flowing from his mouth, nose and ears, and life was extinct. An Inquest on the body was held at five o'clock last evening, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was an orphan, between fifteen and sixteen years of age, and together with another young brother and sister had been taken from the workhouse by a benevolent gentleman, whose name did not transpire.

Western Morning News, Friday 31 August 1860
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - The Accident On The South Devon Railway. - At an Inquest held at Briton's King's Arms Inn, St. Thomas, before R.R. Crosse, Esq., the County Coroner, on the body of the poor man named JAMES DIGGINS, who was killed by the express train on the South Devon line, near St. Thomas station, on Wednesday, Mr Carpenter, the contractor for doubling the line between Exeter and Exminster, said that deceased was in his employ; that he spoke to him ten minutes before the train came up; he then went to his dinner. From inquiries made, it appeared that deceased was in the habit of falling asleep after his dinner, and that he had partially smoked a pipe of tobacco, when the train came up, and he was drawn under the carriages and fearfully mutilated. He was not quite dead when taken up, but expired before he was taken into the King's Arms Inn. The engine driver (Tunstall) did not know of the accident until after he had reached the St. David's station, when a telegraphic message was received at Exeter, to the effect that a poor man had been killed by the express up-train. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed by a Locomotive Engine."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 September 1860
PETER TAVY - The Fatal Drowning Case. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at Gadsworthy Farm, Petertavy, on the body of the man SMALE, the circumstances of whose death have already been recorded in the Western Morning News. There being no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water, no person being present at the time, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

DAWLISH - Suspected Violent Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the London Inn, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a male child of about eight days old, which died at Dawlish Water, about a mile and half from the town of Dawlish. The mother of the child, FANNY WESTLAKE, is the daughter of a labourer, of about 19 years of age who had been living out in service, and was not married. The young woman was suspected by her master and mistress of being pregnant, and was sent home to her parents. She was confined, and about eight days afterwards, on the mother's return after a temporary absence, the child was dead. A post mortem examination of the child was ordered to be made by Mr Cann, surgeon, and the Inquest was adjourned to Tuesday next.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 September 1860
PLYMSTOCK - Determined Suicide At Oreston. - Last evening this quiet retreat was thrown into a state of considerable excitement by the intelligence that a young woman had deliberately committed suicide. her name was MARY ANN PYLE, aged 16, and she resided with her aunt, at the King's Arms Inn. Yesterday afternoon she was visited by her elder sister, and asked her aunt to be allowed to go to walk with her for an hour or two. The application was refused, whereupon the girl retired to her room. About five o'clock her sister carried to her a cup of tea, but, on opening the door of the apartment, she was horrified to behold the unfortunate girl lying on the floor with her throat cut in a dreadful manner. An alarm was raised, and a surgeon sent for, who, on his arrival, pronounced the case a desperate one, and dressed the wound; but the unhappy girl survived the consequences of her rash act but a short time, and expired in the course of the evening. The Coroner's Inquest will probably be holden this day.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 September 1860
PLYMOUTH - The Suicide In St. Andrew-Street. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., touching the death of GEORGE WILLIAM WESTCOTT. The following were sworn to the Jury:- John Rogers, Foreman; Messrs, Wm. Chapman, Geo. Hemmings, Henry Togood, Thos. Madge, T. T. Redding, Daniel Brown, S. Pardew, Robt. Hael, C. Rose, Richard Pearse, Emanuel Fishleigh Cole, John Redding, N. Heeson, J. Damerill, T. Ellis, W. Couch, and James Fell. - The Jury having viewed the body, the first witness called was William Mumford, a mason employed on the Breakwater, and who lives at 30 St. Andrew-street. He said the deceased lodged in the same house, and was a journeyman tailor, working for Mr Feather. He lodged in the house for about eighteen months, and at the time of his death was 70. Between five and six on Sunday afternoon the landlady of the house, Mrs Sutton, came into witness's room in an excited manner, and said she was afraid that there was something the matter with the deceased, for his door was bolted inside, and she could not hear him. Witness went up with her, and after some time broke open the deceased's door, and went into the room. They found the deceased lying in bed, with his clothes off, his head hanging over the bed, and nearly resting on the chamber utensil underneath, which was nearly full of blood and a razor was lying by on a chair. Witness lifted up his head, and placed it on the pillow, and told the people in the house to send for a doctor, and let the police know what had occurred. Mr Stevens, the surgeon, came, but deceased was quite dead. Witness believed deceased was a widower. Could not say what his habits were, but he thought he had been drinking hard lately. - Richard Sutton said he was a drayman, and was the landlord of the house, No. 30 St Andrew-street. Deceased had not worked for the last fortnight, and had been drinking in and out during that time. He had always behaved himself well and attended church. Last week he told witness he was going to get work on Monday (yesterday). He was over-excited during the week and appeared nervous. When witness went away on Saturday at three o'clock, he was perfectly sensible, and did not seem the worse for drink. A short time ago Mr Feather's men had their feast, and went, he believed, to Cothele. Deceased did not go with them, but he met one of them afterwards, and got intoxicated, and continued in that condition for several days. - Mumford said he had known the unfortunate deceased begin drinking at five in the morning, and keep it on till the evening, and he had often come into his (Mumford's) room early in the morning, in his night-dress, to ask one of the children to get him some drink. - Sutton re-examined: Had heard that deceased attempted to commit suicide once before. Did not think he was a confirmed drunkard. - P.C. Manning deposed to being called to see the deceased on Saturday afternoon, and to taking possession of the razor and one and sixpence that was found in the room. - Mumford said that on Saturday morning he saw the deceased in the street, who appeared to be weak in his mind, and undecided as to which way he should go. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict, that the Deceased destroyed himself during a fit of Temporary Insanity

PLYMSTOCK - The Late Suicide At Oreston. - At four o'clock yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the King's Arms Inn, Oreston, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a Jury of 23 persons to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANN PILE, recorded in our paper yesterday. - Mrs Elizabeth Pill, on being sworn, said: I am a widow, and keep the King's Arms, deceased was my niece, and was about 14 years and 1 months old. On Sunday, her little sister HARRIET, who lives in service at Plymouth, and is about 13 years of age, came to visit us. She had dinner with us, when deceased was in good health and spirits. After dinner, the two sisters were alone in the kitchen, and I came up to mine and the deceased's bedroom, as we slept together. On the dressing table I found a pocket handkerchief, with 3s. wrapped in the corner. The discovery surprised me, for I was afraid the youngest of the sisters had taken it from her mistress. I saw her coming upstairs, and beckoned her to come to me. She did so, and I asked her if the handkerchief belonged to her. She said it did, and holding up the coin, I said "Is this your money?" She at first hesitated and said no, I said, "Very well, that will do for the time." Soon after, I went down to the kitchen, and said to deceased and to her sister, "I must know where this money came from." To the younger one I said, "I am afraid you have taken it from your master and mistress." She denied it, and soon after admitted having received it from her sister. I said to deceased, "Oh fie! MARY ANN, how could you be so naughty? You are trying to make your sister as bad as yourself." She made no reply, and I left, taking the younger sister away with me. About ten minutes after, I again entered the kitchen, where the deceased was crying. I told her to go upstairs, saying she should not come down again for the evening, for I knew she could not have obtained the money honestly. At first she refused to go, but on my insisting on her going, she went. About half-an-hour afterwards, I sent her sister to her with some tea and bread and butter. She had not been absent more than a minute when she alarmed me by her cries, and I went up. On entering the room I found her on her hands and knees, and blood flowing from a large wound in the throat. She exclaimed, "Aunt! Aunt!" I said, "MARY ANN, what have you done?" She said, "O Lord! have mercy on me; aunt! aunt!" My eldest son went for the doctor, who arrived in about 20 minutes. The deceased was very lively, with rather a quick temper. My son's razor was lying on the floor, and the deceased must have gone through the rooms to get at it. - HARRIET PILE, the sister, deposed to the deceased having given her 3s. telling her not to show it to her aunt, as she had taken it from the drawers. Witness tied it up in her handkerchief, and left it on the table. Deceased at first threatened to throw herself into the kitchen tank. - My Mould, surgeon, of Plymstock, said the wound in the neck was between three and four inches in length, and on the floor was a large quantity of extravasated blood. He sewed up the wound. She was apparently dying when the wound was being sewn up, but witness gave her a little brandy, and she was placed in bed. She lay quietly for some time ,and appeared to be improving. I was about to leave, when I heard a peculiar gurgling noise in the throat. She died in about ten minutes, from suffocation, from the blood getting into the wind-pipe. - JOHN PILE, having identified the razor produced by the policeman, WILLIAM PILE was examined, but no new facts were adduced. - The Coroner having briefly reviewed the evidence, the Jury, after a short consultation, decided, by a majority of 13 to 10 that the deceased destroyed herself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - On Saturday evening last a little boy, aged about six years, named JAMES MAGOR, son of MRS MAGOR, of the Commercial Hotel, Newton Abbot, was accidentally killed in Bridge-street, opposite the shop of Mr Lamacraft, bookseller, by a horse and cart belonging to Mr Richard Thorn, of Ingsdon Mills, Ilsington, passing over his head. It appears that on crossing the road the poor little fellow became entangled with the horse, which knocked him down, and that the wheel of the cart, which was heavily laden at the time, passed over him and smashed his head almost to atoms. The screeches of the bystanders were most alarming on witnessing what had occurred. The cart was driven by a man in Mr Thorn's employ, named Thomas Powsland, who was riding in front at the time the fatal occurrence took place, but had reins. The body of the poor little fellow was immediately taken up and conveyed to Mr William Laver's, tailor, Bridge-street. On examination of the body life was found to be quite extinct, as the head was smashed almost to atoms. Hundreds of persons visited the pot during the night and on Sunday where the fatal occurrence took place. The body after being rested a short time at Mr Lavers's was removed in a fly to MRS MAGOR'S, the bereaved parent. - The Inquest. - An Inquest on the deceased, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., County Coroner, was held yesterday, at MAGOR'S Commercial Hotel. The following comprised the Jury:- Frederick Godfrey, chemist, Foreman; George Stockman, miller; Frederick Crossman, watchmaker; Herbert Coplestone, miller; Samuel Wotton, cooper; John Williams, coachbuilder; Thomas Jacobs, horse dealer; Nicholas Wakeham, jun., butcher; James Steer, ironmonger; J. F. Cross, tailor; Josiah Jenkins, shoemaker; and George Saunders, corn dealer. - The Jury having been sworn proceeded to a room in the house where the body lay, forewarned by the Coroner that they need not lengthen their inspection, as the body presented such a sad spectacle. On their return the following evidence was adduced:- William Lamacraft deposed, on Saturday evening about seven o'clock, I was standing in my shop, and was attracted by the cries of a boy, and the movement of the people in the street; and, on looking, I saw a boy fall under the wheel of the cart, which was loaded with corn; he was knocked down by the horse, and the near wheel of the cart passed over his head. I immediately ran to his assistance and took him up, his skull was crushed and the brains were falling about the road. I held him in my arms a certain time, and then handed him over to a person named Stitson. He was quite dead. Stitson took the body into Mr Lavers's house, thinking at first it was his son. The boy seemed to be running backwards, and the by-standers saw the danger, but the poor boy did not. The horse was not going fast, and the driver had the reins in his hand. I should think there was no blame attached to the driver. - P.C. 195 was called by the Coroner, and he corroborated the evidence given by Mr William Lamacraft. - Thomas Powsland, the driver of the cart, said on Saturday he came through Newton on his way to Coombinteignhead with a load of flour, on his way back he was loaded with wheat, and when near the Tower a child was killed by the wheel of his cart. He did not know how it happened, because it was done instantaneously. - The Coroner remarked after the evidence that had been adduced he thought the driver should be exonerated from all blame, and that the verdict must be that of "Accidentally Killed" - This the Jury unanimously agreed to. The Inquiry lasted about 40 minutes.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 September 1860
DAWLISH - The adjourned Inquest on the infant child of FANNY WESTCOTT, of Dawlish Water, was resumed before Mr Cockey, the Coroner, yesterday, at the London Inn. Mr Cann, surgeon, deposed that some person had called at his house requesting him to attend the mother of the child for the accouchement, but he was not at home at the time and when he subsequently called at the house the child was born. It was a fine male child, and apparently quite healthy. he did not see the child again until called upon by the Coroner to make a post mortem examination. He found the stomach empty, and in his opinion the child had died for the want of food. It had no food whatever in the body. He was of opinion that if a child were kept without food six hours, that it would be so weak as to make its taking food very difficult. FANNY WESTCOTT said she had had to be absent some time, and on her return she could not get the child to take food, although she used every inducement. She had it named the following day. Several other witnesses were examined, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, and in their opinion the mother and her family deserved censure for having caused the death of the child through neglect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 September 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board H.M.S. Boscawen. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Royal Naval Inn, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the County, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN ABRAMS, a seaman of the Boscawen, who fell from the foretop of that ship on Tuesday morning. - The first witness called was Thomas Gray, captain of the foretop of the Boscawen. He said the deceased was able seaman on board the same ship. On Tuesday morning, between the hours of eight and nine, he was engaged in the foretop with the rigging. He was standing on the chock (a piece of wood fastened to the mast for the purpose of bearing the strength of the chain that hangs the foreyard). His right foot was on the starboard chock, and his left on the after chock. Witness was standing a little below, lifting up the rigging to him, to haul over the masthead. All at once, witness saw his right foot slip off the chock, and his left hand, which was holding the bell-rope, let go, and deceased immediately fell down on to the sleeper of the top (a stout piece of wood placed for the support of the top.) He fell on his shoulder and the side of his head. He lay where he fell without moving. When attended to he was breathing and tears were flowing from his eyes, and blood from his mouth, but he did not speak. He was carefully lowered down to the deck from the top on a grating, but he was dead. Witness could not give any reason for his missing his footing, but was assured that he fell accidentally. - James Hill, leading seaman on board H.M.S. Boscawen gave corroborative evidence. - William Hogarth Adam, assistant-surgeon of the Boscawen, deposed that he was summoned from his cabin on Tuesday morning to the quarter-deck to attend the deceased, who was being lowered. Dr Duirs and witness saw him and found him quite pulseless. The heart had ceased to act, his pupil was much dilated and he was dead. There was a wound on the temple, such as would have been produced by the fall. The height of the fall (about 13 feet) was quite enough to cause death. - The father of deceased was examined, and said his son was 21 years of age last June. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 September 1860
PLYMOUTH - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held by John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, at the King's Arms Inn, Briton Side, touching the death of RICHARD TUCKER, a child of two years of age, who died on Thursday last under the following circumstances:- It appeared that the deceased was the illegitimate son of a married woman of middle age, and that during the absence of her husband in a man-of-war, on board which he was a blacksmith, his wife carried on a disgraceful intimacy, which resulted in the birth of the deceased, who completed the second year of his age this month. The husband came home last November, when the mother sent the deceased out to nurse, at 2s. 6d. a week, to a woman named Elizabeth Drew, of 24 Lower Street. The child was a healthy one till within five weeks ago, when he was taken to the doctor, who said his lungs were affected, and ordered cod liver oil, which it had. He seemed to improve a little in health, but on Thursday last was taken ill at four o'clock in the afternoon, after having previously made, at one o'clock, a hearty dinner of hake. He was going to be taken out for a run when he fell back heavily on his head in a state of insensibility. He was placed in a warm bath, and had some brandy given to him, but died about five o'clock. Evidence of the foregoing facts having been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 September 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident Near Devil's Point. - On Saturday afternoon last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES RICHARDS POLYBLANK WEBB, who came by his death from drowning, under the following circumstances:- It appeared that on Thursday afternoon last, about half-past one o'clock, the deceased, who was sixteen years of age last April, and who was an apprentice to Mr Bankes, shipbuilder, Plymouth, went, in company with four of his fellow-apprentices and another lad, to borrow a four-oared gig of a person named Dewer, of Stonehouse, with the view of rowing at the Sutton Harbour regatta. Accordingly, the following six lads left Stonehouse in the boat, and proceeded towards Plymouth, viz. Charles Head, James Bonney, William Marsh, Benny, Pillar and the deceased. They were got as far as the Victualling Yard and were rounding the Point, when the boat shipped a heavy sea, half filling the boat. Before they had time to put back or consider what else to do, a heavy sea again washed over the boat, quickly followed by another, and the lads felt the boat rapidly sinking beneath them. The deceased had been pulling the second oar from the stern. The boat shortly afterwards came up bottom upwards, and the deceased being seen struggling in the water, he was conducted by Pillar towards the boat, and was afterwards seen on the boat. The deceased had before this caught hold of Pillar by the neck; subsequently two others got on the boat, and on a similar attempt being made by some of the other lads in the water, the boat was again turned up, but speedily filled and sunk, leaving the deceased and the other lads again to struggle in the water. Pillar then threw two paddles to the deceased, one of which he layed hold of; the former lad then swam ashore, and on looking back saw the deceased sinking. The boat having again ascended to the surface of the water, two of the lads again got upon it, and were subsequently taken off by a bargeman passing at the time in his boat. The others swam ashore. The boat was 30 feet long and about 3 feet wide. - Mr Marks, on the of Jurors, stated that he had been informed that another gig tried to round the Point a short time previous to that of the gig in question, but the rowers thought it dangerous to proceed, and they returned to Stonehouse and had the gig conveyed to Plymouth in a larger boat. - The Coroner thought the parties acted very wisely in so doing. The learned gentleman then summed up the evidence, remarking that though it appeared a rash act for the lads to proceed to Plymouth in this boat amidst such boisterous weather, yet they appeared to have done all they could under the circumstances, and to have properly conducted themselves. The Jury ultimately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased resided at No. 24 Clowance-street, Devonport. The body was picked up the following (Friday) morning.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 September 1860
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Child In Plymouth Gaol. - An Inquest was held, before Mr J. Edmonds, at the Borough Prison, Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of ELLEN POWELL, alias ELLEN DONOVAN, aged 15 weeks, daughter of CHRISTOPHER DONOVAN, a cabinetmaker, late a prisoner in the said Borough Prison. The deceased was found dead by her mother's side yesterday morning, in bed, in a cell of the said prison, where the mother is also confined as a prisoner. The deceased was born there on the 3rd of June last, and had been weakly from her birth. There were no marks of violence on the body; and after a long investigation, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the Visitation of God, and was found dead by her said mother's side.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 September 1860
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - A poor man named HOOKWAY fell off a ladder on Wednesday, and was at once taken to the hospital, where he shortly after expired. An Inquest was held before the Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., the same evening, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Death. - Yesterday morning, shortly after seven o'clock, as the workmen in the quarry at Morice Town, belonging to Mr Knowling, brewer, Devonport, were pursuing their labour, having been at work for about an hour, digging stone, they noticed a seaman lying on his back in the quarry quite dead. There was a quantity of garden stuff inside his shirt, and two cabbages lying by his side, and from the fact of there being a garden just above the quarry, it was supposed that the deceased had been committing garden depredations, and had accidentally fallen over; but this is not probable, as he left the beer-shop of Mr Spriddle, Cannon-street, Devonport, the previous night at eleven o'clock, far advanced in intoxication, and it is presumed he missed his road, got into the garden, and began plucking the cabbages in a mere freak. The poor fellow was named JOHN HAWKEN, second class seaman gunner on board H.M.S. Donegal. The height he fell was 49 feet 6 inches. The Inquest will be held this afternoon.

PLYMOUTH- Fatal Accident In Keyham Yard. - At six o'clock last evening an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, to Inquire into the cause of death of JOHN CALLAWAY, late a fitter in Keyham Steam-yard. - Mr Charles Massey said he resided in Morice Town, and was acting foreman to Messrs. Maudsley, contractors for supplying engines in Keyham Yard. Deceased was a fitter, and was employed on board H.M.S. Gibraltar, now lying in the docks at Keyham. About five o'clock on Wednesday afternoon witness told him to assist in putting a piece of machinery below from one of the decks. This was to be effected by means of a rope, which broke, and the deceased was thereby injured. The witness produced a piece of the rope which broken, and said he could not account for the fracture. Deceased fell a height of 22 or 233 feet into the stoke hole. He was soon after taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth. He was about 33 years of age. The weight lowered was two tons and a half; the rope used was good government rope, of two-and-a-half inches in circumference. - Mr W. Scoble said he was leading man of shipwrights in Keyham Yard. He was inspecting his workmen on the ship. Deceased was in the act of fastening a tackle to the casting, when one rope broke, and the other caught him round the leg and precipitated him into the stoke hole. - Richard Myers, porter to the hospital, stated that the deceased died within a quarter of an hour after admission. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Distressing Occurrence In Plymouth. - About eight o'clock on Wednesday evening a man named SAMUEL SIMPSON, about 50 years of age, rambled into the house of an old man named Henry Maddick, the occupier of a table-beer establishment in Lower Batter-street. He was intoxicated, and requested to be furnished with a penny-worth of table beer. This was supplied, and he sat down with the company, but never tasted the beer. Soon after he was heard snoring, and Mr Maddick aroused him and wished him to go home. He refused to do so, thundered forth some abuse, and went to sleep again. By nine o'clock the snoring had subsided, and Mr Maddick and another man attempted to rouse him, but he fell from the chair, and they discovered that he was dead. He was a coal porter on the Quay, and has left four children. An Inquest on the body was held at half-past seven o'clock last evening, before John Edmonds, Esq., at the Guildhall, when the above facts having been deposed to, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 September 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - We yesterday gave particulars of a melancholy accident at Morice Town, in which a seaman named JOHN HAWKEN, gunner on board H.M.S. Donegal, lost his life, by falling over a precipice into a quarry below. Yesterday an Inquest was held, at the Crystal Palace Inn, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner and after a lengthened examination, the Inquiry was further adjourned, for the purpose of procuring an additional witness.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 September 1860
TOTNES - Fatal Accident. - At six o'clock on Sunday evening an Inquest was held at the Steam Packet Inn, St. Peter's Quay, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CAPTAIN SPRAGUE, of the vessel Terra Nova, of Dartmouth, who came to his death on Saturday evening about seven o'clock under the following circumstances:- It appeared the unfortunate deceased had arrived at Totnes with a cargo of culm, and had finished discharging about midday on Saturday, and about an hour previous to the accident was in company at the above inn with the merchant to whom the culm was consigned, and from whom he had received his freight. The poor fellow and his wife left the inn together about seven o'clock to return to the vessel to tea, and to get on board had to cross a narrow plank from the wharf to the vessel. The wife crossed first, and cautioned deceased to be careful, and just at the moment she gave utterance to these words he tripped in the end of the plank resting on the wharf and fell into the water. The wife immediately made an alarm and assistance was on the spot as soon as possible, but all to no avail, as the unfortunate man had sunk to rise no more alive. A diligent search was made for about an hour and a half when the body was recovered. Witnesses having deposed to these facts the Jury after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The deceased, who was perfectly sober when the accident occurred, leaves a widow and five children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 September 1860
PLYMPTON - The Late Fatal Accident At Plympton. - Yesterday morning at half-past eight o'clock, an Inquest was held before Allan Belfield Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at the Guildhall, Plympton, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN HURRELL, announced in the Western Morning News of Monday. - Mr Robert Hooper said he was a carrier, residing in Ridgeway. On Saturday evening he came to Plympton by the 7.10 train. On arriving at the station, he saw the deceased looking in at one of the carriage windows, and heard him say, "You might have known my hat by the piece of crepe around it." The train was in motion, and deceased was walking briskly to keep pace with the train. Witness pulled him by the coat and said to him "Stand back, old man, or you will be knocked over." Immediately afterwards he came in contact with a post to which a wicket gate was attached, and he then fell between the moving carriages and the platform. A dozen voices instantly cried "There is a man down; stop the train." The train was stopped in a moment, the whole of the carriages not having cleared the platform. The deceased was then taken up and a surgeon sent for. The station master and guard were at their duties, and everything was conducted in the usual quiet and orderly manner. Deceased held an umbrella in his left hand, and under his left arm were two parcels; in his right hand he held his hat before alluded to. - Mr Roger Jarvis got out at Plympton station by the 7.10 train on Saturday evening. I heard the guard call forward to the station-master to know if all was right in front. The answer was "Yes," whereupon the guard blew his whistle, and the train started. Immediately afterwards he heard that a man was under the train. He went to see who it was, and exclaimed "Good God! is it HURRELL?" Deceased said "Yes, both my arms are cut off." He saw him afterwards removed to the hotel near the station. - Mr T. Kettlewell, station master, said the train arrived at 7.24 on Saturday evening. The guard, on the passengers getting out, asked him if it was all right. He answered, "All right; go ahead!" He then proceeded to the higher part of the platform to put on the signal, and in doing so passed between the deceased and the train. Deceased was standing still. He put on the signal, and the train started. Immediately afterwards, on hearing a cry of alarm, he called on the engine driver to stop the train, which was done. The deceased was then lying underneath the carriage steps. Deceased was perfectly sensible when taken up. - Mr Richard Stone, Inspector of the South Devon Railway, said the post referred to was one, one foot five inches from the edge of the platform. The wicket gate was placed there to prevent passengers from crossing the line from the arrival to the departure platforms, as there is a bridge for them to do so. The post is three feet six inches from the line of railway. Between the post and the edge of the platform, there is room for a man to pass. - The Coroner: But if the gate is placed there to prevent passengers from crossing the line, why is there space allowed barely sufficient for a man to pass. Seventeen inches is scarcely enough to pass. - Mr Cockshott said it was a regulation of the Board of Trade. - A Juror said he travelled frequently by train, and always crossed the line between the platforms as it was quite a labour to get over the bridge, altogether having to mount and descend some 70 or 80 steps. Either the bridge or the wicket gate should be removed. - Mr Cockshott said the bridge was placed there for the protection of passengers, as there had been many narrow escapes at Plympton, in consequence of persons crossing the line. It cost the company nearly £100. - The Coroner said it appeared to him that the service of the wicket gate was very questionable. It did not accomplish the purpose intended, for passengers would cross the line whether the wicket gate was open or not. - Mr Cockshott said he should see the Government Inspector on Saturday, and convey to him the Coroner's suggestion. If the Inspector decided that it should be removed, it should be cut down immediately. - The Coroner reviewed the evidence, and said it appeared to him that not the slightest blame could be attached to any of the company's servants. - The Jury unanimously echoed the Coroner's conviction, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 September 1860
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held yesterday before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of CHARLES DOIDGE, whose death by drowning we have already noticed. A man named Jasper Westcott deposed that he saw the deceased in his usual place in the canal boat on Tuesday morning, and in about a quarter of an hour afterwards he was missing. Knowing him to be subject to fits, he, in company with another man, searched and discovered him in the water. Every means were adopted to restore animation, but without avail, and the body was removed home. A woman gave evidence to the effect that the deceased was liable to fits, which had been known to continue fifteen minutes. As it was impossible for the Jury to say whether DOIDGE died in a fit or by drowning, the verdict "Found Dead in the Water" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 October 1860
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth Yesterday. - Yesterday evening an Inquest was held at 13 Princess-square, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of EMMA EDWARDS, who came by her death under the following circumstances:- The deceased was the widow of a seaman, formerly serving on board H.M. brig Nautilus, and had for some time been living as cook, in the service of Mrs Young, of 13 Princes-square. For many years past she had suffered from a painful internal disease, and this, added to family cares, had had a great effect on her mind, which had evidently become unsettled, and she had declared on one or two occasions, that "Everybody was against her," although there was not the least ground for such an idea and she had a very comfortable situation. On Monday evening she was poorly and fainted, and yesterday morning got up at the usual time, lighted the fire, and prepared the breakfast for the family. When she took breakfast with her fellow servant, Elizabeth Roberts, the housemaid, there was nothing remarkable in her manner, but all she partook of was a little tea. She helped the housemaid to make the beds, and then appeared rather sullen and depressed in spirits - that was about half-past nine, and they went downstairs again, but the former shortly afterwards returned to the bedroom by herself, and probably whilst there took the poison. A little while after this, she was missed by Roberts, who, on sending for her, found her in the closet, vomiting and suffering great pain, but she would not allow Dr Roe, or any other medical man to be sent for, nor would she go into the house for a long time, when she was persuaded to do so by a servant of Dr Roe who came in. Word being sent to Dr Roe of what had occurred, he arrived in about ten minutes, and applied every means for her recovery, without effect. The following is the medical testimony:- Dr Edward Thomas Roe examined: I am a doctor of medicine, residing at 12 Princes-square, and about a quarter-past twelve today, was called to No. 13 Princes-square, to see the deceased, whom I found sitting on a chair, in the back kitchen, foaming at the mouth and striving as though in a fit. I turned her lips out, and found that there were evidences of poison about them. I asked her if she had taken poison; she made no reply then, but I repeatedly pressed her as to what poison she had taken, and said I should apply the stomach pump; to which she replied you may. I ran to my house for it and sent for assistance to hold her. I applied the pump, and her sister came in and enquired what poison she had taken, and I withdrew the pump, to allow her (the deceased) to speak, but she only observed to me, "You cannot pass it." I washed the stomach out thoroughly and withdrew the pump, but she died in a few minutes; that might have been about half-past 12. I was present at the post mortem examination performed by Mr Square, and have no doubt that she died from poison, - I believe oxalic acid. The difficulty in passing the tube arose from the action of the poison upon the gullet, which had also contracted the stomach very much. - William Joseph Square - I am a surgeon, and was sent for today to see the deceased, and arrived here about 25 minutes to one. She was then dead, and lying in the back kitchen. Dr Roe at once pointed out to me the condition of her mouth, which was very unnatural and appeared t me to arise from the contact with poisoned liquid. This afternoon, by request of the Coroner, I made a post mortem examination. There was nothing peculiar in the external appearance of the body, with the exception of the mouth, which I have mentioned before. On opening the body, I found the stomach contracted and hard. Having removed it from the body, I opened its interior and found its lining membrane white, corrugated, and hardened. It contained no fluid, nor solid, in fact. I placed the stomach in a bottle and sealed it down, and have it in my custody. In the cavity of the abdomen I found a very large and hard tumour, which, in all probability would, in the course of time, have terminated life. Very likely such a tumour might have caused despondency or irritability of temper, and would derange her general health. I have no doubt whatever that she died from the effects of poison, and to the best of my belief, oxalic acid. Epsom salts and oxalic acid have often been taken in mistake for Epsom salts. - Elizabeth Roberts, Richard Northmore, coachman to Admiral Woollcombe, Amelia Leonard, sister of the deceased, and Mr Woollcombe having been examined to prove the foregoing facts, the Coroner briefly summed up the evidence, pointing out to the Jury the fact that the evidence seemed to leave no doubt as to the manner in which the deceased came by her death, namely, that it was caused by a dose of poison that she had taken; what they would have to determine was, as to the condition of her health at the moment, and whether she was suffering from temporary insanity. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased died from the effects of a dose of poison, which she had taken whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 5 October 1860
EXETER - Suicide. - We have to record a most distressing suicide which took place at Exeter about seven o'clock on Wednesday evening. A poor man named JAMES CASTLE, who resides in Russell-street, St. Sidwell's was found suspended by the neck in his bedroom. It appears that the poor fellow, who had been working for Mr Collings, stonemason, of Paris-street, was discharged on Saturday last, and the fact of his being out of work so preyed upon his mind that he was led to commit suicide. He went into his house between six and seven o'clock, and at once walked upstairs, and in consequence of his remaining some time, the mother sent one of her children for him, when the boy was horrified at seeing his father hanging from a beam which extended across the room. An Inquest will be held today (Friday) at two o'clock.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 October 1860
EXETER - The Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held on JAMES CASTLE before the City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Rising Sun Inn yesterday (Friday) afternoon. The Jury, after hearing the facts as reported yesterday, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had committed suicide whilst labouring under "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 October 1860
STOKEINTEIGNHEAD - An Atrocious Child Murder. - On Sunday last, the inhabitants of the village of Stokeinteignhead, near Newton Abbot, were thrown into a state of the utmost excitement, though the circulation of a report that a servant girl, named ELIZABETH HOOPER, aged about 19 years, in the employ of Mr William Bond, had committed a most revolting and atrocious child murder. On Inquiry, it appeared that on Monday forenoon the unnatural young mother, during the absence of her master and mistress at church, gave birth to a child, and immediately cut its head off and attempted to burn it in the grate. The family returned from church somewhat earlier than expected, and Mr Bond, on entering the house, became conscious of a very disagreeable odour, and on approaching the grate, he saw, with horror, the head of a newly-born child on the fire. He immediately raised an alarm, and the police were soon on the spot, searching for the remainder of the infant, which they soon succeeded in discovering, wrapped up in a portion of the mother's clothing. The young woman was immediately taken into custody. She had been in Mr Bond's service for several months. Yesterday (Monday) an Inquest was held on the body before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner for the district, at Bovey's Church House Inn. The following comprised the Jury:- Messrs. Stephen Lang, jun., farmer, Foreman; Nicholas Buckingham, farmer; Stephen Lang, sen., farmer; Elias Fowler, farmer; Joseph Franklin, farmer; Thomas Fowler, farmer; William, Bullied, smith; Wm. Prouse, gentleman; Samuel Palk, butcher; James Pitts, smith; Samuel Lodge, farmer; Wm. Hare, schoolmaster. - The Jury having been sworn, the coroner said he thought this Inquiry had better be adjourned, so as to give the prisoner, should she desire, an opportunity of attending, and in order that a post mortem examination of the body might be made. He said he would now call before them the medical man, who would inform them the state prisoner was at present in; and, after hearing his evidence, they would no doubt agree with him that this was a proper case to be adjourned. - Thomas Brooks, sworn, said: I am a surgeon. I have examined the prisoner. She has recently been delivered of a child, and is now in such a weak state, that I am of opinion she is not fit to be removed to attend this Inquiry. In all probability she would be well enough to attend on Thursday next. - The Coroner said under these circumstances it seemed to him that it would be desirable to adjourn the Inquest to that day. - This was assented to by the Jury, and the names of the Jury were then called over and they were severally bound in the sum of £10 to appear at the same place on Thursday next at eleven o'clock in the forenoon. - The Rev. Nutcombe Gould, Rector of Stokeinteignhead, was present at the Inquest. - The case has excited much interest in Newton and also in the neighbouring villages.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 October 1860
STOKEINTEIGNHEAD - The Case Of Alleged Child Murder At Stokeinteignhead. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned inquest was held on Thursday morning at Bovey's Church House Inn, Stokeinteignhead, before the Coroner, W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a Jury consisting of the following:- Messrs. Nicholas Buckingham, Stephen Lang, senior (Foreman); Elias Fowler, Joseph Franklin, Thomas Fowler, Stephen Lane, junior, William Bullied, William Prowse, Samuel Palk, James Palk, Samuel Doidge, and William Hare. The Rev. Nutcombe Gould, rector of Stoke and Major Stevenson, of Shaldon were also present during the proceedings. - Mr Parsons, solicitor, of Shaldon and Torquay, watched the Inquiry on behalf of ELIZABETH HOOPER, the mother of the child. - Mrs Sophia Bond, on being sworn, said: I know ELIZABETH HOOPER; she entered my service on Monday week, the 1st of October. I did not observe anything particular in her personal appearance. She did not complain of being ill until Saturday last, when I desired her to retire to her room. Shortly afterwards I took her up some tea; she was standing by the bedside. She tasted it and then screamed out saying there was sugar in it. I took it down, and brought up another cup without sugar. She was still standing by the bedpost. After having drank the tea she said she was much better. I remained a short time; in about a quarter of an hour I went up again, she was then sitting on the floor and vomited very much. I then stated my suspicions that she was about to give birth to a child, but she denied the supposition. I then asked her if I should send for Mr Brooks. She replied, "I am much better, and shall be well enough presently, if you will let me be quiet." I then gave her some gin, and told her to get on the bed as she would be more comfortable. Mr Bond told me to come down and leave her and I did so. It was nearly half past four when I went up. She was on the bed and appeared to have had a sleep. I observed that a portion of the floor had been washed up where she had been sitting. I said "You have been washing up the floor." She replied "Yes; I have been violently sick, I was suddenly sick and could not use the basin." She said she was much better now, and should come down, and got up, took up the apron in which something was wrapped and went downstairs. I saw a pair of scissors on the bed marked with blood. I searched the room, and found in a pitcher what made me suspicious. I went to her in the back kitchen where she was working, and in reply to my questions she said had been scores of times ill like that before. She then appeared quite well; after the children had gone to bed I spoke to the girl again, and said I should send for Mr Brooks, the surgeon. She then said the spot on the scissors arose from the bleeding of her nose, as did also what I had seen in the pitcher. The time the girl was in her bedroom on Saturday night, I did not hear any noise as of a child crying. On Sunday morning I went up to see how she was. - By the Rev. Mr Gould: If a child had cried, from the situation of the room I must have heard it. - Examination resumed by the Coroner: On entering her room I asked how she was. She said, "Quite well; I was never better in my life." She went downstairs about her work. I followed after her, fancying she had something in her hand. It proved to be a light apron. The girl complained of my suspicion. I said I was not happy, as I was sure the blood never came from her nose. She assured me, however, that it did. - By a Juror: I could not imagine that she had been confined, but had some vague suspicions. - By the Coroner: Before going to church, I said if she would not tell everything I would send for Dr Brooks. - William Bond, farmer, corroborated his wife as to the girl's confession, and added: I was satisfied with her statement and went to church. Being Sacrament Sunday we came home earlier; things in the back kitchen appeared to be in great disorder, and I fancied I smelled something very disagreeable. I asked what she had in the fire; she said nothing more than what had come from the coal box. I lifted the cover of the fire place, and there I saw the head of a child. I said, "What for God's sake have you here," and taking the poker drew it out on the hob; the servant declared it was nothing more than what was in the box, and this she persisted in saying. My father came immediately after, and then she said "For God's sake say nothing about it for I shall be hung, and if you say nothing no one will know anything about it." I said, "I suppose you want me to be hung instead of you." I then sent for the doctor, a policeman, and the girl's parents. After some time the girl was taken upstairs and Mr Brooks came soon afterwards. - Mr Thomas Brooks, surgeon, said: I was called to see ELIZABETH HOOPER on Sunday last. When I arrived I had produced for inspection the charred head of a child with a large piece of cinder attached, with a portion of the brain on it. I then went upstairs, and proceeded to examine HOOPER. She was sitting on the side of the bed. She at first refused to lie down. I had to lift her on the bed, and in doing so I felt a weight over my arm, which, on being removed from the inside of the petticoat, turned out to be an apron containing the headless trunk of a child. I examined her and found that she had given birth to a child, but had not been properly confined. Mr Brooks then gave some further medical evidence, and deposed to the important fact that the lungs had been inflated, and that therefore the child must have been born alive. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury deliberated, and after a few minutes returned the following verdict: "We believe the child to have been born alive, but how or by what means it came by its death, we have not sufficient evidence to show."

Western Morning News, Monday 15 October 1860
TAVISTOCK - The Suicide Of The High Bailiff Of The Tavistock County Court. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning, in the Guildhall, Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., coroner, and a Jury of 23 tradesmen, foreman, Mr W. A. Palmer, on the body of MR J. H. BROWNSON, high bailiff of the Tavistock County Court. - The Jury having viewed the body, returned to the Guildhall, when the principal witness examined was Mr Jonathan Blanchard, boot and shoe-maker of Russell-street, who deposed that the deceased lodged in his house. On Tuesday morning he had some conversation with him, relative to some matters between them, and BROWNSON requested him to call at the County Court office, which he did, and returned in about ten minutes, when, on entering the room, he discovered the deceased suspended by a scarf to the door. He immediately took him down, and laid him on his bed, and went out for medical assistance, which proved altogether unavailing, as life was extinct. It appeared that the deceased, who was a man of more than ordinary intellectual attainment, has of late, it is supposed through trouble, been given to drinking in excess, and has suffered in a more or less degree from delirium tremens. The Jury returned a verdict of " Temporary Insanity".

At the conclusion of this Inquest, an Inquiry was commenced relative to the death of a man who was discovered on the previous morning in the River Walkham. The evidence went to show that a boy, called Frederick Woodman, saw the body in the water, and with the assistance of two men, named Howe and Penny, succeeded in extricating it. It was removed to the King's Arms Inn, Magpie, and Dr William of Horrabridge, sent for. It was brought to Tavistock yesterday morning, and identified by Martha Gillard, a woman residing in Brook-street, as that of man called SIMMONS, who had been missing since Saturday last. The deceased had formerly been employed by J. Rundle, Esq., late M.P. for Tavistock; and in consequence of the death of his wife, has been in a most desponding state for some time past. In this case the verdict was returned of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 October 1860
EXETER ST SIDWELL - Melancholy Suicide At Exeter. - It is with much regret that we have again to record a most distressing suicide in this city. The wife of MR MOYLE, in the employ of Messrs. Brock and Co., drapers, of Fore-street, was discovered in his bedroom on Friday morning last with her throat cut. It appears that the deceased breakfasted with her husband in apparently good spirits on the morning in question, and shortly after he had left home for business she went upstairs it was supposed with the intention of doing the necessary work of the house. The servant thinking her mistress was longer than usual, went up to see for her, and found that the bedroom door was locked, and upon its being forced open it was discovered that the unfortunate lady had cut her throat, and that life was quite extinct. No reason whatever can be assigned for this melancholy deed. MR and MRS MOYLE are well known to have led an exceedingly happy life together. The event has cast a gloom over the many friends with whom deceased was acquainted, and by whom she was much respected. We are informed that four children are left to mourn their loss. An Inquest was held the same evening, at the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwell's before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was returned to the effect that the unfortunate deceased had committed Suicide, whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 October 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of THOMAS BROWNE, who was picked up in the Hamoaze on Sunday morning, full particulars of which were published in the Western Morning News of Monday morning. Deceased was a private in the 61st Regiment of Foot, a portion of which was stationed in the Plymouth Citadel. He has been missing since the 6th inst., and bore a very bad character. The comrade of the deceased deposed to the deceased leaving him at the Brewers' Arms, Notte-street, Plymouth, and did not return. Deceased was then far advanced in a state of intoxication. Verdict - "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 26 October 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - Determined Suicide Of A Soldier. - Yesterday afternoon, about four o'clock, a desperate act of suicide was committed by a private named RICHARD BEAL, in the 10th Company of the 53rd Regiment, stationed at Raglan Barracks, Devonport. He was a fine young man about 20 years of age. For some alleged misconduct or insubordination he was yesterday ordered to be placed on recruit drill, but contrived to get his name inserted in the sick report, by which means a slight amount of liberty was granted to him. He appears to have taken his own rifle and to have attached a small piece of cord to the trigger which he pulled with his foot. The ball entered immediately under the lower jaw and came out at the top of the head, carrying a large portion of the brain with it, the consequence of which was that the forehead fell in, and the features are scarcely recognizable as belonging to a human being, who, a minute before, was possessed of all the vigour and health of manhood. The body was removed to the Military Hospital where it now lies preparatory to the Coroner's Inquest, which, in all probability, will be held this day. From the fact of the charge having traversed such a path, death must have ensued instantaneously. The parents of the unfortunate young man occupy a large farm in the county of Kent, and scarcely a week passed without their sending him money, and the preliminaries were almost completed for the purchase of his discharge.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday evening last a little girl met with her death in the following melancholy and very distressing manner:- It appears that the deceased was the child of MR HENRY STEWARD, residing No. 17, Edgcumbe-place, near the Mill Bridge, Stoke, and that on the above named evening she was in the public thoroughfare, and dropped a half-penny, when she went into the roadway to look for it. A cart was passing at the time, when from some cause or other the poor child got her head between the spokes of one of the wheels and was whirled round and killed on the spot. An Inquest will be held this afternoon on the body before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner.

ERMINGTON - Keaton. On Monday morning last the retired and quiet hamlet of Keaton, as well as Ivybridge and Ermington, were thrown into great excitement, caused by the painful intelligence that MR ROBERT FREDRICK, a respectable farmer of Keaton Farm, was discovered drowned in the Erne river about half a mile below Ivybridge. He was found by a man named Phillips, who procured assistance, and he was taken from the water and conveyed to his residence. The most romantic stories were rife concerning the event. On Tuesday afternoon an inquest was held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the deceased, when the Jury returned an Open Verdict. The deceased has left a widow and seven children (mostly grown up) to mourn his untimely end.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 October 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Fatal Accident In Tin-Street. - At two o'clock yesterday afternoon, an Inquest was held at the Mill Bridge Inn, Stoke, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., on the body of LOVEDAY EMMA STEWARD, aged three years and four months, who died from injuries received through having been crushed by a cart. On Tuesday afternoon another little girl, named Hannah Hortop, a relative, was leading the child by the hand, and at the place where they stood the street was exceedingly narrow, there being scarcely room for two carts to pass each other. A hand cart and a cart propelled by a horse were in the street at the time, and just at that moment the child slipped from the pavement, and before assistance could be rendered she was crushed between the wheel of the cart drawn by the horse and the pavement. She was taken to her home near Stonehouse Mill Bridge, and expired about five o'clock on Wednesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the driver of the cart from any blame, for although he was riding at the time, he was on the proper side of the road, and he was provided with reins to his horse.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Soldier. - Yesterday morning at ten o'clock, an Inquest was held at the Royal Military Hospital Inn, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, and a Jury of 23, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of Private RICHARD BEALE, the 53rd Regiment, as announced in our paper of yesterday. The Inquiry lasted about four hours, but the main facts may be briefly summed up. - The regiment was under drill on the parade ground on Wednesday, the 17th inst., when the sergeant-major ordered a man to fall out of the ranks for awkwardness and commanded that he should be placed at recruit drill. The colour-sergeant selected the deceased, which was alleged to be a mistake, the sergeant-major saying that it was a man more to the right. This the deceased himself afterwards averred, but he was taken from the ranks, and handed over to the drill-sergeant of the "awkward squad," where he remained to the time of his death. On Wednesday morning last, he was in the barrack-room with several of his comrades, when a letter was brought to him by a corpora of the company, upon seeing which a fellow-soldier who was talking to the deceased left him, as he did not wish for deceased to think he was looking at the contents of the letter. The corporal did not leave the room immediately, but stood talking with another man, and whilst doing so, he observed that BEALE eagerly scanned the handwriting in which it was addressed; that he partly broke the seal, and then, as if hesitating to open it, put it into his pocket. A few seconds, however, had scarcely elapsed before he took the letter from his pocket, opened it, and after reading it, buried his face in his hands, and sobbed violently. This letter, it is presumed, was from his parents, with whom he had been in communication for the purchase of his discharge, but it is mere matter of conjecture, for although minute search has been made for the letter, it has not been discovered. On Thursday morning he was called out, as usual, for private drill, under the command of Drill-Sergeant Rowland, who had known him at Chatham and highly respected him. As the drill progressed, the sergeant said he observed that the deceased was either very stubborn or very awkward, for he was at last obliged to tell him that he should be under the necessity of placing him in the guard-room, should he persist in such conduct. At this, deceased advanced a step to the front, threw down the clubs, and said he would stand no more humbug. The sergeant, out of consideration towards him, went up to him, and pointed out the serious consequences that must follow his making him a prisoner, as he was in duty bound to do. Deceased said he wished to be spoken to civilly, to which the sergeant replied, he did not know how to address him in a more civil manner, unless he expected to be "sir'd". After the sergeant's remonstrance and advice, deceased took the clubs again, and went through the remaining drill in a creditable manner, after which he was dismissed with the others and returned to the barrack-room. About half-past twelve he asked a comrade for a sheet of paper, as he wished to write. He was supplied with the paper and wrote a letter, which he requested should be given to a friend named Thomas Henderson, in the same regiment. It was traced in a bold hand, and ran as follows:- "Devonport, Oct. 25, 1860. - Dear Friend, - As I am so miserable, I intend to shoot myself. When you find it out please to write to my friends, and tell them about it. There will be a letter in a day or two; send it back, and do not open it. It will be from my mother. Direct to Mr R. BEALE, River hall, Biddenden, Staplehurst, Kent. - Yours truly, R. BEALE." As the afternoon advanced he placed himself on the sick report for the reason, as he observed, of getting off drill. At half-past three he was in the barrack-room with others, and sat by the fire with Andrew Page, a private in the same regiment. He continued in conversation with him some minutes, and said he should not be a soldier that day month. He then took his rifle for the ostensible purpose of cleaning it. The attention of his comrades was not specially directed towards him, and in about two minutes the report of a rifle was heard, and the deceased fell between two cots quite dead. Directly above him was a circular hole in the ceiling, such as would have been made by a rifle ball, it having entered beneath the lower jaw and come out at the top of the head. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said that every homicide was presumed by law to be felonious until the contrary was proved. He read an extract from some remarks made by one of the common-law judges, who declared that the act of suicide was one of the most heinous of crimes - that it was too frequently the custom of coroners' juries to return verdicts of temporary insanity in cases of suicide, the argument being that the act was so repugnant to nature as to be incapable of commission. But the murder of a parent or a child was equally repulsive to nature. These remarks, the Coroner observed, were not his own, they were those of very high legal authority. Being satisfied, as doubtless they were, that the deceased had destroyed himself, the remaining question was, had any evidence been adduced proving his insanity? In the absence of such evidence, it was their duty to return a verdict of felo de se. - The Jury, after a deliberation of about a quarter of an hour, decided by a majority of sixteen to seven that the deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 November 1860
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH HOSKIN, who came by her death under the following circumstances. On the evening of the 17th October deceased was going home at Ivy cottages, Stoke, and on passing through Waterloo-street she fell over some stones where the road was repairing and which were projecting a little above the ground. In the fall she broke her leg. She was at once conveyed to her home and attended to by Mr Cutcliffe, surgeon, and lingered until the 30th ult., when she expired. After a lengthened investigation and hearing medical evidence, the Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from disease of the heart, but whether accelerated by the accident there was no evidence to show."

Western Morning News, Monday 5 November 1860
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday morning, about half-past seven o'clock, an assistant in Mr Scott's brewery, Hoe-gate-street, Plymouth, by the name of WILLIAM CURTIS, was engaged in lowering sacks from the second floor of the malt house, when the rope by which one of the sacks was held slipped from his hand, and he lost his balance, falling to the pavement, a height of about eighteen feet. He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was discovered to have sustained a severe fracture of the skull, and expired a quarter of an hour after admittance. He was a sober, temperate man, about 63 years of age, and had been in the employ of Messrs. Scott 33 years. An Inquest on the body was held before John Edmonds, Esq., at the Plymouth Guildhall, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", with a recommendation to Messrs. Scott to place a handrail on the spot, for the prevention of future casualties.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Foreign Captain. - On Saturday afternoon, at three o'clock, an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the Prince George Hotel, Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, on the body of JOHANN HEINRICH KENDLER, captain of the galliot, Sophie, who committed suicide on the previous day. - Peter Haagerah, through Mr Holmes, interpreter, stated that he was mate of the gulliot, about 13 lasts burthen. Deceased was her sole owner, master and was about 44 years of age. He was from Newhouse, Hanover; was home about five weeks since, and has left a widow and two children. They left Hamburg with a cargo of oil cakes, which were delivered in Poole, from which they sailed on the 1st inst., with 30 tons of China clay which was delivered at Plymouth on Thursday. There was no intoxicating liquors on board, but the deceased was not sober during the time he was in Poole, about ten days. They made fast to one of the buoys in Sutton Harbour on Friday; and between 12 and one o'clock the deceased took dinner with the crew, consisting of four men, though he ate very little. He informed witness that he had received a letter from home, but appeared quite lost, and muttered incoherent expressions to himself, inasmuch that one or two of the crew suggested the propriety of watching him. Between half-past three and four a person in a boat came alongside to see the captain, but he refused to be troubled with anything. On going down into the cabin shortly after, witness found deceased lying on the floor with his throat cut. He was quite dead. - Bartholo Doddage, one of the crew, corroborated this evidence. - The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 November 1860
PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Of A Young Man In Catwater. - Yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of thirteen, held an Inquest at the Robin Hood, New Street, to Inquire into the cause of death of THOMAS DRAKE, reported in this paper of Saturday. - Henry Sheldon stated that he was a fisherman belonging to the trawl sloop Joseph and Ann, about 27 tons burthen, the property of Mr Penwam, of 8 New Street, Plymouth. Deceased was about 19 years of age, and an apprentice to Mr Penwam. On Friday Mr Penwam, witness, deceased and a boy named Sloggett, went to Bovisand, and left there about two o'clock. The wind was strong from the eastward, and when just off Queen Anne's Battery, deceased was standing with one foot on the bowsprit, and the other on the night head. He was in the act of hauling down the jib, when it fell quicker than he expected. The sudden falling of the sail caused the deceased to start back rapidly, and he fell overboard. He was encumbered with his heavy sea boots, and sank immediately. Through the whole of Friday night and Saturday, the crew and others were engaged in endeavouring to recover the body, which was not accomplished until about four o'clock on Sunday. The deceased bore an excellent character, and had most completed the term of his apprenticeship. - Thomas Giles Hoppins, mate of the Eddystone tender, deposed that on Sunday afternoon, after having dragged for the body a considerable time, he hooked it by the brace about 40 feet from Queen Anne's Battery, and consigned it to the care of Mr Penwan. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 November 1860
EXETER ST SIDWELL - Another Distressing Suicide At Exeter. - During the past few months it has been our painful duty to record several cases of suicide which have occurred in this city, and it is again with much regret that we report another most distressing suicide committed by a young man named JOHN HILL, aged 26, whose body was found suspended from a tree in a field at Hele's court, Pennsylvania. At an Inquest held on Monday morning, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Acland Arms Inn, St. Sidwell's, in the afternoon of the same day, the following evidence was given:- WM. HILL, father of deceased, stated that he resided at 2 Poltimore Terrace, St. Sidwell's. His son (the deceased) was living with him; deceased had formerly been a gentleman's servant, but latterly had been in the employ of Mr Paul Collings, as ostler, was a single man, and 26 years of age; on Sunday evening he took his tea at home and appeared quite well, with the exception of his foot, which had been bad for some months, and prevented him from following constant occupation. After tea he left home about half-past seven, and did not return again for the night. He appeared for some time past low spirited in consequence of not being able to obtain his livelihood. - Henry Bolt, labourer, said that he went to work in Mr Smith's field, about half-past eight o'clock on Monday morning and saw the body of a man suspended by the neck from a tree in the field - he at once ran to Mr Smith's slaughter-house, which was near, and procured assistance, and returned with one of Mr Smith's men and cut the body down. It was suspended by a piece of packing cord. Another of Mr Smith's men fetched Dr Perkins, who at once pronounced the man to have been dead some time. Anyone could get into the field very easily. - Richard Loosemore, landlord of the Horse and Groom, Longbrook-street, said that deceased came to his house about quarter to eight o'clock on Sunday evening; he had half an ounce of tobacco, which he said he would pay for in the morning. There were five others there, and between them they had three quarts of beer; the others left just before nine o'clock, but deceased did not leave until quarter to eleven o'clock; deceased had to pay for one pint of the beer, and promised to pay that also in the morning. He (deceased) had been in the habit of going to witness's house daily, and latterly had appeared very much depressed. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide whilst labouring under fit of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 November 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death From Falling Over Stairs. - An Inquest was held yesterday before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Adelaide Inn, Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, on the body of SUSAN REEBY. It appeared that on Monday last deceased went to visit some relatives at No. 13 Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, and during the day fell over the stairs of the house, and received such injuries that she shortly afterwards died. Verdict, "Accidental Death, occasioned by falling over the stairs in question."

STOKE DAMEREL - Death At The Devonport Prison. - An Inquest was held on Thursday afternoon last at the Pennycomequick Inn, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of ANN WELLS MILLER, who was convicted of larceny at the last Devonport Borough Sessions, and sentenced to three months' imprisonment. She had been three months in prison previous to her death. She was taken ill on Sunday morning last, and was found dead in the evening. The governor stated that every care was taken of the prisoner. Verdict, "Natural death occasioned by an internal disease."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 November 1860
PLYMOUTH - The Suicide At The Police Station. Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday afternoon at four o'clock, the Coroner J. Edmonds, Esq., held an Inquest before a respectable Jury, of which Mr F. W. Harris was Foreman, on the body of RICHARD ALLEN, coal heaver, the particulars of whose death we fully reported in our columns of yesterday. - The Jury having been sworn in proceeded to view the body at the dead house, and on their return they visited the cell in which the deceased was confined at the time when he so suddenly put an end to his existence. - On returning into the court, the Coroner was about to examine the deceased's wife, when The Mayor (W. Luscombe, Esq.) made his appearance, attired in his official robes, and after expressing his regret that such an unfortunate occurrence had taken place in that building, said he had no means of throwing any light upon it himself, and having been in the Guildhall since 11 o'clock that morning he should feel glad if the Jury would excuse his attendance. However, if he could be of any service he should be most happy to remain, but he thought the matter could not be left in more able hands than those of the Coroner's. - The Coroner assured his worship there was no necessity for his remaining, and having explained to him the course he intended to adopt in the case, he said the real question for the Jury to decide was as to the deceased's state of mind at the time he committed the deed. - The Mayor then left, and the examination of the deceased's wife, ELIZABETH ALLEN, was commenced. She said she resided at 23 Adelaide-street, Plymouth; her husband was 45 years of age; he was a mason by trade, but of late had worked as a coal-heaver; he was of very drunken habits and often violently assaulted her; he did so in the beginning of the present month, and she applied for a summons against him; he did not appear, and the magistrates granted a warrant for his apprehension. After drinking a great deal he became very nervous, and appeared not to know what he was about; for the last twelve or thirteen years he had been in the habit of ill-using her, and during that time had spent nearly all his earnings. The last time he beat her was on Sunday night, the 4th inst., and she had not seen him since Monday last. - By a Juror: Had never heard her husband threaten to kill himself if she applied to the magistrates for protection. - P.C. Colton deposed to having locked the prisoner up at the Octagon station, on Saturday morning last, and during the time he was there he frequently visited him. He handed him over to the custody of P.C. Toll about 20 minutes before 4 o'clock the same afternoon. - A Juror here suggested whether it would not be advisable to take all prisoners to the borough gaol instead of locking them up at the different police stations. - The Coroner said they should discuss that matter presently. They must go on step by step. - P.C. James Strang, on being sworn, said the deceased was handed over to him at the Guildhall, by P.C. Toll, about 4 o'clock on Saturday afternoon. He was doing duty as a reserve man at the time. The deceased was sober, but appeared very "heavy". He put him in No. 1 cell, and before locking him up he told him he wanted a jolly good sleep, and witness said he could sleep as long as he liked. He visited him shortly after 5 o'clock, and found him lying on his back as though he were asleep. At 10 minutes before six he heard somebody knocking, and on going to see what was the matter, the deceased asked him for some water, with which he supplied him, and of which he drank about three-quarters of a pint. Shortly after he (witness) was sent out to make some enquiries about a robbery committed by a soldier, and did not return until about 8 o'clock, when he found the deceased hanging by his neck from the grating which formed the window of his cell. P.C. Fryer, who was with him, immediately cut him down, whilst he supported the body. The deceased was quite dead. - By the Foreman: It is only usual for one reserve man to be on duty at a time, besides an inspector. If the inspector had heard a knocking, he would have gone to enquire the cause of it, but he would not be likely to hear so well as the reserve man. - The Foreman: The reason I put these questions is, because it occurred to me that it was just possible the man may have been trying to make himself heard, and in climbing up may have caught himself in the grating, so that his death was accidental rather than intentional. - Mr Codd explained the duties of the reserve man, and told the Jury he was kept at the station house in case the inhabitants should require him, and also to keep a watch over the prisoners. - Strang, in answer to the Foreman, said if a man had made up his mind to commit suicide, he would do it in any prison, and if he liked he could do it in the borough gaol. - One of the Jurors here called the Coroner's attention to a portion of Strang's evidence, wherein he stated that when the man was brought to him he appeared very low. He should like to go a little further into that matter, and for that purpose he would ask whether or not he meant that the deceased was dejected. - Strang said what he stated was that the man was heavy. He had all the appearance of a drunkard, and shook a great deal. - The Coroner said this was a very important question and he wished the officer to account if he could for the reason of his exhibiting this nervousness. - Strang however replied that he was unable to do so, for he had often seen some men shake at beholding the keys of the cells. - Mr Browse, a Juryman, asked whether or not it was usual to take away persons' neckerchiefs and braces before locking them up. - Strang: - Yes, when man is drunk, but not else. - Mr Browne said he put that question because he recollected that a short time since a man hung himself in one of the cells. - Mr Codd, in reply, stated that it was possible for a man to hang himself with his shirt, and therefore to prevent such a thing it would be absolutely necessary to strip prisoners quite naked; and in corroboration of this Mr Trengrove, town sergeant, told the Jury he recollected a case where a man once tried to hang himself with his shirt, and on that garment being taken from him he attempted to do it with one of the legs of his trousers. - Mr Codd, in reply to the observation made by a Juror as to the advisability of at once removing prisoners to the jail, said they would not be half so well cared for there as they were in the police cells. He had been in the metropolitan police, and he was in a position to state that it was the custom amongst them only to look after the prisoners once in two hours, whereas he gave orders to have them attended to every hour. - No further evidence being produced. - The Coroner told the Jury their duty was to Inquire into the deceased's state of mind at the time he took away his life. - The Jury, having consulted together for a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 November 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, yesterday (Monday) afternoon, at 2 p.m., before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an old man, named GEORGE BIDGOOD, aged 76, who met his death under the following circumstances. On the 14th November deceased, who is a mason and resided with Mr R. Tremlett, of Kenton, went to Powderham to do some work for Mr Pitt, and returned about nine o'clock in the evening. When on getting over a stile near his house he fell back and injured his spine. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the following morning and expired on Saturday the 19th November. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - At four o'clock on the same afternoon, another Inquest was held before H. D. Barton, Esq., at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of a little boy named BENJAMIN DARBY, aged five years, who also died in the hospital on Saturday last, from injuries sustained by burning. On Friday evening the deceased went to the Ragged School with his sisters, and after they had gone, the father and mother went out, and in their absence the children returned from school about half-past eight o'clock; shortly after they returned the little boy, who was left in the room alone, was found by a neighbour, named Knight, with his clothes on fire, and he was afterwards taken to the hospital, where he expired on the following day from the injuries sustained. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Supposed Infanticide At Mannamead. - The following painful case of supposed infanticide was brought to light on Sunday:- About two months ago, a young woman, named ELIZABETH PHILLIPS a native of Fowey, entered the service of William Eastlake, Esq., Mannamead, as cook. On Friday evening last, she complained that she was suffering from a bowel complaint, and her mistress gave her brandy and water, and sent her to bed. On the same day, the housemaid, who usually sleeps with the cook, had left her situation, and consequently that night the cook slept alone. The nursemaid sleeps in a room under the garret, where the cook slept, and heard groans during the night, which she attributed to the illness of which the cook had complained. On Saturday morning the cook rose earlier than usual, and performed her own household duties, with the addition of those which devolved upon her in consequence of the absence of the housemaid. On Sunday she left the house to visit her friends, to attend a wedding, for which she had previously obtained permission. During her absence, the nursemaid, whose suspicions had been awakened, examined the bed and found the body of a child wrapped in a sheet, and placed between the palliasses of the bed. Mr Eastlake, on being informed of the circumstance, sent for the county police, and Mr Superintendent freeman came, and remained in the house until the cook returned at about 10 o'clock at night. She at once acknowledged that she had given birth to a child, and stated that upon her confinement she became insensible, and on recovering consciousness she found the child dead at her side. In her terror she knew not what to do, but states that she had determined to inform her master upon her return Sunday evening. The poor girl has hitherto borne a good character, and is an excellent servant. She was engaged to be married to the father of the child, but it is reported the villain has recently broken off the engagement. - The Inquest was appointed to take place yesterday afternoon, at the Townsend Inn, Mutley, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner for the County. The hour for which the Jury were summoned was three o'clock, but Mr bone did not arrive till within a few minutes before six. On the assembling of the Jury, he apologised for the unavoidable delay which had occurred, and the time he detained them; he said it was quite an unusual thing for him to do, as they were aware, but that day it happened that certain unforeseen circumstances had delayed him, and he had only just come from his duties elsewhere, (at the Jump petty sessions.) It would not be desirable that the post mortem examination upon the body of the child should take place at night, as a most careful investigation was necessary, which could not very well be the case if it were performed that night; and it would, therefore, have to be done the next morning. In the second place, the mother was in such a condition, that he did not think they could bring her there tomorrow (Tuesday), and consequently, they must go to where she was. He must, therefore, ask them to attend at St. George's Hall tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock, when they could proceed with the Enquiry. The only thing for them to do at present was to choose their Foreman, and then view the body, which was lying at Mr Eastlake's house. Mr Elworthy, who appeared to watch the case for the prisoner, suggested that the Enquiry should be held in the afternoon. It was ultimately arranged that the Inquest should be held at one p.m. this day, at St. George's Hall. The prisoner was brought to the place appointed for the Inquest in a cab, in custody of Mr Superintendent Freeman.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 November 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Concealment Of Birth At Mannamead. - The adjourned Inquest upon the body of the newly-born child found dead in a house at Mannamead, on Sunday last, was held yesterday afternoon, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner for the County. ANN PHILLIPS, the mother of the child, was brought up in the custody of Mr Superintendent Freeman, and was accommodated with a seat during the Inquiry. The room was rather crowded, the larger proportion of those present being women and girls. The Coroner reminded those delicate ladies that the Inquiry was not the sort of one that need be listened to unless any of them were witnesses, and he therefore advised respectable women to withdraw. To this appeal there was a reluctant consent, but in about half-an-hour afterwards, the door of the court was opened for the admission of fresh air, when they all returned, and stood their ground till the last. Mr Elworthy appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of PHILLIPS. - Sarah Lyne was the first witness called. She stated that she was nurse in the family of Mr William Eastlake, and had lived there for three years and nine months. ANN PHILLIPS was engaged as cook about two months ago, and from what she observed, witness believed her new fellow servant to be in the family-way, but did not make known her suspicions. The cook and housemaid slept in the same room together, but the latter having left on Friday last, PHILLIPS that night slept by herself, her room being directly over the one in which witness slept. Between twelve and one, on Saturday morning, she was heard to get out of bed and walk about. She was groaning, and witness heard her say, "What shall I do." There were no cries of an infant that witness heard. Another nursemaid slept in the same room with witness, named Anna. About ten minutes before 4 a.m., PHILLIPS came down, and asked for a candle, at the same time saying, "Is the nursery fire alight, for I am dying for a cup of tea." Witness told her that the fire was not, and gave her a candle, and she returned to her own room. By six o'clock she was up again, and called witness and the other nursemaid to get up. That morning they got up earlier than usual, because their master had to attend a court-martial. All day Saturday PHILLIPS seemed unwell and not able to do her work, and complained of being ill. At bedtime she said she was well again, and that she should be able to go out the next day. Before this she had told witness that she had asked the mistress in the middle of the week for leave to go to a wedding on the Sunday. On the Saturday night she again slept by herself and at bedtime went to witness's room, and enquired whether or not Anna had gone to rest, because she wanted her to go up and sleep with her, but she was told that the girl was in bed and asleep. She then went up by herself, and between half-past seven and eight the next morning she went to witness's room and told her to get up, and that she had finished her dining-room and play-room, and was now going to sweep the stairs. At half-past eight witness saw her dressed, ready to go out, and she went away in a fly, which, she said, she had ordered to call for her. She returned on foot about ten in the evening and witness, on opening the door to her, said, "I thought you were not coming home again." She enquired what was the matter, and witness said, "Nothing in particular," and Mr Eastlake then went up and spoke to her. Witness went on to say - "In consequence of some suspicions that I had, I searched her room in her absence, and between the pailliasses of the bed, I found the body of a newly-born female child, wrapped up in the bed-sheets, which were blood-stained. I called up the charwoman, Mrs Hobbs, and showed her the body, and she said she would go and tell her master. I said she had better not do so, but she insisted upon it, and I then said I will tell my master myself. Mr and Mrs Eastlake, were informed of what had happened and Mr Eastlake then went up, and after seeing the body, ordered me to lock the door and give him the key, which I did. In the early part of the week, PHILLIPS told me that she had bought some fine calico, but found she had only half a yard, instead of a whole yard. I asked her what she required it for, and she said she wanted it for a purpose. She also asked me to let her have a baby's shift, but I told her I could not find one. - William Eastlake, Esq., on being sworn said - I am a solicitor, practising in Plymouth, and resident at Mannamead, in the parish of Compton Gifford. ANN PHILLIPS came into my service as cook about two months ago, and up till last Friday no suspicion of her condition was entertained; Mr Eastlake then confirmed the statement of the last witness and said that, on speaking to PHILLIPS, when she returned in the evening, he remarked - "I am very sorry, cook that you have got yourself into this trouble," and before I could give any further explanation, she observed the presence of Mr Superintendent Freeman and appeared to become much frightened. Mr Freeman told her he was a policeman and cautioned her, as a dead child had been found in her room. She immediately said, "It is mine; I did not know what to do; I got into trouble, and meant to tell of it when I got home." By this time she was in an agony of distress, and on my asking where she had been that day, she replied to a wedding, and that she had walked home from Stonehouse. She spoke somewhat incoherently, but it was to the effect that, after the birth of her child, she was insensible for nearly two hours, and that on returning to her senses, she found it lying by her, cold and motionless. The witness added, I should wish to state that up to this time, she had borne a very good character, and I may also state for the information of the Jury, that had she wished to do so, she had opportunities of concealing the body in a much more effectual manner than she did. The box in her room was nearly empty, and had she chosen to do so, she might have locked the door of her room. - Mr Superintendent John Freeman, Devon County Constabulary, deposed to going to Mr Eastlake's house on Sunday night and apprehending PHILLIPS, and to conveying her to the station in a cab. When they arrived at the station he found that she was more calm than when he first charged her; and told her she was in custody for concealing the birth of her child. She replied that she knew nothing about it; that she was senseless for more than an hour, and when she came to herself found the child lying under her senseless and dead. She also told him that the young man who was the father of the child had been very "slack" lately, and that she had given her master and mistress notice to leave, telling them that she was going to be married. It was her intention, she said, to take a furnished room in which she might be confined. - Thomas Crossing, Esq., surgeon, living at Mannamead, stated that he was called to Mr Eastlake's on Monday to examine externally the body of the child. He found no external marks of violence whatever, but it had been subjected to considerable lateral pressure for many hours apparently. The sides of the face were pressed together and both arms were much flattened on the inside from being forced against the ribs, and outside from some external pressure. There was an indentation or pressure on the left side of the head, extending as far as the ear. It seemed to correspond with the pressure that would arise from being forced between the mattresses. The child was well formed, and had arrived at a full stage of maturity, being fully developed. It was placed in his hands that morning by order of the Coroner, by Mr Freeman. The puffiness observable on the head was only such as would arise from natural causes. The weight was 7 lb 2 oz., and the length 18 inches, which was about the average size. On being opened the lungs were found fully inflated with air, and of a crimson colour. The thymus gland, together with the heart and lungs, were placed in water, and the lungs floated, bearing up the heart and gland. The heart was separated, and weighed 12 drachms, and sank immediately on being placed in the water; the lungs weighed 1 oz. 10 drachms. The body contained a due proportion of blood, and the child had not died from haemorrhage. The umbilical cord had not been properly divided, but seemed to have been torn or ripped. From all the appearances, when taken together, he was of opinion that the child was born alive, and that the circulation of the blood had been complete. In the state of unconsciousness in which the mother was said to have been in, it was very probable that the child would die of suffocation if there was no assistance at hand. I cannot form a precise opinion as to the cause of death - the lungs were very congested, and from that cause I think it died from suffocation. - Mary Butchers, wife of a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Cambridge, deposed to the young woman PHILLIPS having gone to her wedding on Sunday last, and to being questioned by witness as to her condition. She confessed she was in the family way, and said she wanted to leave her place, take a room, and get over it as well as she could. Had known her for 18 months, and had always found her a very quiet and respectable young woman. The father of the child was a shipwright in the dockyard, and had kept company with PHILLIPS for twelve months, but witness was told he would do anything for her. Her friends knew nothing of the matter, and she told witness that she had got nothing provided for the child, and did not know how to go about getting it clothes. - The prisoner on being asked if she wished to say anything said, "I cannot say more than that I was overtaken in labour, and the child was dead when I came to - it never moved nor cried. I was insensible for more than an hour I should fancy." - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury, after consulting for two or three minutes, returned a verdict to the effect that they unanimously agreed in finding that the child was born alive, but that how it came by its death there was not sufficient evidence to show. - The prisoner was then removed in custody on a charge of concealing the birth of her child. The Enquiry lasted upwards of four hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 November 1860
EXETER - Another Case Of Flogging In A Public School At Exeter. Death Of The Unfortunate Boy. - We regret to have again to record a case of flogging in a public school at Exeter. A little boy, named JOHN BOURNE, aged 9 years, and who attended the Devon and Exeter Central School in Coombe-street, died on Friday morning last, and at an Inquest held in the evening, at the Sawyers' Arms Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, the following facts were adduced:- The unfortunate boy, who was an illegitimate son of MRS HEARD, residing in Preston-street, had attended the school for about twelve months, and three months since complained to his mother that a pupil teacher in the school had severely beaten him; and requested her not to allow him to go there any more. The mother, knowing the boy to be rather dull and thinking that it was merely an excuse to stay away from school, insisted on is continuing to attend, which he did up to the 2nd November, on which day he went home, and was so poorly, that he could not eat his dinner. He then complained of a severe headache, and the mother, who still thought her son wanted to stay from school, charged him with it, to which he replied that it was not so, and then said that a pupil-teacher named Hawker, had struck him on the back part of the head with a "pointer-stick." Upon being asked by his mother why he had not told Mr Austin (the master,) he made no reply, and his mother sent him to school in the afternoon. The master, who saw that the boy was unwell, told him to go home, but he did not do so until past four o'clock, when he still complained of being ill, and could not eat his tea; he then asked his mother to put him to bed, and was very sick, and complained of violent pain in the head. The boy continued ill for some days, when the mother procured some medicine from Mr Tozer, of South-street; but two days after he became delirious, when the parish doctor (Mr A. J. Cumming,) was called in, who attended him up to his death. Whilst the boy was ill in bed, Hawker, the teacher, called to see him, and whilst with him, said, "I did not strike you to hurt you my boy;" to which the poor youth replied, "yes you did, sir, for you made me sick." Hawker then told the parents that he never used the stick, but he might have struck him once with the "pointer," and upon being told by Heard that it was said that he frequently beat the children, Hawker replied that he was obliged to beat them sometimes, for it was no good to let them have their own way. Mr Cumming, the surgeon, stated that when he first visited the deceased, he had some difficulty in getting him to speak, and he appeared to be suffering from a disease in the brain, complaining that one of the teachers, named Hawker had struck him on the head with a "pointer" - there was a swelling on the scalp, but he could not say whether it was caused by a blow, or whether it existed before. He could not externally see or feel the cause of death, but a post mortem examination would no doubt enable him to come to a conclusion. - The Coroner remarked that this was an important Inquiry, and if they were to fix the matter on a third party it was necessary they should obtain all the evidence that could be possibly got. The Inquest was then adjourned until tomorrow (Tuesday.)

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 November 1860
PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning. Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, Stoke-lane, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury, touching the death of a lad named MOSES LEE, about 7 ½ years of age, who came by his untimely end under the circumstances detailed below. It appeared that about a fortnight since deceased and his sister were in their mother's room together, No. 123 King-street-west, between eleven and twelve in the day, and during the mother's absence the daughter, a child of nine years of age, kindled the fire for the purpose of warming themselves and whilst the deceased was holding his arm over the grate the sleeve of the linen frock he wore caught fire, and in a minute he was in a blaze. While in this state he ran out of the room followed by his sister, who was shrieking, and thus attracted the attention of a woman named Elizabeth Gibbs, who immediately procured some water, which she threw over the deceased. Two other persons then came to their assistance, and they wrapped the child in their clothes and so extinguished the flames. The poor little fellow was put to bed, and Mr Dale, surgeon, sent for, who, on his arrival, found the deceased's right arm and side severely burnt, and having done all in his power to relieve his sufferings, left him for a time. The child only got worse, and it was not until Saturday last that death released him from his excruciating pains. Several witnesses were called and they gave it as their opinion that the child came by his death accidentally, and this being the general feeling of the Jury, a verdict to that effect was returned. The deceased's father is a fiddler, serving on board H.M.S. Gannet.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 November 1860
EXETER - A Child Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) morning at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little girl, named JANE BABBAGE, aged eight years, who was burnt to death on the previous day. The girl was an illegitimate child of ANN BABBAGE, a domestic servant, and ever since three weeks old had been kept by a Mrs Cann, the wife of a licensed hawker, residing in Coombe-street. On Monday morning Mrs Cann got up and lighted the fire, and shortly after the child came down and sat by the fire in her night-dress. Mrs Cann told her to put on her stockings and shoes, and went away upstairs; she had not been gone long before she head the child calling for her "dear mother," and on going into the room found that her nightdress was on fire. Mrs Cann then endeavoured to extinguish the flames, and shortly afterwards the child was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she said that a spark flew out and caught her nightdress on fire. She died at six o'clock the same evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 November 1860
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Woman Through Excessive Drinking. - Yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, an Inquest was held at Bustin's Wine and Spirit Cellars, Octagon-street, before Mr John Edmonds, Borough Coroner, to Inquire into the cause of death of ANN DREW, who expired on the previous evening at No. 110 King-street West, Plymouth. The husband of the deceased formerly kept a public-house in Cardiff, and died about two years ago, since which the deceased had travelled with lace, but was a victim to intemperance. At times she did not undress for a whole week, so besotted was she, and so complete a slave to that potent passion. In August last she was sentenced to three months' imprisonment for some offence by the borough magistrates, and completed her term on Thursday last, the 22nd instant. From thence she proceeded to the house of a friend whom she knew, named Ann Hugo, residing at 168 King-street west. She complained of being ill, whereupon Hugo asked her to take some breakfast, but she refused to do so, and went to an adjacent beer-house, where she became intoxicated, returning to her friend's room between ten and eleven o'clock and slept with Hugo's two children. On Friday morning her entertainer offered her breakfast, but she again refused to partake, and revisited the beer-house, staying there until night, drunk and helpless. Saturday, Sunday and Monday passed, and the operations of the first two days were continued. On each of these days she was in a state of intoxication, and invariably declined any offer of food. On the Saturday morning she pledged a coat, a waistcoat, and two silk handkerchiefs, to procure more liquor, and in the evening, whilst its fumes rendered her stupid, she wandered forth, and exposed herself to the rain, which fell heavily. She remained out during the whole of Monday night and on Tuesday morning entered the abode of another of her acquaintance, named Susan Chapman, residing at No. 110 King-street. She went to bed, and about 12 o'clock sent for Hugo. The habits of habitual intemperance, the sudden change from the diet and temperature of the Borough Prison to exposure to the cold and rain; the entire abstinence from food during nearly six days; and the unrestrained indulgence in drink, had produced an effect, and this the unhappy creature felt, for she declared she was dying. Hugo supposed her to be sinking and administered some brandy, but did not succeed in rallying her. Some arrowroot was made, but she could not take any. Hot water and flannels were applied to her feet, and every attention was paid her by the persons with whom she was, but their efforts were of no avail, for she died between five and six o'clock in the same evening. These facts having been substantiated by the witnesses, Ann Hugo and Susan Chapman, the Coroner briefly summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died by the Visitation of God, and that her death was accelerated by excessive drinking."

EXETER - The Boy Flogging Case At Exeter. Verdict Of Manslaughter Against The Teacher. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN BOURNE, a little boy, aged nine years, who was taken ill and died after a flogging he had received in the Devon and Exeter Central School, was resumed on Tuesday evening by Mr W. H. Hooper, the Coroner. - The Coroner inquired if there were any persons present to give any further evidence. - Mr J. Austin, the master, then came forward and some conversation then ensued between him and the Coroner. He was ultimately sworn, and stated that he was the master of the Devon and Exeter Central School. The deceased was a pupil in the school, and had been so rather more than twelve months. He belonged to the seventh class. On the 2nd of November that class was under the care of a monitor named Pidgeon. He could not swear that Charles Hawker had not had charge of the class during the morning, but to the best of his belief he had not. He (Mr Austin) had himself had charge of the class during the morning on two occasions. He noticed the boy in the afternoon about three o'clock in consequence of one of the boys having told him that he had been sick. He (Mr Austin) saw he was very pale, and then had the conversation with him mentioned above. The deceased never complained to him as having been struck. He heard nothing further of the boy until the 18th of November, when he heard a report from the Rev. Preb. Lee, who said that he had been told by Mr Cumming, the surgeon, that the boy was very ill from a blow alleged to have been given by a teacher. Mr Lee and himself then visited the deceased, but he was in a state of stupor and he could not get any answer from him. - The Coroner: Do you use anything in your school called a "pointer?" - Mr Austin: Yes. - Two pointers used in the school were then produced. These are deal sticks about five feet in length, rather more than an inch in circumference at the largest end and tapering towards the point. - Mr Austin continued: The pointers were used to point out places on the map and for lessons on the blackboard. The seventh class had a lesson on the blackboard on the 2nd of November. It would have been Pidgeon's place to have given this lesson, but he could not swear that Hawker had not given it. - The Coroner: Have you ever been obliged to complain of the pupil teachers' beating the boys? - Mr Austin: Not with the pointers. - The Coroner: With the hand? - Mr Austin: Yes. - The Coroner: Have you ever so complained of Hawker's? - Mr Austin: Yes. - The Coroner: On more than one occasion? - Mr Austin: I do not recollect that I have. The case in question was in which Hawker had struck a boy named Selley with his hand, on the ear, and his mother had complained of it. - The Coroner: Have you ever seen the pointer used by the pupil teachers to knock boys? - Mr Austin: No. The pupil teachers had no right to inflict any corporal punishment on the boys. If they were deserving of punishment, it was their duty to send them to him as the master. If any punishment was inflicted by the pupil teacher it was a direct act of disobedience and a breach of discipline. - The first-class teacher, Wm. Punsfer, was then examined, and corroborated the statement made by deceased's father, with the exception that Punsfer said it was on the 7th and not on the 12th that he visited the deceased. The boy had said that it was not Punsfer who had struck him, but "Hawker had knocked him in the back of his head." - Mr Cumming was next examined. He said that he had on Sunday morning last made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. On removing the scalp from the skull and at the back of the head, between the scalp and skull, there was a small quantity of coagulated blood. Otherwise the surface of the skull was healthy. On removing a portion of the skull, he found the surface of the brain very much congested with blood. Between the skull and brain there were rather more than two ounces of fluid. The base of the brain was covered with a thick layer of lymph, produced by inflammation. In the centre of the brain there was a considerable quantity of fluid. - The Coroner: Did the appearances you have stated lead you to the opinion that they had been caused by a blow? - Mr Cumming: The coagulated blood between the scalp and brain would indicate a blow had been struck; and taking the boy's illness from beginning to end, he (Mr C.) considered that the blow was the cause of death. The immediate cause was inflammation of the base of the brain. - This was the whole of the evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was one of considerable importance. There had been a great deal of prejudice of late against schoolmasters; and he might mention two cases, in St. Sidwell's and St. James's schools, where indictments had been preferred against teachers for ill-treatment of boys. The position of teacher was one of great difficulty: on one side the instructor had to put up with a great deal of irritation by the unruly conduct of boys and masters might, under such circumstances, strike a boy more severely than he ought: and, on the other side, the boys were not to be ill-treated by those who had care of their education. There was, as he had said, a great difficulty in the matter; but he thought there was a reciprocal duty from the child to the master, and the master to the child; and he did not, as one, consider that the child ought to have been upheld in being unruly to his master. The Coroner then read the whole of the evidence to the Jury, and commented on it most impartially. - The room was then cleared, and after an absence of half-an-hour, the public were again admitted, when The Foreman said the Jury had found a verdict of Manslaughter against Charles Edward Hawker; and the Coroner said he would stand committed for trial. - Mr Hawker, sen., applied to have his son admitted to bail. - The Coroner said he should be willing to do so, and in answer to Mr Fildew, said he thought that his own recognizances in £50 and two sureties in £25 each would be sufficient. - Mr Fildew applied to have the warrant suspended. - The Coroner said he had no power to do that. If any bail was submitted to him tonight he would consider and determine the matter tomorrow. - Hawker was then committed on the Coroner's warrant to take his trial at the forthcoming Assizes.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 November 1860
TEIGNGRACE - Fatal Accident At Teigngrace. - On Wednesday, a poor little boy, named GARRY, 10 years old, was sent by his employer, Mr Thomas Shilston, of Teigngrace, into a field with a horse and cart for some mangold wurtzel roots, and while he was loading the cart it is supposed the horse started off, and that, in attempting to stop it, the boy fell, and the cart turned over upon him killing him on the spot. An Inquest was held at Murrin's Union Inn, Teigngrace yesterday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., the Coroner, when the above facts having been deposed to, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 December 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, yesterday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES POPE, aged 45, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Tuckett, of Shobrooke. From the evidence it appeared that as deceased was riding in a waggon drawn by two horses, on the 5th November, near Shobrooke, a gun was fired; the report so frightened the horses that they ran away, and he fell from the waggon, and the wheels passed over his body. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until Saturday. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts.

EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - On Monday (yesterday) morning, MR GEORGE POMEROY, a well-known fish dealer, was found by his servant dead in his bedroom, in Paris-street, Exeter, having hung himself to the bed-post by a small cord. It appeared that deceased, who was 66 years of age, had spoken to his daughter, and also to his daughter-in-law, very despondingly on Sunday, particularly alluding to a demand made on him for the payment of some money, and to the ill-health of his son. - An Inquest was held last evening before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and an unusually large Jury, of which Mr Cole was Foreman: Evidence having been taken, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was found.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 December 1860
PLYMOUTH - Death From Destitution In Lower Lane, Plymouth. - At four o'clock yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, to Inquire into the cause of death of RICHARD WINNICOTT, a journeyman tailor, who was reported to have died from want of the common necessaries of life. - The facts as elicited at the Inquiry respecting the death of this unfortunate man, revealed a state of things almost incredible. The deceased existed - we can scarcely say lived - with his sister, at No. 6 Lower Lane, and was about 53 years of age. Until about two years ago, he indulged in very intemperate habits, but was obliged to become more abstemious in consequence of his declining health. They were in very distressed circumstances, and were either unable or unwilling to apply to the parish authorities for relief. The door of their habitation was always closed against the neighbourhood; no one knew how they managed to live, and very few cared. The deceased had not taken any food since Thursday last, and died from exhaustion on Monday night. - The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the place where the body lay, whither they were accompanied by the reporters, at the request of the Coroner. Accordingly, emerging from the Guildhall, the Coroner and Jury turned down High-street, branching off from the right of which are three localities known as Higher-lane, Middle-lane and Lower-lane, into neither of which enter any but those whose business necessitates their doing so. Perhaps the worst of them is Lower-lane, to which the steps of the party were directed. As the Jurors threaded their way, sometimes by the sides of filthy carts and as they ever and anon stumbled over a heap of dirt on the pavement, the denizens of the region crowded to their doors and windows, attracted by the sight of anyone respectably dressed invading the sanctity of their wretched domain. The dwelling of the deceased having been reached, a guide was procured, who conducted the Jurors through a dark passage, the walls and roof of which hung with the accumulated dirt of years. The end of the passage having been attained, a candle was procured, as the dull December light was rapidly disappearing from those abodes of squalor. The Jury then, four at a time, ascended a dilapidated flight of stairs, which led to the wretched hole in which deceased lay. The window had long since disappeared, and as the cold air rushed in, it almost extinguished the uncertain light of the candle held by the guide. The dead man lay on a pallet of shavings; neither bedstead, table, chair, nor any article of furniture was to be seen. The dirt on the floor might have been taken up by the shovelful. Bare and dingily coloured walls, an old stool, and from the window a view commanding the surrounding abodes of misery, complete the description of this habitation of two human beings in this social reforming age, in the heart of this prosperous borough. A simple glance was sufficient for each spectator; to have remained any length of time would have been detrimental to health. The worthy Coroner avowed that it was the most complete spectacle of filth and wretchedness he had ever seen, and long will it be ere the sight will be effaced from the memory of any of the beholders. On returning to the Guildhall, the following evidence was adduced:- ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE said: I am the wife of William Partridge, who was a stone-mason, but I have not seen him for 28 years. The deceased was my brother, and up to about two years ago was addicted to drinking ardent spirits; since then he has taken nothing but table beer. For the past 18 months he has been a cripple, confined to his room. We rented two rooms at 1s. per week of Mr Amm, Little Durnford-street, Stonehouse. I never applied to the parish for relief. - The Coroner: If you did not feel inclined to go to the Workhouse, you might have had a free dispensary ticket. Were you aware of that? - Witness: I was not, sir. My brother has been very ill for the last three weeks, but last Saturday morning he worked a little. - The Coroner: Were you ever visited by anyone? - Witness: Visited, sir? - The Coroner: I mean, did ever any person come to see you - any ladies, the town missionary, or any kind person? - Witness: No, sir. - The Coroner: There are the St. Andrew's District Visitors. Did not either of them ever call to see you? - Witness: No, sir; my brother slept on shavings on the floor, and so did I, for we had no bedstead. Yesterday afternoon, about three o'clock, deceased asked for a little drink, and I gave him some table beer. He had eaten nothing since Thursday. About eleven o'clock last night, not hearing him breathe, I went to him, and found he was dead. - The Coroner: Has he been attended by any medical man? - Witness: No, sir. - The Coroner: You say your brother was an invalid, and that you received no assistance from the parish. How did you live? - Witness: I did a little plain-work. One week I earned half-a-crown. - The Coroner: And were you two maintained for a week on half-a-crown? - Witness: Yes, sir. One week I only earned tenpence, and we lived on that. (Sensation). - The Coroner: During the past month do you think you have earned five shillings? - Witness: I have not, sir. - The Coroner briefly commented on the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Exhaustion and not from any violence. - The unfortunate surviving relative of the deceased was evidently very languid from long confinement in an impure atmosphere and from want of food, and at times her evidence was scarcely audible. The Coroner and Jury subscribed above 10s. for her, and several of the latter requested her to come to their shops and she should be furnished with tea, bread, sugar and other necessaries so essential to restore her from her present emaciated condition.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 December 1860
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident In Plymouth. - An Inquest on the body of RICHARD HENRY ADDISCOTT, who was killed under the circumstances recorded in the Western Morning News of yesterday, was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday afternoon, at half-past three o'clock. Joseph Gundry, a pensioner in the Royal Marines, residing at No. 23, Princess-street, said he did not see the child until the front wheel of the omnibus passed over his body. The child did not speak after the second wheel passed over him, but he lived three or four minutes after the accident occurred. he attributed no blame to anyone. The driver of the omnibus "the Queen" and not "the Times" said it was impossible for him to have pulled up. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - It appeared that the child was not running behind a waggon, but was merely passing from one side of the street to the other, when the driver of the waggon, to accelerate the speed of his horses, smacked his whip, which caused the little boy to start suddenly and before he could recover himself he was knocked down by the omnibus. MR ADDISCOTT requests us to give publicity to the following letter: Sir, Allow me, through the medium of your columns, to return my sincere thanks to those friends who kindly assisted on the occasion, and to Mr Browse, of Bedford-street, for his valuable service rendered. At the same time, will you kindly correct the statement in yesterday's paper, that my dear child was running behind the waggon, this being distinctly contradicted in the evidence given before the Jury this day. - By inserting the above, you will greatly oblige yours respectfully, R. S. ADDISCOTT. 33 William-street, Dec. 5th, 1860.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 December 1860
POWDERHAM - It is a remarkable circumstance that the poor man LACEY, whose sudden death we reported yesterday, should have dropped down dead while passing through a turnip-field, and that the body was discovered through a dog making a stand at it. The Inquest before R. R. Crosse, Esq., yesterday, resulted in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Oreston. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the "Eagle Tavern," Sutton-road, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PATCHCOTT (not Pertch, as stated yesterday), who was killed in the Breakwater Quarries, at Oreston, on Wednesday. The deceased, it appeared from the evidence, was 56 years old, and had worked for the last 24 years on the Breakwater quarries. On Wednesday afternoon, while in the act of firing a charge of gunpowder for blasting the rock, it is thought, through a spark from the match falling on the powder, an explosion took place, and he was blown some 40 or 50 feet into the air, and his foot severed from the body. He was picked up dead, his boot, with the foot in it, 20 feet from the body. The deceased had called out fire to his fellow-workmen, and they had got out of the way. The blasting was being done in the old-fashioned way of a reed filled with powder, and not by a fusee. Verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 December 1860
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier's Inn, Exeter yesterday (Thursday) before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named THOMAS FORD. The deceased was forty-seven years of age, and a labourer. On Tuesday last he was driving a waggon on the Kermford-road, when his horses took fright and he fell from the shafts, and the wheels of the waggon passed over him. He was at once removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he expired on the following evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 December 1860
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest At Exeter. The Suicide By A Young Man. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Monday) before R. R. Crosse, Esq., at the Buller's Arms Inn, St. Thomas, on the body of the young man named JOHN COLLINGS, who committed suicide on the preceding morning. We published the leading facts in the Western Morning News of yesterday, but the following evidence was sworn to:- Ann Thomas, who resides at the Friars, stated that her daughter-in-law was deceased's sister - she had known him for six years. Deceased had been away from Exeter about nine months, and returned about three months since, and resided with his sister JANE THOMAS. About six weeks since he went into the Devon and Exeter Hospital in consequence of a seizure in the hand, and on Thursday last he came out and lodged at witness's house, but he had been unwell and very low-spirited for some time before he went into the hospital. On Saturday morning last he left about ten o'clock with the intention of going to his sister's, and she had not seen him alive since. During the two days deceased had lodged at witness's house; she observed that he frequently laughed without any cause, and appeared very strange; and on one occasion he remarked that he should like to spend the rest of his days in the hospital; and upon being asked "why he came out," he replied that "it was for the good of his wife and family." Witness told deceased's sister that "she did not think JOHN'S mind was better since he had been in the hospital;" to which she replied, "she could not make him out at all." Deceased took his meals at his sister's, and slept at her (witness's) house. She did not think deceased had been in such a state of mind as to be accountable for his own actions for some time past. - JANE THOMAS, sister of deceased, residing at 31 Russell-street, corroborated the statement of the last witness, and added that his greatest trouble appeared to be because he was not permitted to see his wife and family, and that he would frequently cry like a child without any apparent cause. On the Tuesday previous to his discharge from the hospital he was out for two hours, and visited witness, and whilst with her observed that "everyone looked mazed about him." On Wednesday she received a note from him, with another enclosed to Mr Geare, which she conveyed, but that gentleman would not reply to it. On Thursday evening he was again at witness's house, and on Friday morning, about half-past ten o'clock, he was there, and witness got him some breakfast, and at five o'clock in the evening some tea, and after that he went to sleep in a chair for about two hours; he then asked about his note to Mr Geare, and upon being told the result he said, "The whole world is turned against me." On Saturday morning, about ten o'clock, he went to witness's house and she got his breakfast, but he ate nothing the whole of the day until five o'clock, when he had some tea, and whilst eating it he never spoke, but began to cry bitterly, and was staring at witness the whole of the time. Deceased left her about eight o'clock on Saturday evening, and she had not seen him alive since that time. While deceased was in the hospital witness went to his wife and her family, and consulted them about putting him into a lunatic asylum, and the wife said that she thought he had been insane for the last three years. Witness believed he was in an unsound state of mind, and felt convinced that he had drowned himself, as he had frequently wished himself dead. - Mr Huggins, solicitor was present. Deceased had been in the employ of this gentleman, but upon being asked by the Coroner if he could add anything to the testimony already given, replied that he did not think he could after the evidence of the previous witnesses. - Mr John Bond, spirit merchant, of St. Thomas, volunteered some evidence as to the state of deceased's mind, and remarked that he had more particularly observed a strange manner for the last six months. - Leonard Garry, a labourer at the gas works on the Exeter Basin, deposed to the taking of the body out of the water, and the finding of the clothes on the road about 100 yards from the edge of the basin. Deceased had on his shirt, a shirt front, and one stocking, and his hands were clasped together. - The Coroner observed to the Jury that if they wished to have further evidence from the hospital, as to the state of the unfortunate man's mind, now was the time for them to say so; but if they considered the evidence already given, confirmed by the voluntary statement of Mr Bond, was sufficient, they would consider their verdict, and he would record it. - The Jury at once unanimously returned a verdict to the effect that "Deceased destroyed himself whilst labouring under Insanity." - The deceased was not, as stated, a member of the Exeter Volunteer Artillery."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 December 1860
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death In Stonehouse. - An Instance of very sudden death occurred yesterday morning at Stonehouse. THOMAS SQUIRES, who has for many years worked for Mr Smith, coal merchant, of Bath-street, Plymouth, as a carter, yesterday morning came to his work as usual, and having put his horse to, proceeded with horse and cart to the South Devon coal stores, in Newport-street, Stonehouse. He had not complained, and appeared in his usual health. He commenced work, and while in the act of stowing the coals in the cart, he was seen to fall. He was immediately removed on a plank into a passage and expired within a very few minutes. The deceased was between 40 and 50 years of age, and had many years been in Mr Smith's employ. - An Inquest was holden on the body at the Dock Hotel, Millbay, yesterday afternoon, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, when evidence having been given as to the above facts, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 December 1860
EXETER - Inquests At Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Lord Nelson Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of a little girl named JESSIE CANN, aged six years, who was found dead in her mother's arms on Monday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

A second Inquest was held at the Exeter Workhouse on the same day, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of an illegitimate child of BESSIE TAYLOR. It appeared that TAYLOR was admitted into the workhouse on Thursday last, where she was confined on the same evening, and up to Saturday night both mother and child were doing well, but early on Sunday morning the mother awoke and called the nurse, saying "her child was dying," but before the nurse arrived the child was dead. Dr Warren said his opinion was that death had resulted from suffocation, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 December 1860
EXETER - Accidental Death. - A fishwoman named BRICE, who resides in the West Quarter, was walking in the street on Thursday, when her foot slipped and she fell on the back of her head, causing a concussion of the brain, which resulted in her death two hours afterwards. An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, the same evening, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 December 1860
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - A young man, named CODNER, a moulder, who resided in the College, South-street, was out throwing snow-balls on Thursday evening, and about two hours afterwards he expired. An Inquest was held at the Bear Inn, South-street, on Saturday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

DARTMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Friday morning, a poor old man, named NICHOLAS DODD, an inmate of the Totnes Union, but who had been granted leave of absence to see his friends, whilst returning from the barber's shop to his home, suddenly fell down, and before medical aid could be brought expired. An Inquest was held before the Borough Coroner, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. Deceased was 63 years old.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 January 1861
PAIGNTON - The Inquest on the body of JAMES WILLIAM COX was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., yesterday, at the Crown and Anchor Hotel. It appeared in evidence that the deceased came by his death on the 21st Dec. through his falling on the railway whilst driving three loaded waggons drawn by one horse. The wheels of the waggon went over him, crushing the top of his head so that he died instantly. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

KINGSTEIGNTON - The Suicide On The Railway. The Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday an Inquest was held, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury - Mr R. Knowles, sen., Foreman - at Weaver's King's Arms Inn, Kingsteignton, on view of the body of ROBERT KERSLAKE, a tailor, who was killed on the South Devon line of railway, nearly opposite Hackney, by a train passing over him and severing his head from his body, on Saturday afternoon last. - The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner remarked that they were assembled to Inquire into the death of ROBERT KERSLAKE, who he (the Coroner) was informed had come to his death by his having deliberately thrown himself on the metals of the railway on a train approaching. It would be their duty to ascertain if this were so, and also the state of the man's mind at the time; and if the evidence went to prove that he was in a right state of mind at the time he committed the act, deceased would then be guilty of "self murder;" and if the Jury, after hearing the evidence, were satisfied he was in a right state of mind at the time, they would have to return a verdict of "felo de se;" and deceased would have t be buried in unconsecrated ground, at the dead of night, without having any burial service read over him. But he was compelled to tell them, that in consequence of the witnesses not being present, he should be obliged to adjourn this Inquiry until tomorrow (Tuesday). - The Jury were then accordingly bound over in the sum of £10 each to be present on Tuesday morning. - The Coroner then instructed the policeman who had charge of the case to summon the engine-driver or guard who saw the man throw himself on the metals; the woman, Thorn, who saw him near Hackney before he committed the deed; and the girl Weeks, who saw the body first after the accident happened; and also John Bearne, of Newton, to identify the body. The Coroner thanked the Jury for their attendance and they were accordingly dismissed until Tuesday morning.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 January 1861
KINGSTEIGNTON - Suicide On The Railway. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ROBERT KERSLAKE, who committed suicide, as stated in yesterday's Morning News, by laying himself on the rails, and allowing a train to pass over him, took place at the King's Arms Inn, Kingsteignton, yesterday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq. The Jury having answered to their names, the following evidence was adduced:- - Smith, engine driver, who had charge of the train, deposed that on Saturday last, whilst the train was proceeding between Teignmouth and Newton, and when near a bridge called Hackney, he saw the deceased run down from the embankment and place himself across the metals of the railway. The whistle of the engine was blown, but the deceased took no notice of it, and as the effort would have been useless no attempt was made to stop the train, which passed over him, severing the head from the body. On arriving at the Newton Station, he went back to the spot, accompanied by the guard and others, and picked up the body, which was at once conveyed to Weaver's Kings Arms, Kingsteignton. - A woman named Thorn proved that she saw the deceased at Hackney on the same day, and that he was walking near the rails some time before the arrival of the train. - The girl Georgina Weeks proved seeing the deceased on Saturday and immediately after the train had passed over him. - John Bearde, a tanner, living at Newton, identified the body as that of ROBERT KERSLAKE, a tailor, who lately resided at Newton. Witness had not seen him since the Prize Rifle Shooting Match. He knew that KERSLAKE, who had injured his head some years since, was subject to very great excitement, particularly when he gave way to drink, which made him for the time, completely deranged. - The Coroner summed up the evidence, and the Jury at once returned a verdict - "That the deceased destroyed himself whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity." - Before dismissing them, the Coroner thanked the Jury for their attendance.

Melancholy Occurrence. - On Wednesday last, an old man named ROLSTONE, left Dunsford with apples, in a donkey cart, and proceeded to Bovey and Moreton for the purpose of selling them. He was returning home from Moreton, which place he left about nine o'clock p.m. the snow was rapidly descending at the time, and several parties begged him not to attempt the journey. About two miles from Moreton he must have fallen off the cart and been buried in the snow. He was not found until the Saturday, of course frozen to death. W. A. Cockey Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Monday.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 January 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To A Boy. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the Oxford Inn, Claremont-street, touching the death of THOMAS WARD, a boy nine years and six months old. The lad resided with his grandmother, at No. 1, Claremont-place, North-road, and on Wednesday morning was sent with a bag to procure some shavings. On his way to his destination he fell in with a lad 14 years of age, named William David Lane, who was proceeding from Cambridge-street to Pennycomequick with bread. Deceased expressed a wish to accompany Lane, which was granted. On arriving at Pennycomequick, deceased intimated his intention of climbing into a hedge for the purpose of gathering some "winter strawberries," and persisted in doing so, notwithstanding Lane's endeavour to dissuade him. Soon after ascending into the hedge he fell, and struck the back part of his head. He was taken home and died on the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 January 1861
ST MARYCHURCH - The Fatal Accident at Anstey's Cove, Babbicombe. - In Friday's Western Morning News, particulars were given of a very sad accident which had taken place on the previous afternoon at this beautiful spot, one of the most picturesque of the many lovely views which are to be obtained along the shores of this magnificent bay. On Saturday an Inquest was held at Mr Love's Commercial Hotel, Market-street, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a respectable Jury, when evidence was adduced to the following effect:- Three young gentlemen, MASTER PITCAIRN, (the deceased), Master Batersby (son of Dr Batersby), and Master Hutchinson, went out for a walk on the afternoon in question, shortly after two o'clock, and wended their way towards Babbicombe Down. After amusing themselves on that portion which is marked off for the rifle practice of the Torbay club, they determined to descend the steep rocks which lead to Wansley's Cove. To enable persons to do this, a winding path has been cut, and which, with ordinary care, can be used in safety. The young lads, however, did not proceed directly to the beach. About 50 yards down the declivity there exists a "cave", which is some five feet distant from, and raised above, the path. Into this cave it was proposed to get, and from putting this unfortunate proposition into practice, the fatal accident resulted. It would appear that each of them had got in and out of the cave several times, when at last MASTER PITCAIRN attempted it alone. In climbing up he rested both hands, and consequently his entire weight, upon a large jutting rock, and which, to all appearances, was as firm as the rock itself. But such was not the case. While Batersby and Hutchinson were standing close by and looking on they observed the deceased falling back, and heard him at the same time say "Stand back." Poor PITCAIRN had been thrown to the ground (a distance of some feet) and crushed by a piece of rock weighing half a ton. The mass of stone rested upon his head. His companions, who were very naturally alarmed, did their best to rescue him, but finding their strength insufficient, Master Batersby obtained the help of some quarrymen, who were working near, and with the aid of their crowbars the rock was removed, and the deceased was carefully carried to his father's residence, upon arrival at which it was found that life was quite extinct. In accordance with this facts, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The melancholy event has caused great sympathy to be felt for the REV. D. PITCAIRN, whose good works have won for him the affectionate esteem of all who know him. A few weeks since a very large fall of rocks took place in the quarry opposite the market. Fortunately the workmen were absent, or no doubt a frightful accident would have resulted, the falling mass weighing several tons. At the close of the Inquiry, the Jury requested Sergeant Rousham to hand over the small fee to which they were entitled to the Treasurer of the Torbay Infirmary.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 January 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Coroners' Inquests At Devonport. - The following Inquests were holden yesterday before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner for Devonport:- At the Castle and Keys public house, to Inquire as to the death of JOHN MUGFORD, drill-instructor of H.M.S. Impregnable, whose melancholy death we recorded yesterday. From the statement of Morris ~Evans, it appeared that while deceased was descending the steps at Mutton Cove, he slipped and falling heavily upon is head on the platform was taken up insensible. He was immediately taken on board H.M.S. Impregnable and received all requisite attention. He never rallied however, and died about eleven o'clock on Friday. The deceased was about 40 years of age. The witness characterised the fatal steps as exceedingly dangerous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was also held at the Town Hall, before A. B. Bone, Esq., yesterday afternoon, on the body of JOB ROBINS, an infant, who had been suffocated whilst sleeping with his parents. After hearing the different witnesses the Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Accidental Suffocation."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest On The Body Of The Murdered Man. - Yesterday the Coroner for Plymouth, J. Edmonds, Esq., held an Inquest on the body of Lance-Sergeant HENRY JONES, of the 61st Regiment, who was shot in the Millbay Barracks on Saturday evening last, by Private Robert Hacked, also of the same regiment. Owing to the pressure of business at the Guildhall, the Quarter Sessions being then in progress, the Coroner was unable to obtain the use of either of the rooms in that building until the afternoon; and, in consequence of this, he held a preliminary court at 12 o'clock, for the purpose of swearing in the Jury and the transaction of other business, at Mr Pearse's Mount Pleasant Hotel, Millbay. - The following gentlemen composed the Jury:- Mr Joseph Wills, Foreman; Mr B. Adams, Mr W. Birmingham, Mr E. Edwards, Mr J. Hartnell, Mr J. Hardy, Mr J. Hawkins, Mr J. Holmes, Mr E. Jago, Mr W. A. Jeffery, Mr R. A. Langford, Mr W. H. Miner, Mr E. Paull, Mr J. Pillman, Mr H. Stather, Mr J. Sellick. - The Jury having been sworn in, the Coroner, in the absence of the prisoner, refrained from making any remarks upon the case, and merely recapitulated the facts as given in these columns yesterday. Referring to the body of the deceased, he said that some anxiety was felt by the military authorities at the barracks, that if it was allowed to remain in the same room where the murder was committed, it would be injurious to the health of those persons who were compelled to sleep there; and under the circumstances, considering it would be dangerous to allow it to remain, he (the Coroner) gave orders to have it removed to the guardroom, where it was then lying. Their first duty, he said, would be to go and view the body, and afterwards examine the apartments, so as to get an insight into the whole facts of the case. They would afterwards return to that room, and would then adjourn to the Guildhall; for as the matter was one of public importance he thought it would be better to hold the Inquest in a court of justice, so that the public might have an opportunity of being present. Besides, by going to the Guildhall, they would have the benefit of seeing the prisoner, whom the magistrates promised should be in attendance, and they would then be able to watch his manner and demeanour and judge upon it accordingly. - The Coroner and Jury then repaired to the barracks, and having made a very minute inspection, returned to Mr Pearse's Hotel, and afterwards proceeded to the Guildhall, where they remained for a short time, but in consequence of each of the rooms being still occupied, and finding that it was unlikely that either of them would be disengaged for the next two hours, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until three o'clock, each Juryman being bound over in his own recognisances to appear at that hour. - At three o'clock the Jury again assembled in the Guildhall, when they were accommodated in the magistrates' room; and having answered to their names, the evidence was gone into. - Among those present were Major Deacon, and Capt. Sloman, both of the 61st Regiment and besides these gentlemen, there were not above half a dozen present. - The first witness called was John Allen, who said: I am a colour-sergeant in the 61st Regiment and reside in Millbay Barracks, Plymouth. I have known the deceased about nine years; he was a lance-sergeant in the 61st Regiment and was about 32 years of age. Four companies of the 61st Regiment are quartered in Millbay Barracks. there are three-rooms on one landing one pair of stairs up, to which there is one common entrance from the centre. The rooms lead one into the other by means of doors, and are kept open until nine o'clock at night, when they are shut. I know nothing about a man named Purcell of my own knowledge. About six o'clock in the evening of Saturday last, I was in the end room to the right of the passage, as you come up stairs. I was conversing with the deceased, our backs being towards the doorway dividing the room in which we were from the middle room. We were talking about some orders that the deceased had received from headquarters in the Citadel to carry to Millbay. He said the orders were not long, and at that moment he uttered a groan, threw up his arms and fell to the ground. - The Jury here asked why the prisoner was not present, and the Coroner replied that the magistrates first of all promised him (the Coroner) he should be, but since then they had held a meeting and had decided that he was not to be present at the Inquiry. - This announcement appeared to cause some dissatisfaction amongst the Jurors, but the Coroner told them he could not help himself, and he should be obliged to proceed with the investigation. - The examination of the witness was then continued as follows:- I then rushed into the room and threw the prisoner's rifle up. He was then holding it in his hand, and I ordered him to be secured. I immediately returned to the deceased's body, and found him lying on his back on the floor of the barrack room. The breath was just leaving his body and the palpitation had ceased. That was about three minutes after the shot was fired. A civilian surgeon and a surgeon of artillery came in about half an hour, and the deceased's body was turned over, when I observed that a bullet had entered about the spine of the back, gone through the body and came out of his abdomen. The wounds were then bleeding fresh. Robert Hacked is in addition to being a private, a servant to Lieut. Hamilton, and from orders I received from Major Deacon, I went to the officers' servants kitchen, where servants generally remain during the day, to look for ten missing rounds of rifle ammunition, and on a table in the centre of the room I saw an envelope bearing the initials of Robert Hacked. On making further examination I discovered nine rounds of ball ammunition for an Enfield rifle, in a cupboard; these I handed over to Major Deacon. I am quite positive he had been served out with 20 rounds of ammunition, and in addition to the nine found in the cupboard ten rounds were taken from his pouch packed up, which had not been opened. The pouch was found by me about two paces from where I saw Hacked standing after the shot was fired. I said nothing whatever to him about what he had done, and nothing passed between us. At the time the shot was fired there were, to the best of my recollection, about 16 persons in the room with the deceased and myself, including soldiers, their wives and children. I should think the distance from where the shot was fired to the place where myself and the deceased were standing was to the utmost 30 feet. The sergeant, who is dead, was a kind-hearted and good-tempered man, and had had a fine education. I believe the prisoner also bore a good character, and he wore a good conduct badge. He was a little addicted to drinking; so was the deceased. I should say when the unfortunate occurrence took place the deceased was perfectly sober. Immediately after the act was committed Hacked appeared cooler then before; his excitement had evidently gone down. He was excited by drink but was perfectly rational. To my knowledge no other man in the room had a rifle in his hand, and I have not the slightest doubt that Hacked fired the gun, and that deceased's death was occasioned thereby. The deceased's number in the regiment is 3,135. He enjoyed very good health, and as far as I can judge was in good health up to the time of his being shot. - By the Foreman: The distance from the officers' quarters up the place where the deceased was shot is about 150 yards. It is not usual to have a rifle loaded in the barrack room, and it is not allowed on any pretext whatever. - By the Jury: Previous to Saturday the deceased and Hacked lived on very good terms. They may have drunk together on some occasions, but I am not aware that any animosity every arose between them while drinking. - Joseph McDowell was next sworn, and deposed as follows: I am a private in the 61st Regiment, and have known the deceased about three months. I have also known Robert Hacked about the same time. On Saturday last at six o'clock I was sitting on a form in the middle room of the barracks by the side of the fire, reading a book. Corporal Bryan was sitting on my left, and corporal Graham was standing just on the left of him. I saw Robert Hacked, who is a private in the same regiment, and whom I saw today in the custody of the police in the Plymouth Guildhall, come up the stairs, and on his entering the room and coming near the stove, I saw he had his pouch on his shoulder and his rifle in his hand. I heard Corporal Graham say to him jocosely, "What rifle corps do you belong to?" He made no reply. I was paying great attention to the book I was reading, and in about five minutes after, I heard Corporal Bryan shout out to Corporal Graham to go and seize the rifle, and just as I took my attention off my book I saw Robert Hacked fire the rifle. At the time he fired he had his left leg on the end of a form, and he fired from his left shoulder. I have heard he could always fire from his left shoulder best, and he had permission from the authorities to fire in that position. Corporal Ryan then ran and seized the rifle from his hand, and on my going into the adjoining room I saw Sergeant JONES lying on the floor in a dying state. I saw the wound; it was bleeding. When Hacked fired it was through the doorway into the inner room, where I afterwards saw the deceased in a dying state. The body the Jury viewed today is that of deceased. I was present when Hacked was given into the custody of the police on Saturday evening last, and was one of the escort who took him to the station-house. - In answer to Major Deacon, witness said when Hacked entered the room he had his pouch belt across his shoulder and the pouch in its proper place. - The next witness sworn was Patrick Ryan, a corporal in the 61st Regiment. He said: I have known the deceased about seven years and Hacked about two years and a half. On Saturday last I was present at the dinner table in the middle room. Sergeant JONES was sitting at the upper end of the table, on the left side, and I saw Robert Hacked and a pensioner named Purcell enter the room shortly after 12 o'clock. Hacked was then sober. Purcell commenced a conversation at the dinner table about some prize money from Delhi, and Hacked appeared to be pleased to hear that he was about to get some, and he made Purcell sit down and eat his dinner. Deceased said in a jesting way "You'd spin another such a yarn for another dinner." Hacked did not appear pleased at that observation, but said nothing more about it then. Shortly after Hacked left the room, and did not return again until half-past five in the evening. The deceased was present when Hacked came in, and the latter said, "No one had a right to insult a friend of mine when I brought him in." This I believed alluded to what took place between Purcell and the deceased at the dinner table. The sergeant replied, "You may make the best of what I said," and Hacked then said to deceased, "If it was not for 50 lashes I should get, I would ...." I did not catch the last sentence. The deceased was on duty, and he went into the inside room. Hacked left the barrack-room altogether. This was about half-past five. Hacked returned in about 20 minutes, and I saw him about the centre of the middle room, with his pouch belt across his shoulder, and his rifle in his hand. He came up to the table of the centre room and told some person in the inner room to stand clear, and at that moment he raised the rifle to his left shoulder and fired into the inner room through the doorway. When he fired he placed his left leg on the form, alongside the table. I went into the inner room and saw the deceased; he was not quite dead. When I heard Hacked sing out "Stand clear," I called to Corporal Graham to knock up his rifle, for I thought he was determined on mischief. I saw Hacked in custody today, at the Guild hall, before the magistrates. - By the Foreman: I am in the same company as Hacked is. Prior to this there was no ill-feeling between the deceased and Hacked. I can't say whether Hacked identified the deceased when he fired at him, but I should think he did. - By the Jury: It is not usual for a private and a sergeant to associate together, but there are cases where the two parties would be friendly. There was not time to knock up the rifle before Hacked fired it. The deceased made use of no aggravating language in my hearing on the occasion referred to. Hacked was sober at the dinner table, but at half-past five he had the appearance of being in liquor; he seemed more excited but was not intoxicated. It was not an unusual thing for privates to enter the barrack room at that time of the evening with their rifles and belts in their hands. - At this stage of the proceedings, the Coroner said he would go on for half-an-hour longer, and then he should adjourn the Inquiry until tomorrow. - Several of the Jurors here expressed a wish to have the case finished that evening; but this, the Coroner said, would be impossible, for he wished to make some lengthened remarks to them upon the law bearing on the case; and, in addition to this, they would be conferring a favour on him. It was a matter of great importance, and he was desirous of investigating it as fully as possible; but, as he said before, he thought it was not likely they would complete the whole of the evidence that evening. - James Graham was then called, and deposed as follows:- I am a lance-corporal in the 61st Regiment, and have belonged to it about three months. On Saturday afternoon I was on duty at the Millbay Barracks until about six o'clock, when I went into the middle room. At that time Hacked was standing near the stove, and I went up and stood opposite him. I said, in a joke, "What rifle corps do you belong to?" He had civilian's trousers and a red jacket on at the time; his rifle was in his hand, and his cross belt and pouch were on. He made no reply; he remained there a short time but I took no further notice of him until Corporal Ryan called out to me to knock up Hacked's rifle. When I turned round I saw he had his left foot on a form and his rifle in his left hand pointed half way between his hop and shoulder, abut before I could get to him he had fired. The rifle was pointed in the direction of a doorway leading to the inner room. At the same moment I heard a cry in the other room, and I immediately ran in, and saw the deceased lying on the floor evidently dying. I then had orders to take Hacked to the guard room, and afterwards I escorted him to the Guildhall. - By the Foreman: The deceased and Hacked were always on good terms. - By the Jury: I should say Hacked had been drinking. When in the guard room he said, "I did not intend to shoot Sergeant JONES." I did not ask him who he intended to shoot. did not see him deliberately aiming before he fired. When I asked him what rifle corps he belonged to, he appeared in his usual state of health, and his temper was as good as it generally is. - In answer to Captain Sloman, witness said it was not usual for men to bring up their rifle and other accoutrements in the barrack room to be cleaned. - The Coroner explained, in reference to what Hacked said in the guard room, that if a man pointed a gun with intention to shoot a person, and he, by mistake, happened to kill another person, it was construed into a case of murder. The law was very clear upon that point. - There being no further questions put to the witness. The Foreman said he thought it was hardly fair to the prisoner that he was not allowed to be present, and as this was the first time such a course had been adopted he should be glad if the Coroner would give them some explanation upon it. (Hear.) - The Coroner, in complying with the Foreman's request, said a Coroner was bound by his office whenever a death of this sort took place to Inquire when, how, and by what means the death occurred; and if he neglected to do so he would be liable to heavy penalties. The magistrates had also a right to inquire into it. They had their officers of justice, which the Coroner was not provided with, and therefore he desired the sergeant who called upon him to inform the police authorities of it. Consequently Hacked was taken into custody, and on being brought before the magistrates today, was remanded until Friday. He then applied to the Mayor to have the prisoner brought before them, and he did not anticipate any difficulty about it; but when he came to the Guildhall, about one o'clock, the Mayor told him that the magistrates had decided that the prisoner was not to be brought there. Under those circumstances, and after the difficulty they had had that day in assembling together, he had thought it his duty to proceed with the investigation. Of course, he had given the matter some consideration, but still he must take care to maintain his own rights. He was the last man in the world who would succumb to anyone; but at the same time he endeavoured in all his actions to do that which was honourable, and by so doing he believed he should receive the approbation of his fellow-townsmen. (Hear). - With regard to the man in custody, he agreed with them, and he believed he had a right to be present. (Hear). He possessed the right that every Englishman charged with an offence had, viz. - of cross-examining the witnesses. However, it was no fault of his. He would now bind the Jury down in the sum of £25 each to appear there tomorrow evening at six o'clock. (Laughter.) - Mr Langford: Shall I be out of order if I make a request that the man be brought here tomorrow? If not, I would move a resolution to that effect. - This having been seconded. - The Coroner said it was but just and fair to the man that he should be there. - Mr Jago could not see any argument why the man should not be present; and another Juror said he did not see what right the magistrates had to object to it. - Mr Langford: Seeing the feeling of the Jury, I shall push my resolution. - The Coroner: It is for you to do as you please. - Mr Langford: Must we make our application through the Foreman or through you? - The Coroner: Through your Foreman. - The resolution was then put, and carried unanimously; and the Inquest was adjourned until this evening, at six o'clock, in the Guildhall.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 January 1861
PLYMOUTH - Scalded To Death. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELLEN GODFREY STANBURY. THOMAS STANBURY, brother of the deceased, deposed that he resided at 26 Southside-street. The deceased was about two years and nine months old. On Friday last, between ten and eleven in the forenoon, witness and the deceased were in the kitchen, and the latter was playing near the fire, when she fell forward, and her dress caught in the handle of a saucepan which was full of boiling water. The contents of the saucepan fell over her, scalding her left cheek and neck and other parts of her body. The Coroner having called corroborative evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Monday last, MR SAMUEL GERRY, formerly cab proprietor, but then keeper of the beerhouse Horse and Groom, No 2, Notte-street, was taken suddenly ill and died in a few minutes. An Inquest on the body was held before John Edmonds, Esq., at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon, when evidence in support of the facts of the case having been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased had been subject to palpitation of the heart and was about 56 years of age.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 January 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was holden at St George's Hall, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., yesterday, to Inquire as to the death of the new-born child of JANE KENT, of Hobart-street, Stonehouse. The evidence went to show that the mother of the deceased, the wife of a marine, was affrighted by her child knocking down a number of things from a shelf, that one consequence was the premature birth of the child. The child fell on the floor accidentally and lived 30 hours, continuing to moan all the time. The mother was a sober, well-conducted woman, and the Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 January 1861
Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for Plymouth, at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, King-street, on the body of an itinerant musician named WILLIAM HANCOCK, of about 60 years of age, who came by his death suddenly on Wednesday afternoon. The deceased, his wife and family lived together in one room, 21 Granby-street, and generally the former enjoyed very good health. Of late he had not been out of doors on account of the extremely cold weather. On the night of Tuesday last he complained of something rising in his stomach, but it passed off, and on the following morning he again seemed in perfect health, and at two o'clock he was seen smoking his pipe, apparently very contented. A little before three, however, he complained of being poorly, and on being put to bed became speechless and died shortly afterwards. A doctor was sent for, but none came, and no medical assistance whatever was rendered him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 January 1861
BRENT - On Thursday, CHARLES HAWKING EDMONDS, a child of about three years of age, accidentally caught its cloths on fire, and died in consequence. The child was illegitimate, and was placed by its mother with her married sister, who has children, and the burning happened during the absence of its guardian from the house. An Inquest was held on Saturday on view of the body before W. Cockey, Esq., the District Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when after evidence had been given, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Coroner commented strongly on the impropriety of the practice of parents and guardians leaving children uncared for where there were fires which they could get at.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 January 1861
EXETER - Death By Burning. - A little boy named JOHN MORGAN aged four years, the son of a dairyman residing in St. Sidwells, was so severely burned on Thursday morning last that he died on Friday night. At the Inquest which was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - A second Inquest was held yesterday (Monday) at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of a poor old man named ROBERT HAYDON, aged 61 years. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Huggins, of Shobrooke, and whilst driving a waggon on Saturday (the roads being slippery) his foot tripped, and he fell, the wheels of the waggon passing over his body. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 January 1861
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, yesterday evening, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FREDERICK PHILLIPPS, a child four months old, the son of Lance Corporal PHILLIPPS, engineer, E.I. service, and now stationed at Chatham, which was found dead by its mother's side this morning. The evidence proved that the child, which was of a weakly constitution, was in the enjoyment of its ordinary health when taken to bed by its mother, who, upon waking, found it dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 January 1861
PLYMOUTH - The Accident At Laira. On the 16th instant we reported an accident at Laira, by which a man named TOWL, who had been employed as the driver of some trucks with granite that were on the Plymouth and Dartmoor Railway, was severely injured. Immediately after the accident, the poor man was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered until Thursday. An Inquest was held by J. Edmonds, Esq., at the Guildhall, last evening. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was about 60 years of age, was accidentally crushed in a fearful way between two sets of trucks. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 January 1861
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner on Friday, to Inquire as to the death of a little girl, named THORNE, aged about ten years. It appeared from the evidence offered that on the 23rd instant she caught her clothes on fire, and that as there was no one in the house at the time to come to her assistance, she was soon enveloped in flames, and so much burnt that death soon followed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 January 1861
HARBERTON - W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the boy BESTABLE, at West Leigh, in the parish of Harberton, on Saturday last. From the evidence adduced, it appears that Mr Maddock, his master, sent him (the boy, who was 14 years old) with a horse and cart on the previous day to remove turnips from one field to another to feed the cattle, and that, on finding the deceased did not come home to dinner, another lad was sent to look for him, who, on passing up the road towards the field, saw a cart bottom upwards and the horse on the ground. He immediately ran back for assistance, and on returning to the spot discovered the poor youth under the fore part of the cart, and on taking him up found life to be extinct. The horse was a very quiet one. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 January 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest On A Soldier. - An Inquest was held at the Hospital Inn, Stoke, yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devonport, on the body of a private named JOHN NAVAN, belonging to the 8th company of the 53rd Regiment, who was found dead in a trench, after being missed for some fourteen days. - Henry Randall deposed that he belonged to the 53rd Regiment. He knew the deceased, who was attached to the 8th Company of the same. On New Year's Day NAVAN and another soldier left the Hospital and went to an inn at Stoke, known by the name of the "Wellington." That was about twelve o'clock. He remained until four or five o'clock, when he left somewhat the worse for liquor. He then stated that he was going to Plymouth. that was the last time witness saw him, and he understood that he had no money about him. - Corporal Michael Pursell, 53rd Regiment, deposed that he found deceased at 20 minutes to five o'clock yesterday evening. A boy having told him that there was a soldier's cap in the water, he went and saw the body. He at once reported the circumstance to the sergeant-major and subsequently at the hospital. - Thomas Hall, a seaman, gave evidence to the effect that hearing the body of a soldier had been found in the water, he jumped in and brought it to the beach, after which witness had to be taken to a public house and have restoratives applied, he having fainted. - The Inquest was then adjourned till tomorrow afternoon in order to obtain medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 February 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Awful Death From Excessive Drinking. The Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday, at noon, A. B. Bone, junr., Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest before a very respectable Jury at the Naval Hospital Inn, on the body of JAMES MUGG, a marine, lately serving on board H.M.S. Hero, who came by his death through an excessive drinking of whiskey, as reported by us on Saturday morning. The Jury, after being sworn in, viewed the body of the deceased, which lay in the dead-house, at the Royal Naval Hospital. Captain Ryder, of H.M.S. Hero, and Captain Taylor, of the Royal Marines, were present during the enquiry, and, in answer to a suggestion from the Foreman of the Jury (Mr Charles Trego), the former gentleman promised that if any of the witnesses who gave evidence that day said anything in his hearing to criminate themselves, it should not be made use of at the investigation now taking place by the military authorities, so that the men would not be prejudiced thereby. - Robert Bellesland, a marine, serving on board H.M.S. Hero, was then called, and said he went on guard on Friday morning at four o'clock, and remained there until half-past five, during which time things went on as quiet as usual, but between that and six o'clock he went into the fore cock-pit, where he saw the deceased stretched out on his back quite dead. - George Turner, a sergeant of marines, said that in consequence of a report made to him, at half-past five o'clock on Friday morning, that a man was dying in the cock-pit, he got out of bed, partly dressed himself, and went to the place, but by the time he got there the man had died, whom he subsequently ascertained to be the deceased MUGG. Another marine, named Ryan, was also there lying on his back, about a yard from him, apparently dead. He was quite unconscious as to what was passing around, and was gasping for breath, his eyes being quite closed. Whilst in the cock-pit, Private Kinroe came in, and he also was quite insensible, apparently from the effects of liquor. He spoke, but witness could not understand him. There was no spirit or bottles lying about in the cock-pit, neither did the place smell of spirit. He was on board all night and visited the sentries up to twelve o'clock, but no one kept the middle watch, which was very unusual. From twelve to four o'clock the sentries were by themselves, and at four o'clock Corporal Mitchell was called out to keep the morning watch. The deceased, MUGG, was on sentry from eight till twelve on Thursday night; Ryan, from twelve to four next day; and Kinroe from four to eight. witness frequently visited the deceased during his watch, and was present at twelve, when he was relieved. He was very sober and in good health. According to the ordinary custom he would go to bed then, but it was not witness's duty to see him in his hammock. - In answer to Mr Trego, witness said men were not allowed to stay up during the night, and if he saw a man hanging about the ship when he had no business to, he would order him to his hammock. - Examination continued: Witness put Michael Ryan on sentry at 12 o'clock, at the captain's cabin door, on the upper deck, and about half-past 12 he went over the ship, and found all correct. He did not see the deceased after 12; he might have left the ship without his knowing it, and returned again through the lower ports without anybody seeing him. The men had free ingress and egress at these places without any questions being asked. When the deceased was relieved from sentry he went in the direction of the upper deck, as witness supposed to go down the gangway for some purpose. Witness went to bed at one o'clock, and when called at five o'clock the only persons he saw the worse for liquor were deceased, Kinroe, and Ryan. At six o'clock the ship was examined, and he assisted in the search, but all they found was one bottle, with about half a gill of whiskey in it, in the after cock-pit. - Mr Trego here asked whether a sentry was placed at the store-room door, and the witness replied in the negative. No one, he said, had charge of it, although there was a sentry in the after cock-pit. He did not know there was any spirit on board the vessel. - Captain Ryder, in explanation, said the store-room was in the after cock-pit, so that in reality it was under the charge of the sentry in the cock-pit, who would have seen any attempt to break into it. - Witness, continuing his examination, said that in the middle of Friday the store-room in the after cock-pit was examined, when they found that the jalousie in the door (a sort of panel made similar to a Venetian blind) had been removed and placed back again. It was about 2 ½ feet high and 2 feet wide, and could, in his opinion, be easily shifted. There was a marine on guard in the after cock-pit during the whole of Friday night and he believed that if he had been attending to his duty properly he must have seen anyone enter the store-room. The sentry's patrol was on the port side, and the store-room on the starboard side of the vessel. - The captain of the vessel, in answer to Mr Trego, stated that he was in London when the affair took place; but previous to this he had never any reports made to him respecting the loss of whiskey or any other spirits. - James McKay, the ward-room steward on board H.M.S. Hero, was next called, and he said that on examining the store-room on Friday, he found 15 bottles of whiskey missing. He had not examined the store-room for some time past, and as far as he knew they may have been taken away a week or more. The jalousie was in a perfect condition and did not shit. One bottle of whiskey he found broken in the store-room. - In answer to Mr Trego, witness said he regularly took an inventory of the stock of whiskey he kept, and the last time he did so there were 69 bottles there, but on Friday there were only 54 left. - Bernard Kinroe was then called, and he stated that the deceased had the first watch and he the morning watch. He was put on guard by Corporal Mitchell, and visited by him every half-hour. Between five and six o'clock on Friday morning Ryan brought him about half a pint of raw whiskey in a small tin can, the whole of which he drank, and in about half an hour afterwards he became insensible. He recollected having his stomach pumped, but beyond that he was unable to state anything. - The witness here seemed unwilling to give any further evidence, upon which Captain Ryder offered to withdraw, and at the request of the Coroner he did so, together with Capt. Taylor and several officers of the metropolitan police force, but before doing so, Capt. Ryder told the witness that he had got himself into a serious scrape, and would, no doubt, be severely punished when he returned on board his vessel again. - After these gentlemen had left, the witness, in answer to the Coroner, said that he had told them all he knew. - The Captain and Dr Taylor again returned into Court, when examination of witnesses was continued. - Charles Mitchell, corporal of marines, on being called in, stated that he had the watch from four to eight on Friday morning. At five o'clock he visited Kinroe, the last witness, and Private Ryan, both of whom appeared to be perfectly sober. - Dr Foster, on being sworn, deposed to being the assistant-surgeon in the Keyham yard. About six o'clock on Friday morning he was called up on board the Hero, and on going into the cock-pit of that vessel, he found the deceased MUGG quite dead, and Ryan nearly so. He examined the body of the deceased, and found his face quite pale. He was of opinion that the man died very rapidly from an excess of ardent spirits taken at one time, which severely shocked his nervous system. - In answer to Mr Trego, the witness said he considered whiskey was a poisonous spirit. A pint was sufficient to kill some persons, but upon others it would not have the same effect. - Dr Foster said he saw two other men beside the deceased who were the worse for drink. One was very bad, being quite insensible, but the other Kinroe was not so bad, although he was very drunk. He did not order anything to be done to the deceased, for when he saw him he was too far gone to be restored t life, and he therefore turned his attention to the other man, and did all he could to save his life. - At this stage of the proceedings the Coroner told the captain that he thought Corporal Mitchell could tell them more about the matter than they had already learnt. - The captain, however, disagreed with Mr Bone, his opinion being that the robbery was committed in the middle watch. He had not the slightest doubt that Kinroe knew the whole facts, and he believed if he liked he could tell the Jury who took the whiskey and also when it was taken. - The next witness called was Edward Page, private, R.M., serving on board H.M.S. hero, who said he was sentry from four to eight o'clock on the morning of Friday last at the after cock-pit, but he did not see anything unusual going on in the store-room during his watch. - The Coroner here told the Jury that as the matter stood they had really elicited nothing as to the manner in which the deceased came by his death, and he believed that if they were to call the whole of the marines before them that were on board the ship at the time they would learn very little more. However, they had these facts before them - that 15 bottles of whiskey were stolen, that two other men were perfectly insensible from the effects of spirit, and in addition, they had the doctor's evidence, so that upon that, they must form their verdict. He had not the slightest doubt in his own mind but that the deceased came by his death through excessive drinking, and he thought that must be the verdict at which the Jury would arrive. - The Foreman of the Jury thought it would be well for them to bring in an Open Verdict, but after the Coroner had stated that it would be better to have something more definite, the Jury unanimously returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased, JAMES MUGG, was found dead on board H.M.S. Hero, in the Keyham Yard, in the borough of Devonport on the 1st day of February, and that there is ground to believe that the said deceased died from the effects of drinking an excessive amount of whiskey, although there is not sufficient evidence of the fact."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 February 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - Shortly before 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Mr A. B. Bone, junior, the Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, assembled at the Red Lion public house, Chapel-street, Stonehouse, touching the death of ALFRED JOHN FRIEND, aged 11. The deceased was the son of MR JOHN FRIEND, coal merchant, and on Tuesday afternoon last he was playing with other boys in Quarry-street, when one of his companions took his cap away from him, and threw it into the air. Just at the moment, a mud cart was coming along and the cap falling upon the eyes of the horse that was drawing it, the animal was so frightened that he immediately bolted off, although the driver, Harvey, did all in his power to stop him. The poor little boy did not see the cart; for, as he was running backwards, he came against the off wheel, and was forced to the ground, the wheel injuring his hip and loins. Mr Hanaford, a builder, and others, immediately ran to the little sufferer's assistance, and he did not then appear much injured; for, as Mr Hanaford was carrying him in his arms, he requested to be put upon his legs, and allowed to walk home, which he did. He gradually became worse, however, and died on Friday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident In Keyham Yard. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., junr., Deputy Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN SAUNDERS. The deceased was a seaman belonging to H.M.S. Hero, now lying in Keyham Yard, and on Saturday afternoon last he was engaged with other seamen working on board the ship - which lay in dry dock - and had a spar handed to him whilst he was in the rigging which was too heavy for him, and caused him to lose his balance and fall over the side of the ship to the dock - a distance of about 60 feet. Assistance was immediately given to the poor fellow, but death must have been instantaneous, - the base of the skull being much injured. Evidence of these facts having been taken, a verdict in accordance with them was returned. At the request of the Jury, the Coroner undertook to forward to the Admiral the recommendation of the Jury that a splinter netting of ropes be provided at the dock for the purpose of being made fast from the sides of the dock to the sides of a ship, so that in case of any person falling overboard they might be saved in the netting. Capt. Ryder, of the Hero, who was present during the Inquiry, said the deceased bore a good character in the service, and was just at the time of his death about to receive his rating.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 February 1861
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Revenue Inn, Tavistock-street, Plymouth, on Saturday last, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, touching the death of JAMES JENKINS. - The Jury having proceeded to view the body of the deceased, the first witness, ELIZABETH JENKINS, daughter of the deceased, was called. She stated that her father had lived at No. 12 Park-street, and was employed to drive a donkey chaise by Mr Crocker. His age was 45, last January, and for some months past he had complained of suffering from faintness; about two years since he was taken in a fainting fit, when he remained insensible for ten minutes. On Friday night he had his tea between five and six, but did not take any supper, and went out a few minutes after twelve, for the purpose of getting the chaise from the stables, in Clarence-street, as he was engaged to call for a lady, in Alfred-street, at half-past one, on Saturday morning. He said, when he went out, that he should be home about half-past two. - John Ellis, a cab driver, stated that he resided at the Wembury Inn, in Wembury-street, and had known the deceased for many years. On Saturday morning he had to go to a gentleman's house in the North-road, to take up some ladies, and having driven to one or two places, he was driving up Lockyer-street with Miss Rogers, the last fare, at about twenty minutes before three, when just opposite Windsor-terrace he saw the deceased lying between the wheels of the chaise which was standing in the road. He got off his box and removed the deceased from between the wheels, when he found that he was dead. The lady witness was driving home was very much shocked, but she would not leave the body of the deceased by itself, and stood by its side until witness returned with a policeman. In the meantime he went for the constable, and found P.C. Cann in George-street, and after driving to the Station and giving notice of what had occurred, Mr Stephens, the surgeon, was called. On examining the body the doctor said life was quite extinct, and told them to take the deceased home, which was done, the body being placed in the donkey chaise. Witness had never seen the deceased the worse for liquor, and thought he must have been taken faint, or in a fit, and fallen from the driving box, for the leather of the apron in front had been torn, as if by the weight of the body falling. There were no marks of a struggle, nor was the ground near the spot where the body lay scratched. - P.C. Thomas Cann having given confirmatory testimony, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the Deceased died by the "Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 February 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Millbay Pier. - An Inquest was held at four o'clock yesterday afternoon before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the Guildhall, to Inquire into the cause of death of ARTHUR ADAMS, who died on Sunday morning from the effects of injuries at Millbay Pier on Friday evening. - Richard Morris, of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, deposed to the deceased having been brought into that institution about a quarter to twelve o'clock on Friday night. His left leg was torn off below the ankle, and he died about twenty minutes after five on Sunday morning. - Thomas Watts, a waterman, residing at No. 11 Prospect-row, Millbay, testified that he had known the deceased as an ordinary seaman attached to the steamship Melvina, the property of the Waterford Steamship Company. The Melvina arrived at Millbay about ten o'clock on Friday evening. It formed a part of deceased's duty to proceed to the steamer and bring a hawser on shore, to enable her being brought alongside the pontoon. The hawser having been fastened ashore, he saw it soon after surge, and heard a cry proceeding from the ship. The captain told him a young man had had his foot taken off by a hawser, whereupon he hastened for Dr Whipple, who was soon after in attendance. He was 17 years of age, and his place of abode was 160 Nelson-street, Belfast. The steamer was bound from London to Waterford, touching at Plymouth for goods and passengers. - Mr Henry John Waring said he was the agent of this company at Plymouth. He explained what he believed to be the cause of the accident, viz., a hawser was flung from the vessel to the shore, and lay in coils about the deck. The night was very dark and the young man, who was intent on paying out the hawser, must have placed one of his feet within a coil of rope. A sudden surging of the hawser drew his foot between the bit head and the coil in which it was entangled, whereby it was cut off and he had since died from exhaustion. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 February 1861
HARBERTON - Harbertonford. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Maltsters' Arms Inn, Harbertonford, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., the District Coroner, on the body of the man LAKE who was found burnt to death on a lime kiln, under the circumstances stated in yesterday's paper. After hearing the evidence, the Jury, of which Mr Richard Hoppin, of Wood Court, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Dead on a Lime Kiln."

Western Morning News, Monday 18 February 1861
PLYMOUTH - Awful Death From Destitution. - It is not more than two months since we had to report the death of an old man in Lower-lane from starvation, and it is now our painful duty to record a case that has occurred in the same neighbourhood, even under more revolting circumstances. The deceased in this case is an old man named JOHN BENNETT, of about 70 years of age, who resided at No. 14 Lower-lane, and who came by his death under the circumstances as described below. An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Guildhall before J. Edmonds, Esq., and a very respectable Jury, of which Mr Taylor was Foreman. After the Jury had been sworn, the Coroner addressed them as follows. - They had met together (he said) to Inquire into the cause of death of a poor old man, named JOHN BENNETT, who resided in that horrid place, Lower-lane. He was glad the gentlemen of the Press were present, because he liked publicity being given to cases of this kind, and because he trusted it would be a benefit to the town, and would save life in future. Deceased had been receiving three shillings per week from the parish of St. Andrew's. The story was that he was a man of very peculiar habits, that he liked to lock himself indoors, and would not see anybody. Against that they would have to put this fact, that in this town there were Guardians of the Poor and persons appointed to look after the poor; there was also a great benevolence in the town, as large as could be found in any other place, and therefore he was ashamed, as a Plymouth man, to find this case as reported to him, for it appeared that the man died from destitution. (Hear.) On Thursday he was heard in his room groaning, but still no assistance was rendered him. On Friday it was suspected he was dead, and upon the door of his room being broken open, the body of this poor unfortunate man - a fellow creature, a brother to them all - was stretched out on the floor, naked, dirty, and in a state of the greatest destitution. There was a part of a loaf near him, but he had no bedding, no coals, nor yet any wood, and that poor creature must have found himself dying from exhaustion, dying in that horrid state in the centre of this large town. The house itself was a most fearful hovel. There was a privy there in which the soil was five feet deep, which was contrary to the rules and regulations of the town. It was not only used by the inhabitants of that house, but served for the whole neighbourhood. They had to deal with the case as they found it, but he would tell the Jury that it did seem very remarkable to him that this man should not have been missed either by the guardians of the town, the relieving officers, or some other persons. They had very charitable institutions, and persons who went about visiting the poor, and he must say that if he had been a visitor, instead of a subscriber to those institutions, he should, the moment he found the deceased's door locked, have had it broken open, and thus perhaps his life might have been spared. But there did not seem to have been any attempt made to rescue the poor fellow. Now, so far as the law went, there was no one who could be made criminally guilty on this account, although he might be morally. The guardians of the poor and those who administer the money raised in that town ought to have made some inquiries about this man, but nothing of the sort was done, and the poor creature was allowed to die half starved. Their first duty would be to view the body, and although it would be a most painful duty and disgusting sight, it must be done. They would afterwards return to the Guildhall again, when one or two witnesses would be examined; after which the Jury would have to arrive at a verdict, but he feared their verdict must be that the man died from want, and that he wanted very much indeed. - The Foreman of the Jury hoped the reporters of the press would show these facts up to the Local Board of Health, to which one of them replied that they intended to visit the house, so as to be able to comment upon it themselves. - The Jury then repaired to the room in which the deceased lay, and upon arriving at the spot the scene that presented itself to the eye is really beyond description, and it is impossible in the strongest language to give anything like an adequate idea of it. The room is about 12 feet by 6, and is so low that a person could easily touch the ceiling with his hand. There was not the slightest sign of an article of furniture in the place, and had we not seen the poor creature stretched out in one corner of the room, we should never have believed it was inhabited by a human being. Around the room were a number of large broken pans containing some soup, which we were told the deceased had had given him, but what seemed to us to be unfit even for the use of pigs. Upon a window ledge were some bits of meat that had apparently been there some weeks, and a few other fragments of food. In one corner of the room was a heap of rags, upon which he lay, we had almost said a human being, but what can better be described as a mass of corruption. This was the body, or rather the skeleton of the deceased. His head was tied around with two handkerchiefs, one under his chin, and the other about his forehead. He had no shirt on, and over his body was thrown an old sack, thick with dirt; near his head was a hat containing a quantity of old bread, several small bottles, and three or four short clay pipes. His breasts were perfectly bare, and were literally covered with hundreds of maggots, and the rags upon which the poor fellow's limbs reposed were infested with vermin. It was a sickening and revolting sight, and it was almost more than the Jury could do to stand and look at the body. The stench in the room, as might easily be imagined, was almost sufficient to kill one, and the Jury, before proceeding to view the back part of the premises, were compelled to go into the lane in order to inhale a little "fresh" air. The privy was next examined by some of the Jury, but the effluvia from the place was so great that some of them positively refused to visit it. The cover of the close, which is about three feet long, was taken off, and the soil was heaped up about half a foot above the seat, in fact it was running down upon the flooring beneath. It is really a wonder how people can exist in such a place, and unless some steps be immediately taken, we shall not be surprised to find that in the coming summer we shall be visited by cholera or some other awful epidemic; for we were assured that the spectacle we had just witnessed was such as could be seen in many of the houses in that and the adjoining lanes. After remaining there about ten minutes, the Jury returned again to the Guildhall, when the examination of the witnesses was proceeded with. - Grace Rolling on being called said: I am a widow residing at No. 14 Lower-lane. The deceased came to live in the same house about eight or nine months since. My room is right opposite his in the same passage. From what I have seen, I believe the deceased is a sailmaker by trade. I should think he was about 70 years of age. He was a very distant man, and always kept his door locked, so as to prevent any person entering his room. He received 3s. per week from the parish of St. Andrew's, and paid one shilling a week for the use of the room. His landlady is called Mrs Willcocks, and she lives, I believe, in No. 11, Clarence-street. Six families altogether live in the house, which contains eight rooms, two of which are very small indeed. There is a privy to the house, which is used by the inhabitants of three houses, besides the one in which I live. The privy is now quite full, and has been so for the last week. The deceased scarcely ever got up until the evening, but whenever he went out he always locked his room door, and I do not think any person has ever entered it, neither do I believe the deceased has washed it out since he occupied it. I cannot tell whether the deceased locked his door from shame. I have never seen any fire in the room, and have frequently warmed coffee for him. I advised him to go into the workhouse, but he told me he had had enough of it - he did not like it. He used frequently to complain of cold during the winter, and was nearly always shaking violently during the late severe weather. On Wednesday evening the deceased went out and fetched home some broth in a little pitcher which he very often had given him, and on his return he knocked at my door and asked for a light, and after I had given him one he wished me good night, went to his room, and then locked the door. He was looking very ill at the time, and I thought he was dying. On Thursday morning between eight and nine o'clock, when I was sitting down to breakfast I heard deceased in his room groaning very heavily. I did not go to him, but waited until the evening to see whether or not he would come out. However, he did not leave his room, and as I did not hear him the next morning I became uneasy, and in the evening about seven o'clock told one of my neighbours I thought the old man was dead, and at my request a policeman was sent for. My son, John Rolling, then forced open the door in the presence of P.C. Romia, and the deceased was then found dead. The deceased had suffered for some time past from a cold. He had no bed to lay on, - nothing but a bundle of rags, which was running away with vermin. - By the Foreman: A woman named Williams used to take the deceased's money from the Overseers of the poor on Thursdays, but last Thursday the deceased did not call upon her for it. I have known the deceased stay up for an hour of a night stuffing rags in the crevices in the walls of his room, and when I have asked him sometimes what he has been hammering about, he has told me he was caulking up the holes, for it was so cold he could not sleep in the room. The landlady had promised to have a new pan put in the privy during the present quarter. She never used to visit the house herself. - The Coroner here told Mr Rowley, one of the sanitary inspectors, who was present, that no human being ought ever to enter the deceased's room for at least a month to come. - Mr Rowling told the Coroner he would, as soon as the deceased was buried, have some chloride of lime sprinkled about the room for the preservation of the health of the other tenants. He assured the Coroner that a new pan was put to the privy only a short time since, but unfortunately it had been broken, and the privy had only been in its present state for about a week. The privy always used to be kept clean by an old man who lived in the house, but it had lately been neglected on account of his having gone into the Workhouse. - Mrs Rolling, in answer to the Jury, said she could not tell whether the bottles found in the deceased's room were physic bottles, neither could she tell whether or not the deceased had received any medical attendance. - John Rolling, a seaman lately belonging to H.M.S. Royal Albert, the son of the last witness, deposed to having broken open the door of the deceased's room, when he found the deceased lying upon a bundle of rags without any covering over him. He had no shirt on but wore a waistcoat and a pair of trousers. His breasts were bare and were literally covered with vermin. His head was tied up with two handkerchiefs, one being under his chin, and the other around his forehead. The room was stuffed up in different parts with rags, and the key hole and latch hole were also stopped up. He saw human excrement about the floor, and in one corner in a broken pan was some soup. There was no chair or table in the room, and the place was totally destitute of every comfort. He had frequently seen the deceased bring home soup in a pitcher, but he could not tell where he got it from. There were no coals nor wood in the room, but in the deceased's hat was a lot of bread. He frequently offered to sell his mother some bits of raw meat, but she refused to purchase it, and would very often cook it for him instead. - By the Jury: His mother gave 2s. per week for her two rooms. - P.C. Romia corroborated the evidence of the last witness respecting the state of the room, and the condition the deceased was in when discovered. - The examination of the witnesses being concluded, the Coroner again briefly addressed the Jury. He said it did not appear from the evidence that the deceased died from starvation, but rather by destitution, caused by a want of bedding, clothing and warmth. He was borne out in this opinion from the fact that some bread was found in the house, as well as a little meat. He would now ask the Jury to consider their verdict, and whatever it might be he would take it. - A Juryman here asked the Coroner whether he could tell him if it was customary for relief to the poor to pass through the hands of a second party. - The Coroner replied that such a thing very often occurred. - The same Juryman said it occurred to him that if an individual was unable to call at the relieving office for his money, it was the duty of the relieving officer to see into such cases. He had no doubt that money was not so much an object to the deceased as good bed and clothing would have been. - The Jury then consulted together for a short time, when the Foreman, addressing the Coroner said the verdict they had arrived at was, "That the man died from the want of the ordinary necessaries and comforts which this life required; but at the same there was not sufficient evidence before them to warrant their passing a vote of censure upon any person." - The Coroner: You think the deceased died from exhaustion by the want of bedding and other comforts? - The Foreman: Just so. - One of the Jurors here asked the Coroner to make some remarks about the sate the premises were in. - The Coroner, in complying with this request, told Mr Rowley he considered the privy ought not to be in its present state, and he thought one privy was not sufficient for four houses - indeed, not more than sufficient for more than the tenants of one house, and there ought to be more than one supply of water. He must request him, on behalf of himself and Jury, early on Monday morning to have the privy cleansed out; and if he had much difficulty in getting a new pan put to it and a little supply of water brought in, he had better go to Mr Eastlake, and have proceedings taken against the owner of the premises. With regard to the house itself, it would require to be whitewashed throughout and the plastering must also be attended to. - Mr Rowley assured the Coroner and Jury that it was only a week ago the place was thoroughly cleaned, and if anybody had called at his office to make any complaints, the matter would have been seen into at once. It could not be expected that in such a large town as Plymouth he could visit every house, for it was more than he could possibly do. - The Coroner said that, seeing the very high rates paid by the inhabitants of the town, if one or two men could not perform those duties, twenty ought to be employed. - Mr Rowley said he was always on the alert, and was not in his office an hour a day. - The Coroner: This is the second case of this kind that has occurred in this neighbourhood within two months. - The following was the verdict as recorded by the Coroner:- "That the deceased, JOHN BENNETT, was found dead on the 15th February 1861, and that he apparently died from cold and exhaustion, caused by want of clothing, bed, bedding and warmth."

Western Morning News, Friday 22 February 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Fatal Accident On board H.M.S. Implacable. - An Inquest was holden at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, High-street, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the County of Devon, on view of the body of THOMAS JAMES HOWE, who it will be remembered lost his life from the effects of an accident, on Monday last, on board H.M.S. Implacable. The evidence adduced was to the effect that the deceased, who was a second-class boy on board the ship already named, was, on Monday afternoon, engaged in putting the grating on the hatchway. Two parts of the three, into which it is divided, were put on, and deceased and a youngster, named Symons, were putting on the last piece, when Symons, at the request of the deceased, drew the grating towards him, and deceased missed his hold, and on trying t regain it, he over-balanced himself, and as he fell, he grasped the grating, and fell down the hold, a depth of some 24 feet, carrying the piece of grating, which was two feet wide and six or seven feet long, with him. The grating fell on him, he was taken up senseless, conveyed to the sick bay, and from thence to the Royal Naval Hospital. The blood was dropping from his mouth when he was picked up; this continued until he died. He was insensible from the time of the fall, and his breathing was attended with snoring. he had been about three months on board the ship at the time of the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 25 February 1861
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest At Torquay. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held on the body of HANNAH SMITH, the unfortunate young woman who was killed from the falling in of a high chimney, at Falkland Villa, during the hurricane on Thursday last, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, in the Board Room at the Infirmary. - The Jury having been sworn and seen the body, Edward Sidgreaves was examined, who, on being sworn said: I am a gentleman. Deceased was a cook in my establishment. I live at Falkland Villa, a detached house, belonging to a Mr Bartlett, who resides in London. The deceased was in the kitchen, on the ground, without any room over it. In the afternoon of Thursday last, there was a heavy gale of wind; and, on hearing an alarm, raised by the housemaid, I immediately proceeded to the kitchen, where I found that a chimney had blown down and fallen completely through the roof, deceased being on her face underneath a solid mass of brickwork, which I afterwards measured, and found to be 3ft. 4in. wide, 20 in. in depth, and 2ft 6in. in height. I immediately called assistance and she was taken out and Mr Stable, surgeon sent for, who advised her immediate removal to the Infirmary, which was done. The chimney was from 15 to 20ft. high. About three months since a chimney sweep, named Downs, reported that the chimney was insecure, and I put myself in communication with the owner, who, I believe, wrote to Mr Pook, who was acting as agent, to have the chimney examined by a competent person and do what was necessary; but nothing was done beyond a chimney pot being placed on the top in order to cure it of smoking. - Rachel Matthews said: I am a domestic servant in Mr Sidgreave's establishment. Deceased was cook in the same house. On Thursday last we were sitting in the kitchen at our sewing, and about ten minutes before the accident we heard a noise as of some loose stuff falling and became alarmed, but continued our work, and shortly after we heard another noise, and I jumped up, and, in endeavouring to escape from the kitchen, something struck me in the back and knocked me down. On scrambling out I looked for my fellow-servant, but could not find her, in consequence of the mass of brickwork on the floor. About three months since a chimney-sweep, named Down, who is also a mason, said, when called to sweep the chimney, it was unsafe, and would be blown down before the winter was over. Deceased was taken into the butler's pantry. No repairs were done to the chimney after the sweep stated that it was unsafe, beyond a new chimney pot to cure it from smoking - William Godwin Coombs said: I am house surgeon. Deceased was brought to the Infirmary about ten minutes past five in the afternoon of last Thursday. She was taken upstairs to one of the wards, and I found she was quite insensible, and suffering from a fracture oat the base of the skull, right arm broken, two severe lacerated wounds of the scalp, and temple, two ribs broken, also injuries to the nose and two toes cut off. She never spoke or rallied. We attempted to give her some stimulants, but she had lost all power of swallowing. The injuries she received were quite sufficient to cause death. She died in 40 minutes after being admitted. - At this stage of the Inquiry the sergeant of police stated that he had no more witnesses. - A discussion then ensued between the Jury and the Coroner as to the advisability of calling "Down," the sweep and also Mr Pook, who, it had been shown, had authority to do what was necessary to the chimney. The Coroner could not see that there was any necessity, but nevertheless, if the Jury wished, they should be sent for. - Several of the Jury having desired to hear their version, the sergeant was despatched in search of him, and after waiting a considerable time Mr Down arrived. He was not sworn, and made the following statement - About three months since I was called to sweep a chimney at Falkland Villa, and having occasion to get to the top of the chimney I found that the bricks (which were soft bricks) and mortar were crumbling away; there were holes that I could put my hand in, caused by the action of the frost on the bricks. I told the gentleman in the house that the chimney was unsafe, and I also told Mr Pook, who I understood was the agent. - Mr Pook said he and Mr Powell had examined the chimney, and did not consider that it was in an unsafe condition. - This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner summed up, stating that it appeared to be entirely an accident, caused by the recent heavy gales, and that no one was the blame. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was therefore returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Plymouth Coroner, on the body of a lad named DANIEL JAMES, aged 16 years, an apprentice to a trawler. He went on shore in a boat on Thursday, and was not seen alive afterwards. It is supposed he fell over while trundling a mop, and was drowned. The verdict was in accordance with these facts.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 February 1861
EXETER - Mysterious Death Of An Infant At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, on Monday evening, at six o'clock, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WM. FREDERICK RIDD, aged seven weeks, residing with his parents, at 92 Paris-street. On Thursday last, the 21st the deceased was observed to have a slight cold, accompanied with a cough, which continued up to Saturday, when a lozenge, purchased at the shop of Mr Palk, chemist and druggist, of Sidwell-street, was given to the child by its mother, the remainder of which was produced. After partaking of a portion of the lozenge, deceased was laid down on the sofa, apparently asleep, and shortly after an alteration was observed in him much for the worse. A neighbour was called, who at once laced his feet in a warm bath, and recommended medical aid to be sent for. On Mr Palk being sent for at the Inquest, he said he could give no idea of the component parts of the lozenge in question, as they were not manufactured by him, although marked with his name, but by a man named Budge, of Crediton. The medical evidence was to the effect that the child was dead before assistance arrived, and on viewing the body no marks of external violence wee visible, but deceased appeared perfectly calm and placid, as if in deep sleep, and could give no opinion as to the cause of death without a knowledge of what the lozenges were composed. It was considered necessary in the absence of further proof to adjourn the Inquest till this day (Tuesday) at six o'clock, and in the meantime the Coroner was requested to summon the man Budge to give evidence as to what the lozenges were composed of.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 March 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Accidental Burning Of A Child. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the borough of Devonport, at the Guildhall, on the body of SARAH ELIZABETH CHURCH, the daughter of Sergeant CHURCH, of the Royal Artillery, who died in consequence of her clothes taking fire. In the temporary absence of her mother the deceased, who was three years old, caught her clothes on fire. This was yesterday week, but the poor child did not die until Friday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 8 March 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At The Devonport Foundry. The Inquest On The Body. - The Inquest on the body of the unfortunate child TREGELGIS, who was killed amongst the ruins of the Devonport Foundry, on Tuesday evening, commenced at the Guildhall, Devonport, yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a very respectable Jury, who having been sworn proceeded to view the body, after which they went to the scene of the accident, which presents as complete a picture of devastation as can be well imagined. The "wreckers" have reduced the whole pile of buildings to a heap of rubbish, so that it is almost impossible to tell what form of building stood upon the ground - The following witnesses were called:- MRS TREGELGIS, mother of the deceased, who resided at 65 James-street, Devonport; Richard Jeffery, a tinman, living at 2, Duke-street, Devonport; T. TREGELGIS, father of deceased; W. Swift, tailor of James-street, Devonport; Mr W. E. Bartlett, town surveyor for Devonport; and Mr R. N. Worth, of the Devonport Telegraph. Although the Enquiry lasted nearly five hours, the facts representing the cause of death were few and simple. The poor boy, who was in his eighth year, was in the habit of going to meet his father every evening at the time of his leaving the Dockyard, in which he worked. He left his home about twenty minutes past five on the night of the accident for this purpose, but, unfortunately for him, instead of proceeding as was his wont to meet his parent, he stayed playing or searching about the ruins of the foundry, though not, it would appear, for the purpose of carrying away any of the wood-work, or other property, but merely as a childish act of curiosity. Amongst the ruins, and situated near the pavement, there remained standing a chimney (which formed part of two, the other having shared in the general demolition of the premises), which was described as about 40 feet high. Although it was not positively affirmed, yet the presumption was that this chimney must have been either undermined or rendered very loose through the attacks which had been going on, and one witness (Mr Worthy) himself saw some children throwing stones at it, and endeavouring with a piece of rope to get a projecting piece of wood from it as late as five o'clock on the Tuesday afternoon. Within about two feet of this chimney THOMAS TREGELGIS (the deceased) and James Lowe, the other lad who was seriously injured, but who is not dead as stated, were seen at the moment that the mass of bricks and slatework fell. They were walking away in the direction of the street, in which, indeed, they actually were, when they were buried beneath the debris which fell around. Prompt assistance was at once rendered, but TREGELGIS when taken out was quite dead. Thomas Hawk, who pulled him out from under about 14 inches of earth &c., stated that the poor boy was lying on his breast, with his head turned round, his left arm dislocated, his jaw broken, and his head otherwise severely injured. His opinion was that his neck was broken. It was also stated that both legs of the deceased were broken. The body, being identified, was at once taken to the house of the parents. The various witnesses were subject to a very long examination by Coroner and Jury, with the endeavour to find out all possible particulars as to the destruction of the foundry, how long it had been going on, and the parties who principally assisted in the laudable undertaking of carrying away what did not belong to them, and in some cases displaying the cool impudence of actually selling cartloads of different materials at so much per load. The evidence upon this point, however, differed but very little from the facts which have already appeared in the Western Morning News respecting the extraordinary looting of this foundry - as strange a display, perhaps, of popular notions of right and equity as has been displayed in either of the three towns for some years. - During the examination of Mr Bartlett, surveyor, Devonport, the Coroner questioned him as to his knowledge of the parties to whom the foundry belonged, but this gentleman disclaimed any actual or personal acquaintance with them. Have you, said the Coroner, made any application to any person on the premises, whom you suppose to have an interest in the property? - No, sir. - Whose building is this? - I don't know. Have you made any Inquiry - of any other person? - I have heard many reports about its belonging to the Bank, or to Mr Sparrow. - A Juryman: What is your duty on such occasions? Is it to inform persons of the danger of such and such a building? - If I see any apprehension of danger to the public in the streets. - The Coroner: Somebody must be owner of this building? - A.- I was told Mr Sparrow was, but I don't know. - A Juryman: When you see any person removing a portion of a building, and you think it dangerous, what do you do? - Endeavour to find the owner. - Did you? - I did. - The Coroner: Why? - Because the chief of police had given me this information. Then you knew the owner? - I only heard of Mr Sparrow. - Mr Frost: Supposing another building was in danger, and you could not find the owner, what would you do? - I have no power at all. Not for the protection of the public? - Not in such a case as this; if I saw any portion of your house was dangerous to the public I should come to you. But in case you could not find the owner have you no right to protect the public? - The Coroner: There must be an owner, Mr Frost. It should be here explained that although Mr Bartlett did not know the owner, yet he took upon himself the responsibility, although he had no strict legal authority, to have part of the walls, &c., taken down in consequence of their being very dangerous to the reckless persons who scrambled for the "prizes." Upon this humane proceeding the Coroner highly complimented Mr Bartlett, who he thought had acted most judiciously and considerately. From other conversation which passed, it appeared that Messrs. Hodge and Co., bankers, held a mortgage upon the premises, and the man Sparrow denied all ownership of the property in question. he had been sent for to answer the question, as it had been stated by Mr Bartlett as one of the current reports that he had purchased certain interest in it for £5! - The Coroner, in some remarks to the Jury upon the question before them, and particularly with regard to the responsibility and ownership, said if any person should do a negligent act which should result in the death of anybody, such a person would be guilty of manslaughter. Even acts of omission on certain occasions amounted to the same. But with respect to acts of omission the Judges had said that it was a very difficult matter to make out a charge of felony, which manslaughter was. To prove this it must be shown that the act of omission was immediately connected with the cause of death. About ten years ago a case was brought before the Court of Queen's Bench, in which certain trustees of a turnpike road were under an obligation to repair the road. But it got so out of order that an individual passing over part of it received such injuries as to cause death, and a coroner's Jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against certain individuals who had contracted to repair the road, but who had neglected or omitted to do so. But the judge said that a verdict of manslaughter could not lie, and the verdict was quashed, on the ground that no immediate act of omission of the repairing of the road was the death of the person. There was an Act of Parliament which was passed some time ago authorising the legal representatives of any person who had received injuries occasioning death, to bring an action against the person who had occasioned the death, and make them liable for damages. But then the principles which governed the civil courts and that which had to guide them in the criminal courts, were different. The question which they would have to decide was, whether this chimney was manifestly in such a dangerous state as to be likely to fall upon the public street to the injury of any individual; and next, whether any person was in such a legal position with respect to this chimney as to make him answerable for its fall. But here there was no one on the spot who was answerable. They had some difficulty in finding out whether any person had charge of the place in question or not; and supposing they found out who was the actual owner - which they might presently - why, even then, it was necessary to consider whether any omission on his part caused the fall of the chimney, or whether it did not arise from the unauthorised and illegal proceedings by others. If it was so, he felt confident that the evidence would not make a person having charge of the chimney chargeable with manslaughter. The moral responsibility was another thing - the permitting the building to get into such a state of decay. After further remarks, the Coroner observed that with respect to this, they had the evidence of Mr Bartlett, who was himself acquainted with building, that on Tuesday afternoon he did not entertain any apprehension of danger from this chimney. (It had been stated by some of the witnesses that the chimney was a good deal out of perpendicular, and that if a wind had arisen it must have been blown down.) He (the Coroner) had no doubt that if Mr Bartlett had thought it dangerous he would have caused it to be pulled down. - Mr Bartlett, warmly - Yes, indeed. - Mr Sparrow said that he had nothing to do with the ownership of the foundry and that the bank had. - The Coroner then adjourned the further hearing of the case until Tuesday at two o'clock. The Foreman said that the Jury would not pre-judge the matter.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 March 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, yesterday, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of ROBERT HERBERT, whose death was occasioned under the following circumstances:- The deceased was a military pensioner, about 57 years of age, resided at 59 Southside-street, and was employed as a labourer in the brewery of Messrs. King and Company, Notte-street, in which capacity he has been engaged for about two years. On Thursday afternoon, he was proceeding over a number of huge vats, and had reached the last, when in stepping from the vat to the loft, he missed his footing, and fell to the floor beneath, a depth of 20 feet 6 inches. He was insensible when found, and bleeding from the ears. The unfortunate man was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was discovered that his skull was fractured. He was attended to by Mr Eccles, surgeon, but he died about half-past four on the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 March 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devonport, on the body of an old man named DENNIS MAHONEY, but who was also known as "Prince Albert!" It had been rumoured in the neighbourhood that the deceased had died from the effects of starvation, which caused a rather unusual amount of interest to be felt in the case. The following witnesses were called - Edward Brown, of 57 Mount-street; Wm. Colley, police-constable, Devonport; Mrs Webber, female searcher at the Guildhall; CATHERINE MAHONEY (a poor wretched looking old woman) widow of the deceased; Harriet Adams, 37 Monmouth-street, and Mr De la Rue, surgeon. From their statements it appeared that on Saturday afternoon the old man, who was aged 60, and gained his livelihood by going about the streets picking up rags and bones, was found lying on the pavement, near Prospect-place. It being evident that he was very ill, assistance was procured and he was taken to the Devonport Police Station, where his case at once met with every attention. Mr De la Rue was sent for, and the following is that gentleman's evidence respecting him: - When I saw him he was quite insensible, his face and hands cold, pulse feeble and irregular, eyelids drooping, the pupil of one eye being dilated and the other closed, breathing of a snoring and puffing character. Witness spoke to him several times, but the patient was quite unconscious. He communicated with the superintendent and Mr Chapple, the relieving officer, as he did not deem it right for him to be removed to the Workhouse on account of his dangerous condition, the man being evidently dying. Had him at once removed into one of the cells, and placed on a bed. He was supplied with medical and other comforts, mustard poultices and warm water being applied to his feet and legs. Last saw him alive between six and seven o'clock on Saturday night, when his breathing was heavy and irregular. His pulse never improved, nor was heat restored to his body. He gradually sunk from the time he was brought to the station, where he received every proper care and attention. Had since seen the body, upon which there were no marks of violence. He had on warm clothes. Believed the cause of death to have been natural apoplexy. - By the Coroner: The body was not emaciated, but it appeared fleshy and in good condition - very much so for a man of that age. His stooping occupation (rag picking) might have brought on the attack. From the smell of his breath he appeared perfectly sober. The Coroner: He certainly did not die from a want of any of the necessaries of life, but his death was as you say. Mr De la Rue: Yes, from apoplexy. The Jury at once returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, viz., "Death from Natural Causes." - The probable cause of the rumour that the deceased had died from want might have arisen from facts given in evidence at the Inquest by the widow (wow as accompanied by a troop of Irish acquaintances), who said that she and her husband had lived in Gay's-court, King-street, Plymouth, for the last 16 years. The earnings of herself and husband only amounted to 2s., 2s. 6d., 3s., and 3s. 6d. a week. Upon that they had to live. [Our readers will doubtless suppose that a ragpicker occasionally obtained charity.] She had never formally applied for parochial assistance, "but about three weeks ago she saw Mr Pardon, the relieving officer, come out of a neighbour's, and she then said - Mr Pardon, it is time for you to give me a loaf of bread," but he made no answer and walked on. - Upon this the Coroner remarked that the Irish were in a great measure kept from asking for parish assistance in consequence of their being then liable to be sent back to their own country, which they didn't like so well as this. - The conclusion of the case appeared to be satisfactory to those assembled, there being nothing to bear out the supposition that the deceased had died from neglect or want of food.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 March 1861
EXETER - On Wednesday morning an Inquest was held at the "Sun Inn," Sun-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of a little boy named CHURCHILL, aged five years, whose parents resided in Sun-street. From the evidence deposed to, the deceased had always been a sickly child, and on Saturday morning was taken ill. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, but before the arrival of the surgeon (Mr S. Perkins) the child was a corpse. It also transpired, that although five years old, it had not cut any of its teeth. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 1 April 1861
ASHBURTON - An Inquest was held on Saturday last by W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of JOHN HAMLYN, the poor man who was killed whilst engaged in breaking in a colt for his master, Mr Rowell, of Ilsington. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TEIGNMOUTH - The Late Fatal Accident At Newton Station. - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth on Saturday on the body of the unfortunate man who died from the effects of injuries sustained by falling between the carriages and the platform at the Newton Railway station, on Thursday evening, as reported in Saturday's paper. It will be remembered that the injured man was removed to Teignmouth to be placed in the Dispensary, but the injuries were so severe that he did not survive more than 30 minutes after the accident. The Inquest was held by Mr Cockey. Mr Frederick Symons, wine and spirit merchant of London, deposed that he recognised the body as that of SAMUEL POLACK, who was formerly a tailor and draper, but who had retired from business and had resided at 45 Crompton Crescent, London. Deceased lived with his family, and had a son who was not steady, and had made up his mind to send him to Australia, and he came down to Plymouth for the purpose of seeing his son off. He thought deceased went to Plymouth on Tuesday, and witness had seen him on the Sunday previous. Deceased's daughter had told him of the accident at Newton, and he had come down in consequence. The deceased was a stout man of from 54 to 56 years of age, and he was of very steady habits and never drank to excess. He was very healthy and habitually cautious. The Inquest was adjourned until 11.30 today. The deceased was an Israelite, and, as it is the custom with the Jews to watch a deceased body day and night until the burial, some of his friends have come down from London for that purpose.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 April 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Tradesman At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at the Three Towns Inn, Catherine-street, Devonport, yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of MR THOMAS STETTIFORD, baker, Dockwall-street, Devonport, who committed suicide by hanging himself on Saturday morning, as was stated in yesterday's Western Morning News. The evidence now adduced was in confirmation of the facts then stated. After hearing the witnesses, from whose testimony it appeared that the wretched man's circumstances were rather embarrassed, that he was given to drink, and that about two years since he attempted death by strangulation with a cord, but was then prevented by the timely arrival of his two sons, with whom he lived, the Coroner ably summed up the facts of the case. In the course of his remarks he said, if they (the Jury) were satisfied that the deceased came by his death by his own hands, by hanging himself, the next question which they would have to ask would be, was there any evidence in the case to prove that the deceased was insane? The law was that every person was responsible who caused the death, either of himself or another, unless proof was afforded to remove that responsibility. If a man should kill himself or another, the presumption of the law was that he did it wilfully and feloniously, and that presumption could not legally be removed unless evidence was adduced to prove that the deceased )in this case_ was insane at the time he committed the act. Insanity meant that state of mind which prevented a person making the ordinary distinction between right and wrong, and the same condition of mind which would absolve a person from committing an act of felony, by taking away his own life, must be such as would absolve him if he had taken away the life of another person, instead of taking away his own, and of understanding that that which he was doing was contrary to the law of God or man. If it were proved in this case that this man was in such a state as if he had killed another person instead of himself, he would not have been responsible, of course he would not be responsible now, "but unless this was proved" the law determined that he had committed an act of felony. If they were unable to say in their consciences that there had been any proof offered of the insanity of the deceased, then it was their duty to return a verdict of felo de se. The Coroner then reminded them of the solemn oath they had taken to give their verdict according to the evidence. - The Jury, however, found that the deceased destroyed himself while suffering from Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - The Death Through Jumping From A Train. - An Inquest was held last evening, at six o'clock, at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN DOWN, who unfortunately jumped from the South Devon Railway truck, as it was proceeding from Plymouth to Plympton, at the rate of 25 miles per hour, on Saturday afternoon. On Saturday afternoon, the deceased went to the Plymouth Station to go by train to Tavistock, and as soon as he was on the platform he saw the South Devon Railway train start, and thinking it was the Tavistock train, he ran to it, and was just in time to jump up into the truck that was attached to the train. When he came to the junction of the Tavistock line, finding he was in the wrong train, he jumped from the truck and fell on the ground. The policeman of the South Devon Railway, named Colley, who resides at the junction of the Tavistock branch, seeing deceased jump, ran to him, and when he came he appeared as if he were dead. The policeman then went back and telegraphed to the Plymouth station, and an engine and carriage was immediately sent. He was put in the carriage and as soon as he arrived at the Plymouth station he was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital; but the injury he sustained caused his death the following afternoon (Sunday). The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The deceased was a master house carpenter, residing at Gunnislake. He was 35 years of age and has left a widow and three children. MRS DOWN arrived in Plymouth prior to her husband's death, but he never recovered his speech or senses from the time of the accident.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 April 1861
PLYMOUTH - The Death Of A Birmingham Trader. - An Inquest on THOMAS HULME, whose melancholy death we reported yesterday, was held at the Albion Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday afternoon, by J. Edmonds, Esq. The evidence adduced bore out our statement of the facts in every particular. The deceased was a traveller, had drunk freely, and was on Sunday suffering from the effects of a long debauch, he jumped out of an upstairs window, and died a few hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict according to the facts. The deceased was about 28 years of age; resided at No. 2, Anne-street, Birmingham; and travelled with frames used by photographers. His wife was telegraphed for and has sent directions for his funeral.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 April 1861
TEIGNMOUTH - The Late Accident At The Newton Railway Station. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of MR SAMUEL POLACK, took place on Saturday before Mr Cockey, County Coroner. M. Templer attended on behalf of the relatives of the deceased, and Mr Charles C. Whiteford was present to watch the case on the part of the Railway Company. The adjournment took place at the request of Mr Templer, with a view to producing some of the persons who travelled by the same train as the deceased. It will be remembered that the deceased, who was a stout man of about 55 years of age, on travelling up the South Devon Railway on the 238th March, on the train arriving at the Newton Station, in stepping out fell between the platform and the carriage, and the wheels passed over him, that he was at once attended by a medical gentleman at the instance of the Railway company, and under his directions removed to Teignmouth Dispensary, where he died shortly after his arrival. Several persons were now called who travelled by the same train, and several persons in the employ of the Railway company, and the result of the evidence after a close examination and cross-examination by Mr Templer, was that the Jury arrived at an unhesitating and unanimous verdict of Accidental Death. It was proved that the carriages had not quite stopped when deceased stepped out and fell.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 April 1861
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, Exeter, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH ENDICOTT, aged 77, who met her death under the following circumstances:- It appears that on Friday morning between seven and eight o'clock, deceased was on her way home, she residing at Stepcote-hill, from Alphington-street, and when near the Exe Bridge, some boys, who were playing in the streets, came in contact with her, pushing her down, cutting her face very severely and inflicting serious injuries to her head. She, however, got up and walked home, and gradually became worse, till death put an end to her sufferings on Saturday evening. The Jury, after hearing the medical testimony, which was to the effect that deceased had died from the effects of the injuries she had received, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 April 1861
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Coroner's Inquest at Plympton. Brutal Treatment Of A Man. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Plympton Union, before A. B. Bone, Esq., District County Coroner, on the body of a poor man named WILLIAM EDMONDS, better known as "Billy Huddy," of about 45 years of age, of the village of Sparkwell, about three miles from the Union, who came by his death under the circumstances detailed in the evidence. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- Mr Thomas Brown, Foreman; Messrs. Andrew Walke, John Walters, William Lavers, William Yeoman, William Pitts, William Cann, William Secombe, William Kingsland, Thos. Taylor, Thomas Spry, John Matthews, and Elias Crocker. There were also present during the Inquiry the Rev. Eugene F. Tracey, one of the clergymen of the Parish, G. W. Soltau, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Guardians, and H. H. Treby, Esq. The subjoined is the evidence:- Thomas Munford, on being sworn, said: I am a blacksmith, living at Sparkwell, in the parish of Plympton St. Mary. I know the deceased WILLIAM EDMONDS; he was a man of weak intellect. He had no fixed place of residence, but went about in Devon and Cornwall, I believe. Had known the deceased about 25 years, during which time he has occasionally worked for me as a smith's hammerman. I so employed him last Monday, the 15th of April, and I invited him to breakfast. He declined taking some tea, saying that he had been drinking the night before, and would be very glad of a pint of cider with bread and butter for breakfast, which I gave to him. He was then quite sober. He left work about half-past two in the afternoon, and I paid him 6d. He was then a little "fresh." He refused his dinner, and loitered about all the afternoon. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening he again came into my shop, and I heard him say he had lost some files. He still appeared to be rather "fresh". He had been bothering different parties about these files, and at seven o'clock I heard him go into the house of John Veal, a shoemaker, whose house is immediately adjoining mine, and heard him say, "Veal, give up my files that you've got," or words to that effect. Veal replied, "Me got your files - what next?" To which the deceased responded, "You have got them; I'll have them." Directly afterwards I heard a fall outside Veal's door, and on looking out of my shop window I saw deceased lying on his back on the ground. There are two steps outside the doorway of Veale's house - one of them is of wood, and the other (the lower step) is of granite, and is between ten and eleven inches high above the road. It is rather of an oblong-square shape, and is about the width of the door, which is narrow - hardly two feet wide. The deceased was lying on his back motionless. I saw John Veal come out immediately after, and he lifted deceased up, and I think he said, "What are you lying there for? None of your old tricks - shamming," and then he called out for James Mudge, who lives in Veal's house, saying, "James, come out and help me here." Mudge came out and assisted to bring the deceased into my shoeing pentice. A great many people collected around him, and I did not go out to see the deceased until I had finished the job I was about, which took me about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes. When I left work I saw Veal standing near his shop door, and I then said to him, "Do let's come and see this poor fellow, and see if there's anything amiss with him." We went to the pentice, and found the deceased in a sitting posture, with his back against the wall. He was motionless, and did not appear to be conscious. I said to deceased, "BILL, what's the matter?" or "Are you hurt?" but he made no reply. I said to Veal "Let's find some place to put him in," and Veal replied "There's a linhay of John Dinnis's up here, and I think I can get his consent to put him there." We took him there and laid him down on the floor, and I put some clean straw under him. Before removing him from the pentice I examined and felt his head, but could not see nor feel any marks of violence, neither did I see any blood. I tried to give him some warm tea, but he did not appear able to swallow it, and seemed unconscious. I then returned home, but can't say whether I left Veal there or not. About an hour afterwards I saw the deceased in the highway, a few yards from my dwelling-house, at the bottom of the lane which leads to the linhay, standing up by himself. I said to him "BILL, what's the matter with you, where's your pain, will you accept some tea, or shall I put you in anywhere to lie down?" He said "I'll go home; I'll go to Colebrook; ---- my eyes I'll go home. Two lads then said, "BILL we will help you," and I turned towards my home, and saw the deceased pass my doorway, which is in the direction of Colebrook. In a moment or two hearing a noise coming near my doorway, I went out and saw the deceased between the two lads, who were apparently supporting him. It was then past nine o'clock; the daylight was gone, but there was a good moonlight. The lads appeared to me to let deceased go on my opening my door, and then the deceased fell down backwards to the ground, receiving a very heavy fall. He remained quite motionless. I called Veal who happened to be coming down the road quite sober, and I and Veal helped him into a pig's stye belonging to Veal, near my house. I got a clean bundle of straw and laid deceased on it. The pig's stye had a roof, walls, and a door, which one of us shut. The deceased was at this time senseless. I then went to bed, and did not see deceased again until the next day, at nine o'clock, in the pig's house, lying just as I left him. He then appeared a great deal worse, and was breathing heavily and foaming at the mouth. - By the Jury: The deceased had a pint of cider for breakfast and between that and half-past two I gave him 2 pints and a half more, as his work was very hard. He would not eat any dinner, but had another pint of cider when he left work. - The witness in answer to the Coroner, said, he thought he did right in giving the deceased, a man of weak intellect, four pints and a half of cider in so short a space of time. - By the Coroner: The first time I saw the deceased on the ground, he was lying with his head out on the ground, which was much higher than his feet. The second time he fell I observed that his water passed from him, making a pool on the ground, which caused me to think the deceased was very ill. - John Dinnis, on being examined, said: I am a labourer, residing at Sparkwell. About nine o'clock on Monday evening last I found the deceased in my linhay, on his back against the straw. He was groaning and seemed to be senseless. Not knowing what was the matter with him, I roused him, and got him up on his feet, and supporting him by holding the collar of his coat on one side, I took him out of the linhay into the courtlage outside. Then I ordered him to go off my premises, and he asked me which way he should go. - The Coroner here interrupted the witness by asking him whether he ever knew the deceased suspected of any disposition to steal, to which he replied in the negative. - The Coroner: What harm would he have done in the linhay, then? - Witness: He was such a nuisance, and caused such a smell, that my wife and my next-door neighbour requested me to get him out. - Examination continued: When deceased asked me which way he should go, I told him down the road, and then led him down to the highway. I saw him go down close by Munford's shop, and I called Mr Munford out. - The Coroner: Perhaps you and your wife may now wish that you had left him in the linhay. - By the Jury: Mr Munford did not ask my permission to place the deceased in my linhay. - Mr Munford: I meant to as soon as I saw you. - James Mudge, son-in-law of Mr Veal, deposed as follows: I live in Mr Veal's house at Sparkwell, and am a labourer. On Monday night, about seven o'clock, the deceased came into Mr Veal's kitchen, and said that he (Veal) had got his files and he would have them before he would go. Veal told him he had not got them, and deceased replied that he was ..... if he had not got them, and he would have them. Veal then told him if he did not go to doors he would put him out. I can't say what state the deceased was in; he was not drunk, but it did not come into my mind that he was not sober. Veal then got up and gave deceased a "bit of a push," and the deceased reeled himself round, and fell out over the step of the doorway. I did not see him fall, but I heard the sound of a fall upon the ground. Veal then called me, and I went out directly, and found the deceased lying on the ground - I think on his back. He was quite still, but was not insensible. - The Coroner: Did he seem to you to be conscious, or was he what you would call "stunned? A man, you know, may receive a very slight fall, and be stunned for the time. - Witness: He did not speak. - The Coroner, after reminding the witness of the solemn obligation he was under to speak the truth honestly and fairly, said: We have got it from another witness what state he was in; but you may say whether it appeared to you at that time that the deceased was conscious or senseless? - Witness: he did not speak. - The Coroner: That is not what I asked you. Did it appear to you he was sensible or senseless? - Witness: I don't know. The Coroner: Will you describe a little more particularly what this bit of a push was that you spoke of. Where did Veal touch the deceased? - Witness: He touched him on the front of his shoulder, with his open hand, or with the tips of his fingers. The deceased had his back towards the doorway. - The Coroner: Was it a pretty smart push? - Witness: No; it was not enough to knock a child down. It was not violent. - The Coroner: Yet, you see, it was enough to throw him over the steps. - By the Jury: The deceased was close inside the door, which opened immediately into the street. - By the Coroner: Veal did not say anything when he gave him this bit of a push. - The Coroner: Are you sure it was not a blow? - Witness: Yes, I am sure he only gave him a touch with the flat of his hand on the shoulder. - By the Jury: Veal requested him to go out of his house, but he said he would not go until he had the files. - The Coroner: How many times did he ask him to go out before he pushed him? Was it more than once or twice? - Witness: I heard him ask him more than once. Q.: Who were in the room besides yourself, Veal and the deceased? - A.: Only my wife. I do not know whether there was anybody within view of the doorway in the road. - Mr Stephen Henry Pode, on being sworn, said: - I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons in England and licentiate of medicine. The deceased I have known for many years. He was half silly; not quite a fool, but so silly as to be the butt of everybody. About 11 o'clock on Tuesday night a policeman came to me and desired me to go out to Sparkwell and see him; and I told him he must go to the relieving officer and get an order, and I would go out immediately. - The Coroner: How long was he getting the order? - Witness: About a quarter of an hour - while I was preparing my horse. - In answer to the Coroner witness said that he was allowed to use his own discretion in cases of emergency, without obtaining an order from the relieving officer. - Examination continued: The policeman obtained the order from the relieving officer, and I thereupon immediately went to Sparkwell, and found the deceased in Mr Veal's pig stye. He was lying on his back on a bundle of clean straw, with his head properly elevated, and I saw he was in a state of apoplexy. He was perfectly insensible, and in articulo mortis. I bled him, but there was no hope. He was snoring very loudly, and the pupils of his eyes were contracted, and his pulse was labouring. I afterwards raised his head a little higher, and had hot water put to his legs, and I then left orders for him to be taken to the reception ward, in the Union, as soon as possible on the following morning. I did not see the deceased again until dinner-time the next day, when he was dead. - The Coroner: If this man had been attended to twelve hours before, do you think he would have recovered? - Witness: Since I have seen the result of the post mortem examination I should say not. - Witness then proceeded to say: I have this day made a post mortem examination, but there were no external marks of recent injury. There were a great many marks of old bruises and wounds about his legs. On removing the scalp, I found that not only the integuments under the hair, but also the temporal muscle in a very bruised state, with a very large extravasation of blood extending all over the left side of his head. The brain was in a healthy state, with the exception of rather a large effusion of cerum in the ventricles, and I have no doubt that the apoplexy from which the deceased died was caused by the blow in the side of the head, however, received. A fall might have produced it, so might a blow from any blunt instrument. If such an injury arose from a blow from a man's fist, it must have been a very violent one, as the temporal muscle was very much bruised. The body was in a very excellent condition, not being at all emaciated. Knowing that the deceased during his life time suffered from asthma, I examined his heart, but I found both that and the lungs healthy. He had a smaller heart than most men, but nothing can be attached to that; he died from the blow he had, however received. I cannot say whether the external injury was a recent one, but it was received before death. - Thomas Sanders, a lad about 17 years of age, was next called, and deposed as follows:- I live at Sparkwell. On Monday evening I saw the deceased in Mr Munford's shoeing shed, about half-past seven o'clock. He was lying with his head a little elevated, and his arms stretched out. He was groaning, and did not appear to be sensible. I afterwards saw him in Dennis's linhay and when Dennis led him into the highway, the deceased laid down, and it seemed to me that he was unable to stand up in the road himself. - The Coroner: I do not envy Mr Dennis's feelings when he reflects upon his conduct in taking the deceased, a man of weak intellect, after receiving such an injury, into the road and there leaving him. - The Foreman: It is brutish - shameful. - Witness: I and another boy put the deceased up against a wall. - The witness Mudge was here recalled, and addressed by the Coroner as follows. I wish to remind you of the solemn oath you have taken to speak the simple and honest truth, and I now again ask you whether, when Mr Veal put his hand upon the shoulder of the deceased, you are sure that he had requested him more than once to go out of his house, and whether the deceased refused to go out of the house, and whether Veal put his hand upon the deceased in a gentle manner, or whether it was not in a violent manner. - Witness: He was not in any passion. - Q.: Was there enough done to make him stagger out of the doorway? - A.: He did not touch him hard. - The boy Sanders then proceeded with his evidence as follows: After we had placed the deceased against the wall Mr Munford left, and we then asked him where he was going and what was the matter, and all that we could get out of him was that he was going to Colebrook. We then led him to the step of Munford's door, and at his request we left him alone: and while in the act of attempting to go into Mr Munford's house, he staggered and fell backwards on the ground, where he lay quite still, and appeared to be senseless. He fell on his back. The deceased was afterwards removed into the pig's house. - Mr Pode, on being recalled, said, in answer to the Coroner, that from the evidence he had heard, his impression was that the apoplexy was the result of the first fall. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said: It is a material part of the case that if a person, in the performance of a lawful act, does anything which causes the death of another person, he is not liable for it. If a man comes to my house, and I admonish him, and request him to go away, and after doing so, especially if I repeat the request, he refuses to go, you all know perfectly well that I am at liberty to remove that person from my premises, and if, while doing that, I use only as much force as is necessary for that purpose, why then, whatever happens in consequence of it, I am not answerable for it. At the same time a man must take care to see where it is that any such attempt is made. If, for instance, a man were standing by the side of a quay, or a bank where there was a river running immediately contiguous to it, why then if a man gave another a push, it would be an act of such negligence, to say the least of it, that would render a man guilty of manslaughter. In the present instance, if on account of the position of those steps at the doorway, it was evidently a dangerous thing to push the deceased, then the man who gave that push was guilty of gross negligence, and would in consequence be liable to a charge of manslaughter. The Coroner then referred to that part of the evidence which related to the push given by Veal, and also the description of the steps and then said it was incumbent of Veale that he should have recollected those circumstances, and if they as a Jury, after hearing the whole of the evidence, thought he had been guilty of gross negligence, and also believed the man died from the consequences of the fall by reason of the push Veal gave him, it would be their duty to find him guilty of manslaughter. These were points for their consideration by and bye. The whole matter lay in a nutshell. With respect to the treatment this poor unfortunate man had received from the time when he was first at Sparkwell, the Coroner said: I conceive that we shall all agree that the parties who neglected him in the way in which they had were open to the strongest censure. Surely Mr Veal, or Mr Munford, or Mr Dennis, or any of the other persons at Sparkwell, who saw this poor man in such a condition should have seen that he was properly attended to. Mr Veal ought to have gone barefooted, if it had been necessary, to have given notice of the facts to the proper authorities, in order to have had him removed to the proper asylum, where he would have received that care which his case required. - Mr Veal, who was present in court during the whole of the Inquiry, said he had seen the deceased in other places days together, and he was looking for him to get around again. - The Coroner: I question whether you would have treated one of your pigs in this way. You seem to forget this man had been greatly injured by you. - One or two other witnesses were then called, but nothing very important was adduced in addition to the statements already made, and The Coroner then read over the whole of the evidence to the Jury, and, addressing Dennis, he said: I think, Dennis, when you are lying down upon your pillow, and turning the matter over in your mind, that your reflections will certainly not be very enviable ones. - Dennis: Why, sir, I have told the truth and nothing but the truth. - The Coroner: Here was a man that you say appeared to be senseless, and yet you took him out of your linhay, where he would have done very little, if any, harm, and cast him out into the public road, where he is not fit to be, and where he cannot support himself, and where he fell down for want of support and received a heavy blow, sufficient, after the former injury he received, to cause his death. These are circumstances which are not likely to cause very comfortable reflections when you turn this over in your mind, and remember that fine old adage, "Do unto others as you would be done unto." The Coroner again addressed the Jury, telling them that were it not for some points in the case which were rather doubtful, he should have advised the Jury to return a verdict of manslaughter against Veal. - The Court was then cleared, and, on its being re-opened, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and declared themselves unanimously of opinion that a very strong censure indeed was due to Veal, Munford, and Dennis, for their negligence to the deceased during the long period of time which elapsed from the time of the deceased's receiving the first injury to the time when the police were brought acquainted with the circumstances. - The Coroner, in passing this veto upon the parties, expressed the great disgust he felt at the inhuman conduct exhibited by them. - We have been requested to state that the master of the Plympton Union is directed to attend to all cases of emergency at any hour of the say, and had the deceased been brought to the Union in the middle of the night he would have been received into the House. - In the course of the Enquiry, the Rev. E. F. Tracey told the Coroner that there was a general impression abroad that Munford sold the cider to the deceased, and even if that were not the case, he had been told upon good authority that he made it a practice of selling it. - The Coroner questioned Munford upon this point; but although he repeatedly denied ever having done such a thing, the manner in which he answered the questions left but one impression upon the minds of the Jury. - The Rev. W. Tracey hoped that Mr Munford would not do this again secretly; but that he would, as other parties had done, take out a license, and so act in an honest and straightforward manner. - The Court then rose.

EXETER - Death By Drowning At Exeter. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon at the Buller's Arms, Alphington-street, Exeter, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, to Inquire as to the death of JOSEPH HODGE, aged 32, who was drowned on Wednesday in the River Exe, at a place used for watering horses. The Coroner, before proceeding with the Inquiry, remarked on the dangerous character of the place where the deceased met with his death. He said he understood that the place in question belonged to the Town Council of Exeter. He advised that the pit should be railed in so as to prevent any other person from falling in. To show the dangerous character of the spot, he mentioned on the same day two men, in the employ of Mr Morgan, timber merchant, fell in at the same place, and were only rescued with very great difficulty. From the evidence taken it appeared that the deceased, who was a scavenger, rode a horse into the water and both were immersed, that man and horse came insight, and then the man fell off, and before assistance could be procured, was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 April 1861
TAVISTOCK - The Late Mine Accident At Tavistock. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Queen's Head, Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of PHILIP SUSSEX, aged 36, whose death was noticed in the Western Morning News of Saturday. John Truscott, miner, deposed that he was working with the deceased at the Tavistock United Mines on Tuesday last, they were employed in timbering a shaft which had been sunk, and SUSSEX in carrying a piece of timber, slipped his foot and was seen to fall away. Upwards of three hours elapsed ere he could be brought to "grass," and when he was he had sustained injuries of a frightful character. John Tucker, agent of the mine, gave similar evidence. Catherine Williams, the woman who had attended the deceased, said that he was insensible up to within forty minutes of his death, which occurred on Friday. He was then comforted with spiritual advice by a friend, and described himself as being perfectly happy, but he soon afterwards became again unconscious, and continued in that state until his death. The Coroner expressed his opinion that no blame was attached to anyone and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The unfortunate man was interred yesterday afternoon, and his funeral was attended by a numerous concourse of fellow workmen.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 April 1861
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Plume of Feathers Inn, North-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL HAWKINS, aged 58, dairyman, residing in Exe-lane. The medical testimony was to the effect that deceased died from "Disease of the Heart." Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 May 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock, at the Boscawen Inn, Boscawen-place, Morice Town, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS MUIR, retired sergeant of the Royal Sappers and Miners. It appeared that on Saturday morning last the deceased rose from bed early, and proceeded to whitewash the back portion of his premises in Boscawen-place, for which purpose he raised a plank, one end of which was placed for support on the edge of a water tank, and the other end on the wash-house; and it was supposed that deceased by some means or other slipped his foot and fell off the stage. A young man standing outside the house about eleven o'clock heard deceased fall, and on going into the courtlage saw him lying on the ground, having received a severe blow on the right side of the head. Messrs. Rutter and Rolston, surgeons, were speedily in attendance, when it was discovered that deceased had sustained a fracture of the skull and broken one of his ribs. He lingered until Monday night about eight o'clock, when he expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Summerland Street. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at two o'clock, at the "Lord Clarendon Spirit Vaults," 4 Trafalgar-place, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PIKE, a butcher's labourer, who committed suicide on Tuesday, 30th April, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon. The evidence given by his wife and Mr Greenleaf, whose room is on the same floor, and who saw the whole of the proceedings, was similar to that published in the Western Morning News of yesterday. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From Falling Down Stairs. - Yesterday afternoon, at five o'clock, an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner for Plymouth, at Bustin's wine and spirit vaults, Octagon-street, to Inquire into the death of JOHN MURRAY, which was occasioned by concussion of the brain, arising from a fall on Monday morning last. MARY MURRAY, the widow of the deceased, stated that she resided at 126 King-walk West. Her husband was a builder's labourer, and was about 38 years of age. On Sunday night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, he returned to his home in a state of intoxication, and commenced beating his wife, who to escape an unmerited castigation, fled from the house. Whilst standing opposite, she heard that deceased had fallen over the stairs, and on going into the passage, found him stretched out, bleeding from a wound in the head, and speechless. She attended on him until Tuesday morning, when he became worse and Mr Dale, surgeon, exerted his skill to save the unfortunate man's life, but he gradually sank and died about three o'clock on Wednesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 May 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Man Found Dead. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock, at the Edgcumbe Inn, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Deputy Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of one JAMES HEMER, 73 years of age, who was found dead in a passage in a house in Market-lane, occupied by Thomas Chapman, and where also deceased resided, on Sunday morning last about six o'clock. Thomas Chapman said he knew the deceased, who was a pensioner, having served in the Royal Marines, and had been a sergeant for many years. Sergeant Ockford said that he knew the deceased, that he was a man of intemperate habits, always intoxicated when he had the chance, and his house was totally destitute of furniture. The body of the deceased had no marks of violence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 May 1861
PLYMSTOCK - Suicide At Hooe. - An Inquest was held at Hooe, on Tuesday, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH REPATH, who committed suicide by cutting his throat. - CHARLES HENRY REPATH said he was a carpenter and joiner, of Hooe, in the parish of Plymstock. The deceased was his son, and was thirty-sic years of age. He had always lived with him at witness's house and occasionally worked with him. For two or three months he had been very depressed, but recently his conduct was marked with habits of sobriety. He was unmarried. Witness was at a loss to explain the cause of his depression, although he had for many years suffered from disease of the heart. Witness and deceased were together in the Royal Oak, Hooe, on the evening of Tuesday, the 30th of April, the latter leaving before his father, and retiring to bed. The next morning, about 25 minutes before six o'clock, witness heard a noise in his son's bedroom, as of a fall. He proceeded thither, and found the deceased lying on his back on the floor. Blood was around and witness thought at first that a blood-vessel had ruptured, but on closer examination a razor was found lying near to the deceased. Finding his throat to be severely cut, witness fetched Mr Mould, surgeon, who attended him until Sunday, the 5th instant, when he died. Previously to his death he had been conscious, and once said, "If I had had water from Radford, I would not have done it." There was good spring water at Radford, of which he was fond, and which he was in the habit of using. Witness had often thought that deceased was rather weak in his intellect, and different from other men. He was, witness believed, on good terms with everyone, and had had no quarrel or altercation. - Mr William Pattison Mould said, he was the surgeon of the Benefit Society of which deceased was a member. On being called to him on the morning of the 1st of May he observed that his hands were covered with blood, and the bedclothes were also saturated. His hand was cold and pulseless and he was in a state of partial collapse. He was pale, but conscious. In his neck was a wound five inches in length, which had laid open the windpipe and completely divided it. Bleeding had entirely ceased. Witness proceeded to sew up the wound, and after about a half an hour the deceased rallied. He was under delusions as to his being about to be sent to the Plympton Lunatic Asylum and his food being poisoned. Witness was present at his death on Sunday, which he attributed to exhaustion consequent on haemorrhage, the result of injuries inflicted on the throat. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from the effects of a wound in his throat inflicted by himself, whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 May 1861
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening, at seven o'clock, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., and a respectable Jury, at the Plume of Feathers Inn, North-street, on the body of JOSEPH WILLING, an itinerant basket maker, who was found suspended by the neck in the room which he always occupied when in the city, at the above-named inn. It is not known why he committed suicide; £2 13s. was found in his pocket, and he had a good suit of clothes on; he also had a large quantity of baskets in the room. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From Falling Down Stairs. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon at the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, to Inquire as to the cause of the death of ELIZABETH THOMAS, who died on Sunday morning from the effects of a fall over the stairs, under the following circumstances:- The deceased was the widow of WILLIAM THOMAS, a tinman, and resided at No. 5 Lower-lane, with her daughter, LOUISA THOMAS, who is 21 years of age. The deceased, who was 39 years of age, had been in ill-health, and was subject to occasional giddiness in the head, and had been known to be occasionally the worse for drink. She received 3s. parish pay, and was on Saturday night quite sober; she went out shortly after ten o'clock to buy some meat, and between eleven and twelve her daughter, hearing a noise as of some person falling over the stairs, went out and found deceased lying on the stones at the bottom of the stairs speechless. Assistance was called, and she was taken upstairs to her room. The daughter and a Mrs Dawbeer went to the house of Mr R. H. Derry, the parish surgeon for the district, and requested his attendance, as a "poor soul had fallen over the stairs." Mr Derry was understood to tell them to go to Mr Rowe in Cornwall-street, as he, Mr Derry was poorly. They went there, but could not get anybody to get up. At half-past seven on Sunday morning the poor woman was getting worse; the daughter again sent to Mr Derry, who then came, saw the deceased and said "he could do nothing now, as she was too far gone." She became worse, and died at five minutes before 10 o'clock. - Mr Derry explained that he was unwell at the time and requested the women to go to Mr Morris, Whimple-street, who was his deputy. They must have misunderstood what he said. - The Jury, having considered the evidence of the daughter, confirmed by other witnesses, found a verdict to effect "That the deceased was afflicted with fits of giddiness and that whilst on the stairs on Saturday night she fell over and sustained divers injuries, of which she died the next day." And they added that they were of opinion there was neglect on the part of the medical officer of the district; as although medical aid was sought for immediately after the accident, it was not rendered until seven hours afterwards. The Coroner was requested to communicate this opinion to the Guardians of the Poor. - Mr John Taylor, the Foreman of the Jury said, now that summer was coming on, it was desirable that the houses in Lower-lane should be well cleansed and white-washed. If this were not done various diseases might be produced.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From A Fall. - An Inquest was holden last evening in the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the death of WILLIAM DYAS, an old man of about 70 years of age, who resided in Basket-street, Plymouth. It appeared that deceased died on Wednesday evening about six o'clock, in consequence of injuries sustained through a fall about three weeks since. He was a cripple previously, and when he fell he supposed his leg to have been broken. He continued ill until Tuesday, when fever set in, and on Wednesday he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave it as their unanimous opinion that the house No. 7, Basket-street, ought to be cleaned and whitewashed inside and out.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 May 1861
EXETER - Drink And Death. Coroner's Inquest At Exeter. - An Inquest was holden yesterday at the Bishop Blaize Inn, Commercial-road, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to Inquire as to the death of SAMUEL SATCHELL. The Inquest had been adjourned from the 22nd instant, for the purpose of making a post mortem examination, as there were thought to be some suspicious circumstances connected with his death. - Mr W. Twitcher, builder, of St. Thomas, Exeter, stated that deceased had been in his employ as a labourer, and had been employed on some buildings at Torquay. Saw him alive on the 10th of May in his lodgings at Torquay. He was then sitting with his head resting on a pillow, and had a black eye. He could not speak. - Mark Brook, a joiner, was working with the deceased, and was in his company on the 9th of May, when after leaving work the deceased and two other men went to a public-house, at St. Mary Church, and played skittles, and drank between them four quarts of beer. They came part way home together, and parted in Torquay at about quarter before 12. He did not think deceased drunk then - they shook hands and parted good friends. Saw him again next day at 11; he could not then speak. He had then a black eye. - John Perryman, a carpenter, corroborated the evidence of Brock, and added that he saw deceased at the door of his lodgings on the 9th of May. - Henry Baker, of Queen-street, Torquay, said deceased lodged in his house. Between twelve and one o'clock on the night of the 9th of May he was disturbed by the noise of a fall, and on going out saw another lodger, named Callard, carrying the deceased in his arms upstairs. He appeared to be helplessly drunk and his eye was very black. He sat up with him until five o'clock next morning, when his wife took charge of him. - John Callard, a mason, said he did not hear deceased come into the house; but between twelve and one he heard a noise, and on going to see what the matter was, he found deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs on his face and hands, with his left leg under his breast. He thought he was intoxicated, and lifted him up and took him upstairs. The noise he heard was of deceased falling over the stairs. There was no one with deceased. - Mr Charles Webb, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of deceased. On opening his head he found a large effusion of fluid blood on the brain, with a fracture at the back of the skull, extending from the back of the right eye to the ear on the opposite side. Considered the cause of death to have arisen primarily from the fracture of the skull and consequent effusion of blood likely to have been produced by a fall. - The Coroner having summed up, said there could be no doubt but the man was intoxicated, say what they like about it; and it seemed clear to his mind that it was the result of an accident. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held last evening, at six o'clock, at the Brunel Arms, Millbay, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN KELLEHER, who was found dead in his bed on Monday night, about ten o'clock. - John Saunders, a private in the 61st regiment, said: I have known the deceased about eight years. He was a private in the 61st Regiment of Foot. He was discharged on the 13th of December 1860, in consequence of having completed his enlistment for ten years. His conduct was very good, and he was in possession of two good conduct badges. I was with him at the capture of Delhi. I saw him last Saturday three weeks; he appeared in very good health. I should think the deceased is about thirty years of age. - Maria Blake said: I live at the Terminus Inn, Millbay, as a servant. The deceased came there for two or three nights lodgings on Saturday week last. He generally appeared very well. On Sunday morning last he complained of being a little weak, and did not get up for the day except to have his bed made. On Monday he did not get up for the day. About eight o'clock in the evening the deceased called for someone to come up; he was in his sleeping room. My master was gone to Plymstock, and my mistress was out on business. I went up; he then asked me to get a priest and a doctor. There was no one in the house but myself and my master's son, a lad about 15 years of age, and I did not go. The deceased then said "Oh! my heart, my heart. I am dying." Just before nine o'clock, I went up to the deceased, and told him I would go for a doctor presently. About a quarter before nine o'clock my mistress came home, and she went up to see him and then went for a doctor. While she was away a stranger came and wanted a bed, whom I then showed up into the room where the deceased was lying. The stranger looked on the deceased, and said, "I shall not sleep here, the man is dying," and went downstairs. My mistress came back about ten o'clock, and I had just gone upstairs to see the deceased, when I found he was dead in the bed, lying on his back; my mistress came right upstairs with the doctor, Mr Bulteel, who pronounced him dead. The deceased used to pay for his lodgings nightly, and he did not want for anything. The Jury then returned a verdict of "Found dead in bed, by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Friday 31 May 1861
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was holden at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by John Edmonds, Esq., to Inquire as to the cause of the death of THOMAS PETER COCKRAM. It appeared that the deceased, a waterman, aged 35, who lived with his father in Vintry-street, had for the last few months a bad cough, that on Wednesday he was as well as usual, and came home and went to bed about eleven o'clock. About three o'clock yesterday morning he disturbed his parents by coughing, and while the cough was on him blood was seen to issue from his mouth. Mr Harper, the surgeon, was sent for, but on his arrival the poor man was dead. Mr Harper states that death had resulted from bleeding caused by the eruption of a blood vessel. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 June 1861
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - The Death At The Railway Station Plympton. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning, at half-past six o'clock, at the Plympton Railway Station, of the South Devon Railway, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN MERRIFIELD COOMBES, who was killed by the express train, on Wednesday afternoon last. - John Matthews said: I reside at Ridgway. On Wednesday afternoon, about two o'clock, being then in my front garden, I saw many persons pass as from the Plympton Station, and amongst them I saw the deceased coming towards where I stood, in a direction from the station. I spoke to him; it was JOHN COOMBES . I had known him between 20 and 30 years. He said he had come up by the train for a stroll; that he intended to return the same afternoon; but he did not say by what train. He was alone, quite sober, and apparently quite well and cheerful. He was an old man, and could not lift his feet readily from the ground, and therefore could make but little progress in walking. He told me he was 72 years of age. He said that his sight was very good. We conversed together about five minutes in a friendly way. We then parted, and he went in the direction of Ridgway. I have not seen him since. - Thomas Kettlewell said: I am booking constable, and station master of Plympton Station. On Wednesday last, about 4.40 p.m., I saw the deceased on the up line, endeavouring to cross the down line to the down platform, he was alone, the express train was near Plympton on its way to Plymouth, it was about 300 to 400 yards from the station when I saw the deceased from the booking -office door. I called out to him as loud as I could, "stand back, come back;" I might have repeated it several times, I thought he looked towards me, and also towards the approaching train; immediately I called out to him, I thought he endeavoured to quicken his pace in order to cross the line. He proceeded as far as the middle of the down line, the express train approaching at the same time very rapidly, the engine then struck him, and knocking him down, and the train passed over him, (not the wheels of the carriages.) I held up both my hands, the usual signal to the engine driver to stop the train. He saw me, and immediately opened his break whistle and the train was stopped as quickly as possible. I think the train stopped within a quarter of a mile past the station. It was so close to the deceased when he was in the middle of the line, that it was quite impossible, even had the engine driver seen him as soon as I did, to have stopped the train. There is a curve in the line about 300 yards east of the station, and the engine driver could not have seen the deceased until close to him. The driver had seen the "all right" signals about one mile and a half before he came to the station. I knew that these "all right" signals were put on because I ordered them on myself, and I saw them out. I knew that all was right by a telegraphic message. The express down train does not stop at Plympton. I was on the platform when the deceased stepped on the line. it is not my duty to remain on the platform until the train leaves Emerton. It is my duty to stay until it passes Plympton Station, and I did so. The deceased was knocked down by the front part of the engine, and fell between the transoms and the train passed over him. After the train had passed I saw the body lying prostrate between the transoms. I went to the deceased and found that his head was cut into two parts. His entrails were lying on one part of the line and his liver on the other; his arms and legs appeared broken, and in fact he was smashed to pieces and perfectly dead. I saw no one else on the line nor near the deceased at the time I saw him on the line. The deceased might have crossed the wooden bridge made for the express purpose, without going on the line at all. I had not seen the deceased previously. The accident happened just under the bridge. No officer or person was on the platform at the time. The body was placed in the outhouse where it now lies. The gates leading to the bridge were open as they usually are previous to the arrival of the up and down trains for passengers. - Humphrey Puth, station porter at Plympton station, corroborated the statement of the last witness. - Richard Stone, the inspector of the permanent way of the South Devon Railway, said: On Wednesday afternoon last about 4.40, I had just gone into my house to tea. I had not been there very long before the last witness, Puth, called to me, and I went to the Plympton station, and I found just under the columns of the passenger bridge, lying on the ground, a letter, which I produce. It is signed J. C. COOMBES, and is dated May 6th, 1861. I opened the letter and read it and gave it to the station master, and on the down platform I found the envelope now produced, which is addressed to MR JOHN COOMBES, 9 Charlotte-row, Morice Town, Devonport. There were spots of blood on the envelope, and it bears the post date of May 6th. - Thomas Dymond, porter of Plympton station, found a silver watch and silver guard lying across the transoms of the railway. The key belonging to the watch and a portion of the silver chain were picked up by Sergeant Hicks, Devon County Constabulary, and the walking-stick by Mr Kettlwell. In the pockets of the deceased were found a purse containing one half-sovereign, 8s. in silver, and a penny, a tobacco box, and a bunch of keys. - CHARLES COOMBES, son of the deceased said: I reside at Charlotte Row, Morice Town, Devonport, I am a smith in the dockyard. The letter itself, and the direction on the envelope are in the hand writing of my brother, I received it by post about a fortnight ago, and took it myself to my father's residence, 67 George-street, Stonehouse. The letter is addressed to him at my residence. My brother resides in Dartmouth-road, Westminster, from whence the letter is dated. The last time I saw my father alive was on Monday evening last at my house, at Devonport. He lived by himself at Stonehouse, his wife has been dead about five years. He was as well as could be expected for an old man, he has had a bad foot for several months and could only walk very slowly. My father frequently came to the Plympton station for a stroll. I think he was 72 years of age, had formerly been a stoker in the dockyard, and was a very steady, sober man. I saw the body on Wednesday evening at the Plympton station. The watch and guard found are those which my father wore. The purse was his: and the tobacco box I made myself and gave it to him as a present. The walking stick and keys were also his property. He was rather deaf, owing to his old age. He had great difficulty in going upstairs, and sometimes he would fall and not be able to get up again without assistance. That may be the reason he did not cross over the bridge. - Mr Bone said that he did not think there could be any blame attached to anyone. It appeared to him that it was a very proper duty which the company had prescribed, and he was glad to see on the part of Kettlewell that he had performed his duty so well. The Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 June 1861
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth. - A suicide of a melancholy nature was committed at Coxside on Sunday evening. The deceased was named ANN HOYTEN, the wife of a baker and grocer, carrying on business at 22 Waterloo-street, Stoke. For some time previous to her death, MRS HOYTEN laboured under a delusion that she was shortly to be separated from her husband and family, and confined in a lunatic asylum. Every attempt had been made to disabuse her mind of the idea, but in vain; no serious result, however, was apprehended. On Sunday evening, her husband took her with their infant child for a walk, and they spent some time together on the Hoe. Shortly before nine o'clock, MR HOYTEN sat upon one of the seats and smoked a pipe of tobacco, whilst his wife, taking the child by the hand, left, as the husband supposed, for the purpose of strolling up and down the gravelled walk in front of the seat upon which he was. The thought of self-destruction appears to have suggested itself to the mind of the unhappy woman immediately upon leaving her husband, for it was not long before the child returned alone, and in reply to the father as to what had become of his wife, the little creature said, in simple accents, "She's gone away, papa." MR HOYTEN being acquainted with what appeared to be uppermost in the mind of his wife became alarmed for her safety, and communicated the fact of her being missing to the police. About eleven o'clock two bargemen, named Henry Rhodes and Henry Newton, were entering the Marrowbone Slip, Coxside, when one of them perceived a bonnet and mantle floating on the quay. They saw something black at a distance, and, on proceeding to the spot, they found the body of a woman, which was landed on the beach, and soon afterwards conveyed to the Harbour Avenue Station. In a short time MR HOYTEN was communicated with, and on his arrival he recognised the body as that of his wife, who had left him but two hours previously. Mr Hicks, surgeon, who was immediately called, gave as his opinion that life had been extinct about two hours, from which it would appear that the suicide had been committed within a few minutes after she had parted from her husband. - An Inquest was held last evening at seven o'clock, at Oldrey's Black Lion Inn, Exeter-street, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Soldier. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon, at three o'clock, at Emmett's Military Hospital Inn, Stoke, before Allen B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devonport, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN MCCLARE, private of the 61st Regiment, who was found dead in Stonehouse Pool, on Saturday, 15th inst., as reported yesterday. - William Bracher, lance-corporal of the Royal Marines, who lodged at No. 3 Bridge Cottage, near the Stonehouse Bridge, said his window looks out on Stonehouse Pool. On Saturday afternoon last, just before two o'clock, he saw something like a dead body lying on the mud just under the Rectory wall. He and two of his neighbours pulled in a boat across the pool to the spot, and found the dead body of deceased, dressed in blue summer trousers, boos, blue worsted stockings, and a white shirt. He picked up a military cap about 20 yards from the body with "61" on it. The deceased lying on his right side in the mud he could only just see the left eye. The body was brought to the military hospital, Stoke, and placed in the dead house. There were no external marks of violence except a slight mark over the eye. - John Martin, private of the 61st Regt., stated that the deceased had been in the hospital ward to his knowledge since the 3rd of June, for an injury in the throat. The deceased called him to his bedside about six days ago and said, "This is the second time I have attempted to cut my throat," and asked witness what he thought would be done to him. Witness told him to keep up his spirits and he might get over it easier than what he imagined. The deceased said that in consequence of its being the second time he could not expect mercy from anyone. He said he was very sorry he had not been home to see his two sisters and said he had acted as a blackguard. Witness had known the deceased about 18 years. He had joined the regiment when a boy, had had three good conduct stripes, but lost them through being addicted to drink. - Edward Limbert, private 61st Regt., stated that he watched the deceased very closely during Friday night, and until 5.10 the following morning. Witness went downstairs to wash, and when he returned he found deceased missing. He immediately searched for him but could not find him, and he never saw him again alive. - Henry Greatrex, private of 61st Regt., saw the deceased leave the ward on Saturday morning about five o'clock, saying he was going to the closet. - John Carter, corporal of 61st Regt. stated that he had known the deceased about four years, and was a companion of his. About the 13th of 14th May last he saw the deceased go away from the Raglan Barracks about four o'clock in the afternoon, saying that he was going to take a walk into the country. The deceased did not return, and he never saw him since. About five or six days after he heard he was in the hospital. He stated that he had heard the deceased remark several times that he wished he was dead. He appeared to be tired of the service. - Herbert Reade, surgeon of the 61st Regiment, said that the deceased was a remarkably healthy man, and a most excellent soldier, until he arrived at the Mauritius. He then broke out, and commenced drinking, which made him attempt suicide, but he recovered, and had made a second attempt. Ten days after his admission into the hospital, he appeared to suffer from the effects of drink, and symptoms of slight delirium ensued. The deceased was carefully watched, and he recovered. Within the last few days he appeared to suffer from depression of spirits. He was a very quiet man, and appeared always inoffensive. He was a Roman Catholic. Witness was of opinion, taking all his history into consideration, that the deceased was not right in his mind at the time he drowned himself. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 June 1861
BUCKFASTLEIGH - The Sudden Death of MR LEIGH SOUTHEBY. - The Inquest on the body of SAMUEL LEIGH SOTHEBY, Esq., F.S.A., was held yesterday at Buckfast Abbey. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- W. Coulton, Esq., Foreman: Messrs. J. Hamlyn, W. Yates, P. Yates, A. Warren, W. J. Parsons, D. White, J. Voce, J. Callard, A. Priddis, J. Barns, and J. Bovey. After proceeding to examine the body the following evidence was adduced:- John Tooley, said: On Thursday morning last I was walking up by the side of the river Dart. I saw the body we have just seen lying in the river, underneath some bushes. I went in and took him out, he was then quite dead. The water was about two feet deep; he was lying on his left side; the whole of the body was under water. I examined his hands and face, and there was no mark of violence on either his face or hands; there was no appearance of any struggle near the place where I found him. I found a cap and a stick on the bank near where I found the body; the cap and stick was in such a position that it might have fallen where it was if the deceased had fallen. - Henry Willcocks said:- I was in company with the last witness on Thursday morning last. I have heard his evidence and it is correct in every particular. It is not a secluded part of the river where we found the deceased. - Maria Sleep, the governess at Buckfast Abbey, said:- On Wednesday last the deceased, his daughter, and myself had luncheon together about one o'clock; he ate heartily and seemed to enjoy what he ate; he was quite cheerful and talked to his daughter about the flowers in her garden. After luncheon he usually took a walk, and smoked a cigar; he did not return from his walk on this day as he usually did, and the servants were sent in search of him. I am not aware of anything that would tend to have depressed his spirits. He usually took his walks alone. I have lived eight years in the family. I have known the deceased to have fainting fits. - O. Keirnan, Esq., surgeon, said:- I have examined the body of the deceased: there are no marks of violence on it. I have heard the evidence, and my judgment is that the deceased had a fainting fit, causing him to fall in the river and be drowned. - P.C. Leo said:- From information I received I proceeded to the spot where the deceased was found. I searched his pockets, and found a gold watch; it was topped, the hands of it showing a quarter past two o'clock. I also found 12s. 3d. in silver money. The body was removed then to where the Jury have now seen it. - Dr Tothill Massey, of Sydenham: I am a physician. I knew the deceased, and have attended him. I saw him in London about three weeks ago: I did not then attend him professionally; I dined at his house with some friends. I attended him for chest disease. He was a likely subject to be taken suddenly with spasm of the heart. From the appearance of the hands, it does appear possible to me that such might have caused his death. - The Jury, after a few minutes' consultation, returned the Open Verdict of "Found Drowned." - The deceased was well known as the leading partner in the well-known firm of Leigh, Sotheby, and Wilkinson, the literary auctioneers. He was also, we believe, a director of the Crystal Palace, at Sydenham.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 June 1861
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Port Royal Inn, Exeter, before the County Coroner, (R. R. Crosse, Esq.) on the bodies of JAMES TARR, aged 14 and GEORGE YOUNG, aged 15, who were drowned the previous afternoon, under the following circumstances:- WILLIAM YOUNG, the brother of one of the deceased, stated that he, in company with the two deceased boys and three others, went on the previous afternoon, just before three, to bathe in the river Exe, in a place called Bell Isle. On arriving there the whole six went into the river, and TARR, who was a bad swimmer, endeavoured to swim across the river with the others, but when he was within two or three yards of the opposite shore, witness saw him go under the water and come up again. Witness's brother then swam towards TARR and the latter caught hold of him round the waist and they both went down together several times, when, after a little struggling, they both sunk to rise no more. An alarm was at once raised, and Mr Edwards with others procured a boat and grapnels and repaired to the spot, and in about an hour succeeded in landing the bodies. They were then quite dead, and it was consequently not deemed advisable to call in medical aid. The bodies were then removed to the Port Royal to await the Inquest. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Deaths by Drowning."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 June 1861
BRIXHAM - The Late Fatal Accident At Brixham. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, in the Blue Anchor Inn, Brixham, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, to investigate the circumstances attending the death of JOHN WILCOCKS, who died from having fallen over a rock on Monday. - John Smale was the first witness called. He deposed that he was a ship-carpenter, residing in Brixham. On Monday, the 24th, he was at Berry Head, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon. He saw the deceased asleep about twenty feet from the edge of the quarry. He did not attempt to arouse him and passed on. When next he saw him, about half-past five, he was lying at the bottom of the quarry, whither he had proceeded from a rumour that "COCKS" had fallen over. He was dead, and a boat was sent for to bring the body to Brixham. His head was greatly injured from its concussion with the rocks on which he fell. Witness saw remnants of the deceased's brain scattered over the cliffs, and the left shoulder was dislocated. He had seen deceased at noon very tipsy; he was a man in the habit of getting intoxicated frequently. The height he fell was calculated by the witness to be from 90 to 100 feet. The ground on which he saw the deceased asleep was a gentle slope towards the edge of the quarry. He assisted the body into a boat, and brought it to Brixham. - P.C. George Bird was on duty at Berry Head on Monday last. About half-past four he heard a cry of "A man has fallen over the cliff." On proceeding to the spot indicated he found the deceased lying on his face. On lifting his head he saw the brain protruding about three or four inches. He was quite dead. Estimated the height at 100 feet. - Charles Henry Brooking said he was a surgeon, residing in Brixham. He knew the deceased, and had attended him on many occasions, through diseases brought on by drink. About three or four months since he was called to attend WILLCOCKS in the night, when he found him in a state of apoplexy through drink. He had seen the body, and had no doubt that death was instantaneous. From his knowledge of the deceased and from the evidence adduced he believed he fell over the cliff in a state of drunkenness. - The Coroner said although there was no evidence before them to show how the deceased came by his death, the probability was that he either rolled down the slope into the quarry, or that awaking from sleep in a state of semi-intoxication, he fell over without being aware of his dangerous situation. He would have been better satisfied, and so doubtless would the Jury, if the police could have brought forward some witness to testify to the rolling over, whilst asleep, or rambling over in the manner surmised, for it was possible, although scarcely probable, that anyone bearing the man some ill-will, seeing him in such a state of intoxication, might have given the deceased an impetus, whilst asleep, which impelled him towards the edge of the cliff. If the Jury thought there had been any foul play, he would if they wished, adjourn that Inquest, in order to give the police time to make any inquiries which might elucidate the matter. This was merely a suggestion, and if the Jury considered there was no necessity for any such adjournment or Inquiry, he would leave them to consider their verdict. - The Jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 1 July 1861
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Railway Bridge, Union-Street. - In Saturday's Western Morning News we gave the particulars of a sad accident which took place at the Railway Bridge, Union-street, Plymouth, on Friday, and which terminated fatally to the sufferer, a young man named RICHARD GOSS, aged 17, living in Henry-street. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner. From the evidence of Richard Morris, porter at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Edwin Marsh, engine cleaner, in the South Devon Railway Company and George Hardy, another engine cleaner, it appeared that the deceased, as before stated, got over the railings which guard the bridge for the purpose of seeing the Odd Fellows' procession pass by, and that in the act his foot slipped and he fell to the street beneath, a considerable distance. He was picked up, put into a cab, and taken to the Hospital, but before arriving at which death ensued. He had broken his neck. The accident appeared to have been entirely through his own conduct, and though some other fellow workmen were near none pushed him or at all caused his fall. - At the conclusion of the evidence one of the Jurymen, Mr Napoleon Wills, said he thought it was a very curious case. - The Coroner: I don't think it curious at all. I think it is very plan. (Hear, from other Jurymen.) - Mr Wills: I consider it your duty to know from medical evidence whether the death was accidental or not. (Oh!) (To the Foreman) I consider it your duty - The Coroner put the question to the Jury whether they wished medical evidence upon so plain a point, and they unanimously agreed there was not the slightest occasion. - Mr Wills (who was standing): I sit corrected! (a laugh). Mr Wills (again): What are you and all the Jury without medical evidence. (Order). What, I say, is the use of the Jury without the evidence of a medical man? and that in a case of broken neck? - Several Jurymen signified their dissent. - The Coroner: The other gentlemen of the Jury are against you. - Mr Wills: I should like to understand fairly, do I sit here under you? - (Yes.) - The Coroner: Yes, I hope you will. I should be the first to have medical testimony if I thought it necessary. It is a painful case - alluding to the relatives present - Mr Wills: Yes, it is painful, very painful. - The Coroner: It is painful, sir, in the presence of the distressed sister of the deceased. - Mr Wills (getting up and politely bowing): It is painful. - Another Juryman said it was not at all needful to have medical testimony. (Hear.) - Another Juryman commented on the fact that though others of the deceased's fellow workers were near by him on the bridge when he fell and saw it, that the witness Hardy was the only one with sufficient feeling to go and help him. He thought it strange. - Mr Wills: If it is agreed against me - well - and so - so. Mr Foreman, the thing (Inquest) ought to be adjourned - (no) - to have the evidence of the medical gentlemen. Howe are we to know it that don't understand it. - The Coroner: I will speak to you reasonably for a moment. I is not because a man is a poor man that his body is to be opened to satisfy curiosity. The question is not whether his heart or neck was broken, but whether he came to his death by an accident. - Mr Wills: I want to know whether it is an accident? - Sir, you ought to know better than ask me that question, whether the heart was broken or the neck broken. You asked that question of me. I will say no more; you ought to know better. (Order.) The Foreman (Mr John Bovey): Have you any doubt that it was an accidental death? - Mr Wills: Speak to the Coroner, not to me. - The Coroner: I consider you are unanimous for "Accidental Death." - Mr Wills: I don't think, sir, that we ought to sign without having the testimony of a medical man. (Yes.) How do we know it was accidental. - The Coroner: The witnesses have sworn it upon oath. You viewed the body. - Mr Wills: I didn't see his neck. - (Mr Wills here produced a smelling bottle and applied it vigorously to his nose, at the same time bowing politely to the Coroner. Subsequently however he signed the usual Document.)

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 July 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident In Bedford Street, Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at five o'clock, by John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, to Inquire into the cause of death of JANE AMELIA CHUBB, a child four years of age, who died from injuries received on Friday last. The deceased resided with her father, a tailor, of No. 9 Basket-street, Plymouth. On Friday, the 28th ult., the child was in Bedford-street, for the purpose of seeing the processions of Odd Fellows and Foresters. Shortly before one o'clock Mr John Reed, residing in the same house with the deceased and her parents, was standing outside the shop of Mr Bazley, druggist, of Bedford-street, when his attention was attracted by a cry, and, on looking towards the spot from which it proceeded, saw the deceased underneath the feet of a cab-horse which was drawn up near the Mart of Mr Parkhouse. She was extricated as soon as possible, and was attended by Mr Square, surgeon, but the injuries sustained proved to be of a fatal character, and the little sufferer expired on Sunday morning about seven o'clock. She had been taken with her father to see the processions, but for a moment became separated from him and fell beneath the feet of the horse in the manner described. No blame being attributable to the driver of the cab, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 July 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From A Fall. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at four o'clock at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the death of HENRY SMITH, the accident to whom we reported yesterday. The Jury having been sworn, the following evidence was adduced:- Richard Morris, porter at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that the deceased was brought to the hospital on Monday evening, about 6.30. He had sustained injuries on the right side of the head. Mr Square attended the deceased; and he died yesterday morning about seven o'clock. His father came to see him, and was with him when he died. - WILLIAM SMITH said that he was a man-of-war's-man, on leave, and had to return to the Royal Adelaide. The deceased was his brother, and about twenty-seven years of age; he was an armourer on board H.M.S. Bulldog, now at Portsmouth. His father resides in Regent-street, Plymouth. The deceased was on leave, and on Monday evening he determined to go to Portsmouth to join his ship. The deceased went on board the Irish and London steamer Leda, lying in the pontoon at Millbay, and witness went with him. Witness left the deceased about 5.20 in the evening in very good health and he had not drunk much. The next time he saw him the same evening was at the Hospital quite insensible. - George Axworthy, policeman at the Great Western Docks, said that he was on duty at six o'clock on Monday evening. He had known the deceased 13 or 14 years. He saw the deceased on board the steamer about 5.15 and saw his brother leave him. He then saw deceased sitting in the combings of the hatchway and in a minute he saw his head rise up and his body fall back down into the hold of the Leda. The height was about 20 feet. He went to the hatchway and saw the deceased in the hands of Capt. Teels; no one pushed the deceased, and in his opinion the death was purely accidental. The deceased had been drinking. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 5 July 1861
TEIGNMOUTH - The Fatal Boat Accident At Teignmouth. - On Thursday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Foresters' Arms, West Teignmouth, by F. B. Cuming, Esq., of Totnes, Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZA ISAACS, about 33 years of age, who was accidentally drowned on the previous Tuesday afternoon by the capsizing of a boat near Labrador. The deceased, who was a married woman, was the landlady of the compass Inn, West Teignmouth. On Tuesday afternoon last she, in company with her son, a lad about 13 years of age, and a Mrs Taylor and Mrs Hurley engaged a boat of a man named Perryman, and proceeded to Labrador, which is situated round the Ness. The deceased and Mrs Harley then alighted from the boat and having undressed themselves, commenced bathing. They had not been long in the water, however, before they were noticed by some boys, who began to throw stones at them. They then regained the boat, and the lad having secured their clothes for them pulled off about twenty landyards from the shore. The deceased and Mrs Harley then began to dress, but the former of them finding that her foot was stained with blood from a wound she had inflicted, went to the side of the boat for the purpose of washing it. The weight of her body, however, over-balanced the boat, which was very small, and all four of them were thrown into the water; each of them secured a hold in the boat, which was at this moment upside down, and eventually the three females got upon the stern of the boat, leaving the lad at the bow of her. So great, however, was the weight at the stern end, that that portion of the boat again sunk, and the females were again submerged in the water. At this time the deceased was heard by her son to call out "SAM;" but he was unable to go to her assistance. In this condition they remained in the water floating for about 10 minutes, when a man named Dinion came to their assistance with a boat. They were all taken into the boat in a very exhausted state. The deceased, who was taken into the boat last, was observed whilst she was in the water to have her back upwards with her head beneath the surface. She was instantly taken to Major Brown's house, and Mr Brooks, surgeon, sent for, who upon his arrival applied artificial respiration and other means to restore animation, but in vain. In fact, it was stated by Dinion that he considered the deceased was dead when he took her into the boat in the first instance. The Jury, after hearing the whole of the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 July 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - Extraordinary Discovery Of A Dead Child. - An Inquest was held yesterday at two o'clock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, for the purpose of Inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of a newly-born male child. - From the evidence of several witnesses it appeared that MARY JANE EVENS, the mother of the child, had resided at No. 2, Little Durnford-street, Stonehouse, from Christmas last. On Friday night, about half-past ten o'clock, a witness named Mary Ann Dymond, who resides in the same house, smelt a most offensive stench, which appeared to proceed from the room of MARY JANE EVENS. Just previous to this EVENS was heard to come from her room and go into the courtlage. From various circumstances which directed attention to EVENS'S room, Dymond and other of the neighbours went thither, and said to EVENS they thought there was something not right. EVENS first said it was the drain, and afterwards that it was her floorcloth which they smelt. EVENS had frequently denied being pregnant. On the neighbours, however, replying that they thought it was from her room the unpleasant effluvia came, EVENS positively denied it, and said that she was not going to open her door to let them all into her room. Police-constable Winchester was then called into the house, who, accompanied by Sergeant Ockford, made a search of the room with a lighted candle. It was then between twelve and one o'clock on Saturday morning last. Ockford said to EVENS that he smelt something offensive and asked what was the matter? EVENS replied that it was nothing there; after which she said "Come inside and I will tell you." On the sergeant going inside, EVENS said, "I was delivered of a dead child yesterday morning," and added that it was in the bed. The sergeant turned down the bedclothes and saw the child about the middle of the bed, wrapped up apparently in a female's nightgown. On inquiring of EVENS as to who was present at her confinement, she said "nobody." She had not told her friends of it; she had been to her father's house at Plymouth on that day, but had not told her father of it Mr Perry, surgeon, was then sent for, who put various questions to EVENS, in reply to which she still persisted that the child was dead born. EVENS was subsequently brought to the station-house, and thence taken to the Infirmary of the Workhouse, where everything necessary for her was provided. Sergeant Ocford produced various items of baby clothing which he had found on searching EVENS' room. He also produced a letter which had come by post that (Monday) morning, addressed to MISS MARY JANE EVENS," and which was signed by a seaman on board H.M.S. Orion, dated Malta, June 29th, 1861. There were also various other indications in EVENS'S room of her having been recently confined. A number of letters torn up were also found in the grate. Mr Perry, surgeon, who gave evidence on the Inquest, stated that on examining the child he could discover no marks of violence or injury on the body. EVENS told him that at the time of her confinement she remained in a fainting state for about three hours, and that she never heard the child cry. Mr Perry was of opinion that the child had been born about twenty hours, and he believed it had come to its full time. He had since made a post mortem examination, from which he conceived that the child had but feebly breathed, and then died naturally. He was not of opinion that the child died of haemorrhage, or from any violence whatever on the body During the Inquiry from a statement made by EVENS that a child's bedgown was to be found in her room, thereby showing that she had made provision for the birth of the child, Sergeant Ockford again proceeded to the room, and after a short time returned with the bedgown in question. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, going minutely into the facts, stating that the first fact to be elicited with a view to show that the death of the child had been caused by improper means, was to be satisfied that the child was born alive; they had heard the surgeon's evidence on that point, which showed that the child but feebly breathed and the fact of no violence being found on the body, and baby clothes being provided, were circumstances strongly in favour of EVENS, and of the child dying a natural death. As to the concealment of birth, if such a charge was proceeded with, it would have to come before the magistrates. The Jury then consulted for some minutes, when the Foreman said that the Jury were of opinion that the child was born alive; but some of them considered that with proper attendance it might have been spared. - Mr Perry was then further examined on that point, who stated that it was very uncertain whether under any circumstances the child would have lived, even with the best medical attention; it was probable it would not. The Jury then returned as their verdict that the child was born alive, but did immediately afterwards; but from what cause it came to its death there was no evidence to prove. The Jury added that a severe censure should be passed on the mother for not calling assistance at the time of her confinement.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 July 1861
PLYMOUTH - Yesterday afternoon, at half-past three o'clock, an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, at Bustin's wine and spirit vaults, Octagon-street, to Inquire into the cause of death of JOHN QUINT, who was found dead on the previous day. The deceased was a Greenwich pensioner, residing at No. 1, Quarry-cottages, Quarry-street, and at the time of his death was 78 years of age. He was in receipt of 10d. per day in compensation for former naval services, and about a fortnight previous to his decease, the old man complained of weakness and evinced signs of rapid and natural decay. From the deposition of the son, WILLIAM QUINT, who was blind, a stone-sawyer, and who gave his age as about 47 years, it appeared that he occupied the same room with his father, and on Thursday morning he (the son) went to work, leaving his parent in his usual state of health. He returned in the evening about six o'clock and on ascending to his room, he was not aware of the presence of his father, and being blind, thought he was gone out on some errand. He groped about the room and finding no fire in the grate, went to the house of a neighbour and was furnished with some warm water for tea. Whilst at tea a boy named Menheniot came up and asked him for half a pipeful of tobacco for his father. Witness fetched the tobacco-box of the deceased, and finding a pipeful of tobacco in it, gave the boy one half of it, saying his father would be glad of it bye and bye. "By the way," said the witness to the boy, "have you seen anything of my old man, for I don't know where he is?" "Why, BILLY," replied the boy, "here he is, over here, lying down on your bed." Witness, thinking his father to be asleep, smoked a pipe of tobacco after his tea, but after the lapse of about a quarter of an hour, thinking that his father was very quiet, he felt his way over to the bed, and found the deceased lying across the bed, partly undressed, stiff and cold. He became alarmed, and the neighbours on coming in found the deceased in the position described. He appeared to have been taken suddenly ill, and was about to undress himself, but died in the attempt. Mr Pearse, surgeon, was sent for, but his assistance was of no avail. About five o'clock, Elizabeth Barkwell, a neighbour, saw deceased in the court-yard and asked him how he was. He complained of a pain in the stomach, and no more was said. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 July 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On Board the Ship Parsee. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at three o'clock, at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE CROSS, a lad 13 years of age, who died from injuries sustained from a fall from the main yard of the ship Parsee, on Saturday morning about two o'clock. - Richard Morris said that he was porter of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The deceased was brought there about noon on Friday, suffering from a fracture of the skull and insensible. He never spoke afterwards. Mr Fox attended him and he died on Saturday morning just after two o'clock. - JOHN CROSS said that he was a labourer, and resided at No. 8, Baker's Place, Richmond Walk, Devonport. The deceased was his son, and he was 13 years of age the 6th of May last. He has been three trips to Quebec, and he shipped on board the Parsee about ten days since as an ordinary seaman on a voyage to Quebec and back. Captain Edward Johns commands the Parsee. On Tuesday evening last was the last time he saw him alive and he took his farewell of him as they were about to go to sea. About two o'clock on Saturday morning he returned from his labour up the river when he heard of what had occurred. - David Hoskin, seaman on board the Parsee, said that the deceased had been on board about ten or eleven days. The ship was lying in the Sound on Friday morning, and about 10 o'clock the same morning orders were given to furl the mainsail and all hands went aloft to do it. He was on the main yard, as was also the deceased. He had been there about twenty minutes, when the deceased slipped his hold, fell, and struck in the lower main chains, and from thence overboard. The sailmaker and another man immediately jumped overboard after the deceased and he was slung and brought on board. The deceased was then put in the ship-s gig and he accompanied him to the hospital, where he saw his skull was fractured. There were about twenty-six hands furling the sail. No one pushed the deceased and he believed he fell accidentally. He said it was usual to send persons as young as the deceased was aloft. The Jury without a moment's hesitation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, 31 July 1861
BIDEFORD - A Lady Poisoned At Bideford. - On Monday great excitement was occasioned here by a report that a lady, who had been on a visit at Mr Stephen Wilcocks, had by some means or other been poisoned. The rumour turned out to be true; and the following particulars may be relied on as correct. The lady, who had been governess in the family of Lord Clinton, at Huish, for upwards of twenty years, came here to spend a few days with Mrs Wilcocks. Some part of their early life had been spent at school together. The deceased lady, FRANCIS ANN ROWLAND, was forty-one years of age, had complained of diarrhoea, but attributed her illness to change of air. Mrs Wilcocks recommended a prescription which was made up of tincture of rhubarb and laudanum, and knowing that Mr Thomas Griffiths, chemist, of this place, was careful and safe, she went to his shop and asked for three-penny worth of tincture of rhubarb, and three drops of laudanum, stating at the time that it was a prescription given her by one nurse Williams. On taking the medicine home MISS ROWLAND was engaged at her needle, but told Mrs Wilcocks that she felt poorly and would go up stairs and lie on the bed. When Mrs Wilcocks subsequently went up, deceased said that she had been sick. Mrs Wilcocks poured out the medicine in a wineglass, and MISS ROWLAND immediately drank it, remarking that it was nauseous. Mrs Wilcocks went down to dinner about one o'clock and about two went upstairs again; the deceased said "I have not been asleep," she preferred lying still a little longer and said smilingly "I don't know how people feel when they are tipsy, but I feel very comfortable." Mrs Wilcocks then left her, thinking it for the best. About three, or half-past, Mrs Wilcocks went upstairs again, and when the blanket was removed she observed that MISS ROWLAND breathed slowly. Her hands were clenched, face swollen and eyes shut. Mr Wilcocks, on being apprised of her condition, went for Dr Jones, but MISS ROWLAND died. Dr Jones, at an Inquest held yesterday at the New Inn, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, stated that the deceased died from a narcotic poison; but the Jury deeming further medical testimony necessary, together with a post mortem examination of the body, adjourned their Inquiry at five o'clock until eight o'clock, when it would be resumed. - Mr Incledon Bencraft, solicitor, is professionally engaged to watch the case for Mr Thomas Griffiths.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 August 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the cause of the death of a young man named JAMES DOBLE. It appears that the deceased resided in Fore-street, Stonehouse and was an apprentice to Mr Hocking, shipbuilder, Stonehouse. On Thursday morning, about eleven o'clock, whilst at work on board a new vessel in the Whitehall building yard, he went to get a piece of short rope that was attached to a chain in the fore part of the vessel, and in so doing the spar that he was standing on gave way, and he fell to the ground senseless; the height was about twenty feet. He was immediately conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was attended to by Mr Square and other medical gentlemen, but he died about a quarter before one o'clock the same afternoon. He went to get the piece of rope without orders from anyone, and no one was near him at the time he fell. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 August 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - A Sailor Boy Drowned. - An Inquest was held by Mr Bone, Coroner for Devonport, at the Ferry House, yesterday, on the body of THOS. EDWARD STEPHENS, a second-class boy in H.M. Royal Navy. On Friday week last STEPHENS, who was serving on board the Indus, was in a small boat on Hamoaze, and it is supposed that he accidentally fell overboard and was drowned. On Saturday last the body rose near the spot he was seen in the boat. The Jury found an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 August 1861
ST MARYCHURCH - Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at the Roughwood Inn on Friday last, on the body of MR JOHN KNIGHT, whose melancholy death was recorded on Thursday last. From the evidence adduced it was quite clear deceased met his death by the gun accidentally going off, and after a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 August 1861
DENBURY - Sudden Death At Denbury. - A poor old woman named MARGERY HOWELL, about seventy-six years of age, dropped down dead in her house yesterday, shortly after she had been to dinner. Mr Manley, surgeon, was sent for, and was soon in attendance, but found that the vital spark had fled. An Inquest will be held on the body this morning by Mr F. B. Cuming, the Deputy Coroner for the district.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 August 1861
EXETER - Another Case Of Drowning At Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening, at Pike's Royal George, Quay-hill, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of a lad aged 6 ½ years, named GEORGE BASTOW, who was found floating on the river near the quay, by a custom house officer. The deceased had been missed since Tuesday, and no trace of him could be found. The body presented a very healthy appearance; there were no visible bruises about it. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 August 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident To A Seaman. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held by Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, on view of the body of JOHN MITCHELL, a sailor attached to H.M.S. Circe. It appeared that about half-past five o'clock on Thursday afternoon the deceased, with John Williams, a seaman on board H.M.S. Indus, but now serving on board the Proserpine, was engaged in landing the clothes and other things of Richard Callender, late a boatswain of the Circe, at the "tip," a little north of Keyham. The water was very low at the time, and the boat was moored alongside a barge, to keep her afloat. The deceased, who was perfectly sober, attempted to come into the barge by means of a ladder attached to the quay for that purpose, when he slipped his foot at about the third bar from the top, and fell head foremost to the deck of the barge. He was taken to the sick-bay of the Indus, and attended by Mr Duncan, the surgeon, but expired shortly before nine o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 August 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Royal Standard, William-street, Morice Town, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA ANN WEDLAKE, who died from the injuries sustained by a fall on Saturday afternoon last. Elizabeth Renfrey gave evidence to the effect that she and the deceased worked as seamstresses at Messrs. Adams and Battens, Fore-street. On Saturday last the deceased came to work as usual in the morning. She appeared very well all the morning. About 12 o'clock the deceased and witness left the workroom together, to go home to dinner. The deceased went downstairs first, and when about half-way down the second flight she struck the heel of her boot against the stairs, and fell headlong to the bottom, and lay there quite insensible, and bleeding from the head. Assistance was called and Mr Johns, the chemist, came after the deceased had been removed to the workroom. Mr Johns sent for Mr Laity, who arrived in about half an hour. The deceased had not recovered consciousness, and was conveyed home in a cab. She died about five minutes after arriving there. The deceased was 20 years of age the day before her death. She was very steady. Elizabeth Charlick gave corroborative evidence. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 August 1861
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Sugar Refinery, Coxside. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of which Capt. Peake was Foreman, at the Eagle Tavern, Sutton-road, Plymouth, at five o'clock p.m., to Inquire into the cause of the death of SAMUEL WYATT, stoker, in the Sugar Refinery Works at Coxside, who died from the effects of an accident caused by the bursting of a boiler on the 22nd inst. The first witness called was George Ford, who said: I reside at 29 Jubilee-street, and am employed as assistant stoker at the Patent Sugar Refinery Works, Coxside. I have known the deceased about six years. He was about fifty years of age. He was stoker at the Sugar Refinery, and last Thursday morning about eight o'clock, being breakfast time, I saw the deceased sitting down eating his breakfast, in the stoking place in front of the two boilers. I had been about my breakfast, and rose up to feed one of the boilers. In a moment one of the boilers blew out. I saw the steam escaping and ran out of the way. On turning round to look after the deceased, I saw him on his hands and feet on the ground; the steam and hot water were blowing over him. I took him by the hand, and got him out as well as I could. I think the deceased became frightened at first, and tried to run away and fell over some pokers. The deceased was scalded about the legs and sides very much. He was taken home to his residence, 4 Park-street, and he died last evening. I have seen the deceased once since the accident occurred, and he did not blame anyone for what took place. The boilers are cleaned once in six weeks, and that is due at the end of this week. I don't know the cause of the boiler blowing out. The deceased's whole system seemed to be shaken by the fright. - I have heard the deceased express any opinion of distrust of the boilers. - Robert Oxland said: I am manager at the Patent Sugar Refinery; the deceased has been employed as stoker in the works for upwards of five years. He was a steady man and knew his work well; his regular work was to attend to the boilers every week, alternately by night and day. He was not employed at the boilers last week. He went there to take his breakfast. Since last Thursday I have examined the boiler, and find a hole just inside the brickwork over the flue, about the size of a man's hand, turned back (not broken), and the water had escaped into the flue, and thence into the drain. At the time of the accident the deceased had no business in the place, and if he had not been frightened he might have got over it safely. I examined the boiler with the deceased about five weeks since, and neither of us considered it dangerous. If we had the work would have been stopped immediately. The stokers themselves clean the boilers. The boiler has been in use six years. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 August 1861
CHUDLEIGH - The Drowning and Suicide In The Teign. - An Inquest was holden on Tuesday at Chudleigh, by W. A. Cockey, Esq., County Coroner, on the bodies of HARRIET HILLMAN and MARY ANN, her daughter. It will be remembered that some days ago the body of a little girl was found in the river Teign, not far from Chudleigh, and that subsequently the body of a woman was found. The bodies turned out to be those of HARRIET HILLMAN, of Bovey Tracey, and her illegitimate child. The deceased woman had resided with her father, a cripple in the receipt of poor relief, and on Wednesday morning she left the house as he father was about to give it up, and it is supposed that she drowned her child and herself in a fit of ill-temper or despair. The verdict was "Found Drowned." The funeral took place shortly after the Inquest.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Fatal Accident In The Great Western Docks. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Wellington Inn, Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, as to the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD GRILLS, a youth of sixteen years of age, who was drowned on Wednesday afternoon last in the Great Western Docks, Millbay. The deceased, who was an apprentice to Mr Hocking, shipbuilder, Stonehouse, on Wednesday last was at work on board the Whitehall, a new ship lately launched from Mr Hocking's yard, and which is at present lying in the Great Western Docks at Millbay. Shortly after one o'clock in the afternoon he was observed to be going over the ship's side. He was asked where he was going by a joiner, named Maddock, who was working on the deck. The deceased replied he was going to the "jeddy" a common name for a closet, which by water across the basin from the Whitehall was about 560 ft., and if he were to walk round it would be 1,760 ft. Maddock called the deceased back to help him in holding a piece of board whilst he (Maddock) cut it; after it had been cut the deceased went over the side of the ship and Maddock saw no more of him. Another joiner, Elson, was working in the cabin about half-past one o'clock and feeling rather warm, was in the act of opening the cabin window, when he saw a cap and a paddle floating on the water. Alarm was given, and it was supposed the boy was drowned as he was nowhere to be found. - William Gosling, one o the dock-gate men immediately put the "drags" to work in the docks and within ten minutes picked the body up. Dr Pearse was sent for, and was speedily in attendance, but he found that the boy was quite dead. The body was then taken to the father's house in Adelaide-street, where it now lies. Edward Filder, the secretary of the Great Western Dock Company, said that he had attended for the express purpose of telling the Jurymen that there were eight stations on the docks where life buoys were kept, and if anyone happened to fall overboard and anyone saw him all appliances were ready to save him. Had anyone seen the deceased overboard, a life buoy might have been thrown to him and his life saved. The Coroner said it was very satisfactory for them to find that such precautions were taken for the safety of those who came into the docks. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead in the water."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 September 1861
TORQUAY - Mr Cuming held an Inquest at the Union Hotel on Thursday, on the body of SARAH BROWNING, a child four years old, who came by her death by falling over the rocks at Stentiford's Hill.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 September 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death From Scalding At Stonehouse. - Yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, an Inquest was held before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, at the Queen's Arms, Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse, to Inquire as to the cause of death of ROBERT GEORGE BURNETT, a child between four and five years of age. The deceased was the son of ROBERT BURNETT, a private in the Royal Marines, and lived with his mother in Edgcumbe-street. On the evening of Friday 26th July, William Short, another marine, was carrying away from the house the last two buckets of a quantity of hot "tripe-wash," which he had purchased from Mrs Blackler, who occupied the ground floor. He bought the wash for the purpose of feeding pigs, which he kept; and as he wished to pay for it before he left the house, he placed the two buckets of boiling liquid in the passage, whilst he went to pay Mrs Blackler, who was in the back-yard. There were many children playing about, and as he put down the buckets for a short time he cautioned them not to come near them, as the liquid was hot. The buckets did not intercept the way from the passage to the stairs, but were placed closely by the wall. Whilst Short was engaged in paying Mrs Blackler, the deceased fell into one of the buckets, whereby he received such injuries that although surgical aid was rendered by Mr Hatherley and Mr Warren, the child died on Saturday evening. The opinion of the Jury was that inasmuch as Short warned the children of the dangerous nature of the liquid, no negligence could be attributed to him, and without any hesitation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Another Case Of Drowning At Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at the Cattle Market Inn, in the Bonhay, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of THOMAS DAVEY, a child seventeen months old, who was drowned the previous afternoon, it is supposed from accidentally falling into the water. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the child had been given into the care of its brother, a little boy nine years of age, and that he had left the deceased alone for a short time in the garden attached to the house, which is close to the mill leat running through the Bonhay. The child being missed soon after by the mother, search was made, and the body was found by a workman in Mr Kempe's mill, floating on the water and pressing against the grating. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 September 1861
TORQUAY - Mr F. B. Cuming held an Inquest at the Castle Inn, on Monday last, on the body of WILLIAM E. EASTERBROOKE, a child five years old, who came by his death by a horse and cart passing over him on the previous Saturday, and died from the severe injuries he received on Sunday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Drowning Of A Sailor Boy. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at three o'clock, at the Ferry Inn, Newpassage, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN TOPHAM, a youth about 15 years of age, who was picked up drowned in the Hamoaze on Sunday morning last. The Jury having viewed the body William Sammels, a second-class boy on board H.M.S. Implacable, said: Yesterday fortnight, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, Stucky, Thomas and the deceased were on the poop of the Implacable. The deceased, who was also a second-class boy, said to Thomas, we will lower the boat. He told Thomas to get into the boat, which was the second gig, and lower her. The deceased got in also. The boat at this time was hoisted up and was fastened to the davits. She was almost as high out of the water as the bulwarks of the ship. The deceased said to witness, you lower the foremost-fall, and Stucky can lower the after-fall. Thomas put the plug into the bottom of the boat. Stucky was looking at witness so that they might lower together, and after they had lowered her a little way Stucky got his hand jammed in the cleet, and he tried to hold the fall with his other hand to prevent further squeezing, but the strain being so heavy the boat went down on the lower deck port. When Thomas felt the boat going he laid hold of the life line. As the boat went down on the port she canted, and the deceased fell over the gunnel of the boat into the water. An alarm was immediately made of a boy overboard, and the boatswain and captain came on the upper deck; boats were lowered and manned as quickly as possible. Three boys named Northam, Cann and Gliddon and a marine named Glover, jumped over board to try to save the deceased and life buoys were also thrown overboard. Witness saw deceased, who could not swim, sink, but he rose again quickly. The tide was then running very strong, and the deceased was carried down by it, and just before he came to H.M.S. Wellington he sunk, and witness saw him no more. Soon after the deceased disappeared the boats came to the spot, but they could not find him, although they searched for some time. All the boys had had their breakfast before the accident. Witness saw no sentry near, nor any seaman on the deck at the time the deceased proposed to lower the boat. They had not received any directions to lower the boat. In general there were men present when the boats are lowered. Witness never saw the boat lowered before without men to assist. The deceased said they would lower the boat and get it ready to go after the officers. The boat was four-oared gig. witness did not know but that the deceased had orders to get the boat ready. They had their leave stopped for lowering the boat. There was no boat near enough to pick the deceased up at the time he fell overboard. - James Russell, boatswain, gave corroborative evidence. - John Turner, boatswain of H.M.S. Indus, said that on Sunday morning last he was on board H.M.S. Leopard about 9.10 a.m., when he saw a dead body floating on the surface of the water between H.M.S. Valorous and H.M.S. Leopard. He got a boat, and took the body in tow, and deposited it in the dead-house at Newpassage. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 September 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - A young man named JARVIS, a tailor, was drowned last evening while bathing near Black Rock. Deceased had been drinking throughout the day, and while in a state of intoxication, it is supposed, sought to refresh himself previous to returning home. He undressed himself very hastily and struck off swimming boldly until about the middle of the river, when he turned, and after giving a few more strokes towards the shore, sunk to rise no more. Two young gentlemen, being excellent swimmers, hastened into the water in the hope of saving him, but he rose no more. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 9 September 1861
CHUDLEIGH - Supposed Suicide At Chudleigh. - On Friday evening last SAMUEL CLAMPET, a labourer, committed suicide by drowning himself in the river Teign. The deceased was a married man, and he not returning to his house at his usual time his wife suspected that something had befallen him, and search was made for him, but he could not be found. On Saturday morning the search was resumed and his body was found in the river Teign, quite dead. The corpse was removed on a stretcher to his wife's residence t await a Coroner's Inquest which will be held today.

KENTON - The Suicide At Kenton. - A Coroner's Inquest was holden on Friday at Oxton House, near Kenton, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of LOUISA QUINT, a dairymaid in the family of General Studd, of Oxton House, whose death was recorded in the Western Morning News of Saturday. It will be remembered that the deceased left the house on Wednesday morning, after the receipt of a letter, and that her body was found in a pond, near the house, quite dead. The deceased, who was about 25 years of age, lived at Oxton House about six months. She was highly esteemed by the family and by her fellow-servants, and had never been observed to show any signs of despondency. She received a letter by post on Wednesday morning and read it at breakfast time, and shortly after left the house, and was missed. General Studd and the family were from home, but the servants, finding she did not return made search for her, and the groom found her in the pond quite dead. The letter she had received in the morning was found in her pocket, but it did not contain anything suggestive of a motive for suicide. After a long and patient Inquiry the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The body was buried on Saturday in Kenton church-yard.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Fatal Accident On The Cornwall Railway. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at the Railway Inn, Navy Row, Morice Town, before Allen B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devonport, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH CRITCHETT, a naval pensioner, who was killed on the Weston Mill Viaduct of the Cornwall Railway, by the first morning train from Truro to Plymouth, on Friday last. The Jury having viewed the body at the Devonport Railway Station proceeded by a special engine and carriage which were waiting for them to the viaduct where the deceased's skull and brains were scattered in every direction, and the scalp was completely taken off, and was lying on the line just the same as at the time the accident occurred. The Jury then returned to the Railway Inn, and the first witness called upon was Henry Stibbs Bush, a resident engineer of the Cornwall Railway, who said that on Friday morning he left Lostwithiel by the express train which arrives at Saltash at ten minutes after 10 o'clock. The train does not stop on the way from Saltash to Plymouth. When the train approached the Weston Mill Viaduct, he noticed that the engine driver slackened his speed, and shortly after they got over the viaduct the train stopped. The engine driver then came back to him, and inconsequence of what he said witness immediately ran back with one of the guards. When he got a little more than half-way across the viaduct he saw the remains of the body of a man lying parallel with the rail on the north side between it and the parapet of the viaduct. He felt a portion of the body and discovered that there was no sign of life. He uncovered the shirt where he thought the head would be, and he found a headless trunk; the whole of the head was severed from the body. He then looked around, and saw various portions of the brain, skull and scalp scattered about on various parts of the ballast of the railway. The scalp was lying immediately on the inside of the north rail. The passengers in the train were waiting, and he got into the train, and came on to the Devonport station, where he stopped to get assistance. He then walked back to the viaduct again, and by the time he arrived he found some of the railway packers there. He then took more minute and particular notice, and he saw just beyond the body, on the west side, lying on the ballast, a bag and a lot of chips scattered over the ballast. He then caused the body to be removed to the Devonport station, where it was when the Jury saw it. The engine driver's place is on the right hand side of the engine, and the stoker's place on the left hand side where the break is. He felt nothing unusual in the train as it passed along. He examined the wheels and life guard in front of the engine as soon as the train stopped at the Devonport station, and discovered no signs of either of the wheels coming in contact with anything unusual. He saw on a the east side of the body a portion of a stick such as would be used to support a bag across a man's shoulder. He also saw a man's shoe lying in the middle of the railway, just opposite to the legs of the body, one of which was broken near the shin. The distance from the point of the Saltash and Devonport road at the Weston end of the viaduct, to the spot where the turnpike crosses the railway east of the viaduct is about half-a-mile. There are nine recesses on the viaduct about 150 distant from each other. He found the body lying within five or six yards of one of those recesses. The Weston end of the viaduct is about 300 feet from the Saltash turnpike road, which runs parallel with the railway for a short distance on the north side. The viaduct was fenced in the usual way with posts and rail fencing. Those recesses are seven feet long by two feet wide. Each of them will hold ten men. There is no notice to the public at the recesses; they are intended only for persons engaged on the railway, the railway not being a public throughfare. There is a notice board at the point where the railway approaches the Saltash turnpike road, warning persons not to walk on or otherwise trespass on the railway. The fence between the pasture land adjoining the railway and the Saltash turnpike road is in a most dilapidated state. A great number of persons were, he believed, in the habit of trespassing on the railway at that point by crossing from the turnpike road upon the railway. - MARY CRITCHETT, the wife of the deceased, said that the deceased was 66 years of age, and was rather deaf in one ear. His sight was very good. He was in the habit of going out mornings gathering chips, and he left the house about five o'clock on Friday morning for that purpose. She had heard him say that he had gone over the viaduct, and she had cautioned him not to do so. He said there were places to get on out of the way of the train. The girdle and knife now produced were his, and he used to carry stems of tobacco like those produced. She had heard him say that he had been light headed sometimes. - P.C. Mitchell said on Saturday afternoon he took from the body of the deceased a girdle and knife, which he now produced. - William Newcombe, the engine driver of the express train on Friday morning said, on entering the Weston Mill Viaduct he saw about a quarter of a mile ahead something lying on the line. He mentioned it to the stoker and when they got within three or four yards of it the stoker sang out it was a man. He stopped the train as quickly as possible. He went back and told Mr Bush of it, who was in one of the carriages, and after he had examined it the train proceeded. - John Clatworthy, stoker of the same train, gave corroborative evidence. - Thomas March, a labourer on the Cornwall Railway, said that he went over the Weston Mill Viaduct about half-past five o'clock on Friday morning, and there was nothing whatever on the railway at that time. He had seen a man walking on the viaduct three or four times with a bag, and he had cautioned him not to do so. he left Saltash on Friday morning about ten minutes before ten o'clock on his way to the Keyham Viaduct, and when he got on the Weston Mill Viaduct, about half-past ten o'clock, he saw a man lying on the side of the railway on the viaduct, and it looked to him like the man he had seen there before with the bag by the clothes he wore. He saw a bag and chips near the body. - Nicholas Bartlett, a porter, who lived in the same house with the deceased, recognised the body to be that of JOSEPH CRITCHETT. The deceased told him that he used to go under the cliff to get his chips. - James Clatworthy and George Hatto, engine driver and fireman of the first morning train leaving Truro at 6.20 said that they were looking ahead when they passed the Weston Mil Viaduct, but they saw nothing nor felt the train shake in the least. - Francis Pickersgill Cockshott, superintendent of the Cornwall Railway, said that in consequence of information he received on Friday morning on the arrival of the up-express train from Truro, he went with an engine and carriage truck to the Weston Mill Viaduct and at the end of the viaduct he met Mr bush and his men bringing the remains of the deceased. it was placed in the carriage truck and brought to the Devonport Station. On his return to Plymouth he examined the engines of the 6.20 up-train, and the express, and found no marks of any kind upon them. In the evening he examined the carriages which had composed the 6.20 up-train, and on the step of the outer frame work of the front carriage which had been next to the engine, and on the left or north side of it there were several spots of blood and portions of brain. It appeared as if those marks had been splashed up from the line. The splashes were on the frame work between the front and second wheels of the carriage. If the body had been struck by the end of the step of the front railway carriage, which projects over the rail, the body would have been thrown down, and if the front wheel passed over it, it would fracture the skull, and account for the condition in which the body was found and the marks on the carriage. Such an accident might and probably would happen without its being felt by the engine driver or fireman. The carriage was of the usual dimensions. The step was also of the usual width. The carriage was in perfect order and the railway and parapet of the viaduct were also in their proper state. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that he could see no reason whatever to say that there was the slightest neglect on the part of the Railway Company. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found dead on the Weston Mill Viaduct, but by what means he came to his death there was no positive evidence to show.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 September 1861
The Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at Tuckett's Royal Oak Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM GREENSLADE, whose death was recorded in the Western Morning News of yesterday. Mr Morgan, superintendent of the Newton Station, appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the Railway Company; MR SAMUEL GREENSLADE, son of the deceased, on behalf of the relatives and friends. The Jury, after viewing the body, re-assembled, when the following evidence was tendered:- Charles Tuckett, landlord of the Royal Oak Inn, deposed to having known the deceased for upwards of seven years, and never during that time to be intoxicated. On Saturday, at half-past five, the body of the deceased was brought to his house, and was recognised. He was quite sober when in his house, about five o'clock, with some pig's wash. - Mr Alfred Tucker, manager of the refreshment rooms at the Newton Station, and landlord of the Ship Inn, Martin's-lane, Exeter, was in the up express train on Saturday last. Between the stop signal and the St. David's station, he noticed that they were going very slow. On looking out of the window to see if the stop signal was on, saw the deceased on the down line, and on the engine arriving about 20 feet from him, the deceased seemed to make a cut across the up line as fast as he could in front of the engine. witness made the observation, "Good God! what a madman." The next thing he observed was a straw hat which dropped on the down line and he then asked the guard to look and see what had become of the poor fellow. Did not observe any other person with him. Could not attach any blame to anyone but the deceased. It was one of the most rash acts he had ever seen. Did not know the deceased. - By a Juror: His back was towards the engine. He certainly considered the deceased must have seen the train approaching, and was quite confident he was perfectly safe on the down line where he first stood. - John Smith deposed to having been the engine-driver of the express train on the day in question. The time for the arrival of the train was 5.20, and the time they arrived was 5.23. At the time that he first saw the deceased his back was towards the engine. he was then running along the line. The speed of the train was 10 or 12 miles an hour. Witness saw deceased move off the up line, and then he got on it again. He stopped his engine as soon as he could, and went back with the fireman and guard. They found the deceased lying between the rails. He breathed once or twice and then died. They immediately sent to the St. Thomas' station for assistance, remaining with the body till it arrived. The deceased could have had no business on the line. Directly he saw him he called out and applied the whistle which he kept on until the deceased was struck. - By a Juror: He reversed the engine, but it was impossible to pull up before the deceased was struck. - The stoker, Robertson, corroborated the above, and stated that while he sounded the whistle, the driver shut off steam. - The Coroner informed the Jury that he had not thought it necessary that they should hear medical evidence as to the cause of death. - Mr William Rawling, solicitor and agent to J. W. Buller, Esq., M.P., the owner of the property rented by the deceased, stated that there was no path across the line, and the deceased could not have possibly have had any right there. - This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner remarked that the question for them to consider was whether due precaution had been exercised in stopping the train. In his opinion there had been every exertion made to prevent the unfortunate calamity, and that there was no blame to be attached to the railway company. The Jury, having deliberated a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 September 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident in H.M. Dockyard. - An Inquest was holden on Saturday afternoon at the Dockyard-gate Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of RICHARD BARRETT, a rigger in H.M. Dockyard, who lost his life, as was stated on Saturday, by a fall on board H.M.S. Boscawen, on Friday afternoon. The evidence went to show that while engaged in lowering a portion of the top gear of the Boscawen, the deceased, who was either stupid or stubborn, fell from the main cap to the deck, some 66 feet. He was removed to the surgery, and shortly afterwards died. It was stated that deceased's wife had broken a blood vessel on Thursday, and he had been affected thereby. The Coroner adjourned the Inquest to the 7th October, to secure the attendance of a man named Jordan, who fell at the same time.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 September 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From Suffocation. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Plymouth Guildhall, before the Deputy Coroner, J. G. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of CHARLES HENRY ROACH, an infant about nine weeks old. From the evidence adduced it appears that the mother of the child keeps stall in the market and during her absence left her family, consisting of three children, to the care of a nurse and another servant. On Saturday evening the nurse laid the deceased on a bed while she went down stairs into the back of the house to get its night clothes, and on returning, in about five minutes she found the infant missing. Thinking some person had come in and taken it up while she was away, she went to make inquiries respecting it, but not being able to learn its whereabouts, she returned to the room again, and on looking about, found the poor little thing hanging out of bed with its head in about a quart of water contained in a small pan at the head of the bed. The probabilities are that the child must have rolled out of bed and died from suffocation in a very few seconds. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts. The nurse's name is Betsey Sydenham, and it is but just to her to say that the Foreman of the Jury spoke of her to the Coroner as being a most careful woman.

EXETER - On Saturday forenoon, an Inquest was held at the Oat Sheaf Inn, Fore-street-hill, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of MR H. HARRILL, whose death was rather sudden the previous day. It appeared the deceased, who resided at Bartholomew-street, had been ill for upwards of two years, suffering from rheumatic gout, and a chest complaint; and on Thursday evening deceased came home at his usual hour, and retired to rest about half-past nine. Between twelve and one his wife was awoke through his coughing, spitting, and vomiting blood, which continued without intermission for about an hour. Medical aid was sent for, but ere it arrived the vital spark had fled. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from rupture of a blood-vessel near the heart." The deceased has left a wife and five children.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 September 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquest was holden yesterday by A. B. Bone, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MARIA EDWARDS, whose suicide in Marlborough-street we reported yesterday. She was 38 years of age, a quiet, industrious woman, who got her living by making children's shoes. She has been a widow since February, and has three children, aged 17, 13 and 5 years. She has been low and desponding since her husband's death, and on Wednesday during the absence of her children she hung herself to the bed. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 September 1861
TEIGNMOUTH - The Late Fatal Accident At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, East Teignmouth before Mr F. B. Cuming, Deputy Coroner on Saturday, on the body of JAMES BROWN, aged 20, a shipwright's assistance, who died from injuries received on the previous day, on board the ship Superb. The Jury proceeded to view the body, which was lying at the dead-house at the Infirmary. Thomas Tucker, a shipwright, stated that he was on board the ship Superb, now lying at Teignmouth, about noon on the previous day. The deceased, who was a shipwright's assistant, was there between decks at work. A young man named George Lee called him to help the hatch forward. They put a piece of ropeyard through the holes where the ring bolts ought to have been, to carry it forward to the fore hatch. George Le went back on deck for the purpose of taking hold of the hatch to ship it, when he (witness) said that he would help it up with him. The deceased was standing on one side of the hatch, and himself on the other. The deceased had then a piece of rope-yarn in his hand, and the other he had round an upright, waiting for him (witness) to open the hatch. The deceased knocked him across the arm with the rope-yarn. He (witness) took away his hand rather quickly from the uprights. The deceased stepped backwards and fell down the hatchway, about 15ft. He called to a young man, named Scoble, that was working in another part of the vessel, and they ran to the main ladder, where the deceased was and took him up. He was afterwards taken to the Infirmary. In answer to questions from Mr Nickolson, the Foreman of the Jury, the witness said that he was standing about two feet and half from the deceased at the time when he fell. The deceased might have stepped back, thinking he was going to strike him. The deceased might have seen that the hatchway was opened or not. - Sergeant Mashford here wished the Coroner to ask the witness whether he and the deceased had not been drinking together during the previous day, and whether there had been a robbery on board the ship the previous Wednesday night or Thursday morning, of a quantity of wine and spirits, and whether he had not seen the deceased with a bottle of wine on the previous evening. The witness in answer to those questions said that he had not been in the deceased's company the previous evening. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The money allowed to the Jurymen was handed over to Mr Mansfield with a wish that he would give it to the deceased's father. - The deceased, who was a member of the Teignmouth Artillery, will be interred with military honours.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 October 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident In Her Majesty's Dockyard. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Dockyard Gates Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of the man named JOHN SLOGGETT, a labourer, who fell into the water and was drowned on Tuesday afternoon last. The first witness examined was William Youlden, who deposed that he was a sawyer in Her Majesty's Dockyard, under Messrs. Kitts, the contractors, and that on Tuesday afternoon, about a quarter after three o'clock, he was at the crane which is situated on a tram road, about three or four feet from the edge of the dock. Deceased and witness were about to raise some stones by the crane, when deceased suddenly slipped and fell into the water. He instantly cried out, and witness got a rope which was about 60 or 70 feet away from where he was standing. On his return he found that SLOGGETT had sunk and he saw bubbles rising from the surface of the water. The deceased only rose once above the surface. About two hours afterwards witness saw him taken out of the water. Hooks were sunk in the water to endeavour to grasp the deceased but without effect, and within half-an-hour the diver went down. The handle of the crane went overboard with him and went to the bottom of the dock - James Richards, clerk to Messrs. Kitts, deposed that on Tuesday afternoon, at a quarter after 3 o'clock, he was in his office, about 15 or 20 yards from the crane and heard the cry "a man is overboard." Witness added I ran and saw the deceased in the water, between the dock and the dam, about a foot under the surface of the water. I instantly looked about for something to throw to him: I could only see a wooden roller which I threw into the water. The deceased did not speak or rise above the surface but immediately sank down out of sight. The piece of wood fell within his reach but he made no effort to reach it. I saw no more of him. Several people were near the spot in five minutes and everything was done to save him that possibly could be. There were persons with boat hooks and ropes near enough to the spot had he come to the surface of the water to rescue him, but he never appeared. The deceased was taken out of the water about 1 hour and 20 minutes afterwards. The deceased had been working at the same spot about the same work for a week past, and was a young man apparently from 18 to 20 years of age. - James Tucker, a labourer in the Dockyard, under Messrs. Kitts, gave similar evidence, and said that after the deceased was in the water he paddled about with his hands for 2 or 3 minutes and then sank to rise no more. Witness could not render the deceased any assistance as he was pumping air to one of the divers. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that it was necessary railings should be put at the place where the deceased fell for the safety of those men who should work at the crane hereafter.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 October 1861
TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was holden at the Guildhall yesterday before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of the boy COCK, the particulars of whose death was published on Monday. The evidence of his mother and two men named Stephens and Williams, both of whom saw the accident, was taken, but no facts were elicited other than those that have already appeared, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Accident In H.M.'s Dockyard. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of RICHARD BARRETT, a rigger in H. M.'s Dockyard, who died from the injuries sustained by a fall on board H.M.S. Boscawen, on the 20th September, was resumed yesterday afternoon at the Devonport Guildhall, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. After hearing the evidence of Samuel Jordon, John Oliver, John Spinner and Alexander Pope, the Coroner summed up the facts and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 October 1861
EGG BUCKLAND - Shocking Accident At A Quarry. Three Men Buried And Two Killed. - Travellers on the Tavistock Railway may have noticed two small slate quarries in Cann Woods, about a mile from the junction with the South Devon Railway. One of these quarries, on the west side of the line, was on Monday the scene of a deplorable accident, by which two men were killed and three others seriously injured. On Monday afternoon four men were working on a ledge or rock a few feet in width, and overhanging this ledge were tall rocks, which presented a smooth and firm appearance, and from which no danger was apprehended, although they overhung the ledge several feet. In fact, so safe was the rock considered that at the time of the accident the men were engaged in removing the rock beneath upon which the sloping rock above appeared to lean. Suddenly, about two o'clock, part of the overhanging mass of rock fell forward, and in its fall buried three of the men who were working on the ledge. the fourth man, Charles Saunders, escaped by rushing to the ladder and rope by means of which the men had descended to their fatal position. The ladder up which he was attempting to climb was knocked away and broken into several pieces, but he clung to the rope and succeeded in ascending to the top, though not without receiving serious injuries from the falling stones. When the men working in the neighbourhood went to the spot they found that about 200 tons of stone had fallen, which had covered the place on which the men were working, and as no one could be seen, it was supposed that all had perished, but from the rocks a voice was heard to issue, of which they learnt that one of the men, although completely buried, was still alive. With the instinct of Englishmen the comrades of the buried man immediately climbed to the spot and commenced removing the stones by which he was covered. In doing this they failed to observe the dangerous state of the rocks above them, and shortly another large stone fell and knocked over one of the searches, named James Sellick, into the quarry below; he fell a depth of about 20 feet, and was seriously injured. A pause then occurred in the investigation, but the buried man continuing to cry for help the task was resumed in spite of danger, and in a short time he was removed from his unpleasant position, and strange to say that although completely buried with rocks and stones, the man, who proved to be William Attwell, is not seriously injured. The quarryman who climbed up the rock during the accident was found on the top; he is considerably bruised and it is feared badly ruptured. The other two men are dead. S. MARTIN was found with his head crushed and MCWERISBOROUGH with legs, arms and ribs broken. - The Inquest on the bodies of the deceased was held yesterday at Mrs Cudlip's, Pool Farm, Egg Buckland, before A. B. Bone, Esq., jun., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr J. Sheppeard was Foreman. The bodies were much disfigured, but not beyond recognition. The first witness was William Rolstone, who said, I am a woodcutter, in the employ of Mr W. Weeks. On Monday, the 14th Oct., I was working at Collwell Wood, about a quarter-of-a-mile from the quarry. About half-past two in the afternoon I went to Rumple Quarry, in consequence of having been called by a boy, and saw James Sellick on his hands and knees at the bottom of the quarry. He was not covered with any of the rubbish. Mr Weeks, jun., who was in the upper part of the quarry, called to me and I went. - Here Mr Bone said: I think that we can do no other than adjourn the Inquiry, in order that the men injured may attend and give their evidence, but we will hear the evidence of the witnesses now present. Wm. Rolstone continued: I saw Atwill, who I understood had been bruised and had just got out; he was bleeding and screeching and uttering some words which I could not understand. I and another man in about 15 minutes got the body of MCWERISBOROUGH out. He was quite dead. In about two hours after, I and other men also got out the body of MARTIN. I knew them both and recognised them at once. - Wm. Roberts said: I am a packer on the Tavistock Railway. Yesterday about four o'clock I was called to give assistance. I and the other men went to work to discover MARTIN, and after a short time I saw his arm. We moved a large quantity of slate rubbish, &c., and dragged him out. - ... Pearce said: I have been a quarryman for 10 years, and formerly worked in the Rumple Quarry. On Monday, during my dinner-time, I went over to the quarry. While there C. Saunders asked me how I liked the quarry? I replied not at all, and that I should not like to do work there. He then said, neither he nor MCWERISBOROUGH should work there much longer, and that as there were shortly some government works to be started in the neighbourhood he should go there, as he could get better wages. I did not think it safe. They had blasted, I believe, eight times in the forenoon, but not in any portion of the slate which gave way. Saunders also said that he did not think it would fall yet, but it would some time. I should think it had been in that dangerous state about a week or fortnight. The men having sustained such severe injuries, and as it would be a week at least before they would be able to attend, it was decided that the Inquiry be adjourned to half-pat two o'clock on Monday, the 28th inst., at the River Ford Inn, Plym Bridge. The Jury to meet at the quarry.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest On The Body Picked Up In The Hamoaze. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Mutton Cove Inn, Devonport, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., on the body of a man named MICHAEL MURPHY, who was picked up drowned on Monday morning last. It appears that on Saturday week last the deceased agreed to take a woman named Philippa Dunn in his boat to put her on board H.M.S. Amphitrite to see her husband, and when he got as far as Torpoint he pulled towards H.M.S. Calliope; he said he could not pull her any further as the boat was heavy, and he should be obliged to go on board and get another man to help him. On his arrival at the ship deceased put Mrs Dunn on the accommodation ladder, and on her reaching the top of the ladder she saw MURPHY in the water. She raised an alarm, but before anyone could render him any assistance he sank. She was then taken on board H.M.S. Indus, and from thence to the Amphitrite. The Coroner before he summed up said that he thought the body was found such a distance from Mutton Cove that it ought to have been taken to Torpoint or Saltash, and the Saltash Coroner to have held the Inquest, who had jurisdiction upon the waters of the Hamoaze. He said he was induced to make that remark because several bodies had of late been brought on shore to Devonport and then brought into the town, where the Inquest had been held by him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Millbay. - An Inquest was held last evening at seven o'clock, at Pilliar's West Hoe Inn, Millbay, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM BAKER, who died from the injuries sustained by a fall on Sunday night last. It appeared from the evidence given by Mr Nicholson, agent to the Cork steam ship company, and Edmund Fleming, an able seaman, that the deceased was a cabin passenger by the Ibis on Friday last, from Cork, and he was a resident of Cork, and an hotel or lodging-house keeper at Patrick's Quay, Cork. The deceased was about 30 years of age, and he went on Friday to Paignton, to fetch an aunt named Hebert, and he came on Friday night with her. On Saturday evening they went on board the Preussicher Adler as cabin passengers, and sailed for Cork on Sunday morning. During that day the steamer was obliged to put back to Plymouth in consequence of stress of weather, and about 9 o'clock the same (Sunday) evening the deceased went on shore, and Fleming, whilst on duty on board, between 1 and 2 o'clock on the main-deck, heard some of the passengers sing out there is a man drowning. Fleming immediately went over the ships on the sponson, and he descended by one of the piles to where he could reach the deceased. The deceased said to him "haul me up," and he took hold of the deceased's collar, and told him that he was "all right". Some other assistance came and the deceased was taken in the galley on board the ship and a doctor was sent for, but the man died within ten minutes. There was a large cut over the deceased's right eye, and Fleming thought that the fall must have been accidental as he was coming on board. The aunt left yesterday afternoon by the steamer for Cork, to convey to his wife the intelligence of the deceased's death. The Jury, without a moment's hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In Mount Edgcumbe Park. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at 12.30 p.m., at the Queen's Arms, Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., on the body of CHARLES TRUSCOTT. It appears that the deceased, who was about 45 years of age, worked as labourer, under Mr George Pawley, gardener, at Mount Edgcumbe. On Thursday morning last deceased left his house in Brownlow-street, Stonehouse, perfectly well and went to the park, and was put to work by Mr Pawley, in clearing the walks; nothing more was seen of him until the following morning. The deceased's wife, MARY TRUSCOTT, finding he did not come home as usual on Thursday night, went down to the Admiral's Hard several times to look for him, and finding he did not come, and the weather being very stormy, she thought he might stay at Mount Edgcumbe for the night. Early on the following morning she went across and in company with Snell, an under-gardener, went in search of her husband, and on coming to the amphitheatre looking into Barnpool, near the place where the deceased's work had been on the previous day, they saw him lying at the foot of a chestnut tree which was about twenty feet high. He was rather inclining on his left side with his face towards the ground, and quite still. Snell turned him over and asked him what was the matter. At first he did not speak, but afterwards said "Don't hurt me;" he seemed to be in great pain. On Snell lifting him up he inquired where his feet were. Snell then went for assistance, and the deceased was taken first to the orangery, and then to his home in Brownlow-street, Stonehouse. Mr Bulteel, the surgeon, was immediately in attendance, and found the deceased in bed undressed lying on his back, complaining of violent pain between his shoulders. The deceased's legs were perfectly paralyzed, and he had lost sensation from his arms, but he could move them a little. He had all the symptoms of some injury to the upper part of the spine; paralytic symptoms gradually increased until his death, which happened on Sunday morning. - Mr Bulteel believed the cause of death to have been the injury of the spinal column, probably the fracture or displacement of one of the vertebrae. On Saturday night last, on Mr Bulteel telling deceased that he probably would not recover, and asking him how it occurred, he said that as he was walking home from work, on passing a tree he saw a dead bough a little out of his reach. He jumped up to lay hold of it and broke it off; it gave way and he alighted on another bough, which must have been very near the ground, and he then pitched forward on his hands and face. He tried to get up, but found he could not move. He said he lay there and groaned for most of the night. The deceased told Rebecca James, who attended, that on coming home he saw a dead limb on a tree, and he got up in the tree, and taking it off he felt a very curious sensation and deadness or numbness came over him, and then fell on his face and hands. He said he could not move; he tried to reach his cap to put on his head, but he could not use his hands and could not cry out so as to raise an alarm. He remained in that position all night and was in great pain. He thought and hoped that some person would have found him during the night, but he said no person came. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 18 October 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From A Fall. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at two o'clock, at the Rose and Crown public-house in Pembroke-street, Devonport, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a woman named MARY MATTHEWS, who died from the injuries sustained by a fall on Thursday, the 10th Oct. It appears that the deceased resided at 16 Fore-street, Devonport, and was 61 years of age. On Thursday morning the 10th inst., she and her daughter, who was married to a sailmaker, but resided with her mother, sat down to breakfast together. As soon as the deceased had finished she left the room, and soon afterwards the daughter heard a sound as if someone had fallen over the stairs. She immediately went out on the landing and looked over the banisters, and she saw her mother (who had been subject to fits from a child), lying at the bottom of the stairs on her back, with her head against the stairs and her feet against the wall. She ran down to her and found her insensible, and appeared as if she was in a fit. She got assistance and had the deceased laid on the bed. The deceased complained a good deal of pain at the back of her neck. The deceased's daughter-in-law then went to the Town Hall and saw Mr Allen, the relieving officer of Stoke Damerel, and received the 2s. 6d. which the deceased had allowed her from the parish, and says that she told Mr Allen that the deceased had fallen down stairs in a fit, and she asked him for a (doctor's) note. He told her that he could not attend to her then, and she must come again. A little after 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the same day she went again to the Town Hall, and she had to wait 20 minutes, and then she was ordered into an inner room and after she had explained it to Mr Allen again, he gave her a doctor's note. She then went to Mr Bennett, surgeon, and he immediately went to the deceased, and found that she was sensible. She spoke to him and told him that she had been subject to fits for a considerable time, and that she had fallen over the stairs in a fit. She complained of pain on the right side of her head and he saw on that part of her head of which she complained a large red swelling. The deceased felt great pain at the back of her neck when he pressed it, and especially at the upper part of the spine. On examining her body he found several dark spots on the neck and chest. He attended her three days, and she died on Sunday morning last. He considered the cause of death to be a contusion on the head, and probably some injury to the upper part of the spinal column. Mr Allen said that he was positive the deceased's daughter-in-law never told him that the deceased had fallen over the stairs on the first time of her coming; had he been told that it was a case of urgency, he should certainly have given her a surgeon's note immediately. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 October 1861
DARTMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An old lighterman named HENRY STEPHENS, residing on the New Quay, died suddenly in his chair on Friday morning. An Inquest was held before the Coroner, J. Puddicombe, Esq., at Swaffin's King's Arms Inn, when it appeared that he had been in pretty good health, with the exception of a bad leg. He never complained on the morning in question, but on the contrary, remarked to his daughter-in-law how much better his leg was. On his wife entering the room a few minutes afterwards, she found him dead in his chair. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 October 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide On Board H.M.S. Donegal. - The Inquest on the body of the marine MORELL, who jumped overboard from the Donegal and was drowned, was resumed at Stonehouse yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., jun., the Deputy Coroner. Mr Ker, the surgeon of the Donegal, now gave evidence to the effect that deceased had several times been under his care for colds, palpitation of the heart and slight wound on the hand, and when suffering from the effects of drunkenness. The only peculiar feature he observed was a tendency to sleep when under the effects of drink. A master's-assistant of the Donegal, a corporal of marines, and the brother of the deceased, some of whose relations reside at Tiverton, gave evidence showing that he had shown aberration of mind occasionally, and was not quite right immediately prior to his death. After a brief consultation the Foreman of the Jury, Mr Bartlett, stated that their verdict was "Temporary Insanity."

TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Boiler Explosion. - The Inquest on the unfortunate man WAY, who was killed on Sunday morning last, through the explosion of a boiler at the Wheal Collacombe Mine, was held yesterday on the mine, at four o'clock in the afternoon, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner. Captain Mitchell, the agent, Mr William Matthews, superintending engineer, and others, were examined, and a verdict was returned to the effect that the deceased met his death through injuries received by the collapsing of the tube of the steam boiler.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 October 1861
YEALMPTON - An Inquest was held at the Yealmpton Tavern, on Monday, the 21st, inst., on the body of EDWARD ANDREWS, under gamekeeper to W. E. Matthews, Esq., of Gnaton Hall. - It appears that deceased, with six or seven others, after keeping up the festivities occasioned by Mr Bastard's wedding, left the tavern at 3 a.m. on Friday morning, to return home, but, unfortunately they retired to an adjoining limekiln, where deceased sat on the rails and smoked his pipe, while his comrades slept. On awaking they found he had fallen over the kiln, a height of 21 feet, and they took him home insensible. Mr J. E. Adkins, surgeon, of Yealmpton was in immediate attendance, but he died the following evening. From the evidence of Mr Adkins (after having performed a post mortem examination) deceased by the fall fractured the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae, which lacerated the spinal cord and caused his death. The deceased was highly respected, and it is a pity h should have met his untimely death under such distressing circumstances. he was about 23 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 October 1861
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Case Of Drowning. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at four o'clock, at the Fisherman's Arms, Lambhay-street, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of PETER DART JILLARD, a little boy who was found drowned on the previous day. - JOHN DART JILLARD said: I am a master mason, residing at 20 Lambhay-hill. The deceased was my son, and was about nine years of age. he went to the Bethel School. I have boats in the fishing line, and sometimes the deceased would go in these boats for amusement. he left my house about half-past twelve o'[clock in the afternoon of Saturday last. On Sunday morning, about two o'clock, finding that the boat was made fast to Mr Stibb's vessel, just off the Commercial Wharf steps, I thought he must be drowned. A young man named Dennawick and myself dragged for the deceased and found the body on Sunday morning, about half-past eleven o'clock. He was dead, but dressed as he was on Saturday. There was a mark across his nose and over his eyes, as if he had received a blow in falling. There was also a mark around a portion of the neck. I am not aware that anyone owed him any grudge, or ill-used him. - George Mitchell, about ten years of age, said: On Saturday afternoon last, the deceased and I launched a boat from the basin, at the head of Mr Luscombe's wharf. The boat belonged to the deceased's father. The deceased procured a paddle from his father's house. A man put us in his boat to the boat we were going to. It was then getting dark. We went to different fishing sloops, and got some gurnets and pouting. The last sloop we left was the Sarah, belonging to Mr Stibbs. We went to the James and Mary. Deceased went from the boat into the James and Mary, and told me to make fast the painter. I did so, and he went on board first. I followed him in two or three minutes. I did not hear any splash. I fastened the boat by the painter on the right hand side. When I got on board the sloop I did not see the deceased there. It was dark. I called out, "PETER JILLARD;" but no one answered. I searched about the sloop for him, and then I saw two men in a boat. I called to them, and one of them came on board. I asked them to let me come in their boat and after going to another sloop they put me on shore. I did not tell them I had missed JILLARD, There was not any quarrel between me and the deceased, and I think he fell overboard by accident. I am quite sure I did not see him fall. We were generally good friends. I was frightened when I did not find him on board. - Samuel Gordon said: I belong to one of the pilchard boats, called the Hero. On Saturday night last, about seven o'clock, I was in a small boat off the Commercial Wharf. I heard the last witness crying in a boat made fast to the James and Mary. I went to him and took him from that boat into the one which I was in. I asked him how he got there. He said he came off in the boat with another boy. I then asked him where that boy was. he told me he did not know. He was still crying, and appeared frightened. I asked him if he knew the boy's name that he was with, and he told me he did not. I landed him at the inner steps of the Barbican, with a little string of fish. The James and Mary was lying about 200 feet from the Commercial Wharf. If there had been a quarrel on board the vessel persons on the wharf could have heard it. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found Drowned, but how he became drowned was unknown to them.

Adjourned Inquest On The Bodies Of Two Men Killed In A Quarry. - Yesterday afternoon, at three o'clock, the adjourned Inquest on the bodies of EUSEBRE MARTIN and MAXIMILIAN WINSBOROUGH, who were killed through the falling of a mass of stone in Rumple Quarry on the 14th inst., was resumed at the River Ford Inn, Plymbridge, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., jun., Deputy Coroner. The Jury first assembled at the quarry for the purpose of viewing the scene of the accident. William Pearse, a quarryman, deposed that the mass which fell was of a brownish-yellow hue, and a back of that colour was not so safe as a blue back. He did not think the part which fell was as safe as were some other portions of the quarry. Charles Saunders was called, and stated that he had worked on the part in Rumple Quarry which fell, for about two months. He intended to have left shortly, not on account of the unsafe nature of the part on which he worked, but because he could get higher wages elsewhere. In the afternoon of the day on which the accident happened, Pearse came to him and they had some conversation as to the safety of the ground on which witness was working. In answer to his (Saunders's) question, Pearse replied that he "did not think very much of it." He wrought it between a fortnight and three weeks ago, when a portion of the top was blasted, in order to see whether it would come away. On the 14th he had been blasting about two hours and a half, when he heard a small piece of rock fall at his side, and immediately afterwards he heard, to use his own expression, a terrible crack, followed by the descent of a mass of stone. He called out to the others, "Look up, chaps, there's something coming." Four of the men were at work - himself, Atwell and the two deceased. MARTIN always thought it safe; he had no misgivings as to its safety. Never having worked in a quarry before, he placed confidence in the statement of MARTIN, who had had many years' experience. Edwin Sellick, a lad 17 years of age, stated that he blasted a hole in the top of the quarry between a fortnight and three weeks ago, for the purpose of dislodging a portion of the earth. He could see nothing of the crack which was the cause of the fall. He had several times heard MARTIN say "it was safe enough; it would never fall." He had never heard any complaints as to any part of the quarry being unsafe. One part only was considered unsafe, and this was dislodged by the deceased MARTIN some time since, after which no danger was apprehended. - The Coroner here proposed to call James Sellick and the man Atwill, who had both been injured. It was stated that the men had been confined to their room ever since. The Coroner, attended by the Foreman of the Jury, went to the bedside of the men, but they were not in possession of any additional evidence. - William Weeks, said he was the co-lessee of the quarry, with his father. He saw the portion which fell on Saturday evening the 12th October, and intended to descend the ladder, but in consequence of a representation from the men that four holes were ready for lighting, he desisted. He saw not the least indication of danger then, nor had any complaints ever been made by anyone that the portion of ground was unsafe. A hole was made for the purpose of dislodging some earth, to avoid danger, it was but a small piece, and after its removal nothing was apprehended. He saw the crack in the morning of the accident, but did not believe there was the slightest danger from its appearance. James Soper, the former tenant of the quarry, was next called. He said he gave it up about three months ago. Weeks commenced working the part which fell when he left the quarry. When he left it looked very well. On the Sunday morning before the accident happened, he took a walk round the quarry, and looked at this particular part. He had been acquainted with quarries all his life-time, and had worked Rumple Quarry for eleven years. He thought this particular part dangerous because it overhung so many feet. He believed the surface of the rock was seven or eight feet beyond the perpendicular where the men were working. The ground was weak. He, however, attributed no blame to Mr Weeks, the fault was rather to be attributed to the deceased, who had worked in a quarry all his days. - The Jury, after a brief recapitulation of the facts by the Coroner, returned a verdict of Accidental Death, the Foreman stating his opinion that the majority of quarries were worked in a very unsafe and unsatisfactory manner, and without any especial reference to Rumple Quarry, believed that there existed a necessity for an appointment of an inspector of quarries and mines. He further bore testimony to the handsome conduct of the Messrs. Hodge, of Pounds, who not only rendered every assistance at the time of the accident, but every day since had done everything in their power to alleviate the sufferings of the survivors. The widows of the unfortunate men who were killed are reduced to poverty through this deplorable accident.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 November 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide In Devonport. - An Inquest was held on Saturday before Allan B. Bone, at the Devonport Guildhall, on the body of JAMES THOMAS, who died on Friday from the effects of having cut his throat on the previous Wednesday, under the circumstances already reported in the Western Morning News. The deceased, who was 49 years of age, had been for about three months chapel-keeper at the Ker-street Wesleyan Chapel. He had been poorly and low spirited, but went to bed on Tuesday night in his usual health. In the morning his wife was alarmed by hearing a gushing sound, and on obtaining a light she found deceased had cut his throat with a razor and was bleeding profusely; she got assistance, and the wound was sewn up, but he died on Friday. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 November 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident In The Dockyard. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury, at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, concerning the death of THOMAS FRITHAY, who had died from injuries received whilst in the discharge of his duty in Devonport Dockyard on Tuesday last. The deceased was a leading man of labourers, and was about 52 years of age. On the 29th ult. he was employed, with others, on lump No. 5, in lowering some moorings, and whilst so engaged a portion of the chain attached to the moorings became entangled in some of the lowering apparatus. The deceased, finding that the operations of the men were thus interfered with, stepped forward to disentangle it, and succeeded, but before he had time to step back to his original position he was struck by a portion of rope known as the pennant. So severe was the blow that catching the unfortunate man upon the ribs he was knocked up into the air a height of eight feet, when he fell upon his temple, which bled profusely. He was immediately attended by the dockyard surgeon, and then placed on a litter and conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, where after lingering a few days he expired. As there was not the slightest blame attributable to anyone, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 November 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident On Stonehouse Hill. - An Inquest was held yesterday at 2.30 p.m. at Reed's Rose and Crown public-house in Pembroke-Street, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a little girl about five years of age, named KATE SLEEMAN, who was run over by an omnibus on Saturday fortnight and died on Sunday last. From the evidence adduced it appears that on Saturday fortnight last, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, the deceased and several other little children were playing under the archway at the head of Stonehouse-hill and whilst an omnibus was passing through the left archway from Devonport to Plymouth, driven by a man named Joseph Medlin, the deceased ran across the archway, passing under the belly of the left horse. As soon as the omnibus had passed over the child, Medlin, knowing that she was not in a position for the wheel's to pass over her body, pulled up. The conductor, named Harris, picked the child up, and placed her on a dwarf-wall in the archway. Two lads named Jackson and Ford, who were passing at the time, went to the deceased, and Jackson took off his coat, wrapped her up in it, and then both of them conveyed her to her mother's house, in Fort-street, Devonport. Medlin, the driver, said he was not going beyond five miles an hour when he entered the arch. He did not stop immediately because he thought by moving on a little he should prevent the child from getting under the wheels. He believed the injuries upon the child were done by the horse's feet. Frederick Row, surgeon, said that he was called for on Saturday fortnight last, during the afternoon, but not being home Mr Swain attended to the deceased, but he went to her in the evening and found her undressed lying in bed. On examination he found that there had been serious injury on the chest, several ribs had been fractured, collar-bone broken, and there was evidence of laceration of the lungs. The child at the time was in a very prostrate condition and there was every appearance of her dying speedily. He attended her regularly until the time of her death, which happened on Saturday last. The cause of death he believed was violence producing injury to the lungs. He could not conceive that the wheel of the omnibus had gone over the child, for if it had she would have been instantly crushed to death. He thought that whilst the omnibus was passing over her the low step for the passengers to get into the omnibus might have done the injuries she sustained. The step-mother of the deceased said that the deceased had dinner with her about half-past one o'clock on Saturday fortnight last, and she thought that she went into the yard afterwards to play, but instead of that she must have strolled out with her brother and other children. The Coroner, in summing up, said that he thought it was very much to be regretted that children of such tender age should be let wander about streets unless they had someone to take care of them. The Jury imputed no charge against Medlin, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their opinion that they would be glad to know if there would be something done with a view to render archways safer.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 November 1861
PLYMOUTH - The Accident In Union-Street. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY WIDGER, aged 12 years, who unfortunately met with his death under the circumstances detailed in our yesterday's impression. The Jury was composed of tradesmen resident in the neighbourhood in which the occurrence took place. - The Coroner opened the proceedings by recapitulating the facts on which evidence would be offered, and observed that the Jury were to divest their minds of all the reports they had heard respecting the matter. - Richard Morris, porter at the South Devon Hospital, said the deceased was brought to the institution about six o'clock on Tuesday evening, suffering from fracture of the skull. He died in about five minutes, and before the arrival of Mr Fox, surgeon, who came in about a quarter of an hour. - JOHN WIDGER, father of the deceased, and corporal in the Royal Marine Light Infantry, residing at Stonehouse, said he had four children now living; the deceased was 12 years of age, and about five o'clock yesterday afternoon he gave him a penny and permission to go to Plymouth fair. - Charles Masters, a boy 12 years of age, who said he could neither read nor write, knew nothing about prayers, and had never been to school, stated that he, the deceased, and another boy named Venn, about five o'clock yesterday afternoon agreed to go to Plymouth fair They all came in on the right side of Union-street, and when they had come nearly to the top of the street, a drunken sailor tried to strike them, which induced them all to run, and the deceased in crossing the street was struck by the near horse; he fell down and the wheel passed over his head. The omnibus was going to Devonport, and it proceeded on without stopping. He was picked up bleeding very much, and was quite speechless. The omnibus was going faster than a trot, and it was rather dark. A lady called after the omnibus driver, but he could not tell whether he heard her or not, he went on. - Mr Richard Henry Rodds, a clerk in the County Court, said he was going to Stonehouse about six o'clock, and was outside Mr Harford's shop when the omnibus passed, and went on towards Devonport without stopping. The boy was left in the road, and a crowd immediately gathered round; witness believed that neither the driver nor the conductor were aware of what had happened. The omnibus was running at its usual pace - not at all in a manner that might be called fast. - He subsequently told the driver of the occurrence and he appeared much concerned. - William Barrett, the driver, was next examined, and stated that the omnibus was driven by him at a slow rate, in consequence of another vehicle being a short distance ahead. He had driven an omnibus for 13 years, and no accident had ever happened before. When he drove the omnibus on he had not the slightest idea that anything was the matter, or he should immediately have pulled up. - The deceased's father said he had known Barrett for some time, and he believed him to be a very careful man. His son, too, had been a shipmate of his. - The Jury upon hearing this at once came to the conclusion that the death of the boy was purely an accident, and a verdict to that effect was returned. Some conversation then took place respecting the absence of proper lights at the spot where the boy was killed. Just at the corner of Union-street all is darkness, which is rendered most inconvenient, the eyes up to that point having the full glare of the shop gas lights resting upon them. Nothing definite was arrived at.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 November 1861
EXETER - Suicide By Hanging. - On Saturday last an old man named RICHARD PEARCE, a labourer, hung himself to the stairs of his house in Alphington-street, St. Thomas. He was discovered by his son, a little boy 11 years of age, hanging by a rope suspended from the banisters, and in a sitting attitude. About three months since the deceased fell from a hayrick and hurt his foot, which prevented his attending to his labour, and it is supposed that this preyed upon his mind. At the Inquest held at the Buller's Arms on Monday last, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 November 1861
MARLDON - Coroner's Inquest At Marldon. - An Inquest was held at the Ship Inn, Marldon, yesterday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of MRS ELIZABETH BARTLETT, who died from the effects of having caught her clothes on fire under the circumstances detailed in the Western Morning News of the 4th inst. MARY BARTLETT, the daughter of the deceased, stated that on the night of the 2nd deceased retired to her bed about nine o'clock, and at half-past ten she heard her calling, and went to her room, when she found the bed on fire. She made an alarm, and Andrew Legg came and took deceased out of the bed, and removed her to the adjoining room. She was sensible, and said she caught the bed on fire in trying to light her candle. Andrew Legg corroborated this statement. Dr Goodrige, who attended the deceased, was called on the night of the 23nd, and saw her about midnight. She was much burnt on the hands, face and legs. He attended her until her death, which resulted from burns. The daughter stated she frequently slept in the same bed as her mother, who was infirm, but did not on the night of the accident. The Jury, having regard to the age and infirmity of the deceased, expressed surprise at this, and found a verdict of "Died from the Effects of Burns."

PLYMOUTH - A Boy Drowned At Lary. - An Inquest was holden yesterday, at Browne's King's Arms Hotel, Britonside, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., the Borough Coroner, o the body of WILLIAM JOHN GOFFIN, who was drowned on the preceding day. GEORGE COFFIN, the father of the deceased, said his son, who was about 13 years of age, had got his living for the last 12 months as a seaboy in the barge Tavy. This barge was employed in conveying sand from the Lary to Plymouth. He left home at half-past six yesterday (Monday) to go to the barge at Lary. About ten o'clock, Mr Henry West, the owner and master of the barge, came and told him his son was drowned. He went with Mr West in search of the body which was found about three o'clock by George Adams. There were no marks except those made by crabs on the face. George Adams, a seaman, said he picked up the body about 200 yards from the Saltram side of the Lary. In his opinion the boat of the Tavy was not seaworthy. Henry West deposed that after he and deceased had got the barge under way and set all the sails, the boy, of his own accord, went into the boat that was towing astern to bail her out. A bight of the painter caught in some timbers of the vessel, which gave the boat a sheer, whereon she filled with water and sunk. He told the deceased to hold on by the painter, and he did so for a time, and then let go to get hold of a part of the boat highest up out of the water; he was then washed over the stern of the boat. He (witness) let go the painter, thinking the boat would swim, and the deceased catch hold of it. He also tacked the barge, to try to pick up the deceased, but she would not go around quick enough. He hailed Norman's barge, which was near him, but before Norman's boat had time to get to the deceased he sunk. Witness then brought the barge to an anchor, and came to Plymouth and communicated the circumstance to the deceased's father. He believed that if a bight of the painter had not caught in the timbers, the accident would not have happened. He was quite certain the deceased went into the boat of his own accord. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 15 November 1861
NEWTON ABBOT - Death In A Waggon. The Removal Of A Pauper. - An Inquest was holden in the Board Room of the Newton Abbot Union Workhouse yesterday afternoon, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of GEORGE CONIAM, aged 28 years, formerly a soldier and a resident of Bovey Tracey, who died on the previous day, whilst being conveyed from that place to the Newton Workhouse, as reported in the Western Morning News of yesterday. The following persons constituted the Jury: Messrs. James Thomas (Foreman), John Davis, Robert Lavis, Valentine Hills, John Searle, David Vile, Richard Snell, John Dickes. Philip Shapter, Henry Richards, Peter Bearne, John Vevasor, and Henry Thomas. The Jury having viewed the body, which presented a very emaciated appearance, Susan White, the wife of the porter of the union was examined. She stated that on Wednesday morning, between 11 and 12 o'clock whilst the Board of Guardians were sitting, the Bovey Tracey carrier, Mr Holmes, pulled his waggon up before the union gates, and upon seeing her, exclaimed "Oh for goodness sake make haste, for there is a man here in the waggon who is either dead or dying." She immediately procured assistance and under the direction of the Governor, the deceased was taken into the house. She could not say whether he was dead or alive at the time, as there were so many people around the vehicle that she did not see the poor fellow until he was removed from it. There were five or six passengers in the waggon besides the deceased, and some of them remarked that they had had a great deal of trouble with him on the road. None of the deceased's relatives accompanied him to the Union. One of the women passengers remarked that it was a shameful thing to remove the deceased from his bed on such a cold and stormy day. The deceased had no order with him to be admitted into the house when he came. The witness, in answer to the Coroner said, that it was the rule that all paupers should have an order either from the overseer or the relieving officer of the district before they were admitted. - Mr Moxey, the governor of the Workhouse, said that when he heard the condition the deceased was in from the woman in the waggon, who had got him in her arms, he sent for some wine to give him directly. Before, however, he had time to have him taken out of the waggon he heard the woman say that he was dead, and he believed her statement to be true, for he did not see him breathe afterwards. The deceased was taken to the Union hospital and Dr Gillard sent for. - Dr Gillard was next examined and stated that he was unable to state the cause of death unless he made a post mortem examination. - As none of the friends of the deceased were present, nor those who accompanied him from Bovey Tracery, the Coroner, in compliance with the wishes of the Jury, adjourned the Inquest to Tuesday next, in order that the attendance of those parties might be secured. Dr Gillard was also instructed to make a post mortem examination of the body in the meantime.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 November 1861
PLYMOUTH - A Man Drowned In Sutton Harbour. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at Browne's King's Arms Hotel, Briton-side, Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL BENNETT, who was drowned on the previous day in Sutton Harbour. - WILLIAM BENNETT said: I am a quay porter, and have known the deceased for twenty years. The deceased was also a quay porter, and was about thirty-two years of age. He and I owned a boat seventeen feet long. On Thursday evening she was alongside the Custom House Quay. The deceased and I, about half-past six o'clock, went on board, to remove her near Guy's quay, and moor her there out of the way of the fishing boats. It was dark, but the moon shone out occasionally. After we got into the boat I weighed the stone by which she was moored. The deceased and I were then in the boat, in which there was one paddle. The deceased took that paddle in his hand, and got up on the stern thwart with our boat in tow, and he began to scull. I was sitting forward. In about three minutes we were approaching Guy's Quay, when, I think, the oar slipped and the deceased and the oar fell over the boat's quarter. He was about four or five yards from the boat, and I had nothing in the boat which could reach him, and immediately jumped overboard to try to save his life. I caught hold of him and made an alarm, and I then became insensible. After I came to my senses I found myself in a boat with Mr Rowe, the waterman, and others, and when sufficiently recovered I walked home and went to bed. The deceased and myself were good friends, and we had no quarrel. The deceased could not swim, but I could, and I believe it to be an accidental death. - Nicholas Lee said: I am a seaman and about half-past six o'clock on Thursday evening I left work from a fruit vessel, lying at the North Quay. I was going to my home by Vauxhall Quay, and just as I came to the spot where the vessels unload potatoes I heard a cry of "man overboard." I ran towards the cry, and when at the South Devon Wharf I obtained further information, and I went to the Barbican and procured drags. I then went to the Custom-house Quay and got into Mr Rowe's boat; another man, named May, was in the boat. We proceeded quickly towards Guy's Quay and began to drag, and in two minutes we got the deceased's body into the boat. He was dead. We then took the body into the Three Crowns public-house, and I desired a doctor should be procured, but none came. I believe the body was removed from the Three Crowns the same evening to his residence in Exeter-street. - The Coroner said he thought there was great credit due to William Bennett for jumping overboard to try to save the deceased, and also thought the same was due to the last witness for doing what he did. - The Jury, without a moment's hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 November 1861
NEWTON ABBOT - The Death Of A Pauper In A Waggon. - An adjourned Inquest from Thursday last on the body of GEORGE CONIAM, who died whilst being conveyed from Bovey Tracey to Newton Union, was held in the Boardroom at the Union Workhouse, by A. Cockey, Esq., District Coroner, on Tuesday afternoon. The following additional evidence was adduced:- ELIZA CONIAM, a married woman, said that the deceased was her brother-in-law, and had resided with her about three weeks previous to his death. The deceased, who was a soldier, belonged to the Coldstream Guards, and had been invalided home, and since that time to the day of his death had been with witness. When he first returned home from the regiment he told her that he was in the receipt of 7d. per day, but he did not receive any portion of that amount whilst he was stopping with her, nor had he any other means to support himself with. She, being in difficult circumstances, and having a large family, told the deceased that her husband could not afford to keep him in the house. She also requested him to write to his brother at Torquay, soliciting assistance, but as he omitted doing so, she wrote for him herself. Receiving no assistance from his brother, she related the circumstances to the relieving officer, and on the Saturday previous to the deceased's death, Mr White called and saw him. The deceased remained in a garret, she having no other room for him. The deceased told Mr White that he was prepared to go to the Union when Mr White pleased for him to do so. On that occasion Mr White gave her an order for 2lbs. of meat and left. Mr White subsequently called and said that the deceased was to be sent to the Union on the following Wednesday by Holmes, the carrier. Dr Haydon, who had been visiting the deceased, saw him for the last time on Sunday night. Dr Haydon attended the deceased about a week after he returned home. She told Dr Haydon, when he last saw the deceased, that they were going to send him into the Union on the following Wednesday, and he made no reply whatever. No material change took place in the deceased from the Sunday to the Wednesday when he was removed, nor did he express a wish to remain, but, on the contrary, was very willing to go into the Union. She applied to Mrs Baker, the overseer's wife, and the daughter gave her a note for Holmes to convey the deceased to the Union. On the Wednesday morning the deceased got up and partook of bread and butter and tea as usual. She then left him in charge of her husband, having previously provided a blanket, a shawl, and two pillows for the use of the deceased on his way to Newton, for the purpose of walking to that town in order to receive him and get him a cup of tea. She was not aware that anyone had offered to provide the deceased with a room for a week or two. - Dr Haydon stated that he had known the deceased for 17 years. He saw him as he considered on the Sunday week, and not on the previous day as alleged by the last witness. He was then very ill, being in the last stage of consumption. The garret in which the deceased slept, and which his uncle now slept on the floor, was by no means fitting for sick persons. It was a very small room, and it was also intensely cold. He certainly was not aware they were going to remove the deceased on the day in question, and had he known it he should have opposed their doing so. The day, too, was so inclement that it was quite inhuman to send the deceased away. - Dr Gillard stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that the lungs were very much deceased, and he considered that the deceased died from natural causes, viz., consumption. There was no doubt, however, that his death was accelerated by his removal during such boisterous and severe weather, although under any circumstances he did not consider he could have lived much longer. - Mr Joseph Holmes, the carrier, Mrs Elizabeth Sellick, and the Rev. John Keller, who accompanied the deceased to Newton, were then called. They proved that the deceased was not in a fit state to be removed. One of the witnesses characterized it as morally monstrous and most cruel to remove a man in such a condition; and said that deceased was evidently in a dying state before he was put into the waggon. So offensive was his breath, indeed, that the passengers had to place their handkerchiefs before their mouths the whole of the way,. Just before they got to the Union a marked change was seen to take place in the deceased, and by the time he arrived at the Union gates he fell back into the arms of one of the women passengers and expired. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned the following verdict:- "That the Jury are of opinion, after hearing the evidence adduced, that the deceased died from Natural Causes, viz., Consumption, which death was accelerated through removing him to the Union during inclement weather, but since that removal took place in compliance with his own wishes, the Jury do not consider that any blame is attached to anyone." The Inquest occupied four hours.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 November 1861
PLYMOUTH - Death From A Fall. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD JEFFERY, a mason, aged 63, who came by his death through falling from the roof of a house. The deceased resided in Tin-street, and on the 15th inst. he was observed on a ladder which was leaning against the roof of a building at the back of the premises. He was endeavouring to fasten the top of the ladder, so that he might be enabled to repair the roof, but unfortunately he missed his hold, and both he and the ladder slipped down, the deceased receiving severe internal injuries. He was immediately conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where he was attended to by Mr Fox, surgeon, but no hopes from the first were entertained of his recovery, and he lingered on until Thursday. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 November 1861
EXETER - Verdict Of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Thursday by H. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN RICE, aged 44. It appeared that deceased had cohabited with a man named Scown, and about 4 months ago she was received into the Devon and Exeter Hospital with a broken jaw, which as she gave out arose from an accidental fall against a table. Whilst in the Hospital she told a nurse that Scown pushed her against the table and broke her jaw. She told others that he had kicked and injured her. These statements were corroborated by the evidence of the neighbours, by whom she was known to be ill-treated by Scown. She left the hospital on the 29th of August, but returned there again on Tuesday last. The House Surgeon at the hospital stated that the jaw never united, that her lungs were much disorganised, and her constitution generally bad. He attributed her death to constitutional disease, aggravated by pain and inability to take proper nutriment on account of the broken jaw. The Coroner, in summing up, said the tendency of the evidence was to show that death was accelerated by the ill-treatment of Scown. The Jury after brief consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Scown, who was thereon committed for trial, bail being taken for him - himself in £100 and two sureties in £50 each.

EXETER - Complaint Against The Hospital Surgeons. - Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Thursday, on the body of WILLIAM LANDRY, a sawyer. LANDRY was engaged on the preceding afternoon, with a man named Satterly, in making a sawpit at Mrs Newton's, on the Haven Banks, and whilst engaged in attempting to fix the cross-pieces on the uprights he fell into the pit and the cross-piece on him. The cross-piece was about 3 cwt. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital immediately after the accident. The House Surgeon was out, and although all the attending surgeons were sent for, not one could be found. The man died on his way to the hospital. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, said it was a very serious thing that although there were so many surgeons attending the hospital, none of them could be found when their services were required. He considered that as the house surgeon resided upon the establishment for the purpose of being upon the spot in case any accident was brought in, it was his duty to get some other surgeon to take his place if he required to leave the hospital for any length of time. The Jury in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," fully concurred in the remarks made by the Coroner and expressed a wish that they should be communicated to the surgeon. The Coroner assured them their suggestion should be attended to.

Western Morning News, 27 November 1861
KENTON - Child Murder At Mamhead. - A Coroner's Inquest was holden at the house of Mr Samuel Cornish, farmer, of Westleigh Barton, in the parish of Kenton, on Monday evening, before Mr Crosse, County Coroner, on view of the body of the female infant child of SUSAN PULLEN. The evidence went to prove the statement made in the Western Morning News of Monday. On Friday evening SUSAN PULLEN, who was a servant in the house of Mr Cornish, having complained of being poorly was sent to bed; and on Miss Cornish passing PULLEN'S bedroom door, about ten o'clock that night, she was surprised to hear the crying of an infant. Miss Cornish at once told her mother what she had heard, and Mrs Cornish immediately went to PULLEN'S bedroom. She also heard the infant cry and saw it in bed with PULLEN. She desired her to take care of the child, and told her she would send for a nurse and the doctor. She had suspected PULLEN of being pregnant. Mrs Cornish sent for a woman, and the next morning she sent for Dr Pycroft. The child was not quite dead when Dr Pycroft came. Dr Pycroft having made a post mortem examination, said he found each side of the infant's skull broken as if by violent blows. There were also other marks of violence having been used. - The Jury, after an Inquiry extending over five hours, found a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against SUSAN PULLEN. The unhappy young woman being too ill to be moved, is in the custody of the police at Mr Cornish's house.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 November 1861
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock, at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, to Inquire as to the circumstances attending the death of JANE TURNER, who was found dead in her room in East-street, yesterday morning. GEORGE TURNER, the son of the deceased, said that he was an able seaman in H.M. Navy, and had been invalided home from China. His father had been dead nearly three years, and he had resided with his mother for about six weeks. The deceased was about forty-nine years of age, and was a laundress. Her health was bad, and she was subject to hysterical fits and palpitation of the heart. On Wednesday afternoon, about half-past four o'clock, he took tea with her and then left the house and went to the Morley Inn. At nine o'clock he came home and stopped about five minutes, and the deceased then appeared to be as usual. He left her again and went into the Morley Inn, and about a quarter before twelve o'clock she came to him and asked if he was coming home. He told her he would be home in a few minutes, and she went away immediately. Just before twelve o'clock he left the Morley Inn, which was three or four doors from his own house. The front door of his house was open and he went through the passage and up over two pair of stairs and into his mother's room. The door was open, but there was no candle burning. The fire was burning, and he saw the deceased lying down by the fire on her right side. He spoke to her and caught hold of her to lift her up. She did not answer him. He lifted her up and put her on the bed and called Mrs Gale, a neighbour and Mrs Bartlett, another neighbour, also came, and her husband went for the doctor. Before the doctor came he found she was dead but not cold. The candlestick was on the floor. Mr Eales, the surgeon, came a quarter before one o'clock yesterday morning and said she was dead. He believed she died from the visitation of God. Mrs Gale and Mrs Bartlett were examined, and proved that the deceased was subject to fits, and Mrs Gale said she had seen the deceased for half-an-hour in a fit. Both of them stated that the deceased's son was always very kind and affectionate towards his mother. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 November 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board H.M.S. Revenge. - An Inquest was held yesterday, at 1.30 p.m. at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of GEORGE BENNETT, who died from the injuries sustained by a fall on board H.M.S. Revenge, on the 16th November inst. - Thomas King said that he was captain of the main top of H.M.S. Revenge, now lying in Hamoaze. He had known the deceased about 17 months, who had been in the ship since last March twelve months. The deceased was an able seaman, and was about 36 years of age. On the 16th November instant, about a quarter before two o'clock in the afternoon, he was in the main top. The deceased was also in the main top. He ordered him to take some yarns off the topmast back stay. The deceased then placed himself on the top rail, which is about three feet above the top, and he saw him reach forward and upwards for the purpose, as it appeared to him, of reaching the said yarns. In so doing the deceased overbalanced himself and missed his hold, slipped and fell down on the quarter-deck. When the deceased reached forward he attempted to lay hold of the yarns with his right hand, and at the same time he was holding on with his left hand by the topmast back stay. He believed that the deceased expected with making a spring that his feet would have come down upon the main top rail, in which case he would have probably been able to retain his hold on the back stay. The deceased was perfectly steady and sober, and was fully experienced and quite competent for the duties which he had to perform. No one touched the deceased at the time he made the spring, and he believed his fall was entirely accidental. Witness and George Tucker, a leading seaman, were both within five feet of the deceased. They tried to lay hold of him when he slipped, but failed. The height of the top from the quarter deck was 60 feet. The deceased was carried to the sick bay immediately, where he was attended to by the surgeon of the ship, and within half-an-hour after witness accompanied the deceased to the Hospital. He saw that the deceased's chin was cut underneath. All his teeth were loose, and he bled from the nose and chin. - George Tucker gave corroborative evidence. - William Roche, an assistant surgeon in the navy, said he was on duty at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the 16th of November inst., and some part of the day (he could not remember which) the deceased was brought to the hospital and placed in the casualty ward. He examined the deceased and found him to be suffering from fracture of the right thigh, a comminuted fracture of the knee-cap, and a compound comminuted fracture of the upper and lower jaws. There was also symptoms of concussion, but he was not insensible. The deceased was quite unable to understand and answer a question. The deceased was attended to by Dr Beith, the deputy inspector of the hospital. He saw the deceased every day up to the day before his decease, which was on the morning of the 27th inst., about four o'clock. He attended a post mortem examination of the body, and he believed the deceased to have died from the effects of the fractures and injuries above described. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 December 1861
CORNWOOD - Inquest at Cornwood. - An Inquest was holden at a quarter past seven a.m., on the 29th of November at Chubble-hill Cottage, Haugher Down, in the parish of Cornwood, on the body of PHILIP HORTON, senior, by Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner. Jurymen sworn - W. Thompson (Foreman), R. Mudge, senior, R. Mudge, junior, J. Vivian, J. Sandover, J. Cole, R. Vivian, J. Northmore, W. Hillson, W. Kingwell, W. Walk, T. Horton, and G. Hillson. - The Coroner in addressing the Jury, said they were all aware of the circumstances which had brought them to that place. The body of the deceased, P. HORTON, was found drowned. There was no reason to believe he came to his death by violent means; but it was necessary for them to be called together to hear the evidence. - They were then directed by the Coroner to view the body, which having been done, and the livery being identified, William Vivian deposed: I keep the Royal Oak Inn, in the parish of Cornwood. I knew P. HORTON very well. He lived at a cottage near Haugher Down, his own leasehold property. He was in the employment (as carpenter) of Lady Rogers, at Blachford; he had been in that service more than 30 years. He was given to drink. He came into the Royal Oak at about 5 o'clock on the evening of Tuesday last. He was not sober. He remained until about half-past 9. He had one glass of grog in my house. He asked me for more at about 8 in the evening. I told him I thought he had had enough. I then made him a cup of tea. - The Coroner told Mr Vivian that he deserved great credit, and he only wished there were more landlords like him. - Witness continued: Deceased was a very old man. I have heard and believe he would have been 77 years of age next month. He was a strong, hale old man for his age. He left my house in company with W. Walk at half-past nine. I asked Walk to see him over Langham Bridge, which is about one-eighth of a mile from the Royal Oak, and half a mile from the deceased's cottage. Langham Bridge is between my house and his. I saw him no more alive. W. Walk promised me to see him over the bridge. I have known the deceased come back to my house after leaving it several times. - By the Jury: He drank the cup of tea, but would not have anything to eat. - William Walk jun., being sworn, said: I live at Bridge Farm. On Tuesday night last I was at the Royal Oak and saw the deceased there. He was tipsy. The landlord asked me to see him over Langham Bridge, and I consented to do so. He caught hold of my right arm by his left and we walked on until I saw him over the bridge. I then said, "PHILIP you can go home by yourself now." I don't remember his saying anything in reply. I let him go, and he went on towards his home. He was safely over the bridge. I saw him about two or three land yards past the bridge. I then went home. He could not walk without staggering, but he appeared to me to be able to take care of himself. He was quite alone when I left him. He was very deaf and seldom had much to say. The bridge is on the public highway; for about one and a half land yards the parapet of the bridge is about eighteen inches high, and for about another yard it is but a few inches high and slopes away to the level of the road and forms one side of the highway. I consider it dangerous to children and persons who are unable to take great care of themselves. There have been four accidents within the past twelve months, by persons falling over the low parapet of the bridge. The present is the fourth case. I have heard various complaints of the state of the bridge. The bridge is in very good repair, but is dangerous from the lowness of the parapet. I never saw or heard anything of the deceased after I left him. - John Stephenson, being sworn, said: I am a husbandman living with deceased. He was a widower. He lived with his daughter. I am her husband. I saw the deceased last alive on Tuesday morning when he went away to work. He did not come home on Tuesday night. On Wednesday morning I went to seek him. I found his dead body lying in the River Yealm, near Langham Bridge on his left side, not above a land yard from the north side of the bridge, just under the road. His clothes and hat were on. The body showed no marks of violence. The clothes were not cut, torn, nor disordered at all. I saw no reason to think that anyone had done him any harm. The body was brought home to Chubble-hill Cottage. - Peggy Ford, on being sworn, said: I am the wife of Richard Ford, labourer, living in the village of Cornwood. On Wednesday at about 10 o'clock a.m., I came to Chubble-hill Cottage, and laid out the body of deceased. I found no marks of violence on him. I searched the clothes and found in the pocket a purse containing five shillings, a fourpenny-piece and a threepenny-piece; I also found his spectacles and case, his pencil, a door key, carpenter's rule and some carpenter's tools in his pocket. The clothes were quite sound, and did not appear to have been in any way pulled about. - ARTHUR HORTON, on being sworn, said: I live at Moor Cross, in the parish of Cornwood. The deceased was my grandfather. On Thursday morning last, at about 11 o'clock, I found the compasses now produced about a land yard above Langham Bridge. - R. HORTON, of Moor Cross (brother of deceased), carpenter, said: I think the compasses produced belonged to the deceased, although I cannot positively swear to them, there being no mark. - The Jury, on being asked by the Coroner, said they considered the parapet quite unsafe for public travelling, being on the direct road from Ivybridge to Tavistock; they also considered that the parapet should not be less than four feet high. The bridge was renewed and enlarged about 6 years ago, at the expense of the late Judge Praed of Delamore. - The Coroner, on addressing the Jury, cautioned them as to their verdict. It was probable that, according to the habit of the deceased, he retraced his steps, and accidentally fell over, but there was no evidence to show this, neither was there evidence to show that anyone did him any harm; therefore they could not give a verdict as to how he (deceased) came there. The Coroner then spoke at some length on the effects and consequences of the vice of drunkenness. - Verdict - "Found dead in the River Yealm, near Langham Bridge, but by what means he came by his death there is no evidence to show."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 December 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - A. B. Bone, Esq., held an Inquest at the Devonport Guildhall, yesterday, on the body of an old woman named MARY ANN MORGATE, who lived in Monument-street. On Thursday week last the poor woman was descending the steps at St. John's Chapel, Devonport, when she fell, sustaining injuries which resulted in her death. Verdict accordingly.

STOKE DAMEREL - Determined Suicide At Devonport. - Yesterday morning between seven and eight o'clock a man named SPURRELL, residing at No. 1, Canon-street, Devonport, was found suspended by the neck at the foot of his bed, and quite dead. Deceased had not been seen by anyone since about six o'clock the previous (Sunday) evening. On Monday morning it was observed that deceased was not out as usual, when his daughter-in-law proceeded to his room and found him as above described. An alarm being raised, he was immediately cut down, when it was discovered that he had attempted to cut his throat, a large wound being inflicted just under the chin, and a quantity of blood lying on the floor. It is supposed that, having failed to destroy himself by this means, he procured a rope and completed the horrid deed. Mr Annis, surgeon, of St. Aubyn-street, Devonport, was sent for and promptly attended; but life was extinct some time before his arrival. Deceased was about 66 years of age, and had been superannuated from H.M. Dockyard. - An Inquest was held in the afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 December 1861
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death Of A Drunkard. A St. Austell Man Drowned In Morice Town Canal. - An Inquest was holden yesterday afternoon, at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., borough Coroner, to Inquire as to the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS SALTER LEWARNE, who was found drowned in the Morice Town Canal on Saturday morning last. - James Pascoe, a licensed victualler, carrying on business at Tamar Wharf, said: The deceased had lodged with me for the last two months. I last saw him between 9 and 10 o'clock on Friday night. He was then in my house drinking whisky grog, in company with some sailors. The deceased, who was sober when he left the house, said he was going into the town to get his money. I believe he received a weekly allowance from his father on Fridays. He did not follow any business, and was given to drink. The deceased left the house by himself. He used to talk about how badly his father and sister served him. The deceased paid him 2s. 6d. per week for his bed. - Thomas Parker said: I am master of the merchant schooner Adventure of Plymouth. On Saturday morning last, about half-past one o'clock, as I was standing on the quay of the Morice Town Canal, I heard a woman call out, "A man in the water." I looked, and saw the head of a man floating on the surface of the water just at the head of the Tamar Canal, close to the quay. Having got a boat-hook, I hauled the body of the deceased in, and deposited it on the quay. The body was entirely dressed, but there was no hat on. The clothes were all buttoned up, and in an orderly condition. I saw no marks of violence on the body. On Friday night, between nine and ten o'clock, there must have been nine to ten feet of water in the Tamar Canal. - Eliza Lee said that on Saturday morning, between 10 and 1 o'clock, she saw the head of a man on the surface of the water in the canal. She called to Mr Parker, the last witness, and she saw P.C. Mitchell come down and take charge of the body. - Henry Authers: I keep the Lamb Inn, in Queen-street, Devonport, and have known the deceased since Lady-day last; he used to lodge with me. I saw him on Friday morning last, between 11 and 12 o'clock. He was quite sober then. He visited me nearly every day, and used to read the newspaper and the deceased told me he was very lonely home. The deceased also told me his mind was agitated about home. - Charles Truscott said: I am a clay merchant, residing at St. Austell, in Cornwall. I have known the deceased from a boy, and am intimately acquainted with his family. The deceased was the son of HENRY LEWARNE, a retired currier, of St. Austell. He was forty-seven years of age last March. He learnt the business of a currier with his father, who, when the deceased was about 26 or 27 years of age, gave him a part of the business, viz., the shop part. The deceased was always very dissipated, and much given to drink. The deceased gave up the business, and his father employed him as a currier, and paid him wages: but at length his conduct became so bad that his family were afraid of him. His father then made him a weekly allowance, and the deceased lived at St. Austell a considerable time, but things went on so bad that his father asked me to take charge of him. The deceased was allowed 9s. per week, which was afterwards reduced to 7s. per week, and the father used to provide the deceased with clothes. I believe the deceased left St. Austell about four years since. The deceased was a habitual drunkard. For the last three months the deceased had had remittances amounting to 7s. per week in postage stamps, which were addressed to him at his lodgings. Last Friday 7s. worth of stamps were sent to the deceased. I addressed the envelope, and I believe my wife wrote on the envelope in his absence that the deceased's application to me should be attended to. About two years ago the deceased's uncle, MR LEWARNE, bequeathed to the deceased an interest in Lower Bloyn Mill, situate in St. Austell parish, the value of which, if the property could be let, would be about £8 a year. I am one of the trustees of the mill, but have never been able to let the mill since the death of the deceased's uncle. I now produce a letter written by the deceased, which I received by post on Thursday last. - The letter was then handed to the Coroner, who read it. It stated that the writer was very hungry, and had no clothes hardly to put on; that he received the 7s. worth of stamps weekly, but asked what was it to live upon during the week. When he exchanged them for money he received 6s. 9d., and by the time he had paid 2s. 6d. for rent, he only had 4s. 3d. to live upon during the week. The deceased wished Mr Truscott to sell the mill and send him some more money, for he said what he received was not enough to keep him. He ought to have 1s. per day to keep him. - Mr Truscott then said: According to the will it is not in my power to sell the mill, and I have not had time to answer the letter to tell the deceased of it. About three or four months ago the deceased received from his friends about £3 worth of clothes, and about a month previous to that the deceased received a parcel of shirts, stockings, and a quantity of under linen. - Eliza Belyea said last Friday afternoon just before four o'clock the deceased left her house. He used to come to her house nearly every day. The deceased told her that the last two months he could not sleep by night, his mind was in such a state. He also told her that the last witness had some property belonging to him, and if he had sold it he should be able to pay his debts. He should then go to Jersey, and then his mind would be different. He was at present quite ashamed to walk through the streets. He was dying almost for want of food. The deceased sometimes would swear about his father, and call him all the rogues he could think upon. The deceased said many times that he should destroy himself if the property was not sold. The deceased used to come to her house very often and have something to eat, saying that he was starving, and on Friday night last, when he left her house, he asked her to lend him a penny, and she lent him 6d.; he shed tears over it, and said, "I shall never make you any amends for your kindness, but you shall hear something of me before Monday." The deceased used to write letters for people, and he used to get drunk with the money. About four years ago she saw him tied down upon his bed; he was then suffering from delirium tremens, from the effects of drunkenness. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found dead in the canal, but by what means he came to his death there was no evidence to show, and expressed their opinion that the quay should be better protected for the safety of the public.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 December 1861
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - Yesterday evening, an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT MADDICK CARNE, 62 years, who committed suicide by hanging himself in his workshop in St. Andrew-street, under very distressing circumstances. - ELIZABETH CARNE, widow of the deceased, said she resided at No. 2, Halwell-place, Granville-street, Plymouth, and the deceased, who was 62 years of age, was a hatter by trade, and dealt in rabbit skins. He left the house shortly after breakfast this morning, and took his dinner with him to go to work, saying, "he should be home to tea at five o'clock." She did not hear of his death until between twelve and one o'clock. He was anything but cheerful; in fact he has been very melancholy for about three months. He always fancied he should come to want; that was a delusion. Witness said they had enough for three years to live on, if nothing else came in. Occasionally he would become comfortable for a fortnight at a time. Last Thursday he was taken light in his head, and was obliged to go to bed; on Saturday he was worse, but on Sunday he became happier. When he returned last night, witness asked him how he was, and he said "I am better in health if it was not for circumstances." She said, "O don't begin with that again," and nothing more was said. I did not believe the deceased to be of sound mind at intervals. - ELIZABETH CHUBB, his daughter, said the deceased was very frequently in low spirits. Sometimes he talked of going to America with some hats and caps for the miners, and he was told it would be a failure, on which he became very desponding. - ELIZABETH CARNE, niece to the deceased, residing at 24 St Andrew-street, and where deceased had a workloft, deposed to finding him hanging from a beam in the loft about 12 o'clock when she went up to put some clothes on a line to dry. His brother was in the house at the time, and he at once cut the deceased down. He was quite dead. - The Jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

EXETER - Death From Chloroform - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT GREY, sailor, who died under very painful circumstances, in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Tuesday morning, previous to his undergoing an operation. It appears from the evidence of William Skinner, an inmate of the hospital, that deceased told him his name and age, and that he (deceased) was a native of North America. Previous to his (deceased) entering the hospital he was in the Crediton Union. The deceased has friends in Liverpool. He wrote to them on Monday last. - From the evidence of Mr James, surgeon to the Hospital, it appeared the deceased entered that institution on Thursday last, the 5th instant, suffering from a disease that had occasioned sores on his body. On Sunday he was operated upon, and on Tuesday his sores seemed disposed to expand. Deceased was informed that it was necessary that he should be operated upon by strong nitric acid, the effect of which when applied is eminently painful. Deceased said he should not be able to bear the pain, upon which chloroform was applied in an apparatus with a large amount of atmospheric air. The apparatus that was used was invented by the late Dr Todd, for the administration of chloroform. The first dose was a very small one, only a little more than half a drachm; that had little or no effect. A second dose was then applied, when the struggling, or second stage commenced. Deceased inhaled the chloroform for half a minute, when his features assumed a palid livid hue. Mr James had one hand and a pupil the other. Mr Huxley, the house surgeon, was applying the chloroform. Mr James exclaimed, "His pulse does not beat." The chloroform was discontinued, and remedies immediately applied for his reanimation, but without effect. - A post mortem examination of the body was made, and every organ of the body was minutely and the heart microscopically, examined, but nothing was found in them to show that deceased died from the effects of chloroform. The blood was in a fluid state, and in both cavities of the heart there was seen no blood that was not in a fluid state, as from the chloroform. Chloroform has been administered many hundreds of times in the hospital without ill effect. The witness Skinner was having twice the quantity that deceased had every day. The medical men pronounced that deceased died from paralysis of the heart, induced by chloroform. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 December 1861
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident At Bideford. - On Wednesday evening a man named GEORGE HARVEY met his death at the Railway-station, under the following circumstances:- Mr Johnson, shipbuilder, despatched some of his men to the station to unload a timber-laden truck. No sooner had they begun their task than a large piece fell on a man named HARVEY, killing him instantaneously. His remains were taken to his home to await the Coroner's Inquest. On Thursday an Inquest was held before G. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased has left a wife, but no family.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 December 1861
EXETER - Melancholy And Distressing Suicide. Brutal And Heartless Conduct Of A Father. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Double Lock public house, about two miles from Exeter, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a young woman named PIPER, about 19 years of age, who drowned herself in the Exeter Canal on the 19th instant, through the brutal conduct of her father. The facts of the case will be gleaned from the following evidence. - Mary Ann Best, a young woman residing in Waterbeer-street, Exeter said she knew the deceased, who lived with her parents in an apartment in the same house, that her (the witness's) parents occupied. The deceased's father had been in prison for three months, having only come out of gaol about one week, during which time he had been living with his wife and daughter. He had always been a very cruel parent to the deceased, and when drunk would turn her out of doors, and threaten that he would do for her. At such times witness's parents would take the deceased into their apartments, when she would threaten to drown herself. She said she would do this about a fortnight since. The last time witness saw her alive was Tuesday night at nine o'clock, at the New London Inn. Witness asked deceased to go home with her, but she said she could not go until ten o'clock, upon which witness replied "I must go," and so they parted. Before parting, however, deceased said "Good night, and I might say good bye," and upon witness asking her what she meant, she replied, "If you wait long enough perhaps you will see." - The Coroner: Was there anything in the deceased's conduct which justified the father in turning her out of doors? - Witness: I don't know that he had any reason for so doing. He was always very cruel to her. - The Coroner: do you consider it was through the cruelty of her father that she committed this rash act? - Witness: I do. - A Juror: Do you think it was premeditated? - Witness: I do; for she used to tell me that the sight of her father was too much for her. She had a very kind mother. - The Coroner said he could not take down as evidence anything the witness thought. - MRS HARRIETT LOUISA PIPER was next examined. She deposed as follows: The deceased was my daughter. She has not evinced anything strange in her manner until within a few weeks since, when she seemed unusually merry- singing that I could hardly stop her. My husband has been a very cruel father to her. He has turned her out of doors at night, and I have heard her say that if he ever came home again from prison and treated her badly she would drown herself. He has left home since her death; his conscience, I believe, would not allow him to remain home. The deceased has told me she could not pass through again what she had already borne from him. She was not so merry on Saturday, when my husband came home, as she had been before. She seemed depressed in spirits, and cried because he had returned. On Sunday night last, my husband and the deceased had some words because she came home late, about 11 o'clock. She had been with some friends, but he would not believe it, and when she assured him that she had, he ordered her not to answer him or else he would give her a b...... good thrashing, and would tear her clothes to pieces. The deceased replied that he should never do that again, for she would rather drown herself. She then left the room and slept in the stairs all that night until five o'clock the next morning. She told me on the following day that she did this because she was afraid of her father. On Monday she had some breakfast and complained of being cold. I sent her to Mr East's, boot and shoemaker, to inquire about some work, but she returned and told me she could not obtain any work, as Mr East did not intend to take on any more hands until after Christmas. Upon this her father replied that he knew she would not get any work because she wanted to keep up the Christmas holidays, and he should remember her as soon as he got into work. She did not sleep home that night, and I did not see her again until five o'clock on Tuesday night. He then became very angry with her, and said he would not give her anything he worked for. Deceased told him she should not want it, and with the same she left the house looking exceedingly wild and dejected. I have not seen her alive since. The body I have seen today is that of my daughter. She was a member of the Bristol Prudential Insurance Company, for which she used to pay 1d. a week. She had been a member of it about two months. Her executors or representatives were entitled at her death to receive £8 11s. - P.C. Harris here stated that it would be his duty, on the part of the parish, to make a demand for this money. - The Coroner told the Jury that had nothing to do with him. All he wanted to find out was whether the deceased's father was wretch enough to drive her to commit this act for the purpose of receiving this money. - Witness: Oh! he's a wretch, sir. - Examination continued: My husband has always treated her very cruelly, and I believe he wanted to driver her to something. My daughter joined the Assurance Company of her own accord, and I used to pay the penny weekly for her. - The Coroner: Do you believe he treated her worse since she had been a member of the company than before? - Witness: I can't say that; but when I told him what had happened to my daughter, and that I had seen her mantle and bonnet, he said, "I am d...... glad of it, and if it is she who is drowned I'd stay up all night to make her coffin. Now I shall be happy." (Sensation.) - The Foreman: Since her death has he mentioned anything about the insurance money? - Witness: Not that I know of. I suppose my husband slept home last night, but I don't know. I slept at my sister's, for I was afraid what he would do. About nine months since he broke in my ribs, and tore up everything my daughter had. He was committed to gaol for nine months on account of it. I believe my daughter was overcome with trouble, and that she destroyed herself when in an unsound state of mind, for I do not believe she knew what she was about lately half the time. - P.C. Harris, of the Devon County Constabulary, said that from information he received on Wednesday morning, that a mantle and bonnet had been picked up in the Haven Banks, he sent a constable down to learn the truth of it, he himself being bound over to attend at the Castle of Exeter. On the following day the last witness identified the clothes as her daughter's. Having got permission from the Council he had the Exeter Canal dragged, and the deceased's body was found. - The father, SAMUEL E. PIPER, was present during the search and he did not seem the least concerned. In his absence he tried to take the earrings out of his daughter's ears. (Indignation.) - A Juryman said that he heard the father a second time propose to take the earrings out of his daughter's ears; in fact it was almost the first words he uttered when the body was discovered. He (the Juror) replied that if he attempted to do so he would kick him into the canal where his daughter had just come from. - The Coroner said he should not have wondered if he had done so, for he could easily imagine that the feelings of any Englishman would not have been kindly at such an exhibition of heartless conduct on the part of a parent. - The Coroner then summed up the evidence and in the course of his remarks he said that of all the melancholy cases which had come before him this was the most distressing. If it were true that the father had driven his daughter out of her mind he did not know how they should meet the case. He could only wish that their verdict would reach him, but he was afraid it could not. All they had to Inquire into was how this girl came into the water. - A Juror: Although her father did not actually throw her into the water he was the means of it. - The Coroner: There can be no doubt of that. - Another Juror asked whether they could not record such a verdict as would mark the feelings the Jury entertained of the case, so that some further steps should be taken against the father. - The Coroner replied that as there was a reporter present he thought the best thing they could do was to leave it to that gentleman to report the case fully, so that the facts might come before the proper authorities, who would, or ought to, take the necessary steps to prevent this man from acting in a similar manner towards other persons. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," which met with the approval of the Coroner. - The public officer then made an application for the policy of insurance, so that the parish, which had been put to the expense of providing the coffin, might be able to draw the money from the company. - The Coroner at present refused to sign any certificate. - Several of the Jurors expressed their opinion that the mother of the deceased had not stated all the truth, and they thought it looked very strange that she had been in the habit of paying the 1d. per week into the company for her daughter. One Juror said he believed something more would arise out of this Inquest, and the Coroner replied that he was therefore very glad they had returned the verdict recorded by them.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 December 1861
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, at McLean's beer-shop in Hampton-street, on the body of WILLIAM SMALLRIDGE, a hardware dealer, who resided in Hampton Court, Hampton-street. Deceased, who was 61 years of age, formerly carried on business in Southside-street as a tallow chandler, but became reduced in circumstances. Latterly for several years he had carried on a hardware stall in the market. He was last seen alive on Saturday afternoon between three and four o'clock. In the evening between seven and eight o'clock, one of his sons on returning home found the deceased suspended from the handle of the staircase door. The unfortunate man had used a piece of sash line, the loop which encircled his neck being only about three feet and a half from the ground. The son stated to the Jury that his father had recently on two occasions broken a blood vessel in his head, which he considered had weakened deceased's intellect. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 December 1861
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death Of A Seaman On Board H.M.S. Emerald From Suffocation. Heroic Conduct Of Two Of The Seamen. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of FREDERICK PARFIT, who died from suffocation on Wednesday night last. From the evidence of the several witnesses belonging to H.M.S. Emerald, viz., William Duncan, William Paget, --- Winnacott, John Pickets, and James Boys it appears that the deceased, who was generally a sober man, shortly after seven o'clock on Wednesday evening last left his mess to go into the head, but the head being full he turned back again and went into the fore chains on the starboard side. Duncan, soon after the deceased went into the fore chains, heard a splash in the water, and he immediately called out "A man overboard." Paget being on the main deck and hearing the cry of "A man overboard," ran to the gangway and jumped overboard, a height of about 20 feet. The night was very dark and Paget had to swim several yards before he got to the deceased, and when he got to him he found Winnacott had hold of him, but the deceased was under the water. Paget lifted him up and he and Winnacott swam to the cutter with the deceased. They got the deceased into the cutter and took him on board the ship and he was taken into the cockpit and the surgeon sent for. The Coroner, in addressing Paget and Winnacott, said: I confess I feel that the thanks of all persons who have any feeling of humanity about them are due to you, and I have much pleasure in thus publicly expressing my highest approbation of your very noble conduct. I think it is highly to be commended, and I should not do justice to my own feelings if I did not make this expression to both of you. - John Coffin, the surgeon of the Emerald, said: On Wednesday evening last he was in the gun-room at dinner, when he heard the cry of "Man overboard," and he was told by the first-lieutenant that the man was being brought down to the cock-pit. He then went down to the cock-pit, where he saw the deceased lying on the cock-pit deck. The men were removing the wet clothes which he had on, and he had the deceased wrapped up in blankets and placed in a cot and he attended to the deceased to give him such restoratives as were necessary. About nine o'clock the same (Wednesday) night he left him. The deceased was then breathing regularly, and the skin had become of its natural temperature. About an hour afterwards he saw the deceased again, who was then going on very well, breathing natural, pulse regular and his skin natural. The deceased was not sensible, but was like a man asleep. Shortly after that he went to bed, and he had only been there about three quarters of an hour when he was called by an assistant-surgeon, whom he had left with the deceased. He went to the deceased and found him lying on the deck of the cock-pit, and his breathing had ceased. He found the mouth, nostrils and gullet full of vomited matters, such as large pieces of meat and other food. He postulated the deceased, and used what was called "The Marshall Hall Method of Resuscitation," but without effect, and the deceased exhibited no symptom of life. He believed the deceased died from suffocation, caused by the blocking up of the air passages by vomited food. He believed that the immersion in the water would not have caused the deceased's death. When he came down the last time to the cock-pit he saw vomited matters on the deck and he also saw the deceased's mouth and nose full of the same sort of material, and his eyes were shut. He was conscious of a spirituous smell in what the deceased had expelled from his stomach,. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the blocking up of the air passages by vomited food, and attaching no kind of blame to anyone. The Jury also expressed their admiration of Paget's and Winnacott's noble conduct, for the way in which they had exerted themselves to save the life of a fellow-creature. - There was a sovereign due to the surgeon for his attendance at the Inquest; but Mr Coffin declined to take it, and desired that it should be shared between Paget and Winnacott, as an evidence of his admiration of their heroic conduct.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 December 1861
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on Saturday evening, on the body of GEO. MAY, a paper maker, in the employ of Mr John Allen at the Ivybridge Paper Mills. On the previous Friday fortnight, the 20th inst., the deceased was working in a new part of the works, where some carpenters were working in the roof over him about the shutters of a ventilator, when one of the shutters fell upon him. Directly after the accident the deceased was brought into the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered until Saturday morning, when he died. From the evidence given at the Inquest, it appeared that the shutter that fell was eight feet long and two feet wide, of three-quarters inch stuff, with an iron pivot about three-quarters of an inch long, fastened on an end of the shutter. Two carpenters were taking it out of the ventilator when one of them who, from the height of the shutter from where he was standing, had but an imperfect hold of it slipped his hold and let go his end; the other carpenter held on for a short time, but finding it was over-balancing him let go also. The shutter in its descent glanced from off a beam down upon the deceased's head, the pivot being driven into his head. The deceased put up his hands and lifted the shutter off. From where the carpenters were at work they did not see deceased either before or when the accident occurred. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased who was a steady man and much respected has left a widow and three children.

Weston Daily Mercury - Friday 3 January 1862 TAVISTOCK - Coroner's Inquest. At Lane-head yesterday, an Inquest was held by the Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JOHN COLE, a miner, who was killed by an accident at Wheal Crelake Mine, on Tuesday morning. An account of the unfortunate occurrence has already appeared in our columns. After a short investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury - Saturday 4 January 1862
PLYMOUTH - Death In A Railway Carriage. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock, at Mr James's Brunel Arms, Millbay, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Henry Branson was the Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a seaman supposed to be JOHN NOLAN, who was found dead in a railway carriage on the arrival of the down mail train, at Plymouth, at 5.45 that morning. The Jury proceeded to view the body, which was lying in a second class carriage at the Millbay Railway Station. There was a cut over the left eye, about an inch and three-quarters in length. - The first witness examined, was Mr Francis Pickersgill Cockshott, who said: I am traffic superintendent, South Devon Railway, and reside at Clarendon Place. In consequence of information I received this morning, I went to the railway station, at half-past six and found the body which has been seen by the Jury, laid in a compartment of a second class carriage, which had come from London to Plymouth by the mail train, which is advertised to leave Plymouth at 5.45 a.m. Having ascertained that the body had been examined by Mr Rendle, the surgeon, I had the doors of the carriage locked, and gave information to the Coroner. There were two bags of seamen's luggage in the same compartment with the deceased. With the hope of identifying the body, I then had one of the bags opened, and found a jacket, such as is worn by a petty officer in the navy. On the arm there were two gold anchors, and on the left breast of the jacket there was a Sebastopol medal, a Baltic medal and a Turkish Crimean medal. I also found the book I now produce, having the name and addition, "JAMES NOLAN, H.M.S. Narcissus, January 21, 1861," and "JOHN NOLAN, No. 2, Victoria Terrace, Cambridge Heath, London," and also a letter dated Haslar Hospital, 13th December, signed John Andrews, and addressed Dr Edmunds, H.M. ship Victory. (The book referred to seemed to be a memorandum book, containing a few memoranda). - The Coroner read the letter, of which the following is a copy:- "H.M., 13th December. - My Dear Sir, - I have discharged the bearer cured of his disease; and as he is weak, will you allow me to ask your assistance on his behalf, that he may have a month's leave, which will tend more to recruit his strength than remaining in the Hospital, or on shipboard. - I am, faithfully yours, John Andrews. - Dr Edmunds, H.M.S. Victory." - Examination continued: I sent the book and letter to the Admiralty at Devonport. They received a telegraphic reply from Portsmouth, stating that JAMES NOLAN was paid his wages for Narcissus on the 19th instant and went on leave the same day. From Haslar Hospital they say _ "JAMES NOLAN, yeoman of signals, late of Narcissus, appears to have been discharged from Hospital on the 13th December, to Victory, cured. Nothing is known at Haslar of his friends except that he belonged to Plymouth." I was present when Trengrove, constable, examined and searched deceased's body today. He found the ticket-of-leave, which I now produce, being No. 148, from the commanding officer of H.M.S. Victory to the bearer, JAMES NOLAN, from the 19th December 1861 to the 29th of December, 1861, when he was to return to the Royal Adelaide, which is now in Hamoaze. There was also found in the pockets of the deceased £1 6s. 9d. in silver, 1s. 5d. in copper, a silver watch, silver guard and plated Albert chain, a small photograph of a female in a case, boatswain's whistle, pipe and a second class sailor's ticket from Bristol to Plymouth, issued for the mail train, on the morning of the 30th December. This ticket has not been marked at Collumpton, or any other station. - The Coroner: That will show you that he could not have been seen. - Mr Cockshott: It ought to have been marked at Collumpton, where all the tickets of the down night mail train should be checked and marked. This evening I saw in the compartment of the carriage where the deceased lay a quart stone jar of gin, partly full and a rug and great coat laid on one of the seats. The two bags of the deceased in the compartment are marked "J. NOLAN;" they have been opened in my presence, and I have examined the contents, and find nothing further to identify the body. - Henry Tucker said: I am a policeman at the South Devon Railway Station. I was on duty this morning when the mail train arrived. It came in at 5.45. I collected the tickets. I opened the door of a second class carriage and saw a man lying on the floor on his belly. I thought he was asleep. I asked him for his ticket three or four times, but received no reply. Another porter was standing by my side, and I directed him to take the ticket, and I went to collect other tickets. After I had done so, I came back to him, and asked him if he had got the ticket. He said no, he thought the man was dead. I told the porter to shut the door, and let the train come into the platform. That was done, and occupied two or three minutes. I got down to the platform, the door was opened, and the same porter went into the compartment, and he reported the man dead. I then let out the other passengers and reported the circumstance to Mr Gedye, the station-master, and Mr Gedye came. I went into the compartment with him and found the deceased lying on his belly. There was blood about the left eye. I had a lantern with me. There was no portion of his dress disturbed. Mr Rendle, the surgeon, came shortly after, and when he came the body was lying in the same state as I found it. Both windows of the carriage were closed when the train arrived at the ticket platform. - Mr Charles William Gedye said: I am station-master at the South Devon Railway Station at Plymouth. In consequence of information I received I went this morning to a second class railway carriage. I saw the deceased lying on his face. I had assistance, and we lifted him to see if there was any life, but he was dead. I sent for Dr Rendle, and before he came I had deceased laid on his back. Dr Rendle came and examined the body in my presence. The deceased's clothes were not in the least disordered. When I first saw him his arms were under his body. - The Coroner: There is no injury to the knuckles: I saw that myself. - Mr Gedye: No. The bags were one on each seat, and there was not the slightest appearance of a scuffle. - Samuel Goodhind said: I am a guard in the South Devon Railway Company's service. About 20 minutes past three this morning I joined the mail train at Exeter. I did not see the deceased at Exeter. Where I first saw him was at Newton. He was in a compartment by himself. He was lying down on the bottom of the floor. I could not tell whether he was alive or dead; I thought he was asleep. I did not open the carriage door. I did not look into the carriage again until I arrived at the Plymouth Station, and deceased was found dead. I was riding in the third carriage from the deceased. The train stops at Dawlish, Starcross, and Teignmouth, before it arrives at Newton. Only two passengers got out at Newton, and none at either of the other stations. The windows of the deceased's compartment were closed. They were also closed at Exeter when I took charge. I am certain no one got out of the compartment in which deceased was between Exeter and Newton, but I think two other persons left the second or third compartment from deceased, at Newton. They were both civilians, and appeared very respectable people. One was lame. There was a trap there to meet them. - By the Jury: No one got into, or came out of, the deceased's compartment between Newton and Plymouth. - William Cheeseman said: I am a guard in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company. About 12.40 today, just a minute or two before starting from Bristol, I saw a man with a sailor's bag on his shoulder, get into the compartment of the carriage in which the deceased's body was found. I drew the attention of the other guard, William Panes, to it. I never saw anything of deceased until his body was found dead at Plymouth. I did not see anyone get in or get out of the deceased's compartment. There was not any scuffle or quarrelling amongst the passengers; if there had been, I must have heard it. - William Panes said: I am the passenger's guard o the Bristol and Exeter Railway. This morning I saw the deceased, about 12.35, in a compartment at the train at Bristol. He had his luggage with him, which consisted of a white bag and a dark one. There was a man outside the carriage drinking with the deceased, who was inside. They drank out of a stone jar. Just as the train was about to leave deceased shewed me his ticket; he wished the other man goodbye, and I locked the door and started the train. I am quite certain he was the only person in that compartment. At the Weston Junction, I looked into the compartment and saw deceased lying, stretched out, on the seat, with his head resting on one of the bags. At Collumpton, I told the man collecting the tickets that I had seen deceased's ticket at Bristol, and it was all right for Plymouth, and as he was asleep, he need not disturb him. I do not know whether the collector went in. No one could have gone in or come out of that compartment of the carriage without my knowing it,. There was no noise or quarrelling during the journey between Bristol and Exeter, where I left. The windows of his compartment were closed at every station. - By the Jury: Deceased was lying on the seat nearest the engine. - By the Coroner: When I saw him lying on the seat his head was to the south. - Mr Edmund Marshman Russell Rendle said: I am a surgeon practising at Plymouth. This morning about ten minutes to six I was called to see the deceased at the railway station. I went there. I saw Mr Gedye. I found the body lying on its back on the bottom of the floor of the carriage. The deceased was quite dead - perhaps within two hours. The chest was quite warm. There was no rigidity in the muscles. There was a wound over the left eye-brow, about an inch and three-quarters long, going down to the bone. In the centre of the wound it was a little deeper. The bone was not bare. There was some clotted blood about the wound, and some had dropped on the floor of the carriage. On the floor projecting from under the opposite side to where the deceased had been lying, there was an iron covering for the wheel-box of the carriage. He must have been alive when the blow was produced. I think the probable cause of death was that deceased had been drinking, which had produced some degree of congestion, and that whilst asleep, in some movement of the carriage, he was thrown off the seat and the side of his head came in contact with the edge of the wheel box, probably causing concussion or compression of the brain. I am not certain whether there is any fracture of the bone, but death might take place without a fracture. Supposing he was a healthy man, that is the most natural supposition. He had some gin with him. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased was found dead in a railway carriage, that he had been drinking, and whilst asleep, in some movement of the carriage, accidentally fell off his seat and the side of his head came in contact with the edge of the wheel-box, probably causing concussion or compression of the brain."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From The Roof Of A House. - An Inquest was held at Bustin's Wine and Spirit Vaults, Octagon-street, yesterday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a little boy named JEREMIAH HOLLAND, whose death had resulted from a fall from a house-top on the previous day. Several witnesses were heard, and it appeared, from their evidence, that the deceased was about six years and ten months old, the son of a widow named ELLEN HOLLAND, who lived at the back of No. 26 King-street West, and obtained her livelihood by unloading potatoes from ships at the quays. On Thursday afternoon he was playing with several children at "hide and seek", and was seen, about two o'clock, leaving over a rail surrounding the flat roof of the house No. 1, Ellis-street, at the back of Jay's Court, by a little girl named Ellen Vosper, who was standing in the yard below. He appeared to be watching where his play-fellows ran to, and while doing so, he slipped. He caught hold of a slate and called for his sister, but the slate almost immediately gave way, and he fell into the court below. He was able to speak, and was taken by his sister and a woman named Murphy to the house of Mr Stevens, surgeon, who told them to take him to the hospital. The woman saw he could not live, and brought him towards his home, but before reaching it he died. Shortly before the accident occurred he had been seen by an inmate of the house going towards the door leading on to the roof, but she had sent him away. Children frequently went on to the roof to play, but were sent away by the occupants of the house. The girl Vosper said all deceased's play-fellows had left him before he fell, and, therefore, none of them could have pushed him over. It was stated there was no lock or fastening to the door leading to the roof. - When all the evidence had been taken, the Coroner addressed the landlord of the house from which deceased fell, and the house occupied by his mother, a man named Bate, and told him he must have the property put into a proper condition, so that the loss of human life could be prevented. If children could get to the roof they would play there, and their lives must be protected. He (the Coroner) was not sure that he (the landlord) was not liable to an action, if the mother of the deceased thought fit to institute proceedings against him. But he must remedy something even worse than this. The house in which deceased had lived was in a most horrible state - the drainage bad, and abounding in filth. It was not fit to live in, and it would be his (the Coroner's) duty to report its state to the proper authorities, in Plymouth, immediately. The children living there were in such a squalid condition that, should the place be visited with any infectious disease, such as cholera, there would be a vast loss of human life. If it was not improved the town would take the matter in hand, and charge him with the expense. The place was the worse he (the Coroner) had seen since Upper, Middle and Lower Lanes had been altered; and he would not have believed that there was such a place within the precincts of the borough. The drainage was bad in the extreme, and although the inhabitants were poor, they paid well for their occupations, and their lives must be preserved. - The Jury fully concurred in the opinions expressed by the Coroner, and suggested that the rails round the roof of the house should not only be made stronger and higher, but placed closer together; and that a fastening should be placed upon the door leading to it. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Saturday afternoon last, before J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of GEORGE CHAMBERLAIN MAY, who had died at the Devon and Cornwall Hospital, that morning, about one o'clock, having been there since the 20th ultimo, suffering from a fracture in the skull. - William Henry Chamberlain said: I am a carpenter, and work at Mr John Allen's mills, at Ivybridge. I have known the deceased about six years. He was a journeyman paper maker, about 31 years of age, and has left a wife and 3 children living at Ivybridge. On Friday, the 20th inst., about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing on the floor of the machine house, about ten feet from the deceased, who was oiling the machinery in the drying room. The ventilator of the house is closed with a wooden shutter, which is hung on iron pivots, and is eight feet long, two feet wide, and three quarters of an inch in thickness. Two men, named Crispin and Windsor, were engaged in removing the shutter on a scaffold erected over the place where the deceased stood, and fastened on the binding beams of the roof. I heard the shutter falling and saw it, after striking a cross beam, fall on the deceased's head, with the end downwards; one of the pivots sticking in. He lifted it off, and placed his hands on his head. Assistance came directly. Dr Hartley was sent for, and by his directions deceased was sent to the Devon and Cornwall Hospital. I have no reason to believe that the falling of the shutter was anything but accidental. There are about 300 persons employed at the mills. - Philip Windsor, a labourer employed at the paper mills, said he was on the scaffold referred to n the 20th ultimo, removing the shutter of the ventilator with Richard Crispin, sen. They had removed it from its place, and each had hold of an end of it, when it suddenly slipped from his (witness's) hands. Crispin held it about a second, and it then fell. It weighed about 30 lbs. Witness did not know deceased was below, and did not see him struck. Had not the slightest hesitation in saying that the occurrence was purely accidental. Had always been on friendly terms with the deceased. - Richard Crispin, senior, corroborated this statement, adding that he held the shutter until he was nearly overbalanced. - Mr Michael Pattison, the engineer of the establishment, in answer to a Juryman, said he knew the last two witnesses had not been drinking on the day in question. He believed there had been no negligence on their part and that the occurrence was perfectly accidental. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - A Man Drowned In Sutton Harbour, Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at seven o'clock at the King's Arms Hotel, Briton Side, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENWOOD DOWN, who was found dead in Sutton Harbour on Sunday morning last. - Constant Le Courtour said: I am a seaman belonging to the smack Princess Alexander, of Jersey, now lying in Sutton Harbour. On Saturday night last, I was on board my smack, lying near the north quay. I was in bed. About ten minutes to eleven I was awoke by hearing the cries of a man overboard. I jumped out of my cabin as fast as I could, and went on deck. I saw deceased in the water; he was then about two feet from the quay. I threw a rope on top of him, but he took no notice of it. I then jumped over the bow, in a schooner's boat, but he had sunk and I could not save him. I got on board my own vessel again, at about ten minutes past eleven o'clock. Information was immediately given to the authorities of what had happened. About half-past seven yesterday (Sunday) morning, deceased's body was taken up by a boat-hook. It was landed, and taken to deceased's residence, No. 2, Gascoyne-street. When I first heard the deceased, he was crying out loudly. In my opinion he accidentally fell over the quay. - JOHN DOWN said: I am a carpenter, and reside at No. 3, Moon's-lane. The deceased was my brother. He was 31 years of age, and was a journeyman carpenter. I last saw him alive on Monday last. Deceased has left two children. I have not the slightest reason to suppose that he drowned himself. I think he accidentally walked over the quay. - P.C. George Rider, No. 47, said: I received information of the death yesterday morning at 6 o'clock, when I came on duty. I assisted the first witness in recovering the body. There were 7s. 7d. in the pocket of the deceased. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury - Monday 6 January 1862
WALKHAMPTON - A Man Burnt To Death. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Walkhampton, by the Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of FRANCIS SOWDEN, a miner, who was burnt to death, whilst in a state of intoxication, on the previous day. - From the evidence brought forward at the Inquest, it appears that the deceased, in company with a friend of his, had been drinking during the whole of Thursday evening, at the public house, Walkhampton, and that they left there together at about eleven o'clock at night, in a deep state of intoxication, to proceed towards their respective homes. Having to pass the house in which his friend, whose name is William Rowe, lodged, SOWDEN was asked in to have some supper. The people in the house did not get up; the drunken men, however, succeeded in obtaining a light, and fumbled about for the supper, of which they partook. SOWDEN then lit his pipe and smoked for some time; but feeling drowsy, both he and his friend tumbled down on the floor of the kitchen, and went to sleep. This was about half-past one o'clock on Friday morning. Shortly afterwards the other inmates of the house heard groans proceeding from the kitchen, but thinking that they were merely sounds emanating from the sleep of the inebriated men, they took no notice of them for some time. These noises, however, did not cease, but continued in a much louder tone, and one of the other lodgers went downstairs to see what was the matter. As he neared the kitchen, he smelt very strongly something burning, and when he opened the door a fearful spectacle presented itself. The man SOWDEN was lying on the floor in a mass of flame, and Rowe lay a little distance from him apparently in a state of suffocation, the room being filled with a stifling smoke. The man dashed a portion of his clothing, which he carried in his hand, upon the face of SOWDEN, to save it from further damage from the fearful element, and called for assistance. When the other inmates arrived upon the spot, the clothes of the unfortunate man was entirely burnt from his body, and his flesh charred in a dreadful manner. He still breathed, but he was in great agony. Rowe was quite unconscious; and, and it not been for the timely arrival of help, would have perished from suffocation. SOWDEN was immediately conveyed to his home at Huckworthy-bridge, where he died a few hours afterwards. Rowe has nearly recovered, through medical skill, from the effects of the smoke; but his mind was so fettered with drink at the time of the fire that his evidence is of no consequence. How the clothes of the deceased caught fire there has been no evidence to prove; but it is presumed that not knowing what he was about when he fell asleep, he put the pipe which he was smoking into his pocket, the tobacco being still on fire. - The Jury, after duly considering the evidence adduced by the witnesses, returned a verdict of "Burnt to Death whilst in a state of Intoxication; but there was not sufficient evidence to prove in what manner his clothes caught fire."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 7 January 1862
EXETER - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - On Monday morning an Inquest was held at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of LOUISA JANE HOLLAND, an infant aged four months, who died in her mother's arms on Saturday morning, at about five o'clock. This being the third case of children dying of the same disease, the Coroner ordered Mr Perkins to make a post mortem examination of the body, which he did, and found the child healthy. The right lung was a mass of inflammation, the left lung healthy, the lower portion of the windpipe was stopped up with bronchial matter; he had no doubt that the child died from suffocation produced by the child's not being able to clear the matter, by having the use of only one lung. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 8 January 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Staddon Heights. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances of the death of JAMES DUKE, who had died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on the previous morning. The evidence adduced went to show that the deceased was about forty-two years of age, and in the employ of Messrs George Baker and Son, contractors and builders, of London. He was engaged on the Government works being carried on by that firm on the Staddon Heights and on the 20th of December last was driving a horse and waggon along the tramroad near Staddon Point. An incline commences at this place, and it is usual for the horses to be taken from the waggons, which are allowed to roll down the hill without them. The deceased went towards the waggon he was driving, which was loaded with limestone, to take off the horse, but as he got in front of it, his foot slipped over the rail, and he fell on his left side. The wheel of the waggon passed over his left leg, and nearly smashed it to pieces. A man who was with him obtained assistance and he was carried to a neighbouring stable, where he was seen by Mr Wilson, surgeon, who directed him to be taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. He was at once removed there, and attended by Dr Whipple, who found it necessary to amputate the limb. He was quite sensible, and blamed no one for the accident, but died about one o'clock on Monday morning He leaves a wife and six children. The Jury unhesitatingly returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury - Thursday 9 January 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a child, about six weeks old, the son of a mason named SULLIVAN, living in King-street, at Bustin's wine and spirit vaults, Octagon-street, yesterday afternoon. It was shown that the mother went to bed with the child about eight o'clock on the previous night, and awoke about one o'clock in the morning, when she found that its hands and head were quite cold. She obtained assistance and it was found that the child was quite dead. It had had a cold for a few day's previously The mother had shown great affection for it both before and after its death. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 20 January 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident Near Hooe. On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Victoria Inn, Hooe, before Allan Bone, jun., Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM COOK, who had died on the previous day from injuries received on a tram-road, connected with Government works at Staddon. The first witness heard was Joseph Thomas, who said he was in the employment of Mr Baker, the contractor, and had charge of the machine up which stone was taken to the new works at Staddon. He Kept time. Had known the deceased and had worked with him for about four months. Deceased went to work on the previous day about seven o'clock in the morning, and commenced working a waggon up and down the tramway. The line was a double one. About eleven o'clock witness met deceased taking up a waggon fully loaded. witness talked with him, and almost immediately after leaving him, heard a scream, and on looking round, saw deceased on the ground, and the waggon thrown off the line. Witness went for help. Deceased had been up the line three times previously that morning. There were two tons and a half of stone in the waggon, which was loaded to the top. - James Walters, labourer, in the employ of Mr Baker, said he was a signal-man on the incline referred to. About eleven o'clock on the previous day deceased came with a waggon, fully laden, up to the signal station, about half way up the line. He (deceased) was walking between the two roads by the side of the waggon. He put his left foot on the "near metal," a short distance before the waggon, and tried to reach his can, which was on the top, on the stone in the waggon. He could not reach it the first time and stood on his toes. As he was in that position the waggon came upon him, and threw him down, the wheels passing over him. Witness ran to assist him, but he could not speak, and gave no signs of life, with the exception of opening his mouth twice. He was removed to his home, and visited by a surgeon. The rails of the line were dry, and in good order. The line had been used for three or four months. Deceased and witness were sober, and on good terms with each other. - William Miles, the foreman of the works, said the incline spoken of was little more than a mile long. There were two lines, and the gauge was about 4 feet 8 inches. The waggons were drawn up by a steel wire rope, an inch in diameter, and a "whim," worked by horses at the top. When the driver was at the bottom on the incline he shouted to the signalman half way up, who shouted to the man in charge of the horses and whim at the top to draw up the waggon. The lines were in good order, the metal being new. There was a space of four feet between the two lines. The whim was a temporary arrangement. - It was suggested by the Jury that it would be better to supply the signalman with flags as a substitute for the present mode of communication with the man in charge of the whim. - RICHARD COOK stated that the deceased was about 30 years of age. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 21 January 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - Suspected Child Murder At Stoke. - A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday afternoon to Enquire into the circumstances attendant upon the death of a new-born female child, which had been found dead on the previous day, and was suspected to have been murdered by its mother, HANNAH BROWN, a servant in the employment of Mr P. Pearse, solicitor, of Penlee Villas, Stoke. The Jury having viewed the body, heard the evidence. - Elizabeth Statton, the first witness, said: I am a single woman, engaged as cook in the house of Mr Pearse of Penlee Villas, Stoke. The only other domestic servant employed in the house is a housemaid, named HANNAH BROWN, who has been there since the 12th of September last. She has slept in a bedroom by herself, and I have slept in the room next but one to it, an empty room being between the rooms. Between the hours of ten and twelve o'clock, on Friday morning last, I saw the housemaid come over the stairs into the kitchen with a pail, containing the carpet of her bedroom, in her hand. She took it into the passage or verandah behind the kitchen, having pumped some water into the pail, and there washed the carpet. I suspected something, and went out to see what she was doing, and saw her take the carpet from the pail. I saw some bloody liquid running from the carpet, and said to her, "I fear, ANN, there is something very wrong about you." She said she hoped I would not think so. The carpet was in two pieces, and she hung them up, having washed them. I thought, at this time, that she was not so stout as she had been. She went through nearly all her work that day, and attended table at dinner at six o'clock,. She had complained on the previous day (Thursday) of being unwell, and said she had a cold. She went into her bedroom, which was near the kitchen, three or four times during the day, and remained there on one occasion for longer than an hour. On Saturday she did all her work. On Sunday morning my suspicions were fully aroused, and I went into her room between eleven and twelve o'clock. She was downstairs before eight o'clock, and went about her work, and went out before eleven o'clock, saying that she was going to chapel. Whilst she was away, I went into her room and saw a box behind the door. I tried to open it, but it was fastened. I lifted up one end of it. [The housemaid was brought in at this stage of the proceedings and seated near the witness.] I thought there was a lump in it, feeling something heavy in it. I did not shake the box violently, but merely lifted up one end, and then the other. I don't think my movement of the box caused what was in it to roll from one end to the opposite end. When Mrs Pearse came home from church, I told her and she sent for Mr Swain, the surgeon. On Saturday morning I had told the housemaid that I feared that what I had told her on the previous day was quite true. She said she hoped I would not think so; there was nothing wrong about it. Mr Swain came about two o'clock. I went into the housemaid's bedroom, and found her there. I told Mr Swain had come and wanted to see what she had in her box. She said she had done wrong, and hoped he would forgive her. She gave him a key, with which he opened the box I had moved. I saw a baby in the box, but no clothes. There were a few things in the box, and the baby was covered up with something. - Mr Paul William Swain, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, said: On Sunday afternoon last, about two o'clock, I went to No. 10 Penlee Villas, the house of Mr Pearse, solicitor. The last witness told me she had reason to suppose the other servant had had a child. I went with her to a bedroom, where I saw the housemaid, now present, seated on a chair, weeping bitterly. I made a remark - "This is a mysterious case," or something of that kind. She said, "Oh, I have done wrong," several times. I said, "Has a child been born, and if so, where is it?" She made no reply, but immediately took from her pocket a key, which she gave to me. There was in the room a box, covered with blue paper. I opened it with a key. It was two-thirds empty, but in one end of it was a large bundle of linen. From it I saw the hand of a child projecting. I then partially removed the linen, and found the body of a full-grown child. I examined it. The child appeared somewhat discoloured and was quite naked. The mouth was open, and the limbs stiff. I made no further examination of it at that time, but re-locked the box, and took charge of the key. I then said it would be necessary to send for the police. The housemaid said, "Oh, not the police!" I said it was imperative and sent for the police, and left the house. I returned about four o'clock the same afternoon, and saw in the same room Mr Superintendent Edwards and the housemaid. The box was on the floor tied round with cord. I left the room, leaving them there. This morning, about nine o'clock, I saw in one of the chambers at the Guildhall the same box, containing the same child, which was brought by Mr Edwards. He opened the box, and I examined its contents. I examined the body of the child, which was wrapped in several folds of line and a petticoat, and concluded that it had come to maturity. It was partially discoloured in patches. The nails were fully developed and the hands firmly clasped. I have seen such discolouration - which is the result of death - in children who have died under no suspicious circumstances. The body did not appear to have been disturbed from its original position in the box. There were some white marks around the back of the neck, but they did not extend to the front, and I believe them to be the fold marks of the skin, and not the result of anything put round it. The nostrils were firmly compressed. The mouth was vertically open (instead of the transverse way), as a mouth would open by pressure on either side. There was considerable discolouration on the inner membranes lining the cheeks, and also on the gums. This was perceptible, more or less, all round the mouth, but was more marked on the insides of the cheeks and gums. When a child dies naturally, or is stillborn, the mouth generally closes partially, and, if open, is open transversely; but in the present instance it had the appearance of the cheeks and nostrils having been forcibly compressed. The appearance of the inner membranes of the cheeks and gums would lead to the opinion that the child was alive when the face was compressed. On opening the chest, which was well developed, the heart and lungs presented themselves in the usual situation, but the lungs were not sufficiently distended by air to fill the cavity of the chest completely. Where respiration has been perfect, the lungs completely occupy the whole cavity of the chest; but on examination of bodies of children who had died a day or two after birth, I have seen cases in which the lungs presented the same appearance as in the present case. I put the lungs and heart into water, and the lungs were sufficiently buoyant to float themselves, and to cause the heart to float also. I then cut the lungs into small pieces, and every piece floated in water. I conclude from these facts that the child had breathed, but that the perfect act of respiration had not been thoroughly established. There was no appearance of a blow or injury on the external surface of the skull; but on removing the scalp I found a fracture or bending on the right parietal bone, forming a triangle, whose base was the sagittal suture; the apex of the triangle was towards the right. I can have no doubt that the bone was broken to a certain extent, but it is so membranous and soft that a comparatively small pressure might affect it. A fall upon the apex might cause the appearance. The brain was entire, and natural in every way. There is no impression in my mind to connect the appearance in front of the face with the injury at the back of the head. - The Coroner: What, in your opinion, caused the child's death? - Witness: It is a difficult matter to say. I may have ideas, but not opinions. I believe the child was born alive, and breathed once or twice, but not much more. The appearance of the mouth and face were such as a forcible pressure would produce,. I don't see how it should have been produced naturally. - The Coroner: Is there any appearance of death by suffocation? - Witness: The general impression upon my mind is that suffocation was the cause of death. It is only an impression. - The Coroner: Would the compression of the face referred to be calculated to produce suffocation? - Witness: Certainly, by closing up the air passages. I should think the entire exclusion of the air for five minutes would be sufficient to produce death. I don't think respiration was ever complete. I have not the least impression that the fracture on the head itself caused the death of the child, I only think it material as connected with probable violence - the pressure upon the face. I examined the prisoner this morning, and found about her indications of a recent delivery of a child - within the course of four or five days. The child was not at all decomposed, but it must have been dead twenty-four hours to be so cold and rigid, and it may have been dead three or four days. - Mr Superintendent Edwards said he went to the house mentioned about four o'clock on the previous afternoon, and saw the prisoner (HANNAH BROWN) in the kitchen. He told her that he had reason to suspect that she had recently given birth to a child, and she then began to cry, and said she hoped she would not be punished. He asked to go to her bedroom, and she took him there; and she said the box in the room was hers, but there was nothing in it. He forced open the lid, and discovered the body of a new born child. The prisoner then said she meant there was nothing but the body of the child there. He then removed her and the box to the Guildhall, and delivered the body of the child to Mr Swain that morning; it was the same which the Jury had seen. He found in the box two medicine bottles, one of which had a label, marked "tincture of steel." There was no label on the other bottle, but it contained a white liquid. There was also a pint bottle, which was empty,, He asked the prisoner if she had prepared any clothing for the child, and she said she had not. - Jane Webber, the female searcher at the station-house, said the prisoner had slept in a room at the station on the previous night, and had said to her that the baby was born alive on Thursday morning, but she could not say how long it lived. She did not know whether it was a boy or a girl, and she did not know much about it. She was confined in the bedroom. - This was the last witness, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury after a short consultation, returned a verdict to the effect that the child was born alive, but how it came by its death there was no evidence to show. - The prisoner will be brought before the magistrates at Devonport this morning, to answer a charge of concealing the birth of the child.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 22 January 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Boat Accident In The Sound. The Inquest Yesterday. - The Inquest on the body of the waterman, JOHN THOMPSON, the owner of the boat which was so unfortunately sunk in the Sound on Monday morning, and from which several men were drowned, was held yesterday afternoon at the Mutton Cove Inn, Mutton Cove, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Henry Mitchell was Foreman. - The body was lying in an out-house near the Inn, and the Jury proceeded there to view the body. On their return, John Waterfield was called, and said: I am an ordinary seaman, now serving on board H. M. lighter Coronation, at the Royal William Victualling Yard. Yesterday morning, about from nine till one in the afternoon, the lighter was lying alongside H.M.S. Revenge, just inside the Breakwater, close to the west end. There was a strong breeze from the south-east. I was on the deck of the lighter about eleven o'clock, when I heard a cry from the quarter deck of the Revenge, that a boat had capsized on the bridge. I and two other men belonging to the lighter manned her boat, and pulled towards the bridge. The first thing I saw, when we had proceeded about three-quarters of a mile from the ship towards the bridge was the mast of a boat. I saw no boat, but there was a man clinging to the mast. The mast was floating about, and a sail was furled to it. We caught hold of the man, and in hauling him into the boat found that another man was clinging to his coat. We looked around and saw the Revenge's boat as we were hauling the two men in. The second man clung to the first with a sort of death grasp. I saw THOMPSON (the deceased) floating on the water, and called to the men in the boat belonging to the Revenge. I had seen THOMPSON before many times and knew him. He was floating with his two wooden legs above the surface of the water, but his head was under water. He was about three boats' lengths from us. I shouted that there was a man floating on the water, and the crew of the Revenge's boat pulled towards the deceased, and dragged him into their boat. As we found there was plenty of assistance we took the two men we had picked up on board the Revenge immediately. I don't know whether they survived. - The assistant-surgeon of the Revenge, who was present, here stated that both the men referred to were alive. - Witness, continuing: Just after we got our men on board, I observed the Revenge's boat alongside, and saw men carrying the deceased towards the sick bay. I followed to the sick bay, and saw the deceased there, and the assistant-surgeon now present also. I saw that they made attempts for about an hour to revive the deceased. The surgeon and two other men were employed, but without success. I saw nothing of any boat from whence the deceased might have been capsized. That is all I know about it. - The Coroner: Is there any other witness? - The constable replied that there was no other, at present. He had understood from the secretary at the Admiral's office that the two men summoned from the Warrior would be sure to appear, but they had not yet arrived, and the Warrior was getting under weigh. He had sent to Millbrook to see if another man who had been in the boat could come, but the surgeon had sent word that he was too ill to appear. The two men on board the Warrior were in the boat when it capsized. - The Coroner: Then I am afraid we shall have to adjourn the Inquest to get the witness at Millbrook. Just let us see someone who saw the boat leave the shore. - The last witness said he had heard that the boat had been found, and taken into Millbay. Several of the Jurymen here stated that a steamboat - the Pike - was just coming from the Warrior. - The Coroner: Then we shall, perhaps, be able to hear the men. We should be able to send them back in a quarter of an hour. - The Assistant-Surgeon, Rinso Robert Siccama, was next examined. He said: I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and assistant-surgeon of Her Majesty's Ship Revenge. Yesterday, the 20th instant, I was on board the Revenge, then lying inside the Breakwater in the Sound. At about between half-past ten and a quarter to eleven o'clock in the morning I was in the sick bay. A man, having two wooden legs, was carried there at that time. It was the deceased. Life was quite extinct; he showed no symptoms of vitality. His face was pallid, and surface cold; no pulsation or action of the heart being perceptible. His clothes were on, but they were quite wet. He was immediately stripped and wrapped in blankets, and we attempted to restore animation by artificial respiration, and continued for about three quarters of an hour to use all the usual means to restore life, but without effect. The man was dead. - By the Coroner: There were no external marks of injury upon him. I don't remember whether his hands were shut, but his eyes were open. I think his wooden legs were calculated to keep his head under the surface of the water when he was floating. - Henry Richards said: I am a waterman, and live in Morice-street. Yesterday morning a little after ten o'clock, I heard a waterman, named Dawe, shouting out that there were too many men in a boat. I then went to the head of the quay at Mutton Cove, and there saw THOMPSON, the deceased, a waterman, of Millbrook. He was in a waterman's boat, about one hundred yards from the quay. I told him to put something in his bunking hole, which was nearly level with the water. The boat was very deep in the water, which came up to about three inches from the top of the gunwale. I think there were nine or ten men in the boat; I counted nine. The length of the boat, I should think, was 16 feet, and eight passengers are allowed by the rules to go in such a boat. There was a man, not a passenger, with THOMPSON, but whether he was a waterman of not I don't know. He (THOMPSON) told me to mind my own business, and said that he knew what he was about. I heard him tell one of the passengers to shift forward, and I saw them pulling away. THOMPSON was steering, I think. The passengers were sailors. The wind was rather strong, and it was rough outside the Island. There ought to have been a stormy flag up, but there was not, although it was hoisted afterwards. I saw no more of the boat, and have not seen THOMPSON or the boat since. - By the Coroner: The men in the boat appeared pretty steady. Bruce and his brother appeared to be sober. - The Coroner: There is no chance of these men coming, I am afraid. - The Constable: The Warrior is gone. - The Coroner: I suppose this man at Millbrook saw the whole affair? - The Constable: He saw it all, but he is very unwell. His daughter is below. - By the direction of the Coroner, the daughter of the man referred to (Brace, the brother-in-law of the deceased), was called up, and she said her father was very unwell when she left home in the morning. She thought he would be able to come out in about a few days. - The Coroner: I am afraid we must adjourn the Inquest. - The Constable said he had not heard of any other men besides those referred to who had seen the whole affair. - The Coroner: Gentlemen, we must adjourn this Inquest until this day week, at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Guildhall, and then we shall be able to hear this man - Where is the Warrior gone? - It was stated that the Warrior had gone to Lisbon; and was going out to Halifax. - The Coroner: It is a very fortunate thing this man is here, who will be able to tell us something about it. The Jury having been bound over to appear on Monday next, the court adjourned. - The Assistant-Surgeon of the Revenge returned his fee to the Coroner to be applied for the benefit of the family of the deceased. - The Coroner thanked him for his kindness and agreed to carry out his desire.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 23 January 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. - Yesterday afternoon J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall, on the body of GEORGE STEER, late an engine-driver on the South Devon Railway, who had died from injuries received that morning on the line, near the South Devon Railway Station. Mr George Stephenson was chosen as Foreman of the Jury. Mr F. P. Cockshott attended as the representative of the South Devon Railway Company; and Mr Wright as representative of Messrs. Evens and Co., the contractors for the supply of locomotive engines and engine men. The Jury proceeded to the South Devon Hospital to view the body and returned to the Guildhall. - Thomas Lloyd was the first witness called. He said: I am a railway engine driver, in the employ of Messrs. Evens and Co., contractors for providing locomotives and men for the South Devon Railway. I have known the deceased more than two years. He was a railway engine stoker or fireman, in the same employ as I am. He was about 23 years of age, and unmarried. I was working with him all last night. We came down by a goods train from Exeter, and arrived here at 5.36 this morning. About a quarter to seven o'clock deceased and myself arrived with our engine at the turntable, at the engine shed of the Plymouth station. There is a line of railway running over the turntable. Deceased and myself were on the turntable, turning our engine round, which is done with a "crab" or "winch" fixed on the turntable. I did not see or hear anything approaching, but in a moment I found myself in the pit of the turntable. I looked around and saw the deceased fall down by my side. Another engine, driven by Samuel Bradford, now present, in coming from the goods station to the turntable had run into the side of my engine and knocked me and deceased into the pit. I suppose the handle of the winch struck the deceased; I saw he had received a dreadful blow on the head. He was speechless. I got assistance and carried him into the shed. The medical man, Mr Pearse, came and deceased was then taken to the South Devon Hospital. I accompanied him there. Within a minute after it happened Samuel Bradford came to me, and said, "It is a bad job." The body the Jury have seen is that of GEORGE STEER, the deceased. - At the request of the Foreman, the witness explained the construction of the turntable, and the position of the engine. - By the Jury: It was not dark at the time - just daylight. - I think deceased must have received a blow from the handle of the winch, and I heard his head strike against the stone of the pit. - Edward Escott being sworn, said: I am a railway engine stoker, in the same employ as the last witness. This morning Samuel Bradford, now present, and myself were about to take the 7.15 a.m. goods train to Exeter. About ten minutes after six o'clock, Bradford got on an engine near the signals at the engine shed, and I accompanied him. We had formed the train, and intended going up the line to get coals and water. Bradford drove the engine. I saw an engine ahead, but could not tell whether it was on the turntable, or over the pit, which is the other side of the turntable. I had just put on fresh coal, and my eyesight was affected for a few minutes by the fire. I saw the engine distinctly, when the front of our engine was between seven or eight feet of the turntable, but that was too late to stop her, and in a moment our engine struck against the other. Bradford then got off and assisted deceased from the pit. I saw a great deal of blood about his (deceased's) body, and he did not speak. - By the Coroner: We made no signal that we were going to the shed; it is not the practice to do so. The portion of line on which this happened was in the engine-shed yard, and not on the regular line. - By the Jury: We were driving very slowly. Had the other engine been over the pit, it would have been further from us, and we should have had time to stop, The gas-lamp at the turntable was not lighted. If it had been, we could have seen the other engine distinctly. - Thomas Stevens said: I am a labourer in the same employ as the last witness. This morning, about a quarter to seven, I was on the coal stage. I heard two engines come in contact and heard Lloyd said, "Bradford, you have killed my mate." I went to the place and saw deceased in the pit, and saw Bradford go there. Deceased was speechless, and much injured about the head. It was coming daylight and there was good moonlight. I could see an engine at the distanced of a hundred yards. The gas-lamp is not lighted when it is moonlight. - By the Jury: I should think Bradford could see as far as I could. - Mr Cockshott: There was a haze over the moon at ten minutes to seven. - Henry Pethick said: I am a switchman on the South Devon Railway, I was on duty this morning at the switches leading to the engine-shed. At a quarter before seven, I saw Samuel Bradford driving an engine past my box. It was going very slow. It was moonlight, and sometimes darker than others. There was a shower just before the engine passed, and it was dark for a minute or two. The gas was not burning at the engine-house. If it had been I could have seen the engine which was over the turntable plainly. - The Coroner: If the gas had been lighted, would this have happened? Do you think it might have prevented this? - Witness: I think it might. If it had been lighted, Bradford must have seen the engine earlier than he did. - By the Jury: My box is about 300 yards from the table. - Nathaniel Lewis was called, and said: I have charge of the engine-yard at the South Devon Railway Station by night. The gas-light at the engine-shed was burning at five o'clock this morning. I then thought it was light enough and turned it off. I left a quarter past six. It was not then daylight, but moonlight. It was showery, and the moon was obscured at times. It was light enough when I left to see an engine at the distance of a hundred yards. - By the Jury: I put out the light at my own discretion. The light is about eight feet higher than the turntable. - Mr Cockshott explained that the gaslight referred to was placed upon the water tank, which was near the turntable and engine-house. - Richard Morris, porter at the South Devon Hospital, said: The deceased was brought to the hospital about half-past seven this morning. He had sustained serious injuries in the head. He never spoke and died about ten minutes after ten o'clock. - The Coroner asked the Jury if they wished to adjourn the Inquest to inspect the premises, but the Jurymen thought it was unnecessary. - Mr Francis Cockshott said: I am the superintendent of the South Devon Railway. I left my house this morning at ten minutes to seven o'clock, to go to the station. I noticed that it had been raining, and that there was a mist driving across the moon from the north-west, which slightly obscured the moonlight. About five minutes after seven I was in the telegraph office, and was told an accident had happened in the engine-house, and I proceeded there. The body of the deceased had been removed. - By the Coroner: I have heard the evidence of the stoker Escott, and I think that the glare from the fire box prevented Bradford and Escott from seeing the engine on the turntable. The engine which they were on was preparing to take a goods train to Exeter, and would have a large fire. I know from experience that the glare from the fire fox of an engine, when the door is open, will prevent the engineman and stoker from seeing objects distinctly, except in broad daylight. The moon was obscured until a quarter past seven. - By the Jury: If the lamp had been lighted it might have assisted the engine driver to see the other engine; but I don't think the man is to blame for putting it out. The lamp in question was placed there about eighteen months since to light the turntable, but the men put it out when they think proper. The light from the fire would affect both the driver and stoker. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that the question for consideration was whether the engine driver Bradford had used due and proper caution or not. There were many things favourable to him. They had Mr Cockshott's evidence about the light of the morning. The most important evidence was that of Escott, and Mr Cockshott, who was a practical man, stated that both engine driver and stoker would be affected by the light of the fire. If they thought Bradford had not used proper care he would be liable to a charge of manslaughter; but if they considered that he had then it would be simply a matter of accidental death. - The Jury, having consulted together in private for a considerable length of time, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and accompanied it with the following recommendation:- "That, in order to prevent similar accidents, the Jury recommend to the South Devon Railway Company, that a sufficient light be kept constantly burning near the turntable from dusk to broad daylight, irrespective of any discretion on the part of their servants to distinguish the same." - The Coroner observed that he agreed with the Jury, and Mr Cockshott undertook to convey their recommendation to the company.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At The Dockyard. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of JAMES PHELP, a seaman, of H.M.S. Lapwing, who had died on the previous Monday, at the Naval Hospital. - Edward Welch, a waterman, said he was on board the Lapwing, in the basin of the Devonport Dockyard, some days since, when he saw the deceased fall from the prow, one end of which rested on the vessel, and the other on the shore, into the water. Assistance was rendered, and he was brought on board. There was no one near enough to touch him when he fell off. - Henry William Chapman, first class ordinary seaman, serving on board the Lapwing, in the basin of the Devonport Dockyard, said the deceased had been a shipmate of his for three years. On the previous Thursday, about five o'clock in the evening, he saw the deceased, who was quite steady, come from the lower deck to the upper deck. About ten minutes afterwards he heard a cry of "A man overboard." He ran to the gunwale of the ship, and saw a man in the water of the basin. He jumped into the fender, which was in the water, between the ship and the quay, and from there jumped into the water. He caught the man, who was sinking, by the collar, and, with assistance, got him on board the ship, from whence he was carried to the surgery in the Dockyard. He was insensible when taken from the water. The men on board the ship were hoisting tanks from the after-hole, and getting the ship ready for paying off. The prow is a proper one, about three or four feet wide, with cross-pieces nailed on, and a hand-rail to prevent persons from slipping off. At the time deceased fell the tide was only half up, and the prow had spring in it, in consequence of not resting properly on the shore, but it was not dangerous. When the deceased was taken from the water he had a wound over his eye, and was supposed to have struck against the fender in his fall. - Richard Pasley Lawrenson, assistant surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, said the deceased was brought to the hospital on Thursday evening. He was insensible. His body was warm, but his hands and feet cold, as though he had been in the water some time. He became sensible in the morning, and complained of symptoms of inflammation of the lungs, of which he died on Monday morning. Immersion in water would be likely to produce influenza of the lungs. It was very rapid in this case. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" and through the Coroner expressed their admiration of the conduct of the witness Chapman.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 24 January 1862
PLYMOUTH - An Artilleryman Drowned In Sutton Harbour. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an artilleryman named WILLIAM HOLMES, who had been found dead in the water in Sutton Harbour that morning. - William Thomas Putt, a licensed waterman, said he was in a boat in Sutton Harbour, between Guy's Quay and Vauxhall Quay, about a quarter to eight o'clock that morning, when he saw about ten yards from him, and twenty yards from Guy's Quay, the body of a man about six feet below the surface of the water. The tide was more than half flood. Witness called assistance, and went towards the body, which he found to be that of an artilleryman, standing erect. The man who had come to his assistance, pulled the deceased out of the water by the hair of his head, without any difficulty. His mouth and eyes were open, but there were no marks of violence upon him, nor was he in the least disfigured. He was removed to the dead house. - William Slade, sergeant of the 5th Brigade, No. 2 Battery, said the deceased was a gunner in his regiment, and about 40 years of age. The deceased was on leave on the previous day. He drank occasionally. Witness had examined the body, but found no marks of violence upon it. - James Walker, battery sergeant-major, said the deceased was on duty with him on the previous afternoon. That was the last time he saw him alive. His general character was good. He had served in India, in the Lancers. When he was drunk he rolled about very much. - The first witness Putt, stated to the Jury that there was nothing on the quays to prevent persons falling into the water, and no life-buoy or rope to throw to them. He thought the Sutton Harbour Company were to blame, and that their attention should be called to the matter. - The Coroner observed that there was no evidence to show that a life-buoy would have been of any assistance in this case, but should any such case come before him, he would take care to communicate with the Sutton Harbour Company. - This witness also stated that he was near the spot where deceased was found about half-past five that morning, but the body was not there then. When the body was removed from the water, a quantity of air escaped from the mouth, and he (the witness) considered that this being in the chest, had caused the body to remain in an upright position. - A verdict of "Found Drowned; probably walked over the Quay accidentally," was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 29 January 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Fatal Boat Accident In The Sound. The Adjourned Inquest - Yesterday. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of the waterman, JOHN THOMPSON, the owner of the boat which was so unfortunately sunk in the Sound on the 20th instant, and from which several men were drowned, was held yesterday afternoon at the Devonport Town Hall, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Henry Mitchell was Foreman. - William Bruce said: I reside at Millbrook, in the County of Cornwall. I am a naval pensioner. On Monday week last I left Millbrook at about a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning, in the boat of the deceased. We went to Mutton Cove. - The witness seemed to give his evidence in a very unwilling and contradictory manner, and The Coroner: You have just taken a solemn oath to speak the truth, and the whole truth, and that I will have you know. We do not want any mistakes. I expect that you think you are answerable for what has happened, and under that impression we might be an hour procuring that testimony which might be taken in a quarter of an hour. The deceased THOMPSON, had the management and direction of the boat - is that not so? - Witness: Yes. - The Coroner: Then that relieves you from all responsibility; you are not liable. Was it not a fact that you came down from Millbrook that day with the intention of being with him (deceased)? - Witness: I came down as a passenger. - The Coroner: Did you not intend to be with him during the day? - Witness: No, sir. I came down as a passenger, as I wanted to see the Warrior, not having seen her before. - Witness's examination continued: We arrived at Mutton Cove at about 10 o'clock. I did not leave the Quay. Deceased remained in the boat. His brother went up into the town after some gear for the boat. We then shoved off with some more men in the boat. - The Coroner: More men; we have not heard about any men yet? - Witness: He came down with the gear and then we shoved off to the Warrior. - Q.: Was there anybody in the boat besides you and THOMPSON? - A.: Yes, sir. Q.: How did they get there? - A.: We all got into the boat. Q.: Who were they? - A.: I don't know their names. Q.: Who are they? - A.: Men belonging to the Warrior. Q.: Now tell us how the people got into the boat. How long after the gear was fetched did they get into the boat? - A.: In about a quarter of an hour after. There were eleven of us altogether in the boat - I, the deceased, his brother, two blue marines, and the remainder were sailors belonging to the Warrior. - Q.: What was the size of the boat? - (Witness did not answer.) - The Coroner: Are you deaf? - (Witness did not answer again.) - The Coroner (loudly): Are you hard of hearing? - Witness: No, I am not. - The Coroner: Then if you can hear the question why don't you answer it. You are about one of the worst witnesses I ever examined. There is no getting anything out of you at all. You can make a guess at it I should think. Was she 10 feet long? - Witness: Yes, and longer. - After some trouble the witness stated that the boat was about 16 feet in length, and his examination was continued as follows:- The boat was in proper repair, and did not take in water. All the persons came into the boat at the same time. The deceased had two wooden legs. THOMPSON pulled one oar, and I pulled the other. THOMPSON pulled the near oar. I believe they were all sober. No liquor was taken into the boat to my knowledge. I did not see any taken in. THOMPSON was quite sober, and so was I. Deceased's brother GEORGE steered the boat. Deceased's brother was a shipwright of the Warrior. The weather was rather rough, and the wind was blowing from the South East. It was flood tide. The boat was pretty low in the water. I should think the gunwale of the boat was about 6 inches from the water. All the persons in the boat sat down. I and the deceased pulled out so far as the outer end of Drake's Island. About five minutes before we set the foresail the deceased handed the mizen aft to his brother, who was steering, to ship it, and he did ship it. About five minutes after the mizen was shipped, the deceased said, "Now we will make a stretch off for the Warrior," and then I set the foresail by his direction. We sailed under the foresail and mizen about half way between Drake's Island and the Warrior, which was lying about 500 yards inside the midship part of the Breakwater. The sheet was not belayed. The deceased held the sheet. He was sitting with his face aft and the oars in. Then a sea struck her on the port quarter, and the greater part of the sea came on board, and then she made a "list" to starboard, which half filled the boat. She made another "list" a'port and filled, and went down. She did not turn over, she sank right down. We were all in the water immediately. I swam as well as I could. I did not see THOMPSON in the water. I was away from the stern sheets altogether. I was right in the bow of the boat when she filled. When I rose out of the water there was not a soul near me. I kept myself afloat until a boat from the Revenge picked me up, and took me on board the Revenge. I did not see THOMPSON at all afterwards. I was sensible, but much exhausted when I was taken on board. I have no idea how long I was in the water; but the captain of the water tank, who picked up two men, said they must have been in the water more than three-quarters of an hour. When I got on board the Revenge, I was taken into the sick bay and dry clothing was put upon me, and I was put before the galley fire to warm myself. I did not see anything of THOMPSON then. I remained on board four hours, and then left the ship and came ashore at Mutton Cove with the bombboat woman, from thence home. I did not see THOMPSON at all, he was taken ashore before I recovered. I saw the dead body on Sunday last in his own house at Millbrook. He was buried at Maker on Sunday. There was no quarrelling or larking in the boat, or anything of that kind. The sea was very rough and the further we went out the heavier sea there was. We were close on the wind at the time of the accident. The man at the helm was steering properly, he kept the sheet full. He seemed to understand his work very well. We did not see any squall coming on at all. We continued to be deep in the water, the same as when we started. The boat has been recovered and is now at Mutton Cove. - By the Jury: Somebody cautioned us when we left Mutton Cove. Did not hear anyone say to deceased that the water was coming in at the bunking hole. - The Coroner (to Mr Dunbar, Inspector of Boats and Wherries): How many was this boat licensed to carry? - Mr Dunbar: Eight, sir. She is only licensed to go into the Harbour. She is not licensed to go into the Sound. - A Juryman: I did not understand, until now, that the boat was under sail at the time of the accident. In Waterfield's evidence it was stated that when the marine got upon the sail, it was furled to the mast. - The Coroner read Waterfield's evidence, and found that such was the case. He (the Coroner) thought it very likely that when immersed into the water the sail would become furled to the mast. - By the Coroner: We were outside the bridge a good way. - The Coroner: Then the bridge had nothing to do with it? - The Coroner: Where is THOMPSON'S brother? - Witness: He is gone out in the Warrior. - The Coroner then summed up as follows: You have heard this; it is for you to say whether you are satisfied with Bruce's testimony If so, you will return a verdict of accidental death, or, rather, accidentally drowned. It is very much to be regretted that watermen should take into their boats a greater number of persons than the law allows. It is also much to be regretted that this boat, which was only licensed for the Harbour, should have been taken by the deceased into the Sound. However, whatever amount of negligence there may have been in the case, poor THOMPSON, who is dead, was the responsible party. Had THOMPSON been saved, inasmuch as he had the management of the boat, and took into it an excessive number of passengers, and the boat being a boat not fit for the work, and going into the Sound, the weather, too, being rough, I think it very probable that I should have had to request you to consider whether the negligence was so gross as to have authorised a verdict of manslaughter. But you see poor THOMPSON, who was the person wholly responsible for the proper care and caution, has paid the penalty of his negligence, poor fellow, and has forfeited his life, so that I see no reason why you should not return a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." I suppose that must be your verdict. - The Coroner asked Mr Dunbar whether it was his duty to be in attendance to see that watermen did not carry a larger number of passengers than they were licensed, on occasions like this? - Mr Dunbar replied that he was supposed to be at some place. He was at Newpassage watching the same thing, and was returning when he was informed of the accident. - The Coroner: Do you, in those cases, when you know of them, represent them to the Commissioners? - Mr Dunbar: I report these cases to Mr Jago. - The Coroner: The Solicitor to the Commissioners? - Mr Dunbar: Yes. - The Coroner: Are they dealt by? - Mr Dunbar: They are when I have got a clear case. - The Coroner: Was there not a waterman committed from here for manslaughter some time ago? - Mr Dunbar: Yes. Bruce was in the same boat. - The Foreman: The Jury entirely acquit Mr Dunbar from any blame in the matter. - The Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and appended the following remarks to their verdict:- "At the same time, the Jury recommend that an additional officer, to act as inspector of Boats, should be appointed and be in attendance on occasions like the present, in order to see that boats do not carry more than their licensed number. The Jury are inclined to think that if this boat had had no more than the limited number in her at the time of the departure, this melancholy accident would not have happened. They cannot leave this court without expressing their highest approbation of the bravery and energetic conduct displayed by the three men composing the crew of the lighter Coronation. They entirely exonerate Mr Dunbar from any blame whatever."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 3 February 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At The Plymouth Foundry. - An Inquest was held at Martin's Wine Vaults, Courtenay-street, on Saturday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HAYNES, who had died on the previous day. - Thomas Floyd, a pattern-maker, said he had known the deceased, who was about 50 years of age, and in the employ of the Plymouth Foundry and Engine Works Company, Limited, about five years. On that day week he had seen deceased at work in the shop in Russell-street, at a turning machine, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. Witness heard the gouge, with which the deceased was cutting a rapidly revolving "boss," catch in the wood of the boss, and, on looking round, saw deceased falling backwards. The boss had separated into two pieces, and witness saw both of them fall to the ground. Witness assisted deceased to rise, and afterwards walked home with him to Union-place, George-lane. Witness afterwards saw Dr Randall at the house, and knew that deceased died on the 29th ult. The boss in question was joined in two pieces with glue, and had been previously used with safety. It was the duty of deceased to judge whether it was safe or not. Witness believed that deceased's gouge had caught in one of the joints of the rim of the boss, and had so put additional pressure upon the glue joining the pieces together. The glue was probably damp, and having given away, one of the pieces had flown up, and struck deceased on the head and knocked him down. Witness had been a pattern maker 13 years, and had no hesitation in saying that the affair had been a pure accident. - Mr George Down, the foreman of the works, said the deceased had been desired to go to the hospital, to which the company subscribed, but he had refused and he had been, with difficulty, persuaded to call in a surgeon. They had no idea that the injuries were so serious. The company had done something for deceased's widow and family of seven children. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 4 February 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - A Soldier Drowned AT Mutton Cove. Unprotected State Of The Quay. - An Inquest was held at the Naval Hospital Inn, Stoke, yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CORNELIUS DACEY, a private of the 37th Regiment, whose body had been found dead in the water at Mutton Cove, early on the previous morning. It was stated that about half-past six o'clock on Saturday evening, an engineer at the Steam Flour Mills, Mutton Cove, named James Chilton, heard, as he stood with his back towards the quay, about to lock up the gate, a splash in the water. He ran to the edge of the quay and saw an object in the water, about eight yards from the quay, but he could not distinguish what it was, although he believed it to be the body of a man or woman. He called some men from the mill, and on his return saw the object moving in the water, and heard a voice call out "Oh!" but it sank from view before assistance could be rendered. Information was given to the watermen near, and they dragged for the body for a considerable time without success. On Sunday morning, about half-past one o'clock, George Luscombe, a custom-house officer, and a waterman, named Willcocks, found the dead body of a soldier of the 37th Regiment on the beach at Mutton Cove. Intelligence was conveyed to the police-station and Raglan Barracks and the body, which was properly dressed, with the exception of the cap, which was missing, was taken to the dead-house at the Military Hospital, Stoke, and there viewed by the Jury. From the statements of Joseph Garnham, a comrade of the deceased, and Colour-Sergeant Huckstable, the sergeant of his company, it appeared that the deceased was about 22 years of age, had been in the army about four years, and had served in India about two years. During that time, he had, although a sober man, been in almost constant trouble for such offences as staying out late at night, disputes with non-commissioned officers, &c.; and since his return home had been on a short allowance of money in consequence of his debts. He was of a somewhat gloomy and sullen disposition, and appeared to dislike his profession. John Foley a private of the regiment, heard him say on the 31st ult., when the sergeant was making memoranda as to the relatives of the soldiers, "I may as well leave my kit to you, sergeant, as there's nobody else." On the same day, when his debts were mentioned to him, he said, "I shall soon be out of them altogether." For some time past he had held little communication with the men of his company, and said last month that he would "as soon be dead as alive." On Saturday last he neither ate his dinner nor tea, and when met near the Gunwharf, about a quarter to seven that evening, by his comrade Garnham, who then saw him for the last time, he gave no reply where he was going, although, apparently quite sober. it was stated, with reference to the quay at Mutton Cove, that the nearest light or lamp was about twenty yards from the quay, and that there was not sufficient light to enable a person approaching the quay to see the edge of it. Although it was a public thoroughfare, and two persons besides the deceased had been drowned there within the last twelve months, and the attention of the authorities had been drawn to the subject, there was no chain or protection to prevent persons from falling into the water. - The Jury returned a verdict, to the effect that the deceased was Found Drowned, but how he came by his death there was no evidence to show; and recommended that precaution should be taken to prevent persons falling over the edge of the quay into the water.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 14 February 1862
MARY TAVY - The Accident At Wheal Friendship Mine. - Yesterday Mr Vallack, the Coroner for the district, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM STOCKER, at the house of the deceased, Lane-head, St Mary Tavy. A Jury of twelve was summoned, Mr Merrivale acting as Foreman. Only one witness was examined, and no facts were elicited beyond those already known. The Inquest lasted but a short time, and resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at a beer-shop in York-street, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES GIDLEY. The deceased was a regrater in the market, and about 58 years of age. On that day, while standing near the stable in William-street, h complained of great pain about his shoulders, and suddenly fell down dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 17 February 1862
ST MARY CHURCH - Inquest On The Two Men Drowned At Babbicombe. - An Inquest was held at the Carey Arms, Babbicombe, on Saturday afternoon last, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ROBERT HARRIS, one of the two fishermen who were drowned between Wednesday night and Thursday morning last, the particulars of which have already appeared in the Western Daily Mercury. The Jury were composed of the following:- John Weymouth, Foreman; Arthur Hill, William Smith, jun., William Edgcombe, Charles Grover, James Shenner, William Gasking, and Robert Edwards. - John Peate, sailor, said that on the previous Thursday, about 11 o'clock, he was on Babbicombe Hill, when the wife of the deceased asked him if he had seen her husband. He replied "No;" and on asking when she saw him last, she said on the previous night at ten o'clock, when he had gone out to look after his crab-pots. About one o'clock he saw RICHARD, the son of the deceased, who had been out in a boat on the Torbay side of the water, and he said he had not seen his father. He (witness) then went again on Babbicombe Hill, and saw a boat belonging to the deceased lying bottom upward. He then went back to the son, and went with him and some others to the Bell rock, where they found the boat about thirty yards from the shore. HARRIS was in the water close by, entangled amongst the lines and quite dead, but they could not find Bray. He thought the boat was not fit for crab-potting, as it was not large enough. There were no sails in the boat, and the wind was not blowing hard t the time. It was impossible to tell how many of the pots had been taken into the boat before the accident occurred, but there were eight close by. He never knew an instance before of a man going out so late at night about crab-pots. The wind came on to blow a little about four o'clock in the morning from the eastward. - A Juryman here stated that the wind was blowing rather hard from the east from about half-past 1 to 1 o'clock. - Henry Turner, proprietor of the Roughwood Inn, and one of those who went out in the boat, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness. On arriving at the spot they found everything but one paddle, which had, however, been picked up afterwards. He had searched all along the shore for Bray's body, but without any result. :The boat in which the two men went out had often been used for the purpose, but was not, he considered, safe. - MARY HARRIS, the widow of the deceased, deposed to having parted from the two men shortly after ten o'clock on Wednesday night, when she saw them for the last time. Deceased and Bray were on very good terms, and had never had an angry word. - The Jury after a short discussion, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 19 February 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Catdown Quarries. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, yesterday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN ROOK, who had died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on the previous night, from injuries received. The deceased was about 52 years of age, and had been a limestone quarryman in the employ of Messrs. Sparrow, Brothers and Scott about twenty years. On Saturday, the 8th inst., he was at work at a clay-soil quarry at Catdown, digging out clay rubble for conveyance to the quays for shipment. A companion saw that the ground about twelve feet above him was giving away, and called out to warn him. He ran towards a cart that was near, but the clay, amongst which there was stone, fell upon him and covered him to his middle. His companion escaped unhurt, and obtained the assistance of other workmen, who drew deceased from beneath the earth. He then said he thought his thigh was broken, and was taken to the Hospital in a cart, when it was found that his conjecture was correct. He gradually became worse and expired on Monday evening about seven o'clock. It was supposed that the frost and wet had had an effect upon the earth which fell. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 24 February 1862
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Fatal Accident Near Buckland Monachorum. - An Inquest was held on Saturday morning, at nine o'clock, at the Crown Inn, Buckland Monachorum, before A. B. Bone, jun., Esq., Deputy Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE FOX, who met with his death on Wednesday evening last, from a tree falling upon him. The Jury was composed of the following gentlemen:- Mr Richard Read (Foreman), and Messrs. John Brown, Jacob Northmore, John Tozer, John Spry, Richard Undworth, Robert Luscombe, Samuel Cock, Joseph Rowe, Thomas Austen, William Worth, Richard Bryant and John Cocks. The following evidence was adduced:- William Sleeman stated that he was a farmer, renting Torr Farm, in the parish of Buckland. On Thursday, the 20th inst., the deceased, who was a carpenter, came to his farm to take down an oak tree, which was in a hedgerow, in a field called Garden Park. witness went with him to the field for the purpose of helping him. They used a saw commonly called a "cross-cut" saw. They did not cut off any of the tops or lops preparatory to sawing the tree down. They commenced their work about three o'clock in the afternoon, and worked on until six o'clock. During the afternoon deceased went home to procure some wedges. The tree was a short, stumpy one. They began to "cross-cut" the tree rather south of the hedge, which ranged from east to west. The stem of the tree was about 8 feet in height. They began to work first inside the hedge and cleared the ground 6 inches. They then commenced to "cross-cut" it as soon as they could. The tree fell towards the east, and they were endeavouring to throw it west. Witness was some distance from the tree at the time it fell; h was removing the saw. There was an orchard adjoining the field, but witness was in the field. The stock must have slipped on the ground; that was the only way in which he could account for the accident. The deceased was standing on a hedge, which was about six feet in height, driving the wedges with the mallet. There were three wedges under the tree, one on the north side and two on the eastern side. Deceased was on the south side of the tree driving in the wedge which had been put in on the east side About 8 feet from the base of the tree was a large limb coming out from the south side. When deceased heard the tree cracking he stepped back, unfortunately, and turned his face towards the orchard. If he had moved a step in the opposite direction he must have been saved. He thought the tree would have fallen west, but the tree fell towards the east, on the top of him. Witness thought the stock was about 15 or 18 inches in diameter. The limb of the tree crushed deceased, who never spoke after the falling of the tree. He groaned twice. Witness procured help from the neighbours, but they were not of sufficient strength to lift the tree off from the body of deceased. Additional assistance was then procured and the tree was lifted off from the deceased. About six or seven minutes elapsed before the body was taken out. They did not saw the tree to take him out; it could not have been done in as short a time as it took to have the tree lifted. The limb of the tree struck him on the back. He groaned and moved his head after being taken out, and his eyes were open. The tree was lying across him on his back rather below the shoulders. No blood came from the mouth, and his face turned very black. Witness sent for a doctor immediately, and he arrived at 8 o'clock; the accident happened at 6 o'clock. The deceased was removed on a shutter to witness's residence, where he remained until the doctor arrived. He was afterwards removed to his own residence. The deceased was an exceedingly steady and sober man. The doctor said the cause of death was suffocation. - Jane Marks stated that she resided at Anderton, close by where deceased lived. She knew him well; his name was GEORGE FOX. About 8 o'clock on Thursday he was brought to his residence. He was quite dead. Witness had since examined the body, and found a large bruise on the left side, between the shoulder-blade and the hip, and the skin was broken. There was no bruise on the middle of the back. - John Sleeman gave evidence in corroboration of the first witness. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said their verdict must be one of accidental death. If there was blame attached to anyone - but there did not seem to be any - it must be to the deceased himself, for he was a carpenter, and must have known the nature of the work he had to perform. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury - Wednesday 26 February 1862
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Fatal Boat Accident In The Sound. - It will be remembered that an account of a fatal boat accident in the Sound, by which six persons lost their lives, was given in our impression of the 21st of January. Eleven persons (three more than the proper number) embarked in a waterman's boat for the purpose of reaching the Warrior, but the boat having capsized on the south-east of Drake's Island, the deplorable accident we have referred to took place. On Sunday last, the body of one of the victims of this occurrence - a marine artilleryman, named FREDERICK SHIELDS - was picked up off Bovisand, by a coastguardsman named Charles Bean. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday afternoon, at the Royal Naval Hospital Inn, Stonehouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The body was quite beyond identification, but was found, from the initials on the belt and a letter found on the body, to be that of the unfortunate man SHIELDS.

TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday, at Bentley's Commercial Hotel, before F. B. Cumming, Esq., the Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SAUNDERS, a labourer in the employ of Mr Brocks, who came to his death by falling over some steps on Saturday night last. The Jury was composed of Messrs. John Boyce, Foreman, Benjamin Cox, John Price Tothill, Jason Marles, John Truman, Samuel Tucker, John Bulkely, Richard Ward, Wm. Cole, John Carpenter, William Elford, and George Bentley. From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased went, on Saturday night last, to the house of Miss Ford, at Throne Park Villa, with two baskets of apples from his master, and that, on returning in the dark, he fell over four steps leading from the carriage drive to the footpath. He was immediately seen by Mr Francis Douglas Harris, surgeon, who, not considering the injury done to be very serious, had him put in a fly and driven home, but he expired before reaching his house. On examining him after death, it was found that the vertebrae of the neck were partially dislocated. The Jury agreed that no blame was to be attributed to anyone, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the Harvest Home, Tavistock-road, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of FREDERICK HORE. - John Steer stated that he resided at Vine Cottage, Glanville-street, Plymouth. He had known the deceased for about 30 years; he was a house carpenter (master) and about 39 years of age. Deceased was a single man, and so was witness. He had lived with witness about two years and a half. In his habits, deceased would turn the night into the day; he was lively and fond of amusements and excitement. He would drink as much of an evening at a sit as would make an ordinary man drunk. On Tuesday morning last, the 18th instant, the deceased told witness that he came home about six o'clock in the morning. He told this between 12 and 2 in the afternoon. He then complained to him of being very queer, and said he had been tasting some champagne, but did not like it. He did not go out that day. On Wednesday, witness went to Yealmpton, and did not see deceased until he returned at eight o'clock in the evening. He then breathed very short. On Thursday last, he got up about one o'clock in the morning, and said he was better, but witness knew he was worse. Witness told him that he had a slight inflammation on the lungs, and he had better have a doctor, but he refused to have any. Witness saw in the course of the afternoon that he was becoming worse, and about three o'clock witness went to Mr Rowe's, the druggist. He told Mr Rowe that deceased had a pain in his left side. Mr Rowe gave him some mustard to make a poultice and witness, on his way home, met deceased's brother, WILLIAM HORE, and informed him that the deceased was very ill. Witness got home and applied the poultice immediately. The poultice remained up for about two hours. Witness left him about 10 o'clock, and then went to bed. On Friday, the 21st instant, when witness got up, between six and seven o'clock, deceased said he was better. At breakfast time he got up and appeared better. At dinner time witness came in from the garden. The deceased then looked very bad. Witness's sister said, before deceased, "He says he has been dreaming and tossing all night." Witness urged him to have a doctor, but he refused. On Saturday, the 22nd, the deceased got up about nine o'clock; he looked worse instead of better, and witness then began to think deceased was not in a right state of mind, and told him he should get a doctor today, whether or not. At dinner, witness's sister and deceased were together. He said to witness, "What's Dick about." Witness said to his sister, "I think he is a little bit out." She said, "I think so too." He said he would go out. Witness said he should not, and told his sister, in deceased's presence, to keep him there. Whilst witness was in the workshop, deceased came there, and talked to him incoherently about his fetching Mr Eales. Witness went for the doctor at three o'clock, and returned again at about five o'clock, as he heard deceased was out of his mind. On his return, he found Mr Square, the surgeon, had been there. Witness said to deceased, "Fred, why did you go down into the shop sharpening knives?" He answered, "I have put up with it years enough." Witness asked him what he meant, and he replied, "Anything you like." Mr Square came again that evening, about seven o'clock, and prescribed a mixture, which witness got made up by Mr Rowe, which was given to deceased. The nurse came about a quarter to twelve o'clock. On Friday he complained of having a nasty cough, but witness did not hear him cough. On Friday he thought deceased was becoming insane, and on Saturday he was quite sure he was so. His circumstances were comfortable, and witness did not think he had anything preying on his mind. Deceased never ate much. - Jane Steer said she was the sister of the last witness, and had known the deceased for about two years and a half. On Friday last she saw deceased about nine o'clock in the morning. he said he had had a very bad night, and had been dreaming. On Saturday morning he got up between nine and ten o'clock, and he said he had been dreaming and throwing his arms about all night, and was very stiff. He said he could not wake himself up, and witness advised him to wash his face. He looked very dull about the eyes. He said, "I see your father in the garden," but witness was quite sure that her father was not there. She thought then that deceased was out of his mind. In about half an hour after witness's brother went to fetch a doctor deceased went down into the garden. Witness did not know he was gone, and looked for some time in the house for him, and then went to the workshop, where she found him standing with a penknife in his hand, and his throat cut. She sent for her father and brother. Deceased walked with them into the house. No other person could have done any injury to the deceased's throat but himself. - Mr William Joseph Square, a surgeon, residing in Portland-square, Plymouth, said that on Saturday afternoon, about a quarter past four, when in the street, he was called to the deceased at Vine Cottage. He found him in his bedroom, which was on the ground floor. He was near the bed, in a sitting posture. Witness's attention was immediately directed to his throat, in the upper part of which he found five very small wounds. The most important was on the right side, and near, but not over, the carotid artery. There was a very small quantity of blood on the skin and hair of his throat, and the orifice of his right nostril was stained with blood. The wounds were apparently inflicted with a very small, sharp instrument. He was taciturn and morose in his manner. His pulse was firm and good, and he appeared to have lost but very little blood. Witness went with Mr Steer, sen., into the workshop at the bottom of the garden, and on the work bench were a few spots of blood, a penknife, another small knife, a chisel, and a hatchet, smeared with blood. The wounds were, in his opinion, inflicted with the penknife, as its size corresponded with the wounds. Witness believed that one of the wounds penetrated the pharynx, as there was blood in the nostril. Witness placed deceased on the bed, directing that he should be undressed and taken care of. He prescribed no medicine, but said he should see deceased again in the evening. He did so about seven o'clock; he was in bed and totally incoherent, and incapable of answering witness's questions. Witness procured all the necessary information as to the deceased's habits, and prescribed for him, according to his (witness's) judgment. There did not appear to be any immediate danger. He saw him the next morning between nine and ten o'clock; he was then dying. In his opinion the deceased would not have died of the wounds, independent of other causes. - Richard Steer gave evidence relative to the insanity of the deceased. - The Jury after a lengthy consultation, returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased was ill on the 18th instant, brought on by excessive drinking and irregular habits, and so continued up to the time of his death, and that on the 22nd instant, he, not being at the time of sound mind, but lunatic and distracted, stabbed his throat with a penknife, thereby inflicting upon himself diverse wounds, but which were not mortal, or tending to cause death, and that the said FREDERICK HORE died on the 22nd instant, of the said excessive drinking and irregularities."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 1 March 1962
NEWTON ABBOT - Death Of A Child From Burning. - An Inquest was held at the Union Inn yesterday (Friday), before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of WILLIAM DOWN, aged 5 years, the infant of a widow, living in East-street. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the child was alone in his mother's kitchen, when - from his own statement made before his death - he took up some paper and cut it with a pair of scissors, with which he also put it to the fire, the paper ignited, but the child could not remove it and then rubbed it about his apron, which immediately caught on fire; the child ran to the house of a neighbour (Mr G. Whiteway) in whose kitchen was his mother. Mr Whiteway seeing the child's clothes on fire ran to a clothes line and took down a flannel petticoat, with which he extinguished the flames, but not until the child's shoulders, arms, hands and side of his face were much burnt. Mr James Ponsford, of Wolborough-street, druggist, was soon in attendance, and applied an embrocation to the wounds, but the poor little sufferer lingered until Thursday morning, when he died; he had not been left alone more than 10 minutes previous to the occurrence of the melancholy accident. Mr Ponsford gave it as his opinion that the child died more from fright than from the injuries of the burning, as he remained quite sensible until his death. The above facts having been proved by the witnesses - G. Whiteway, S. Marshall and Mr Ponsford, - the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Death From Apoplexy In Plymouth. A Scene At The Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held last evening, at the Plymouth Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of PHILIP HEYDON, who, it was supposed, had died from the effects of the injuries he received from falling over some stairs. - Mary Bennett said: I am the wife of Joseph Bennett, and reside at No. 21, St Andrew-street, Plymouth. I have known the deceased four or five years. He was a journeyman baker and about 47 years of age. His general health was good. I reside in the same house with him. He had a little shop below and a little room behind, in which he and his wife slept. They kept lodgers, who slept two pair of stairs up. My bedroom is on the first floor. I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock on Monday night last. Just after, I heard deceased come upstairs. He was up there about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I heard him wish the lodgers good night, and heard him going over the stairs. When about four or five stairs from the bottom I heard him fall. I think he remained in the passage about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I heard his door open, and I suppose he went in. I do not think anyone came to the deceased. Shortly after deceased fell I heard a quarrel amongst the lodgers - they were fighting. Deceased's wife went up to them and restored peace. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, on hearing the row, I went down to deceased's room and called to MRS HEYDON to come up to the lodgers. I went back to my room and then heard the chimes going twelve. Just after that MRS HEYDON went up. About seven the following morning she told me deceased was very ill, and wanted Mr Laurence to go work for him. I did not see her again for the day. - Elizabeth Stitson was next examined, and said: I am the wife of Andrew Stitson, who is a mason, and reside at No. 10 St Andrew-street. I have known the deceased many years. His step-daughter had a room in the house in which I reside. On Tuesday morning last, a little before eight o'clock, the deceased crossed St. Andrew-street, from No. 21 to No. 10. I saw him going up the stairs of No. 10; he was almost doubled up. He said to me, "Mrs Stitson, I am very ill." I opened his daughter-in-law's room for him and he went in. I saw his wife, and she told me she had bathed his bowels and put linseed meal poultices all night. She said it was a stoppage. She never told me he had fallen over the stairs. - Richard Cook said: I am a seaman pensioner, and reside at No. 10 St Andrew's -street. I have known the deceased about fifteen months. On Tuesday afternoon about a quarter past 5, I assisted deceased's wife in getting him into bed. The surgeon was present. I observed a scratch on the left side of the nose and another on the right shin. I saw him die about a quarter before 6 on that morning. - Mr William Bray Stephens was then examined, and said: I am a surgeon, and reside at No. 6, Flora-street. I have known the deceased a couple of years. I am surgeon to a club of which he is a member. About a fortnight or three weeks ago I attended the deceased; he had fallen down. He was well enough to come to me. He was completely cured of that. Last Tuesday, about half-past 9 in the morning, I was called to see the deceased by his wife. I went to No. 10 St Andrew-street, a little after 10 o'clock, and there saw deceased in bed, undressed. He was quite sensible, and I observed a scratch on his nose. I asked how it happened. Deceased's wife, in his presence, told me that during her absence to call me he fell, in endeavouring to get out of bed. The deceased did not make any observation. The deceased's wife, or any other person, never in my life time told me that deceased had fallen over the stairs. He complained of pain in his bowels. I prescribed for him, and said I should call again at one o'clock. I called accordingly and found the bowels relieved. He was quite sensible then. I gave further directions, and called again between five and half-past and then found him out of bed, in a fit of apoplexy. I assisted in getting him into bed, and saw him die. Deceased's step-daughter and Jane Lucey came to me for a certificate on the following morning for the registrar. Up to that time I had no notion that the deceased had fallen over the stairs, and I gave a certificate that he died of apoplexy in nine hours. The deceased was subject to giddiness. A blow from falling over stairs might produce apoplexy. - The court was then cleared, and, after a deliberation between the Jury and the Coroner, the court was re-opened, and it was decided, to clear up some doubts in the case, to hear the evidence of the widow of the deceased. - MARY HEYDON was accordingly sworn, and said: I am the widow of the deceased. On Monday evening last - I cannot speak the exact hour - my husband went upstairs. I heard a noise as if of a person falling over the stairs, and directly I heard the noise I opened the door. I saw my husband had fallen down. He was lying in the passage, and had fallen over three or four stairs. He was getting up when I came out. I took him by the hand, and he got up in a moment. When I took him up I asked him if he had hurted himself. He said he had not hurted himself much. I took him into the room, and he sat down in a chair; he sat there for about half-an-hour, when he went to bed. We went to bed, and went to sleep. About two o'clock in the morning he awoke me and said he was bad. He complained of pain in his bowels. I had an opening pill on the chimney-piece, and I gave it to him. He said he was thirsty, and drank a bottle of ginger beer. I applied linseed meal poultices to his bowels, and that gave him ease. He got up between six and seven o'clock, and dressed himself to go to work. I would not allow him to go, and said I would get another man to work for him. I then fetched the doctor. - The Coroner: Why did you not tell the doctor that he had fallen over the stairs? - Witness: I did not think anything at all about it, sir. - The Coroner: You did not tell the doctor anything about it then? - Witness: No, sir, I did not. - The Coroner here intimated to the deceased's sister, who was present, that she could ask the last witness any question if she chose, whereupon she said to the witness - MARY, you told me you had told the doctor the first time that he had fallen over the stairs. - The Coroner (to deceased's widow): Did he drink at all? - Witness: He did drink a little, but I have seen him worse. I can't say he did not drink anything. He was subject to get faint and giddiness and apt to fall down when he had a little drink. - The Coroner: So would any man. - By the Jury: We took our supper together that night. Deceased drank a glass or two of beer with the lodgers. - Q.: You heard the first witness say deceased remained in the passage ten minutes or a quarter of an hour? - A.: I think she must have mistaken another man for my husband. MR HEYDON did not remain there two minutes. I came there immediately. - A Juryman: It appears strange to the Coroner and Jury, from the statement of the first witness, that your husband should have been allowed to stay there a quarter of an hour or ten minutes. - Witness: He did not stay in that place a second. - Another Juryman remarked that it was strange that deceased should have crossed the street to another house the morning after the accident. - The witness said her husband went over there because it was more comfortable than his own house. - By a Juryman: I did not lay the deceased on the floor. - The deceased's sister (to Witness): You told me you told the doctor that he had fallen over the stairs. - The witness, who had been crying bitterly all the time she had been giving her evidence, here broke out in a great rage, and said: I never told you that I told the doctor so. you have not been near your brother for the last four years ...... - The Sister: I know I have not. - The Witness: Oh! you good-for-nothing wretch, you have robbed me all you can. - The Coroner: Stop, stop (To the Officer of the Court): Take her out. - The Witness: She has nearly stripped me naked, the wretch, she has! She has gone into my bakehouse and taken my bread from me. - The Sister: I have taken what is my own. - The Witness: You are a bad woman, you are. Oh! you bad woman. This is the way you all come upon me in my affliction. Oh! you dishonest woman, you bad, bad, woman! - The Officer of the Court: You must be quiet. - The Witness: I will not. I cannot help it. The base wretch! - The Coroner: If you do not be quiet, you must be removed. - The Officer (after vainly endeavouring to persuade her to be quiet): It's impossible to keep the woman quiet. - The Coroner then ordered her to be removed from the Court. - This having been done, the Coroner briefly summed up. He said the only question for the Jury to consider was, whether the deceased falling over the stairs was accidental or not. He had not the slightest doubt that the deceased had been drinking at the time, and that his fall was quite accidental. - The Jury then returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased died from Apoplexy, probably caused by his accidentally falling over the stairs."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 3 March 1862
PLYMOUTH - Death of GEORGE LEACH, Esq., and Inquest On The Body. - We record with regret the death of GEORGE LEACH, Esq., a gentleman who has been well-known for very many years past in the county of Devon, as a faithful and zealous supporter of the Liberal party and promoter of its principles, a prominent public man, and a liberal contributor to the charitable institutions of the locality. For a long series of years MR LEACH was the senior partner of the firm of LEACH, Little and Woolcombe, solicitors, Devonport, now known as Little and Woollcombe; and from that firm he retired about twenty years ago. In 1832 he contested the borough of Devonport, at the first election after the passing of the Reform Bill and the enfranchisement of the borough. His opponents were Sir George Grey, Bart., and Sir E. Codrington. They were all Liberals, and the contest was a severe one, resulting in the return of the two gentlemen last named. At the next election MR LEACH again came forward, but, in accordance with an agreement between himself and Tuffnell, he did not go to the poll. Since MR LEACH'S retirement from active life, he has lived upon his means as a man of considerable property. His health has generally been good, and he has continued to take an interest in those political and public affairs that engaged his more active labours formerly. As a landlord and an employer he has been greatly esteemed; and his contributions to the philanthropic societies and establishments of the county have led to a still wider appreciation of his many merits. In the latter part of last year, MR LEACH suffered from congestion of the brain and partial paralysis, the permanent effects of which have been weakened intellect and occasional insanity. Since October last he has been under constant medical treatment; and during the last few weeks his movements have been closely watched. But on Thursday afternoon he left his house in Lansdowne-place unobserved, walked across the Hoe and was seen going towards the Citadel. In crossing the field between the Hoe and the Citadel, the unfortunate gentleman either fell or threw himself over the cliff, and thus lost his life. Diligent search was made for him during Thursday evening and the whole of Friday and on Saturday morning his body was found, quite dead, and somewhat bruised, in a cavity in the rock, beneath the cliff, partially submerged in the water. It was conveyed to the deceased gentleman's house, and information of the circumstances sent to the borough Coroner. The circumstances themselves are more fully detailed below. - The Inquest. - J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, summoned a Jury to meet him at No. 6 Lansdowne-place, where the body lay, at seven o'clock on Saturday evening. The Inquest was held at that hour, and the following gentlemen were sworn as Jurymen:- Mr W. H. Hawker, jun., Foreman; Mr Thomas Nicholson, Colonel W. H. Fisk, Mr E. R. Brown, Mr R. K. Geldard, Mr H. Keen, Captain J. H. G. Trist, Rev. W. Harpley, Mr R. E. Waddington, Mr J. Honey, Captain J. F. Trist, Mr E. H. Barwell, Captain Goldfinch, Mr T. T. Shawfield, Mr J. Bunce, Captain R. W. Thomas, Mr J. Shilston, Mr E. Edwards. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said they were met to perform a very painful duty - to Inquire into the death of MR GEORGE LEACH, a gentleman probably well known to them all; and of high character and reputation, and great age. He believed the deceased had not of late had his ordinary good health. Witnesses would be called to show in what state of health he had been; that he left his house on Thursday last; and that he was seen about half-past five on that part of the Hoe leading to the Citadel. Every enquiry had been made since that time, he believed, until about eleven o'clock that (Saturday) morning. The Hoe constable (Kessell) had been very active in the search, and he found the body at the time mentioned in a cave under the cliff, near the Citadel, where the tide ebbed and flowed. The body was well known, and it was removed to the deceased's house. Some silver was found in the pockets. The first question for the Jury to consider would be, whether the deceased had destroyed himself or had been destroyed by any person. If they thought he had destroyed himself, the next question would be as to the state of mind in which he was at the moment when he committed the act. That he had been found drowned they could have no doubt; but he thought they would trace enough to show that he had not been killed by any person. Witnesses would tell them what had been his habits for a month or six weeks past, and probably the medical man who had attended him would be called. - The Jury having viewed the body, witnesses were examined. - Mr George Jackson said he was a solicitor, residing at No. 1 Hoe Park Terrace. He had known the deceased by sight for many years; and saw him last alive about half-past five o'clock on Thursday afternoon last. Witness was walking up the hill from under the Hoe, in the carriage road, and in a line between the obelisk and the flag-staff at the Citadel he saw the deceased lowering himself from the Hoe over the bank into the road, by swinging himself under the rail. His view of the deceased was very rapid; and, after passing on, he thought it strange that MR LEACH, whom he understood to be very weak, should be there, and he turned round. The deceased was then on the footpath, on the Citadel side of the road, walking along. As he seemed to be able to walk, witness passed on. Deceased appeared to have his hand upon the rails at the time. - Robert Clifton, servant of the deceased, was sworn and said he had been in the service of the deceased 30 years. He last saw him alive about five o'clock in the afternoon. He was then in the drawing-room. Witness went out and left him there alone, and returned about half-past five. Deceased was not then there. Witness looked through the house, but could not find him. He had enquired for him at other places since. Witness and another man servant attended upon deceased in turn. He had always had someone to walk with him when he went out, during more than a month past; being considered too infirm to go alone. Witness had thought that at times the deceased was a little out of his mind, and he was alarmed when he missed the deceased. Witness had slept in the room with the deceased lately; and sometimes he would be restless in his sleep. No one called to take MR LEACH out on Thursday evening. MR LEACH had been very infirm for some time; but he would be able to walk across the Hoe by himself. He did not require support in walking, and his sight was not bad for a gentleman of his age. Witness would not have prevented his going out, had he seen him; but would have gone with him. - Mr John Whimple said: I am a surgeon and reside at 14 Devonshire-terrace. I have known the deceased many years and attended him since October last. He then suffered from congestion of the brain and partial paralysis; from which he recovered, but with weakened intellect, that showed itself in his pecuniary matters and in weariness of life, as he could be no longer useful to society. These pointes induced me to put a watch on his acts. All necessary precaution was taken, fearing that he would damage himself. From this state he very much recovered during the last month; the only weak point remaining being that of his weariness of life. I saw him last alive on Thursday morning. On my entering the drawing room he was particularly bright and cheerful, and accounted for it by telling me that two of his old servants had been married. He said he had risen early to shake them by the hand and wish them every happiness. When I was half way downstairs, after I had left him, he called me back, and, putting his hand on my shoulder, asked me how long I thought it would last. I don't know whether that referred to the time of his existence, or to the notion he had taken up latterly that he had a cancer in his stomach. I told him that I could not answer his question, and that if I could I would. He did not appear to be depressed at all. I left him a little before twelve o'clock. I have seen the body of the deceased this evening, and have examined the head, externally. I found a small lacerated wound on the skin of the nose; the skin of the face and forehead a good deal rubbed; and the body has all the external appearance of being drowned. The deceased had made an attempt to destroy himself on the 19th of December. The mark on the nose of the body appears to have been caused by a blow, probably received in falling off a rock; but the others are such as would be caused by washing about in the water. I can positively state that at times, since I have been attending the deceased, he has not been sane on all points. My fear would be that he drowned himself when in an insane state of mind. There was not the slightest ground for the fancy that he had a cancer in his stomach. I recollect his saying to me, "I have a government annuity of £500 a year, and when I die that will be lost; and how can I live and keep up the same establishment if I lose that?" - William Martin Rickard, clerk to Messrs. Little and Woollcombe, at Devonport, said he had known MR LEACH upwards of 40 years. He had been a retired solicitor upwards of 20 years, and was latterly a landed proprietor, and possessed of a Government annuity. He had resided at No. 6 Lansdowne-place since the beginning of November last; and was 79 years of age. The body viewed by the Jury was that of MR LEACH. - Edward James Kessell, Hoe constable said: On Friday morning I heard that MR LEACH was missing; and I looked round the rocks under the Hose. This morning I went again, not being satisfied with the first search. I found the body in a hole, under the rocks, about midway between the road that leads under the Hoe and the flag-staff at the Citadel. It would take about one-third of the tide to come up to the hole. This morning the tide was low, but the hole was not dry. The body lay on the face, partially afloat. I got assistance, and we removed the body in a boat. I searched the body, and found in the left-hand trousers pocket a purse containing 11s. 3d. in silver. There was nothing in any other pocket. There was only one shoe on the body, and no hat. There was no eye-glass. - The Coroner recapitulated the main points in the evidence; and the Jury, having considered their verdict, found - That the Deceased, not being of sound Mind, threw himself into the sea, under the Hoe, and was Drowned.

EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Half Moon Hotel, on Saturday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, touching the death of JOHANNAH HEATON, aged 62 years, whose death took place under the following circumstances:- It appeared that the deceased was mistress of the Free School at Broadclist, and had come into town on a visit to her daughter who resides in Paris-street. The daughter asked her, as she was going out, to call upon the housekeeper at Messrs. Green and Bennett's, drapers, High-street, with a message. The housekeeper invited the old lady to partake of something and having eaten a small piece of meat and drank about half a glass of beer she suddenly fell down. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, and Dr Woodman shortly arrived, but the unfortunate woman was dead. A verdict in accordance with these facts was returned.

DAWLISH - A Coroner's Inquest took place on Saturday last before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM HOLE, yeoman, who has lately been residing at Dawlish, and who, before that, was a tenant under the late Sir Robert Newman, for many years, at Mamhead Farm. It appears that the deceased, as was his custom, went to see the sheep and lambs in a field near the Teignmouth Road, belonging to his son-in-law, Mr R. Lamacraft, butcher. This must have been about six o'clock on Wednesday evening last. As he did not return at his usual time, search was made, and he was found on his face and hands, quite dead, about two o'clock the next morning. Mr J. F. Knighton, surgeon, in his evidence, said he attributed death to some latent affection of the heart, and internal congestion. The Jury found a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 8 March 1862
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death At The Catdown Lime Kilns. - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM COOK, a man about 35 years of age, who had died on the previous day. The Jury having viewed the body at the Dead House, heard the witnesses. - William Martin, a lime burner, in the employ of Messrs. Sparrow and Scott, said the deceased had been in the habit of going to the lime kilns, at Catdown, about six o'clock in the evening, for the last four months, and was generally found there in the morning, when the men went to work. He would then go away. Witness had found him there about six o'clock on the previous morning, when he was lying as usual on the ground, about six feet from the edge of the lime kiln, apparently resting himself. About four o'clock witness aroused him and asked him why he remained there, and did not go to the Workhouse. He gave no answer, but arose and smoked a pipe of tobacco, and then laid down again. About half-past five o'clock witness feared something was the matter with him, and removed him to about 18 feet from the kiln, into fresh air. He then went to the house of Mr Harper, surgeon, who was not at home, and then went to the police-station and gave information. P.C. Strang went back with him to the lime kiln, and the man was then dead. He had never complained to witness of poverty. - P.C. Strang deposed to finding the deceased quite dead, and to finding in his pocket two-pence, a razor, and a knife. he was not badly dressed, and had on a clean white shirt, and one shoe and one boot on his feet. Snow and rain had fallen on the previous day, and the wind had been very strong. - JOHN COOK, a labourer in the dockyard, said he was the brother of the deceased, but had known little of him for the last eight years. He was single, and a man of dissipated habits. He had occasionally been employed in a blacksmith's shop, and also in mending shoes. He had never complained to witness of poverty. - The relieving officers of the poor, Messrs. Pardon and Ash, whom the Coroner had desired to be present, said the deceased had never applied to them for relief, and stated that persons were constantly applying to them who had been in the habit of sleeping at the Catdown lime kilns. They complained of the kilns being the resort of all kinds of persons of indifferent character. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died by the Visitation of God, but that his death was accelerated by his lying in the open air, exposed to the inclement weather and the effluvia of the kiln; and accompanied their verdict with a recommendation that the attention of Messrs. Sparrow and Scott should be drawn to the necessity of placing a fence round the kiln.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident In The Sound. - The body of the last of the men drowned by the swamping of a boat in going from Mutton Cove to the Warrior, in the Sound, on Monday, the 20th of Jan. last, was picked up on Thursday floating in the water, and brought ashore in Sutton Pool. The body was greatly disfigured and far advanced in a state of decomposition. It was conveyed to the dead-house in St. Andrew's graveyard, Westwell-street, to await the Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest was held at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner. The Jury viewed the remains, which were identified by three seamen named Crabb, Williams and Thompson, belonging to the Warrior, as those of JOSEPH EDGCUMBE, also a seaman of the ship. The clothes of the deceased, the peculiar formation of his feet and his knife, upon which his name was engraved, led to the recognition. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening, at seven o'clock, at the Guildhall, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Francis Foale was the Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a child named THOMAS JOHNSON HALL, aged about seven weeks, who was found dead in bed that morning. - ELIZABETH ANN HALL stated that she was an unmarried woman, residing at No. 16 Stillman-street. Her father, who was dead, was a stonecutter, and lived at Penzance. She was about 23 years of age. The deceased was her child, and was seven weeks old. He was weak from his birth. she had not nursed it from the breast. She retired to rest at 12 o'clock on the previous night, and about half-an-hour afterwards she fed the deceased with bread and milk. Another female named Agnes Ann Hicks slept in the same bed as witness. Witness took the deceased on her left arm: he appeared comfortable then, and she went to sleep. She awoke that (Friday) morning between four and five o'clock, and deceased was then alive. She went to sleep again, and awoke between six and seven o'clock. The deceased was lying on her arm. She held him up, and found he was dead. She told Agnes Ann Hicks that her child was dead and called for Mrs Collins, the landlady of the house. She came directly and the child was quite dead. When in the bed, the deceased was on the side nearest the wall. She did not think that anyone had injured the child. - Corroborative evidence was given by Agnes Ann Hicks, and Mrs Collins. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead without any marks of violence."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 14 March 1862
TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Accident At Devon Great Consols. - The Inquest. - Yesterday (Thursday) afternoon an Inquest was held by the Coroner (A. B. Bone, Esq.) at the West Bridge Cottages, on the body of WILLIAM COCK, a miner, who was accidentally killed at Wheal Maria Mine on Tuesday last. - Mr William Clemo, an agent of the mine, attended, and produced a plan of the Wheal Maria shaft, showing the position of the spot where the deceased was working at the time the accident occurred. He stated that the ground upon which the deceased was working appeared to have been perfectly safe. - JAMES COCK, brother of the deceased, deposed that he was working with the two WILLIAM COCKS, when the ground they were standing upon gave way. He was very close to the place and saw them fall. In his opinion there could be no blame attributed to anyone. - Samuel Webber, a miner, said he was engaged in the mine at the time of the fatal occurrence. He was working a short distance from the deceased and heard the noise of the falling earth. He went as quickly as he could to the spot and found the deceased, WILLIAM COCK, lying upon his hands and face, apparently dead. The other young man was much injured, but was trying to rise upon his feet. This was about nine o'clock in the morning. The deceased, though not killed upon the spot, was quite unconscious from the time of the accident till his death, which took place in the afternoon of the same day. - The Jury, after considering the evidence adduced by the witnesses, returned a verdict that "WILLIAM COCK died from mortal injuries received through an accidental fall of earth at Wheal Maria Mine."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 15 March 1862
NEWTON ST CYRES - An Inquest was held yesterday (Friday) afternoon, at Mr Sheers' Crown and Sceptre Inn, before R. R. Cross, Esq., on the body of an old man, named WILLIAM CLATWORTHY. Deceased was at the Three Horse Shoes' Inn, had a fight with his brother, fell on the fender, went home, and died a fortnight after; but being in an enfeebled state from drink, and there being no external bruise, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died of Inflammation of the lungs from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 17 March 1862
BERE FERRERS - Fatal Effects Of A Scuffle At A Public House. - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held at Beeralston, before the Deputy Coroner (A. B. Bone, Esq.) and a highly respectable Jury - Mr J. Borley acting as Foreman - on the body of JOHN ROWE, a miner, who met with his death in consequence of injuries received in a scuffle with a man named John Langman, at the Commercial Inn, on the 28th ultimo. - From the evidence brought forward it appears that ROWE had been drinking with Langman, and a dispute had arisen about the singing of a song. ROWE caught Langman in his arms and carried him out of the public-house into the road, where they were found by P.C. Horswell wrestling. The policeman separated them and ordered Langman to go home, which he did. When the deceased returned into the Inn his companions observed that he was severely cut about the forehead, and the upper part of the nose and that he was bleeding profusely. ROWE treated the injuries he had received in a very trivial manner, and attended his work, as he was wont to do, for several days. Eventually, however, the wounds upon his face became worse, and R. Jackson, Esq., surgeon, was sent for. The deceased was found, upon the arrival of this gentleman, to be suffering from lock-jaw, the effects of which caused his death on the 10th instant. The deceased, we are told, leaves behind him a widow and four children. - The Jury, after duly considering the lengthy evidence adduced, returned a verdict that "JOHN ROWE died from Lock-jaw, caused by an accidental wound upon the nose, received in a scuffle with John Langman, on the 28th ultimo."

BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held at Ash's Waterman's Arms, Upper Brixham, before F. B. Cumming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, to Enquire into the death of a young man named JAMES ELLIOTT, son of MR CHARLES ELLIOTT, farmer. From the evidence of Mr Gilbert, Wheaton Baddley, it would appear that on Thursday, the 13th, he was proceeding down North Field-lane, when his attention was attracted to a cart laden with wood going at a furious rate. He succeeded in stopping the horse, and then heard a groan coming from a distance up the lane. He went to ascertain where the groaning came from, and discovered the unfortunate deceased seated on the ground. He asked him how it happened, and found the horse had knocked him down, and the wheel had passed over him. On examining him, he found no bones broken. He then left him, and went to deceased's residence, and called assistance, and he was placed in a cart and taken home. Mr Brooking, surgeon, said that he was called to see the deceased, and found him suffering from internal injuries, caused by the wheel of a cart passing over him. He applied the usual remedies, but the man died at five o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 18 March 1862
PLYMOUTH - The Foundered Vessel - Inquest On The Body Of One Of The Crew. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body of one of the crew of the mackerel boat, the Crystal Palace, of Hastings, which was overwhelmed by a tremendous sea during the gale on last Sunday week. It will be fresh in the recollection of our readers that the entire crew, consisting of eight individuals, perished on that occasion. - The Jury, under the presidency of J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, assembled in the Guildhall, at five o'clock, and after the viewing of the body the examination of the witnesses commenced. - GEORGE E. BULLON said:- I am a fisherman. The deceased, JAMES PETERS, was my half-brother. He was also a fisherman, lived at Hastings, and has left a wife and two children. The last time I saw him alive was on Thursday, the 6th instant. On the following Saturday I saw the Crystal Palace go out for mackerel. The deceased was, I suppose, in her. About daybreak on the following morning the wind commenced to blow in a furious manner and increased to a regular hurricane. About eleven o'clock the Crystal Palace was visible just outside the breakwater. The waves were running mountains high at the time and the vessel was struck by a tremendous sea and went down at once. There were eight men on board her, including the master, and all of them were drowned, so far as I am aware. They were all experienced men, and knew their duties. On the following day the vessel was recovered, not far from where she had capsized, and brought into Sutton harbour. I saw the body of deceased at the dead-house, and am sure it is that of my half-brother. I was present when the police officer searched the body. The 4d. in coppers and the pocket handkerchief produced were all that were found. The body of deceased is the only one yet recovered of the men lost in the Crystal Palace. - William Hockins, fisherman sworn:- Today I went out dredging, between the breakwater and the new fort at Mount Edgcumbe. I drew up the body now lying at the dead-house about twelve o'clock. The drag caught in the shoulder of deceased, and the body rose up perpendicularly. I towed it to shore, and gave it to the charge of P.C. Friar. The body was found just within the limits of the Sound, and was no doubt that of one of the crew of the mackerel boat that went down in that locality on Sunday week. - P.C. Friar (16B) said - At half-past two o'clock this afternoon I received the body from the last witness. I found upon it 4d. in coppers and a pocket handkerchief, which are now produced. - The Coroner remarked that there could be no doubt on the minds of the Jury as to who deceased was, and how he came by his death. Most, if not all of them, were personally aware of the terrific nature of the gale in which the Crystal Palace foundered, and the evidence clearly showed that death in the case under investigation was not attributable to any negligence, criminality, or want of experience on the part of anyone, but simply to the tremendous sea which struck the boat. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 19 March 1862
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide Of The HON. MISS REAY. - An Inquest was held at No. 10 Windsor Terrace, yesterday afternoon, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attendant upon the death of the HONOURABLE MISS CLARA MACKAY REAY, daughter of LORD REAY, who had died on the previous day. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- Mr Samuel Cave, Foreman, Mr Bengamin May, Captain George Goldfinch, Mr Henry Spearman, Mr Jeffery Hardy, Mr John Stacey Bunce, Mr Edward Burnard, Mr Robert Dunn, Mr Charles Gideon Edwards, Mr John Wheeler Webber, Mr Henry Steadman, Mr Isaiah W. N. Keys, Mr George Browse, Mr William Tucker Shapter and Mr Thomas Holman. - The Coroner observed to the Jury that they were convened to Enquire into the cause of the death of CLARA MACKAY, one of the daughters of LORD REAY. It had been reported to him on the previous day that the deceased had jumped out of a four or five pair of stairs window at the back of the house, and had sustained very serious injuries. Surgeons were procured, but death supervened in four or five hours from concussion of the brain. She never spoke after the fall. He believed there was no supposition that deceased went to the window for a legitimate purpose, and accidentally fell out. It was a most unfortunate occurrence. The deceased was a very good, worthy, pious woman, but had been subject since her womanhood - she was about thirty-nine years of age - to fits of acute melancholy, and that had affected her so much that she was obliged to be sent at one period to the lunatic asylum at Plympton. She had returned to her family, and had since been of great comfort to her father and mother. Within a fortnight or three weeks the unfortunate drowning of a gentleman of the neighbourhood had produced an effect upon her mind. On the previous morning she had been seen by her father, and then made some incoherent remarks about supposing she should be obliged to go t Australia, which was, of course, a delusion. He (the Coroner) had seen his lordship, who had stated that if he was obliged to be examined he had a duty to perform, and would do it; but he was of the advanced age of 82, and if possible they would spare him that painful duty. The serious question for the Jury to consider was the state of mind in which the deceased was when she committed the act. His opinion, the result of a long experience as the Coroner of the Borough, was that the distinction between sanity and insanity was so slight that they might always give the inevitable doubt in favour of its victim. The Coroner, after some further observations on this point, referred to the death of Sir Samuel Romilly, and said that of course the verdict would be their (the Jury's) own. He added that he had been told by LORD REAY that they had been a very united family. The Jury then proceeded to view the body of the deceased in the room which had been occupied by the deceased as a bedroom and from the window of which it was stated she had thrown herself. The window was at least forty feet from the ground. Across the lower part of it was a slight iron bar, but this had not been broken. On their return to the room below, the evidence was heard. - Emma Jewell was sworn and said:- I am housemaid at LORD REAY'S, who resides at No. 10, Windsor-terrace. I have lived there about one year and ten months. The family consisted of LORD and LADY REAY, of two daughters, one of whom was the deceased, one son, and three female servants. The deceased was about 39 years of age. Last Thursday she said she felt very much grieved in her mind. She would not say for what. Yesterday morning I took her breakfast to her bedroom, which is four stories high. She said she would take it, as it was her papa's wish, but did not want it. At her request I carried her a cup of batter, and she pasted some paper on to the wall of her room. About a quarter after eleven o'clock I went into her room to look for the key of LORD REAY'S wardroom, and she asked me what I was looking for. I told her, and she said, "Whatever you want get; you know where it all is, for I shall not be with you long." I did not find the key, and left the room. The sash of the window was then up. In less than five minutes I was alarmed by the cries of the cook. On my going downstairs the other servants had brought the deceased into the kitchen. I had received directions from LORD REAY to be very attentive in looking after her, and also from MISS GRANVILLE MACKAY. I have heard that the deceased was at the Lunatic Asylum at Plympton before I came to live here. Since last Thursday I have seen her crying at times, and walking about the room rubbing her hands, and seeming very much distressed. She was a religious woman, and the attachment between her parents and herself was mutual. When she said, "I shall not be with you long," it was not spoken as if she was in her senses. I can positively swear she was not in her senses when I quitted the room. On Saturday night last she said, "I know Emma you are a good girl, and I hope you will never have in your mind such thoughts as I have. I have not bodily sickness; it is my conscience; I keep on grieving." She cried a good deal, and put her hand to her head. She was then in a very melancholy state. The body which the Jury and Coroner have viewed in my presence is the body of the deceased. - The witness stated, in answer to questions from the Jury, that the deceased took her meals alone, by her own wish. She (witness) had attended deceased constantly on the previous morning, and when she left her the last time should have sent someone to her had she not been suddenly called away to answer a bell. Before she had finished she heard the cries of the cook. - Sarah Cox said: I have lived as cook at LORD REAY'S two years. Yesterday morning, about half-past eleven o'clock I heard a noise. I went downstairs to put away some meat, and saw the deceased lying senseless on the stones outside the kitchen, under the window. I made an alarm, and my fellow-servant Elizabeth Beer, and myself, took her into the kitchen. Medical men were immediately sent for and soon came. Being cook I saw very little of the deceased. When the doctor came deceased was removed from the kitchen to her bedroom. She never spoke. - Dr Charles Hingston said: I am a Doctor of Medicine and reside at Plymouth and have known the deceased about ten years. I attended her several years ago. She was then suffering from acute melancholy. At my request she was removed to an asylum at Plympton. I cannot positively say how long she was there; I think six months - it may have been more. She returned from the asylum at the end of 1856. Last Thursday the deceased came to my house with her sister. She complained of threatenings of her old symptoms, which consisted chiefly of sleeplessness, loss of appetite, and distress of mind. I prescribed for her, and endeavoured to cheer her up, but felt very uneasy about her. Her sister called upon me the next day (they wished me not to come to the house in order to spare LORD REAY'S feelings) and spoke of her as better. On the third day (Saturday) I was requested to see her at this house. She was in bed, but considered herself better, having slept well. I then left her with fresh medical advice, promising to see her in two days, but begged them to let me know should she require any services in the meantime. I heard no more of her until I saw her yesterday, dying from the fracture of the skull, produced by a fall from her bedroom window. She was insensible from the first, and died at twenty-five minutes to six in the evening. I think that when the servant Emma Jewell left the room she was under a paroxysm of acute melancholy, and was insane at the moment when she jumped out of the window. The witness added that he understood that the deceased had appeared somewhat better, and that her family were off their guard. She had spoken in the manner mentioned by Emma Jewell previously. She had asked a daughter of witness, speaking of the death referred to by the Coroner, whether she would be surprised if she (deceased) did the same. - It was stated that the deceased lady had attended the geological lecture at the Mechanics' Institute on Wednesday last. - The Foreman said he considered the evidence to be so conclusive, particularly that of the last witness, that he thought it would be unnecessary to pain LORD REAY, or any members of the family, by asking them questions, with reference to the melancholy event. - The Jury were unanimously of the same opinion, and, without the slightest hesitation returned a verdict to the effect - That the deceased not being of Sound Mind, but Lunatic and distracted, threw herself from a window, four stories high, by which means her skull was fractured and of which injuries she died.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 24 March 1862
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquiry into the cause of the death of SAMUEL VICARY was instituted before Francis B. Cumming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Dawlish Inn, on Saturday afternoon. The evidence of George Rogers, a porter in the employ of the South Devon Railway Company, corroborated by Charles Jones, engine-driver, and JAMES VICARY, foreman porter and uncle to the deceased, showed that on the 15th instant the deceased, whose duty it was to attend to the engines on their arrival, was running across the platform towards the engine of the train, which was then coming up. He stumbled in something and fell between the platform and the rails; the side bar of the engine struck him as he fell and turned him on his back, and the driving-wheel of the engine passed over his foot. The train was stopped almost immediately, and the deceased was put into a carriage and conveyed to the Teignmouth Infirmary. Mr f. D. Harris, house surgeon to the Infirmary, gave evidence to the reception of the deceased into the institution. His foot being much mangled it was found necessary to amputate, and this was done by Dr Magrath. Surgical attendance was also rendered the following day, but mortification to the stump ensued, and death followed. He died on Friday afternoon at three o'clock. The Coroner briefly summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Fatal Accident At The "Western Times" Office. - A melancholy accident, terminating fatally, occurred on Friday afternoon, at the Western times' Office, Exeter. The supplements of the paper were commenced being printed at noon on Thursday, and nothing unusual was observed till half-past one on the following day, when an immense volume of steam was perceived to be issuing from the boiler house, at the window of which the engine boy made his appearance, and requested to be taken away. On entering the lace a sad spectacle presented itself, the boiler having burst, and two or three persons being apparently injured. MARY ELIZABETH COLEMAN, a little girl who had brought her brother's dinner, was severely scalded, as were also the engineman and a boy, some of whom were immediately conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid to them, and others to their homes. The poor girl expired at eight o'clock on the evening of the same day, and the other injured persons were greatly suffering from their injuries. On investigation being made, the boiler was found to have burst at the end. It was erected about the year 1846, and had since been under the inspection of Mr A. Bodley, who last examined it in December. It appeared that a leakage was seen on Thursday, by one of the men engaged in lighting the fire, who failed to inform anyone else of the circumstance, which was not known by Mr Latimer, the proprietor, till after the accident had occurred. The papers were afterwards printed at the Gazette office, by the kind permission of Mr Wescomb. Mr Latimer has contributed the expenses of the funeral of the deceased. Arrangements have been made for the erection of two new boilers. Besides the persons taken to the hospital two others were slightly injured. - The Inquest. - Was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalene-street, at three o'clock on Saturday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., and a large and respectable Jury, Mr William Carter, draper, Fore-street-hill, Foreman. - The Coroner objected to Mr Richard Southwood being on the Jury, he having been employed at the Western Times office, between five and six years since, remarking that he thought it would be very much better to have an independent Jury. - The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner further remarked that as it was a most important Enquiry he hoped he should have the best attention of the Jury, as well as the attendance of all necessary witnesses, in order that the matter might be fully Enquired into. For that purpose it might be necessary to adjourn from time to time, and he should feel it his duty to adopt that course if he found it necessary to do so. Their first duty would be to view the body, which was lying at the hospital. - After the return of the Jury, the following evidence was taken:- CHARLES FREDERICK COLEMAN said he was a clerk of the parish of St. Olave, and a bootmaker by trade, and resided at 32 Bartholomew Yard. The body which had just been viewed by the Jury was that of his daughter, MARY ELIZABETH COLEMAN, who was about ten years and ten months old. She lived at home with witness, and on the previous day she left home about one o'clock to carry a dinner to her brother, who was an errand boy in Mr Latimer's office. She was then in her usual good health; and soon after one o'clock he was informed by a woman named Taylor, residing in Friernhay-street, who came to his house, that a sad accident had happened at Mr Latimer's, and that one of them had been injured. He went towards the office, and on his way met his son ALBERT in Friernhay-street, who said that POLLY and not JAMES had been injured, and directed him to go to the hospital, where he immediately went, and where he found the child in bed. He only saw a part of her face. She was very much scalded about the face and body, and the left eye was closed, but she was very conscious, and begged t be put into a cold bath. She died about eight o'clock in the evening, in the presence of witness. - Solomon Govier said he was a printer at the Western Times Office, and resided in Twiggs'-square, St. Sidwells. About half-past one on the previous day, he was working in the machine-room when he heard a slight noise as of an explosion. The machine-room was separated from the boiler-room by a thin partition. There was a glazed window in the partition, in which was a trap door, which fell back, and was fastened with a button. Almost directly upon hearing the noise, he saw a boy named Francis Stamp, who was in the engine-room, put his head through the trap-door. He said to witness and another man, named Bickham, who was in the machine-room with him, "Pull down the window and let me out." They broke in the window and took out Stamp. He saw steam issuing from the trap; the boy said nothing, but rushed out to the front, as if with the intention of obtaining aid. After taking out the boy, witness went into the boiler-room and found it full of smoke and steam, and heard the cries of a little girl. He could not see anyone nor anything there, and he felt about in the dark, and from the sound he found the girl, who was about four feet from the boiler. He took her up and carried her out, and then sang out for someone to take her from him, which was done by a man named Webber. He afterwards went back into the room, but could see nothing, and was obliged to return from the quantity of steam and smoke. The girl at first cried out - "Kill me! kill me!" but did not say anything afterwards. - By a Juror: There was water floating about on the floor, and witness was scalded. The room was about ten feet square. he could not see the engine-man when he went in. - Robert Webber said he was a porter in the employ of Mr Davey, oil and colour man, who resided next door to the Western Times Office. About a quarter past one on the previous day Mrs Davey called him and told him to go to Mr Latimer's. He went immediately, through the printing office, and up a flight of steps and met a man with a child in his arms. Seeing a stand with some coats hanging on it, witness took one and placed it round the child, which he took away towards the hospital. On reaching Mr Vickary's, ironmonger, he met a cab and took it in the vehicle to the hospital, where he laid it on the bed and left it there. On the way to the hospital the child kept crying out, "Put me in a cold bath," but said nothing else. - In answer to the Coroner, Mr Latimer was sworn, and said the boiler-room and machine-room adjoined each other. He thought it was in 1846 that the engine and boiler were erected. A young man by the name of George Hookins, had charge of the engine, and was in charge the previous day; there was also a machineman who had charge of the machine, and who, being a superior, had a general supervision, and the boiler and engine were under the charge of those men. The previous day the engine was at work, but there were frequent stoppages, from the nature of the work. About that hour it was usual to receive a telegram from mark Lane with the price of corn, and the machine was stopped for the purpose of inserting it in the paper. There were three or four lads employed about the machine-room, apart from the engine-room, and the custom was for the engineman to open the furnace doors, and the lads being all idle at the time, when it was cold, gathered round the fire-place. The engine was under the charge of Mr Bodley, and had been for several years, and was inspected by him in December last. Mr Bodley had told witness that he could repair the boiler, but he had determined not to use it again, but to have an entirely new one. In December last it was reported sound, and some repairs were then made to it, the boiler being improved up to 80 lbs. pressure, but it was ordinarily worked at about 25 lbs., which would do the work. If he (witness) found [large portion of the text faint and unreadable] The Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Foreman observing that not the slightest blame could be attributed to Mr Latimer or anyone in his employ.

SALCOMBE REGIS - Sudden Death At Salcombe. - A man named JOHN PERRING was found dead on Wednesday last in a coal barge at Frogmore near Salcombe, and on Friday an Inquest was held at Trinick's Union Inn, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury. - William Damerall, a labourer, living at Frogmore, stated that he had been at work with the deceased on Wednesday morning unloading a barge of coal; he left deceased at about 5 o'clock in the morning, and went with a cart load of coal to the stores of Mr Gard, a distance from the barge of about 200 yards, and on his return he found the deceased sitting on his heels with his head dropped forward, and on trying to raise him up found that he was dead; witness immediately procured assistance and with James Fairweather conveyed the body to Salcombe. - James Fairweather, on being sworn, stated that the deceased left him on Wednesday morning at about half-past three, they having slept together that night; deceased had not had anything to eat or drink that morning, nor had he complained of being ill. - James Gilbert Martyn, surgeon, residing at Chillington, stated that he was called to see the deceased before his removal from the barge and found him quite dead; he had examined the body but could not find any marks of violence, nor did the deceased appear to have struggled; he could not give any opinion as to the cause of death, but should think it resulted from natural causes; he saw nothing to make him suspicious. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 26 March 1862
BRIXHAM - Committal For Manslaughter At Brixham. - An Inquest was held at the Lord Nelson Inn, yesterday morning, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN MARTIN, late landlord of the Tower Arms, who had died on the previous Sunday. From the evidence of the wife of the deceased it appeared that on Tuesday night last two men, named respectively William Voysey and William Shears, went to the Tower Arms about eleven o'clock in a state of intoxication. They asked for drink, but the deceased refused to supply it to them, and requested them to leave, advising them to go home as they appeared to have had drink enough. They refused to go, saying that it was not time to close, and declaring they would have drink. witness assured them it was too late, but as they still refused to go the deceased endeavoured to push Shears out of the house. A struggle ensued and Shears struck deceased a heavy blow on the eye. A considerable quantity of blood flowed from the wound thus produced. Deceased became ill and died about ten o'clock on Sunday morning. Mr Brooking, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that death had resulted from a severe blow on the eye. The Jury immediately returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence and William Shears was at once given in custody on a charge of Manslaughter.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 29 March 1862
DARTMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. The Late Gale. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening at seven o'clock, at the Marine Tavern, before J. M. Puddicombe, the Coroner for this Borough, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES HENRY MOSES, who was drowned in the gale of Thursday, the 20th instant, in attempting to return to a pilot cutter in an open boat after having put a pilot on board a barque. The Jury having viewed the body, the following witnesses were examined:- Robert Kerswill said: I am a pilot belonging to Dartmouth. The accident happened on the 20th instant. I was in command of the pilot cutter Fanny, belonging to Dartmouth. We were in the Range coming round one of the Rock buoys and on the look-out for vessels. There was a very heavy gale blowing. The deceased, JAMES HENRY MOSES, was on board assisting to work the Fanny. Myself and deceased left the Fanny and endeavoured to board a barque. We reached the barque in safety, and I got on board her. I desired deceased to hold fast where he was by the ship's side, which I thought he was doing until I saw him going astern of the barque. A few minutes afterwards I spoke to him on observing that he had left the barque and was attempting to reach the shore. He was on the boat by himself. I called to him and he answered he was all right. I heard nothing more of him until I was told in the harbour that he was drowned in the attempt to land. - Manoah Kerswill: I am a pilot belonging to Dartmouth Harbour. I was on board the smack Fanny on the day of the accident. I observed the deceased in the boat after he had put the pilot on board the barque endeavouring to reach the cutter Fanny. He failed in this in consequence of the gale. I could not go to his assistance. He was drowned in attempting to land in a cove called Compass Cove on the coast. - James Stephens: I am a boatman belonging to Dartmouth. In consequence of the deceased having been drowned when out at sea, I have endeavoured to find the body during the past week. On Thursday myself and others found the body near the place where the accident happened. - This being all the evidence, the Coroner briefly summed up. He said it was one of those deaths which sometimes accidentally happen in seaport towns. He thought from the evidence that they could return no other verdict than that the deceased was accidentally drowned. The Jury having consulted together for a few minutes returned a verdict accordingly, namely - "That the deceased, JAMES HENRY MOSES, was Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 1 April 1862
BRAMPFORD SPEKE - Military Funeral. - The body of the man ROBINSON, belonging to the 6th Carabineers, who was drowned on Wednesday last, after attending the Brampford and Speke and Stoke Canon Races, was recovered on Saturday morning about 100 yards from the spot where he fell in. The Inquest was held the same afternoon at the Agricultural Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., when it transpired that the deceased whilst in a state of intoxication, went to the river's bank to wash the mud from his boots and trousers, and that he fell in. Every effort was made to save him, but without avail, although the deceased was one of the best swimmers in the regiment. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." His body was afterwards removed to the Topsham Barracks, and yesterday afternoon he was buried in Heavitree churchyard, the band and a firing party of the regiment attending, in the presence of thousands of spectators. We understand that the deceased had been in the service several years, and that when sober he was a most quiet and orderly soldier.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 9 April 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening, at the New Town Inn, York-street, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of AMELIA ANN BICKFORD, a child eleven days old. - The Coroner, on opening the Enquiry, observed that there could be no doubt that the deceased had died a natural death, but it was necessary that enquiries of this kind should be made, and it very often prevented crime. He should endeavour, if possible, to dispense with taking the depositions of the mother of the deceased, as she was in a very ill state. - Grace Harris said she was a married woman, and was the wife of John Harris, a labourer, residing at No. 28 York-street, Plymouth. She had known the father and mother of deceased for nine months. The father was called WILLIAM BICKFORD, a rag store labourer. they resided in the same house as witness. The deceased was eleven days old that day. Mr Rundle, the surgeon, attended the mother when she was confined. Deceased never had much power of sucking or feeding. Witness washed and dressed the deceased after the first four days of its birth. She undressed the deceased on Sunday night and put it to bed with its mother. Yesterday morning, at about six o'clock, witness was called, and went into the mother's room, when she saw the child was dead, in bed with the mother. The child was not cold. The mother appeared a weak woman, and was not now well. She was very much distressed at the death of deceased. They had four children besides. Witness was sure no one hurt the deceased, and had not the least doubt that the deceased died by the visitation of God. There were no marks of violence on the body. - The Coroner said, if necessary, they could have the evidence of the husband of the mother of the deceased. They had got very good secondary evidence indeed. It was utterly impossible to examine the mother in the state she was at present, as it might be productive of most serious results. - The Jury expressed themselves satisfied with the evidence adduced, and thought there was no necessity to examine either the husband or mother, and at once arrived at a verdict of "Found Dead in Bed, by the side of its mother, without any marks of violence." - The Coroner remarked that the deceased, although only eleven days old, weighed twice as much as the body of a child three months old, on whom an Inquest was held on Monday evening.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 12 April 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - A Child Scalded To Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock in the Town Hall, Devonport, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a child named WILLIAM HENRY ALLEN, about two years of age, who had died on Sunday last, from the effects of having thrown a quantity of hot water on itself. The Jury proceeded to view the body, which was lying at No. 18, Mount-street, Devonport, and then returned to the Town Hall, where the following evidence was adduced:- ELIZABETH MARY ALLEN said the deceased was her son and was called WILLIAM HENRY ALLEN. He would have been two years old on the 17th of this month. She resided at No. 18 Mount-street, Devonport, with her husband and family. Her husband was a ropemaker in Her Majesty's Dockyard, Devonport. On Friday evening last, about 6 o'clock, witness was in her own room, in company with the deceased, her baby, who was about six months old, and her husband. They were partaking of tea. She had the baby on her lap when the deceased asked for some more tea. She took the teacup from his hand and put it on the table, and went to the fire-place, the baby being still in her arms She took a kettle of boiling water off the fireplace, and poured some water into the cup. She turned her back again to put the kettle back on the hob of the fireplace, the teacup with the hot water being on the table, when she immediately heard the deceased scream out, and on turning round towards him the teacup was upset on the table, and she perceived that the front part of the dress which the deceased had on was wet and smoking. There had been but very little water in the teacup, which she had intended to fill up with milk. Witness called Mrs Hall, who lived in the house, and she (witness) looked at the child, and found it scalded over the front part of his bosom. Mr Butcher, the surgeon, came, and attended on the child until the time of its death, which happened on Sunday last, at about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon. The child was very well before. She had previously taken him in from the door, where he was playing, to give him his tea. - MR ALLEN, the father of deceased, corroborated the testimony of his wife. - Ann Hall was then sworn, and stated that she was a widow, living at No. 18 Mount-street, Devonport, for the last six months. She had known MRS ALLEN during that time and before that. She was a very kind and attentive mother to her children. On Friday evening last witness was in her own room, when MRS ALLEN called her. She went into her room, where she found MRS ALLEN, her husband, the deceased and her baby. The father had the child on his lap. Witness examined the child, and saw that it had been scalded on the chest and breast. The scald was about the size of a woman's hand. Witness fetched Mr Butcher, the surgeon, who examined the child, and attended on it to the time of its death. The deceased was the eldest child, and could articulate but very few words. The Jury at once found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death - Misery And Crime. - At six o'clock on Monday evening an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SELINA ANDREWS, aged 11 weeks and 3 days, who died suddenly on Saturday last. - Jane Davies deposed that she met the mother of the child, MARY JANE ANDREWS, in Catte-street, on Thursday night and at her request took the deceased child to dry nurse for the night. The child appeared ill at the time, but it ate some food heartily. On the following day the mother came to witness, gave her 6d. and asked her to continue to take care of the child until another nurse was procured. On Friday and during the night the child also ate heartily, but on Saturday morning early witness found it in convulsions and it shortly afterwards died. - Cross-examined by the Coroner: I am the mother of 10 children. It is very difficult to bring up a child by hand. - Mary Ann Harris, wife of Charles Harris, deposed that some six weeks previously she was given the child to nurse, by its mother. It was partly fed by hand and partly by its natural aliment, for about three weeks. Witness then gave it up, as the mother did not pay sufficiently for its nursing. The child was thin and small when witness parted with it; but it was in good health. I think the mother was frequently in want of food. She is an unfortunate, and the child was born in the workhouse. - Elizabeth Launden had also had the child to nurse for a time and given it up in consequence of irregularity of payment. The mother seemed very poor. The child was thin and small. The mother did not want to take it, but witness put it on her bed. - Jane Elliott deposed that on the previous Saturday fortnight the child was brought her in all but a dying state. She nursed the child to the following Friday, and it became much improved. She then gave it up as the mother did not pay for it. Witness consented to again take charge of the child, and kept it until the Wednesday before its death, when she finally gave it up to the mother, whom she advised to send it to the Workhouse. She (the mother) appeared very fond of the child, but was very poor. - MARY JANE ANDREWS, 18 years of age, without any fixed residence, deposed that she was the mother of the deceased, and had been confined at the Workhouse on the ?] of January. She left the house three weeks afterwards. The child was a small one, but healthy. She had frequently been in want of the necessaries of life when she left the Workhouse, and had no means of paying for the nursing of the child. - Cross-examined: My father is a labourer on the quay. I have no mother. I applied to the workhouse for assistance for the child, but was refused relief by Mr Ash because I had not sworn to the father of the child. I applied twice for assistance and was refused on each occasion. - A Juryman said that it seemed a great piece of impropriety on the part of the Workhouse authorities to have allowed her to come out in such a short space of time after her confinement; and still more so to refuse her relief because she had not sworn the child, which perhaps, under the circumstances, it was impossible to do. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that, so far as the Workhouse authorities were concerned, they had only one side of the case before them. If the Jury wished to see Mr Ash the case could be adjourned. - The court was then cleared, and after a brief discussion, the mother of the deceased child was again called in and closely questioned as to her application to the workhouse for relief. It then appeared that she had refused the note for admission into the house tendered by Mr Ash. - The Jury expressed itself perfectly satisfied with the conduct of the Workhouse authorities. The Coroner then summed up; he pointed out that the child had been neglected from its birth and bandied about from one nurse to another until the termination of its brief existence. But the question was whether there was any criminal neglect, and if so, upon whom could it be fixed? Neglect there certainly had been, but it was extremely doubtful whether it was criminal, or to whom it could be attributed. To him it appeared that the child itself died from convulsions, brought on by unsuitable food. The Jury agreed with the Coroner and a verdict of "Death from Convulsions" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 14 April 1862
HENNOCK - A Man Killed In A Mine At Hennock. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Palk's Arms Inn, Hennock, near Newton, on Saturday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Richard Brizzo was Foreman, on the body of a miner named WILLIAM ORCHARD, employed in the Frank Mills Mine, in the parish of Christow, who met with his death on Thursday last by the explosion of a hole which he was tamping in the mine. - James Tonkin, employed in the same mine as the deceased, was working with him at the time of the accident, and at the Inquest deposed as follows:- On Thursday last, about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, I and WILLIAM ORCHARD were at work in the Frank Mills Mine. He was tamping a hole which we had bored 16 inches deep. The hole was charged with, I think, about 9 inches of powder. He was tamping it with a sludge which came out of the hole with a tamping bar and a hammer. The powder suddenly exploded. I can't say what caused the explosion. There was a fuse in the hole, but no light had been applied to it, nor had that place been blasted before. On the explosion taking place the deceased was knocked off the stage he was standing on. I went to him, and he groaned several times, and then said, "Lord have mercy upon me!" He then appeared to be choking and I ran to get assistance. John Reed came back with me and deceased had then fallen back, and I noticed that his bowels were much injured, they were protruding. He never spoke after. I think he groaned once or twice. I think there must have been a train of powder in the hole, and that the bar he was using must have struck fire against the side of the hole and caused the powder to ignite. Deceased was quite sober. He was taken out of the mine as soon as possible, but he was quite dead before we could take him out. - Mr J. P. Nicholls, the captain of the mine, was then sworn, and corroborated the evidence of the previous witness, and also agreed with him as to the probable cause of the accident. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 16 April 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Cecil-Street. - An Inquest was held at the Wheat-Sheaf Inn, King-street, yesterday afternoon, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE COOPER. The deceased, who was a discharged sergeant of marines, and had been in receipt of a pension from Greenwich Hospital for nine years, was 54 years of age, and had occupied a room in the house of Mr Rogers, 42 Cecil-street, three years. His wife was dead, and he had lived alone for nine months. For some time past he has been suffering from ill-health, but refused to have medical advice; he was rather eccentric in his habits, and did not like to receive visitors. On Sunday night Mr Rogers sent him up some warmed ale, and in the morning the servant knocked at his door to enquire, as usual, his state of health, but received no reply, and Mr Rogers applied, with the same result. Information was sent to the house of his son (ship's corporal to the Impregnable), at Stonehouse, and the son's wife and mother came. In the presence of the latter the door was burst open and the deceased was found dead in his bed. Mr Pearce, surgeon, was sent for, and gave it as his opinion that he had been dead six or seven hours. There were no marks of violence upon his person. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

WIDECOMBE IN THE MOOR - Suicide By Hanging At Widdicombe. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., at Widdicombe, near Ashburton, on the body of WILLIAM FRENCH, of Dunstone, who committed suicide on Friday last, by hanging himself in an outhouse adjoining the farm of his son-in-law. - The deceased lived with MR RICHARD MANN, his son-in-law, and was about 54 years of age. On Friday last, he partook of his dinner as usual, with the family and men, and then appeared in his usual health and spirits. He went out after dinner, and nothing was heard of him until about four o'clock when one of the deceased's grand-children discovered him hanging by a rope from a beam in an outhouse in the farm courtlage. The child immediately gave an alarm, when two men, named Joseph Warren and John Ireland, proceeded to the building, and immediately cut the deceased down, but life was then found to be extinct. A medical man was sent for, but the deceased did not breathe after he was cut down. The deceased has been once or twice insane, the last time being about two years since, when he was attended by a medical man, and he was also generally of a rather desponding temper, and appeared in low spirits previously to the committal of the rash and fatal deed. He was also rather excitable after having partaken rather freely of drink. No cause was assigned for his having committed the act, and he was also described as being on very good terms with his family. - The Jury returned, under the circumstances, a verdict of "Suicide under Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 17 April 1862
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Lower Lane. - J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Guildhall, on the body of JAMES MASEY MCCARTHY, who had died on the previous Monday at a room in the house No. 8, Lower-lane. - The Coroner, in stating the facts of the case to the Jury, said the deceased had been in very reduced circumstances, and had pledged some articles which had been entrusted to him. On Saturday last he purchased, at a shop in this town, some oxalic acid, which was much used for domestic purposes, and was sold perhaps too freely by the druggists. The deceased had this poison in his possession from Saturday until Monday, and it would be for them to judge of the state of mind in which he had been when he took it. - The Jury proceeded to Lower-lane to view the body, and on their return MARY ANN MCCARTHY, the wife of the deceased, was called, and said she had been married to him nearly 15 years. He was a journeyman tailor, and about 61 years of age. Their son was eight years of age. Her husband had been very fond of drink, or he might have done better. Since within a few months of their marriage they had been in distressed circumstances. She knew that before the death of the deceased he had pledged the cloth of a coat he had to cut out. They had had high words about it. On Friday last he expressed a desire to have the cloth back, and she sold two chairs for 1s. and gave him it to redeem the cloth, but he went to a beer-shop and spent it. About eight o'clock he went home tipsy. On Saturday morning they quarrelled because he would not tell her where the cloth was, as she was uneasy about it. On Sunday he was very low-spirited. On Monday they had a slight difference about the cloth. The deceased and witness had no dinner that day. About a quarter past three in the afternoon deceased said he felt inclined to have a nap and she and the boy might go out for half an hour. They did so. She owed a fortnight's rent for their room (14d. a week) and she expected a distraint. As she was going home a little girl told her she must make haste home, but did not tell her what was the matter. On arriving she found deceased upon the bed and vomiting. In a few minutes Mr Derry, the surgeon, came. The deceased told the latter that he had poisoned himself. He lingered until twenty minutes before eight on Tuesday morning, when he died. After his death she found the paper she now produced in his pocket. [The paper read as follows:- "I JAMES MASIY do her By sertify that the Act that I commited is my Own act and All the Pawning has Been Done By My order against the Will of my wife JAMES MASEY MCCARTHY Son and the Boy to Pat And I hope that he will take warning By fate May God Bless you all."] - Caroline Dolbere, the next witness, said she resided in the same house as the last witness, and had known the deceased several months. On Monday last she was in her own room, and, at a quarter before four o'clock, she heard someone sick. The deceased knocked at her door, and said, "I want you; follow me." She followed him into his own room. He looked pale. He had been vomiting, and vomited again, but refused a cup of tea which she offered him. He asked her to fetch his wife and child. She called in Mrs Scantlebury, and went for the wife and child, but not finding them, returned to the house, and was told the deceased was very ill. He was still vomiting; he gave a paper to Mrs Scantlebury, and said, "I have taken poison." She went for Mr Derry, the surgeon, and he came immediately. Before she went for the surgeon the deceased said, "I am dying." On Tuesday morning he told her there was something heavy on his mind; he also said there was something in his pocket. - Emilia Scantlebury deposed that on the Monday afternoon the deceased took her hand, put something in it, and shut it, and then said, "I have poisoned myself and that is the paper I had it in." He added that he had done something he ought not to have done. She asked him what he had done, and he said he had put away something which could not be redeemed. - Mr R. H. Derry, surgeon, stated that he saw the deceased just after four o'clock on Monday afternoon. He found him lying on a straw bed, vomiting frightfully; but after a few minutes it ceased, and he asked what was the matter with him. He said he had poisoned himself with oxalic acid. Witness said "How much?" and he said, "A pennyworth." That would be about half-an-ounce. He complained of a fearful burning in his throat and stomach. Witness applied remedies, and asked him why he had done such a foolish act; and he said he had put away some cloth with which he had been entrusted to make a coat. Witness told him not to bother about that, for if he would give him the ticket he would have it immediately sent for. Deceased said he could not do that, it was gone altogether. Witness procured further remedies and applied them, and in a short time the sickness stopped the pain abated, and the deceased slept. Witness left strict instructions as to what was to be done during the night with Mrs Dolbere, and also found, on making enquiries that the wife and child were in the greatest poverty, and at once wrote to Mr Ash, the relieving officer, who immediately relieved them. Witness then left, and as he was going to see the deceased in the morning he was informed that he was dead. The deceased died by poison - witness should say by oxalic acid. It was sold by druggists for various domestic purposes. Did not think the deceased had taken more than half-an-ounce. - By the Jury: The remedies had been to a great extent successful when he left the deceased at night. Hoped to have saved him. Oxalic acid was variable in its effects. - A Juryman said he considered that Mr Derry's offer to redeem the articles was very creditable. The Jury and the Coroner expressed a similar opinion. - The Coroner observed that the note produced certainly commenced as though the mind of the writer had been affected, for he did not give his full name. - Mr Ash, the relieving officer, said that during the three or four months the deceased had been on his books he had known him by no other name than MASEY. He had once been committed to prison for an offence. - The Coroner stated to the Jury that there could be no doubt that the deceased had poisoned himself; the question for them to decide would be his state of mind. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 21 April 1862
BERE FERRERS - The Late Fatal Boat Accident At Calstock. Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at Easonadge Farm, Beerferris, before A. B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, on the body of MR GEORGE RICH, a farmer and cattle dealer, who, it will be remembered, met with his death in attempting to cross the river Tamar at the Calstock passage, on the 24th ultimo. The deceased had taken his horse into the passenger boat, and had proceeded a few yards across the stream, when the boat was capsized by a sudden movement of the horse. The body of the deceased was not found till Thursday last, when a man named Hutchings discovered it floating a short distance from the spot where the accident occurred. The body was identified by relatives and friends, and a sum of money which the deceased had taken with him when he left his home - upwards of £13 = was found in his pocket, with only 10d. deficient. - The Jury, after examining the witnesses, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning." The Foreman, with the consent of the Jury, added to their verdict that they considered it highly desirable that a proper person should be placed in charge of the ferry; the man at present occupying it being too old to perform safely the duties entrusted to him.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 29 April 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the Working Men's Reading room, Shaftesbury Cottages, yesterday afternoon, on the body of ELIZABETH HUMPHREYS, who had died on Saturday. - George Hancock, junior, said he had known the deceased about twelve months. She was about forty-eight years of age, and the wife of a sergeant in the 77th Regiment of Foot, in India. On last Monday evening the deceased went to his house, 39 Shaftesbury Cottages, about six o'clock, to lodge. She was very excitable, and had suffered from heart complaint. Last Saturday evening she was in the town three times, and expected a new bonnet to be sent home about nine o'clock. It did not come, and she felt disappointed, and became a little excited. A few minutes after ten o'clock she left the house and again went into the town. Some time afterwards witness heard that the deceased had fallen in the street. He found her in Tavistock-road, opposite the reservoir. He got her home with assistance. She was then speechless and died about ten minutes to eleven o'clock. A surgeon's assistant was present. - James Coles, a mason, said he was going up the Tavistock-road about twenty minutes after ten, and saw two or three people together near the reservoir, and saw the deceased fall on her back. He lifted her up and found she was groaning and suffering from pain. She did not smell of spirits or anything of the kind, and was speechless. By the direction of Mr Adams, a surgeon's pupil, waster was thrown in her face, but on her partly rising she again fell down. The last witness came and she was removed to his house. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased, who had suffered from disease of the heart several years, and was excited by disappointment, had Died by the Visitation of God.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 1 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - The Supposed Murder In Stonehouse-Lane, Plymouth. Verdict of Manslaughter Against The Prisoner. - The Inquest. - The Borough Coroner (J. Edmonds, Esq.) held an Inquest on the body of THOMASINE PITCHER, at the Guildhall, at four o'clock in the afternoon. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Jury:- Messrs. T. Jarvis (Foreman), T. H. Seymour, J. Hawkings, J. H. McKeer, J. Heard, E. Frith, T. H. Walters, J. V. Luxmoore, T. M. Vicary, G. Gillard, W. Heath, W. H. Rowe, S. Steer, J. W. Murlis, W. H. Stone, and R. W. Winnicott. - Before hearing the evidence, the Coroner addressed a few sentences to the Jury, in which he simply stated an outline of the facts detailed in the evidence given before the magistrates. - Mr Inspector Thomas, who had been requested by the Coroner, in the early part of the day, to give the governor of the gaol notice that he wished the prisoner to be present at the Inquest, stepped forward and said that Mr Sims had requested him to present his compliments to the Coroner, and say he had no power to bring the prisoner to the hall. - The Coroner reserved his observations upon this subject, and went with the Jury to view the body at 77 Stonehouse Lane. There was a large crowd of people about the house. Upon the return to the Guildhall, The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said he had no doubt they would recollect that about sixteen months ago a man named Hacked, a soldier, killed his sergeant, and that at the Inquest held upon the body the magistrates refused to allow the prisoner to be present. Representations were made to the Town Council upon the subject, and great excitement prevailed in the town. In consequence of the course adopted by the magistrates he (the Coroner) tendered his resignation; but it was determined by the Council that in future the police should be subject to the orders of the Coroner in such cases, and he withdrew his resignation on the distinct understanding that in all such cases the prisoner was t be permitted to be present before the Jury. On Tuesday evening Inspector Thomas and Detective Julian reported to him the death of the woman PITCHER, and he told him he would attend to it in the morning. He had issued his warrant for summoning the Jury. At ten o'clock that (Wednesday) morning, he came to the Guildhall and told the Superintendent of Police, Mr Codd, that he wished the prisoner to be brought to the Inquest. Afterwards he informed Mr William Luscombe and Mr John Burnell that he had told this to Mr Codd; and he did not understand from them that there would be any difficulty in the matter. About two o'clock he received a communication informing him that the prisoner had been remanded, and that the magistrates had issued their warrant for his immediate removal to the borough gaol. Upon this, he had endeavoured to find Mr Sims, the Governor of the gaol, and he had sent Inspector Thomas to request him to bring the prisoner; but Mr Sims had stated that he had no power to do so. The case was now before them, but the prisoner was not present. He liked to see justice done, and he thought every man ought to be present when witnesses were being examined about a matter that concerned him so seriously; in order that he might hear what they said and have an opportunity of cross-examining them. He should have thought that, so far as the magistrates were concerned, his (the Coroner's) character, and the manner in which he had discharged the duties of his office, would have been sufficient to ensure a compliance with his wishes, in a matter so reasonable. He had been deliberating whether he should go on with the Inquest under these circumstances; but considering the state of decomposition in which they had found the body, it was important that he should give an order for its burial on Thursday; and on this account he had determined to proceed. - Witnesses were then called:- Lavinia Dingle said: I am married. My husband is called John Hart Dingle. He keeps the Traveller's Rest beershop in Stonehouse Lane. We have only lived there a month. I have seen the deceased, and her husband there often during that time. I have frequently seen the deceased drunk; and I have seen the prisoner drunk three or four times. They came to my house yesterday about eight o'clock in the morning, and they remained there all day. They began drinking beer when they came in. About 11 o'clock they were both tipsy - she worse than her husband. She took up a large knob of coke and threw it at him. It did not strike him, but struck the wall, and made a mark there. They were then in the back room. She pulled him by the hair, and struck him on the head; but he did not touch her. She wanted more drink, and my husband would not let her have it. My husband brought her a jug of cold water, and she lay down on the settle, and fell asleep. She remained asleep about an hour and a half. During that time her husband left the room, and sat down in the little room by the bar, where he continued drinking. Then she awoke and went to her husband, and cursed and swore at him, and Detective Julian, who was passing, came in to interfere. Then my husband put her into the back room, and she was quiet for some time. I think she went to sleep again. Her husband remained in the bar, drinking, but he did not drink much then. The next thing was that she came out of the back room again and went into the little room where her husband was, and struck him repeatedly with her fist. He did not touch her, and when she came out I put her into the other room. He wanted to follow her, but I would not let him. I held the door in my hand, and prevented his following her for a few minutes. She was very violent inside, and swore what she would do to him; and then she pulled the door out of my hand. I slipped back with her pulling. As soon as her husband saw the door was open, he went into the room where she was. I remained in the bar and don't know what went on after that. There were two men - Thomas Richards and George Godbeer - in the room at the time and another woman, named Mary Burt. The next thing I know is that I was called in some time after, and I found the deceased very ill. Her husband and several others were there. I asked Burt and another woman to take the deceased home. As they were taking her out of the back-door, I saw blood about her stockings and the lower part of her dress. She was then alive, but insensible. On my return to the taproom, I saw a great deal of blood under the table. When I went in and found the deceased so ill, her husband was lying on the settle. He was drunk and asleep. I forgot to say that, in the morning, before she threw the coke at her husband, she took the poker, and tried to beat him with it. I prevented her from doing so. I have seen the body seen by the Jury; and it is that of THOMASINE PITCHER. - By the Foreman of the Jury: The prisoner was in a passion when he went into the taproom. - By a Juryman: He was not obliged to go into the taproom in self--defence. - Eliza Marshall was then called, and repeated the evidence given by her before the magistrates in the morning. She added that she had seen the body of the deceased, and identified it as that of the woman she had seen prisoner striking and kicking in the beer-house. - In answer to a Juryman, this witness said that, at the time when the prisoner was kicking his wife, there were many persons in the front of the premises, but no one came in. - Mary Burt, who was examined before the magistrates, was next called, and repeated the substance of the evidence then given. - Mr Pearse, the surgeon, was also called, and detailed the facts which he had stated at length in his examination before the magistrates. He added that the wound which he believed to have been the cause of death was about an inch in depth. Since the proceedings before the magistrates, he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He did not find any internal injury; but the symptoms showed that nearly all the blood had left the body He was of opinion that death had been accelerated by the mental excitement under which the woman was suffering at the time of her death. Had she been in a passive state, the blood would not have flowed from the wound so rapidly, and prompt medical aid might in that case have saved her life. His opinion was that the woman died from haemorrhage. The wound was such as might have been caused by a violent kick from a boot or shoe. - John Manning, a police constable, repeated the evidence reported in the proceedings at the Police Court. - Detective Julian said: Yesterday I was on duty in Stonehouse-lane between 3 and 4 o'clock, and was passing by the Traveller's Rest, when, hearing rather loud talking, I went in and saw the deceased there. She was very drunk. I also saw her husband, who was a good deal in drink. I saw Mary Burt, who had been drinking, the landlady and several others. The landlady said she wished I would keep the people quiet, and I said they were in her house, and she must keep them quiet. The landlord said - "They are quiet now," and I then left. Between 6 and 7 I was on duty in Union-street, and heard of the occurrence, and I went to the back door of 77 King-street. There I met Manning coming out with the prisoner. We took him to the Octagon station, and on the way the prisoner said - "Mr Julian, I never touched her nor kicked her at all. Many people have died sudden; and she has died sudden." He appeared to have been drinking a good deal, but the fright had partially recovered him. He was brought from the Octagon station to the Guildhall station in a cab. I searched him, and he was locked up, a man being put into the cell with him. Afterwards I went and took possession of the body of deceased, and locked the door. I went again to the house today at three o'clock, with Mr Pearse, the surgeon, when he made his post mortem examination; and I remained there while it was made. Last night I went to the Traveller's Rest, and saw marks of blood on the floor; and afterwards I went into the prisoner's cell, and took possession of his boots, which I now produce. [The boots were Bluchers, and were lightly made.] - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said: Now gentlemen of the Jury, the case is before you. I suppose, from the evidence, you will have little doubt that it is a case which will amount to what is called manslaughter. - not to murder, but manslaughter - the lesser crime; and it will be your duty to send the prisoner to Exeter to meet his trial. - The Jury deliberated and found a verdict of Manslaughter. - The Foreman (Mr Jarvis) said he thought the Jury ought to express an opinion upon the subject of the prisoner's absence. - The Coroner observed that he agreed with Mr Jarvis - the case was one in which they might fairly express an opinion. The prisoner ought certainly to have been present. With regard to himself, it would not at all rest there. He held the Inquest under protest, and meant the matter to go before higher authorities. He had held the Inquest because he was anxious that the woman should be buried; and that she should not be buried until the facts of the case had come out. He hoped the Jury would act without reference to himself, for he was old enough and sufficiently well known to be certain that the town would protect him - (hear, hear.) - Mr Viccary thought some note should be appended to the verdict, with regard to the manner in which the Excise granted beer-house licenses. Mr Seymour was of opinion that the matter was sufficiently notorious already.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 2 May 1862
TAVISTOCK - Coroner's Inquest At Tavistock. - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, Horse-bridge, before the Coroner, A. B. Bone, Esq., and a highly respectable Jury - Mr E. Martin being Foreman - on view of the body of JOHN WHITE, who met with his death at the Devon Great Consols early on Sunday morning last. - It appears from the evidence, that on Sunday morning the machinery underground at one of the shafts of the Devon Great Consols somehow got out of order, which caused the pumps to work very irregularly. Upon perceiving this, WHITE went down to remedy the defect. He reached the 40-fathom level, and then ascended about two fathoms to put a pin right in a plunger-valve. It seems he got up to the valve and removed the pin, but before he could complete his work it is supposed - for no one witnessed the sad event - that he fell from the spot where he was operating to the planking of the 4-0-fathom level (about 12 feet), where he was found lying on his back quite dead, upwards of an hour afterwards, by William Stevens and Edward Coombe, two miners who had seen him depart upon his errand. - Captain Clemo, in his examination, stated that it was generally arranged in mines that the men should work in pairs, so as to enable them to render assistance to each other in case of any mishap underground. A man named Williams ought to have accompanied the deceased; but he had neglected his duty, and had, for his negligence, been summarily dismissed. - The Jury, after an interval of a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Found Dead; but how or by what means, there was insufficient evidence to show."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 3 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Waterman. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Robin Hood Inn, New-street, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL AVENT, a waterman, about 36 years of age, who had died suddenly in his boat on the previous evening. - Nicholas Bennett said: I am a waterman, and reside at Prospect-row, Millbay, Plymouth. Between seven and eight o'clock last evening I went off in my boat to the Cape mail-steamer, Dane. She was lying between the Island and the Main. I saw deceased alongside her in his boat. He had one passenger (Mr Cluness, reporter for the Western Daily Mercury) in her going to the steamer. My boat was alongside his. The deceased said to me, "I am very ill; I want a glass of water." I said, "If you want it, I will take care of the boat whilst you go on board the steam-boat." Deceased was then alone in the boat. He said to me, "I wish you would jump into my boat and put me ashore." I was put in his boat, and left my own there with my partner. Deceased said to me, "I am a dying man." I urged him to rally. I wanted him to steer the boat, but he said, "I can't." It was a fair wind and I set the canvas, and steered the boat. Deceased sat on the stern-sheets. In coming on shore he shivered, fell down in the bottom of the boat, and said, "My poor wife and family; may the Lord have mercy on my soul!" I think he then died. I arrived at the Barbican and landed the deceased's body, and it was immediately carried to his residence, No. 30 New-street, Plymouth. - Samuel Jenkins said: I am a waterman, and reside at No. 12 Lambhay-hill. I have known the deceased for the last three or four years. He was a boatman. The boat was called the Swan. He plied her himself. He has been in a bad state of health for several months. He had a wife & four children, & was anxious to work for them although he was ill. He had been brought in, in his boat several times ill. Last evening I was in my boat at the Barbican when the last witness arrived with the deceased at the Barbican Quay. The deceased was lying at the bottom of the boat and dead, with his head towards the stern. I assisted to take the body out of the boat. Deceased was about 36 years old. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 5 May 1862
TAMERTON FOLIOT - A Child Burnt To Death Near Tamerton Foliott. A Caution To Mothers. - An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon, at Dunborough Farm, in the parish of Tamerton Foliott, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Edward Maynard was Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA ANN HILL, a child about three years of age, who had died on Wednesday last, from injuries she received in consequence of her clothes catching fire. - WILLIAM HILL was sworn and said: I am a husbandman, and live at the cottage called West Broadley, in the parish of Tamerton Foliott, in which cottage the deceased now lies. The deceased, whom the Coroner and Jury have just seen, is my daughter, ELIZA ANN HILL. She was three years old last July. On Wednesday morning last, at about 7 o'clock, I went away to my labour. About 11 o'clock in the morning, whilst I was at my labour, in afield about one hundred yards from my cottage, I heard my wife screaming and I went home and saw the deceased child in her arms. I saw that the face of the child was burnt, and I afterwards saw that the neck and breast of the deceased were burnt very much. Mr Langford, the surgeon of Knackersknowle, saw the deceased about one hour afterwards. The deceased died on the same day. - MARY ANN HILL was then examined, and said: I am the wife of WILLIAM HILL, now present. I live with him and my children at Broadley Cottage. On Wednesday morning, a little after 11 o'clock, I went away to get a little drop of milk, a few gunshots from my cottage. I left the deceased in the kitchen, playing to and fro. No one else was in the kitchen. One of my children, aged 8 years, was outside the cottage. There was a fire on the hearth, but you could not see any fire without touching it. The deceased was very well when I left her. I told her not to touch the fire, and she said "No mother." There is no cottage near to my cottage. No grown up person was in the house. There was no one about the house but the children. The child was three years old last July. I returned home in about 20 minutes and when I came into the court I saw smoke ascending from the wall, and I found the child under the wall of the garden lying on her face and hands, and the flames were over her head. She was quite still and quiet. The clothes which were left on her were burning. I stripped off the remaining clothes, and ran with her into the house. The child was conscious and she said "I want to drink." She was severely burnt about the face, neck and shoulders, and part of the breast. Mr Langford, the surgeon, saw her and dressed the wounds. She died the same day at 5 o'clock in the evening. The kitchen was the same to all appearances as when I had left it. The deceased had on a linen apron and a linen frock. - The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased's death was caused by Accidental Burning. The Jury were unanimously of opinion that the mother was very much to blame for leaving the child in a room where there was a fire without anyone to take care of it. - The Coroner concurred in the opinion expressed by the Jury and addressed the mother in severe terms on her conduct.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 7 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - A Cornishman Drowned In Sutton Pool. - Yesterday afternoon J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on the body of JOHN SINCOCK, which had been found in Sutton Pool on that morning. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased was a master mason, and resided between Roche and Bugle in Cornwall. On Saturday evening he entered the train at the Bodmin Road Station and came to Devonport with a miner named Dyer. They came to Plymouth on Sunday morning and on Monday night went to the Anchor and Hope, on the Barbican Quay, having been drinking all the day. The deceased went in and out of the house continually, and Dyer fell asleep. Deceased gave a waterman named Houghton a glass of beer about ten o'clock, and, while they were drinking together, deceased asked him if he had ever seen him before, and, on his replying that he had never seen him until a few minutes before, said "When I go out of this house it is a great chance if you ever see me any more." He then went out and Houghton went on to the quay in about a quarter of an hour, when he heard that the deceased had been missed. A Custom House officer said he had seen him go down the steps, but he had not seen him return, and therefore thought he must have fallen overboard. Houghton procured drags and searched for some time, but at length came to the conclusion that the deceased could not have fallen over. Some time after this, P.C. Fryer saw a dark object floating on the water outside the southern steps of the pier, and called Houghton, but he had then disappeared. About two o'clock they saw this object near the steps, and Houghton, having obtained a boat hook, drew the body ashore. It was then removed to the dead-house, Westwell-street. In an account book in which Dyer had seen the deceased wrote on Monday, and which was found upon the body, was the following entry:- "This is all ELIZA SINCOCK'S fault to drive them from my wife and home this 5 day of May 1862." It stated that a person standing on the steps mentioned might easily fall into the water. - The Jury did not think that the deceased's observations to the waterman on this entry showed that he intended to destroy himself, and returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was Found Drowned, but there was no evidence to show how he came by his death.

STOKE DAMEREL - A Seaman Drowned At North Corner. - An Inquest was held at the Steam Packet Inn, North Corner, Devonport, yesterday afternoon, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HUGH WILLIAMS, a seaman of H.M.S. Warrior, in Hamoaze. The body was identified by the master-at-arms of that ship, who stated that the deceased was generally a sober man. From the other evidence adduced it appears that he had been seen drunk on that morning about one o'clock, and going towards the quay at North Corner, Nothing more was heard of him until half-past four o'clock, when his body was found floating in the water off the Quay with a bruise over one eye. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and the Jury appended to their verdict a strong recommendation that posts and chains should be put up on the Quay so as to prevent any accidents occurring from its unprotected state. - A coffin was made on board the Warrior and covered with black cloth at the expense of the messmates of the deceased. It was brought on shore about four o'clock yesterday afternoon, and the body was then conveyed to Stonehouse by a party of seamen from the ship, under the command of two officers.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 9 May 1862
ASHPRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest At Ashprington. - An Inquest was held at Mrs Ashwick's Waterman's Arms Inn, Ashprington, yesterday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to investigate into the cause of the death of a child named LOUISA FISHER, aged 8 years, who died on Tuesday morning last, at Washborne. - Mr P. P. Nind, of Harbertonford, surgeon, had made a post mortem examination of the body, and discovered a slight quantity of lymph about the heart, which he considered was produced from inflammation, but yet was insufficient to cause death. He considered that her death had been occasioned by inhaling a poisonous gas, which would depress the system and the heart's action. He could not discover any signs of poison having been administered. - The premises in which the deceased lived with her parents, and two other children, were in a very dirty condition, both inside and out, and noxious matter in a large quantity surrounded the dwelling, which had been left there by a previous tenant. The family had only entered the house on the evening of Friday last, and on Monday evening the deceased and the other two children were taken seriously ill, but no medical attendant was called in until after the death of the deceased. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the opinion of Mr Nind: that the deceased died a Natural Death, caused by inhaling impure air.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 10 May 1862
ILSINGTON - Charge Of Manslaughter At Ilsington. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Star Inn, in the parish of Ilsington, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man about 60 years of age, named PETER WINN, of the village of Halford, who died on Monday last from the effects of blows received on the 24th of April last, in a scuffle with a man named Edward Easton. The deceased had gone to reprimand Easton for assaulting his son, when some angry words passed between them and eventually a scuffle ensued, in which the deceased received a blow in the abdomen, besides other parts of the body. In the following week, WINN summoned Easton before the magistrates at Newton, upon which occasion Easton was convicted of the assault and fined. On the deceased's returning from Newton he was heard to say that he was a dying man, and the day following his having made use of this expression, he was taken very ill, and vomited a large quantity of blood; and he continued to vomit and pass blood up to the time of his death. - Several witnesses were examined at the Inquest, who proved the fact of Easton's having struck the deceased, and also as to his subsequent illness. A post mortem examination of the body was made by N. J. Haydon, Esq., of Bovey Tracey, who found a quantity of blood passing from the mouth, and also found signs of decomposition over the lower part of the abdomen. There was considerable infiltration of bloody serum over the region of the umbilicus, which extended in patches over the right side of the abdomen, one especially large spot over the right hypocondron, which was the spot where the deceased had described the blow as having been struck. There were no corresponding marks on the left side. An effusion of blood was found between the layers of the abdominal muscles, and about a pint of blood in a fluid state was found in the stomach. The whole of the inner surface of the stomach was highly congested and infiltrated with red fluid. There was also a deposit of red fluid in the small intestines, and various other evidences which led Mr Haydon to conclude that death had resulted from the effects of the blow acting upon a previously diseased constitution. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Edward Easton, who was forthwith committed to take his trial at the ensuing assizes.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 12 May 1862
CHUDLEIGH - Sudden Death At Chudleigh. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Chudleigh, on the body of a lady named KENDELL. Deceased had been out for a drive in her carriage, accompanied by a lad about fifteen years of age, and on her return, as she was driving through the street, she was observed by several persons to fall from her seat to the bottom of the carriage. Some hastened to her assistance, and she was conveyed to her residence, when Dr Haydon and Mr Lillies, surgeons, were soon in attendance, but their assistance, we are sorry to say, was of no avail, as it was found that the vital spark had fled. The deceased lady, who was much respected, was about fifty years of age.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 13 May 1862
NEWTON ABBOT - Determined Suicide. - On Saturday RICHARD WOTTON, between 50 and 60 years of age, residing in East-street, committed suicide by hanging himself, on Hennaborough Farm, near the Nunnery at Abbotsleigh, and about two miles from Newton, belonging to Mrs Beazeley, of the Globe Hotel, in whose employ he had been for a number of years as hind. In the morning he was engaged on the farm with two other men named Vicary and Demeral. About ten o'clock they left and went to another part of the estate, and did not return until about half-past three in the afternoon, when they found WOTTON was not there, but had left his tools. Proceeding up the field, they discovered the deceased lying against the hedge with his face downwards. On coming up to him they discovered he had hung himself to a small branch of a tree by a large piece of cord. The deceased, who was standing on his feet at the time, was quite black in the face and dead. He could not, however, have been there long, as it was stated by Vicary that he saw him at work about half-past one o'clock. The deceased was immediately cut down, and a vehicle having been obtained, he was conveyed to his home, in East-street. An Inquest was held yesterday at the Beer Inn, East Street, Newton Abbot, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 14 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy And Fatal Accident At The Great Western Docks. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall at five o'clock yesterday afternoon, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN WILLIAMS, who died from injuries he received that morning, in consequence of a railway truck passing over him. - Richard Morrish said he was the porter of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he resided. About 9 o'clock that morning the body of the deceased was brought into the Hospital, suffering from the injuries he received from the trucks. He spoke several times after he was brought in. He was not bleeding when he was brought in. Dr Hingston saw him. Dr Square was sent for, but deceased died before he arrived. He died about 10 o'clock and was sensible at the time. - James Bartlett, a porter in the employ of the South Devon Railway Company, said he had known the deceased for upwards of three years. He was about thirty-one years of age. he was "the way-bill" man and in the employ of the Great Western Docks Company. When home he resided at No. 7 Martin-lane. He had left a widow and two children. That morning, at about half-past 8 o'clock, witness, the deceased, and Edward Carroll, were engaged in running two empty railway trucks from the South Devon Company's yard into the Great Western Docks. The trucks were going very steady, and much slower than usual. The weighing house was inside the Dock wall. Witness did not see deceased come out of the weighing house, but he saw him go over to the turn-table and take the "sprag" to "sprag" the trucks. A "sprag" was a large piece of wood which they inserted between the spokes of the wheels to stop the truck on the turn-table. Witness saw deceased try to put the "sprag" between the spokes of the wheel. He missed the spoke of the wheel, which caught the point of the "sprag" only. The hind part of the "sprag" fell to the ground, and deceased held on to the "sprag" instead of dropping it. In consequence of this proceeding deceased was thrown in between the two trucks, and the fore wheel of the second truck passed over the lower part of his body. The deceased then turned round on his back, and the hind wheel of the same carriage passed over the calves of his legs. Witness got assistance, took up deceased, and carried him into the weighing house, where they laid him down. He was conveyed from thence to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on a stretcher. He was sensible, spoke, and did not blame anyone. For two years and a half it had been witness's duty to run the empty railway trucks, and he did not think anyone was to blame for deceased's death. Witness had seen deceased "sprag" for the last two years. He believed his death to be purely accidental. Deceased was a good man for work and steady. - Edward Carroll, a porter in the employ of the South Devon Railway Company, gave corroborative evidence. - The Jury at once arrived at a verdict of "Accidental Death." - Mr Filder, the Secretary of the Great Western Dock Company attended on behalf of the company.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 16 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In The Plymouth Workhouse. - An Inquest was held last evening at five o'clock in the Committee-room, at the New Workhouse, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Mark Blackmore was chosen Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES ALGAR, a journeyman tailor, about 709 years of age, who died suddenly on Tuesday evening in the Workhouse. - William Poole was the first witness examined, and stated that he was the porter at the New Workhouse, Plymouth. He had known the deceased for fourteen or fifteen years. He was a journeyman tailor by trade and about 70 years of age. He had been admitted into the House twice or three times. On Tuesday night, at about twenty minutes past 5 o'clock, witness admitted the deceased into the Workhouse, under an order of Mr Ash, the relieving officer. He was to be admitted as a vagrant for one night only. The general order was for one night only. He appeared then as witness had seen him on many occasions. He suffered from asthma and disease of the heart for several years. Permission was given by the master (Mr Truscott) for the deceased to be put in the receiving ward. He went there and had his supper, consisting of milk and bread. He did not ask to have a surgeon sent for. Witness believed deceased had a wife and two children. About eight o'clock the same evening, witness went into the receiving ward, and saw the deceased in bed. He asked deceased how he was, and he replied that he was very short of breath. They wished each other good night and witness left. One other man, named John Dawe, slept in the same ward. Witness was quite sure no one injured the deceased, & in his opinion he died from disease of the heart, by the visitation of God. - John Snell, an inmate of the Workhouse, stated that he had known the deceased about eighteen months. His health was generally bad, and he was short-breathed. Witness went into the receiving ward on Wednesday morning, at about half-past six o'clock, and deceased was then asleep, lying in the proper position. About half-past seven witness went into the ward again, and found his position altered. His head was where his feet should have been, and the clothes were stripped from the bed. He was dead, though quite warm. Witness was quite sure no one could have injured the deceased. John Dawe was asleep each time witness went in. He reported the death to Mr Truscott, the master of the House, immediately, and he at once came to see the deceased. - John Dawe, the man who slept in the same ward, was called, but he knew nothing of the death of the deceased. - Mr Cosens, one of the Jurymen, wished to know why the surgeon of the establishment was not present? - The Coroner said he had not thought it necessary that the surgeon should attend. He (the surgeon) could only tell them that deceased suffered from asthma and disease of the heart, and, probably, he died from disease of the heart. He could only give them his opinion, but could not state positively without opening the body. That he (the Coroner) was quite sure was not the desire of a Plymouth Jury, merely to satisfy a morbid curiosity, because the poor man was a pauper. If, however, they desired it, the Inquest should be adjourned to procure the attendance of the House surgeon, and enable him to make a post mortem examination. He (the Coroner) did not think it was necessary in the present case to have the attendance of the surgeon of the House. - Mr Cosens said he merely asked the question as a Juryman; he thought that because the man was a pauper the surgeon was not in attendance. He believed that such would not have been the case if it had not been a pauper. - The Coroner assured Mr Cosens that such had not been the practice during the whole of his experience, which extended over a very considerable period. - Mr Cosens expressed himself satisfied, and the Jury immediately arrived at a verdict of "died by the Visitation of God."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 19 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Supposed Suicide Of A Boy. - At the Guildhall on Saturday, Mr J. Edmonds, the Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body of JOHN HENRY DODDRIDGE, a boy about 15 years of age, taken out of the water at Guy's quay, near the Custom House, on the previous evening. The body had been conveyed from the harbour to the dead-house, in Westwell-street, and it had been there recognised on Saturday morning by the father of the deceased, a blacksmith employed in the Devonport Dockyard. The principal witness was Mrs Gent, baker, Fore-street, Devonport, who stated that the deceased had been employed by her as an errand boy during the last four or five months, and that he left the bakehouse on Thursday morning about eleven o'clock, saying that he would "go and fetch the dinners." Since that time she had not seen him alive. He had been a good boy. The evidence of the father added nothing to this statement, and the only other witness was the man who found the body. The Jury returned an Open Verdict - "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 20 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Cattedown. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall last night before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CORY, who died on Saturday last from the effects of a fall which he received on the 8th of April last, in the dock at Cattedown. - Richard Morris said: I belong to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The deceased was brought to the hospital about 8 o'clock on the morning of the 9th ult. with his left leg smashed. The leg had to be amputated the same day by Dr Square. Deceased was getting better during the first two or three weeks, but eventually became worse, and died on Saturday evening last. - JANE CORY said: I am the deceased's wife and live at Ashford, near Barnstaple. Deceased is about 52 years of age, and was mate of a schooner called Henrietta. I came to him three days after the accident, and I found him in the hospital. I stayed with him a fortnight, and then went home, and came again on Wednesday last. He told me he fell into the dock, but did not know how. - Thomas Haynes said: I am a shipwright, and reside at No. 4 Shepherd's-lane, Plymouth. I was passing from Plymouth to Cattedown on the 8th ult. The night was very dark, and a sailor said as I was near the dock, "Who goes there?" "A stranger," said I. He said, "Will you give help to a poor man who has fallen over the dock?" and I said "Yes," and went. There was also a man there with a lantern. We tied a rope round the sailor's body and let him down, and he brought deceased up, and I could see his left leg was broken. We sent for Mr Greenwood, who came about an hour afterwards and tried to set the leg, but failed. Deceased told me he tripped his foot in a stone and fell over the dock. I remained with deceased till two the next morning. - The Coroner and Jury gave witness much praise for his kindness towards the deceased. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Accidentally falling over the dock."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 21 May 1862
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest On A Boy of H.M.S. Impregnable. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Navy Hospital Inn, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Coroner, and a respectable Jury, Mr Thomas Bartlett, Foreman, to Enquire into the cause of the death of JAMES TOWNSEND, a second-class boy on board H.M.S. Impregnable. From the evidence adduced, it appears that the lad was between 14 and 15 years of age, and had been on board the training ship two or three months, during which time he had behaved very well. On Monday morning last, the deceased, together with several other lads, had to go into a boat to learn pulling. The boat is kept two or three feet above the water, and the deceased and his companions went into the boat previous to its being lowered. Before the boat was lowered the bolt at the stern of the boat broke, and that side fell down, and the sudden strain caused the bolt at the bow to break as well. The boys were very much frightened and thrown about and the deceased, who was leaning across one of the seats, was fallen upon by another boy named William Short. He was picked up breathing heavily, and was at once removed to the sick bay, where two medical men were immediately in attendance. Every means was resorted to for his restoration, but without effect, and he died in about a quarter of an hour, without having spoken a single word. The iron bolt was produced by Commander Francisco Tremlett, of H.M.S. Impregnable, and plainly owed its breaking to a flaw in the centre, which could not have been ascertained by external examination. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" without attaching blame to anyone concerned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 29 May 1862
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Death Of A Plymouth Gentleman. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Dock Hotel, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MR PARMINTER CARDELL, a gentleman residing at Burgoyne Villas, Pennycomequick, who met his death under the following distressing circumstances. - William James said: I am a master mariner, and live at No. 1, Nelson's Cottages, East Stonehouse. I am master of the ship Whitehall, registered in Plymouth. Mr Richard Hocking is the owner. He invited some friends on board yesterday to dinner. There were both ladies and gentlemen, making a very respectable party. The deceased's daughter, son and nephew were there, and went ashore about 7 o'clock. The vessel was lying in the Great Western Docks, alongside the quay. Mrs Hockin and her son also went on shore at 7 o'clock. The gentlemen began to move from the cabin, to go on shore, about 9 o'clock. Five or six gentlemen had gone ashore before MR CARDELL left. About half-past nine o'clock the deceased was alone and going to leave the vessel. I was standing on the rail, port side, with a lantern. I offered him my hand, but he said he did not require it. I think he went two steps on the ladder and missed the next one and then fell from the ladder into the water, between the ship and the quay. I made an alarm at once. Many of the gentlemen were on the quay. Mr John Bromham went over the quay with a rope to his assistance. Mr Bromham held on the rope with one hand and with the other tried to keep him up. I pulled off my coat, got the end of the rope and made a bow line, and went down. I hooked him with my foot about 4 feet under water. I pulled him up with my foot, and got hold of the tail of his coat. I took a round turn of his coat in my hand and put my legs around his body, and called to the people on board to haul up. We were drawn by the people within, I should think, two feet of the edge of the Quay, when his coat came off and he again sunk in the water. I was so exhausted that I could not render him any more assistance. I called one of my men to go down by the same rope as I had gone down by. He did so, and was hauled up with him in his arms. Deceased was immediately taken to Mr Bulteel's surgery, who reported that life was extinct. The body was then removed to the Dock Hotel. There had been no angry words on board the vessel before the accident occurred. It was the happiest party I have seen for some time. When the deceased fell there was no one near him but myself. I have not the slightest hesitation in saying that the deceased's death was purely accidental. He must have fallen about 18 feet. I never heard him speak after he fell. I should not think he was in the water more than five minutes. In my opinion he died immediately on falling in. I have known the deceased for 20 years. I should think he was about 50 years of age. - By a Juror: The vessel was about a foot or 14 inches from the Quay. - The Jury considered there was no need of further evidence, and returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 31 May 1862
EAST STONEHOUSE - A Child Burnt to Death At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a child named JOHN BUTT, who had died from the effects of a burn he had received. It appeared, from the evidence adduced at the Inquest, that the deceased, on the 1st instant, was playing before the fire when he fell backwards towards the fire, and came in contact with a piece of wood, which was placed on the hob to dry, and knocked it into the fire. The wood jolted out a red-hot cinder, which fell on the child's neck, burning it fearfully. No notice was taken of the matter until a week after, when the mother took the deceased to a medical man, who prescribed for it. The deceased lingered until Monday morning, when death put an end to his sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 6 June 1862
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday afternoon, at five o'clock, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES SAUL, who died suddenly on Wednesday night. The following evidence was adduced:- Jane Jeffery said: I am the wife of William Jeffery, journeyman carpenter, and reside at 12 Middle-lane Plymouth. I have known the deceased for years. He was married, but lived apart from his wife. I should think he was about 65 years of age, and a pensioner from Greenwich Hospital, and received £15 4s. per annum. I keep a lodging house for men. The deceased came to lodge with me about five months ago. He had been ill in the Workhouse, got better, and came out. His health had been failing him ever since he came out. Sometimes he lay in bed for two or three days together, but on Tuesday he appeared in his usual state of health. He took tea about three in the afternoon, and afterwards went out with another pensioner called Phillips, and they had some beer together at the Mechanics' Inn, St Andrew-street. When he came home I was out. I understood he went to bed about nine o'clock. Three other men slept in the same room with the deceased, called Elias Alger, Gilbert Luttrell and Caleb Gillard. I heard nothing more of deceased until this (Thursday) morning about half-pat five, when Alger informed me he was dead. I went to his room and saw he was dead, but warm. I slept downstairs. The deceased's room is two pair of stairs high. There had not been any quarrelling in the house. I am sure he had not been ill-used by anyone, and in my opinion he died a natural death by the visitation of God. His wife never came to my house to see him, but his daughter did, and she was there on Wednesday afternoon, and brought him down some soup about two o'clock. - Elias Alger said: I am a quay porter, and lodge at the house of the last witness. I went to bed on Wednesday night between nine and ten o'clock. My bed was in the same room as the deceased. He was then awake, and the room was dark. I was tired and went to bed and fell asleep. I awoke about half-past five this (Thursday_ morning, when I discovered he was dead. The two other lodgers were also in the room.. I informed them of it, and then the last witness. I have lodged in the room with deceased for the last five months. His health failed very much. He was a quiet man. I never saw him quarrel, and I don't think anyone hurted him. - Gilbert Luttrell said: I am a quay porter, and have lodged with Mrs Jeffery for about a month. Between nine and ten o'clock on Wednesday night I went to bed. The deceased was in bed in the same room, and it was dark. At his request I got two candles, and lighted one, and went to bed. I had been drinking and fell asleep, and did not awake this (Thursday) morning, when the last witness awoke me, and told me the deceased was dead. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatal Boat Accident In The Sound. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL PYNE, a seaman, lately belonging to the Hydrus, fishing boat, of Brixham, who was drowned with the mate of the Hydrus on the 14th of May. - William Henry Mills said: I am a fisherman's labourer, and reside at No. 7 Castle-street, Plymouth. I have known the deceased about four or five years. He was a sailor of the trawl-sloop Hydrus, about forty tons. When the deceased was home he lived at Brixham. He was about nineteen years and eight months old. I know that the deceased and Henry Ratley, the mate of the sloop, were drowned in the Sound on the 14th of May. When Ratley's body was recovered I assisted in conveying it to the deadhouse. The body of the deceased, SAMUEL PYNE, was landed at the Barbican, in this Borough, on Wednesday afternoon, at four o'clock. I assisted P.C. Fuge in cutting off the pocket from the deceased's trousers. there were in it, three threepenny pieces, one penny, some tobacco, and a bag. I know him by a buckle round his waist, a peculiarity on the left sole of his foot, and a small metal basket suspended round his neck, which the deceased told me he had had given to him by a young woman at Brixham. He had a small silver ring which he wore on the third finger of the right hand. From this evidence and by his dress, I am positive that deceased was one of the men so drowned on the 14th of May. - P.C. Fuge deposed to searching the body, and finding the articles mentioned by the last witness. - Samuel Crocker, a waterman, stated that he resided at 40 New-street. On Wednesday afternoon he was on board one of the hulks in the Sound, lying off Jenny Cliff. From information he received he went in his boat in search of deceased's body. He found it just rising, and towed it to the Barbican P:ier, where he landed it, and gave it into the charge of P.C. Fuge. - The Coroner said he had the particulars of the Inquisition held on the body of RATLEY; and the Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." They (the present Jury) could not arrive at that verdict now, as they had not the evidence before them to shew that such was the case. They could, however, meet the case by returning a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Jury then returned a verdict in accordance with the directions of the Coroner.

EXETER - Coroner's Inquests At Exeter. Absent Jurymen And Inattentive Nurses. - An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalene Street, yesterday afternoon, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM MILTON, aged 23 years, a servant with Mr Rowe, a farmer, at Narracott, in the parish of Spreyton. It appeared that on the 28th of May the deceased was driving his master's waggon laden with manure from Crediton to Yeoford, when on getting down to put the drag under the wheel, the whip fell upon the fore horse, which started off, and deceased, who was intoxicated, falling at the same time, the wheel passed over him. The horses dashed on with the waggon at a terrific pace; and ultimately upset in the hedge, the wheels breaking off; but the deceased was left on the road, where he was shortly after discovered by a woman named Lang and a man named Levett. He was removed to a neighbouring house, and afterwards to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found that he had received severe injuries, and where he lingered until Wednesday last, when he expired. The house surgeon added that, when the deceased was brought in, he was covered with dirt and vermin; in fact, he never saw a man in a more filthy state in his life. The Foreman and the Jury remarked upon the latter statement, and observed that it should be publicly made known. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Melancholy Suicide. - A second Inquest was held at the London Inn, before the same gentlemen, at 6 o'clock in the evening, touching the death of CHARLES BLUNDEN STRONG, aged about 60 years, who had committed suicide on the previous day. The evidence of Robert Sutton Manning, the waiter at the hotel, and other witnesses went to show that on the evening of Tuesday, a solicitor, residing at Sidmouth, and who was of eccentric and intemperate habits, walked into the house, having only just before arrived by the Sidmouth mail cart. He said that he should want a bed and went out, being apparently in good spirits; but he returned at about half-past ten o'clock, when another waiter saw him in the coffee room, reading a letter, two cards or letters being on the table before him. He then fell off to sleep; but in a short time afterwards he intimated that he should retire to bed, and was shown to his room by the chambermaid, Susan Southcott, being then more sober than usual; in fact having had nothing to eat or drink at the hotel during the night. About a quarter of an hour after he had retired, Hansford, as was usual with deceased, went to his room to see if his candle was extinguished. He knocked at the door, but receiving no answer, he opened the door and found the room in darkness. He did not get up the next morning, and about two o'clock in the afternoon Darby (the boots) went to his room, and failing to get an answer when he knocked, he pushed open the door and spoke, but received no answer, and he then put his hand upon him and found that he was dead. An alarm was raised and medical assistance sent for, when Mr T. W. Caird, surgeon, arrived, and from the appearances judged that death had taken place about nine hours previously. There was nothing unusual about the bed clothes, but the arms were outside the clothes, and were somewhat spasmodically contracted. From the appearance of the body he thought that the death had been a violent one, and he proceeded to examine the room. On the dressing table he found a skin cap and a leather cap which are usually tied on a phial bottle, and on the bedsteps, within reach of the bed, was a wet glass, with a small blue ounce phial in it. The stopper was in the phial, which contained about thirty or forty drops of prussic acid; a label bearing the words, partly in Latin, and partly in English, indicating that it contained prussic acid. It was, however, such as was supplied to the profession, and to the trade; but not to private individuals and from 50 to 60 drops would produce death, in the absence of any antidote. He made a post mortem examination the next morning, and found that death had resulted from prussic acid, and, from the quantity, almost immediately after it was taken. Three letters were found in the pockets of the deceased by Thomas Hambly, bar clerk at the hotel, one directed to Mr R. Wreford, solicitor, of Exeter; the other two being addressed to himself from his trustee, relating to some property, and showing that he was in embarrassed circumstances. Mr Wreford said that the deceased confided his affairs to him, and he had lead a gay life, having spent all his own money and that of his wife. A cousin of his died some time since, from whom he expected a large sum of money; but being disappointed, it had preyed upon his mind and spirits. he had for some years been in straitened circumstances, and once, when he was abroad, he had been under restraint from outrageous conduct. He had also threatened to put an end to himself if he had had the pluck, and he believed that if he had come into the property, he would not have committed suicide. The letter addressed to him said that if he would call at the London Inn on the 4th inst. he would find all that remained of him. He alluded to his debts amounting to £300, and made some remarks as to how they should be paid, and directing that the expenses of the funeral should be paid out of the money found in his pocket, which amounted to £1 5s. 9d. The Jury retied for about twenty minutes, and then returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself by taking prussic acid whilst in a state of Insanity. The proceedings occupied about three hours and a half.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 7 June 1862
PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatal Boat Accident In The Sound. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Guildhall, before Mr Edmonds, Coroner, on the body of HENRY RACKLEY, mate of the sloop Hydrus, of Brixham. - William Ellis said: I am master of the Hydrus, of Brixham, of which ship deceased was the mate. He is about 238 years of age. On the 14th of last month we were sailing out of the Sound with a fair wind, when deceased, and Prynn, a seaman, fell overboard. I immediately brought the ship to, and got the boat out and sailed after them. When within 20 feet of deceased, he sank, and I saw no more of him. I came to port and reported the case, and went and searched for the body three days, without success. Deceased was a very steady man. - Francis Dunger, a seaman, belonging to the smack Elizabeth, of Plymouth, said that yesterday, about half-past ten in the morning, he was about a quarter of a mile from the Mew Stone, when he saw something floating in the water. He got into a boat and pulled towards it, and found it to be the body of the deceased. He took it in, and brought and landed it at the Barbican steps, where he gave it up to a police-constable. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BUCKFASTLEIGH - Coroner's Inquest At Buckfastleigh. - An Inquest was held at the Sun Inn, Buckfastleigh, yesterday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, W. Coulton, Esq., Foreman, on the body of a man named WILLIAM WILLCOCKS, who died on Thursday last, from the effects of a serious injury which he received on the 28th of May last, when he became entangled with the machinery in the bark mill of Messrs. Hamlyn, of Buckfastleigh. - John Rockey, a workman in the mill of Messrs. Hamlyn, stated that on the 28th of May the deceased was at work in the bark mill grinding bark, at which witness was also engaged. At about four o'clock in the afternoon witness heard the deceased sing out, "Oh! my arm; Oh! my arm! Stop the Wheel!" Witness stopped the wheel as soon as possible, and then found that the deceased had caught his right arm and was dragged into the mill; the right hand was cut off. The deceased was got out from the mill with assistance and did not appear to be much hurt excepting in the arm. Doctor Kiernan was sent for and soon attended the deceased, both at the mill and the man's residence, to which he was removed. On examination he found that the deceased had lost his forearm entirely - up to the elbow - with laceration of the muscles of the humerus; he considered it necessary to perform an operation, which, with assistance, was skilfully performed. After this the deceased progressed favourably until Wednesday night, when - from gangrene having attacked the stump - he became worse, and gradually sunk until his death on Thursday, at noon. The deceased was described as a steady man, and was about 63 years of age, and the cause of his death was attributed to the injuries he had received and the shock to his system. The Coroner having summed up, a verdict was brought in by the Jury that the deceased died "An Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the Ferry Inn, Newpassage, yesterday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES BASLEY, a marine, lately serving on board the St. Jean d'Acre, now lying in ordinary: who came by his death at half-past six, on the 20th of May, by drowning. - George Sparkes said he was a marine on board the St. Jean d'Acre, and knew the deceased. They were engaged in getting up a boat on the 20th May, and one of the men threw over a rope for witness to get up with. He was nearly up when the deceased came down the tackle and jumped on to the rope a little above his head. The rope was jerked very much, so that both fell into the water. Witness saw deceased was sinking and he caught hold of him by the hair; but as he could not swim very well and was sinking with the deceased, he let go, and the deceased sank immediately. About the same time he observed a boat from the Cordelia, which picked him up. The deceased told him one day that he could not swim. - Robert Davie, boatswain, of the same ship, corroborated the evidence of this witness: as did James Horson, stoker on board; and John Cameron, boatswain of the Princess Royal, deposed that he picked up the body in the Hamoaze on Thursday. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned; the Jury expressing an opinion that a life buoy ought to be kept on board every ship in ordinary.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 9 June 1862
TORQUAY - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held before E. P. Cumming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury at the Castle Inn, Union-street, on the body of MR FREDERICK WHITE, builder and undertaker, of Portland Row, who died suddenly at his residence, at about half-past six on Friday morning. Mr Stabb, surgeon, deposed that he was called in at an early hour on Friday morning and found that deceased had died before his arrival. He had known him well for several years, but had never attended him professionally; in fact, did not know that he was ever unwell. He felt no doubt in his own mind that deceased had died of heart disease, but could not speak positively without making a post mortem examination. Two neighbours deposed to being alarmed by MRS WHITE on Friday morning and finding MR WHITE apparently in a fit, lying on the floor and he died in a few minutes after. Deceased was a very temperate man, and was much respected in the neighbourhood. In accordance with these facts, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Death Of A Soldier. - An Inquest was held at the Eagle Tavern, Barrack-road, on Saturday, at one o'clock, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of RICHARD ALIN, aged 18 years and four months, a bandsman in the 6th Dragoon Guards or Carabineers, whose death took place at the Higher Barracks, Exeter, from the effects of a kick which he had received from a horse, whilst on the route to Aldershott. The following evidence will show the particulars of the melancholy affair:- William Welch said he was the landlord of the Nag's Head, Crewkerne. The deceased, with other men belonging to the regiment, was billeted at his house on Sunday, the 25th May. At about a quarter to one on that day he (witness) went into the stable, where the deceased was engaged about his horse, to ask him about when he would have his dinner, when he heard a blow, and directly afterwards he saw him lying on the ground, by the wall. He (witness) then called deceased's comrades, who carried him out - he being covered with blood. He was taken into a room, and medical assistance called, when Mr Joliffe, surgeon, and the doctor of the regiment, arrived and treated him, when he revived, but did not give any account of the accident. He was placed in bed and remained in the house until about seven o'clock the next morning, when he was placed in an omnibus and removed to the station. He was not accompanied by any medical man, the regiment having left, the deceased being in the drawing-room, and seeing them depart. On the previous day the deceased said, "That brute kicked me, and you were standing by;" and, added the witness, it was the awfullest brute I ever saw in my life, and he ought to be shot. there was a wound in his temple, from which he was bleeding profusely. When the deceased was being removed he observed that he was very glad he was going to return to Exeter. Deceased was perfectly sober, not having drank a drop of anything during the day. - George Phillips, a private of the regiment, identified the body as that of RICHARD ALIN, late a private in the regiment. He (witness) still remained at the Exeter barracks on a sick furlough, and the deceased, who was brought into the Hospital on Monday last, had told him that the injuries he received had been occasioned by a kick from a horse. He did at 6 o'clock on the evening of Wednesday. - James Crigligton, sergeant and assistant-steward of the army hospital corps, quartered at Exeter Barracks, said that the deceased was brought into the hospital on the 26th ultimo, and was at first placed under the care of Assistant-Surgeon Davenport, when Mr Hartnoll, surgeon, took charge of him. - Mr T. H. Hartnoll, surgeon, stated that he took charge of the sick in the barracks' hospital on the 31st ultimo, the deceased being amongst them. He had a contused wound on the right temple, about an inch long, but he (witness) could not detect any fracture of the bone, and on the whole he appeared to be progressing favourable until Tuesday evening, between 8 and 9 o'clock, when he became more restless and excited, having then and previously complained of pain in the back and head. He saw him again between 9 and 10 o'clock, when he was in a state of stupor and could not be roused, the pupil of the left eye being particularly dilated - in fact, he was labouring under pressure on the brain; and he lingered until 6 o'clock in the evening, without rallying, when he died. He had since made a post mortem examination of the head only; there was not any fracture of the skull, but there was about half an ounce of pusulent matter on the right hemisphere, which evidently caused compression on the brain, and hence death. The matter found inside corresponded with the wound outside, and the latter was likely to have been caused by a kick from a horse. - This being the whole of the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from a kick received from a horse. Two or three of the Jury wished to append to their verdict a recommendation to the colonel of the regiment that the horse should be destroyed; but as it could not be shown which animal had inflicted the blow, the suggestion could not be adopted. - The deceased will be buried at the Cemetery at 3 o'clock today, when the Volunteers will attend.

EXETER - Another Melancholy Suicide. - A second Inquest was held at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, at six o'clock in the evening, on view of the body of SAMUEL WIDGER, a retired farmer, aged 47, who resided near Ashburton, and who committed suicide by cutting his throat that morning at Mr Tancock's lodgings, Paul-street. There was a large attendance of Jurymen, Mr Philip Wish being the Foreman: The Jury went and viewed the body at Mr Tancock's. The appearance was very shocking; the neck presented a deep cut, almost from ear to ear, and the wind pipe very much protruded. There was a large quantity of blood in the room, and the body lay on the floor, the clothes being off. - The following evidence was adduced:- Wm. Tancock stated that he was a hairdresser, residing in Paul street, and he let apartments. He did not know the deceased. He was sent to his house by a person named Tuck on the previous night, about nine o'clock. Mrs tuck was in the habit of sending lodgers to his house, when her own was full. Deceased sat talking with witness and Mrs Tancock until about half-past ten, when he asked for a candle and went to bed. He said he had been to the great Epsom Races. He said he had not been betting. He asked him if he had been successful or not. He replied, "I never do anything in that way." They had a glass of beer each; he was quite sober when he came. There was nothing in his manner to create mistrust; he was quite cheerful. Never spent a more pleasant hour with any person. He saw nothing more of the deceased until half-past four o'clock this morning, when he was called by a young man, named Fletcher, who slept in the same room with the deceased - in a double-bedded room. He went to the bedroom. He saw the deceased lying on the floor; he was lying on his side, and he saw him put back his hand to remove his shirt. The blood was flowing very freely from his neck. He did not see any weapon in the room. He went immediately for Mr Webb, and by the time he returned, the deceased was quite dead. - Mr Easton jun. (A Juryman) said the knife appeared very small to create so large a wound as appeared in the neck. - John Fletcher, a compositor, lodging at Mr Tancock's, slept in the same room with the deceased. The deceased was in bed when he went to the room. He conversed with the deceased for a quarter of an hour after he got into bed. His conversation was principally about the Derby Races. He appeared cheerful. About half-past four this morning, he was aroused by something falling like water on the floor. He looked to see what it was; and he saw the deceased sitting on the side of the bed, and the blood was flowing very freely from his neck. He instantly ran downstairs and told Mr Tancock of what he had seen. He heard something fall when he was downstairs. He returned with Mr Tancock to the room, and then the deceased was on the floor. He never heard deceased speak at all. Mr Webb, the surgeon, came soon after; and heard him say that he saw a penknife near the deceased. The deceased had only his shirt on. - In reply to several Jurymen, witness said that he only took a glance of the deceased, and then he ran downstairs. He did not hear any particular noise beyond the dropping of blood. He did not speak to the deceased; he was too much horrified. He could see the deceased quite plain. - Inspector Fulford produced the knife found near the deceased. The small blade was open; there was a quantity of blood about it. (The knife was handed round to the Jury; it was of the ordinary pattern, the small blade of which was quite sufficient to effect the wound in the neck.) - WILLIAM WIDGER, farmer, of Ashburton, stated that the deceased was his brother. His name was SAMUEL WIDGER. His age was about 47. He last saw the deceased about the middle of May, when he was living with him; but he left to go to the Great Exhibition in London. Deceased was a farmer, but had retired three or four years from business. He received a letter from the deceased stating that he was going to the Epsom races; and that he would return to Hereford on the 7th of June, respecting the purchase of a young bullock. He had heard the deceased say that he betted at races sometimes. He had been at Epsom before. He did not retire from business because it did not answer. When the deceased was a boy he met with a severe accident over his eye and he nearly died from it. The medical man then said that a little would upset him as he got older. He found that, as he got older, he became more irritable. When he had drank a little he would get very much excited. He thought the deceased had been affected by the kick. Very little drink would upset him. Heard him complain frequently of pains in the head. He thought that the blow in the head and the drink affected his temper and mind. - In reply to several Jurymen, witness said he did not know if the deceased had lost any money at the races; had heard him say that he had won money at the races before now. He could not recognize the knife produced; never saw him carry a pocket knife when out on the farm. - THOMAS WIDGER, another brother of the deceased, stated that he saw the deceased alive the first week in April. He knew deceased had a kick from a horse in his eye when about seven or eight years of age. Deceased was younger than himself. Deceased suffered a great deal from the kick. He would talk wild after he had drank a little; he thought that wildness had latterly increased. When in liquor he would talk of subjects he did not remember afterwards. Never heard him speak at all of destroying himself. Deceased was unmarried. He did not think money matters preyed on his mind. - By a Juryman: The deceased went solely to see the races; he had been there for the past three or four years. - [Mr Tancock here produced a gold watch and chain, a check book, and a purse containing £4 12s. 3d. found in the deceased's possession.] - The Coroner made a few observations to the Jury, who immediately returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 11 June 1862
TOTNES - At the Market-house Inn yesterday, an Inquest was held before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, Mr E. Evens, Foreman, to Enquire into the death of MR THOMAS BEABLE, of Ugborough, smith, who died suddenly at Totnes on Monday morning, as reported in our columns of yesterday. - Mr W. Oldrey, bailiff of the County Court, and Mr W. D. Narramore, clerk in the court office, gave evidence as to the entry of the deceased into the County Court office on Monday morning, between the hours of 10 and 11. Mr Narramore asked the deceased to wait until he was disengaged, when he would attend to him; but before he was ready to do so, the deceased dropped heavily by his side, and on being placed on a chair, he groaned two or three times; but before any restorative could be applied, or medical attendance afforded, life was extinct. - ARTHUR BEABLE, a son of the deceased, stated that his father had worked with him until about 9 on Monday morning, both at North Filliam, where he lived, and where he also had a shop for carrying on his trade, and also at Wrangerten, where he had another shop, and to which they had walked together from North Filliam. The deceased left Wrangerton for Totnes at about 10 o'clock, and intended to return by the midday mail train, for which purpose he had taken a return ticket. He appeared in his usual health, and better than he had been a few days previously. The only indisposition of which he had complained, was a slight giddiness and a pain in his chest, and he was also described as an abstemious man. - Thomas Edward Owen, of Totnes, surgeon, deposed that he was called into the County Court on Monday morning to see the deceased, whom he found quite dead; he could not, without making a post mortem examination, state the exact cause of death, but it might have ensued from one of three causes - disease of the heart, aneurism, or apoplexy. He did not believe it was from any other than a natural cause, but he could not say what, as he had not attended, nor did he know, the deceased. - One of the sons of the deceased, older than the one who had been examined, here stated that he recollected his father having been troubled with apoplectic fits about 20 years since, in consequence of which he had relinquished his business of a smith for some years, and turned his attention to farming, but that he had not had an attack for more than fourteen years, and was at the time of his death again following his previous trade. The deceased had been very healthy for many years past, and had only once been attended by any medical gentleman a few months since. Mr Owen said that he was still of the opinion at first expressed, and did not doubt that from some physical derangement some vessels might have bursted and caused an overflow of blood to the brain, which would produce sudden death. - The Coroner having summed up and expressed himself as satisfied with the opinion of Mr Owen, and also as considering a post mortem examination unnecessary, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes by the Visitation of God." The body was fast decomposing and much swollen and after the Inquest was removed for interment by the family.

EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Holloway-street, on the body of WILLIAM BENNETT, who died from injuries received to his leg by falling from the shafts of a waggon on which he was riding in St. Sidwells, on Ascension Day, the wheels passing over his ankle. He was picked up and conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was attended by Dr Delagarde, and the house surgeon, who considered it a bad case. Erysipelas intervening, the poor fellow succumbed. After hearing this evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 16 June 1862
TEDBURN ST MARY - On Thursday last a man named WILLIAM PLYMSELL committed suicide by hanging himself to an apple tree, at Tedburn St. Mary. An Inquest was held on Friday, before R. N. Cross, Esq., and a respectable Jury, at the Red Lion Inn, Tedburn, when a verdict was returned to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 19 June 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - Melancholy Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the White Lion, King-street, Devonport, on the body of WILLIAM BUNKER, who committed suicide by hanging himself, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury of 23 men, of whom Mr Henry Vercoe was chosen Foreman. - AGNES BUNKER said: - The deceased was my husband. He was 33 years of age. He has lately been in the employ of Mr Baker, contractor. He has been in very low spirits for a long time, and on Monday night he came home, and said the horse he had given £37 for, was not worth much. He began to sob very much. I did all I could to console him. He fed his horse and went to bed. I awoke two or three times during the night and heard him sobbing. The deceased got up at five o'clock on Tuesday morning, and got some bread and fish. He directed me to bring his breakfast to Keyham Gates between eight and nine o'clock. He has been low spirited for two years since. He was very sober, and appeared at some times lost. He was a very nervous man. I waited 20 minutes at the Keyham Gates for him, but could see nothing of him. I heard nothing further of him until a Mrs Rowe came and told me that he had hung himself. - Rebecca Titherly, who had known the deceased about two years and a half, gave corroborative evidence relative t the state of the deceased's mind. - Sampson Dawe said: - I am a labourer, working for Mr Brooking, a forager. On every Friday, Saturday and Monday, I had to put two bundles of grass into the deceased's loft for his horse. I neglected to go on Monday, but I went on Tuesday morning at about half-past ten o'clock and drew the waggon which contained the grass in front of the loft door, so that I could reach the loft door by standing on the waggon. The loft is about eight or ten feet from the ground. I pushed back the door and saw the body of a man hanging to a principal or beam by a rope, which was tied round his neck. He was about five feet from the door. I went and called a policeman, who came in about three minutes afterwards. When we returned an artilleryman had cut him down. He was lying on the floor. - Thomas Voizey, a sergeant in the Royal Artillery, stationed at the New Granby Barracks, said: - On going to the Barracks on Tuesday morning I passed the deceased's stable in Geake's Alley. I saw a waggon at the door of a loft. The last witness said a man had hung himself. I then jumped up on the waggon into the loft, and, having procured a knife, cut the deceased down. The policeman then came and searched him in my presence. His feet were touching the ground, and he was resting on his toes. His knees were bent very much. There is an opening in the floor against which a ladder is placed to go into the stable below. There was found on deceased 14s. 6d. which was in his trousers pocket, a comb, lead pencil, tobacco pouch, and the bread and fish in his other pockets. He also had a pocket knife. - P.C. Mitchell gave corroborative evidence, and stated in addition that the first thing that met his eyes, on entering the loft, was a razor lying open on a bundle of forage. - The Coroner summed up at length, and explained to the Jury the law bearing on the matter. - The Jury, without any deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 21 June 1862
EXETER - Extraordinary Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning before H. W. Hooper, Esq., and a Jury, of which Mr Richards was the Foreman at Snow's Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of JOHN TANCOCK. As far as the case has gone at present, it is involved in a great deal of mystery, and is briefly as follows:- A man named Wills, known about Exeter as the crier of "Old Chairs to mend," lived with a woman, said to be his wife, in a room over Giles' cider shop, in Rack Street. A short time since the deceased, who is a nephew of Wills, came to reside with them. Mrs Wills taking another room for him on the same floor. The two men used to go out gathering broom together, and notwithstanding the circumstance that Wills's wife had two or three times left her husband to cohabit with TANCOCK, all three, up to the 20th May, drank and generally agreed well together. On that day, however, after having been drinking cider in Giles' shop downstairs, a quarrel ensued, and this was the first symptom of disagreement. All seemed to go smoothly again, as far as the evidence went, until the 26th, when it appears that Mrs Wills gave up the key of No. 2 to Mr Elliott, agent for the landlord, and on the 27th, while Wills and his wife were drinking at Giles', deceased came home and asked for the key, which was refused him. He then threatened to break open the door, and went upstairs, followed by Mrs Wills, who soon afterwards came down for Wills to go up and turn deceased out. Wills went up, and quarrelling was heard for half-an-hour, when Wills's wife ran down stairs with a poker bearing stains of blood, and begged Mr Giles to go up or murder would be committed. Giles requested her to go for a policeman, and she went out while he went upstairs, and on the landing-place found TANCOCK lying on the top of Wills, and the floor covered with blood. A stick also stained with blood was lying on the left side of TANCOCK. Giles lifted up the latter, who went downstairs without speaking, and walked straight to the hospital, where he died on Wednesday. Wills was so ill as to require help. Blood flowed from a large cut in the temple, and it was considered he was mortally wounded. The father of deceased, a labourer of Dunsford, and Mr Giles, and his wife, were examined to shew the cause of the quarrel, and it being stated that a militiaman saw a hatchet in one of the men's hands, the coroner adjourned the case until Saturday (this day) at eleven o'clock, for the attendance of this and other witnesses.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 23 June 1862
EXETER - Death From Intemperance. - An Inquest was held at the Fireman's Arms, West-gate, Exeter, on Thursday evening, on the body of an old woman named BETTY KNIGHT, who met her death under the following circumstances:- It appeared that the old woman had long been suffering from a decayed constitution, and on Wednesday, being drunk, a stone was thrown at her by some boys. The old lady subsequently fell, and, becoming ill, Mr Cumming, Surgeon, was sent for. He ordered nourishing food and stimulants to be administered, but she never rallied and Mr Cumming now stated his belief that she died from Natural Causes, accelerated by intemperance. A verdict in accordance with these facts was returned.

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Inquest On BENJAMIN CORBER. Verdict Of Felo De Se. - It is rare, indeed, that the suicide of a man in comparatively humble life, and in its minor incidents so common, excites so large an amount of attention and interest, as has that of BENJAMIN CORBER, which we recorded on Saturday as having taken place at Milton, near Buckland Monachorum, on the preceding day. Not only the immediate neighbourhood, but the whole district, was in excitement on the event - a fact which is only compatible with the supposed connexion of the deceased with a cold-blooded tragedy, which, in 1852, filled the locality with horror. That this murder is the immediate cause of the suicide of CORBER, whether he was the guilty man or not, is beyond question. - The village of Milton is a singularly wild spot. One who is an authority on such matters expressed the general appearance of the place tersely and forcibly when he told us that it was "the most cut-throat sort of place he knew." It lies completely out of the path of ordinary business or pleasure drives; its position appears to have been chosen from the fact that there a rapid stream rushes along at the foot of thickly-wooded cliffs. It is only to be approached by a narrow, tortuous, and precipitous lane, at the end of which is an wholly illegible sign-post, and consists of some thirty cottages, in all stages of dilapidation, from the house that, twenty years ago, was gutted by fire, within which trees have now grown up, to the really habitable inn, off which the heavy rains of the district have not yet succeeded in washing the coat of paint which was once bestowed upon it. In one of these tenements a scene was enacted on the 29th of October, 1852, which created intense excitement at the time, and of which, seeing that it is intimately connected with the tragedy of Friday, we will give an outline. In a very small and rude cottage, right in the centre of what we must call the village, lived an old lady, 65 years of age, named Mary White. She had formerly, in conjunction with her son, carried on a grist mill at Milton, but the son having married, differences arose that eventually led to a separation. The son continued in the mill, and the mother went to reside in a cottage near, and opened a general shop on a small scale. She had accumulated some little property, which she foolishly kept in cash in her house. The amount is not known; it was variously estimated at from £12 to £15. On the evening of the 29th she was seen in the shop, and the following morning, in consequence of her window shutters not having been taken down, the neighbours became alarmed, and after unsuccessfully trying the door, a ladder was obtained, and the neighbours on looking in through the window saw the body of the old woman on the bed, which was much stained with blood. On going in it was found that her head had been all but separated from the body, being attached simply by a bit of skin at the back of the neck. There was no evidence of anything having been taken from the room, but the money the old woman was supposed to have had was not to be found. The first suspicion certainly pointed towards John White, the son, who had been on bad terms with his mother, and who on bringing the chief of the police at Tavistock acquainted with the fact said there was "a woman," or "an old woman with her throat cut at Milton." The Coroner's Inquest, after an adjournment, resulted in a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown." - BENJAMIN CORBER, a man 35 years of age, had long been on intimate terms with the deceased, who had been accustomed to milk his cows for him. He was a small farmer and pig jobber, and lived at a house exactly opposite and within twelve feet of that of the murdered woman. Some suspicious circumstances appearing, CORBER was apprehended on the charge of murder. The two witnesses who were supposed t be able to give important statements against him denied on examination what they had formerly alleged and almost the only evidence against him was that, on the Tuesday after the Saturday of the murder, he paid to the Messrs. Eastlake £10 for rent, due to the Rev. George Hunt, although he was known not to have had anything like that sum a few days before the murder. It was proved, on his behalf, that on the Friday night - the night previous to the murder - he was very drunk; that he and a miner, Nicholas robins, had been drunk in Tavistock, had drank more at Buckland, and come to Milton late in the evening, drunk. The prisoner CORBER was committed for trial by the magistrates, but the bill against him was thrown out by the grand jury. - CORBER has since that date continued to live at the same house, and has been regarded, as we learn, with considerable aversion and distrust by his neighbours. It was generally supposed that two men were concerned in the murder; and CORBER and Robins were rightly or wrongly pitched upon by their neighbours as the culprits. That it was done by someone who knew the premises thoroughly there could be no question. Robins left the country: CORBER lived soberly and steadily for some years, having given up his drunken habits and become a teetotaller. Two years ago, however, he started a beer house - the second in the little village - and then his sobriety vanished and he again became a drunkard. This has especially been the case during the last two months. - A circumstance occurred last autumn which again drew down suspicion on the head of CORBER, and caused his neighbours anew to turn to him the cold shoulder. A man named Holwill, a leading stoker on board H.M.S. Indus, came before the magistrates at Stonehouse, and stated that in August 1860, when at Rio Janeiro, a man named robins told him that he murdered old Mary White at Milton, in Buckland, and that CORBER was wrongfully accused of the murder. Robins said he did the murder, and took away £75 from the house. Holwill said when Robins told this he was apparently sober, and he evidently knew the neighbourhood very well. When Holwill began to question him as to his connections in the neighbourhood, he refused to say any more; and the next time he saw him he pretended not to be able to speak English. Before leaving Rio, Holwill learnt that Robins had hung himself. CORBER'S sister interested herself to have Holwill's statement made public. Prior to this there had been several stories about the murder, but they had all left the affair as mysterious as it was before. CORBER has continued steadily to deny that he was connected with the affair. Of late, however, he has complained that he had something dreadful on his mind which would not allow him to be alone, that his life was a burden to him, and he wished he was dead; and only last week he told a neighbour that he should soon be dead; that "he should be in hell before Saturday night." Before that Saturday night came he had hung himself to a beam in an outhouse of his own dwelling, under circumstances fully detailed in the following evidence:- The Inquest. - Was held in the house of the deceased, the "Welcome Inn," in the village of Milton, on Saturday morning, before the Coroner for this portion of the county, A. B. Bone, Esq. The Jury comprised the following inhabitants of Milton and Buckland: Mr George Gidley, who was chosen Foreman; and Messrs. John Gusthan, Thomas Spry, Thomas Ford, Simeon Uren, James Beer, Robert Glanville, James Beer, jun., William Chowen, John Hamblin, Thomas Wheaton, William Lickman, Thomas Austen, John Brown, William Picke, Christopher Lethbridge, Philip Smallacombe, Saml. Venner, William Worth, William Gill, John Bryant, Edward Tavaner, and William Austin. - The Jury having been sworn, the proceeded to view the body. It was that of a large-made and full-grown man. Around his neck was discernible a very slight discolouration. The features wore an aspect of heaviness and at the same time of great determination. - The Jury then returned to the room and the following evidence was adduced. By her express and very urgent desire, the wife of the deceased was present during the whole proceedings. - SUSANNAH CORBER, the widow of the deceased, BENJAMIN CORBER, said: My husband was a farmer; he kept pigs and cows. He lived in the house where we now are at Milton, in the parish of Buckland Monachorum. His age was forty-seven years. His family consists of six children of whom four live at home with me. I last saw him alive yesterday morning, the 20th inst., about half-past seven o'clock. He had milked the cows and fed he pigs. After he had done that he was in the kitchen washing his face and hands, when he said he would go up to Mr Fowler's to return the horse which he had borrowed. Mr Fowler is a farmer, living at Tamerton. Deceased said if he could get a drink he would take his hat and go on, and I said to him that he had better take a cup of tea, which was then on the table, and that there was also a bit of fish on the table which he could have. He made no reply, but he went out of the kitchen by the back door, and I never saw him afterwards alive. He went out alone. He got up that morning between six and seven his usual time. He said nothing on getting up - he dressed and went downstairs without saying anything. He lit the fire in the kitchen as usual, and put the kettle on the fire. We were on very good terms, and had never had an angry word all the previous day. I have not had any angry words for some time, beyond my asking him not to drink. - Coroner: What have been his habits the last three or four weeks? - Witness: He has drank freely for some weeks past; he has frequently been the worse for liquor. He has been lately cross with me. - Coroner: Has he said anything to you lately about the state of his mind particularly? - Witness: A few days since he said to me, "Oh, I wish I was dead." I said, "That is a bad wish for you, with all your little children about you." He said "You could do better without me than with me." I said, "I am sure I could not." I have heard him say a good many times when he has been drinking that he wished he was dead. On the morning, soon after he went out of the house - I heard that he was dead. He would often say when he had drank that it was hard that an innocent man should suffer what he had done by being taken to Exeter. He said that he had been an innocent man, he was innocent of the murder of Mary White, and he said that Mr Beer and the witnesses had sworn false against him, and that Mr Gill, the magistrate, was an old rogue for listening to him. As soon as I heard the deceased was dead I went to see him. It was about ten minutes after he had left the house that I went to the pound chamber, at the back of the dwelling house, and saw my son JOHN, who is about seventeen years of age, supporting him. I said, "Is he dead?" and my son said, "Yes, he is." My husband's blood relations live at Plympton St. Mary. I have known the family a long while. - Coroner: Have you ever known any of his family out of their mind? - Witness: His brother was confined in the Devon County Asylum for a long time, and he died about three or four years ago in that asylum. - The Coroner: Have you ever seen anything to induce you to believe that your husband was out of his mind? - Witness: No, sir; I never saw any appearance of insanity about him, except that he was cross when he was in drink. - Coroner: At the time of the something of which he said he was innocent, was he given to drink? - Witness: Yes he was. He has always from a child been given to drink more than others. About three years ago he became a teetoller, and he kept to that for two or three years. He then broke out as he was before, and gave way as he used to. For the last five weeks he has given way a good deal. He has been lately saying that we were getting back in the world, and we should be in the Union soon. He said this almost every day lately. We had had bad luck lately, I believe. - JOHN CORBER, an intelligent-looking farm labourer sworn, said: The late BENJAMIN CORBER was my father, and I lived with him in this house. Yesterday morning I first saw him about 7 o'clock when he was milking the cows. I saw nothing peculiar or unusual about him then. He afterwards told me that I was to put the tackle (harness) on the horses; he meant the horses one of which was his own and one Mr Fowler's. He said he was going up to Mr Fowler's with a horse. I was not going with him, but my little brother was. I never saw him afterwards alive. - Coroner, to MR CORBER: When did his brother become insane, as near as you can judge? - MR CORBER: I should think that it is 10 or 15 years ago. He did 4 or 5 years ago. There was no particular circumstance which affected his mind that I know, except that he fancied he was become poor. - Examination of JOHN CORBER resumed: About a quarter of an hour afterwards, my younger brother called me from the kitchen; and, in consequence of what he said, I went from the house into the pound chamber, the door of which was open. I there saw my father hanging up by a rope, one end of which was fastened round the shelf on which they used to put apples; it was round the wall of the pound house. The shelf was about 7 or 8 feet high from the ground. The rope was fastened - one end round the beam and the other round deceased's neck. His body was quite still. He was then dead. He was down on his knees, and the body was leaning backward. There was no one else in the pound chamber. I then cut the rope with a knife and took the deceased down. I laid him down on the ground, and then called for assistance. Mr Samuel Quick, a neighbour, then came to the spot. The deceased was dressed just as I had seen him when milking the cows. He had no hat on his head. He had a hat on when he was milking. He had nothing in his hands. - Coroner: Do you know what rope it was he was hanging with? - Witness: It was a common cow slip that the cows are tied up with. He had no rope in his hand when I saw him milking. The rope was tight around his neck. - Coroner: Have you ever heard your father say anything that alarmed you? - Witness: No, sir. Coroner: Have you ever heard him say he wished he was dead? - Witness: No, sir - I went for the doctor at my mother's request, and Mr Willis, the surgeon, came about an hour and a half after. The doctor bled him in his arm. I did not see him bled. - By the Jury: Deceased was resting on his knees, and his feet were on the ground behind him; his toes down on the floor. - A Juror: Had the rope slipped, or anything, for I can hardly understand his being hung like that to be dead? - Witness: As he was hanging, the rope was tight round his neck. There was not much spare rope between the deceased and the ceiling. I cut the noose of the rope. - The Coroner: It is very possible that, when deceased became unconscious, his body was in a different position, so that he was suffocated. If the shelf to which the rope was attached was, as is said, about 6 feet 6 inches high, the rope would have come within about 3 feet of the ground. (To Witness): Did you see any stool or anything from which deceased might have slung off? - Witness: No, sir, I did not. The shelf now produced is the same I have spoken of. - Mr John Freeman said: I am superintendent of police for the H Division of the Devon County Constabulary. I produce the shelf which I have taken from the pound chamber of the house. I visited the chamber in the presence of the last witness this morning. I put the rope round the shelf, and asked if it was the same as that on which he had found deceased suspended; and he said it was. The shelf was fixed in the wall of the pound chamber at a height of 6 feet, and between 3 and 4 inches from the floor. One end of the rope was round a support of the shelf fixed in the wall. The spare end of the rope was about three or four inches long. The length of the pendant, perpendicular part of the rope without the loop was 2 feet 2 inches when the rope was round the neck. - A Juror: Deceased must have thrown his weight quite off his legs. - The Coroner: He must have bent his knees so as to bring the strain of the rope upon his neck. - Superintendent Freeman: The noose was not tight round his neck, but was quite loose. - A Juror: Then he must have thrown his weight on his neck in a very determined manner. - Superintendent Freeman: The door of the pound chamber could not be fastened on the inside. - Mr John Hodge sworn, said: I am a retired farmer, and live at the village of Milton. The deceased was a tenant of mine; he rented about twenty acres of land, and the dwelling-house in which his body now lies. His rent was back a little; at Midsummer there would have been twelve months' rent due. I never had any words with deceased: we were always particular friends. He has never said anything particular to me about committing this deed. I have never seen anything particular about him till the last few weeks. He was not minding his work as he used to, but as he was out drinking, I thought it was that. He was always a very steady man while he was a teetotaller. I saw him last alive last Wednesday; he passed by, and he nodded as he went on in a friendly way. I have not had any conversation with him for the last three weeks that I know of. I can give no further information about the matter. - Mr John Kinsman, sworn, said: I keep a beer-shop in Milton. There are two beer-shops there - the deceased's and mine. Deceased was in the habit of coming in to my house occasionally. During the last few weeks he has come pretty frequently - three or four times a week. I have seen him the worse for liquor, but not tipsy He has not said anything to me that was remarkable, except that in coming back from Buckland Fair last Monday night he said that the opening of this beer-shop was his ruin. He said he had lost £30 this year, and could not give any account of it. I have never heard him say he wished he was dead, or anything of the kind. I saw him yesterday morning, about half-past six, and then he seemed as usual - there was no difference about him. I said, "Good morning," and he did not take any notice: I don't expect he heeded me. He was alone. - Mr John Helson, sworn, said: I am a smith, living just below. I have known deceased 14 or 15 years. About the 16th of April last, I came home with him from Jump Fair. I assisted him home, for he was rather tipsy. - Coroner: Did he appear to you to understand what he was saying? - Witness: I don't know whether he did or not; he seemed to be tipsy. He said to me several times that he was dying, and that he would be dead and in hell before Saturday night. I persuaded him to look to something better, and not to give way like that. He did not say anything else. - The Superintendent of Police said that the house had been searched to see if there were any papers of importance, but none were found. - This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner addressed the Jury. He said: Gentlemen, the circumstances of this case, serious as they are, are so very plain and simple that I scarcely think it necessary to read over to you the particulars of the evidence which has been adduced. The first point which it is your duty to determine is whether the deceased has taken his own life, and the circumstances are such as to leave you without any doubt on that head. The next question for your consideration is, whether evidence has been brought before you to show whether the deceased was at the time of committing the act in an insane state of mind. Gentlemen, it is my duty to tell you that, by law, every homicide is deemed to be felonious unless the contrary is shown; and, therefore, if a man either takes his own life or the life of another, the presumption of the law is that he has done so feloniously, unless that presumption is reversed by evidence proving that at the time the act was committed the person who did it was in a state of insanity. Mind, gentlemen, insanity by law does not consist in mere lowness of spirits or hypochondrias, but it means that the man is in that condition of mind which precludes him from making the necessary distinctions between right and wrong, and if he is proved to be unable to make those distinctions the law does not hold him to be responsible for what he does. The same conditions of mind which would excuse a man in the eye of the law for taking his own life would also be for him a valid excuse had he taken the life of another. The question for you to consider is, whether the deceased was in such a state of mind that had he committed a robbery or a murder or any other crime the law would not hold him responsible. There is not a particle of evidence in this case of insanity on the part of the deceased, unless we can accept as such what has been said by MRS CORBER with regard to his brother having been insane. But that does not appear to me to be evidence in this case at all. I confess to you, with some pain, that I can see no evidence to show the deceased to be insane. It is, however, for you to apply the law which I have to explain, and it is for you to return your verdict, and not me. At the same time, I must remind you that I have taken a solemn oath to discharge my duty, and that you have each of you sworn to perform yours, without reference to personal feelings, prepossessions, or preferences; that is your duty to your God, your country and to the law. I have now endeavoured to explain to you what insanity is and what the law is, and if there is no evidence that the deceased, at the time he hung himself, was insane, it will be for you to return a verdict of felo-de-se; if there is such evidence in your judgment, you will then return a verdict of temporary insanity. - The Court was then cleared, and the Jury were left alone. In a quarter of an hour the public were re-admitted, when The Coroner, addressing the reporters and public, said - It is right that I should inform you that the Jury have informed me that three of their number have important evidence to give. I have, therefore, thought it was desirable to discharge these three from the Jury, and will proceed to take their evidence. - Mr Thomas Spry, sworn, said: I am a mason, living in this village and deceased used to work for me occasionally on some ground which I rent. In the matter end of March last, at about half-past one in the afternoon, I called to deceased, who was in a field at work, and asked him if he and his men could come and take in a little hay for me, and he said he could not let his men go, and could not go himself, for there was something the matter with him that he was afraid to stay in the field by himself, or to take in the hay by himself. I met deceased last Tuesday below Littipits, and he said he was going to Bickham. At that time he was half a mile further from Bickham than he would have been at his own house. - By the Jury: There are two Bickhams - one Bicham's Bulteels and the other Mr Gill's Bickham, but he was not going towards either. - A Juror: He was then in the right road to go to Mr Gill's Bickham. - Another Juror: He was then going to borrow the horse of Mr Fowler. - Thomas Wheaton, residing at Milton, labourer, said that 3 weeks or a month ago he saw deceased at his house. Deceased said he was so bad he could not go into the fields to work or stay there; it was always troubling his mind. He said he believed it was owing to the false accusations which had been brought against him, and he should not live in that state of mind long. - Mr William Austin, sworn said: I live at Milton, and am a carpenter and wheelwright. The deceased has frequently been in my shop for 3 or 4 weeks past. He has had a deal of talk about this country and about other countries, saying that he had no heart to do anything here, as everything went against him. He said, "My head gets so muddly that I hardly know what I am about." - The Coroner then again briefly addressed the Jury, reading over the evidence which had been given by the three last witnesses. That evidence, he said, did not show that the deceased was out of his mind, it only indicated that he was uneasy, and that there was something pressing on his mind which caused him not to like to be by himself. Would that amount of evidence excuse a man from the commission of any crime, or warrant his detention in a madhouse? for if a man was insane he ought to be under control or restraint, and was not fit to be at large. - The Jury then consulted alone for another quarter of an hour, when the public were re-admitted and a list was handed in, which showed that of the 20 Jurors in the room, 18 were of opinion that the deceased was of a sound mind, and two that he was unsound. The two were Messrs. Hamblin and Ford. The Coroner said that the Jury had done more by that decision than they had any need to do. It was not necessary that they should have decided that the deceased was sane, but to say whether any evidence had been brought before them that he was insane - a widely different matter. The verdict, therefore, was as follows:- "That the said BENJAMIN CORBER did, at the parish of Buckland Monachorum, in the said county, on the 20th day of June, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty-two, feloniously, wilfully and of malice aforethought, kill and murder himself, by hanging himself by the neck, against the peace of our sovereign lady the Queen, her crown and dignity." - The Coroner said that this verdict having been returned, it was necessary by law that the deceased should be buried between the hours of nine and twelve at night, within the twenty-four hours of the time of the verdict being given, and without the rights of Christian burial. It was necessary, therefore, that the body be interred that night, between nine and twelve. - Instructions having been given to the police to see this carried into effect, the proceedings terminated.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 24 June 1862
PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide Of A Young Woman In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Saltram Tavern, Sussex-place, Plymouth, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of JESSIE FERRIS, aged 18 years, who had committed suicide on Saturday night, by jumping into the water under the Hoe. The following evidence was adduced:- MARY PEARCE said: I am the wife of EDWARD PEARCE and live at No. 8 Lower Batter-street, Plymouth. My husband is a labourer at Staddon Heights. The deceased was my daughter, an illegitimate child. She was about 18 years of age. She was a general domestic servant at a lodging house in Plymouth. She left that service a fortnight ago. Since that she has lived with me, and slept at my house. She intended going home to her grandmother, who lives two miles the other side of Modbury. She was brought up by her grandmother from an infant. The deceased left my house on Saturday evening at about 7 o'clock. She was not in company with anyone, and did not say what time she would return. She had told me that she was going to meet Brice, the soldier. She appeared in very good spirits when she left, but through the week, from Tuesday to Saturday, she was very low-spirited at times, and I saw her in tears, and she would get away to the top of the house alone. I asked her what was the matter frequently, but she would not tell me and expressed sorrow at having left her situation so quickly. My husband and myself waited up all Saturday night, and he went about the streets looking for deceased. The body, which the Coroner and Jury have viewed in my presence at the tool house under the Hoe, is that of the deceased. She told me that she was going to be married at the end of next month and intended to return to her grandmother until that time. She did not return home on Thursday night until half-past 12 o'clock. - George Brice, a private in the 1st Company of the Royal Engineers, bearing a good conduct stripe on his arm, said: I am stationed at Mount Wise barracks, Devonport. I have known deceased since the day after Good Friday last. I courted her and promised her marriage next month. On Saturday night last, about eight o'clock she came to me, and I met her at Devonport hill. I was in her company until half-past eleven o'clock, when I parted with her at Harvey's Hotel. We had been in a public-house at Stonehouse for about an hour and a half. I had some ale and deceased drank about half a glass. We parted down by Harvey's Hotel, opposite the Royal Hotel. Just before we parted she asked me if I would go to walk with her on Sunday evening. I answered her rather sharply I would not, but I said I might be out about six o'clock in the evening. She appeared to take it to heart. She grasped me by the hand; my time was up, as I had to be in my barracks at 12, and I pulled my hand away. I went on to Devonport, and I saw her turn and go up the street towards the Hoe. I did not observe anything particular in her manner all the evening until we parted. I never thought that she would have drowned herself. - Richard William Weale said: I am a boatman belonging to the coastguard stationed at Stonehouse Point. On Saturday night, just after twelve, I was continuing my duty under the Hoe. I was patrolling my guard from the eastward to the westward, and I was leaning over the wall of the ladies' bathing lace, looking on the beach. I saw upon the steps something dark. I examined it and found it to be a bonnet and a mantle belonging to a female. I could see or hear nothing then. I went a little further down, looking on the beach, but could see nothing. Looking along the eastward I saw something on the sea wall, but could not tell at that time whether it was one or two persons. I went on a little further to ascertain what it was, when I saw the deceased jump off the wall into the water of Plymouth Sound. As she jumped off the wall I heard a sigh or groan. I ran as quickly as possible to the spot, pulling off my clothes as I ran along, with the intention of jumping over to try to save her. When I got to the wall, I found it was a very difficult place, there being no way to get down unless I jumped off. The height of the wall was about 9 or 10 feet. It was then nearly high water. I saw the deceased in the water. She did not speak to me although I spoke to her. I found that my life was in danger if I went down, and I determined to get assistance. I think deceased was on the top of the water when I left. I went towards the Hoe Constable's residence, and met a man and claimed his assistance. We went together to Mr Kessell and he immediately accompanied me with the man to the spot, and recovered the body. There was no person near deceased when she jumped overboard. - Edward James Kessell said: I am the Hoe Constable. On Saturday night, shortly after 12 o'clock, the last witness and a man called John Brooks came to my house. I got out of bed, dressed myself, took a boat hook and grappling iron, and went to the ladies' bathing place. The last witness pointed out to be where the deceased jumped from. We used the boat hook and the grappling iron for half an hour, and at last got hold of deceased. She was quite dead. After considerable difficulty, all three of us at length got her body out of the water, and deposited it in the tool-house about two o'clock. I found in her pocket a purse containing half-a-crown, one penny, three half-penny gate tickets and a pair of gloves. - The Coroner then addressed the Jury, and said the main question for their consideration was the state of mind in which the deceased was when she committed this rash act. If they thought she was in a sound state of mind at the moment she committed the act, then their verdict must be that she feloniously destroyed herself, and the consequences must follow. - The Jury were unanimously of opinion that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, and, accordingly, returned a verdict to that effect.

MANATON - Suicide Of A Young Woman At Manaton. - An Inquest was held yesterday before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, Mr Thomas Drake, Foreman, at the house of Mr James Stephens, known as Hedge Barton, in the parish of Manaton, on the body of a young woman aged 18 years, named ANN FRENCH, who committed suicide by drowning herself in a pond of water near the house on Friday last, it is supposed from fear of punishment for stealing certain money belonging to a young man who lived in her master's house, and of which she had been accused, the particulars of which will be found in the following evidence taken at the Inquest:- The first witness was Mr James Stephens, with whom the young woman lives as servant, who deposed as follows: I am a bailiff, and reside at Hedge Barton, in the parish of Manaton. ANN FRENCH, now lying here dead, and whose body the Coroner and Jury have just seen, was my servant. I last saw her last alive on Friday evening in my house a little after seven o'clock. I then left the house. About three-quarters of an hour after, I was passing a pond about a hundred landyards from the house, and I saw the body of a female in the water; I saw it was ANN FRENCH. I came into my house and got assistance, and took the body out; she was quite dead. The water was about two feet and a half deep. She was on her back. There is a wound on her throat, but insufficient to occasion death. I found a knife in her pocket, but did not discover any blood on it. I produce the knife; it is a small table knife. Henry Huxham, who lives as a servant with Mr Holloway in the house adjoining, lodges in my house. On Friday last he missed one shilling which he had marked. He came to me and told me of the loss. I called ANN FRENCH into the kitchen, and told her there was something wrong in the house. I did not accuse her of stealing the money, but I told her the money was missing, and said, "There must be a rogue in the house; if it is not you it must be my mistress or myself, because we are the only three in the house." I then asked her if she had any money marked like some pieces of coin I had from Huxham. I showed her the marked money. I said I should leek to see her money. She said she would get it directly, and with the same she went upstairs, my wife following her, and brought down all the money she had in her possession. There were two half-crows, and four shillings and sixpence in coppers. Huxham immediately picked out one of the shillings which was marked - and claimed it as his. He thought he had lost money before, and that caused him to mark it. ANN FRENCH denied taking the money and she seemed confused. This occurred the same evening - that is, on Friday - not more than five minutes before I left the house. She would not own taking the money, and I said, "I shall be obliged to get a policeman." I then left the house, and called to Henry Huxham, and said I should send for her father to take her home that night, which I did. ANN FRENCH did not know I had sent for her father. I had not observed any peculiarity in her mind before this time. She seemed very much excited about the matter. She was about eighteen years of age, and had lived with me about eighteen months. Her father came for her the same night, after I had sent for him to take her home, but she was dead before he came. Henry Huxham left the house with me, and was in my company the whole of the time, excepting about five minutes before I found the deceased. - Matilda Stephens, wife of the above witness, stated that she was present when the deceased was accused of stealing the money, and that she afterwards saw her go out at the gate, as she thought to fetch the geese. She was going in the direction of the pond where her body was found. I had not noticed any peculiarity in her manner. Previous to this accusation, she was always a lively girl. I saw her fetch the purse from a basket in her window, and my husband opened it as described. It is the same as produced. - Henry Huxham sworn, deposed as follows: Previously to last Friday I had lost some money, which caused me to mark some. On Friday I lost one of the marked pieces, a shilling. I told Mr Stephens of it, and I heard him speak to ANN FRENCH about it. She denied taking the money. Mr Stephens sent her to fetch her money, and, on her doing so, I recognised a shilling as my property. (The witness here described and identified it by certain marks he had made.) She still denied taking it, and seemed excited. Mr Stephens said, as I was leaving, "It will be the worse for you, ANN;" and to me he said, "You had better get a policeman." I then left, and Mr Stephens came after me and said he would send for her father. I did not see her alive afterwards. The money lost was left in my trousers' pocket, in my bedroom. She had occasion to go into my room to make my bed. - George Nelson Collyns, Esq., of Moretonhampstead, deposed as follows:- I am a surgeon, residing and practising at Moretonhampstead. On Friday evening last I was called to see ANN FRENCH. I found her quite dead. I examined her throat: there was a wound in it, but insufficient to cause death. The wound appeared to have been made by a blunt instrument. I think the knife now produced was very probably the instrument used. It was a stab and not a cut across the throat. The cause of her death was suffocation from drowning. - The Coroner summed up on the evidence offered as to the cause of death, and also as to the motive which might have influenced the deceased in meditating her own destruction in order to avoid the exposure of a charge for theft; but as no evidence or proof could be given as to her state of mind at the time, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased "Drowned herself in a certain pond, but that there is no evidence to satisfy the Jurors as to the state of mind of the said ANN FRENCH at the time she so destroyed herself."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Drowning At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon, before the Coroner, Allan B. Bone, Esq., on the body of HUGH MCVAY, mate of the schooner Problem. - John Mines said: I am a labourer engaged in unloading the schooner Problem. On Saturday last I went to work on the quay at six o'clock, when the captain called to me and said, "Do you see that?" pointing under the ship. I looked down and saw the arm and leg of a man. I went to the police-station for a policeman and on my return I got under the ship, the tide having risen. I tied a rope to one of his legs and pulled him up. He has a bruise on his left eye. His right chest is very red, as if it had been much rubbed. - William Frost, a beer house keeper, said: The deceased came to my house last Friday evening, and he had a pint of beer, and left, saying, "Good night." - Henry Wheeler, captain of the schooner Problem, said he last saw the deceased, who was mate of the Problem, at about nine o'clock on Friday evening. He went on shore in the boat. The vessel was lying about six feet from Mr Roach's Wharf. Witness saw the deceased's "sou'-wester" on the quay. The planks were all ashore. He was a good sailor when at sea. - Sergeant Ockford said: On Saturday morning, at ten o'clock, I went to the quay and found the deceased lying in an outhouse. On examining the double-doors I found a staple on the top of the door, to which was tied a rope, so that anyone could catch hold of the rope and climb up the door. I searched the body, but nothing was found on it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 1 July 1862
PLYMSTOCK - The Fatal Explosion At Lang's Quarry. - In our Friday's issue we recorded a most melancholy and fatal accident which occurred at Lang's Quarry, near Plymstock, in consequence of the explosion of a rock. A hole had been bored and filled with powder for the purpose of blasting. The match was applied, but the hole hung fire. Two men named THOMAS JACOBS and Samuel Bunker went forward to ascertain the cause, when the hole suddenly exploded; killing JACOBS on the spot and frightfully injuring BUNKER. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last, on the body of JACOBS, at Pomphlete, near Plymstock, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for this district, and a Jury, of whom Mr Samuel Perry was chosen Foreman. The above facts were deposed to and the Jury arrived at a verdict of "Accidental Death." On making enquiries we find that Samuel Bunker, the other man who was much burnt, is progressing favourably.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 2 July 1862
PLYMOUTH - Inquest On An Infant. Last evening an Inquest was held at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of an infant named JAMES RAINS. - Mrs Grace Wiseman, wife of Benjamin Wiseman, labourer, said that the deceased was about six months old, and was the illegitimate child of JANE RAINS, a servant. Witness took the deceased to nurse when he was five weeks old. He was an unhealthy child - very delicate. Witness dry-nursed the deceased with baked flour, corn-flour and bread and milk. She received 3s. 6d. a week for nursing him, which was paid regularly. The child became worse, and she took him to Mr Burdwood, chemist, of Frankfort-street, who gave her medicine, which she duly administered. By his recommendation, she took the deceased to Mr Jago's surgery, as it appeared to get worse, but the surgeon was out twice when she called. Two days after deceased became worse and died in her arms. - Mr James Burdwood deposed to having seen the child, and made up medicine for it and advised that if it did not get better it should be taken to a surgeon. - Jane Westham, wife of Oliver Westham, labourer, said she knew the child, by seeing it from her door since it had been nursed by Mrs Wiseman. It appeared a weakly child. On Friday last witness advised her to take the deceased to a chemist. She always appeared to take every care of the child. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 4 July 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident to An Artilleryman. - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of JAMES CHARLES HORSWELL, 34, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner and a Jury, of which Mr Moses Delion was the Foreman. - MARIA HORSWELL said: I am the wife of the deceased; he formerly belonged to the Artillery, from which he has since been pensioned. On Friday last, he and myself went into Major Stawell's service, and on Monday morning he went out with a horse and on returning he said he had got on very well, but the horse was rather spirited. I think there was something the matter with deceased's heart. I know he had palpitation of the heart, and also asthma. He had been attended by medical men for that purpose. - Mr Jonas Stawell, barrack-master at Devonport, said: The deceased came into my service on Friday last; his wife - the last witness - had been in my service some time before, and on Monday he took out the horse. I last saw the deceased on Monday evening, at half-past ten. The horse was led into the yard by a man. I have had the horse 18 months or more, and I have ridden it myself. I think it is a steady animal; it is a strong trotting horse. - George Cragoe, a mason, said he saw a man on horseback as he was standing at the corner of the lane leading to the Block House at a few minutes before seven on Tuesday morning. It was cantering along when he saw it, and the man had one hand on the horses' shoulder and the other on the mane, with his legs out of the stirrups. About a quarter of an hour afterwards he saw, as he was going down Addington-street, a horse without a man on it. He found out who it belonged to and took it to Major Stawell's. - George Dyer said he saw deceased fall from the horse, and also watched him from the top of the street, and he appeared very much excited. Deceased had hold of the horse's mane with both hands, and on coming near witness the horse increased his speed and the deceased caught hold of him by the neck, and the horse dipped his head and threw deceased over on to the ground, where the deceased lay stretched out as if he were dead. - Mr John Sanders, builder, said he arrived on the spot soon after the accident occurred, and had him taken to the Mason's Arms in Navy row, where he died about twenty minutes after the accident. - William Wakeham said he cautioned the deceased on his getting on the horse, as he did not think he knew the way to ride a horse properly. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 5 July 1862
PLYMOUTH - Recovery Of The Body Of One Of The Men Belonging To The "Crystal Palace." - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday afternoon, at five o'clock, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE SARGENT, whose body had been picked up that morning in the Sound, and who was supposed to have belonged to the "Crystal Palace," fishing boat, of Hastings, which foundered outside the Breakwater, on Sunday, the 9th of March last. Mr Robert Rooke was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The body was received at the Dead House, in Westwell-street, by the Coroner, Jury and Witnesses. The body was in a sickening state of decomposition, the legs and thighs being entirely gone. The flesh of the head was also gone, the skull only remaining. On returning to the Guildhall, the following evidence was taken:- Louisa Peters, the wife of William Peters, a fisherman, residing at No. 5, Parade, Plymouth, said she had known the deceased for about 15 years. He was a seaman belonging to the "Crystal Palace," fishing boat, of Hastings. George Page was the master of the boat. The boat was employed in the mackerel fisher. Deceased was about 32 years of age. when home he lived at No. 39, All Saints-street, Hastings. He has left a widow and two children, the last of whom was born on the day that he died - namely, the 9th of March. The body which the Coroner and Jury had viewed in her presence, at the Dead House, in Westwell-street, was the body of the deceased. She had washed his clothes many times. The body was very much decomposed. She knew him by the general dress, and the mark "G.S." on his inside flannel shirt. She was sure it was GEORGE SARGENT. She recollected the 9th of March last; it blew a gale from S.S.W. In that gale the "Crystal Palace" foundered outside the Breakwater, and all hands - seven men and a boy - she believed were drowned, including the deceased. - William Henry Mills, a fisherman's labourer, living at No. 6 Castle-street, Plymouth, said, in consequence of information he received he went to the Sound that morning, at about ten o'clock, and received the body of the deceased from William Macey, skipper of the "Star." The "Star" was then just inside the Breakwater. The body was picked up just inside the Breakwater. He delivered the body to P.C. Fuge. - The Coroner: Do they expect an award for picking the body up? - Witness: I don't know sir. - The Coroner: If they d I think they should have brought it in. - P.C. Fuge said he received the body of deceased between twelve and one o'clock that day. He caused it to be conveyed to the Dead House in Westwell-street. The last witness cut deceased's clothes open, and on the inside flannel shirt, he found two letters marked "G.S." The thighs and legs of the deceased were entirely gone. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Allan B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury of twenty-three, of whom Mr Robert was the Foreman, on the body of ELIZABETH GEACH, aged 56, who committed suicide by hanging herself on Thursday last. - Thomas Rennolls said: I live at the Boot Inn, Devonport and on Thursday morning, as I was going down Tavistock-street towards the Market, I heard the cry of a woman in one of the houses. I went a little way down the street when I heard somebody crying "Murder!" and I saw a woman running about. After some time I got her to show me to a room, where I saw the body of a woman hanging to a bedstead by a pocket handkerchief round her neck. I instantly cut her down. Her feet were hanging about 18 inches from the floor. I went for a policeman, and, on finding one, we went together to deceased's room, and sent for a doctor. - MARY SOMERVILLE said: I am the sister to the deceased, and she is a widow and has a stall in the Market. We slept in the same room, and on Wednesday night, between 11 and 12 o'clock, I was sitting there; my sister was walking up and down in a very excited state. She said we must not go to bed, for somebody was coming to turn us out of the house, and she would not have any bed to lay her head upon. In about an hour afterwards she said to me, "You had better undress the child and put him to bed," and added, "You won't see me any more." At two o'clock she came into my room and said, "If we do not meet again here I hope we shall in Heaven." I asked if she meant to destroy herself, and she said, "No, I do not mean to do so." She said she could soon stop that, and if I would not go to bed with her she would go by herself. She once said something about changing her clothes, for somebody was coming to take her away, and they should take her away clean. I afterwards heard a creaking noise, which I thought was her opening the drawers for the changes. I went to her door and looked through the keyhole, and I thought I saw her hanging, when I cried out for help. I do not know whether I opened the door or not. I opened the door at the top of the stairs with a knife, for she had locked it, and went upstairs and asked Mrs Pekin to come to her assistance, and she said he could not come. I went downstairs and a gentleman went up and cut her down. - Elizabeth Thomas said the deceased was a very sober woman, and she was a very good woman. On the Thursday morning witness heard a great noise and on going upstairs found that the deceased had hung herself. - Sarah Pekin said: On Thursday morning after daylight I heard the deceased say to her sister, "Why don't you come to bed, MARY?" Her sister replied, "I shan't." About six in the morning she came up to me for assistance, and I told her to go down to the front door and she could get plenty there. - Sarah Luke said: I keep a stall in the market next to the deceased, and we have known each other for ten years. Of late she has been in a bad state of mind, and on the morning the Freemasons walked she came to me and said, "What do you think I have been doing all night? I have been up and have been very busy. I have not had a minute to spare. I have been cutting up things all night, and have thrown them out of the window. I have had a very large fire all night, and have burnt a chair because they should not have it, and about three o'clock I went up in John-street and sat on a door-step and counted my money; but I feel better now." I think the deceased has been much better until Saturday, when she became in a very desponding state, frequently saying that she owed a great deal of money, and the bailiffs were coming to sell her things, so that she would have no bed to lay her head on. - Henry Davey said: I have served the deceased with potatoes for two years, and during that time she has kept up her payments very well. She hardly owes me anything. I have of late thought she was not in her right state of mind, as she has frequently ordered things and then sent all the way into Plymouth to stop them, and on my coming for orders she would want to know why I did not send the last. - P.C. Mitchell said: On Thursday morning, at twenty minutes before ten, I went to the deceased's room, in Tavistock-street, where she had hung herself. I took the pocket handkerchief from off her neck and in searching the room I found £11 10s. in gold, and 17s. 9 ½d. in silver and coppers. - Sarah Greenwood said she had known the deceased for forty years, and had always found her a very steady and honest woman. On Wednesday deceased came to witness's house, and said she was in great trouble - she was in debt everywhere. Everybody was talking about her, and saying that her landlord was going to turn her out of doors for rent. Her creditors were going to put her in the county court, and she was in great trouble. On coming in deceased would shut the door and keep on asking if anybody was coming for her. She would peep out of the door and throw her arms about as if she was out of her mind. - The Coroner having summed up at some length, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased hung herself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." - The Jury wished the Coroner to remonstrate with the deceased's sister on her conduct and she was, consequently, called, when, the Coroner censured her for her drunken habits, as deposed to by several of the witnesses, who had stated that she was drunk on Thursday morning, and that such was her usual practice. He had also heard that she went out sometimes and stayed for two or three days at a time, and one witness had said that she never saw her sober. He warned her that that was a very bad way of living; that she would be sure to come to some bad end if she did not change her mode of life. He did not think that any woman in her right senses would have allowed her sister to stay in a room all night after what she had said, and thus to have an opportunity to hang herself, knowing at the time the state she was in.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 8 July 1862
STOKE DAMEREL - Another Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon on the body of JOHN KNAPMAN, aged 67, who had committed suicide by hanging himself at eleven o'clock that morning. A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, presided, and the Jury consisted of twenty-three gentlemen, of whom Mr Bond was the Foreman. - HENRY KNAPMAN, son to the deceased, said he was a sawyer in the Dockyard. He last saw the deceased at half-past nine yesterday (Monday) morning, when he was at breakfast with his mother and sister. The deceased seemed very well and ate very heartily. During breakfast time he said he wished to give up his pension and go to work. The deceased was formerly a smith in the dockyard, and has been pensioned about two years, He said if he did not go to work again they should starve. He had £39 11s. 2d a year pension. He very often went up to the yard gates and wanted to go to work. About 36 years ago he lost the use of one eye by a piece of red hot iron flying in it, which injured his brain. Witness went out at half-past ten till half-past eleven, when he went upstairs for a drink of water, and on opening the door he found the deceased hanging by his neck in one corner of the room. He called for his mother, who was in the room under, and cut the body down. Deceased was quite dead, but still warm. Mr Chapple, the druggist, came and a doctor. - MARY KNAPMAN, wife of the deceased, said that the deceased had not lately slept much at night, and at half-past five that morning he got up and went out. At seven she got up, and deceased was then sitting in the room. He told her he had been up to the Yard gates, and the policemen told him that if he came there again they would put him in the mad-house. After he had his breakfast, he said it was time for him to go to see the accountant of the Yard. He went downstairs, and witness went after him, and asked him where he was going, and he said he was going to give up his pension paper and going to work again. He gave her the paper and went back and sat down in the room while she was there. At eleven o'clock she wanted to clean up the room, and asked him to go upstairs, which he did. Some days he would not know any more than a baby what he was doing. About thirty-six years ago he had his eye burnt out in the Yard. About half-an-hour after deceased went upstairs, witness's son came in and went upstairs also, and directly he got up he screamed out for her, and on going up she found her son cutting deceased down. She sent for a doctor and Mr Chapple, chemist, came, and afterwards Mr Page, surgeon, but deceased was past recovery. - Joseph Horswell, a mason, said he had known the deceased for fourteen years, during which time he had been his tenant. Deceased had been at times in a very low state of mind. On going to his house sometimes, he would find the walls of the bedroom all chalked over, deceased having done it during the night. The family would often send for witness to talk to deceased, and sometimes deceased would send for him to come and see if the locks and fastenings of the doors were all right, so that no one could come in at night. - The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased hung himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Another Fatal Accident At Staddon Heights. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon, at five o'clock, before John Edmonds, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Samuel Bartlett was chosen Foreman, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS BUCKLEY, a mason's labourer, about 43 years of age, who died on Sunday morning from injuries he received from a fall while engaged in dragging a plank across a cutting, at Staddon heights. The Coroner and Jury having viewed the body at the Hospital, they returned to the Guildhall, where the following evidence was taken:- William Stacey said: I am porter at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where I reside. On Friday evening last, at about six o'clock, deceased was brought to the hospital in a cart, marked "Baker and Son, Staddon," accompanied by a large number of men. He was cut in the head, but it was not bleeding much. Mr Fox, surgeon, attended him. Deceased was sensible from the time he was admitted up to the time of his death, which occurred on Sunday morning, at three o'clock. He was about 43 years of age, and was a mason's labourer. He has left a widow and two children, living at 26 Granby-street, Devonport. Deceased's wife and daughter were with him when he died. - James Scagell said: I am a journeyman mason, and work for Messrs. Baker and Son, at Staddon Heights. they are the contractors there for building Government forts. Deceased had been in their employ one day before this happened. On Friday last, at about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, myself, the deceased, and John Bevill, were employed in dragging a plank across the top of an open cutting, at Staddon Heights. The cutting was about 20 feet in height. I was on one side of the cutting and deceased was with me, and so was Bevill. We were dragging the plank across by a rope. I was on one side of the plank and deceased was on the other. When the plank came to a balance, it "swerved," and carried the deceased with it, and he fell into the cutting. If the plank had "swerved" the other side, I should have been the sufferer, and the deceased would have escaped. Deceased fell first on one of the shores, and then to the bottom, an depth, in all, of 20 feet. I went to him directly, with the other man, and found him sensible. His head was cut, I think on the crown. We carried him to the surgery, and from thence he was taken to the hospital. The plank weighed about 1 cwt. and 44 lbs. It was not too heavy for three men to manage. We were all willing to join in the work, and I did not apprehend any danger. In my opinion, his death was not the fault of any person, but was purely accidental. We were all sober at the time. - The witness was examined by one of deceased's friends as follows:- The plank was 19 feet in length, 11 inches wide, and 3 inches thick. Bevill held the rope. I cannot account for the plank swerving. I don't think the person who held the rope was to blame. I think this work was properly conducted, and we might take 1000 planks across again without any accident occurring. - John Bevill corroborated the last witness's statement. - James Miles, the Foreman of the works at Staddon Heights, attended, and said he thought that occurrence was purely accidental. He did not at all think anyone was to blame in the matter. These men performed this work without any instruction. - The witness Scagell was recalled, and stated that if it was required he could have had half-a-dozen men. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," being of opinion that no person was to blame in the matter.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 12 July 1862
Accidental Drowning At Pennycomequick. - An Inquest was held yesterday before Allan Bone, Esq., and a Jury, of which Mr Braun was the Foreman, concerning the death of RICHARD PEARDON, who was found in a pond at Pennycomequick, on Thursday. - William Roseveare, a dairyman, said: I live at Deadly, Stoke. I knew the deceased; he was a dairyman, and kept cows in a field belonging to me. He had kept his cows there for the last twelve months. I saw the deceased on Tuesday last, apparently in good health. I have not seen him alive since. I met his brother on Wednesday; he asked me if I would go with him to look for his brother. We then went to the field where deceased kept his cows to see if we could find him, and on going through the gate to go into the field we met Mrs Geach. Deceased's brother stopped talking to her, and I went around the field. When I came to the pond I saw a hat there. I went over and looked in. I then saw deceased's hair. I went back and told his brother that it was a bad job, for deceased was in the pond. We then got assistance and conveyed him in a cart to Pennycomequick Inn. The deceased was a quiet, sober man. I think he must have fallen in whilst attempting to wash his hands. - THOMAS PEARDON said: I keep a beer-shop in Navy-row. Deceased was my brother. He was a very sober man, and was 43 years of age. He had a wife and three children. On Monday week last I went with him to St Bude in his cart. He then complained of a sinking in his stomach. His wife came out to me on Wednesday, about seven o'clock, and told me that her husband had not been home since the morning. I then went away to look for him, but I did not find him until the next morning. - MRS PEARDON said: The deceased was my husband, and he lived in George-street, Stonehouse. He kept a dairy. The last time I saw him alive was on Wednesday morning. he then left to go to the field. I told him if he did not make haste he would not be home in time for dinner. He said "Yes". He seemed in good spirits. - William Roseveare, jun., said: I met the deceased on Wednesday morning, between twelve and one o'clock, in Cobourg-street. I asked him to have a glass of ale. We went into a public-house and had a glass of ale. He would not stay long, for he said he wanted to go to field, as it was near dinner time. He then left me. - Mrs Vanstone said: I keep the Duchess of Cornwall Inn and on Wednesday a little before one o'clock, the defendant came to my house and had a pint of porter and a glass of ale. I think he was quite sober. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 14 July 1862
NEWTON ABBOT - On Saturday an Inquest was held by Brooking Cuming, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Bracewell's Bradley Inn, on the body of ESAU BOND, a boy of ten years of age. It appeared that the boy had been sent to the marsh on Thursday evening with a horse, and as he did not return a search was made for him, but without success; it was, however, ascertained that the horse had been put into the field. On the following morning his body was found lying in the mud forming the bed of the River Teign, close to the railway viaduct. It is supposed that the boy, who was blind of one eye, had accidentally slipped from the bank of the river, and was unable to recover himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 15 July 1862
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From The Rocks. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon before Mr J. Edmonds, Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Henry Albert Lanstone was Foreman, to Enquire into the death of RICHARD OATEY, a boy of about 10 years of age, who fell off the precipice called Tinside, yesterday morning. - ANN OATEY said she was the wife of RICHARD OATEY, a labourer, formerly a miner, an