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Help and advice for Inquests 1877-1878

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and the Western Daily Mercury

[printed in Plymouth.]

1877 - 1878

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living. .


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Adams; Alford; Angel; Arnold; Ashley; Bagshaw; Bailey(2); Baker; Bambury; Barlow; Barnacott; Barnes; Baron; Barrett; Bartlett; Bassett; Bater; Bayliffe; Behenna; Bell; Bennett; Benney; Binmore; Blatchford; Blight; Bond; Bone; Bonner; Boterell; Bovey; Bowden; Boyd; Brassington; Bray; Brimacombe; Brimmicombe; Bromfield; Brooks; Burdett; Bray; Brown; Browne; Bryan; Buckpitt; Budd; Butland; Callard; Cann; Castle; Caston; Cater(2); Chappell; Chenoweth; Chipwin; Choake; Chubb; Churchward; Clatworthy; Cload; Coit; Cole(4); Collard; Collings; Coode; Cooper; Cornish(2); Cory; Cranfield; Crimp; Cunliffe; Cunningham; Cureton; Curwood; Dashwood; Davey; Dawe; Dean; Densham; Dicker; Dilke; Doebeer; Down; Downer; Drew(2); Duff; Dufty; Dulling; Duomon; Durant; Dyer; East; Eden; Ebbles; Elford; Ellery; Elliott; Essell; Evans; Ewings; Ferguson; Ferris(2); Fishley; Fitzgerald; Fitzpatrick; Foley; Frager; Freeman; Fugler; Fuller; Gale; Gammon; Gater; Gaylard; Gedye; Gendall; German; Giles; Gleeson; Glyde; Goad; Gooding; Gorman; Goss; Gregory(2); Guswell; Hammett; Hancock; Hannaford; Harris; Hart; Hatch; Hawkins; Hawton; Haywood; Helling; Helmore; Hicks; Higgins(2); Hill; Hodge; Holland; Hollock; Holloway; Hood; Hookway; Hopkins; Hornsby; Horswell; Hosegood; How; Howard; Huckins; Hyde; Hysum; James; Jarring; Jarvis; Jeffery; Jefferys; Jenkins; Jewell; Jinks; John; Johns(5); Joint; King(2); Knapman; Knight(2); Hoehler; Laballister; Lacy; Lampey; Lang; Laskey; Launder; Lavis(2); Lawler; Lawton; Layfield; Leaman; Learwood; Leary; Lee; Lewis; Ley; Lightfoot; Lister; Long; Lucas; Lugg; Luscombe; Maclean; Mallock; Marks; Marshall; Martin; Matthews(2); McEvoy; McEwen; McKeer; Meager; Medland; Meers; Milford; Miller; Mogg; Moore; Morgan; Mortimer; Mortimore; Moss; Mugford; Mules; Murch; Murray; Narramore; Nattle; Neville; Newcombe; Newman; Nilstrip; Nodder; Northcote; Nunn; Ogwell; Oldrieve; Olver; Osborne(3); Osmant; Owens; Palmer(2); Parker; Parr; Parrington; Parris; Parrish; Pash; Paterson; Payne; Pearce; Pellow; Pengilly; Pentor; Perryman; Petersen; Pethick; Phillips(3); Polkinghorne; Pollard; Powlesland; Prinn; Pursley; Pyke(2); Raymond; Reeve(2); Richards(3); Ricketts; Riley; Roberts(2); Robertshaw; Robinson; Rogers; Rogman; Rowe(3); Rowse; Runnalls; Salter; Sanders; Santillo; Satterly; Saunders(2); Sawday; Searle(2); Shanks; Shepheard(2); Shergool; Shilabeer; Shobrook; Shute; Sixmouth; Slater; Sleeman; Smith(3); Snell; Sparrow; Spencer; Spurrell; Squire; Stanton; Stark; Steed; Steer; Stewart; Stidston; Stone; Straddon; Stratton; Strong; Sweet; Sydney; Symons; Tallack; Taylor; Thomas(3); Thorne(2); Thorning; Thwaites; Tinney; Tomlin; Toms; Touton; Tozer; Trace; Tremlett; Trickey; Tucker(2); Turner; Turpin; Underhay; Vaux; Veale; Vosper; Wakem; Walke(2); Walters(2); Ware; Watts; Waycott; Webb; Webber; Weeks; Welsh; West; Westaway; Whiddon; White(2); Whiting; Whitty; Wilcocks; Williams(5); Wills(3); Wilson(2); Windeatt; Wise; Woollocott; Wood(3); Woodgates; Woodrow; Worth(3); Wotton; Wright; Wyatt; Yardley

Western Morning News, Monday 1 January 1877
LAMERTON - Mr Rodd held an adjourned Inquest at Lamerton on Saturday afternoon touching the death of MR ELLIS, of Chaddle Hanger. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMPTON - Drowning At Plympton. - Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest at Plympton on Saturday relative to the death of GEORGE WINYETT WEBBER, aged 11 years, who on Friday fell over the bridge near the railway station into the river Tory, and was swept away by the swift-running swollen stream and drowned, his body being found near Blaxton Point. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 January 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Of A Child At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Morice Town yesterday relative to the death of JAMES WILLIAM VEALE, aged seven weeks. The deceased was the son of a labourer named JOHN VEALE, residing at 11 John's-street, Morice Town, and on Saturday night it was taken to bed with its mother, who is subject to fits. During the night MRS VEALE was seized with two fits, and t eight o'clock the following morning, when she got out of bed, she discovered that the child was dead. - The evidence of Mr May, jun., surgeon, was to the effect that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the child, and he was of opinion that death resulted from suffocation, and that it was a rapid one. He believed that the mother of the child must have lain on the child when she was suffering from the fits, and in a semi-lethargic condition. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 January 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, relative to the death of ANN THOMAS, aged 72 years, the wife of a naval pensioner. CHARLES THOMAS, husband of the deceased, stated that he resided at 62 Southside-street, and on Sunday night, the 24th of December he and the deceased went to church together. On their return he went to his room, and almost immediately he heard his wife fall over the stairs. When picked up she was unconscious and covered with blood and she had been attended ever since by Mr F. Fox, surgeon. The deceased had fallen over the stairs twice before and broken her arm on both occasions. The stairs were very dangerous, but witness had never complained to the landlord about them. - Mr Francis Fox, surgeon, said that when he saw the deceased, directly after the accident, she was very much bruised all over the body. She was shortly afterwards seized with paralysis in the lower extremities and became totally blind, and he believed the blindness was brought about by the injuries to her head. He attributed her death to the injuries received consequent upon the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Coroner to ask the landlord of the house to protect the stairs by hand rails.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 January 1877
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Exeter respecting the death of the unfortunate man NORTHCOTE, who was killed on Thursday in the Lion's Holt Tunnel of the London and South Western Railway. No new facts were elicited. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner expressed a hope that the company would do something for the family of the deceased, who has left a wife and twelve children.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth Workhouse. - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Workhouse on Saturday afternoon respecting the sudden death of THOMAS GUSWELL, an inmate of the house. From the evidence it appeared that deceased, who had been a mate in the merchant service, and who was only 47 years of age, was partially paralysed, and had been in the Workhouse off and on for some years, having been last admitted on the 12th April 1876. On Saturday morning he was in his usual health apparently, and took his breakfast at eight o'clock. About ten minutes after he was seen standing with his hand up to his head, and ten minutes after that again he was found lying dead on the floor in the day ward. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes;" and, at the same time, expressed surprise that no member of the deceased's family had attended at the Inquest, particularly as the master had told the friends of deceased that the Inquest would be held that afternoon.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 January 1877
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at Torquay last night by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN TRICKEY, labourer, aged 67 years, who died on Monday from the effects of a fall from the roof of a house in Higher-terrace, Torquay. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 January 1877
EXMOUTH - Drowning At Exmouth. - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday by Mr Spencer M. Cox, County Coroner, respecting the death of JOHN NEWMAN, a fisherman, belonging to Topsham, who was drowned off Exmouth by the upsetting of a boat on the evening of the 5th instant. A boy named Norton, who was in the boat when it overturned, said that the deceased was his uncle. They were going fishing, and were crossing the Mouster Sands when a heavy sea struck the boat, and threw both of them into the water. He and his uncle caught hold of the boat, but it was struck by another sea and overturned, and they then caught hold of the keel and held on until the boat sank. His uncle could not swim but he could, and he struck out for a boat which he saw coming, and was taken on board, but his uncle sank before the boat reached him. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 January 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall From A Housetop. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday, relative to the death of a mason named GEORGE CALLARD, aged 59 years. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Hodge, master mason, at Devonport, and on Monday morning the deceased and Mr Hodge's son were repairing the roof of a house at the back of Mount-street. They were standing upon ladders, and about noon the deceased was left upon the roof alone. he was then taking off a few slates previous to repairing the leakage, and shortly afterwards the deceased was seen by a Mrs Jane Bizzon, who resided at 15 Pembroke-street, and who was looking at the deceased from her room, to get up from the ladder, after being in a sitting posture, and to grasp the other ladder which led to the front of the house, when either he missed his hold or slipped his foot, falling flat upon his face, after which he slid off the roof to the ground beneath - a distance of about thirty-five feet. The deceased received fearful injuries to his head and face, and both his arms were broken. When picked up he was covered with blood, and he was immediately removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he remained in an unconscious state up to the time of his death, which occurred early yesterday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 January 1877
SHAUGH PRIOR - Fatal Accident At Clayworks. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry on Saturday respecting the death of a miner named THOMAS LEY, who had been employed at the Lee Moor Clayworks. Shaugh. The deceased was descending a shaft at the works when he slipped off the ladder and fell a considerable distance, receiving injuries from which he died the same day. Sufficient evidence was taken to warrant a certificate for burial, and the Coroner then adjourned the Inquest until Wednesday for the presence of Dr Foster, the Government Inspector of mines.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 January 1877
LYDFORD - Sudden Death At Dartmoor Prisons. - An Inquest has been held at Princetown respecting the death of a convict named JOSEPH BOYD, who fell down dead in his cell on Saturday morning a little after 7 o'clock. The deceased had earned by steady conduct and work his licence, and was going home today, and no doubt the grief of his parents will be great, for instead of welcoming home a penitent son, they will receive a missive giving the sad details of his death. The history of the unfortunate fellow out of prison appears to have been very [?]. He was one of the class of habitual criminals, and appears to have been summarily convicted no less than 10 times. The crime for which he was sentenced to seven years penal servitude was stealing ducks.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 January 1877
EXETER - Fatal Railway Accident At Axminster. - Yesterday Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter respecting the death of JAMES BAILEY, aged 44 years, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Deceased resided near Uplyme, and was employed as a packer on the London and South Western Railway. On Tuesday he was working at the Broom ballast hole, about three miles from Axminster, assisting to load a train of trucks with gravel. After the work had been finished, and the train was in motion, deceased tried to jump upon one of the trucks. He should have got upon the truck before the train started, but having gone to fetch his coat he was late. In the attempt to take his place on the moving wagon, the unfortunate man slipped his foot and fell, and the wheels of four wagons passed over him before the engine driver could pull up. BAILEY was at once placed in a van and taken to Exeter to the Hospital. He was found to have [?] bad fracture of one thigh, the leg was broken almost [?] and internal injuries were suspected. Death took place within a few hours of his admission to the Hospital, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." [?] the Jurors fancied deceased ought not to have been [?] to such a long journey. Inspector Rogers, who attended the Inquest on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company, stated that he was removed with [?] of a medical man; the nearest place would have been the Cottage Hospital at Yeovil.

SHAUGH PRIOR - Fatal Fall Down A Shaft. - The Inquest on the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS LEY, miner, was resumed at Lee Moor, Shaugh [ Very faint text, but verdict was 'Accidental Death']

IVYBRIDGE - The Death Of A Lady By Drowning At Ivybridge. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Ivybridge yesterday relative to the death of MRS AMELIA STEPHENS SLATER, aged 50 years, who was found drowned in Ivybridge mill leat. - Mr Edwin Allen stated that the deceased was his sister, and was the wife of the REV. WM. PAUL SLATER, governor and chaplain of the Wesleyan College, Taunton. The deceased with her husband had been staying at the residence of Mr John Allen, of the Ivybridge paper mills, her father. MR SLATER returned on Monday to Taunton, but the deceased remained behind. On Tuesday morning, about half-past ten o'clock MRS SLATER left the house alone, and came to witness's office at the mills, about half an hour later and inquired at what time the north mail was due at Ivybridge. He told her, and she left. She then appeared to be in her usual spirits. As the deceased was away a very long time suspicions were aroused and upon a search being made witness found her in the leat against the hatch, at the entrance of an ornamental pond, into which the stream of water ran very rapidly. The deceased was immediately taken out, and it was found that her watch had stopped at ten minutes to eleven, and that her clothes were not in the least disarranged. - Mr James Randle, surgeon, stated that when the deceased was extricated from the water life was extinct. There were no external marks of violence upon the body, but there was an abrasion on the skin of the knee. He discovered that her hands were not clenched, as was usual in the case of persons who met their death by drowning while conscious. There was no evidence, from the appearance of the deceased, that she had struggled for life, and he believed that she must have had a fit, which resulted in her falling into the water. - The Coroner remarked that the surgeon was not sure whether the deceased was attacked with a fit or not, and there was no evidence to show how she came into the water. - The Jury, of whom the Rev. G. W. Anstiss was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and handed over their fees to the funds of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 January 1877
PLYMOUTH - A Child Scalded To Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Brunel Hotel, Millbay, into the circumstances attending the death of ANN EMILY BRYAN, aged 3 years. - ANN BRYAN, mother of the deceased, stated that she resided at 2 Martia-street. On Sunday morning the deceased got on a chair, which was close by the fire, and fell off into the grate. In falling she turned over a kettle of boiling water, which scalded her severely. Witness took the deceased to a chemist, who gave her a lotion to apply to the scalded parts of the deceased's body, and subsequently she sent for Mr Pearse, surgeon, who found the child dying. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 2 February 1877
TIVERTON - Fatal Fall At Tiverton. - An Inquest has been held at Tiverton respecting the death of MRS MARIA BAYLIFFE, aged 75 years, the mother of the REV. E. S. BAYLIFFE, pastor of the Independent Church at Tiverton. About midday on January 22nd, the deceased was walking through Leat-street, when one of two boys running after each other ran against her and knocked her down, breaking her right thigh. She was under medical treatment until Monday, when she died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 February 1877
HARFORD - Fatal Fall From A Ladder. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Lakesland House, Harford, yesterday, relative to the death of WM. ARNOLD, aged 28 years, a mason's labourer. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased had been in the employ of Mr J. Pethick, contractor, Plymouth, for three years, and was a sober and industrious workman. For the past two weeks he had been attending to masons engaged in repairing the roof of Lakesland House, and on Wednesday morning he ascended a ladder with some cement for a mason named Brayley, who was working upon the roof. After handing the cement to him he conversed for a little time with Brayley, and was still talking when, without the slightest warning, he slipped from the top of the ladder and fell to the ground, about 28 feet below, receiving such severe internal injuries that he died almost immediately. The ladder, which was a new one, was secured to the parapet, and it did not fall with the deceased. ARNOLD resided at Albert-road, Morice Town, and leaves a wife and one child. - The Jury, of whom Mr B. Sherwell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Coroner to hand their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 February 1877
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Plymouth Gentleman. His Wife Censured. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Mutley last evening relative to the death of MR THOMAS COODE, aged 50 years, a gentleman of independent means. - MRS LAURA COODE, wife of the deceased, residing at No. 6 Alexandra-buildings, stated that her husband had been very unwell for the past two months, and had not been out of doors for that period. He went to bed at midnight on Thursday; but was very restless, and got up about four o'clock yesterday morning, and dressed himself. He walked about the house for upwards of two hours, and complained of pains in the chest. About six a.m. deceased caught witness by the hand and exclaimed, "I think I am dying," and then lowered himself upon the floor, at the same time making a curious noise. He remained upon the floor, and witness did not disturb him, thinking he was asleep. At nine o'clock the servant came into the bedroom, and upon looking at the deceased, who was still upon the floor, she remarked, "I believe he is dead." Witness replied that she did not think so, and told the servant to call a Mr McCready, a neighbour, residing opposite; and who, upon seeing the deceased, confirmed the servant's opinion. Mr Wolferstan, surgeon, was called, and stated that the deceased had been dead for several hours. Her husband was subject to spasms, and had been attended to by Dr J. Laity, of Devonport. - By the Jury: The deceased had often said he thought his complaint would cause his death, and that was the reason she did not send for a surgeon at the time. She did not get into bed after her husband lay upon the floor, but rested upon the bedside. She did not place a pillow under the deceased's head, because, thinking that he was asleep, she did not wish to awake him. Did not give him any stimulant. - Mr Richard McCready gave evidence to the effect that when he went into the bedroom, where the deceased was lying, there was no other person there. - Dr J. Laity deposed that he had attended the deceased professionally for nearly nineteen years. About the middle of December last he was sent for by the deceased, and found that he was suffering from spasms and debility. Witness treated him, and he became very much better. After spasms the deceased would suffer from faintness. On Saturday the deceased was very much better in health, and witness did not think that he would die suddenly from disease of the heart. He thought that death was attributable to fatal syncope after a spasm. - The Foreman of the Jury said that it appeared very strange that MRS COODE should have allowed her husband to remain upon the floor for so many hours without attending to him, and he considered that she treated him very indifferently. It was her duty to have done all in her power to have saved his life. - The Jury generally considered that MRS COODE had been very neglectful in not sending for a doctor when the deceased said he thought he was dying. - The Coroner thought that MRS COODE had not done all that was possible for her husband. He could not understand why the deceased was allowed to lie upon the floor from six until nine o'clock without MRS COODE even looking at him. If he had seen Dr Laity before the Inquiry he should have ordered a post mortem examination of the body and it was for the Jury to decide whether they would adjourn the Inquiry so that one might be made. The case was not at all satisfactory, and there was apparent neglect on the part of MRS COODE. In conclusion he remarked that if a stimulant had been given the deceased he would probably have recovered. - The Jury were satisfied that the deceased died from "Natural Causes" but censured MRS COODE for her neglect.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 February 1827
PLYMPTON - The Suicide At Plympton. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Underwood yesterday relative to the death of JOSEPH THORNING, aged 34 years, who committed suicide on Saturday night. - MARY ANN THORNING, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was a general dealer, and on Saturday night last he came home about eleven o'clock, and said that he had been at a raffle. He ate his supper and appeared very cheerful, both talking and laughing. About twelve o'clock, before going to bed, he said he was going downstairs, and did sop; and a quarter of an hour afterwards she went down also, as the deceased had not returned. She tried to open the closet door, but could not, and she then looked over the door, and saw her husband's head. She raised an alarm, and the deceased was found hanging by the buckle strap he wore around his waist. - By the Foreman: Deceased owed Mr Sampson, coal merchant, Plymouth, between £30 and £40. Never heard the deceased complain of his debts. She believed that the deceased was owed a considerable sum for potatoes and coals. - JOSEPH THORNING, father of the deceased, said that on Sunday morning, about half-past twelve o'clock, he found the deceased suspended by the neck by a buckle strap. His feet were about two inches off the ground. Deceased never complained about his affairs. - John Mullrin, a labourer, stated that he saw the deceased in Underwood on Saturday evening about nine o'clock. Deceased was quite jolly then. - Mr Ellery, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, and found him quite dead, his neck being dislocated. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the deceased owed a little money, and this, no doubt, preyed on his mind and caused him to commit the rash act. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 19 February 1877
PLYMOUTH - At the adjourned Inquest held by Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, respecting the death of BERTHA HYDE, aged two years, Dr T. Pearse stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the child, and found the organs and stomach in a healthy condition, but an examination of the intestines shewed four intussusceptions, which he thought had caused death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 February 1877
At the adjourned Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of a lad named JOHN ROBERTS, who had been killed by falling down the shaft of Bedford Consols mine, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 February 1877
LYDFORD - Inquest At Princetown. - An Inquest was held at Princetown yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, Deputy County Coroner, respecting the death of LAWRENCE DRAKE CUNLIFFE, a convict in the Dartmoor Prisons, who was undergoing a sentence of five years' penal servitude for larceny. CUNLIFFE had been nearly three years at Dartmoor, and with the exception of a short period had been in the infirmary of the prison. He was well conducted and of good education, and had apparently moved in good society.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 March 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, acting as Deputy Coroner, relative to the death of THOMAS ROBINSON, aged 42 years, a labourer in the employ of Mr J. Pethick, contractor, of Plymouth. The evidence was to the effect that on Saturday morning last the deceased was working at the dock extensions in Devonport Dockyard, and was engaged with other men in hoisting timber from the water to the quay, when a large piece of timber slipped from the chain and fell on the deceased's chest. He was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died on Tuesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 March 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE SLEEMAN, a shoemaker, aged 62 years, who committed suicide the previous day by cutting his throat. - P.C. Horne stated that on Monday afternoon he was called to No. 5 Ordnance-court, in which house the deceased occupied a room; and finding the door of this room locked on the inside, he forced it open. Upon entering he saw the deceased lying on his face on the floor, with his throat cut and covered with blood. A razor besmeared with blood was upon the table. - By the Jury: The deceased was quite dead, and his throat was deeply cut from ear to ear. He had the appearance of having fallen off the bed after having inflicted the wound. For some time past the deceased had shewed signs of mental aberration. The deceased had nothing on but his shirt. - EMMA SLEEMAN, daughter of the deceased, deposed that on the previous afternoon deceased sent her for some brandy, and after being absent for about five minutes she returned and found her father had committed suicide. He had been very peculiar in his manners during the past twelve months and often complained that when he went into the streets all the people followed him. He went into Cornwall for some months, but returned no better for the change. In answer to a Juryman, witness denied that the deceased was in the habit of drinking. - JOHN SLEEMAN said that he was the son of the deceased, and although his father enjoyed very good health he had been in a very desponding state. Deceased had some money left him about eighteen months ago, and since then he had been constantly saying that he thought he should be robbed of it. As his father's behaviour had been so peculiar he had kept a watch over him; but on Monday he was away from home. Deceased's children were very much afraid of him. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." One of the Jurymen called attention to the disgraceful state of the house the deceased had resided in, and also the houses in the immediate neighbourhood, and asked the Coroner whether he would speak to the Sanitary Authority respecting it. The condition of the houses, the Juryman remarked, was really shocking. - The coroner observed that the matter was under the consideration of the authority, and he had no doubt that something would shortly be done. He did think that attention should be called to the want of a mortuary for the town of Devonport, as one was needed very much.


Western Morning News, Saturday 10 March 1877
DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Dartmouth yesterday by Mr R. W. Prideaux respecting the death of EDWARD ELLIOTT, a child three years old, whose clothes became ignited at a fire in a room in which he was left alone, whereby he received injuries which proved fatal. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

LIFTON - Fatal Result Of A Slight Mishap. - An Inquest was held at Lifton on Thursday respecting the death of JOHN WALTERS, aged 16 years. On the afternoon of Tuesday last WALTERS and a young man named John Clatworthy were riding in a cart when the rein broke and the horse, becoming frightened in consequence, started off at a rapid pace. A short distance ahead was a perambulator and in order to save the child that was in it Clatworthy jumped out of the cart and tried to stop the horse, but failed to do so, and, becoming entangled in some way, he fell on the ground and was dragged along by the frightened animal. A boy seeing the danger of the child snatched it away just in time, and the horse dashed over the perambulator, whilst Clatworthy was still dragged along and continued to be so for a hundred yards. When picked up he was nearly dead, but hopes are entertained that he will return. Meanwhile, WALTERS had jumped from the back of the cart, but, in doing so, he pitched on his head, and breaking his neck, was killed on the spot. At the Inquest a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was buried yesterday, and his funeral was attended by members of the Good Templar lodge, of which he was a member, and which bore a great part of the funeral expenses.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Keyham Factory. - Yesterday afternoon Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, concerning the death of WILLIAM LONG, a workman in the Keyham Factory. On the 1st March deceased went to the wash-house, and whilst washing his hands in a tank of hot water elevated at some distance above the ground he overbalanced himself and fell head foremost into the almost boiling water. He was immediately taken out and conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, but the shock to his system was so great that he died on Thursday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 March 1877
PLYMOUTH - A Medical Man Censured By A Jury. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Kings Arms Hotel, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of MAUD CLARE LABALLISTER, aged 5 weeks. - ELIZA LABALLISTER, mother of the deceased, stated that the child was restless during the previous night. At half-past six o'clock that morning she attended to her and went to sleep again, and about two hours afterwards when she awoke she found the child very pale. - Ellen Lambracombe deposed that MRS LABALLISTER called her about 8.30 a.m. yesterday, and she went to her and saw the child, who, she thought, was not dead then as its lips opened. Mr Hicks, surgeon was sent for, and on arriving about 8.50 a.m., he pronounced the child to be dead, and said that it had died from being overlain. Witness asked him why he thought that, and he replied, "We must say something, and it as well to say that as anything else." He was then paid 2s. 6d. for his attendance, and he gave her a piece of paper which, he said, was a certificate, to the effect that the child was overlain by its mother, and that there was no necessity for a Coroner's Inquest. Witness took the piece of paper to the Registrar, who stated that it was not a certificate. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and censured Mr Hicks for giving the paper to the woman, saying that no Inquest was necessary.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatality At The Great Western Docks. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Millbay yesterday, relative to the death of FREDERICK GEORGE DAWE, aged 21 years, who was found drowned on the previous day. - Mr J. Rooney watched the Inquiry on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. The evidence shewed that the deceased was a labourer in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, and that he was engaged on board the mud dredge belonging to the docks. It was the duty of the deceased to keep watch on the dredge on Saturday night, and at eleven o'clock he was seen going to the steps where his boat was moored. He was spoken to by a watchman named George Orchard, also in the same employ as the deceased, and in answer to him DAWE stated that he was going on board the dredge, and wished him "Good night." Orchard told deceased that he was late, to which deceased replied "Yes, but it's a fine night," and walked away. The following morning George Bond, a labourer, went to the docks at six o'clock for the purpose of relieving DAWE, and finding the boat moored to the steps and the deceased's hat in it his suspicions were aroused and he immediately gave an alarm. A man named Parker obtained the grappling irons and dragged for the body, but the irons proved unsuccessful, and he then used a boathook, and succeeded in finding DAWE'S lifeless body, and bringing it to the surface. It was in eight feet of water and was discovered directly under the boat. Two witnesses proved that the deceased was a very steady young man, and was perfectly sober when spoken to by Mr Orchard. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 March 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest concerning the death of RACHEL JOHNS, aged 48 years. - Rachel Rickard, daughter of the deceased, deposed that on Wednesday evening last her mother was seized with a fit of coughing which took away her breath. Witness went for Dr Wilson and her father, but when arrived her mother was dead. Deceased had a similar fit of coughing about two months ago. - LAURA JOHNS, daughter-in-law of deceased, stated that about half-past eight on Wednesday evening she was sent for to see her mother-in-law. When witness arrived deceased was lying on the floor breathing with difficulty; deceased did not speak during the time witness was with her. - Dr Wilson stated that he made a post mortem examination of deceased, and found the body well nourished. He made an internal examination, which convinced him that deceased died of fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 March 1877
WALKHAMPTON - An Inquest was held at Walkhampton on Friday afternoon by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, with respect to the death of an old man named WILLIAM WILLIAMS, a ganger in the granite quarries, who died suddenly on Wednesday. Mr G. W. Northey, surgeon, stated that death was caused by apoplexy, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.

KINGSTON - Burnt To Death. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Kingston on Saturday respecting the death of a little girl named SARAH FREEMAN. During the temporary absence of her mother on Thursday the deceased's clothes caught fire, and she was severely burned. Mr George V. Langworthy, surgeon, stated that the child died from shock to the system on the day following the accident, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, of which Mr George Pearce was Foreman.

PLYMOUTH - A Child Suffocated In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Union Inn, George-lane, Plymouth, by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of the infant child of MR SHOBROOK. It appeared from the evidence of MRS SHOBROOK that she fell asleep on Thursday night, having the deceased in her left arm. She awoke about four the following morning, missed the child, and found that it had rolled out of her arm upon the bedclothes, and was quite dead and cold. The Jury, of which Mr George Medland was Foreman, found that the deceased had been Accidentally Suffocated, exonerating MRS SHOBROOK from all blame.

EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday before Mr Cross, County Coroner, respecting the death of SAMUEL WOODROW, aged 66 years. The deceased was a shoemaker and was chiefly in the employ of Mr John Henry Gilbert, boot and shoemaker of Fore-street. On Tuesday last he left the Workhouse, of which he had been an inmate, and called upon a man named William Foster, with whom he had previously lodged, and he then appeared to be insane. On the following day he went to Mr Gilbert in search of employment, and was there about half an hour, but Mr Gilbert could not understand what he was talking about. He was very excited at the time, passionate and dissatisfied with himself. William Marks, on Thursday last, saw an apron and a hat on the banks of the Canal, and just opposite discovered the body of the deceased in the water. There was a scarf tied around the neck and to it were attached two stones. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 March 1877
MEMBURY - Strange Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Hill Farm, Membury, on Monday, before Mr E. C. Fox, Deputy Coroner, respecting the death of ROBERT PARRIS, a well-to-do farmer, 77 years of age. Deceased's son, who lived with him, stated that on Saturday morning, shortly after two o'clock, he heard a very strange noise and went to the room of the deceased, whom he found with his throat cut. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, but in spite of the attention he received deceased died on Saturday evening. The witness could assign no reason whatever for the strange act, as his father was not in any way embarrassed and he retired to bed on the Friday night in apparently good health and spirits. He had been conversing with witness, who was over 50 years of age, on the previous day, as to his intention of giving up the farm to him. After deceased had committed the rash act he was able to converse a little, and, although he assigned no reason for it, he expressed his regret at having acted in such a manner. The deceased was occasionally "queer". The medical and other testimony corroborated this evidence, and the Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 March 1877
PLYMOUTH - A child Burned To Death. - The Plymouth Borough coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of FLORENCE BARNES, aged 3 years. The facts elicited were to the effect that on Wednesday morning last the mother of the deceased went out, leaving three young children in charge of her eldest daughter, who is about 8 years old. As soon as the mother had gone the girl went out, and subsequently neighbours hearing the deceased cry, went to the room and found the deceased almost naked, her clothes having been destroyed by fire, and the child herself severely injured, the skin being burnt off altogether on one side of the body. Oil was applied and the little sufferer was afterwards taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she expired early on Thursday morning. The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that it was a mystery that there were not three children burnt to death instead of one, as, according to the evidence of a witness, the other two children were playing around the deceased whilst her clothes were in flames. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 March 1877
PLYMOUTH - Inquest On Children. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry last evening at the London Inn, Richmond-street, into the circumstances attending the death of the illegitimate female child of MARY ANN JOHNS, widow of a warrant officer of the Royal Navy. The mother of the deceased stated that she resided in William-street, and that about midnight on Saturday last she retired to rest with the deceased, who was about three months old, lying with its head resting on her left arm. About five o'clock on Sunday morning witness awoke and found the deceased in the same position, but dead. Mr Williams, Coroner's officer, stated that on Sunday morning he made an external examination, and found the deceased had had a violent death. The Jury wished to have the Inquiry adjourned in order that a post mortem examination might be made, and the Inquest was consequently adjourned until tomorrow.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 March 1877
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An adjourned Inquest was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, relative to the death of the illegitimate female child of MARY ANN JOHNS, widow of a warrant officer of the Royal Navy. - It appears that about midnight on Saturday last the mother of the deceased went to bed, and fell asleep with the deceased lying on her left arm, and on awakening, about five o'clock on Sunday morning, she found the deceased lying in the same position, but dead. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Wm. Square, F.R.C.S., who stated that there was a mark on the left arm of the deceased, and that he thought this was caused by laying on a hard substance. The body was well nourished, but the lungs were in an extensive inflammatory condition, and he believed that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 April 1877
TOTNES - The Sudden Death At Totnes. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Totnes Railway Station, by Mr Henry Michelmore, County coroner, respecting the death of RICHARD MOORE, a pensioner, of Ashburton, who died suddenly at the Totnes Railway Station on Thursday evening, while waiting for the train to Ashburton. - John Warren, a porter employed at the station, said someone called his attention to the deceased, who was on a seat, looking very ill. He lifted him from the seat, but he almost immediately expired in his (witness's) arms. - The wife of the deceased said that her husband had been pensioned from the Royal Marines on account of his having a bad leg, but he had not complained to her of being unwell, and she thought he was in perfect health. He went to Ivybridge on Sunday last, and was returning home to Ashburton on the night of his death. - Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, stated that from deceased's emaciated and general appearance he considered that he died from organic disease of the heart or a similar cause. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from disease of the heart, or other Visitation of God, and handed their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 April 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide Of A Sentry. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Stonehouse Townhall yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN JOHNS, a private in the 36th Regiment. The evidence confirmed the narrative of the facts we yesterday gave, and it was shewn that the deceased had been drinking heavily of late. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 April 1877
TORQUAY - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Torbay Infirmary, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of ROBERT SANDERS, aged 57, lately employed as a delivery porter by Messrs. Slade and Sons, grocers, Abbey-place, who received fatal injuries by being thrown from his van whilst delivering goods at Kilmorie on Wednesday last. The accident was caused by the horse running away, and the Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death" expressed a hope that Messrs. Slade and Sons would, in the future, employ for the work a man who was more accustomed to horses.#

NEWTON ABBOT - The Fatal Fall At Newton. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of GEORGE EDWARD HYSUM, who had received fatal injuries to his head by falling over a flight of stairs. The deceased was the owner of the Fox Inn, Newton, and lived alone in a cottage behind that house. He was last seen alive about eight o'clock on Friday evening, when he borrowed a paper from Mr Banbury, the landlord. Two hours later he was found lying dead at the bottom of the stairs in the house, with a wound in the head, caused, apparently, by a fall. Mr Drake, surgeon, stated that he believed MR HYSUM died from the rupture of a blood vessel of the brain, or from the blow received, and a verdict of "Accidental Death," was returned. The deceased was about 55 years of age.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 April 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at Devonport yesterday, relative to the death of EDWARD SHUTE, aged 14 years. MARY ANN SHUTE, mother of the deceased, deposed that on Wednesday evening her son was taken ill, and she immediately went to Mr Gard, surgeon, who gave her a prescription, which witness had made up, and administered twice during the night. The lad, who died yesterday, had suffered for some years from an injury to the spine. - Mr W. J. Gard, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found one of the lungs completely disorganised, the lining of the lung was also affected, and there was an ulceration of the spine that had caused an abscess, which had broken internally and caused death. The ulceration had probably been caused by the injuries received in the spine a few years since. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Drowned In The Exe. - Mr R. R. Crosse, District Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon, at the Royal Oak Inn, St. Thomas, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM PYKE, aged 47, a thatcher by trade, who had been missing from home for some time, and whose body was discovered in the river Exe on the previous day. In opening the Inquiry, the Coroner said the view he took of the occurrence was that the deceased had not come to his death by violence, but it would be for them, of course, after they had heard the evidence, to return what verdict they thought proper. - John Connibeer, landlord of the Buller's Arms, Exwick, stated that on Friday, 19th March, deceased was at his house drinking cider with a man named William Woodgates. When he left at 9.30 p.m. he was neither drunk nor sober. - Thomas Reed, a lumper, said that while walking through the Exwick fields on the previous evening, he saw the body of a man in the river Exe, hanging to a bush. he communicated with P.C. Vanstone, and the body was taken out of the water and conveyed to the deceased's house. - P.C. Vanstone proved searching the body. In one of the deceased's pockets he found 7s. 11 ¼d., a watch, keys and a knife. The watch had stopped at twenty-six minutes to eleven. witness had searched the spot near where the deceased was found on Good Friday, but the body was not there then. - Dr Farrant, who examined the body, said that it was in a state of great decomposition, and a portion of the thumb had been eaten away by rats. The body was so far advanced in decomposition that he could not state the cause of death. - JOSEPH PYKE, brother of the deceased, stated that his brother enjoyed good health, and he never knew him to have a fit. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met with his death by Drowning, but how or by what means he came into the water there was no evidence to shew. They concurred in the view taken by the Coroner, that in all probability the deceased accidentally walked into the river.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 April 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of EMMANUEL PHILIPS, aged 34 years. - Joshua Burns said that on Monday afternoon he was in the Caxton Arms, King-street, when the deceased came there, and told the landlady that he had a kilderkin of beer for her. She directed him where to put it, and he took the empty cask out. About two minutes afterwards the landlady said that the man had fallen, and he went out and found the deceased lying on the step, face downwards, and the empty barrel in front of him, between the two doors. The cask appeared to have rolled over the head of the deceased, and then turned on end. There was a large wound on the deceased's forehead and blood was flowing copiously from his nose and forehead. He ran for Mr Lewis, surgeon, who came and pronounced PHILIPS to be dead. Deceased was quite sober at the time. - ROGER PHILLIPS, father of the deceased, stated that about eleven years ago the deceased had a piece of one of his heels cut off, in consequence of it having been jammed by a railway truck, and for several years he was lame. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that no doubt the injured heel was the cause of the accident by causing the deceased to slip whilst carrying a heavy weight. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and urged that an endeavour should be made to place the step in a proper condition, as it was now very dangerous.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 April 1877
EXETER - At the Inquest held yesterday on the boy F. OGWELL, who met with a shocking death on Tuesday at the Shilhay Saw Mills, Exeter, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. While exonerating the proprietors of the mills from any imputation of criminal neglect, the Jury expressed an opinion that the deceased ought not to have been set about such dangerous work so soon after being engaged, and that greater precautions should be taken in future.

EXETER - Doctor And Coroner. - Collisions between Coroners and medical men are rare; as any rate it is seldom that if a doctor thinks an Inquest unnecessary he publicly protests against the holding of it. Such an instance occurred, however, at Exeter, yesterday. Mr Hooper, City Coroner, had summoned a Jury to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MRS BROMFIELD, wife of a tradesman, which had taken place very suddenly at an early hour the same morning. Before the Jury were sworn Dr Shapter, who had attended the poor woman some time before, and had certified that death resulted from an affection of the heart, asked permission to make a statement. Permission was given, and Dr Shapter said that he considered that there was no need for an Inquest in such a case. Mr Hooper differed, and remarked that he could not allow his authority to be questioned in that way. - Mr Greenhill, one of those subpoenaed to serve on the Jury, said he did not consider the doctor had any locus standi; and, after threatening to lay the case before the Home Secretary, Dr Shapter left. - The Coroner said he believed that when the Jury had heard the evidence, they would quite agree with the course he had taken. He added that he had not acted simply on his own judgment of the case, but had been requested by a very near relative of the deceased to take steps for holding an Inquest. He could not allow any medical man to dictate to him as to whether or not Inquests should be held; if he did so, he would be unworthy of the post he filled. Evidence was then taken. - MR CHARLES BROMFIELD, wholesale stationer, of 7 Salutary-place, was called, and stated that the deceased was his wife. She had been under medical care for eighteen months, and was last attended by Dr Shapter. The last time she was out was on Friday week, when she took a cold. On Tuesday his wife was much better, and had her meals as usual. Witness came from business about eight o'clock. He and his wife retired to rest about ten o'clock, having previously partaken of some corn flour. About quarter-past three o'clock he was awakened by his wife moaning. He jumped out of bed and lifted her up, and after two or three minutes had elapsed, he felt that her pulse had ceased to beat. He immediately sent his servant for a medical man, and a policeman who was called in, also ran for a doctor. Mr Perkins, junr., soon afterwards arrived and pronounced life to be extinct. Not more than five minutes had elapsed from the time he had jumped out of bed. His wife had been suffering from an affection of the heart for about thirty years. - Mary Lyons, domestic servant at MR BROMFIELD'S stated on the afternoon of the day before her death deceased came into the kitchen, and said "I have a little pain in my heart," at the same time placing her hand to her side. Witness said, "Tell master," and deceased said, "He would have a doctor; I shall be better in the morning." She did not take anything. For her tea she had some bread and butter, some tea, and lamb, and partook of some corn flour for supper. She seemed quite well at about ten o'clock, and witness did not hear of anything until she was called by MR BROMFIELD, who said that his wife had woke up in a fit. - Dr Shapter, who consented to give evidence, said he had known the deceased for many years, but had not attended her professionally since June last year. He then attended her for general disorder, having reference to his knowledge that her heart was diseased and that she had had previously three attacks of angina pectoris, or spasms of the heart, in one of which (in 1872) he thought there was great peril of her life. Since 1871 he had occasionally visited her, and had treated her as having an affection of the heart. From the manner of her death he unhesitatingly attributed it to angina pectoris. - Mr Alfred Perkins concurred. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he was exceedingly sorry that any difference of opinion should have existed, between himself and any member of the medical profession. This was the first time it had been so. He was bound to maintain the dignity of the office of Coroner, and as long as he held it he should continue to do so. The Jury had heard the remarks which had fallen from him and Dr Shapter, and the evidence, and it was for them to consider whether the Inquest was a necessary one or not. - Mr Greenhill thought it was their duty as Jurymen to express an opinion as to the Inquest being a proper one. However painful it was to the relatives of the deceased, he thought this Inquest was a just one. If it had been the case of a poor man, no objection would have been taken, and he submitted that this was a fit case to come before the Jury. - The other Jurymen unanimously concurred and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 20 April 1877
JACOBSTOWE - Sudden Death At Jacobstow. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR DUFTY, a butcher. Deceased attended Northtawton Fair on Tuesday, and on his return called at Mr Sander's, Chapel Inn, Sampford Chapel. This was about two o'clock in the afternoon. He did not stop at the inn long, and was quite sober. On endeavouring to remount his horse, however, he fell back and died almost immediately. Dr Budd, of Northtawton, was sent for, and at the Inquest he gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from an apoplectic fit, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 April 1877
BERE FERRERS - Sudden Death At Beeralston. - An Inquest was held at Beeralston yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of MARY ANN SPURRELL, a widow, 62 years of age. The deceased went to bed with her daughter on Saturday night, and some time afterwards complained of being unwell. A medical man was sent for, but MRS SPURRELL died before his arrival. Mr Norrish, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that death was caused by apoplexy, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.


Western Morning News, Friday 4 May 1877
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH BURDETT, aged 65 years. The evidence adduced shewed that the deceased resided in Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, and on Wednesday she had tea with her landlady, and said she felt very well. About 6.30 the same evening the deceased was walking in Millbay, and as she turned the corner of Bath-street she suddenly fell on her face, and expired within a few minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 May 1877
HENNOCK - The Fatal Accident At Chudleigh Knighton. - At the Inquest held by Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL LEARWOOD, who was killed last week by falling down a china clay pit, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was interred in the parish churchyard on Sunday, the funeral being very largely attended. LEARWOOD was a very active local preacher, and both before and after the funeral service addresses were delivered and hymns sung outside the churchyard.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 May 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Milehouse. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, yesterday, respecting the death of THOMAS FITZGERALD, aged 36 years, who had hanged himself to a tree near the new cemetery. The deceased was brought before the Plymouth magistrates on Monday on charges of drunkenness and attempting to commit suicide, and was discharged with a caution. - ANN FITZGERALD, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband had been drinking of late and was a man of very weak mind. About eighteen months ago he fell on an anvil in the dockyard and since then he and often talked in his sleep and complained of his head. On Monday, after he was discharged by the Plymouth magistrates, he was much worse than usual. He left home on Monday evening, and she did not see him again. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 May 1877
WEMBURY - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Wembury yesterday respecting the death of WM. JEFFERY, aged 54 years, who was washed overboard from the barge Thomas, of Plymouth, off the Mewstone on April 15th, and drowned. The barge was on her way from Salcombe to Plymouth, and a heavy sea was running. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall on Thursday evening into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PERRYMAN, aged 57 years. The evidence adduced shews that the deceased was at the Coxside Creek on Monday morning last. He was working a winch employed in discharging coal from a ship, and was told to slack out the rope. This not being done, a labourer, named Ley, looked towards the winch and missed deceased, who was then seen struggling in the water between a vessel and the creek. He was got out; blood was flowing from his mouth and he was speechless. Deceased was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died on Wednesday. It was stated that the winch was in a defective condition, and that it was about two feet from the quay. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 18 May 1877
TIVERTON - The Fatality On The Exe. - An Inquiry was held at Tiverton yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr F. Mackenzie) touching the death of the young men, JOSEPH THOMAS COLLARD, and WILLIAM TAYLOR, who were drowned in the river Exe on Tuesday evening. It appeared from the evidence that some of the party had been fishing, and on their way home, JOSEPH COLLARD (one of the deceased) let one of the oars fall, and on his reaching after it, water was let into the boat. The other persons in it leaned the other side, and, as a consequence, more water was admitted. COLLARD being of opinion that the boat would sink, put his foot on the edge and leaped into the water, causing the boat to capsize and the four others to be precipitated into the water. Two of the part were able to swim and succeeded in reaching the shore, and were the means of saving ARTHUR COLLARD, the brother of one of the deceased. - The Coroner asked the witness Williams if the boat would have been righted if the deceased COLLARD had not jumped out, and he replied that it would. - After a short consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 May 1877
HOLSWORTHY - The Mysterious Death Of A Woman At Holsworthy [By Telegraph.] - An Inquest was held by Mr Fulford, Coroner, yesterday, at the White Hart Hotel, Holsworthy, on the body of ELIZABETH DUFF, a waitress at the house, who had died under somewhat suspicious circumstances. Mr Aspinall was Foreman of the Jury. - John Sargent, superintendent of police, identified the body. Had known deceased for six weeks as waitress at the White Hart. Last saw her on Sunday, the 20th inst, at two p.m., leave the town alone, carrying a carpet-bag, in the direction of Bude. Saw the body on Monday at Piper's Cottage. witness was told she had vomited and he took away the vomit. - Thomas Burnard deposed to deceased living with him since Lady-day last. On Saturday night she was in her usual health, which was good. Did not know of her going out on Sunday; she asked permission of the barmaid. Deceased was away for two days on a previous occasion, and they did not know where she was. - Emma Day, barmaid, said that deceased told her on Sunday that she was going out, and left about 1.30 o'clock. Witness had heard her complain of her heart, and of not being able to carry heavy weights. - Laura Grace Nicholls, chambermaid, knew ELIZABETH DUFF, and occupied the same bed with her. Had heard her complain of heart palpitations, and did not hear her complain on Sunday. She went to Bude on Sunday afternoon and appeared in her usual health. She was in the habit of writing and receiving letters frequently; on one occasion last week witness posted a letter for her addressed to W. Cann, Camelford. - George Braund Piper, road contractor, living at Higgaton, on the Bude-road, said that on Sunday afternoon a gentleman came to his house with the deceased about 5.30. They asked to have a cup of tea. She opened a bag and took out a pint bottle nearly full, from which she filled up his glass and took some herself. Witness had some too. She said it was port. They remained about an hour, appeared very comfortable, and left about six. Witness noticed nothing in their conversation particular. They walked away towards Holsworthy. After he had gone to bed he heard a knocking at the door. He saw it was the same gentleman. Deceased was holding by the gate, and groaning. Witness went down at once, and he said: "This young woman has been taken very ill since we left." Witness said: "Where have you been?" He said: "We have been up the road for a walk, and she 'took bad,' poor thing; she has been lying up in the ditch for two or three hours." He wished he could get a trap to take her to Holsworthy. The gentleman, whose name was Cann, said he had seen several persons on the road, and asked them to lend him a trap. He had to carry her much of the way to the house. Witness could not get a trap, but said they were welcome to remain, and see if she got better. She walked in great pain. Deceased said: "Let me right down on the floor." She lay down on some things by the fire, and remained in the same condition, and witness suggested that a medical man should be called without delay. Cann said, "By all means; will you go?" Witness asked Cann to go with him. He went, and witness remained until he came back. She appeared to be easier when witness returned, but died about a quarter of an hour afterwards. Mr Cann appeared to be most anxious and kind to her. he remained about two hours after she died; he left his name and address, but gave no direction as to how witness was to act. His address with William Cann, Free Inn, Stratton. - Matilda Piper corroborated her husband's statement. - Dr Ash said on Monday he was called at three a.m. by Piper and Cann, and hearing their description of the case sent some remedy. At four o'clock precisely Piper came again alone. She was not better, and he wished witness to see her at once, which he did. He found deceased in bed. She was cold, pulseless, and breathing with much difficulty, in fact dying. He told Mrs Piper that she was past remedy or hope and he did not think she had an hour to live unless she rallied. He told Mr Cann that she was dying; nothing could be done for her. He said "You don't say so." I asked him where they had been. He said "Out for a walk, and she was taken suddenly ill in the road. This was about six p.m." Witness asked him: "Can you offer me any explanation upon the altered condition she appeared to be in since leaving the cottage? He said he could not. He thought it was spasms, as she had had spasms before. A bucket was produced which was said to contain the vomit which came from the stomach. Witness placed it in a bottle. He went upstairs and examined the woman, and said to her, "Can you account for this illness in any way? Have you taken anything to produce these symptoms?" She said, "No, I cannot." Witness said, "I have suffered from these attacks before?" and she replied, "Yes; many times." He told her she was dying; she made no reply. He had since made a post mortem examination. There were signs indicative of previous pregnancy. The lungs were dark from venous engorgement but otherwise crepitant and sound. The heart was large, the valves were all competent, and the organ itself in structure was perfectly normal. The liver and spleen were also healthy. The stomach was removed with the gullet and tied at both extremities. It contained two ounces of thick brownish fluid. The mucous membrane of the gullet from the throat downwards was red, down to the entrance of the stomach; about an inch was pale and healthy. Immediately below it the cardiac end was intensely red and congested. A large spot, two inches in diameter, was dark and looked greenish. The middle of the stomach was more healthy, but had patches of congestion. In the small end of the stomach there was a similar greenish and congested condition as that of the other end. The appearances were not consistent with [?] of health. There were no marks of violence to shew that instruments had been used. The uterus contained a foetus about five months old. It measured 12 inches and weighed 18 ounces; a healthy female child. - The Inquiry, which had lasted for several hours, was then adjourned for the contents of the stomach to be analysed by Dr Wynter Blythe, the county analyst.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 May 1877
MODBURY - The Fatal Fall At Modbury. - Mr r. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Modbury on Wednesday relative to the death of JOHN WALKE , aged 55 years. The evidence shewed that the deceased went to a public dinner on Tuesday, and returned to his home, in Church-street, about midnight. He was put to bed very much the worse for drink and yesterday morning he was found lying at the bottom of the stairs. Mr Langworthy, surgeon, was called in, and found the deceased quite dead and cold, with a contused wound on the left side of the cheek and over the eyebrow. There were several bruises and marks about the deceased's body. The Jury - of whom Mr G. Gee was Foreman - returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of LOUISA ANN WORTH aged 21 years. The deceased, who was the wife of a mate in the merchant service, resided at 5 Saunders-place, and had been married about eight months. She had had very bad health, and on Wednesday complained of great weakness. About half-past five yesterday morning the deceased was taken very ill, and shortly afterwards died. Sarah Nicholls, sister of the deceased, stated, in answer to the Coroner, that the deceased suffered very severely from fits when about 17 years of age, and she believed that she died in one. Her husband went to see a month after the marriage, and had been on a voyage ever since. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Death From Scalding. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of VIOLET CUNNINGHAM, aged sixteen months. The evidence shewed that on May 9th the mother of the deceased was having her breakfast by the fire, and the deceased went to the table, and upset a cup of tea over its shoulder and chest. Mr T. Leah was called in, and attended the deceased until Monday last, when the child died from severe scalds. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 May 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at Stonehouse, into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH THOMAS HORNSBY, aged 14 years. CHARLES J. HORNSBY, father of the deceased, said that his son left him about eight o'clock on the previous evening to attend the Bible Class held at the St. Matthew's Mission-room, Battery-street. - Wm. Henry Step, a lad, aged 18, said about half-past eight o'clock he was standing on the Battery, and saw the deceased and several other boys playing in the Quarry with a "timber devil." The shaft of the "devil" had been hoisted in the air, and was being supported by several boys, but as the deceased ran under it the boys being unable to support it any longer allowed it to fall to the ground, and in its descent it struck the deceased on the shoulder, knocking him down. The deceased got up, but shortly afterwards fell down again, and called to his comrades to help him. Witness caught deceased's arm with a view to raise him, but before he succeeded the deceased struggled and died. - Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, last evening found deceased quite dead. There were marks of violence on the left temple and ear, and blood was proceeding from both ears. There was a sufficient fracture of the skull to cause death. - Francis Edgland, errand boy, accompanied deceased to the quarry, where they began to play. The deceased was hoisting the shaft of the "devil" when he slipped his foot and as he was falling, the shaft struck him on the head, killing him instantly. Deceased did not move after being struck by the shaft. - William Henry Humphreys, an errand boy, was returning home from work through the Millbay-road, when he saw the shaft, which had been suspended in the air by several boys, fall upon the deceased, knocking him down. - The Coroner considered the evidence to be so conflicting as to render an adjournment necessary, and adjourned until Tuesday in order that other boys who were in deceased's company might attend.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 May 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Saturday relative to the death of JOHN LISTER, aged 22 years, a private in the Royal Marines, serving on board the Lord Warden, now lying in Plymouth Sound, who died on Monday last from injuries received on the 19th inst., from a blow by the breaking of the capstan bar whilst at sea. As no witnesses were in attendance from the ship, the Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday next.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 May 1877
PLYMOUTH - Suffocation Of Two Sailors At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE DOWNER, aged 20, and WILLIAM TINNEY, aged 19, who were found dead on board the schooner Leader on Sunday. - Benjamin John Reding, a fisherman, stated that he was upon the Parade about quarter-past eleven on Saturday night, talking with the deceased and the other man found on board, all three having just then left Mr Sheers's public-house on the Parade. DOWNER lodged at the house; they had been drinking, but were not drunk. Witness asked TINNEY if he was going home with him, but he replied, "No, I am going on board that vessel," pointing to the schooner Leader, lying alongside the quay, "with Gover and DOWNER." Witness wished them "Good night," and three left, going in the direction of the vessel. It struck witness as being very curious that they went on board the schooner, but he did not say anything to TINNEY about it. Witness went home. On Sunday morning about half-past eight he met a young man named French upon the Quay, and being near the Leader witness remarked to his companion that some men went on board that ship on the previous night. French said, "Let's go on board and see if they are awake." Upon going on deck witness noticed that the scuttle was open, and on going into the forecastle he found TINNEY lying upon his face. he then saw Gover and DOWNER also in the forecastle, and the latter was lying on his face. Witness tried to rouse them, but being unable to do so obtained assistance and went on board again. He then lifted DOWNER up, but found that he was quite dead and blood flowed freely from his mouth and ears. A Mr Sheers examined TINNEY and pronounced him dead. Gover only shewed signs of life. He was breathing very heavily. In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that all the hatchways were secured excepting the scuttle, which was open. - William Sheers, landlord of the Coal Exchange Inn, Parade, said that DOWNER had lodged with him for over a fortnight. The deceased was a native of Shoreham, and had just completed a three years' apprenticeship as seaman, but since he had been discharged from the barque Maryborough, he joined the Royal Naval Reserve, and was undergoing drill. Shortly before eleven p.m. on Saturday he saw DOWNER in his house talking to Gover, and he went out. As was his practice, witness went around the quay just before midnight to look for DOWNER, but could not find him. Witness went within two feet of the ship Leader in his search, but had no knowledge that deceased was on board. He had stopped out all night twice before; he did not say that he was going to remain out on the night in question. When witness went on board the vessel on Sunday morning the first thing that drew his attention was the state of the scuttle. He found that the top part of the slide had been taken off, and it was hanging by the lock. He saw the three men in the forecastle. TINNEY and DOWNER were apparently dead, but Gover was breathing. He bathed the latter and all three men were conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Police-Inspector Murch said that the surgeons at the Hospital pronounced TINNEY and DOWNER dead directly they were admitted, but stated that it was very likely that Gover would recover. - Joseph Dan, master of the schooner Leader, belonging to the South Devon Shipping Company, trading between Plymouth and London, said that the vessel arrived in the port on Monday last, and at noon on Saturday the crew finished discharging the cargo, and witness then determined to fumigate the ship to destroy the vermin which were on board. Fires were lighted in the forecastle, cabin, and main-hold; charcoal and pepper were used. The crew secured the scuttle by locking it, and afterwards lashed a sail over it. They did the same to the companion hatch, and the three other hatches were buttoned down as they were at sea. Witness then ordered the men to leave the ship, and not to return until Monday morning and, further, not to go below before he gave them leave. At 7.30 p.m. on Saturday witness quitted the ship, and open going on board the following morning he found that the scuttle had been forcibly opened. From the state the ship was in, it was dangerous for any person to go below, in fact it would have been quite impossible for anyone to have lived there. Witness should have thought that the strength of the fumes which must have escaped when the scuttle was opened would have deprived anyone of breath. He had no doubt whatever but that the men died from suffocation. They were not members of the crew, and had no right on board. - By the Coroner: Within the past nine months the vessel had been broken into three times by night, and articles had been stolen. He did not know of any regulation existing prohibiting fumigation being made on board a vessel lying alongside a quay. It was not usual to give notice that a vessel was full of dangerous smoke. He had fumigated vessels several times before. - A Juror remarked that he had often fumigated a ship, and it was not a general rule to give notice of the fact. - The Coroner said it was a source of considerable danger. Persons might forget themselves and go on board in total ignorance that it would be death to them. A portion of the vessel, he believed, was not lying within the precincts of the wharf. - The witness (Dan) said that although the shed did not extend to the end of the wharf, the whole of it belonged to the Shipping Company. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that if the Inquest was adjourned for the attendance of Gover he did not think he could throw any more light on the sad affair. The men had no right on board the vessel, yet he thought that some intimation should be given that a ship was undergoing such a process, and it was a miracle that Gover had escaped with his life. There was no doubt that the other men came to their death by being suffocated by the fumes arising from the fires, but the question for the Jury to decide was whether the occurrence was accidentally caused or not. - A Juror thought that the wharf ought to be better protected seeing that it was a public thoroughfare. Although a person had no right to go on board the ship, yet the public ought to be warned that there was danger. - The Jury, after a long private consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Coroner to forward the following recommendation to the South Devon Shipping Company:- "That in the judgment of the Jury it is advisable that in future when vessels are being fumigated, as the Leader was on Saturday night, that notice should be given of the fact, and that during the night a watchman should be placed on the quay to prevent trespassers going on board." - The Coroner said that if, after the matter had thus been publicly noticed, a similar accident occurred, he was sure the Jury would look at the matter far more seriously than they had done that day.

LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at the Dartmoor Prisons yesterday by Mr Fulford, Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM MCEWEN, a convict, who died suddenly on the afternoon of the 24th instant. The deceased was 61 years of age, and had suffered various terms of imprisonment from three months to two years between the years 1852 and the date of his last conviction in 1873. He was undergoing a sentence of seven years for larceny. His conduct as a prisoner was good and his health had appeared excellent. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

WALKHAMPTON - Murder and Suicide By A Devonshire Farmer. - A crime, of which no adequate explanation has been offered, was perpetrated at Park Town, some miles from Walkhampton, on Sunday. JOHN GILES, a man 53 years of age, had for some time occupied Park Town Farm. He was left a widower three years ago, but in the course of twelve months remarried, the second wife being the widow of a farmer named Mortimer. By his first wife GILES had a son, a lad 6 years of age, named JOSEPH GEORGE. GILES went to Horrabridge to transact some business on Saturday, and stayed in the village until the public-houses were closed for the night. His prolonged absence created some alarm in his wife's mind, but he eventually reached home in safety at a late hour. He had evidently been drinking, although he does not appear to have been intoxicated, and the wife states that no quarrel took place between them. Next morning GILES rose at his usual hour, and took his breakfast apparently in good spirits. He went out walking, and returned to the house about ten o'clock. By this time the lad had finished his breakfast, and he left with his father, it being their usual custom to go to look after the cattle. The sheep dog belonging to GILES accompanied them. This seems to have been the last time they were seen alive. As the day progressed, the prolonged absence of father and son created apprehension in the farmhouse, and this feeling was heightened when, about seven in the evening, the dog returned alone, and although at once fed, manifested considerable restlessness. MRS GILES and the servants then commenced a search of the farm, and on a bank called the Hitoms, near the house, MRS GILES, led by the dog, found the hats of her husband and stepson. About an hour later Mr Joseph Mortimer, a neighbouring farmer, who was assisting in the search, discovered the dead bodies of GILES and his boy in the river Walkham, near the same bank. The bodies were covered with water, and were tied together by a rope. The child's head was on the father's shoulder, and the little boy had evidently struggled. The watch found on GILES had stopped at five minutes past one o'clock. The deceased had manifested great fondness for the child. - Yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the bodies at the late residence of the deceased. - Nellie Halling, servant at the farm, stated that on Sunday morning her master had his breakfast as usual, and appeared in good spirits. He went out to walk and returned about ten o'clock for his son, who, having breakfasted, went out with his father, a sheep-dog following them. She thought that they went to look after the cattle as was their usual custom. They generally returned about one o'clock, but they did not return on Sunday. Witness never heard any quarrel taking place between her master and his wife. - Joseph Mortimer, residing at Well Town, near Walkhampton, stated that about eight o'clock on Sunday evening he went to the Hitoms, by the river Walkham, and found the bodies in the water, about three feet from the bank. With assistance, witness took the bodies out. They were dressed with the exception of their hats. The little boy was tied to his father by a piece of rope, which passed round their waists. Both bodies were covered with water, the boy was underneath. His head was on his father's left shoulder, and there were appearances of a struggle having taken place. - ELIZABETH GILES, wife of the deceased, said her husband appeared in good spirits on Sunday. On Saturday he had had a little to drink. There had been no quarrel between them, and she could not account for the deceased getting into the water with the boy in any way. - The Jury, of whom Mr James Clogg was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence as to how the deceased came into the water."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 May 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, concluded the Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday respecting the death of a lad named JOSEPH THOMAS HORNSBY, aged 14 years, who met with his death by the falling upon him of the shaft of the "devil" on Friday last, whilst playing with several other boys in the Quarry at Millbay-road. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Lord Warden. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, resumed the Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday morning, relative to the death of JOHN LISTER, a private in the Royal Marines, serving on board the Lord Warden. Mr William Eastlake, Deputy-judge advocate of the fleet, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty. - F. Drake, boatswain on board the Lord Warden, stated that on the morning of the 10th May the vessel was lying at moorings off Queensferry, and about 100 of the crew were engaged in working the capstan on the upper deck, heaving up the moorings, for the purpose of disconnecting the slip at the bits, as the ship was about to proceed to sea. The first bridle was eased out without any mishap, but in easing out the second bridle, after the slip was off, the commander gave the order to warp back the capstan steadily. After the first six feet of the bridle had been got up, the capstan was doing its work properly, but afterwards it appeared to take charge. The first lieutenant at once ordered the men to stand firmly to the bars, but the capstan seemed to take greater charge of them; and some of the men jumped upon the bars, and immediately the capstan spun around very violently, and the men on the bars were taken around with it, whilst the others dropped upon the deck. One of the bars caught, and struck a rope shaft the mast, and this caused the "swifter" to carry away, and the whole of the bars flew out in all directions and injured several men. The deceased was working at one of the bars. Witness did not see him struck, but noticed him fall upon the deck. - By the Jury: If all the men had "stuck" to the bars as they were ordered the accident could never have happened. The men who jumped on the bars were not ordered to do so, and by so doing they lost power. There were twenty bars in the capstan, and five men at each, and that was sufficient to work it. He had been 37 years in the service, and that was the third accident of the kind that had occurred in his experience. - Mr P. Burgess, staff-surgeon, serving in the Lord Warden, said that when the deceased was brought to him he was insensible and suffering from an extensive fracture of the skull. The deceased remained unconscious until the 21st instant, when he expired. - By Mr Eastlake: LISTER died from the injury to the head. No limbs were broken. - The Coroner thought that the officers were not to blame in the matter, and it was clear that precautions were taken to avoid an accident, as the captain had ordered that one bridle only should be taken up at a time. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating all the officers and men from blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 May 1877
HOLSWORTHY - The Mysterious Death At Holsworthy. Verdict of "Wilful Murder." - The Inquiry respecting the death of ELIZABETH DUFF, was resumed at the White Hart Hotel, Holsworthy, yesterday, before Mr Fulford, Coroner. Mr Rowe, of Stratton, watched the case on behalf of Mr Cann, of Camelford. - After the depositions already taken had been read, George Piper, Braund, corrected his statement that the bottle was empty on the return of deceased and Cann to his house. It contained nearly as much as before they left. He and Cann drank what remained. - Sergeant Stone deposed to carrying the bottles to Dr Blyth on May 24th. On searching deceased's box he found fourteen letters (produced) a packet of some powder, and a bundle of herbs. - Dr Winter Blyth, county analyst, Barnstaple, said he received on the 24th of May, from Sergeant Stone, three bottles
bottles labelled, 1, 4, 5, all containing vomit, No. 2 labelled "contents of stomach," a jar containing a stomach, and two powders. The lining membrane of the gullet was red and inflamed. At the end of the stomach, nearest the gullet, there was an irregular patch about the size of the palm of the hand, much inflamed, and discoloured, and several other smaller patches of inflammation in other parts of the stomach. These appearances could be only explained by the action of some acrid or irritating substance. There was no known disease which would produce them. The vomits contained in bottles 1 and 4 were identical, of a green colour and peculiar odour, slightly acid. Vomit No. 5 was of a reddish colour. The contents of the stomach were greenish, not unlike the vomit. The powder consisted of sulphate of iron. He carefully examined various fluids, but could detect no mineral poison. The greenish substance he found, by the microscope and chemical tests, to be savin, a poisonous shrub which has been used for the purpose of exciting abortion. He also found fragments of other leaves, which he had not yet identified. From the post-mortem appearances, from his own analyses, and from the depositions he had heard, he formed the opinion that the deceased died from poisoning by savin. - By the Coroner: From the appearances after death in the gullet, it was certain that the poison acted immediately, or almost so. In this case, probably, it was given in the form of a tea. - Dr Ash, recalled, stated that the appearance of the stomach was such as would have been produced by an acid substance like savin, and could not be caused by any natural disease that he knew of. From the condition of the back of the throat and gullet, he considered that the poison acted immediately. It was probably taken in a decoction, judging from the olive green colour of the vomit. Savin was frequently used by certain classes for the purpose of exciting abortion; but he had never known it to succeed, except by shock through the maternal system. - Dr E. T. Pearse, who assisted at the post mortem examination with Dr Ash, confirmed this evidence. - Gilbert Sanders, of Killatree, deposed to seeing deceased and Cann about seven on Sunday evening in the road between Pyworthy and Bridgerule. They both appeared to be perfectly well at the time. - Mary Bowden saw them about eight o'clock, the woman lying in a gateway, groaning and coughing, the man by her side with jacket off. Witness asked if there was anything the matter. Cann said "Yes; she is taken very unwell." Deceased declined to speak to witness, thinking she would be better in a few minutes. Cann said she was taken very suddenly in her stomach, and had been sick. They had further conversation. He wanted a trap to take deceased to Holsworthy. - Thomas Petherick saw deceased at 9.30 p.m. in the same road lying in the ditch. No one was with her. He asked "What's the matter?" She replied, "I'm very ill." Asked her name, and she said, "I can't talk to you;" but added that she lived about three miles away, and that they were gone after the horse and trap. Witness remained with her until Cann came. Cann said, "My darling, I'll do anything for you." He tried to lift her up, and assisted her towards Holsworthy. He saw them into the cottage. He knew both Cann and deceased. Cann had asked his father to lend him a horse and trap. He would not tell his name, but offered to pay. The distance from where he first saw the woman to the cottage, half a mile, took them half an hour to walk. - At this point it was elicited by Mr Rowe that at least two of the Jury could give material evidence. - The Coroner declined to examine them, and strongly censured those who summoned the Jury. - On reassembling after luncheon, the Coroner drew attention to the fact that Cann and deceased met not by chance on Sunday, but by appointment. Mr Burnard, in his evidence, stated that the deceased was absent for two nights about a month ago, but he could not tell where she was. - Margaret Penwarden deposed to the deceased asking her where she could go to with her "chap," who was coming up from Stratton. Witness told her to an inn, but she preferred going to witness's house. She remained there all one Sunday. In the forenoon she sent witness to the Stanhope Arms to see if she could find Cann; she found him, and asked him if he was not the person the waitress was waiting for. They remained at her house all day together. She provided meals for them and hired a bed at Routley's for them; but deceased stayed in witness's house all that night with Cann. She made up a bed for them in the kitchen with a mattress and blanket. On Monday she came to the White Hart to work, leaving Cann and deceased in her house. On her return about six found them still there. Deceased complained of being ill; was sick. groaning, and urging; she appeared in agony, and swollen. Deceased sent witness to Mr Mill for tincture of rhubarb. She urged a good deal. They remained up a great part of the night with her. She vomited on Tuesday before she left more than once. Cann left at eight o'clock with her, and witness saw no more of them. Cann paid witness nine shillings for accommodation. Deceased drank something out of a bottle before she became worse on the Monday., Did not know she was in the family way. - At this stage the letters were produced; but the Coroner declined to read them, as on a future occasion they might be more strictly legal evidence. There was, he said, enough evidence at present to satisfy his Inquiry. - The Coroner, having warned Cann (whose letters to deceased were handed to his Solicitor) Cann tendered himself for examination, but his evidence in no way materially differed from that of former witnesses. - The Coroner proceeded to sum up the evidence in an impartial and lucid manner, and to declare the law, feeling manifestly his grave and serious responsibility. An act done without a primary intention of killing, but which was felonious and resulted in the death of a person, was held by the law to be an act of murder. - The Jury, having retired for a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against William Cann." - The Coroner then formally committed the prisoner to take his trial. A Warrant was issued and Cann surrendered.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 June 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - Yesterday afternoon, Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall relative to the death of ELIZABETH WALTERS, a widow, aged 73 years. It appears that about ten weeks since the deceased, whilst attempting to reach a shelf in her room, in Russell-street, slipped her foot, fell on the floor and broke her thigh. She was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she lingered until Sunday, when she expired. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquiry was held last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of NORAH HARRIS, aged about 18 months, the daughter of a labourer named JAMES HARRIS, residing in Alice-street. The mother of the deceased stated that on Sunday night the deceased became very unwell and yesterday morning she got worse and witness took her to Mr Pearse, surgeon, who upon examination found that the child was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 June 1877
LOWESTOFT - The Alleged Triple Murder At Lowestoft. The Accused Devon People. - The account we have already published of the triple murder at Lowestoft derives additional interest from the fact that the father and mother, who are charged with the murder of their children, are both natives of Devon, the former having been born in Newton, and the latter in Brixham. The subjoined details of the Inquest will therefore be of special interest. The deceased were JOHN WILLIAM BROWNE, aged 3 years; ALICE BROWNE, aged 2 years, and GEORGE BROWNE, aged 7 months, children of SAMUEL BROWNE, smackmaster, of Lowestoft. - Alice Kate Harris, a girl of 14, servant in the family of the BROWNES, deposed that on Thursday evening she and her master and mistress and the three deceased children had tea together. The tea consisted of shrimps, bread and butter, and tea to drink. The deceased children partook of tea as usual, and appeared quite well. The two elder children had bread and butter and shrimps, with tea to drink, and the youngest child had sops. Witness put ALICE to bed about seven o'clock with her clothes on, her mistress telling her t do so. About 8.30 MRS BROWNE put GEORGE to bed also with his clothes on. When witness woke, at about half-past four on Friday morning, her mistress was covering JOHN up, and ALICE was gone. JOHN looked very white, and witness asked her mistress the reason. She said she did not know, but that ALICE was the same, and that she had taken her into her own bed to try to get her warm. Witness found on examination that JOHN was dead, and called her mistress; her mistress in return called MR BROWNE, who at once came into the room and soon ran out, as MRS BROWNE said, send for a doctor. Both MR and MRS BROWNE were dressed when witness found that JOHN was dead. Witness observed ALICE lying upon her mistress's bed as if she were dead. The two younger children had nothing given them after tea before going to bed. JOHN had a little bread and cheese and some water. MR and MRS BROWNE were both sober on Thursday night. MRS BROWNE told witness that she should go on the Friday to her father's at Brixham, and that she should take the children with her. MR and MRS BROWNE "had a few words" before they went to bed on Thursday. Witness had seen her master the worse for drink, but not her mistress. On Thursday the children had some biscuits and sweets; they were bought by the deceased boy JOHN. - Police Inspector Jeffries stated that on hearing of the death of the three children he went to BROWNE'S house, and charged him with causing the sad occurrence. On Thursday BROWNE had come to the police-station and complained that his wife had pawned almost all the things out of his house, and that he wanted a separation. BROWNE also told witness that he had a great objection to his wife taking the three children to Brixham. Neither BROWNE nor his wife had been seen the worse for drink, but fourteen pawnbrokers' duplicates were found upon MRS BROWNE upon her being searched. - Mr Chant, surgeon, assistant to Messrs. Worthington, stated that he was called in to BROWNE'S house and found all the three children dead; there were no marks of violence, and the bedclothes were thrown lightly across the bodies. The children had been put to bed in perfect health and MRS BROWNE stated to witness that she had given the baby the breast at half-past one. - The Inquiry was adjourned. BROWNE and his wife were brought before a magistrate on a charge of murdering the children, and were remanded.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 June 1877
HIGHWEEK - WILLIAM JOHN SPENCER, little boy, was drowned in the Lemons Mill Leat at Newton Bushel on Wednesday. An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, and after hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that the owner of the cottages at the place where the child fell in, should be called upon to fence the leat at this spot.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 June 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fall At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM BRASSINGTON, a marine pensioner, 75 years of age, who died from injuries received in falling downstairs. The deceased lived at the Robin Hood public-house, St. Mary-street, and was last seen alive on Tuesday night, just before going to bed. He was then perfectly sober. On Wednesday morning, however, he was found lying on the stairs leading from his room quite dead. Mr Leah, surgeon, made a post mortem examination, and found that death had arisen from pressure of blood on the brain, that might have been caused by a violent blow, such as deceased probably received in falling. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 11 June 1877
CHERITON FITZPAINE - Suicide Of Assistant Overseer. - It was stated a few days since that MR WOTTON, assistant overseer and rate collector, of Cheriton Fitzpaine, had died suddenly from heart disease; but an Inquest has revealed the fact that he committed suicide, while in an Unsound State of Mind, by hanging.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 June 1877
BUCKLAND BREWER - Fatal Accident To A North Devon Farmer. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at Buckland Brewer, respecting the death of MR JOHN DURANT, 64 years of age. Deceased was removing a cob wall upon his farm, when a portion fell on him, but being a strong man he managed, with assistance, to extricate himself and walk home, though with difficulty. Dr Thompson, of Bideford, attended him, but he died from the effects of the injuries a few days after. The medical evidence went to shew that the back of deceased was broken. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."


Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 June 1877
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Death From Lockjaw. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Horrabridge yesterday respecting the death of RICHARD BAILEY, aged 9 years, the son of WILLIAM BAILEY, a mason. About three weeks since an iron bar fell upon the right big toe of the deceased, but nothing serious was apprehended until Sunday last, when tetanus set in. Mr Willis, surgeon, was sent for, and attended to the boy, but the little fellow died on Monday. the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Tetanus, resulting from a blow received by the Accidental Fall of an iron bar.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 June 1877
TEIGNMOUTH - Shocking Accident At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth last evening by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of ERNEST WILLS, aged 3 years, son of MR F. WILLS, butcher. On May 24th the deceased was placed on a pony, to which he was strapped, and sent for a ride in charge of a boy named Causley. The animal became restive, and knocked the attendant down, and started off with the child suspended to the stirrup by his foot, and with his head hanging down. Whilst the pony was jumping over some pieces of timber, the head of the child came in contact with them, and the scalp was entirely removed and the skull severely bruised. Mr Lake attended the sufferer, but little hope was entertained of his recovery from the first, and he died on Tuesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 June 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Fatal Accident In Plymouth Sound. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at the Royal Naval Hospital yesterday afternoon, relative to the death of GEORGE DYER, a sailor boy serving on board the training brig Liberty returned from a cruise in Channel, and in order to take up her moorings outside Drake's Island the cutter was manned by boys, who were directed to take the hawser from the bow of the vessel and secure it to the buoy. In doing so, however, the boat came in contact with the brig's bows, the consequence being that the former was capsized, and all on board, including the deceased, were thrown into the water. All the other lads were rescued, but DYER disappeared directly afterwards. On Thursday morning the body of the deceased, which was very much decomposed, was found upon the shore on the north side of Drake's Island by William McKay, a bombardier in the 3rd brigade Royal Artillery, the tide having just then left it. Yesterday evidence was given as to the identity and to finding the body, but as the Liberty was in the Channel cruising the Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday for the attendance of the witnesses. The Admiralty was represented by Mr W. Eastlake.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 June 1877
PLYMPTON ST MARY - An Inquest was held at Plympton last evening by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of JOSEPH DOEBEER, aged 21 years. On Saturday evening the deceased, who was a farm labourer, and two or three other young men were returning from work at Knackersknowle, and when near Longbridge they agreed to have a bathe in the river Plym. They went into the water, and shortly afterwards a young man named Finemore got out of his depth, and whilst struggling to reach the bank he heard the deceased's brother, who was upon the embankment, call out that deceased was sinking. Finemore was unable to render any assistance to DOEBEER, who could not swim, and the poor fellow sank almost immediately. Finemore was called and in reply to the Coroner, said that the deceased sank in about ten feet of water, at a spot where there was a very strong undercurrent. Shortly after the accident a boat was procured, and the deceased was recovered about fifteen yards from the place where he disappeared. Witness was unaware that persons were not allowed to bathe in the part of the river in question. he was unable to swim himself. - The Coroner observed that the spot where the deceased was bathing was a very dangerous place, and in the meadow through which he and his companions passed to get to the river there was a notice prohibiting persons from bathing. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Coroner to hand their fees to DOEBEER'S widow, who is in very poor circumstances and who has only recently been married.

TORQUAY - Strange Drowning Case At Torquay. - At Torquay last evening, an Inquiry was held by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH POWLESLAND, servant, 18 years of age, whose body was picked up on the seashore on Sunday afternoon. - Thomas Ascott, who was the first witness, said that on the previous afternoon, whilst walking along the Torbay Road, near Cumper's Hotel, he discovered the body of a woman lying on the ground face downwards. With witness there was a young man named Harding, who immediately brought two policemen to remove the body. On a projecting stone about five feet down from the top of the wall was a hair net. - P.C. Edmund Trott stated that on Sunday afternoon his attention was called to the body of a woman lying in about four feet of water some fifteen yards from the sea wall near Cumper's Hotel. - Daniel Skinner, fisherman, said that he went with two others in a boat to where the body of deceased lay. A rope was passed round the body and it was towed to the Coal Quay. The tide was on the ebb. No one was trying to get the body out of the water. It was jammed between some rocks. - P.C. Trott recalled, said that the body was placed in a shed on the Coal Quay, and subsequently taken to the mortuary. The body was that of a young girl, and was completely dressed, with the exception of bonnet and shoes. He had seen deceased about the town. She was generally alone, or with another girl; had never seen her with a man. - P.C. John Adams produced a woman's boot and velvet tie found near the body. The woman's hat (produced) was found later in the evening. - Police-Sergeant William Board stated that as soon as the body was found he sent for Mr Marsh, surgeon. On searching the body witness found a pocket handkerchief, a book, and a photograph of a young man. Thought he could recognise the photograph of the man. Deceased had never been charged with any offence. - The Coroner, in reply to a Juryman, said that the title of the book was "A brief sketch of Mrs Hannah Moore." - JOHN POWLESLAND, father of deceased, a milkman, of Barton, near Torquay, said deceased was 18 years of age, and had been in the service of Mrs Lear, St Marychurch, for about two years. Had not seen deceased since the 9th instant, and Mrs Lear had said to witness that she did not know where deceased had gone since she left her service. Deceased had always been very steady, and he knew nothing of her having kept company with a young man. Fancied he had seen the man whose photograph was produced. - Mrs Lear, wife of Mr W. H. Lear, ironmonger, of St. Marychurch, with whom deceased had been living as general servant, said that the deceased left her service on Sunday morning, the 10th instant, at about six o'clock. She was under notice to leave on the following Tuesday, having, on one occasion, gone out and left the children alone, and not returning until after eleven o'clock at night. Deceased had lately been in the habit of going out a good deal. She went to bed on Saturday apparently in her usual spirits. Could not recognise the photograph nor anything but the shoes. Deceased was of a cheerful disposition and did not appear to be at all likely to commit suicide. - Wm. Worden, shoemaker, Upton, Torquay, stated that the deceased came to his house on the night of Friday, the 15th instant, and said that she had been with her grandmother in Exeter, but had now got a place at Mr Slade's, grocer, Torquay, where she was going on the following Wednesday. Deceased, who was very well known to witness, was given some supper and a night's lodging, as she said she had missed the late train to Exeter. During supper deceased took the photograph (which had been produced) from her pocket, saying it was that of her young man, who lived in Torquay as a coachman and was named John Dart. She left witness's house on Saturday morning, and the last time he saw her was on Saturday night, in Fleet-street, at about nine o'clock, when she appeared to avoid him. - William John Jefferies, coachwheeler, of St Mary Church, said that he knew the deceased and had walked with her once or twice lately, and saw her last Saturday evening at about eight o'clock, but did not walk with her. The photograph was that of a young man named Nias, who was with deceased on Saturday night. - Mrs Godfrey, of Temperance-street, said that deceased and a man named Tregaskis slept at her house on the night of Monday the 11th inst., the man saying that deceased was his wife. Deceased had never been in her (witness's) house before nor since. - Robert Tregaskis corroborated the evidence of the last witness. - Mr E. A. Marsh, surgeon, stated that he, as assistant-surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, made a post mortem examination of the body, and found upon it no marks of violence, nor were there any indications that deceased had ever been pregnant. He had no doubt that the cause of death was drowning. - John Nias, labourer, stated that he went to Upton with deceased at about half-past ten on Saturday night to a house in which deceased said her aunt lived. He had seen deceased only two nights - Friday and Saturday. Gave deceased the photograph (which was of himself) on Friday night. When he left deceased, at half-past ten on Saturday night, she appeared to be in good spirits. He did not give her the name of John Dart, but told her his proper name. She gave her name as Ellen Beer. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how deceased got into the water there was no evidence to show." - The woman Godfrey and the men Nias and Tregaskis were called forward by the Coroner and received a severe reprimand for their conduct in connection with the deceased. The Coroner also called attention to the fact that during the Inquiry great inconvenience had been caused by the Local Board not having allowed the mortuary to be constructed, so that post mortem examinations might be conducted in it. The body in that case had been removed from the mortuary to a neighbouring public-house for a post mortem examination, and back again to the mortuary for viewing. This carrying about of the body was very painful both for the friends and the public, and he thought that if the attention of the Local Board were properly called to the matter they might do something to improve the present state of affairs.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 June 1877
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, of Plymouth, yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY TOMLIN, aged 9 months. Its mother, SELINA TOMLIN, who said she was unmarried, stated that the child was usually healthy, but on Sunday, as she was dressing it, it turned black in the face and stiff, and presented the appearance of having a fit. About ten minutes afterwards it died. - Mr Williams, Coroner's officer, said he had examined the body and found no suspicious marks on it. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Cart. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of THOMAS WORTHLY ROBERTSHAW, butcher, 51 years of age, who resided in Kent-road, Ford. - Richard Pitt stated that on Monday, the 4th June, he went for a dive with deceased in a light spring trap. When in Higher-street they met a friend and had a glass of ale each, and then returned to the cart. He (witness) stood on the pavement while deceased got up to adjust the seat, after doing which deceased went to sit down, but the seat tilted a little sand he was thrown over the back of the cart into the road, which was paved. Witness, with assistance, carried him to the public-house and sent for Mr Harper, surgeon. Deceased was subsequently taken to the Hospital, where he had seen him since the accident, and on one occasion he remarked, "If I had tied the seat it would not have happened." - The house surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital was then called, but he did not put in an appearance. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and asked Mr Brian to compel the surgeon to attend on similar occasions in the future.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide Of A Stonehouse Tradesman. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of JAMES MATTHEWS, aged 62 years, baker and confectioner, residing in George-street. - George Rowling, baker, in the employ of the deceased, stated that during the past five days the deceased had been drinking, and had complained of pains in his head. About six o'clock yesterday morning he (witness) arrived at the house to go to work, and in consequence of what the deceased's wife told him he went to the bedroom, where he found the deceased hanging by a rope suspended from the cross-piece at the foot of his bed. - Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, stated that about a few minutes after six o'clock yesterday morning he was called to see the deceased, who he found had been dead for two or three hours. He believed that the pain in the head with which the deceased was troubled was ascribable to the warm weather and his intemperate habits. - LOUISA WILLIAMS MATTHEWS, daughter of the deceased, stated that about half-past eleven o'clock on Monday night the deceased went to bed with her mother, and at two o'clock yesterday morning he requested her mother to leave the bedroom and go to sleep with witness. This she did, but about six o'clock she returned to the bedroom and found the deceased hanging. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that it was evident that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXMOUTH - The Boat Accident At Exmouth. - An inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday by Mr S. M. Cox, Coroner, touching the death of ELIZABETH BENNETT, who was drowned by the capsizing of a boat on the evening of Sunday, the 27th May. - Thomas Hill, cabinet maker of Exeter, deposed that on May 27th he, his little boy, and his brother, were about to return from Starcross to Exmouth in a boat 12 ft. long, when the deceased asked to be taken across. He told her that it was very rough, but that they would give her a passage across if she wished. She asked what they would charge, and he told her nothing. They pulled to Cockwood and then hoisted sail, and went as far as Bull Hill, when a sudden squall struck the boat, which capsized. The young woman fell to the leeward. On coming to the surface he first saw his little boy, and swam to him and helped him up, and then got hold of the keel of the boat. He was in the water twenty minutes. At the time of the accident he had let go the sheet to ease the sail, and had the rope in his hand. did not make any mistake in the management of the boat. Was accustomed to boats in his younger days. His brother was a porter on the railway, and did not know much about boating. - Thomas Henry Curry, boatman, Starcross, said he was leaving Exmouth for Starcross when he observed the accident, and rescued the men and boy, but could not reach the girl, whom he saw about six or eight feet under water. The men were hanging to the keel of the boat. It was very squally. He (witness) was sailing with a single reef sail. - WILLIAM BENNETT, of Iddesleigh, near Dunsford, stated that deceased was his daughter, and had been living with Mr Haydon, of Kenton, as domestic servant, but had left her situation on the Thursday previous to the accident. She was 19 years old. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased was Accidentally Drowned, and considered that to prevent similar accidents a presentment should be made to the Local Board in favour of a byelaw to prevent unlicensed persons plying for hire on the Exmouth beach.

LOWESTOFT - The Alleged Murders By Devon Parents. Witnesses From Brixham [Special Telegram.] Lowestoft, Tuesday. - The Inquiry as to the cause of the deaths of JOHN WILLIAM BRAY BROWN, aged 3 years; ALICE AMELIA BROWN, aged 2 years; and GEORGE BROWN, aged 7 months, was resumed for the fourth time at the Masonic Hall, Lowestoft this evening before Mr C. W. Chaston, Coroner. SAMUEL BROWN, smackmaster and MARY JANE, his wife, parents of the deceased, are in custody on suspicion of having caused the deaths of their children. It having become known that two witnesses had been brought from Brixham (one of them the mother of MRS BROWN), who, it was expected, would give important evidence, increased interest in the proceedings was manifested. A large crowd of persons who could not gain admission to the hall waited outside until the adjournment of the Inquiry, anxious to learn the nature of the expected "important evidence." - Police-Inspector Jeffries read a statement made to him by the male prisoner on the 2nd instant. Prisoner said that on Friday morning, the 1st instant, his wife brought his little girl to him, saying how cold it was. he laid outside of the bed all night with his clothes on, and his wife laid by his side. In the morning he missed her. When he saw the child he ran for the doctor. - Mary Bray, wife of William Harte Bray, fisherman, Higher-street, Brixham, mother of the female prisoner, said on Thursday night the 31st of May, she received a letter from her daughter, who wrote that she was in great sorrow and trouble. When she was confined she was allowed 15s. a week to pay a nurse and doctor, and she was obliged to pawn things to do so. Her husband had diseased her, and by the time witness received the letter she and the children would be no more. A fortnight before that she received a letter from her daughter, who said she was coming to Brixham on the Friday with her children, and would arrive by the midnight train. Witness and her husband went to meet them, but they did not arrive. Witness burned both letters, as she always burnt letters. Witness also received a letter from SAMUEL BROWN on the 31st May , in which he ridiculed his wife for saying that he had "jacked her up." He would cry her down if he did so. She would be no more his wife as long as he lived. Witness here added that her daughter said in her letter that she and her children were in the way. - Harriet, wife of William Reed, fisherman, Brixham, said that on Tuesday, 5th inst., she went into Mrs Bray's house. Mrs Bray read MRS BROWN'S letter to her. Witness corroborated the statement of Mrs Bray as to the contents of the letter, and added that it said that BROWN had beaten his wife with a stick, and had got tired of her and his children; they were all in his way. By the time that letter was received the mother and the children would be drowned. - Ann, wife of James Martyn, labourer, Brixham, also read the letter in Mrs Bray's house, and corroborated the other witnesses as to the contents of it. - Edna Johnson, widow, who keeps a small shop in Middle-street, Brixham, said she went to Mrs Bray's on Saturday, 2nd of June. After Mrs Bray had read the letter she burnt it. - George Hammett, 61 Bolton-street, Brixham, letter carrier, deposed that within the fortnight ending 31st May he delivered two letters to Mrs Bray. The last was, he believed, on 31st May. Both letters bore the Lowestoft postmark. - The Inquiry was adjourned until tomorrow, when Dr Tidy of London, will give the result of his analysis of the stomachs of the deceased children.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 June 1877
LOWESTOFT - The Charge Against A Devonshire Woman. Verdict of "Wilful Murder." [Special Telegram.] Lowestoft, Wednesday. - At the resumed Inquest today on the bodies of three children named BROWN. Dr Charles Weymott Tidy, Bachelor in Medicine, Professor of Chemistry and Medical Jurisprudence at London Hospital, said he had analysed he stomachs &c., of the deceased children, and his conclusion was that all the viscera submitted were natural and healthy, and there was no reason whatever to believe that the deaths of the children were caused by poison. he should not like to give definite evidence beyond the fact that the deaths were not caused by poison, but having read the evidence, he would say the state of the heart, namely the contraction of the left side, was not inconsistent with death from some external cause. In cases where death was caused by the stoppage of the respiration, he should expect to find contraction of the left ventricle, and the right ventricle full of blood, as had been described by the medical evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, took it for granted that the Jury believed the children came to their deaths by unfair means. They must also believe that one or more of the three persons in the house that night must have been guilty of the deed. - After twelve minutes' consultation, the Jury found that the children came to their deaths by suffocation, and that they were so suffocated by their mother, and they returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against MARY JANE BROWN.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 June 1877
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Soldier. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, of Plymouth, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Citadel on Saturday evening respecting the death of WILLIAM BAGSHAW, aged 26 years, a private in the 52nd Regiment. - G. Durant, a corporal in the Army Hospital Corps, stationed at the Citadel, said that the deceased had been at Aldershot for the past two months with the captain of his company. He returned from Aldershot about midnight on Friday, and on Saturday morning, about quarter to three o'clock, witness was sent for, and found the deceased in bed very ill. About five o'clock he went for the doctor, and returned with him in the course of half an hour. Deceased died a few minutes afterwards. - Surgeon Wm. H. Steele said that about 5.30 a.m. on Saturday morning he found the deceased in bed perfectly unconscious and dying. He made a post mortem examination, and found a rupture of a blood vessel in the substance of the brain, of which there was also a softening. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 June 1877
PLYMOUTH - Suspicious Death In Plymouth. A Disgraceful Scene. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT GENDALL, shoemaker, Southside-street, aged about 70 years. - Edwin J. Edmonds, saddler, stated that he knew the deceased and that he last saw him alive on Saturday evening at the back of the Plymouth market. At this time the deceased was not properly sober, and he asked witness to give him three halfpence for a pint of white ale, which he did. He knew that the deceased had been drinking freely, and that he suffered from depression of spirits occasionally. The coat and hat which were found on the rocks under the Hoe on Sunday morning were those which the deceased was wearing on Saturday night. - P.C. Scantlebury stated that on Sunday, about 3.50 a.m., he was on duty under the Hoe, and upon looking down the landing steps he observed a hat, coat and a vest, which had apparently been placed there carefully. - Eli Horn, labourer, employed on the Breakwater, stated that about five o'clock on Sunday evening he was on the Breakwater and observed the body of the deceased floating west of the fort. He procured assistance and towed the body to the North Quay. On the way from the Breakwater to the Quay the body turned over, and he (witness) saw a quantity of blood on the forehead. The body had a shirt, pair of trousers and a pair of boots on. He had never before known a body to be washed from the Hoe to the Breakwater. On arriving at the North Quay, he saw a police-constable, to whom he handed over the body. When the body was landed three bargemen and a police-constable placed it on their shoulders and carried it through the streets to the police-station. Before the body was removed from the quay he heard that there was a mortuary near, and that a stretcher could be procured. Nothing was placed over the body when it was being carried through the streets. Several hundred people followed the men who were carrying the body through the streets. - P.C. Damerell stated that on Sunday evening he went to the North Quay steps to take possession of the body, and was pushed into the water. Upon the body being landed he informed the men who were standing around the deceased that there was a mortuary on the North Quay. The mob took possession of the body, and he made no attempt to prevent them from carrying it through the streets, believing that they would meet the men with a stretcher. His instructions were that if a body were found not in a decomposed state he was to bring it to the Guildhall, but if it were decomposed he was to place it in the North Quay mortuary. He had carried a number of bodies through the streets without anything being thrown over them; there was no rug provided for the purpose. - The Coroner: Who gave you orders to bring a body through the streets if it were not decomposed? - Witness: You did yourself, Mr Brian. - The Coroner: Where and when? - Witness: At an Inquest just as the new dead-house on the quay was built. - The Coroner: I most emphatically deny it. It is not part of my duty to do so. I shall take further notice of it. - Inspector Murch stated that on Sunday evening three men came to the police-station and asked for a stretcher and a rug, which he gave them, but just after they had left with the stretcher several men arrived with the body of the deceased, uncovered, on their shoulders. If he had been on the quay he should not have allowed the body to have been brought through the streets uncovered. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the case was an unsatisfactory one. Referring to the body being brought through the streets uncovered, he pointed out that there was no necessity for it, inasmuch as there was a mortuary on the North Quay. All bodies towed into that place should be placed in the quay mortuary, and not simply bodies which were decomposed. The mortuary was erected on the quay for the purpose of preventing dead bodies being brought through the streets. He considered that there was considerable blame somewhere, even in the fact that the body was uncovered. It was the police officer's duty to place the body in the dead-house, and not allow a mob to run off with it without attempting to check them. He asserted distinctly that he never gave P.C. Damerell any instructions to take any body to the station, and he could not excuse P.C. Damerell in allowing this body to be taken through the streets uncovered. He had never before heard of a body being brought through the streets in such a manner. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 June 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Coxside. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JOHN WELSH, a labourer, aged 44 years. On the afternoon of the 3rd of May, the deceased and another labourer, named William Henry Martin, were engaged in undermining a wall which was about 15 feet high, 20 feet long, and 18 inches thick, and belonging to a Mr Clark at Coxside. They had undermined the wall, and the deceased was trying to take a large stone out, when he exclaimed to his fellow workman "Look out," and just at that moment the wall fell, and, although WELSH ran when he saw the stones falling, he was unable to get clear, and about three feet of it fell upon his legs. Martin extricated him and had him conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found that he had sustained a fracture of the lower part of the right leg. The thigh was also fractured in two places and the hip-joint was dislocated. The limb had to be amputated below the knee. The deceased never properly recovered, blood poisoning having set in shortly after the amputation, and he gradually sank and died on Sunday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 July 1877
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Results of "Larking" at Tavistock. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Tavistock Guildhall on Saturday relative to the death of THOMAS OSBORNE, a young man aged 19 years, who died from the effects of a blow which he received at the hands of a fellow-workman named John Andrews. Mr Fuller was elected Foreman of the Jury, and Andrews, who was in custody, was present during the Inquiry. - Benjamin Bawden, moulder, in the employ of Messrs. Nicholls, Matthews, and Company, ironfounders, at Tavistock, said that the deceased, who was an apprentice, and the man Andrews were in the same employ as himself. About four o'clock on Friday afternoon the deceased was drinking water from a can in the moulders' shop, and just at that moment Andrews entered the door carrying some oil for the purpose of attending to the machinery, this being part of his duty. Deceased spat some of the water over Andrews as he was passing, and the latter stooped down to pick up a little sand to throw at OSBORNE. Deceased then spat more water over Andrews, who in running backwards fell down, knocking his finger against some iron. Upon the finger bleeding, Andrews appeared to get exasperated, and immediately threw a piece of iron, weighing about 2lbs., at the deceased, who had by this time run to the other end of the shop, and was now lying upon the ground. The iron struck OSBORNE in the head, and he became unconscious and remained so for about twenty minutes. Upon recovering consciousness he spoke to one of the workmen, but said nothing respecting the injury. - By the Jury: The deceased had been teasing Andrews for several days past. Both had worked together for abut twelvemonths. Witness did not think there was any ill-feeling existing between the two, and he believed what the deceased did was done only in fun. OSBORNE commenced the annoyance shortly after dinner on the same day by knocking off Andrews's cap; but the latter did not say anything to deceased then. Andrews was in a great passion when he threw the missile at the deceased, who was about eight paces off; but witness did not hear him use any threats. Andrews was a very quiet man. The point of the iron struck OSBORNE on the side of the head, and a small cut also appeared just under the left eye. - In answer to Andrews, the witness said that the latter gave the deceased no provocation whatever for either of the insults. - James Harris, a youth, said he was working with deceased on the day in question, and saw him throw water from his mouth over Andrews's shirt sleeve. Deceased and Andrews had not been quarrelling before. witness corroborated Bawden's statement as to the throwing of the iron, and denied that Andrews made use of any angry expressions. He also identified to Andrews's general peaceable character. By the Jury: When Andrews threw the iron the deceased was lying behind a box about 18 inches high, but his head was visible. The deceased was very fond of "skylarking" in the workshop. - Mr W. C. Northey, surgeon, stated that he saw the deceased sitting in a chair at his lodgings about an hour after he received the blow. He was then insensible, and was breathing stentoriously; froth was proceeding from the mouth and nose, and his pulse was flagging. Upon examining the head witness found the skull fractured, and a contused wound on the scalp, the fracture corresponding with the other injury. He attended to deceased and remained with him until his death, which occurred at six o'clock the same evening. Death resulted from an effusion of blood on the brain, caused by a large rupture of the membranes of the brain. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said he was of opinion that the injuries received might have been produced by such a weapon as the piece of iron. - At this stage of the proceedings Andrews desired the Coroner to take his evidence, and, having been duly cautioned, he stated that on the previous afternoon, when passing through the workshop, the deceased knocked off his hat and began to laugh at him. He took no notice of that insult, and did not speak to OSBORNE, but about four o'clock he (Andrews) was told to get the crane ready to charge some metal. Finding the funnel of his oil-can choked, he went into the moulders' shop for the purpose of getting something to clear it, and whilst looking about the deceased threw a quantity of water over the side of his face and arm. He said to the deceased, "TOM, don't do that again;" but as he was stooping down OSBORNE spat water over him the second time. Witness did not speak to the deceased, but took up a little sand to throw at him, when, in turning around sharply, he stumbled over some loose iron, and in the fall cut his little finger, which had been previously injured, and was then healing up. finding that it was again bleeding, he got into a passion. He took up a piece of iron - he could not say whether it was the same as that produced - and threw it out of his hand, but when he did this he could not see either the deceased's head or any part of his body, as he was hiding behind a box. He admitted having thrown it in the direction of where OSBORNE was lying, but he had had no intention of striking him. He was not aware whether he struck deceased or not, as he was in such a passion. - The Coroner observed that there was no doubt that Andrews inflicted the injury upon the deceased from which he died, and, notwithstanding the provocation he might have received, the law would not justify him in doing what he did. Whether he threw the iron at the deceased or not, the simple act of throwing that which was calculated to injure and take life would be sufficient to enable the Jury to say, in that court at least, that Andrews was guilty of manslaughter. If, on the other hand, the Jury believed that Andrews had any malicious intention, it would be their duty to return a verdict of wilful murder; but he did not think the evidence before them would justify such a decision. - The Jury, after retiring for about fifteen minutes, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against John Andrews, and the Coroner ordered him to be detained upon his warrant.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN RICHARD PETHICK, aged 4 years and 9 months. Deceased had been an apparently healthy child, but on Thursday last he exhibited symptoms of illness. He slept with his parents, and about twenty minutes after six on Friday morning he was found dead by the side of his mother. Dr Harper was sent for, but as he was informed that the child was dead he directed the parents to communicate with the Coroner, who sent his officer (Mr J. Williams) to view the body. Mr Williams was of opinion that the deceased had died a natural death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Drowning Of A Shipwright At Devonport. - Mr W. Shaddock, Coroner for Saltash, held an Inquest at the Dockyard yesterday, relative to the death of EDWIN MURCH, aged 35 years. The evidence adduced shewed that the deceased was in the employ of Mr Pethick, contractor, and was at work on the Master Attendant's jetty in the dockyard with a fellow-workman named Dean, when suddenly the deceased was seen by Dean and a marine named Ambrose, on board the Aurora, to stagger and before any assistance could be rendered he was in the water. The deceased fell about twenty five or twenty six feet. An alarm was raised immediately, and a diver, named Nicholls [rest of article cut off.]

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 July 1877
SIDMOUTH - Drowned Whilst Bathing At Sidmouth. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Bedford Hotel, Sidmouth, before Mr Charlton Fox, Deputy Coroner, on the body of HENRY WILSON, aged 19, who was drowned in the bathing bay on Sunday. The deceased was apprenticed to a man at Ottery St Mary, he came to Sidmouth on Saturday night and next morning went to bathe. Mr A. Coate, when undressing, saw deceased in the water, but did not notice him after he himself entered the water. There was no one else bathing at the time. Shortly afterwards a gentleman named Wren attracted his attention, and asked him where the deceased was. An alarm was raised and a boatman speedily pulled out, and after a short search discovered the body, but deceased was quite dead. The state of the body when discovered was consistent with an attack of cramp. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Death At The Tiller. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of WILLIAM MITCHELL HILL, 64, master of the smack Rhoda. - Henry Huxtable said he was in the Rhoda yesterday, just outside the Breakwater. Deceased had the tiller. Witness was in the fore-part of the vessel attending to some gear. On turning round witness missed deceased, and on looking down the companion hatch saw him at the bottom in a kneeling position, with his head forward. Witness went down and found deceased's face quite black, he was insensible, but not dead. Witness bathed his face, but he died in four or five minutes. A slight accident had occurred half an hour before causing the loss of part of the trawl. Witness thought this had excited deceased, as he was a man of very excitable temperament. - John Ball, another of the crew, corroborated the last witness's statement. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Stentiford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - "Accelerated By Drink." - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Cambridge Hotel, Devonport, yesterday, touching the death of JANE LAMPEY, aged 53 years, who died suddenly at her house, 5 Cornwall-street, on Monday. - James R. Baser said the deceased was much addicted to drink. He very seldom saw her except under its influence. - WILLIAM LAMPEY, the husband, said deceased had been ailing for the last four months. She could not walk a few steps without having to support herself. She was very fond of drink. On Monday morning about half-past eight she was much worse than usual; he sent for a parish medical order, and Mr Wilson, surgeon, was in attendance as quickly as possible, but deceased had just died. - Mr W. C. Wilson, surgeon, said he found both the body and the room in a filthy state. In his opinion death had been caused by asthma, accelerated by drink, and the condition in which the woman had been living. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by drink."

SIDMOUTH - Suicide By An Old Servant. - MARY ANN STRONG, old domestic servant at the house of Miss Warner, Cotmaton, Sidmouth, committed suicide on Monday by severing both arteries of the throat with a table knife. An Inquest was held at the house the same evening, before Mr E. Charlton Fox. - Jane Halse, a sister of the deceased, and Mary Ann Searle, her niece, both in the employ of Miss Warner, and William Gigg, gardener, stated that the deceased was, by the kindness of Miss Warner, allowed to live in the house with her relatives, although her age would not permit of her doing much work. She had been unwell for some time, and subject to fits of depression. She passed a restless night on Sunday, and rose early. She walked into the grounds, as was her custom, shortly before seven, and about half-past seven, her sister was going to call her, when outside the door of the kitchen she met deceased with one hand at her throat covered with blood. The deceased walked into the kitchen, and then fell down. She expired almost immediately. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 6 July 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Tradesman's Arms, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of WILLIAM HENRY CORY, aged 3 years and 6 months. On the Saturday afternoon the deceased, a very fine child, and his brother, one year older, went to their grandmother's residence, at 3 Bath-place. They remained in the house a short time, and afterwards left with the intention of going home. When they arrived outside Mr Pearse's house, in Flora-street, the deceased asked his brother to lift him upon the window sill of that house, which is about three feet from the pavement. He did so, but the deceased fell off, spraining his right leg. The deceased was attended to by Mr Pearse, surgeon, who prescribed for it, but on Tuesday the child was taken very ill, and died on the following day. - Mr Pearse said that the deceased must have struck his head in the fall, for the symptoms were consistent with a rupture of a vessel of the brain, and he attributed death to that cause, the injury to the leg not being sufficient to occasion fatal results. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 9 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Keyham Yard. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Albert Hotel, Morice Town, on Saturday, relative to the death of EDWARD OWENS, aged 58 years. - Frederick Owen, an apprentice in the iron foundry at Keyham Factory, said that the deceased was employed in the moulding department. About four o'clock on Friday afternoon witness went to the stove for a bar of iron, and in the corner, near the fireplace, he discovered OWENS lying upon his back with his right hand across his breast. He tried to rouse the deceased, but being unable to get any reply to his questions he called assistance, and it was then found that OWENS was dead. - By the Jury: The stove was about twelve feet long, and was used for drying iron moulds, but it was not occupied on the afternoon in question, and he did not know what the deceased went there for. The stove was full of smoke and vapour when he (witness) entered, so much so as to make him think it was dangerous to get in. He had seen deceased about fifteen minutes before, when he appeared in his usual health. - By the Coroner: Witness had heard the men complain of foul air in the workshop on casting days. Some of the men put articles in the stove for their own convenience. - Thomas Ware, a workman in the foundry, deposed that when he was called by the last witness there was a great deal of foul air in the stove, but he (Ware) had been in it when the air had been worse. Shortly after three o'clock that afternoon a quantity of coke was put into the furnaces, and the foul air which arose from it was very trying. [?] at that time the deceased, who was working near witness, complained of pains in his stomach, and about ten minutes before OWEN came to him witness missed him. - By the Jury: Deceased did not tell him he was going to lay down in the stove. He was not aware whether OWENS had anything in the stove which he might have required in his work. - By the Coroner: All the flues in the department diverged into one large stack, and he believed that the fumes from the coke must have come down the flue of the stove, and thus the vapour overpowered the deceased. OWENS was a very steady man. - Dr F. Row said that he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He had been assisted by Mr Delarne and two dockyard surgeons; but, as the circumstances which surrounded the case required a great deal of careful consideration to ascertain the exact cause of death, he should suggest an adjournment, it being very desirable that there should e no difference of opinion between himself and the other medical gentlemen respecting the main point. - The Coroner concurred in the opinion of Mr Row, and adjourned the Inquest until this evening.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Ventilation Of Keyham Factory. A Hint To The Admiralty. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of EDWARD OWENS, founder in Keyham Factory, who died on Friday in the stove of the moulding department, was resumed last evening by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner. Mr W. Salmon watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty, and Mr Wm. Eastlake, the Admiralty law agent. - Mr Frederick Row, M.D., J.P., deposed that he made a post mortem examination of the deceased in company with Staff-Surgeon Hunter, M.D., Mr Power, surgeon, R.N., and Mr P. F. DeLarne, surgeon. the body was that of a moderate sized man, apparently robust and in good condition. There was nothing unusual to note in the appearance of the body, except that the countenance was placid and that the face, including the lips, was pale. There was no marked rigidity of the limbs, and the fingers were not clenched. The internal examination shewed that the body had been well nourished. On opening the chest the lungs were distending it, and they presented an unusual aspect on the surface, partly arising from the abundance of black pigment spots, but more so from the dark brown colour pervading the entire surface, the whole having a striking mottled appearance which was not common. He examined carefully the whole of the organs presented to view without discovering any trace of ruptured blood vessels or other palpable injuries. The only remarkable feature of the chest was the intense congestion of the lungs, which throughout every part of their substance, were of a dark chocolate colour - still, however, permeable to air. The appearance of the heart was healthy and natural. There was far less the usual quantity of blood in the cavities of the chest. There was nothing in connection with the stomach or intestinal canal to suggest that injury or disease had affected them except that a few small patches existed externally on the surface of the large intestines, shewing irregular circulation there. On opening the head a general bloodless condition marking the external surface was equally remarkable in the membranes covering the brain and the internal texture of the brain itself, as well as the blood vessels which supplied it, which presented throughout the same anaemic appearance. There was no indication of apoplexy or of any other disorder within the cranium. The other organs of the body were found to be healthy. His individual opinion was that the death of deceased was not reconcilable with the belief that it was from natural ordinary disease, but, on the contrary, he believed it was solely attributable to the breathing of poisonous gases. - By the Coroner: Had had no consultation with the gentlemen who assisted him as to their opinion of the cause of death, and could not give their opinions. Was clearly of opinion that death arose in this case from the breathing of poisonous gas. The death of the deceased was not in any way corresponding with death from what was known as grinder's asthma. The congestion of deceased's lungs was by no means a common complaint, for the lungs were entirely choked up. Such congestion would, he thought, be brought about by deceased having been in the drying stove for ten minutes. - Mr Jas. Ellis, foreman of founders in Keyham Yard, said deceased had been under his orders for twenty-one years, and he had known him for forty years. The place where deceased was found was used for drying the moulds before casting, but none were in it at the time of his death, and none had been drying there for the past six months. No orders were given by him, nor, that he knew of, by anyone else, for deceased to go into the stove on the day of his death. If anyone had given such orders it would have been witness. The doors of the stove were generally kept closed. Some hay was put there a month ago, but that was to get it out of the way. - The Coroner: Then, so far as you believe, on the day of his death deceased went into the stove of his own accord and not by the wish of any officer? - Mr Ellis: Yes, certainly. He knew of no other place large enough to contain the hay. - In examination by the Coroner and Jury, Mr Ellis said Friday was one of those peculiar days when, by the way of the wind and the construction of the chimneys, and the employment of only one, as the other was under repair, the shop became very full of noxious gases. Had no orders to cease work on such days. - The Coroner said it was clear that OWEN'S life had been sacrificed in consequence of the impure atmosphere of the drying stove, and he would like the witness to suggest any means which could be recommended to the Admiralty to prevent the recurrence of such an accident. - Mr Ellis said gases, both when casting and at other times, got into foundries; into some more than others. His opinion was that Keyham foundry ought to be better ventilated; that had been his opinion for many years, and the chief engineer shared it. There was no ventilation in the iron and brass shop at all like there was in any other part of the department. - The Coroner: Is that because it is a Government factory and that they will take a liberty which other people will not? - Mr Ellis: It is an arrangement which, of course, I cannot account for. - The Coroner having pointed out that it was clear that deceased died from the poisoning of noxious gases by being in a place which clearly he had no right to visit, and which, it seemed, he had not been ordered to, impressed upon the Jury, as practical men, the necessity of adding something to their verdict which might have weight with the Admiralty in ventilating the factory, and thereby preventing a similar occurrence. - The Foreman of the Jury was strongly of opinion that the ventilation could be improved in the factory, and the Jury, finding that deceased died from Inhaling Noxious Gases, strongly recommended the Admiralty to provide better ventilation for the factory at Keyham. - The Coroner said he would forward the recommendation to the Admiralty, who had invariably treated suggestions of Juries with the greatest courtesy.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Shooting Of A Soldier At Ernsettle Rifle Range. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Military Hospital, Stoke, yesterday relative to the death of EDWARD CURETON, a private in the 36th Regiment. Mr G. H. E. rundle, solicitor, watched the Inquiry on behalf of the War Office. - The first witness called was Sergeant Richard Westley, 36th Regiment, who stated that on the morning of the 7th inst. he was in charge of the markers at the butts at Ernsettle rifle range. the deceased was one of the markers, and between nine and ten o'clock the same morning he heard the bugle at the firing point sound, "Cease firing." It being a signal that the markers might leave the butts they all came out, and witness noticed a woman crossing the range. After she had passed he saw a man driving some pigs in the direction of one of the targets. Just then the bugle sounded, "Commence firing," and witness ordered all the markers to retire into the butts, but before they could get in a shot was fired from the 800 yards range, striking the deceased, who was still holding the danger flag in his hand. Witness went to the assistance of the deceased, whom he found severely wounded. He was conveyed to a farmhouse close at hand, and the services of Mr Porter, surgeon, of Saltash, were procured. The deceased was afterwards removed to the Military Hospital, where he expired on Sunday evening. - By the Coroner: The deceased would have been the last man to retire into the butts, as he was carrying the danger flag. - Witness ordered the men to return into the butts the moment he heard the bugle, but the shot was fired just before the bugle call had ceased sounding. No man was allowed to direct his rifle to the target, nor under any pretence to place a cartridge in the rifle, until the danger flag at the butts had disappeared. The deceased was about three yards from the target when he was struck, and the man who fired the shot should have directed his fire to the right target, instead of which the shot came toward the left target. - Lieutenant H. C. Cowell, 36th Regiment, stated that he was officer in charge of a party of men at rifle practice at Ernsettle on the 7th inst. The range was divided into two parts - one for volunteers, and the other for regulars; the two ranges wee independent of each other; each had its own bugler and danger signals. The party firing at the volunteer range was in charge of Lieut. Coleman, whilst witness superintended the practice at the other range. On account of his range being a double one the men were divided into two squads, and although the squads fired at the same time at different targets, they had only one bugler and one danger flag, and notwithstanding they fired independently of each other both squads had to obey the same signals. The squads, which had different non-commissioned officers, were separated by six to ten yards, and the targets were parted by a similar distance, with the markers' butt intervening. Two acts of markers were stationed in the butts, one for each squad, but there was one danger flag only for both sets, and the markers also had to obey the same signals. The men were firing at the 800 yards range, and witness ordered two men from each squad to fire alternately five rounds, this being strictly in accordance with the instructions he had received. Shortly after the firing had commenced he saw a female crossing from the left of his range, and he immediately ordered the bugler to sound "Cease firing." The order was obeyed, the markers exhibited the red danger flags, and both came out of the butts and placed themselves in front of the left target. In reply to the marker's flag, witness ordered the danger flag at the firing point to be hoisted. When he saw that the woman was well out of danger, and finding that the markers were very slow in returning to their station, the bugler, by his instructions, sounded "the fire," but this signal, the witness explained, was not intended as an order for the men to resume firing, but to serve as a warning call to the markers to get under cover immediately, as firing would shortly commence. It was the duty of the markers to obey the call whether persons were in a dangerous proximity to the range or not; but if they considered the fire would be dangerous they would keep the danger flag flying, and as long as it remained up the flag at the firing point would also be kept hoisted, and consequently no firing could be permitted. If the markers considered the range clear as far as they were concerned, they dropped the danger flag, in reply to which the officer in charge ordered his flag to be taken down, and gave directions to continue the firing. On the occasion of the accident the bugler had not completed the call to resume firing, and both danger flags were still up - the one at the butts and the other at the firing point - when a shot was fired by a soldier in the right squad, striking the deceased. Witness believed it was Private Lawler who fired. He was attached to the party firing at the right range, and of course should have aimed at the right target. - By the Coroner: At the time of the occurrence the right target was all clear, and the whole of the markers were in front of the left butt. As soon as the bugler sounded "Cease Fire" every man who had his rifle loaded was supposed to take the shot out, and it was the duty of the officer or non-commissioned officer in charge to see that that order was obeyed. Lawler was a bad shot, and he had heard that his eyesight was defective. - Sergeant Alfred Bannister, 36th Regiment, deposed to being the non-commissioned officer in charge of the squad to which Lawler belonged. He heard the report of a rifle, but did not think it was fired by a man in his section. - By the Jury: There were fourteen men in the squad, and witness was standing on the left of the. It was Lawler's turn to fire, but witness did not see him discharge his rifle. - Corporal Henry Hatter, 36th Regiment, said that he was engaged keeping the register at the rifle practice on Saturday last. After the female had passed the line of fire he heard the bugler give "Commence firing," and just as the call was finishing he heard the report of a rifle, and upon looking around saw Lawler bringing his rifle down from the present, having then just discharged it. - By the Coroner: He could not say whether the danger flag was flying at the firing point at the time. Lawler was in the 3rd class for firing, and he was a very bad shot. He was in the habit of firing from his left shoulder, and if he pulled the trigger of his rifle instead of pressing it, and, at the same time, gave it a jerk, that would account for the shot going to the left. Lawler was firing at 800 yards, and the order for third class shots to fire at that distance had only lately been issued. - Arthur Donegan, bugler, stated that when he sounded the call, "Cease firing" he raised the danger flag. shortly afterwards he was told to give "Commence firing," but as the markers did not lower their flag, he kept his raised; and whilst it was flying he heard a shot fired. He was surprised to hear it; and thinking that the markers could not have distinguished his call, he repeated it a second time - but still the flag was kept up. Witness then heard that the deceased had been shot. - Private John Lawler, 36th Regiment, after being cautioned by the Coroner, desired to make a statement respecting the occurrence. He said that he did not fire directly he heard the bugle sound, but waited a few seconds. some men in the rear ordered him to fire, and he did so. The range was reported clear by the bugle sounding "commence firing," and he took that as an order that he might fire. It was only the second time since he had been in the regiment that he had fired at 800 yards, but he could not see the bull's eye of the target or discern any object at that distance, in consequence of his defective sight. He had suffered from bad sight ever since he enlisted, and he was allowed to fire from the left shoulder because he could see better with his left eye than with his right. He denied seeing the deceased, or that he fired at the left target, at which CURETON was standing. He shot at the right target, but aimed to the right to allow for the pull to the left. - By the Jury: From the position in which he was lying on the ground he could not see the flag at the firing point, nor could he see the danger flag at the left target through his bad eyesight. He joined the army in 1861, having served two years in the 57th Regiment, and the remainder in the 36th Regiment. He suffered very much from nervousness, and was easily excited. - Sergeant Westley was recalled and stated that from the direction the wind was blowing on the day in question, bullets would be carded a little to the left, especially in the case of Lawler, who fired from the left shoulder. - The Coroner remarked that there seemed to be very perfect instructions laid down for the government of firing parties, but it appeared from the statement of Lawler and the other witnesses that such instructions were not understood by the men as they should be. they did not appear to know that the "Commence Firing" was to be treated simply as an order to the markers to immediately get under cover, and that they were not to fire until the danger flag at the butts had been lowered. There were no danger flags, however, flying at the right butt at which Lawler aimed, and even if there had been he would have been unable to see it on account of his defective sight, and although the instructions said that a man should await an order from an officer or another person in charge before firing, Lawler was told by some men in the rear to fire, and it was clear that after waiting a few moments he did so. It would be the duty of the Jury to consider whether he had through wilful neglect caused the death of the deceased. If they thought he had, they would return a verdict of manslaughter, but if they believed it was the result of the man's nervous state and defective vision, and him failing to understand the orders, they would return a verdict accordingly. He asked them to give Lawler the benefit of any doubt. He considered it would be an uncharitable act to put the blame upon Lawler, a man with such bad eyesight, and one would have thought that a man in his condition would never have been permitted to remain in the army. He gathered from the fact of the instructions not being properly understood by the men that many a premature shot had been fired, and the shot fired by Lawler was simply a premature one. In conclusion, he observed that there appeared to be every protection to persons crossing the range, if the instructions were obeyed and understood. - The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a recommendation "That no man of defective sight should be allowed to fire at long ranges, and that more definite instructions be given the firing parties."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 July 1877
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of ELIZABETH EMILY LANG, aged 14 months. The deceased's parents live at 14 Harwell-street. The baby was left asleep in its bed yesterday. Subsequently her sister went into the room and found her, head downwards in the utensil, the body supported in that position by the bed. She was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Stonehouse Guildhall last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY ERNEST PHILLIPS, aged 22 years. MARTIN PHILLIPS, brother of the deceased, stated that both he and his brother resided with their father, in Victoria Place, Stonehouse. About ten o'clock on the previous night witness and deceased retired to rest together, but they slept in different beds, as his brother was subject to fits. Shortly after midnight the deceased had a fit, and about half past eight yesterday morning, witness found him dead in bed. During the past week his brother had had about twenty fits. Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, stated that when he saw the deceased, he had been dead for several hours. He had been under witnesses care for epileptic fits. In his opinion the deceased died from an epileptic of apoplectic fit. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."


Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday respecting the death of a boy, named SIMON WALKE, 13 years of age, who died from injuries received at the dockyard extension works. - Thomas Wakley, labourer, in the employ of Mr Pethick, contractor, said that on the 11th of July he and the deceased were employed at the works in guiding some empty trucks down an incline. The deceased was standing by the side of the tramway near a sharp curve, when, after the trucks had passed, a wire-rope slipped off the traveller over with it ran and struck the deceased. The rope had done so before. - John Powell, labourer, stated that he saw the two trucks running down the incline. The deceased was sitting on a stone near the metals, and as the wagons passed he tried to "spragg" the wheels by putting a piece of wood between the spokes to stop the wagons from running too fast. The boy did not succeed, and soon after the trucks had passed the rope slipped out of the traveller and struck him in the face. - Samuel Gale, engine-driver, said he had known the rope slip off the traveller on previous occasions, but had never had any complaints from the men of it so doing. Witness had seen younger boys than deceased "spragging," and did not consider it dangerous. The wagons were generally, but not always, "spragged." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and suggested that a guard should be put on the traveller, in order to prevent similar accidents in future.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 July 1877
MARLDON - Sad Suicide At Mannamead. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Compton, on Saturday, relative to the death of RICHARD KNIGHT, a naval pensioner, who had committed suicide. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who some time since worked at the new buildings in Mannamead, left his home on Friday afternoon, and was not seen or heard of until Saturday morning, when one of the workmen arriving at the buildings referred to, the deceased was found suspended by a double rope from a partition. He was quite dead, and cold. Deceased had been greatly depressed in spirits lately, and had suffered from rheumatism and acute pains in the head. He was a pensioner and since receiving £9 pension three weeks ago, he had not been to work. - Mr Langford, surgeon, proved that the injuries were self-inflicted, and that the brain of the deceased was diseased. - The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 July 1877
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth yesterday respecting the death of a child named AGNES HICKS, aged 11 weeks. The evidence went to shew that the child died whilst in bed with its mother and that marks of pressure were found on the left ear and face. A verdict of "Death from Accidental Pressure" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Boy From Lock Jaw. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an inquest at the Spread Eagle Inn, last evening relative to the death of JOHN P. KING, aged 10 years. - Sophia Paddy, grandmother of the deceased, said that on the 17th of June the deceased was home with one of his hands hurt and very much swollen, and after a few days an abscess formed. He told her that he had caught hold of a lamp-post, and he thought that a splinter of iron had entered his hand. The splinter was taken out, but witness could not tell whether it was made of wood or iron. The deceased was an out-patient of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and about a fortnight after the accident occurred Mr Harper, surgeon, was sent for, and attended the deceased to the time of his death. - Mr Harper stated that he found the lad suffering from a state of spasm, contraction of the muscles of the jaws, and tetanus. The splinter that came out of the deceased's hand was half an inch long, and about the size of a pin in diameter. It was black, but he could not say whether it was of wood or iron. The splinter had been lost. The deceased died from tetanic spasms or convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" caused by a splinter running deceased's hand.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 July 1877
BRIXHAM - Sudden Death At Sea. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Brixham yesterday, respecting the death of JOHN RAYMOND, one of the crew of the schooner Elizabeth, of Ipswich. It was stated that the vessel was bound to Bridgwater, and that on Wednesday night, when the wind was very high, the deceased assisted in putting the ship about. He afterwards complained of pain in the stomach, and leant against the boat for support, and about eleven o'clock the captain (Samuel Rendall) accompanied him below. At two o'clock Captain Rendall sent one of the crew below to see how RAYMOND was getting on, and the man found him dead. - The vessel then bore up for Torbay, where she arrived yesterday morning, and upon the body being landed a post mortem examination was made by Mr G. Green, who found the body well nourished, and the lungs perfectly healthy, but the heart was slightly congested and the membranes much gorged with fluid. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Deceased was a steady man, 26 years of age. He leaves a wife and child

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 July 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall At Devonport. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. Vaughan at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY LAWTON, aged 6 years, son of P.C. LAWTON, of the Devonport police force. The deceased was on Saturday last playing on the rocks overhanging the bathing place at Richmond-walk, when his foot slipped and he fell over, pitching on his head on the rocks below. He was picked up insensible, and taken to the Hospital, where he soon expired. - John Henry Brookshaw, boat proprietor, Mount Wise, spoke of the frequency of accidents at the place at which this occurred, and said he had known two accidents of the same nature occur in one week at this particular spot. - The Coroner said he thought similar accidents might be prevented in future by placing a fence to prevent boys getting on the rocks. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Sunday's Bathing Fatalities. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of WILLIAM SAUNDERS, a boy who was drowned on Sunday while bathing. The deceased, who was a plumber's apprentice, living at Exeter, went down the canal on Sunday in a boat with two companions. Leaving their boat a little below Salmon Pool drawbridge, the boys walked across the fields to the river, and bathed in the pool at the foot of the weir. This is an extremely dangerous spot, owing to the number of deep pits formed by the action of the water descending the weir. Neither of the boys could swim well, and soon after they had left the bank deceased got into one of the pits. One of his companions, a boy named Clarke, responded to his cries for help, but was unable to do more than swim to him and support him for a few moments, when, finding that he also was in danger of being drowned, he relinquished his hold. Help was soon at hand, but unfortunately too late to save life. The body was recovered by drags in the afternoon. It came out in evidence that although Salmon Pool Inn is much frequented and there is a ferry at the spot, no drags or life-saving apparatus are kept there. - The Coroner remarked upon this, and said the authorities ought certainly to supply the deficiency at the earliest moment. The Jury concurred, and attached to their verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" a recommendation to that effect. - Mr Tozer, of Exeter, suggested that a notice board should be erected cautioning bathers, and the Jury adopted a rider recommending that this should be done also.

TOTNES - An Inquest was held last evening at the Dartmouth Inn, Totnes, with respect to the death of WILLIAM HAMMETT, of Totnes, who was drowned while bathing in the Dart on Sunday morning. - John James Sims, a pensioner, residing in Victoria-street, and with whom deceased lodged, stated that on Sunday morning the deceased, witness and witness's two sons went for a pull down the river in a boat. It was high tide. As they passed by the Shooting Marsh, they saw some people bathing, and one of his sons undressed in the boat and jumped into the river. The deceased also wished to bathe, and at his request witness pulled to the shore, where the deceased undressed and walked into the water, and on getting as deep as his waist he began to swim. He appeared to be able to swim capitally, and after he had swam about for some time his (witness's) attention was called by one of his boys to the strange way in which HAMMETT was diving. He remarked to his boy that it was "funny diving" as deceased rose up and went down as if he was in trouble, and immediately after he sank. Witness rowed to the spot where the deceased had sunk, and dived, but could not recover the body. He consequently sent for the grappling irons, and after dragging the river for about an hour the body was recovered. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The deceased was 39 years of age.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 August 1877
ILFRACOMBE - A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned at the Inquest held at Ilfracombe yesterday respecting the death of MR C. FETHERSTON-DILKE, a county magistrate of Warwickshire, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 August 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide Of A Supposed Murderer At Stonehouse. Verdict Of Felo-De-Se. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a double Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was foreman, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at the Stonehouse Townhall into the circumstances attending the death of FRANZ KOEHLER, aged 35 years, who committed suicide on Sunday in a cell at the Stonehouse Police Station, where he was under arrest on a charge of murdering his wife in New Jersey, United States. - Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, stated that about half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon he saw the body of the deceased at the police-station, and observed that there was a mark around his neck such as would caused by the handkerchief produced, if the body were suspended by it. From the free movement of the neck he believed that the neck was broken, and that death was instantaneous. - Police-constable Blake Jones stated that just before half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon he visited the cell in which the deceased was confined, and saw through the trap-door the arm of the deceased's shirt hanging against the door of the cell. Thinking that something was wrong he called for assistance, and entered the cell, and found the deceased suspended from the iron bar over the cell door by a handkerchief and a necktie, which were tied together. He caught hold of the deceased in his arms, and had him cut down; and found that he was quite dead. The deceased being a man about 5 ft. 11 in. in height, his feet nearly touched the floor of the cell. The deceased always appeared to be in good spirits, cheerful and sociable. - Police-constable J. Yeo deposed that on Sunday last he was on reserve duty and as Police-sergeant Holman told him to look after the deceased, and pay great attention to him, he was with him during the greater part of the morning. About eleven o'clock he took the deceased into the yard for exercise, and kept him out until a quarter past one. The deceased was in good spirits, and conversed freely. At two o'clock he gave him his dinner and about five minutes later he left him. - Fritz Weitag, boarding clerk, in the employ of Messrs. Fox Son and Co., shipping agents, Plymouth, stated that on Saturday afternoon he visited the deceased in his cell, and ascertained that he was born in Bohemia, that he had served as a captain in the Austrian cavalry, and that he had a mother and four sisters living. The deceased further stated that his youngest sister was a hard working woman, and two years ago forwarded him 110 dollars. He wished witness to draw up a document giving his property and money to his mother and sister, and if his mother was dead, his youngest sister was to have the whole. Witness told him that he would have to go to London, and he replied, "My God, my God, what are you going to do with me? When I get to America, I do not care even if they hang me if I can only repay my sister the money she sent me." The deceased told witness that he had some money at home, and that his sister knew all about it. He further stated that he sent his wife money to come over to America to join him. [ ?] he told her to be careful when she arrived at Hamburg, and not to be taken as a stranger, to stop at Castle [?], New York, upon her arrival at that port, and to telegraph to him upon her arrival, as he would meet her there. After the steamboat had sailed from Hamburg, he did not hear of her until she had been in New York for a few days, when she telegraphed to him from [?] New York. He went to the hotel and made enquiries respecting his wife, but found that no such person had stopped there. Being disappointed at not having found his wife, he stood at the hotel door, and whilst stopping there he saw his wife and another woman approaching arm in arm with two gentlemen. He asked his wife [?] she was with was, and she said it was only a gentleman she had met on board, and he had shewn her a great many favours. He then inquired what favours he could have done, when he had paid her passage, food and attention, and a quarrel ensued. They ultimately left together [?] country and arrived at a farm kept by a Mr [?] whose employ he had been for some time. As they could not agree, he made up his mind to proceed to [?] made preparations for doing so. In the event he asked her to go out for a walk, and whilst walking he missed her. Witness did not ask him whether he killed her or not - the deceased did not tell him. - Police-sergeant S. Holwill stated that the deceased, who was a bricklayer, was under remand upon a charge of wilful murder. The deceased had told the Inspector that he was very comfortable and that every person connected with the establishment was very kind to him. His instructions were to allow prisoners to keep their handkerchiefs in their possession. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that there was not the least evidence before the Jury of insanity; in fact it was quite the other way. The deceased appeared in good spirits and cheerful, and therefore they could have no difficulty in saying that the deceased hanged himself whilst in a state of sound mind. It was, therefore, his duty to return a verdict of Felo-de-se, which verdict the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - A verdict of Accidental Death was returned at an Inquest held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of HENRY BAKER, a private in the Royal Marines, who had died from injuries to the head, received through falling down a ladder of the Indus, on board which vessel the deceased was serving.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 August 1877
HOLBETON - - Bathing Fatality At Mothecombe. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Mothecombe, in the parish of Holbeton yesterday, relative to the death of JAMES DREW, pensioner of Plymouth. On Monday last deceased went with some friends on an excursion, and whilst bathing in the sea was seized with a fit and drowned. Mr Atkins, surgeon, stated that the immersion was the indirect cause of death, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this evidence.

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Suicide Near Plympton. - An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, at Lee Mill, Plympton St. Mary, respecting the death of WILLIAM ROWSE, retired tailor, aged 64 years. The evidence shewed that deceased, who has for some years been of unsound mind, was found dead in his bedroom on Monday morning, having committed suicide by hanging himself during the night. He had been living with his sister, who had taken great precaution to prevent him from doing himself an injury, although he had been pronounced harmless. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had committed Suicide whilst Insane.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 August 1877
DAWLISH - Bathing Fatality At Dawlish. - A young man named WILCOCKS, an engine fitter, in the employ of Messrs. Adlams, of Bristol, was drowned whilst bathing at Dawlish on Saturday afternoon. The employees of the firm were enjoying their annual holiday trip to Teignmouth and deceased with others went to Dawlish and bathed there. He was suddenly missed whilst in the water, and upon a search being made the body was speedily recovered, but life was extinct. An Inquest was opened on Saturday night and adjourned until Friday, and in the meantime a post mortem examination will be made. There is the mark of a blow on the forehead, received, it is supposed, in diving, as the deceased could swim.

BISHOPS NYMPTON - A "White Witch" And A Dying Woman. - An Inquest was held at Bishopsnympton by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH SANDERS, the wife of a cattle doctor, who keeps a shop in the village with a few drugs in his window, over which he styles himself a "Chemist," and on the door is a brass plate, on which are the words "Veterinary Surgeon." Locally he is well-known as DR SANDERS. Another man connected with the case is one John Harper, of West Down, near Barnstaple, well known as "the White Witch." This man is consulted far and near by a large number of people throughout North Devon, and is implicitly believed in. The first witness called was Mr Edwin Furse, Surgeon, of Southmolton, who deposed that about eight or nine weeks ago he was called in to attend the deceased, and found her suffering from an attack of rheumatic fever, from which she rallied. On the 14th July, he was called in again and found her suffering from chronic bronchitis and general debility. He attended her up to the 3rd August, when he considered her in a very precarious but not hopeless state. Dr Budd, of Barnstaple, saw the deceased in consultation with him on the on the 30th. On August 4th he (witness) heard that a man named Harper, known as "the White Witch," had been sent for, and he therefore did not afterwards see the deceased. He and Dr Budd agreed as to the nature of the case and treatment. Deceased died on Tuesday. He was applied to for a certificate of death, but finding she had been seen and prescribed for by Harper, declined to give one. - MARY ANN WALDRON stated that she was the daughter of deceased, who was 54 years old. On August 3rd MR SANDERS, her stepfather, went to West down for Mr Harper, who the following day came and saw her mother. He felt her pulse, and said she was very feverish, and that he was not sure he could do any good, as he was "only a humble instrument in the hand of God, and we must leave the result to Him." He told her (witness) that he had with him some bitters which would cool down the fever, ease the mouth and throat, and, if the deceased continued to take them, would alleviate the breath. He gave her a powder and told her to pour a pint of boiling water to one quarter of it, which she did. The remainder she now produced. He said he always administered that in every kind of fever, except typhus. He remained about an hour-and-a-half in the room, and had some refreshment there. The mixture in the bottle was what she prepared from the powder, and was the first and only medicine of Harper's that her mother took. She died last Tuesday. Harper wished to know the day and hour of her mother's birth so as to find out under what planet she was born. They told him the day; they couldn't tell him the hour. He took out a pocket-book, and out of it a piece of paper, on which he wrote "ELIZABETH SANDERS, Bishopsnympton," and her mother's age. Her two little sisters, Mrs Rodd (the wife of the parish clerk) and MR SANDERS, were in the room, but not the whole time. Mrs Rodd was sent for by Mr Harper to speak to him. He had two tin boxes; he took his pocket-book out of one, and several other things out of the other. Saw on the paper the names Mercury and Jupiter, and the names of other planets. Her mother took a wine glass full of Mr Harper's medicine every day up to the day of her death; she took some of Mr Furse's medicine after Harper came. - Eliza Rodd, wife of James Rodd, parish clerk, Bishopsnympton, said: I was sent for on Saturday last to speak to MRS SANDERS, the deceased. I went and saw Mr Harper there at dinner. I went upstairs to MRS SANDERS, and in about a quarter of an hour Mr Harper came up. I saw him feel her pulse. He said she was feverish. He said something about the planets. He asked me if I could see some writing he had. He also asked MR SANDERS and John Waldron, who were there. We neither of us could; the only one who could was Miss Waldron. He wrote something about the planet. He had some iron rods with bits of parchment; they struck one against the other. The deceased took them in her hands off a table by her bedside. He asked us to look and see what he was about. He did some other things, but I can't tell what it was exactly. MRS SANDERS held them in her hands for about a minute - one at a time. - ROBERT SANDERS stated that he was a cattle doctor, and after describing his wife's illness, he gave his evidence in a very unsatisfactory manner. (Mr Joseph Kingdon, the managing clerk to the clerk of Southmolton county justices, happening to be in the room, he at the request of the Jury, and with the consent of the Coroner, examined him). Witness said: I went for Mr Harper, knowing he was an herbalist doctor, and thinking he might do my missus some good. Mr Harper said the fever was running very high, and if she didn't get rid of the fever, the fever would of her, or something like that. He said he did not expect she could live long. He left some bitters for her to take. He did not give her anything then. He took a small pocket-book out of one of his tin cases, and took out a piece of paper and wrote my missus's name and her age. He might have written the name of a planet or two. He had some iron rods in another old tin box, seven or eight in number, and other "trincklements." There might have been something on the top of the rods, hanging on. I think I saw one of the rods in my missus's hand. He talked a good deal, but what he said I don't know now. He told her she might get better, and she mightn't. He might have told her to strike the iron rod on a piece of stuff - which looked to me like iron - he put on the table by the bedside. - On being questioned as to what he paid Harper, witness asked the Coroner whether he was bound to tell. - The Coroner replied: Yes, and tell the truth, whereupon witness said: Well, I asked him just before he left what I was in his debt. He said: Five and twenty shillings, and I paid him like a man before he left my house last Saturday 25s. I gave him a glass of rum and water also. (Laughter). Mrs Rodd was in the room while he was there. I sent my little girl to Mrs Rodd as Mr Harper wanted to see her. Mr Harper might, and he mightn't, but I don't recollecting whether he did or didn't as it was necessary that he should have two or three persons in the room to believe in his faith before he could do anything for my wife. - At this stage of the proceedings the Coroner said he thought no more evidence could be taken that day. - The foreman said the Jury thought they ought to hear the evidence of Harper, and in the meantime the bottle of mixture and powder left by him should be analysed by Dr Blyth, the county analyst. - The Coroner concurred, and the mixture and powder were then taken by Superintendent Wood and sealed in the presence of the Jury for Dr Blyth's analysis, and the Inquest was adjourned until August 20th. As far as could be ascertained, it was thought the powder left by Harper was chirretta, a harmless sort of herb.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 August 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Improper Treatment Of A Child. - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday by Mr John Vaughan, Coroner, on an infant 10 days old, the child of a labourer in Keyham yard, named CHARLES MACLEAN, living at Lower Cannon-street. - Dr Row, who made a post mortem examination, said the child had been, he believed in ignorance, improperly treated. It had had no maternal nourishment and the midwife and the child's grandmother had administered peppermint and castor oil as medicines, and fed it on bread and milk. Such treatment Dr Row considered improper; that the little one died from exhaustion; and the Jury, whilst giving a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," added that such death was accelerated by improper treatment."

Western Morning News, Friday 17 August 1877
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Torquay on Wednesday at the Torquay Infirmary before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on ROBERT PHILLIPS, aged 58, lately a ganger on the Torquay Main Drainage Works. The deceased was knocked off the sea wall at Meadfoot Beach by a "skip" about a week ago, and he gradually sank from the injuries he then received to the back and head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 August 1877
TIVERTON - Fatal Accidents At Tiverton. - An Inquest was held at Tiverton on Thursday respecting the deaths of ELIZABETH JEWELL and ELIZABETH OSMANT. The former, an old woman, was riding in a timber wagon on Wednesday when she fell into the road, and one of the wheels passed over her chest and stomach, inflicting fatal injuries. MRS OSMANT, who was 43 years of age on Monday last, caught hold of a girl who was throwing dirt into a window, and on the child struggling the deceased fell and pitched on her head. She never spoke afterwards, and died on Tuesday night. Verdicts of "Accidental Death" were returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 August 1877
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening by Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, respecting the death of a mason's labourer named JOSEPH MARSHALL, aged 22 years, who had died in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital after great suffering. On the 9th instant a stone fell on and broke one of deceased's legs, and the deceased gradually sank and died on Friday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 August 1877
BISHOPS NYMPTON - The North Devon "White Witch." - Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, resumed his Inquiry respecting the death of ELIZABETH SAUNDERS, at Bishops Nympton yesterday. It will be remembered that when the deceased was dying she was visited by an old man named Harper, of West Down, popularly known as "The White Witch," who prescribed for her. A bottle containing a liquid and some powdered herb, left by Harper as medicine for the deceased, had been analysed by Dr Blyth, the county analyst, who certified as follows:- "The powder consisted of the broken stalks and fragments of the engthrea centaurium, or common centaury, or of some plant nearly allied to it. The liquid was contained in a Bass's beer bottle and had a label tied to it with the word "physic" written upon it. It consisted of 9 ½ ounces of a straw coloured neutral and bitter fluid. It was found to be simply and solely an infusion or tea of herbs. In neither the powder nor the liquid was there any poisonous substance; both were of the most harmless inert, and innocent character. Injury, of course, would result to a person seriously ill if such simples usurped the place of more potent remedies." - Mr Edwin Furse, surgeon, deposed that on the 11th inst. he made a post mortem examination of the deceased, assisted by Dr Dickenson, and found that death was caused by fatty degeneration of the heart, bronchitis and congestion of the lungs; and, after haring Dr Blyth's analysis and report, he was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their regret that such superstition as had been manifested in the parish had rendered the Inquiry necessary."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 August 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN MCEVOY, aged 17 years, 2nd class boy serving on board the Impregnable. Mr W. Eastlake watched the Enquiry on behalf of the Admiralty. - James Inniss, gunner's mate and swimming instructor on board the Impregnable, said that about three p.m. on the 14th inst deceased went with other boys to bathe from the boat provided for that purpose. He could swim well, but had been in the water only one or two minutes, when he threw up his arms apparently in a fit. He (witness) immediately swam towards him, and caught him round the body, and the deceased gave a shiver and slipped from his grasp. Witness and five boys dived after him but to no purpose, the water being muddy and not clear. Previous to the accident the deceased had apparently been in good health. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 August 1877
PLYMOUTH - Painful Discovery By A Child. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Monday evening by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of RICHARD HANNAFORD, a labourer, in the employ of the South Western Railway Company. The deceased, who was only 35 years of age, was at work at the proposed new station at Laira, and was engaged in "tipping" up to noon, when his mate - William Bryant - went to his dinner, leaving the deceased between the rails. Within a few minutes the deceased's daughter - a girl about 14 years of age - came to the spot with HANNAFORD'S dinner, but, to her horror, found her father lying lifeless on the ground; and here, by the side of her parent's body, the poor child remained until one o'clock when Bryant returned, no one having passed in the meantime. Help was procured, but life was extinct. The deceased had complained of pains in the chest; and the Jury, thinking that there were no suspicious circumstances in connection with the case, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DAWLISH - The Bathing Fatality At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at Dawlish last evening by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, concerning the death of WALTER WARE, aged 13, one of the two boys who were drowned whilst bathing on Sunday afternoon. the body of the other boy (Mullens) has not yet been recovered. JOSEPH WARE, labourer, father of deceased, said the lad went away contrary to his orders, and was in the habit of bathing. - Joseph Mutters aged 14, stated that he and six other boys were bathing together on Sunday afternoon. Three could swim, and two of them were the deceased lads. They went in the water at the cove about 2.15 p.m. The sea was very rough, and there was a great deal of weed about. They remained in the water about half an hour, and then he knew something was wrong. The deceased WARE was further out than Mullens, and he saw WARE, who went down first, hold up his hands and cry out. He came on shore and ran on the wall, but could not see them. He then called for assistance, and a man named Gilpin helped to launch the boat, but there being no rowlocks or paddles he ran to the other cove, and a boat was immediately launched; but did not recover the bodies. - John Arthur Mells, a gentleman from London, stated that he was sitting on the wall and saw the occurrence. He assisted to launch the boat, in which there were no rowlocks, but there were paddles. Those in the boat did not understand sculling. He directly went to the other cove, and found that a boat had gone off. Witness thought it possible that if the boat had been put off one of the boys must have been saved. A gentleman named Soltau volunteered the statement that several men swam about and dived after the bodies, but without avail. In consequence of the rough sea he did not think if the rowlocks had been in the boat the bodies could have been recovered. - The Coroner expressed a hope that the boat would in future be always kept ready, but if it was locked up in church hours notice should be given. He thought the drowning was quite accidental. - Mr Bolt, a Juryman, considered that for the benefit of the town and for the sake of decency bathing should be stopped on Sundays at ten in the morning. - Mr R. Tripe, another Juryman, added that it was time to stop the disgraceful behaviour at the cove on Sundays. - The Coroner said the stopping of bathing on Sundays rested with the Local Board. - Mr Davies remarked that when the rowlocks were left in the boat the boys would not let it rest. On one occasion it was found near Langstone, two miles off. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At West Hoe. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening relative to the death of a naval pensioner named HENRY CANN, aged 68 years, who had been acting as the master of a yacht belonging to Mr Hingston. On August 4th some watermen at the Brethren's Steps under the Hoe observed a torpedo launch stop and send a small boat to the rocks under West Hoe-terrace, whence it proceeded to the steps and the deceased was carried to the road above. The officers in charge of the launch behaved with great kindness, and paid for a cab in which CANN was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where they afterwards called and inquired after his progress. According to his own statements, deceased had slipped in going up the rocks and fell heavily to a rock below, whence he rolled into the water. Mr Herbert Herbert, resident surgeon at the Hospital, stated that on his reception it was found that the deceased had broken his right thigh bone and smashed his knee-cap. He afterwards became delirious and continued to get worse until his death, which occurred yesterday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The gentlemen who acted with so much kindness towards the deceased could not be found, and it was supposed that they had gone to the eastward, but the Jury expressed their warm sense of their conduct and their regret that they could not tender them their thanks.


Western Morning News, Friday 31 August 1877
EXETER - The Strange Death Of A Prisoner At Exeter. - An Inquest was held last evening at Exeter on JOHN HOOKWAY, who died under circumstances already reported in the Western Morning News. - Police-sergeant Denning stated that he knew the deceased, who was about 47 years of age, and believed he had been out of his mind of late. - P.C. George Sullock deposed that on the morning of the 29th inst. he found the deceased asleep in Tiverton-road, and, as he repeatedly refused with oaths to go away, and to get up, he was carried to the police station on a stretcher. On his way there he used disgusting language, and attempted to get off the stretcher. He was certainly drunk and smelt very strong of spirit. - Sergt. Meardon gave corroborative evidence. - P.C. Perriam said he saw the deceased at midnight on Tuesday in St. Sidwell-street. He was drunk, and fell from the footpath into the street. He said "All right, master, I'll get up again in a minute. I knocked myself rather hard - almost senseless." - Inspector Wreford, who was in charge of the police station on Wednesday morning, gave evidence of the deceased being brought there about three o'clock and stated that he visited him shortly before six o'clock, and as he could obtain no answer to his inquiries, a medical man was sent for. - P.C. James Sullock, reserve constable, corroborated the evidence of the other officer as to deceased's condition on his arrival at the police-station, and said he visited him at intervals of half an hour until half-past five, when, finding that he was still unconscious Inspector Wreford said he thought they ought to send for the doctor, and that was done. A prisoner named Hill made a noise, by knocking at his cell window, about four o'clock, and on witness going to him he threw his boot at him, and demanded to be supplied with bread and butter and coffee; but he said nothing about a man dying in the next cell until the doctor came. - Mr Phelps, surgeon, stated that he found the deceased insensible and breathing heavily. There was a slight smell of drink upon him, but it was not particularly noticeable. The man was certainly drunk when brought in; but, judging from his emaciated appearance, a small quantity of drink would have taken a great effect on him. It was impossible in his condition to administer an emetic, and the stomach pump was therefore resorted to. Northing was brought up but water, tinged with blood, and he could not detect in the contents of the stomach any sign of drink. Restoratives were applied, and as they had no effect deceased was sent to the hospital at half-past eleven o'clock. He believed that the man died of congestion. The police were perfectly correct in their theory that he was drunk when apprehended, and his explanation was that the congestion sent in after the immediate effects of the last drinking bout had passed off. In his opinion no human power could have saved the man's life. - Mr Bate, acting house surgeon at the Hospital, detailed the remedies adopted. The deceased was unconscious when admitted; he never rallied, and about three o'clock death took place. At the request of the Coroner he had made a post mortem examination. He was satisfied that death was caused by concussion of the brain, resulting from the rupture of one of the vessels. The rupture might have been caused by a blow, or it might have come from hard drinking. He did not consider the brain to be that of a person of deficient intellect. It was healthy apart from the congestion, which he had no doubt was brought on by drinking. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 September 1877
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of MARY TURNER, aged 50 years. It was stated that the deceased lived at 7 Westbury-terrace, and that early on Monday morning she was seen in her house, and was heard moving about at five o'clock the same day. On Tuesday, however, she was not heard, and her neighbours becoming alarmed, a locked door was forced open, and the deceased was found in bed dead, and quite cold. She suffered from abscess and heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."


Western Morning News, Friday 7 September 1877
HARTLAND - Death Of A Medical Man From Poison. - Mr W. Toller, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Hartland yesterday respecting the death of MR JOSEPH R. DUOMON. The deceased, who was about 35 years of age, was a surgeon, and had been living at Hartland for the past few years. Of late he had been much addicted to drink, and on Tuesday evening he took an overdose of opium, which terminated fatally, despite the efforts of Mr Cooke, surgeon, of Clovelly, who used the stomach pump, and was with the deceased for some hours before he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from an overdose of opium," and found that it was not taken intentionally.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 September 1877
PLYMOUTH - Scalded To Death. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, yesterday, respecting the death of JANE ELLEN POLLARD, aged 2 years and 7 months. - Elizabeth Pallett, aunt of the deceased, stated that she lived at 82 Treville-street, with the deceased's father. On Monday last she was in the court when she heard screams proceeding from the room where she had left the little girl. She went in and saw her lying on the floor very much scalded about the face. A saucepan which had contained boiling water, and which she had left on the fire, was lying inside the fender, and the water was about the room. Remedies were applied, and until Wednesday deceased seemed to be recovering. On that day, as she was a little worse, Mr May, surgeon, was called in, but to no purpose, for on Thursday the child died. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 September 1877
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fall At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of BENJAMIN COIT, aged 69 years. The deceased was a shoemaker and resided at 27 King-lane. About half-past eight on Monday evening he came home, and was shewn to his room by a woman named Flora Rice, residing in the same house. He went to bed, and about an hour afterwards his daughter came home and asked to be lighted upstairs. Deceased got out of bed and took a candle with him, but he stumbled and fell over the whole of the stairs, receiving severe injuries. Mr Pearse, surgeon, was called in, but the deceased died before he arrived, his neck having been broken. It came out in evidence that the stairs were very dangerous and were unprotected. The woman Rice, in reply to a question, stated that she believed that the deceased had been drinking a little, but said that he was capable of taking care of himself. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but recommended that a rail should be placed along the stairs to prevent similar accidents.

TEIGNMOUTH - The Case Of Drowning At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth yesterday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM ROWE, tailor, formerly foreman cutter for Messrs. Feather and Hicks, tailors, late of Bedford-street, Plymouth, and who has been working for the last eighteen months in Teignmouth. - James Newberry, a young man residing at Teignmouth, stated that as he was walking on the sea wall on Monday morning he saw a body floating in the water sixteen yards out. He walked into the water and pulled the body out. It was quite warm, but life was extinct. - Emma Syms, a lodging-house keeper residing at Northumberland-place, stated that the deceased had lodged with her for eighteen months, and had lately been very much depressed, owing to not having much work to do. He usually dined with her family, but on Saturday and Sunday he refused to do so, and remained in his room the whole of Sunday. On Monday she heard him leave the house about 6.45 a.m., and at 8.30 a.m. she heard that he had drowned himself. He inquired on Friday whether there were any letters for him, and when she told him there was none he seemed very much disappointed. Deceased was a very quiet man, and she had never seen him intoxicated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how deceased came into the water there was not sufficient evidence to show."

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 September 1877
ASHBURTON - The Death From Hydrophobia At Ashburton. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Gaye, Deputy County Coroner, respecting the death of CHARLES JOINT. Mr George Langler, portreeve, acted as Foreman of the Jury. - WILLIAM JOINT, mason, said the deceased was his son, and was 17 years old. He lived at home and worked with witness, and enjoyed good health. On the 6th July witness saw wounds in the left hand, and deceased said they were inflicted by a dog in the Heavy Head-lane while he was in the company of his sister. The wounds were attended to, and he returned to his work up to Monday last. - Francis Barnett, labourer, stated that he had a lurcher bitch for three or four years, and that it was a quiet dog. His brother brought her in one evening, saying that she had bitten someone. She was chained up that night and broke loose. In the morning, in consequence of strange symptoms, the dog was shot. - James Adams, surgeon, in practice at Ashburton, deposed: I was called in to see CHARLES JOINT on July 7th, and found marks about the thumb of the left hand. I thoroughly cauterised the wounds and saw him two or three times afterwards. The wounds did not heal quickly, due, as I expect, to free use of the cautery. I saw him again on September 19th, and found him depressed. He complained of pain in the left arm, and also numbness all over the body. He told me he could not swallow. I urged him to drink some milk, which he did with considerable difficulty and pain. He spat frequently a white visced phlegm. All the symptoms I have mentioned increased in intensity until twelve at night, when he was in a state of delirium, and refused his medicine. He had constant spasms of threatened suffocation; the more movement of the bedclothes induced a spasm. From the first he had a strong impression that he should go mad. His temperature gradually rose from the time witness first saw him until Wednesday morning, when it reached 103 F., and this rise of temperature corresponded to the development of the other symptoms. The tetanic symptoms continued during the morning, and it took two men and a woman to hold him. He gradually sank from exhaustion, and died at ten p.m. Witness attributed death to hydrophobia. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Hydrophobia."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 September 1877
PORTHLEVEN - On Saturday an Inquest was held at Porthleven, respecting the death of EDWARD WINDEATT, of 3 Woolster-street, Plymouth, who was washed off the deck of the Whisper pilot boat of that port as stated in our Saturday's paper. A verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned, and in the afternoon the interment took place in the churchyard of the port.

BERE FERRERS - An Inquest was held at the Edgcumbe Arms, Beeralstone, on Saturday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of HENRY LAVIS. LAVIS was employed as ferryman at Hone Passage and on Monday last in crossing he was missed. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 September 1877
PLYMOUTH - The Fatality At Turnchapel. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, yesterday, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of WILLIAM CLOAD, aged 34 years, master of the yacht Firefly, belonging to Mr Sherlock. - William Samuel Kelly, owner of the Mount Batten yard, stated that the Firefly was being hauled up for the winter in his yard on Saturday. The deceased had charge of the yacht, which was pulled up on rollers by means of a tackle worked by two horses, and he was on the port side under the bilge keeping the "leg" clear of the plank. She was hauled up until the blocks of the tackle came together, and it was then unhooked from the bow and hooked to a bolt in the keel. Hauling had recommenced, when the hook slipped from the bolt in the keel, and the yacht ran back six or eight feet, and then fell over to port on the deceased. The other men who were under that side of the yacht jumped away. - John Coram, who was working with deceased, corroborated Mr Kelly's evidence. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Supposed Suicide Of A Lad. - Yesterday the body of a lad named THORNE, 15 years of age, who worked in a factory, was found in the river Taw, near Pill Farm. The lad had been missing since Saturday midday, when he told a companion that he meant to go and drown himself. An Inquest was opened at the Guildhall yesterday, and evidence as to the finding of the body having been given, the Inquiry was adjourned until tomorrow. It is said the boy's father committed suicide about three years ago.

EXETER - The Fatality At Exeter Quay. - The Exeter Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of CHARLES HENRY YARDLEY, aged 8, who was drowned by the partial capsizing of a vessel at the Quay on Saturday. It was stated that on Saturday afternoon a series of rowing matches took place in the river Exe, off the quay, and the committee who organised them engaged a schooner, the Aguila, from which to start the competing boats. The general public were admitted on board on payment of a fee, and a large number of persons, between 150 and 200 in all, availed themselves of this opportunity of obtaining a better view of the sports. About half-past five some men were engaged in walking a greasy pole for a leg of mutton, and nearly the whole of the persons on board the Aguila had shifted to one side of the vessel. Suddenly the chain which secured it to the shore parted with a loud snap, and the schooner heeled over, the jerk precipitating a large number of people into the water. All of those were rescued, with the exception of the deceased, whose dead body was recovered some time later. - In answer to a question from the Jury, one of the witnesses stated that for the size of the vessel he did not think there were too many persons on board. The Aguila had been secured to the shore by her own crew. - A police inspector produced the hook with which the chain was fastened to the rigging of the ship. It was about four inches in length, and about half an inch thick. - John Bealey, carpenter, in the employ of the Exeter Town Council, stated that after the accident he examined the moorings of the vessel. At the first mooring ring by the landing shed he saw a piece of rope fastened to it. The hook and shackle produced were fastened to the mainmast of the vessel. The hook was straightened out, caused, as he supposed, by the pressure on the chain. The chain was a 9-16th chain. - By the Jury: Should consider this a proper fastening. - William Giles, labourer, stated that he was engaged in dragging the river after the accident. He found the body of the deceased in about 14ft. of water, opposite the middle of the ship. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, observed that it was very sad to see the poor boy's life sacrificed in such a way; but, at the same time, it was a matter for congratulation that a much larger loss of life had not occurred. The accident seemed to have been occasioned by the sudden rush of people to see the climbing for the leg of mutton. It was a question for the Jury whether a fair amount of caution had been exercised; that the Coroner left entirely to the Jury. - The Jury were unanimously of opinion that proper care had been exercised in fastening the vessel, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 September 1877
PLYMOUTH - Death Whilst Sleeping. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, yesterday, concerning the death of MR JACOB JARRING, aged 87 years. The deceased was a retired farmer, and resided at Holbeton, where for the last forty years he had preached in one of the chapels. On Tuesday last deceased came to the house of Mr Martin, 33 York-street, Plymouth, intending to remain a few days on a visit. He went to bed about 10.30 p.m., and on Wednesday morning, about half-past six, a cup of tea was taken to his bedroom. He then appeared to be sleeping very soundly, and was not disturbed. About an hour later Mr Martin went to him and found him dead. Mr Jackson, surgeon, was sent for and pronounced life to be extinct. Deceased had been rather weak for the last two months, and had had two slight seizures. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 September 1877
EXETER - Drowning At Exeter. - An Inquest was held last evening at Exeter respecting the death of LEFTEN WILSON, a sailor, aged 19, belonging to the Aquela, of Goole, which recently arrived at Exeter Quay. The deceased's father left him on Northernhay on Sunday afternoon, and in the evening a Mrs Elizabeth Dunley saw him very drunk at the Jolly Sailor Inn, West-quarter, and she saw him on board. The following morning his dead body was found in the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell, by Mr Hooper yesterday, concerning the death of RICHARD STARK, a cab driver, but formerly a member of the Exeter police force, who committed suicide on the previous evening, by cutting his throat with a razor. Evidence was given showing that the deceased had of late been of ill-health, and in a desponding state. On Thursday he was in bed, being much worse, and about half-past eight he was discovered with his throat cut. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 September 1877
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Fall Of A Drunken Man. - An Inquest has been held at Barnstaple respecting the death of THOMAS GAMMON, ostler, at the Green Dragon Inn, who had died in the North Devon Infirmary. A witness named Thomas Mitchell stated that whilst on horseback he overtook the deceased on the turnpike road and as GAMMON was drunk, and had great difficulty in walking, he had him assisted upon his horse. After walking for about a couple of miles the horse went off at a trot, and the deceased fell off. He was picked up in an unconscious state and suffering from an extensive fracture of the skull, which was the cause of death. He leaves a wife and eight children. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 September 1877
LIFTON - Birth And Burial. - At the Arundel Arms, Lifton, yesterday, Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of a newly born male child, whose body was found in the churchyard on Monday. The first witness was John Glanville, who stated that he was sexton of the parish church. About 10.30 a.m. on Monday he went into the churchyard in connection with his duties, and noticed that in the corner of the yard the earth had been recently broken up. He took a shovel and opened the ground and found a piece of flannel about seven inches under the surface and in it was wrapped the body of a child. The ground had been broken up between Saturday and Monday morning. - Mr J. G. Doidge, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, which was that of a fully developed, well-formed male child. There were no marks of violence on it except a slight scratch (as from a pin) under the right jaw. On opening the chest and examining the lungs he was fully convinced that the child had breathed. The umbilical cord had been cut, but not tied. The child had evidently had a separate existence. The whole substance of the brain was more or less congested, but the head bore no external marks of violence. - By the coroner: There were cloths of blood under the soft portion of the skull. On Tuesday he saw MARY ELLERY (a single woman) professionally, and found that she had lately been confined. She told him that about two o'clock on Sunday morning she had to leave her bed, and that she went into the kitchen, where she gave birth to a child; after which she became insensible for more than half an hour, and sank on the floor. Upon recovering consciousness she called for help and her mother came. His opinion was that the death of the child was caused by profusion of blood to the brain, and not from any act of violence on the part of the mother. - The Jury found that the deceased was the child of MARY ELLERY, and that it came by its death through the unassisted condition of its mother at the time of birth.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 October 1877
LYDFORD - End Of A Strange Career. - Mr R. Fulford, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Princetown yesterday, respecting the death of a convict named HENRY FRAGER, who died on Friday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The deceased's career seems to have been a remarkable one. It is stated that he was in holy orders, and that he served with the army during the Crimean campaign. Since then he has led a strange life. In January 1871 he was convicted for stealing a portmanteau at a railway station, and was sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment. not long after he had undergone this sentence he was convicted for a somewhat similar offence at Oxford and for this he was awarded seven years' penal servitude, five of which he had nearly completed at the time of his death.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Milehouse. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest at Stoke yesterday relative to the death of JAMES FITZPATRICK, aged 47 years, a pensioner from the Royal Marines. Samuel Bayley, a lad, said that he was in a field adjoining the new burial ground at Milehouse on Saturday morning, and saw the deceased hanging by the neck by a waist-belt, which was attached to the bough of a tree by a rope. The body was suspended about fifteen feet from the ground. He called the attention of a gravedigger named Francis Hooper, who climbed up the tree, and cut down the body, which was quite cold, lift being extinct. - P.C. Landry deposed that he found a scarf in a pocket of the deceased's clothing. It was torn up, and it appeared very much as though deceased had attempted to hang himself with it. He also found two pawn-tickets on the body, which bore the name of ELIZABETH FITZPATRICK, of Plymouth. - Mary Ann Perkins said that she kept a lodging-house in Duke-street, Devonport, and the deceased had lodged with her for ten weeks. He worked in the dockyard, as a labourer, and he was a very quiet and sober man. Deceased never complained of being in trouble, nor did he appear in a desponding state, although he was in a low condition at times. By the Coroner: FITZPATRICK had told her that he had been living with a woman for seven years, and that she had deserted him to reside with another man. He told witness that he felt the desertion very much indeed. Deceased left the house on Wednesday morning shortly before seven, and she had not seen him since. By the Jury: Deceased had borrowed money of her to take out of pawn clothes which, he complained, had been pledged by the woman with whom he had lived. - Joseph Landrey, a labourer in the Dockyard, deposed to having worked with the deceased for upwards of twelve months, and during the past ten weeks the deceased appeared to be very much depressed, availing himself of every opportunity of being by himself. Other workmen had also noticed his melancholy condition. - By the coroner: Deceased had given away to drink of late. He did not tell witness his troubles, but several of the workmen knew that it was caused by some woman. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 5 October 1877
PLYMOUTH - An Unexplained Fatality. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of JOHN RUNNALLS, aged 49 years. It was stated that the deceased was seen on Wednesday evening about ten o'clock and that he then appeared to be depressed. Yesterday morning a boy named Hearn saw the dead body of the deceased near the Parade-quay; part of the body was on the mud, the rest in the water. The deceased did not appear to have received any injury. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at Plymouth, yesterday, respecting the death of AGNES CHUBB, aged 83 years. The deceased, who lived in Ebrington-ope, went to bed on Wednesday night apparently in her usual good health. The next morning, as she did not come down to breakfast, her daughter-in-law went to call her and found her dead in bed. Nothing about the room was disarranged, and the deceased had apparently died in her sleep. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 8 October 1877
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Saturday, respecting the death of ELIZABETH PENGILLY, aged 51 years. On Friday last the deceased was going to Oreston, with her husband, in one of the small steamboats plying from the Plymouth Barbican, when, on nearing the landing steps, MR PENGILLY told his wife to get ready to land, and as she did not reply or move, he took her by the arm to assist her, and found her insensible. She was taken back to Plymouth and carried to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she died about ten minutes after her admission. For some months past deceased has been suffering from giddiness. - Mr H. H. Herbert, resident house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that he had made a post mortem examination, and found that death had resulted from softening of the base of the brain and the rupturing of a blood vessel in the brain, which had issued a large clot of blood. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Strange Case Of Drowning At Exeter. - Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Port Royal Inn, Exeter quay, on Saturday, on RICHARD NEWCOMBE, a contractor, of Cowick-street, St. Thomas, who had met with his death by drowning in the Exe. The deceased left his house on Wednesday, stating that he was going to pay his rent, having about £10 in his possession. Later in the day he called at a spirit shop in New Bond-street, kept by Robert Yandell, and drank three small glasses of brandy. He then stated that he had paid his rent. Yandell asserted that deceased was sober when he left. - A woman, named Larkworthy, who had formerly kept the Round Tree Inn, which deceased used to visit, stated that she saw NEWCOMBE leave Yandell's premises by the back door, and that he was then apparently the worse for liquor. Deceased called at her house and remained in conversation with her about twenty minutes. While there he poured out a little spirit into a glass which was standing on the table, but the witness was uncertain whether he drank it. Nothing was seen of the deceased after he left Larkworthy's house; but the following morning his body was found in the river Exe. There was no money on his person when searched by the police. No evidence was procurable shewing positively how the deceased got into the water; but a sergeant of the Royal Artillery stated that about 12 o'clock on Wednesday night he saw a man of similar build on the ballast quay, whom he judged to be the worse for liquor, and that just after he passed he heard a splash, but on running to the water's edge all was quiet. The sergeant informed a policeman of what he had observed. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 October 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Railway Accident At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday respecting the death of HENRY JAMES JINKS, aged 18 years. The deceased had been employed for the past ten months as [?] in the goods department of the London and South Western Railway Department, and on Wednesday afternoon he was engaged in that capacity upon the [?] goods trains at the station. Just previous to the arrival of the 4.23 p.m. passenger train the trucks upon which deceased was working was shunted upon the goods [|?] and when it was at a standstill JINKS jumped off the [?] 6 feet way, between the goods and passengers lines and stood upon the metals of the down line, with his back towards the signal-box. Deceased had no sooner taken up that position than the 4.23 train came up and the front of the engine struck him violently in the back, and he was thrown a distance of about twelve yards, and he landed heavily upon the line. Assistance was immediately at hand, but the deceased expired shortly after the accident. - A porter, named John Adey, stated that eth engine of the passenger trains did not sound the steam whistle upon entering the station; but it was sounded upon passing the signal-house, a quarter of a mile distant. The engine of the gods train was blowing off steam at the [?] of the approach of the passenger train, and it would be quite impossible for a person to have heard the noise of the in coming train. - Joshua Avery, superintendent of the goods department, bore testimony to the deceased being very attentive to his duties. He asserted that JINKS had no right to have been on the passenger rail in the persecution of his duty. - Mr Vesey (station master) remarked that the men in the company's employ had been repeatedly warned not to unnecessarily expose themselves to danger. The Coroner said he thought that no blame was attached to the railway authorities; and the Jury recorded a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 October 1877
PLYMOUTH - A Presentment Of Death. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday respecting the death of MR SAMUEL WISE, farmer, of South Coombe, near Milton Abbot. The deceased arrived at the house of Mr Soper, Tavistock-street, on a visit on Thursday afternoon, and then complained of being unwell. About ten o'clock at night he retired to rest, and was yesterday morning found dead in his bed. The deceased apparently had a presentment that he would die suddenly for before going to bed on Thursday evening he told Miss Soper where to telegraph in case of anything happening to him, and he always carried a slip of paper about him with his name and address written on it. The Jury, of whom Mr Anning was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 October 1877
EXETER - Disastrous Hurricane. Loss Of Life. - The gale was very heavily felt at Exeter and its immediate vicinity. In the city itself a large number of houseroofs were wholly or partially stripped, two or three long pieces of wall were blown down; and though there was no actual loss of life from the falling of chimney stacks, there were some narrow escapes. Mr Alexander, optician of High-street, Exeter, was with his wife sleeping in a room at the rear of the shop, next the roof. A chimney belonging to an adjoining house fell full on the roof while they were in bed, smashing through the slates and the plastering, but fortunately for them the roof had very recently been fitted with new rafters, and as those remained intact they received no hurt. Had the rafters broken they must have had the whole weight of the chimney upon them, and would probably have met a similar fate to that which befell an elderly lady named BAMBURY, living at the Post-office, who was crushed to death just as she was preparing to retire to rest. The circumstances of the accident at Pinhoe are very painful. - It appears that the business of the Post Office is carried on by MISS ELIZABETH BAMBURY, who was living with her two sisters and an aunt, MISS ANN BAMBURY, aged about 53, the lady who lost her life. The four females occupied one bedroom at the rear of the house. The only other occupant of the premises was a Mr Ireland, a young man who manages a little bakery which was carried on in connection with the Post Office. MISS ANN BAMBURY, the deceased, usually slept with her niece, HARRIET, in a bed near the fire-place; the postmistress and her other sister, HELEN, had a bed at the other end of the room. The door was midway between the two beds. About twenty minutes after eleven, HARRIET having got into bed, and the other three being just about to do so, a rather tall chimney was blown down upon the roof of their bedroom. It crashed right through the whole length of the roof, leaving nothing remaining but two or three feet of slating at the end where the bed belonging to the MISSES ELIZABETH and HELEN stood. The other bed was completely buried; and the mass of fallen debris prevented ELIZABETH and HELEN from opening the door to call for assistance. Their screams, however, were heard by Mr Ireland, whose room had also been broken in by the falling chimney. By his help the door was broken in two, and a means of exit thus obtained. The sister, HARRIET, was heard crying for help from underneath a mass of rubbish heavy enough to crush the life out of two or three persons, but with assistance she was extricated, apparently without any injury but the shock. The aunt, however, was found to have been crushed to death. She was in a stooping posture, as if the chimney had fallen on her when she was unfastening her boots (which were still on her feet); and besides a fracture of one of the thighs, she had a blow at the base of the skull sufficient to have killed her on the spot. Dr Somers, of Broadclist, was sent for, but his services were of no avail. Yesterday (Monday) afternoon Mr R. R. Crosse held an Inquest at the Poltimore Arms Inn, and after hearing the evidence of MISS BAMBURY, Richard Bennett, railway signalman, who helped to extricate HARRIET BAMBURY and her aunt, and other witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

WEYMOUTH - MR FRANK COLE, commercial traveller, of Bideford, was found dead in bed at a Weymouth hotel on Saturday morning. It was stated that he had been drinking freely, and had taken a draught containing opium, traces of which were found in his stomach. The post mortem examination also shewed internal disease. An Inquest has been opened and adjourned.

At the Inquest held at Hooe Meavy yesterday, before Mr Rodd, Coroner, it was conclusively shewn by the evidence of Mr West, surgeon, of Tavistock, and the wife of the deceased, JOHN ELFORD, that he had for many months past been of depressed and unsound mind, and had been under treatment for it, but was supposed to have recovered. A verdict of "Suicide by hanging while of Unsound Mind" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner, of Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of JOHN THOMAS POLKINGHORNE, aged 61 years. The deceased, who resided in Chapel-street, retired to rest on Saturday night in his usual health, and about seven a.m. on Sunday he was found dead in bed. - Mr Horton, surgeon, stated that the deceased died from Natural Causes, and general decay of nature, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 October 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Devonport Waterman. Another Victim To Drink. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of WILLIAM WOOD, waterman, aged 52 years, who committed suicide by cutting his throat on Tuesday. - MATILDA WOOD, wife of the deceased, stated that on Tuesday afternoon, about half-past one, she sent two of her children to the George Inn after the deceased, who had been in the house since eleven o'clock that morning. When he came she told her children to go upstairs as he was very drunk and violent. This appeared to annoy him, and he rushed at his daughter, but witness succeeded in pulling him back on the floor. Witness then went into the street, but on hearing him breaking the furniture, she went upstairs after the papers by which she obtained her son's half-pay, fearing that he would destroy them with the rest of the things, and as she was returning downstairs she heard the people in the street shouting that her husband had cut his throat. Deceased had been a hard drinker all his life, but for a fortnight previous to last Thursday he had not drunk anything intoxicating. On that day and on Friday he got very drunk, but was more temperate on Saturday. He was very violent when drunk, and had often broken the furniture before. On Monday he went into the Sound and when he came back he complained of pains in his head. Deceased, who was formerly in the merchant service, had had several cuts and blows on the head, and had been in India three times. She had frequently heard him say when drunk that he should take his life. - P.C. Blake stated that he went to deceased's house in Monument-street on Tuesday, and heard a great disturbance there. P.C. Colwill was with him and when WOOD, who had been before the magistrates for drunkenness, saw them, he made use of threatening language, telling them that if they came into his house they should not go out again. He then said he had broken his furniture to pieces, and that on the morrow he should be sorry for it. Witness turned round to drive away the crowd, and WOOD rushed towards him, and before any person could prevent him drew the razor across his own throat, inflicting a deep wound. Witness did not see the razor previous to the deceased cutting himself. He was very drunk at the time. Witness had often seen him drunk before, but on Tuesday he seemed quite insane and different to what he had been previously. Deceased was taken to the Hospital and witness remained with him until he died, which was about twenty minutes after his admission. - P.C. Colwill corroborated Blake's evidence, but said WOOD appeared to him just the same as he had always been when drunk and there was nothing unusual about his appearance. - James Pinsent, landlord of the George Inn, said WOOD was in his bar on Tuesday, from eleven o'clock until about 1.15 and during that time he had only three two pennyworths of rum, and appeared to be sober when he left the house. He was not a customer of his, and called that morning to pay him 9d. which he had owed for some months. If the wife of deceased and two constables said he was very drunk it was not true. - The Jury (a double one) returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity brought on by drink.

Western Morning News, Friday 19 October 1877
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fight In The Royal Marine Barracks. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM LASKEY, aged 25 years, a private in the Royal Marines. Mr Loye, solicitor, watched the case for Mr W. Eastlake, on behalf of the Admiralty. The first witness called was Private Raymond, R.M.L.I., who said that the deceased and himself belonged to No. 46 room in the Royal Marine Barracks, and Corporal Hector was in charge of it. About five minutes to ten o'clock on Saturday night the deceased returned to barracks intoxicated, and upon coming into the barrack-room used abusive language towards witness and afterwards struck and knocked him off a stool that he was sitting upon. witness asked him why he struck him, whereupon the deceased attempted to strike him again. He (Raymond) walked away, but deceased followed him. Witness tried to get out at the door, but he was prevented from doing so by Private Green, who had locked it. Corporal Hector told LASKEY that he should take him to the guardroom if he was not quiet, whereupon the deceased said he would serve him (Hector) in a similar manner if he interfered. The corporal took no notice of this, but mustered the room, and afterwards went away to report that all the men were present. Upon returning the corporal put out the lights in the room and went to his bed. The deceased lay upon his bed with his clothes on. After the "rounds" had gone the corporal lighted the gas again, and went to the deceased's bed and said, "Come on, I'll have a round with you." LASKEY jumped out of bed and struck the first blow. Hector hit the deceased down, and blood immediately came from LASKEY'S head. The corporal, Private Mutter, and witness then went to the assistance of the deceased, who was insensible, and, after being undressed, he was put in bed, where he remained unconscious and bleeding. He believed deceased struck his head against the bedstead, but he did not see it done. When witness awoke, about half-past six o'clock the next morning, he saw Hector and Mutter washing the blood off deceased's face. He heard the corporal say, "I will go and fetch a doctor," and Surgeon McCarthy shortly afterwards arrived. - By the Coroner: The deceased was five yards from his bed when he was struck. He fell on the floor and he never spoke afterwards. Witness had never heard LASKEY quarrel with anyone in the room before, in fact had not heard him have an angry word with anybody. - By Mr Loye: Deceased was only a few inches from the foot of corporal Hector's bed when he fell. Blood flowed from his nose directly afterwards. Did not see the wound on LASKEY'S head. He might have fallen against a trestle which was in the room. Witness did not return the blow after deceased knocked him off the stool. Did not notice anyone but Hector strike the deceased. All the men had their boots off. Did not see anyone kick the deceased, who was bleeding when put in bed. After the fight all retired to rest for the night. Although LASKEY'S face was covered with blood, he did not think it came from any other part than his nose. - By the Foreman (Mr Holland): There was no angry feeling existing between deceased and himself. Believed LASKEY struck him (Raymond) because he would not fight. - Richard Vincent McCarthy, surgeon of the Plymouth division of Royal Marines, stated that at 6.45 a.m. on Sunday last Corporal Hector came to his quarters and said that a man belonging to No. 46 Barrack-room had injured himself the night previously, and they were unable to rouse him; also, that he had lost a considerable quantity of blood during the night. In answer to witness as to why he had not called him before, Hector said he had not done so because he did not think the injuries were of a serious nature. He proceeded to the room, and saw the deceased lying in bed, quite insensible, and he was breathing stertorously, and had a weak pulse. He then observed a wound on deceased's nose, but he did not examine it minutely, because he saw that the deceased was dying. There was blood on LASKEY'S bedding on the right side of the head, and there was also some on the floor, quite close to the head of the bed. Witness ordered the deceased to be conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, but he died a few hours after admission. He had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found it that of a well-developed and muscular man. there was a slight abrasion over the prominent part of the forehead on the left side, and there were also two slight abrasions on the left elbow. There was a contused wound of a semi-circular form over the centre of the nose, and extending along the length of the nose and not across it. On examining the cartilage of the nose on the left side, he found it detached from the nasal bone, and that the cartilage on the other side was driven in. On removing the skull cap he discovered clots of blood on the skull, evidently recently effused, pressing on the brain beneath the external covering towards its lateral and under surface on the right side. The amount of blood effused was about six ounces, and it would appear to have come from the ophthalmic vein on that side, which was found to be ruptured near its point of exit on the skull. The brain was healthy, as were also the lungs. The heart contained clots of blood, but it was free from disease. All the other organs were healthy. The cause of death was an effusion of blood on the surface of the brain. The injury on the nose might have been caused by a kick or blow from the heel of a boot. It was his opinion that the injury was not the result of a blow from a fist. The blow on the nose was quite sufficient to cause the effusion of blood on the brain; indeed was the cause of it. A fall on the floor would have caused the abrasion on the side of the head, but he did not believe a fall on a bedstead would have done so. When Corporal Hector asked him to come and see the deceased, he accounted for the man's condition by saying that LASKEY came into the barrack-room on Saturday night he stumbled and fell, his nose coming in contact with the side of an iron bedstead. He further stated, in reply to a question from witness, that deceased was not drunk when he came to barracks, but that he had been drinking. - Robert L. Bett, staff-surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, who assisted the previous witness in making the post mortem examination, concurred with Mr McCarthy's statement with regard to the cause of death, and the other results of the examination. - John O'Brian, a private in the Royal Marines, deposed to the deceased coming to barracks on Saturday night in a drunken state. Private Raymond and another man were at supper in the barrack-room when the deceased came in, and LASKEY had not been there long before he attempted to strike Raymond. The latter said, "Surely you will not strike me," whereupon LASKEY hung his belt upon the rack, and then, returning to where Raymond was sitting, knocked him off a stool. Not wanting to fight with the deceased, Raymond tried to get out of the room, but was prevented from leaving in consequence of the door being locked. Witness then tried to get out to report the circumstances, but Private Green, who was at the door, prevented him from leaving, saying that he (witness) would "get the same" f he tried to get out. Corporal Hector was at this time away, reporting that all the men were present, and shortly afterwards, upon Hector returning, the lights were extinguished. Previous to the gas being turned off, Hector said to deceased, "You are no man to get drunk and to come to barracks and strike one of your comrades without any provocation." Deceased took his clothes off and went into bed, and a few words passed between him and the corporal. LASKEY said, "You can take Raymond's part if you like," and Hector immediately jumped out of bed and lighted the gas and going to the deceased challenged him to fight, saying "Come out of bed if you are a man." LASKEY got out, and said to the corporal, "Will you put me in the guardroom if I fight you?" Hector replied in the negative and blows were then exchanged between the two, the deceased dealing the first. LASKEY and the corporal then fell together, and the latter kept deceased, who was on his hands and knees, upon the floor, and struck him five or six violent blows on the right side of the head with his fist, and said, "That will do you." Deceased then rolled over on his back and Hector went to the other end of the room. Both men were undressed, and neither of them had his boots on. Private Mutter, who was in bed when the fight commenced, got out, and after putting on his trousers and socks went to the deceased, who was still on the floor, and kicked him violently two or three times in the face with his heel, but he had no boots on. Deceased did not speak afterwards. Witness noticed blood flowing from deceased's nostrils before Mutter kicked him. Corporal Hector and another man then put the deceased in bed. - By Mr Loye: When the deceased came into the barrack-room he stumbled and fell over the bed, but he (witness) did not observe him bleeding then, nor did he see any scar on his nose. Witness did not observe Richmond strike the deceased. Nobody struck LASKEY after he was put in bed. The corporal did not use a boot to strike the deceased with. Never saw the deceased fight before. Hector was drunk. - Henry Bolton, private, R.M.L.I., gave corroborative evidence. He stated further that he did not observe deceased fall over his bed, although he stumbled upon coming into the room. Mutter had been drinking, and so had the corporal. Witness did not think the deceased was so ill as he was, or otherwise he would have considered it his duty to have reported the circumstances. Deceased was under the influence of liquor. - Private Green, R.M.L.I. detailed the facts from the time the deceased entered the barrack-room until the fight commenced. He swore that the deceased first challenged Hector to fight and not as the other witnesses had said, that the corporal gave the challenge. He did not take any notice of the deceased after he was knocked down, as he went to bed. He denied that he stopped the witness O'Brien from going out of the room. O'Brien did not attempt to leave. On Sunday morning he heard the corporal say he did not think deceased was so bad as he was. Hector and Mutter washed the blood off deceased's face. - John Hartley Sandwith, lieutenant and adjutant of the Royal Marines, said that Corporal Hector came to his office on Sunday morning and said that he wished to telegraph to the friends of the deceased, who resided at Exeter. He told him to bring him more particulars than he (Hector) was then able to furnish. No report of the circumstances of the death was made by Corporal Hector, nor as anything known by the authorities respecting the case until the order for an Inquest was made. - Corporal Joseph Hector and Private William Mutter were then called, and, after having the usual caution given them by the coroner, declined to make any statement. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that the Jury must have observed many minor discrepancies in the evidence, but they were not very material to the issue. He must tell them if two parties fought and one received injuries during the affray which caused his death, that the person who inflicted them would be guilty of manslaughter, and it was quite immaterial who dealt the first blow. There could be no doubt that LASKEY came into the room, that he was knocked down, and that he remained in a state of insensibility until his death. The result of the post mortem examination was conclusive that deceased died from the injuries he received. It was not necessary to direct the attention of the Jury to any malicious intention as he did not think the facts would amount to murder on the part of the corporal. In conclusion, it was for them to say whether they implicated Hector and Mutter in the matter, the latter of whom, it had been proved, kicked deceased whilst on the ground, but this was done bootless. If they were satisfied that LASKEY died from injuries received from the two men then they would return a verdict of Manslaughter against them. - The Jury then retired, and, after five minutes' absence, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against Corporal Hector and Private Mutter." - The Coroner concurred in the verdict, and in committing the prisoners for trial at the Assizes, observed that they had been found guilty of a very serious charge; and characterised their verdict, in allowing the deceased to remain unattended all night in his injured state, as deserving severe reproach. - The prisoners will be brought before the magistrates today.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 October 1877
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, the Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of a young child named PASH, who had died from the effects of scalds received by pulling a cup of hot tea over herself. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 October 1877
SIDBURY - Child Burnt To Death. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Sidford by Mr S. M. Cox, County Coroner, on ALICE GOODING, aged 10 years, the daughter of JAMES GOODING, a brickmaker. It was stated that on the 1st inst. the mother of the child left the cottage to attend to a neighbour who was ill, and that the child took up a lamp containing petroleum, and which was quite full, for the purpose of moving it from one table to another, when the petroleum exploded and severely burnt the child's hand and arm. Mr E. C. Fox of Sidmouth, was sent for, and attended the little sufferer until her death, which took place on Monday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Experiments were tried before the Jury with some of the same oil, which it is supposed the lamp had contained, and it was proved to be quite harmless; consequently it is assumed that benzoline must have been put into the lamp, or got mixed with the paraffin.

YELVERTON - Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Hole's Hole yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM NATTLE, aged 33 years. The evidence adduced shewed that the deceased was a deckman on board the steamer Aerial, plying between Calstock and Devonport. On the 11th instant, about 5.30 p.m., Col. Edgcumbe asked the captain to take his boat which was at Chubb Hill in tow. Deceased made the boat fast to the steamer. He afterwards went aft to haul the boat closer up. Just after that he was seen in the water and the boat was adrift. The steamer was stopped immediately, but NATTLE sunk before he could be reached. - John Norrish, surgeon, stated that the body presented the appearance of having been in the water some time. It had been picked up by a man named Richards, on the beach near Hole's Hole. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Coroner said he had heard that a Cornish policeman from Cargreen had demanded the body. If the body had been taken away he should have thought it his duty to have held an Inquest after. He should write to Superintendent Barnes, and take care that the matter was inquired into.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 November 1877
TOTNES - The Fatal Fire At Totnes. - Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at Totnes yesterday respecting the death of EMMA GLYDE, aged 43 years, who was burnt to death under circumstances already reported. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased, her husband, and their two children (a girl aged 13 and a boy 4 years old) went to bed about half-past nine o'clock on Monday night. They were all sleeping in the same room, over a stable in which were GLYDE'S horse and his stock of crockeryware, rags, &c. About half-past four o'clock on Tuesday morning GLYDE awoke and saw fire coming up through the floor close by the bedside. He jumped out of bed and pulled his wife out, and awakening his children, carried the boy down the steps and pushed the girl before him. GLYDE thought that his wife, whom the girl had seen standing by the bed, was following him, but on placing the children in a place of safety he found that she had not done so. He then attempted to get back to the room, or loft, but was prevented by fire and smoke, and the poor woman was burnt to death; indeed her head and limbs and part of the body were entirely consumed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 9 November 1877
BIDEFORD - Crushed To Death. - Last evening an Inquest was held by Dr Thompson, the Bideford Borough Coroner, concerning the death of a child of JOHN JOHNS. It was stated that a workman in the employ of Mr Squire was backing a laden wagon into King-street, where the child resided, when the little fellow came out and stood by the wall close to the door of his house, between that and Mr Squire's stores, and whilst he was there the wheel crushed him against the wall. It appears that the man in charge of the wagon did not see the boy, who was about 3 years of age, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 November 1877
ALPHINGTON - Fatal Accident Near Exeter. - A sad accident occurred near Alphington on Saturday evening to a labourer named JOSEPH TREMLETT, aged 63 in the employ of Mr Way, farmer. It seems that owing to the heavy rain and wind of the past few days a cob wall on Mr Way's farm partially fell down on Saturday morning. The deceased was employed to clear away the rubbish and was cautioned not to touch the part of the wall which remained standing, as it was evidently in a dangerous state. Whether he neglected this warning or not it is impossible to say; but the next morning the remnant of the wall was seen to have fallen, and the deceased's body was found under the ruins. TREMLETT'S watch had stopped at four o'clock. It appears that he had been paid his wages before leave-work time, consequently Mr Way did not miss him, as he would have done had the poor fellow had been expected to come for his money at the close of the day; and it was only in the course of a casual walk round the farm on Sunday morning that Mr Way became aware of what had happened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 November 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Death At Devonport. Important Inquiry. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest last night relative to the death of ALICE NODDER, aged 6 ½ years, the daughter of MR JOHN NODDER, currier, Princess-street. The evidence shewed that on Friday evening the deceased told her mother that she had a bead in her ear, and MR NODDER immediately took the child to Dr Wilson's surgery, in St. Aubyn-street, and after hearing the circumstances Dr Wilsons aid, "All right, I will take it out," and commenced the operation, but after using every endeavour to extract it he said that the operation was a very difficult one, as the bead, which he believed to be a large one, was some distance down the ear. Prior to the operation the deceased did not complain of any pains in the ear, but during the progress of the extraction she suffered acutely. Whilst the operation, which lasted over an hour and a half, was proceeding, Dr Wilson repeatedly held out hopes to the father that he would succeed, and said two or three times, "I have got the bead; it will be out directly." Dr Wilson further remarked that it would have to come out, and that if it remained in the ear until the next day inflammation would set in, and it would be very difficult to extract it. In the course of the operation a substance was produced, which appeared to be bone, and upon the child's father asking the operator what it was, Dr Wilson said, "It's all right." Blood shortly afterwards made its appearance, but only in small quantities. MR NODDER suggested, after the piece of bone was taken out, that further medical aid should be procured, but Dr Wilsons said, in reply, "I have done my best, and if anyone can get it out I can. You can get some other doctor if you like. I will give anything when I succeed." He was most earnest in the work, and MR NODDER, having every confidence in him, allowed him to continue the operation, having previously heard the probes touch some substance in the ear, which sounded very much like that of glass. Dr Wilson then said that he could feel the bead, and that he had nearly got it out. Not long afterwards, however, a considerable effusion of blood took place, and the child fainted. Dr Wilson endeavoured to resuscitate the deceased, but it never recovered consciousness, and died at about eight o'clock. The operation commenced shortly after six o'clock, and continued until the time mentioned with the exception of several minutes interval. - The father, in the course of his evidence, stated that the deceased put a bead into her ear about three years' since, but that Dr Wilson, to whom the child was taken, successful in abstracting. He (witness) had the greatest confidence in Dr Wilson, who led him on, in the present instance, with hopes that he would succeed in the operation. Dr Wilson changed the instruments used during the operation two or three times, and witness was satisfied that he used every endeavour to get the bead out. When the doctor saw the blood issuing from the deceased's ear he said he could stop it. Mr Wilson did not suggest that he (himself) should have assistance. In reply to the Jury, witness said that Dr Wilson did not appear nervous, and he had every confidence that he should get the bead out. The child had not told anyone how the bead got in her ear, and witness did not know whether it was done at school, or at the dancing class which she attended the afternoon in question. She complained directly after coming home from the dancing. Deceased had been playing with beads, and she told Miss Potham, the dancing mistress, that she had placed a bead in her ear. - Dr W. C. Wilson said that he examined the child's ear with a probe and came across a substance with appeared to be glass, and which he endeavoured to extract. He thought after thirty minutes effort that he had succeeded in partially getting it out, and he thought he had got the right thing when he found that it was only a small piece of bone. He afterwards got hold of something which he thought ought to come out. He then said to the child's father "It's either bone or glass that she has put in her ear," and he was very careful about the operation. About half an hour after the child had been operated on blood issued from the ear. He felt confident that he would succeed in abstracting the bead, and considered that only one person could operate. He did not see any necessity to call in further medical aid. He never expected for one moment that the child would die. He gave her brandy and water, and the father, who held the child, and who fainted during the operation, also partook of some of the brandy. Witness saw that deceased would die ten minutes before she did, and he used artificial respiration to restore the child, who had also fainted, but to no effect, and she died about eight o'clock. - In reply to the Jury, witness said that he found a substance in as far as the tympanum of the ear, three-quarters of an inch from the outside. The substance was some foreign body. When he took the piece of bone out of the ear he thought there was something left behind. It was far better that it should be taken out at once, and his impression was that had it remained inflammation would have set in, and the child's life would be in danger. The cause of death was the shock to the system and haemorrhage. He wished the Jury to understand that he had done everything in his power and to the best of his judgment, and he took the greatest care of the child. - Mr C. Bulteel, F.R.C.S., said that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. He found the passage leading to the right ear considerably dilated, and in one part the lining membrane lacerated. The bony part of the ear was bared to a considerable distance, and there was a laceration of the blood-vessel close to the external part of the bone of the skull beyond the drum of the ear. there were two or three loose minute portions of bone in the passage leading to the ear; but he could find no foreign body. He did not find any bead. If there had been one left there he must have found it. He believed the cause of death was the loss of blood from the accidental laceration of the vessel referred to. By the Coroner: Do you think it possible for the bead to be abstracted and not noticed when it left the ear? - Witness: It is quite possible, and the doctor might have continued the operation even after the bead had left the ear. - Q.: Do you think it right to have continued probing the ear of a child of the age of deceased, seeing her sufferings, and hearing the father suggest that aid should be called. - Witness: Must I answer that question? - The Coroner: We cannot arrive at the exact truth unless you do. - Witness: Am I bound to answer? - The Coroner: You are. - Witness: I have no doubt that Dr Wilson did all for the best, but I think he displayed some want of judgment in continuing his efforts so long. - In answer to the Jury witness said that he would not swear that the piece of bone abstracted was a foreign substance, or part of the child's head. - Continuing witness said that he found a portion of the skull broken, and the piece of bone might have been part of it. He could not fit it anywhere. The abstraction of such pieces of bone would not have caused danger to the child's life. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said he was of opinion that if Dr Wilson, after trying a quarter of an hour to abstract from the ear of the child the foreign body without success, had desisted, no great injury from inflammation or otherwise would have been caused to the child by leaving it until the next day. - By the Coroner: Do you think it was right to continue the operation for more than an hour? - A.: I think it was an error of judgment. The injured blood-vessel was distant about one inch and a quarter from the outside of the ear. The removal of a foreign body from the ear was often an operation of a considerable difficulty. The witness added that he had known Dr Wilson for many years, and had formed a high opinion of his professional abilities. In every case where he had met him he had displayed a thorough knowledge of his profession. It was very seldom in such an operation as the one in question that the assistance of a second surgeon was required. In reply to a Juryman, Mr Bulteel said that there were cases on record where foreign bodies had remained in the ear for months without any injury, and there were instances in which the result had been quite the reverse. - Dr Wilson here observed that he thought Mr Bulteel would bear him out, that having once disturbed a substance in the ear it would be difficult to leave it. - In reply to a further question, Dr Bulteel said he was of opinion that dancing would have a tendency to shake the bead further down into the ear. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it was very evident that Dr Wilson was very anxious to remove the foreign substance, and there was no doubt he used every effort to extract it. This anxiety had led him to continue his efforts beyond the period at which some other medical man might have desisted. He pointed out further that it was quite possible that with the flow of blood the foreign body was carried away. Apparently Dr Wilson had miscalculated the strength and endurance of the child, and in any case the error was an error of judgment, for which he was not in any way criminally amenable. - The Jury, after consulting for over twenty minutes, returned the following verdict: "That the deceased died from loss of blood, which she suffered in consequence of the accidental laceration of a blood vessel close to the internal part of the bone of the skull beyond the drum of the ear, and that such laceration was made during a long continued operation performed by Dr Wilson." The Inquiry which lasted over four hours, then terminated.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Turquoise. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM GLEESON, first-class boy, on board the Turquoise. The evidence shewed that on the 6th inst. some of the crew of the Turquoise were engaged in taking in the jib-boom and it hitched in the bowsprit. Deceased, who was near the skylight on the forecastle, was struck by the jibboom and crushed against the skylight. He was taken to the Royal Naval Hospital where he died on the 11th inst. - Mr Francis William Davies, fleet surgeon at the Hospital, stated that he made a post mortem examination of the body and found that the deceased died from rupture of the bladder and fracture of the pelvis. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 16 November 1877
LYDFORD - Dartmoor Convict Prisons. - An Inquest was held at the prisons yesterday on a convict named JOHN NEVILLE, who was undergoing ten years' penal servitude for burglary at Manchester. NEVILLE had undergone two previous sentences of penal servitude for similar crimes, besides numbers of summary convictions. He was 48 years of age, and a thoroughly hardened criminal, but his conduct during his incarceration at Dartmoor has been good; perhaps the fact of his being so much in hospital has contributed somewhat to that end. The cause of death was a long standing heart disease.

POLTIMORE - An Inquest was held at Poltimore, near Exeter, yesterday by Mr Crosse, County Coroner, respecting the death of ANN HAWKINS, aged 61 years, the wife of a labourer, who had died suddenly whilst walking along the road. It was believed that heart disease was the cause of death, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 November 1877
DAWLISH - Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Dawlish yesterday respecting the death of a little boy named GOSS, the son of a labourer. The child had just got out of bed, and was left alone by a fire for a few minutes when his shirt became ignited and he obtained injuries which proved fatal. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM BRIMACOMBE, mason, aged 44 years. - William Mumford stated that on Monday he was working with deceased at a house in St. Andrew's-street, where they were building a chimney. He was working on the opposite side of the chimney to that where the deceased was engaged, and hearing some women making a noise he descended, and found that deceased had fallen into the back court, and had been removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Witness saw him after his admission. He made no remarks about the accident. - Mr Herbert, resident house-surgeon at the Hospital, stated that deceased had died from a scalp wound and several broken ribs on the left side which had penetrated the lung. Charles Kendall, who was also working with deceased, said he was in the court and saw BRIMACOMBE in the act of falling. He struck nothing until he reached the ground. Deceased was working on a ladder on the roof, and when he fell the ladder came with him. The height of the house is about twenty feet. - Mr Saunders, contractor, stated that he had passed up and down the ladder several times. The ladder had been in the same position for upwards of three weeks, and heavy loads had been carried up it. It was fastened to a piece of lead at the base of the chimney and to a screw which if the wood in which it was screwed had not been rotten, would have been quite strong enough. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 November 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Opium In Powders. - An Inquest was held at the Devonport Guildhall yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough coroner, respecting the decease of a child named SWEET, aged eight months. - MATILDA NICHOLSON SWEET, mother of the deceased, stated that the child was taken ill on Wednesday, and in the evening she gave her half of a powder, which she had had of Mr Codd, chemist, Duke-street. She had had the powder in her house for about two months, and had frequently given similar powders to her other child. She also gave deceased half a powder about a month ago with beneficial results. It slept until about 1 o'clock, when it had a fit. It recovered, however, and slept until the morning, when it again had a fit, with slight convulsions. It afterwards lay very quiet; and Mr Horton, surgeon was sent for, and upon his arrival he pronounced the child dead. There was a label on the paper in which the powder was enclosed, setting forth the quantity that should be given. Francis Codd, Chemist, said he had been selling similar powders for ten years and did not consider them dangerous to any child if given as directed. Besides the directions on the label he made it a practice to tell purchasers that the powder should not be administered more than three times a week. He then mentioned the component parts of the powder, amongst which was 1.10th of a grain of opium, and the method by which he mixed them in order that the ingredients might be equally distributed in each powder. - Henry Horton, surgeon, deposed to being sent for on Thursday morning to visit the deceased, who was dead on his arrival. Made a post mortem examination, and found the brain and its membranes congested, as was the right lung. The left lung was very small and the lower part had never been inflated. The liver was very large and congested. Could not detect any smell or trace of opium in the stomach. He thought that if n opium had been given to the child it would have been living now, although it was very weak. He would not have given the child opium under any circumstances, nor did he think any other medical man would have done so. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and recommended that opium should not form part of powders administered to children. - Mr Codd remarked that after hearing the evidence of Mr Horton he would attend to the recommendation of the Jury.

PLYMSTOCK - Fatal Cart Accident. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner held an Inquiry at Plymstock yesterday respecting the death of ALFRED HENRY PENTOR, aged three years. On Thursday afternoon the deceased was at play in a road near Turnchapel, when a horse and cart, in charge of a lad named Williams, knocked him down, and a wheel of the cart passed over his body inflicting injuries from which he died immediately afterwards. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 November 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth yesterday by Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner, respecting the death of a painter named JOHN PRINN, aged 57 years. The wife of the deceased stated that her husband had told her that whilst at work in a room in the third story of a house in Hill Park Crescent on the 5th inst. he lifted the window, suddenly became giddy, overbalanced himself and fell to the pavement beneath. He broke both his thighs, and was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died yesterday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury subscribed a sovereign amongst themselves and gave it to MRS PRINN, who has been left in very poor circumstances and with several children between fifteen and four years of age.

LYDFORD - A Sad Carter. - Mr Fulford, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Princetown on Monday on REGHEB JOHN GREGORY, aged 52 years, who died in the Hospital of the convicts' prison on the previous Wednesday. It transpired that the unfortunate man had been under medical treatment since April last, and had but very recently been visited by his wife and daughter. The cause of death, as described by Dr Power, was a new complaint, known as "Addison's disease." By permission of Captain Harris, the body was handed over to the relatives within ten minutes after the Inquest; and a nephew having procured a hearse from Tavistock took the corpse away with him. The charge on which GREGORY was convicted was that of receiving 200 bales of yarn knowing them to have been stolen. His brother, SQUIRE GREGORY, who participated in the felony, is undergoing a similar sentence, viz., five years' penal servitude at Dartmoor. They were yarn merchants in Manchester, and neither had been previously convicted summarily or otherwise.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 December 1877
DAWLISH - Killed At A Level Crossing. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Starcross on Saturday respecting the death of an old man named EDWARD SEARLE, who was killed on the railway on Wednesday. The deceased, who had been a lighterman, was seen on Wednesday afternoon standing on the sea wall near the Starcross Railway Station, and by the side of the level crossing. The up train left the station and passed the deceased, who thereupon began to cross the line; but the down train from Exeter, which was due at Starcross at 2.36 came along at that moment, and before the deceased could get out of the way he was struck by the engine. SEARLE appeared to have seen his danger, for he attempted to retrace his steps, but was struck before he could do so. His head was knocked off, and the body literally smashed to pieces. It was thought that the deceased did not see the down train approaching him in time to get out of the way. the driver blew the whistle but the deceased did not seem to hear it; he was a little deaf. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 December 1877
BERE FERRERS - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Beeralston yesterday respecting the death of CHARLES BONE, a labourer, aged 17 years, who had died from tetanus produced by a slight cut on the left forefinger, inflicted a fortnight since. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 December 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday relative to the death of FRANCIS HAWTON, labourer, aged 60 years. - William Buckingham, a labourer, in the employ of Mr John Pethick, contractor, said that he was engaged at the dock extension works in Devonport Dockyard, and the deceased was working at the same place. On Saturday morning the deceased, witness, and two or three other workmen were employed in stacking blocks of granite which had been taken out of the dock, and which was brought to them in wagons. About eight o'clock a large granite block was hoisted out of a wagon to be placed in the stack, and was within a foot of its place when, whilst the crane was being slewed around, the sling chain around the chain parted about three links from the top. The "jib" of the carne flew up and the "tail" dropped, knocking down the deceased, who was standing near the tail, which fell upon his body. It took the united efforts of three or four men to lift the tail of the crane off him. Deceased complained of severe pains in the stomach, and, after he had been attended to by the surgeon of the Dockyard, he was conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died shortly after admission. - By the Coroner: He (witness) generally overhauled the chains after lifting heavy stones, but he did not do so on Saturday morning. On Sunday he examined the chain that parted. Off and on he had worked the crane for twelve months, and he knew of only one chain breaking during the whole of that time. He could not say whether the chain which broke had been repaired. The stone which fell on the deceased was half a ton lighter than the one lifted just before. The heaviest stones raised by the crane had been upward of four or five tons, but he could not swear whether the chain that parted was used then. - Mr Pethick, who was present, requested the Coroner to ask the witness whether he and all the other men had not been cautioned by his foreman not to get near the tail of the crane when "slewing". Witness replied in the affirmative, and said that ropes were fastened to the tail of the crane to pull upon, and at the moment of the accident both witness and HAWTON were pulling upon the rope fastened to the opposite side of the tail. This rope was brought closer to the crane than it should have been. - The Coroner: If you had been using the proper rope would the man have stood the same chance of being injured? - Witness: No; he would have been all clear. - Q.: How long are each of the ropes? - Witness: About four feet. - Q.: What width was the crane? - Witness: About three feet. In using the rope as we did we were only about 1 ½ feet clear. The body of the man was under the crane in pulling. The witness considered that the chain, after having proved strong enough to hold the stone in being taken out of the dock, might be safely used to put it on the stack. - The Coroner expressed his intention of adjourning the inquiry until Monday, and said that in the meantime the assistance of a thoroughly competent civil engineer would be obtained and would give scientific and technical evidence as to the fitness of the sling chain and lifting apparatus. - Prior to taking any evidence the Coroner and Jury visited the scene of the accident, where Mr Pethick described the sling chain as being of sufficient strength to lift seven tons, and stated that the stone that fell weighed only two and a half tons. It was explained that the weight of the stone before it fell tended to lift the tail of the crane. Directly the accident occurred the "job end" of the crane, being freed, the tail suddenly dropped and pinned the deceased to the ground.

OKEHAMPTON - Child Murder At Okehampton. Verdict Against The Mother. - A boy going over the moor at Upper Holstock, near Okehampton, last week, discovered the body of a newly-born female child. There were external appearances leading to a suspicion of violence, and rumour pointed to a young widow named MARY ANN PELLOW as the probable mother of the child. The body was found just inside an enclosure in the occupation of PELLOW'S father, THOMAS KELLY, with whom she lived. The police, after searching the house, and asking PELLOW some questions, took her into custody on suspicion of having concealed the birth of the child and murdered it. MRS PELLOW is 34 years of age, and her husband has been dead three or four years. She has had four children previously and two of them were born before she married. A preliminary Inquiry was held last Thursday by Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, and the accused woman was also taken before a magistrate and remanded. - The adjourned Inquest was held yesterday at the White Hart Hotel, Okehampton. The first witness was Alexander Horne, a lad working at Pothanger Farm, Holstock, who gave evidence as to finding the body wrapped in a rag on Wednesday last. Corroborative evidence was given by William Hodge, Mr John Bevan, and P.C. Richard Walter, to whom the discovery was made known. - Dr Walters detailed the result of a post mortem examination made by him in conjunction with Mr Deans, surgeon, of Northtawton. The body, which was fully matured, was 21 inches in length, and weighed 7 ¾ lbs. The features were unrecognisable, the nose being quite flattened and turned to the right side, and the left side of the face and nose had the appearance of some heavy weight having been placed upon it. There was a deep furrow round the neck close under the angle of the jaw, with elevated ridges on each side. The umbilical cord was about half an inch in length, and appeared to have been partly cut and then torn through. There was a small quantity of blood on the back of the knees and the right arm. The skin did not peal off readily. There was a fair quantity of dark-coloured hair. The tongue was congested at the tip, and protruded slightly from the mouth. The right eye was much more prominent than the left, and more congested. Internally they found the lungs were of normal colour, crepitant to the touch, floating readily in water, and air escaped from a cut surface on pressure. The heart contained a quantity of dark-coloured uncoagulated blood, especially on the right side. The foramen ovale was but partially closed, and in all respects quite healthy. The liver was quite healthy but congested. The stomach contained about half an ounce of a thick reddish fluid, with specks of some white substance floating in it. The small intestines were empty, but the large intestines were distended with maconium. The rectum and bladder were empty, and the kidneys were healthy. On raising the scalp of the head it was found that the vessels were highly congested, and there was a large effusion of blood between the scalp and the skull, and on removing the skull cap the vessels of the surface of the brain were found much congested, the brain substance was too soft for further examination, but the ventricles did not contain more than the ordinary quantity of fluid. The neck shewed considerable congestion of its muscles immediately beneath the furrow, which appeared externally to be contracted. From this examination witness was of opinion that the body was that of a female child at the full period of uterogestation; that it had breathed and had a separate existence from its mother, but that it did not live for any lengthened period. It might not have lived more than six hours, certainly not two days. From the deep indentation round the neck, having a well-marked ridge on either side, the congested state of the parts beneath, the protruded and congested state of the tongue, the prominence and congested state of the vessels of the right eye, the congested state of the vessels of the scalp, the effusion of blood between the scalp and the skull, and the congestion of the vessels on the surface of the brain, he was led to the conclusion that death was caused by strangulation. - In reply to the Coroner, the witness stated that a mark such as that round the neck could, he had heard, be caused by the umbilical cord. - Mr Deans gave corroborative evidence. He considered that the mark on the neck could have been made in the delivery; but the lungs would not then have been so completely inflated. - At this stage of the proceedings the Coroner said it appeared to him - the child having been proved to have had a separate and individual existence - that it became their duty to Inquiry further who was the mother of the child, and by whom the injuries causing death were inflicted. - Police-Sergeant Sherriff said from rumours he heard after the Inquest had been adjourned last Thursday he went to the house of the accused woman's father at Higher Holstock. He said to MARY ANN PELLOW, "Have you heard that there was the body of a female child found in your father's field?" She said, "Yes; I heard of it at Okehampton today," and she added, "I intended to have gone to Belston today, but I came back, as I expected you would come here, as the child was found in father's field." He said, "The rumour is that you were in the family way," and she replied, "I heard so, but I told them to wait and they would see." Witness said, "Are you in the family way now?" but to this she made no answer, and he further asked, "Were you away the early part of last summer for a change of air?" and she replied that she was away six weeks, and that she came back a week before the soldiers came on the moor. Constable Walter, who accompanied the witness, thereupon produced he apron in which the body was found, and asked the accused woman and her family if they knew anything about it. MARY ANN said, "It isn't mine; I don't know anything about it." Witness then left, but on Friday, from further information, he went again to the Kelly's house, and on seeing MARY ANN PELLOW, he said, "Rumour is so strong that you were in the family way that I want to search your house." Permission was at once given by the father, who said he was quite welcome to search the house at any time. P.C. Walter then made a search, and some baby linen was found, but this the accused woman's unmarried sister said was hers. After the search he cautioned MARY ANN PELLOW, and charged her on suspicion of having concealed the birth of a child of which she had been lately delivered, and also on suspicion of having murdered the deceased child. To this she replied "I never murdered it; I can kiss the Bible I never murdered it; but you don't hear me say that I don't know nothing about it. How long ago was the child born?" Witness replied, "I don't know; " and she said, "I'll tell the truth when I come before Dr Walters." Witness said, "You are my prisoner now; you must come with me;" and she then asked first to be allowed to see her father and mother, who were much affected. She said to her mother, "I have got to go away with the policeman, but I didn't murder it; and if I didn't murder it they won't hang me, will they?" On the way to the police station in a conveyance she said, "When a woman is left with children and no man it will make a woman do what her wouldn't do else." She was afterwards taken before a magistrate and remanded until Wednesday on a charge of concealment of birth. - P.C. Walter gave corroborative evidence, and, with respect to the search, he said he found articles of female underclothing under the bolster of the bed in which MARY ANN PELLOW slept. They were stained. - In reply to a Juryman, witness said there were no strings on the apron in which the body of the child was found. - Eliza Walter, the wife of the last witness, proved searching the accused woman and finding nothing on her. She said to witness, "If I tell you all you won't want to undress me. I am the mother of the baby and no one else, and what was done I did it all myself. What I did I was driven to do. I was afraid the farmers would know I had a baby, and they would take away the pay I have for the other children. I hope they won't hang me, for the sake of my dear children, for I never could murder." Afterwards the accused woman added, "I thought I would tell you, and you can tell Mr Walter better than I can. And now I'll tell you all the sense of it. Four weeks ago last Wednesday I went into the field, and after I got there I was taken very ill; so ill that I could not come out again. I suffered so much that I became insensible, and when I came to myself I found the baby "dead and stiff." I got up as well as I could, and thought what I could do with the baby. I thought it would be no sin, as it was dead, to wrap it up and put it away, which I did in my apron that your husband's got and pushed it in under the rock, and stopped it up with clots and stones, and then I went home. Mother said "MARY ANN where have you been?" I said, "I have been to work," and when I was getting supper mother said, "MARY ANN, you are looking very ill," and I replied "I am suffering from such headache." The accused further said that her mother and father, and brothers and sisters were all innocent of any knowledge about it. - The Jury, after an hour's deliberation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 December 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HOLLOCK, painter, aged 60 years. John Wills, grocer, residing at William-street, Morice Town, stated that he knew the deceased, and that Sunday morning about nine o'clock he was passing over the bridge at the head of Fore-street, when he saw the deceased lying in the trench beneath. He went to his assistance, and the deceased told him that his right thigh was broken. A stretcher was procured from the Raglan Barracks, and the deceased was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died early the same evening. The deceased informed the witness that he had been lying in the trench for upwards of nine hours. - MARY JANE HOCKIN, daughter of the deceased, deposed that about four years since the deceased injured his head at the Devonport Dockyard, which necessitated his being removed to an asylum. Since he had been home he had on one or two occasions shewn signs of insanity. The deceased, a short time before he expired, informed witness that he was leaning over the wire fencing in the Brickfields, and that he got up too far and fell into the trench. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 14 December 1877
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Lady At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at 5 Moor View-terrace, Mutley, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of EMMA DREW, an unmarried lady between sixty and seventy years of age. - Jessie Stantaford, a domestic servant, said that she had been in the deceased's employ for the past two years, and saw the deceased alive for the last time, in her bedroom, on Wednesday night, about a quarter past ten o'clock. She slept in a room over that of the deceased, but did not hear any noise, nor was she disturbed during the night. She went to the deceased's room yesterday morning, and found the door partly open and the deceased lying on the floor. Being frightened she called Miss Paige, who lived in the next house, and who returned with her. She observed some blood on the floor and also on the bed. The deceased had been low spirited of late. - Mr William Reynolds, residing at 10 Moor View-terrace, said he knew the deceased, and observed that she had been depressed of late. He was called to her house yesterday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, and found her throat cut severely, and that she was dead. There was a large table knife covered in blood on the floor. Mr A. S. Harris, residing at 5 Gascoyne-place, said the deceased had been depressed for the past two months. On Sunday last she dined at his house, and told him that she was distressed about money matters. - Mr E. C. Langford, surgeon, stated that he was called to the deceased's house about 10 a.m., and found her dead. The wound in the throat divided all the arteries on both sides of the neck, and also cut the upper portion of the trachea. There was a pool of arterial blood in the bed, and there was also blood on the floor. He thought that the deceased must have committed the act in bed, and then got out and fallen from the loss of blood, which was enormous. From the evidence he hard he thought that the deceased committed the act whilst of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind, and the Coroner, on behalf of the Jury, expressed their sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 December 1877
PLYMOUTH - The Wreck Of The R.H. Jones. - An Inquest respecting the death of MRS ROBERTS, wife of the late captain of the ship R. H. Jones, was held yesterday at the Plymouth Guildhall by the Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian. It will be remembered that the vessel was wrecked on the Breakwater during the disastrous gale of October 14th, and that the deceased and all on board, with but one exception, were drowned. On Saturday morning a diver named Willcocks was engaged upon the wreck, and discovered the body between the side of the ship and the Breakwater. He brought it to the surface and the body was conveyed to Millbay. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, resumed the Inquiry, at the Guildhall yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of FRANCIS HAWTON, a labourer employed by Mr J. Pethick, contractor. The Inquest was opened a week ago when the details of the accident were given by a labourer named Buckingham, a fellow-workman of the deceased. The Inquiry was adjourned until yesterday for the attendance of the man who was also injured by the accident and for scientific evidence as to the suitability of the crane and gear, and, more especially, the chain. Mr Albert Gard, solicitor, represented the widow of the deceased, and Mr E. C. Edmonds appeared on behalf of Mr Pethick. - John Tonkin, labourer, in the employ of Mr Pethick, stated that on the 8th instant he and the deceased were engaged in stacking blocks of granite when, about nine a.m., a stone weighing two tons was lifted by the crane, and he and witness was directing it upon the stack when the sling chain around the stone broke. He (witness) received a severe injury in the left leg. Deceased, who was standing at the tail of the crane, was knocked down by the "tail," which crushed him beneath it. - By the Coroner: He generally examined the chains used for hoisting purposes twice or three times a week. The chain which broke had been specially used for raising stones on the stack. On the Friday (the day previous to the accident) he examined the chain, and found no defects in it. He did not look at every link. Before raising heavy stones the chain was examined. - By the Coroner: Sometimes blocks of granite came to the spot for stacking with chains around them. He did not think that there was any chain on the stone that fell when it was brought to him. The chain had been used off and on since last April. - By the Coroner: When he found a defect in the chain he sent it to the foreman, and, when returned, he invariably found it had been repaired. - By a Juror: The links might have been twisted in slewing the stone, which was almost in its place when it fell. - By the Coroner: The rope the deceased was pulling upon was the wrong one, and his body was, in consequence, right under the "tail." - By the Jury: Sometimes the men pushed against the tail of the crane in "slewing". The men themselves put ropes on the "tail," the ground being low in that spot. It was left to their option to put the ropes. The chain in question had been repaired near the hook, and not near the ring. It was the first large stone brought to be stacked that day. - By Mr Gard: He usually looked over the chains, but the foreman was responsible for them. It was not his (witness's) duty to look after them, and he was not responsible. - Richard Wise, foreman to Mr Pethick, said that the deceased had been in the employ only a week. He had on many occasions cautioned the workmen against getting under the stones whilst being hoisted, and also against being near the tail of the crane. He provided two ropes to enable the men to swing the crane around. There had been ropes attached to the crane ever since it had been at work. When he had noticed the absence of a rope, and had been told that it was broken, he always requested the men to get another. He had been using similar ropes for eighteen years. Had cautioned the workmen on the week of the accident not to get too near the tail of the crane. Deceased was present when he gave that caution. The stones usually left the dock with the chain around them. When chains required repairs the workmen sent them to witness, and he forwarded them to the smith's shop; but he did not remember this particular chain being so repaired. It was possible that a chain might have been taken to the smith without his knowledge. The accident could not have happened if the deceased had obeyed the contractor's rules. He (witness) was engaged in building Scraesdon Fort with cranes of similar description, and they were employed there seven years without a single accident. - By the Jury: They did not test a chain after a repair. they had no process for doing it; but he took care to have a 5/8 link put in a ¼ chain, and he was very careful to see that the repair was properly done by the smith. - Mr Peter John Margary, C.E., stated that at the direction of the Coroner he had examined the crane and chain. He saw an iron link, which was stated to have been the link in the chain that broke, and Mr Wise, who accompanied him, pointed out the stone which the men were lifting at the time the chain parted. The links of the chain were about two and half inches in length, and half an inch in diameter. The link that parted was about three inches in length, and in its weakest part barely half an inch in diameter; and it had, in his opinion, been put in by an ordinary blacksmith. It had been unsoundly welded, and was in a fractured state some time previously to the accident. It had also probably been strained sideways by being placed round the hook of the chain. The flaw might easily have escaped the view of the examiner of the chain or of the blacksmith, and have been there unknown to anybody. The iron of the link looked good, but the weld had been badly made. It was the ordinary rule when a chain was bought of a maker to have a proof of its tests, but it was not customary, when formed into a sling chain, to have it retested. It was a great mistake "to prove" chains too highly. Replying to other inquiries respecting the testing of chains, Mr Margary said that the purchaser of a chain relied entirely on the invoice of the maker. - By the Coroner: A half-inch chain would lift one ton seventy-two pounds. The chain which broke should not have been employed in lifting a heavier weight than two tons. - By Mr Edmonds: Did not remember any man or men being killed at the railway works at Dawlish in consequence of the breaking of a tested chain. - Witness, continuing, said that men would constantly use chains for lifting greater weights than they could bear. - Mr Edmonds here produced a book by Mr Hurst, in which it was asserted that the breaking powers of a half-inch chain was seven tons. - Mr Margery stated that the broken link had evidently been repaired by a smith, and the weld was a clumsy one, but no person could very well have detected the flaw. - Mr Edmonds: Is it not a fact that you have had many men killed on the railway by the breaking of chains? When you investigated the cause of the last accident, did you not find that the tested chain had broken? - Witness: I do not remember any such case, at least I did not attend before any Coroner that I can remember. - In reply to the Coroner witness said that although the weld was very clumsy yet it might have been equally as strong as the other parts of the chain; the clumsiness of the weld had no effect upon its strength. - By Mr Edmonds: The link might have been equally as strong as the other part of the chain if it had not been for the flaw. - By the Jury: He thought the contractor should have had a stronger chain. - By the Coroner: If the carriage of the crane had been longer probably the accident would not have happened on the breaking of the chain. The crane was one which required a great deal of care in working, and he would recommend that its use for the class of work it was engaged in should be discontinued. He did not believe there were many such old-fashioned cranes in use now. - By Mr Edmonds: Could not say whether all the travelling cranes in every quarry within six miles of Plymouth were not on the same principle as the one in question. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that from the evidence the Jury could not find that there was any carelessness on the part of anyone using the chain with a flaw in the link. It had been shewn that the flaw could not be detected upon examination, nor was there anything to shew that on any previous occasion such an accident had been caused by the use of the crane, so as to shew clearly and precisely that it was a dangerous crane, and that its use should be discontinued. It would be a difficult matter for any contractor to supervise the carrying out of his orders. In this case directions had always been given for the men employed at the cranes to use the ropes attached to tail for slewing, but these orders had not always been carried out, and in this case the deceased had acted in direct contradiction to the desires of his employer. It was for the Jury to consider if the chain in question was practically strong enough to lift a stone of over two tons in weight. In conclusion he pointed out that the Jury would be wrong in returning a criminal verdict against Mr Pethick when they were unable to bring home to him any personal carelessness or neglect of positive duty. - Mr Edmonds complained that one of the Jurymen had, since the adjournment, been in conversation with a relative of the deceased. - Mr Gard said that he knew nothing of the circumstances. - The Coroner said it was very wrong for a Juryman to have done such a thing, and he hoped that the Juror would shew no animus. - The Jury then retired, and after a consultation lasting over half an hour, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that in future stronger and thicker chains should be used in the hoisting of such stones. - Mr Pethick explained that there were plenty of larger chains upon the works if the men felt disposed to use them, and it was their own choice that they worked with such small chains. They found the small chains much handier. The Inquiry, which lasted over four hours, then terminated.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 December 1877
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Morice Town yesterday relative to the death of HENRY WOOLLOCOTT, aged 45 years, an established rigger in the dockyard. Mr W. F. Salmon watched the case on behalf of Mr W. Eastlake, Admiralty law agent. - Samuel Gill, a rigger, said that on the previous morning he and the deceased were working upon the maintop of the Invincible, which vessel is now lying in the north basin at Keyham, and they were engaged in lifting the mainsay by means of a gantline. Just before the accident the deceased was easing off the gantline with an iron bar, which acted as a lever to assist the rope, and a minute or two afterwards he said, "Look out, mate, the stays are lifting." No sooner had witness run to the other side of the deceased than the lashing of the block parted and the block fell (a distance of 10ft.) upon WOOLLOCOTT, smashing in his skull. - The Coroner: Whose duty is it to see that the ropes are in good order and secure? - Witness: As a rule the men looked over them. WOOLLOCOTT examined all the ropes that morning previous to commencing work. - Q.: Could you have detected anything defective in the construction of the rope if it had been examined before beginning work? - A.: No; I do not think I could. - The broken rope was here produced, and witness having examined it, said he could not tell what caused it to part. He did not know what weight the rope would bear. There was no sudden jerk to cause it to give way. The rope, which was 3 ½ inches in diameter, had been used very little. - By the Jury: The stays were hanging in the gantline in the fore part of the maintop, and single whips were used in lifting the eyes of the stays. The gantline was bent to the eyes, and the double gantline was on the fore part of the stay. Previous to commencing work that day deceased, who had examined the gear, said to witness "Everything is all right, mate." Witness was not aware that the splice bore anywhere. It was fastened to the eye bolt. - Joseph Lillicrap, foreman of riggers, deposed that he told the men to be very cautious in what they did, and not on any account to have too much weight on the gantline. He made that remark because the stays were heavy. He had not the slightest doubt that the rope and gear used were sufficiently strong for the work. He was not on the maintop, but he was some distance away on deck superintending the work. In reply to the Coroner, Lillicrap stated that he thought the men were getting a heavier weight on the gantline than was necessary, but that thought was not in his mind more than a moment or so before the accident occurred. He had just time to communicate his thoughts to the deceased and the other men aloft, and receive a reply "There's plenty of slack," when the block fell. - Q.: How long after you received the answer did the accident happen? - Witness: Not more than a few seconds. The men had a better opportunity of judging whether they had too heavy a weight than I had as they were on the spot. - Q.: Were you content to take their answer? - A: Yes, because they were better able to judge than I was. The witness, having examined the rope, was asked by the Coroner whether he could tell what caused the accident. Lillicrap replied that the rope did not break from being defective, but because it had too much weight upon it. - Q.: If you had to superintend the carrying out of similar work, would you do more than was done on the occasion of the accident? - A.: No, after being told by the men, in answer to my inquiries, that they had slack enough on the "collars." - By the Jury: Deceased did not make fast the block to the masthead. - John Wills, a seaman rigger, deposed to having drawn the rope and block, which were brand new, from the Dockyard stores. He overhauled them and found no defects. He fixed the block &c., to the mast previous to the riggers coming on the ship to work. There were three whips to be used in putting up the stay in place. They were properly secured, and had never been used for such work before. - The Coroner remarked that he could not see that there was anyone to be blamed in the matter, as the work was proceeding in the ordinary manner; but it was unfortunate that deceased was directly under the block. He was glad, however, that WOOLLOCOTT examined the rope himself and expressed his satisfaction with it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 21 December 1877
PLYMOUTH - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday concerning the death of WILLIAM HIGGINS, aged 27 years, a merchant seaman, who died suddenly on board the brig Contest, now lying in Plymouth Sound, in which he was about to sail for the West Indies. - Abraham John Noel, master of the brig, stated that deceased, who was boatswain of the vessel, was a native of South Shields. The vessel was taken from Cattewater to the Sound on Wednesday and deceased worked in the early part of the day, and then lay down in consequence of feeling unwell. Although witness had only joined the ship a few days, he had seen deceased intoxicated on two occasions. On Wednesday evening he vomited a large quantity of blood and food, and yesterday morning, as he seemed to be much worse, he (witness) went on shore for a doctor, and on his return to the ship found that HIGGINS was dead. Mr Fox, surgeon, examined the body yesterday, and told him (witness) that it was his opinion that the deceased had died from haemorrhage, brought on by excessive drinking. Deceased had received an excellent character from his last master, and appeared to be a good seaman. - William Wiedenweg, steward, stated that deceased had been a comparatively sober man before he arrived in Plymouth about a week since. On Monday he received a letter from his brother stating that his mother was dead, and he seemed to be much affected by it. Witness attended deceased throughout Wednesday night and gave him some tea. He died about eight o'clock yesterday morning, after the captain had left the ship. He was a healthy man, and on Wednesday night expressed an opinion that he would be all right in the morning. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had died of haemorrhage from the stomach, brought on by excessive drinking.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 December 1877
BUCKFASTLEIGH - The Suicide At Buckfastleigh. - An Inquest was held at the Sun Inn, Buckfastleigh, yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, to Inquire into the cause of death of THOMAS FULLER, aged 66 years, formerly national schoolmaster at Buckfastleigh, who had committed suicide by taking poison. - Eliza Harvey, wife of Richard Harvey, shoemaker, stated that she resided in Church-street next door to the house of deceased, who was a widower, and living alone. On Tuesday evening about half-past six o'clock he came to her house and inquired for her husband, who was taking supper, and asked him to come into his (deceased) house at once. Her husband replied "I will be in in a minute," and the deceased went back to his house, but returned again immediately afterwards, saying "Run for the doctor, I have taken poison, help me back to my house." He added that he had taken poison from a cup, which he had washed out at the pump, and that the poison had been in his house for years for the purpose of destroying rats. The deceased was conscious up to the time of his death, and told her at various times that trouble had made him tired of his life. - Richard Harvey, husband of the last witness, corroborated her statement. Mr H. Ubsdell, surgeon, stated that he was called by Mrs Harvey, who requested him to see the deceased. The deceased told him that he had taken a dark blue powder, which, from the symptoms, he had no doubt was a mixture of strychnine and bluestone. He gave him the usual remedies, but the stomach pump was of no service, owing to the lapse of time since the poison was taken. The Jury, after a few minutes' consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMPTON ST MARY - A Child Burnt To Death. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at Mount Pleasant, near Venton, into the circumstances attending the death of EDITH TURPIN, aged about 7 months. - SARAH ANN TURPIN, mother of the deceased, and wife of a packer in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, stated that between three and four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon last she went out on business, leaving her three children at home. The lamp was lighted when she left the house, and was in its usual position on the mantle-piece; but when witness returned she found that her daughter, FLORENCE, aged about four years, had taken the lamp off the mantlepiece, and that the deceased's clothes had been burnt, as well as several parts of her body. - Elizabeth Matthews, a neighbour, deposed that on Tuesday afternoon last she heard screams proceeding from the previous witnesses house, and upon entering it she saw the deceased sitting in its chair, with its clothes on fire. Witness called out for assistance, and her husband came immediately, and extinguished the flames. - Richard Ellery, surgeon, stated that when the father of the deceased came to him on Tuesday evening he gave him a quantity of linseed oil and lime water, with instructions to bathe the burnt parts. He was unable to attend the deceased personally until the following morning, in consequence of having to attend a more important case at the Workhouse. The cause of death was shock to the system - the result of the severe burns received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 December 1877
BUCKFASTLEIGH - Death By Suffocation - (Special Telegram). - An Inquest was held last evening at the King's Arms Inn, Buckfastleigh, by Mr H. Michelmore, respecting the death of EDITH MARY MEERS, the infant child of [?] JAMES MEERS, mason, residing in Lower Town. The father deposed that on the morning of Tuesday he rose about 6 o'clock, and aroused his wife; who immediately said that the child was dead. He at once went for a doctor. - Mr Johnson, surgeon, stated that after making a post mortem examination, he found that the [?] the vessels leading to the heart were slight congested, confirming his former opinion, that the child had died from suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday concerning the death of a mason named JAMES SHEPHEARD, aged 54 years. - James Maker, mason, stated that on Monday morning, about a quarter to eight o'clock, he was engaged with deceased working at a house in Cambridge-street. Witness was standing at the head of a ladder, and deceased was walking round on the parapet to get to the back of the house, when, on stepping on a sloping board on the ledge, he suddenly slipped forward and fell heard foremost on the pavement, a distance of about 10 feet. Witness immediately went to his assistance, and found him lying on the ground insensible and bleeding a little from a wound behind the right ear. With the assistance of P.C. Lidstone, who happened to be on the spot, the deceased was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Mr H. E. A. Herbert, resident surgeon at the Hospital, said that the deceased was admitted about eight o'clock in the morning. He was living, but quite insensible, and had a scalp wound on the right side of the head. He became partly conscious about noon, but not sufficiently so to give any account of the accident. He died about midnight. Witness made a post mortem examination, and found the skull extensively fractured. The fracture had no connection with the external wound, and could not be discovered by any external marks. There was a blood vessel ruptured in the head, and this he considered was the immediate cause of death. It was impossible to tell the cause of death without a post mortem examination, as the only injury that could be discovered from the outside was the comparatively small scalp wound. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Wednesday concerning the death of HENRY MORTIMORE, a carter, aged 77 years, who had died suddenly on Christmas day. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 December 1877
LYDFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the prisons, Princetown, yesterday afternoon, on the body of WILLIAM RICHARDS, who died on the 23rd instant. RICHARDS was undergoing a sentence of ten years' penal servitude for an unnatural crime. He had never been previously convicted, and his conduct appears to have been exemplary whilst in prison. He was 53 years old. the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

EXETER - Death From Excessive Drinking At Exeter. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Duke of York Inn, St. Sidwell, Exeter, on the body of WILLIAM BOWDEN, aged about 50, a stonemason, who died on Thursday night under circumstances which gave rise to a report that he had killed himself by excessive drinking. - MRS MARY BOWDEN, laundress, widow of the deceased, stated that she had not lived with her husband during the past ten or twelve years, having parted from him in consequence of his intemperate habits. Witness knew nothing of the circumstances of her husband's death. The Coroner asked if her husband had any property. MRS BOWDEN stated that he had none at the time of death, but he had "run through" hundreds of pounds. - Sarah Coombes, a married woman living at 3 York-terrace, stated that about three weeks ago, a Mrs White, of Summerland-street, came to her house to look at two rooms which she had to let. Mrs White said the rooms were for herself. Later in the day she informed witness that her husband had taken a small house, consequently she would not require the rooms, but she had a lodger named BOWDEN whom she wanted to find accommodation for. She added that BOWDEN was then in liquor; he was "on the breakout," and would be like that very probably for six weeks. Witness said she could not take him for a week, but the next day Mrs White brought him in a fly. He was drunk, and witness at first objected to allow him to come into the house. Mrs White, however, pressed her very much, offering to lend her some bedding for a week, and she ultimately consented. Deceased agreed to pay £1 a week for lodgings and board. He was not in work at the time, but had paid her regularly. Witness supplied him frequently with gin and water. He ate heartily, and took gin and water at every meal. - Mr Scott, a Juror, asked if the liquor was included in the £1 a week? (Laughter.) - Witness: No; that was extra; he would give me the money, and I would send for the gin half a pint at a time. He would have three or four half-pints a day - I can't say exactly how many. If I didn't get it for him he would go to the door half-naked, saying he would fetch it himself. He did go out in that state early one morning before we got up, and came back half tipsy, with his "things" all down over him. I told him this would not do for me, and I gave him notice to leave. He said he would stop it in a fortnight if I would keep him. He then took to his bed. - The Coroner: Did you still supply him with gin and water? - Witness: Yes, sir. - Witness was pressed to say what quantity he consumed per day, but she persisted in stating that she could not say, but admitted, however, that she sent out twice a day for a half-pint. Did not take any of the gin and water with him; her husband might have done so. He always drank water with the gin. It was about a week ago the deceased took to his bed. She saw no change in him until the evening of Thursday; when seeing that his breath was bad she sent for a doctor. - A Juror: Had you any idea he was drinking himself to death before you sent for the doctor? - Witness: No. - The Coroner. The Jury will form their own opinion. - Witness said it was deceased's habit, she understood, to spend a week at a time in bed when on a drinking bout. She sent for the doctor twice; the first time was on the Thursday evening. On telling deceased what she had done he said, "If you send for the doctor, I won't see him; if the doctor comes I'll order him out." Mr Harris came directly he was sent for. He saw deceased and told him he must not drink so much gin. BOWDEN said "I shan't leave it off"; and the doctor replied "If you don't it will lead you off." - Mr Harris: "That was his own remark." - Witness stated that the man died at three o'clock on Friday morning in the presence of witness, her husband, and other persons. Witness understood that he had property. - The Coroner: didn't you think this gin you supplied him with was injuring him very much? - Witness: No, sir. - Q.: Then you thought he might drink any amount without injuring him? - A.: No, sir. - Q.: But didn't you think that the amount of gin you and your family were getting for him would hurt him? - A.: I didn't understand anything about it. (Laughter). - In answer to further questions, witness stated that she had never supplied him with "neat" gin. She mixed the spirit with equal parts of water, and placed a b[?] of the mixture by his bedside about once every two hours. - MRS BOWDEN was recalled by the Coroner, who asked what her husband was in the habit of drinking when he lived with her? Witness stated that he generally drank cider and beer, and if he was very tipsy he would take a little spirit. - The Coroner: What did he get tipsy on cider? - Witness: He would get so tipsy as to be hardly able to speak. - The Coroner: Did he drink at home? - Witness: No. - By a Juror: I don't think he had any private income. He must have saved money when he was sober. Sometimes he would stay sober for a month, and then "break out" again. - Mr J. Harris, surgeon, stated that about five o'clock on Thursday evening he was called by Mrs Coombes. Before entering deceased's room she told him that she feared his illness was brought on by drink. Witness found him lying in bed with his clothes on. He was in a stolid, stepid state, and answered witness's questions "in a drunken manner." Found his pulse was quick, and from other symptoms came to the conclusion that he was one of those men who thoroughly saturated themselves with spirit. He was not in a state to be reasoned with. Witness advised him to give up the gin; and he said, "No, I won't." He added, "I'll give up my gin tomorrow, but I'll take it tonight." Witness then told him that if he did not he would die. He replied, "Yes, I seem I shall." Witness saw that he was in a critical state, and advised him to give up the gin that night, and take the medicine instead. - The Coroner (to Mrs Coombes): Did he take any of the medicine? - Witness: Yes; one dose. He did not take any gin with it or afterwards. He had some beef tea about ten minutes before he died, and said, "Oh, that's good." Witness was called at quarter to three on Friday morning, and when he arrived he found the patient dead. He considered that the man died from alcoholic poisoning; in other words, from excessive drinking. - The Coroner (to MRS BOWDEN): Was his father an intemperate man? - Witness: Yes; at least he was not like his son, but he used to drink a little. Deceased was an only child. - Q.: Was your husband intemperate before marriage? - A.: He was always so. - Mr Harris said he understood from the witness Coombes that she rather cheated the deceased into taking gin and water under the impression that it was gin, and that he always watered it down himself. - The Coroner (to witness): Did he know you watered it? - A.: He used to say sometimes that there was water in the gin. - Q.: What did you say to him? - A.: I didn't answer him. - Q.: He thought it was weak I suppose. He knew the difference between gin and gin and water? - A.: Yes, sir. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said this was a most lamentable case, and the fewer they saw of such cases the better. To see a man so addicted to drinking that his wife was unable to live with him, and to have gone on getting worse and worse for so many years until he killed himself at last, was distressing in the extreme. He should certainly have liked to see Mrs White and to have known a little more of what took place at her house. However, she was not before the Jury, and he did not see that her evidence could alter their verdict. It was to a certain extent creditable to the woman Coombes that she gave the deceased water with his gin, though of course he soon found it out, as most drunkards would. The question for the Jury was whether or not the death of this man arose from excessive drinking. There could be no doubt that he had been so addicted to the drink that it had "saturated" his system; and, according to the doctor's statement, he had caused his own death by alcoholic poisoning. He seemed to have taken gin and water with breakfast, lunch, dinner and tea; in fact, it was gin and water all the day long, and but for Mrs Coombes diluting it, it would have been pure gin, as very probably it was before he came to her house. As he had said, it was a most lamentable thing to think that a man should so give way to drink as to produce the terrible state of things they had just witnessed. It was a long time since he had such a case, and he trusted it would be a long time before another of the kind occurred. - The Jury unanimously, and without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Death from Excessive Drinking."

Western Morning News, Monday 31 December 1877
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Down Stairs At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of ELIZABETH COLLINGS, aged 68 years. The deceased lived with William Webber, a painter, residing at Vauxhall-street, who said that about twenty minutes to ten on Friday evening he heard a great noise on the stairs, and on going to the spot he found the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs apparently unconscious. From her position he thought she must have fallen down head first. There was a large wound at the back of her head, and blood was oozing from her nose and ears. Mr Harper was immediately sent for, but when he came he found the poor woman was quite dead, and her skull was fractured. At the conclusion of the Inquiry the Coroner remarked that it was no wonder the deceased fell downstairs, for in the house in which she lived there was not a rail, rope, or any kind of protection near the stairs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and recommended that a rope or rail should be placed on the stairs.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death In Barnstaple Gaol. - On Saturday morning an Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Borough Prison on the body of a man named RICHARD WEBB, who had died suddenly on the previous day. It appeared from the evidence that the prisoner who had been employed as a sewing machine agent, was presented by the firm he represented upon several charges of embezzlement. He was found guilty and on the 5th of October last committed to gaol for six months with hard labour. On his arrival at the gaol, he was examined by the surgeon (Mr J. W. Cooke), who, finding that he was suffering from heart disease, ordered that he should not be put to work, and gave extra diet. The utmost consideration was shewn to the prisoner by the govern (Mr Webber); but he grew gradually worse, and on Friday was found dead in his cell, just after dinner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and a relative of the deceased, who was present at the Inquiry, said he was persuaded that his unfortunate friend had been most kindly treated.


Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 January 1878
EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Mr Blacking's Wine and Spirit Vaults, High-street, Exeter, yesterday afternoon, on the body of WILLIAM MORTIMER, aged 52 years. The evidence shewed that the deceased committed suicide early on Tuesday morning by cutting his throat with a razor. He was in the employ of Messrs. Pasmore and Savery, woollen merchants, as care taker of their establishment, and he lived on the premises. For six years past he had been suffering from pains in the head, and had been an inmate of the Wonford Asylum. - Dr Henderson, who attended the deceased previous to his death, said he then appeared much depressed, but talked rationally. He was suffering from bodily derangement. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 January 1878
SALTASH - Strange Fatality On board H.M.S. Impregnable. - Mr William Shaddock, Mayor and Coroner of Saltash, held an Inquest on board H.M.S. Impregnable yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE CORNISH, a pensioner from the Royal Marines. Mr W. f. Salmon, on behalf of Mr William Eastlake, Admiralty law agent, watched the case. The Jury was composed of petty officers of the ship and the master-at-arms (Mr Opie) was elected Foreman. - John S. Ramsay, assistant paymaster, serving on board the Impregnable, said that he knew the deceased, who had been a colour-sergeant in the Royal Marines, and had served with him in the Victor Emmanuel at Hongkong for eighteen months. About three o'clock on Monday afternoon the deceased came on board his ship to transact some money matters with him and remained in his cabin. Shortly after 9 a.m. on the following day he (witness) went on shore, and the deceased, whom he left in his cabin, knew where he was going. CORNISH was apparently quite well, but when he (witness) returned to the ship in the evening, just after six o'clock, he found the deceased lying in bed with all his clothes on with the exception of his coat. Deceased appeared to be asleep and he tried to arouse him, but could not do so. He was very cold and stiff, and breathing could not be perceived. Believing that deceased was dead, or dying, he reported the circumstances to Lieutenant O'Connor and every means that could be thought of were used, with a view of restoring consciousness, but without success. Surgeon Anderson, serving in the Royal Adelaide, was sent for, and tried artificial respiration; and afterwards pronounced the man to be dead. Mr Anderson said that deceased must either have died from effusion of blood on the brain or heart disease. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said that he was on very good terms with the deceased, and they had never quarrelled. He had all his meals in deceased's cabin. - William Puckey, a private in the Royal Marines, said that he was the previous witnesses servant, and he supplied deceased with his meals at Mr Ramsay's request. Deceased was alive at five p.m. on Tuesday. He supplied him with some coffee with his dinner. After CORNISH partook of tea he complained of a slight pain in the chest, but said he thought it would soon pass. Witness did not see deceased alive again. When he left him just after five o'clock he was sitting in a chair in Mr Ramsay's cabin. - By the Coroner: On Monday he took the deceased some whisky in a bottle together with some water, and left it with him. There were no other spirits kept in the cabin, and deceased did not appear to be the worse for drink the whole time he was on board. - George O'Connor, lieutenant on board the Impregnable, gave evidence of having been called to Mr Ramsay's cabin and finding the deceased apparently dead. - MARIAN CORNISH, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was 42 years of age, and they had been married only five months. The deceased, who was employed by Mr Arliss, accountant, Plymouth, was discharged from the service in May last, having completed twenty-one years' service. He had served several years in China, and all his discharges were "excellent." A fortnight ago he complained of a pain in the left side, but he had never been attended by any medical man. On Monday morning deceased left home quite well and was sent on board the Impregnable shortly afterwards. - Richard Medland deposed that the deceased rented a furnished room of him at 48 Harwell-street, Plymouth. Deceased was not a particularly healthy man, and he heard him complain of being unwell about a fortnight or three weeks since. He could testify to his sobriety during the time deceased had been in his house. - The next to be called to give evidence was Mr Anderson, the surgeon, but after the Jury had waited for over an hour and half he had not put in an appearance. Commander F. A. Wetherall, of the Impregnable, said that he told Mr Anderson that the Inquest was to be held that day, but did not know at what hour, and he ought certainly to have remained on board his ship - the Royal Adelaide - until he was wanted. He had sent several messages, and messengers to the ship, but his whereabouts had not been ascertained. - The Coroner thought that Mr Anderson should have remained on board, so as to be at hand when wanted, but as there was no likelihood of their procuring his attendance that evening the Inquiry would have to be adjourned until today. Commander Wetherall was requested to procure the doctor's attendance.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 January 1878
SALTASH - The Strange Fatality On Board H.M.S. Impregnable. - The Inquiry as to the death of GEORGE CORNISH, aged 42 years, a retired colour-sergeant of the Royal Marines, was reopened yesterday by Mr W. Shaddock, the Saltash Coroner, on board the Impregnable, at Devonport. The deceased, who had been employed as bailiff by Mr Arliss, of Plymouth, was sent on board the Impregnable on Monday afternoon to transact some money affairs with the Assistant-Paymaster, Mr J. S. Ramsay. CORNISH remained in Mr Ramsay's cabin that day and during the night, and early on Tuesday morning the officer left to go on shore, leaving deceased in his cabin. CORNISH, at the direction of Ramsay, had all his meals brought to him by William Puckey, the officer's servant. On Tuesday afternoon about five o'clock Puckey gave deceased some tea, and he then complained of a pain in the side, but treated the matter very lightly. Puckey shortly afterwards left the deceased in the cabin, and he was not seen alive again. A little after six p.m. Mr Ramsay returned on board, and found the man dead in the cabin. Evidence was given by the deceased's wife that her husband complained of pains in the chest about a fortnight since, but when he left home on Monday he appeared in good health. On Wednesday the Inquiry was adjourned on account of the non-attendance of the doctor who was called to see the deceased after he was found. - Mr Anderson, M.D., surgeon of the Royal Adelaide, attended yesterday, and prior to giving evidence explained his absence from the Inquiry on the previous day. He regretted that he inconvenienced the Coroner by not being at hand, but he waited on board his ship up to two p.m., and not receiving a summons requiring his attendance at the Inquest, he went on shore. He considered that it was not his duty to attend unless he was summoned, nor was he called upon to give any evidence without such notice, as the deceased was not connected with the service, or with the Royal Adelaide. - The Coroner remarked that Dr Anderson had put all of them to very great inconvenience. Seeing that the Inquiry was such an important one Dr Anderson ought not to have absented himself. He (the Coroner) had been given to understand by Commander Wetherall that Dr Anderson's attention was drawn to the fact that an Inquest would be held, and that in all probability his attendance would be required, and he should have held it as a duty to those in the same service as himself, to whom the Inquiry was, under the peculiar circumstances, of some importance, to have remained in the ship until wanted by the Jury. Very great inconvenience had been caused thereby. - Dr Anderson replied that he was very sorry; but if he had known the Inquest would have been held on Wednesday he would have remained on board. - The Coroner said that he had been told it was very likely his services would be required, and he should have remained at hand. If he had given his evidence on the previous day, and there was not sufficient proof of the cause of death, he (the Coroner) might have arranged for a post mortem examination, and so have concluded the inquiry that day. - The evidence of Dr Anderson was taken. He said that about seven o'clock on Tuesday evening he was sent for to go on board H.M.S. Impregnable to see the deceased in Mr Ramsay's cabin. He found him lying in bed with all his clothes on excepting his coat. Life was extinct, death having taken place, he thought, about an hour previously. There was no appearance of convulsions. He had not the remotest idea of the cause of death. - In reply to the Coroner, the witness said he had expressed a private opinion that heart disease or effusion of blood on the brain was the cause of death. The true cause of death could only be ascertained by a post mortem examination, which he recommended should be performed by a civilian surgeon. - The Coroner considered it would be more satisfactory to have a post mortem examination, and for this to be done the Inquest must be adjourned. - Dr Anderson remarked that in such a case a naval surgeon was entitled to a fee for attendance, the deceased not belonging to the service. - Mr Cleverton, the Saltash Town Clerk, said the Coroner would consider the subject; but the Coroner considered Dr Anderson ought to be fined for not being in attendance yesterday. - Dr Anderson replied that he was called in as an outsider, and out of service hours; and, therefore, was entitled to a surgeon's fee. - The Coroner: That shall have attention tomorrow. - The Inquiry was then adjourned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 January 1878
SALTASH - The Strange Fatality On Board H.M.S. Impregnable. - The Inquiry on board the Impregnable, respecting the death of GEORGE CORNISH, was concluded yesterday by the Coroner of Saltash (Mr W. Shaddock). The deceased, who was 42 years of age, was a pensioner from the Royal Marines, and a bailiff employed by Mr W. Arliss, accountant, of Plymouth. He died suddenly on Tuesday, in the cabin of Mr Ramsay, an assistant paymaster serving on board the Impregnable, where he had been sent in the execution of his office. Yesterday was the third day of the Inquiry. The only witness called was Mr George Thom, surgeon, of Devonport, who stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased, and found no external marks of violence, but discovered that many of the internal organs were in an advanced state of fatty degeneration. The kidneys, heart, and liver were diseased, and the intestines were loaded with an enormous quantity of fat. The cause of death was fatty degeneration of the heart, the immediate cause being syncope, and this he attributed to the state of his heart. Sudden death in such a case would naturally be expected. - By the Coroner: He did not think that if there had been anyone in the cabin to have attended to him when the deceased was seized with fainting just before his death that his life would have been saved. He was of opinion that death must have taken place quite suddenly. - Mr Cleverton, town clerk of Saltash, reviewed the whole of the evidence, and pointed out that from the surgeon's evidence, death, in such a state as deceased's frame was in might have been expected at any moment, and it was clear that the poor man died from natural causes. - The Jury )composed of men belonging to the Impregnable) returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 January 1878
MILTON ABBOT - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Milton Abbot, on Friday, relative to the death of JAMES OLVER, who committed suicide by hanging himself. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been in a desponding state of mind for some time past. On Thursday he went to work as usual, and as he did not return to dinner search was made for him, and P.C. Cardew found him hanging by his scarf to a tree in a plantation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMSTOCK - A Lad Drowned At Turnchapel. - An Inquest was held at Turnchapel on Saturday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of JOHN NATHANIEL DAVEY, aged 14 years. The deceased was the son of the master of the barge Sophia Holten, and on Friday last was left on board for a short time alone. When the deceased's father went on board the lad was nowhere to be found, but his dead body was subsequently discovered in the water under the bows of the barge, with a bucket close by. It is supposed that the deceased, whilst drawing water from the side of the vessel, overbalanced himself and fell into the water. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - Another Victim To Vice. - The Coroner of Plymouth held an Inquest yesterday, relative to the death of LOUISA CHURCHWARD, a woman of ill-fame, aged about 20 years. - Susan Luxham stated that she lived with deceased at 19 Bath-street, and on Monday morning, about eight o'clock, she came into witness's room to call her, and was apparently in her usual health. About an hour afterwards witness took a cup of tea to her bedroom, and deceased then said she was going to sleep. Deceased was in the habit of drinking spirits, but on Sunday night was quite sober. Between eleven and twelve on Monday morning she went to deceased's room and found her mother, who told her to leave the room, which she did. - Mary Tolley, mother of the last witness, stated that she rented the house in which deceased had lived for the past nine days. She had known her for about eight years, during which time the deceased had been "on the town." Witness thought deceased's health had failed her of late, in consequence of her drinking habits. On Sunday night she went to her room about eleven o'clock with a marine, who was not drunk. She did not hear him leave, nor did she know whether he stopped all night or not. He and deceased had been well acquainted for some time. Deceased came into her room just before calling her (witness's) daughter, and then appeared to be in her usual health. She went into deceased's room about eleven o'clock, and on looking at her, thought she was sleeping. About noon she again went, and on taking her by the shoulders to awake her, found she was dead. There was a little blood running from her mouth, but there was nothing suspicious about the room. - Mr Pearse, sen., surgeon, was in attendance within ten minutes and said he thought she was still living, but he left the house, saying he would come again, which he did about eight o'clock in the evening. He then examined her, and pronounced her to be dead. She was at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport in August last, and the doctor then told her that if she did not give up drinking she would soon be a dead woman. Deceased, however, did not stop the drink and hence the result. - P.C. Scantlebury stated that on the previous afternoon his attention was called to the house in which deceased lived, and on entering saw her lying dead in her bed. Mrs Tolley did not inform him that any man had been with her on the previous night. One of the two previous witnesses told him that deceased had been out of bed that morning. He went direct from the house and saw Mr Pearse, surgeon, who informed him that he was going to see deceased again, as when he saw her last he considered there were some symptoms of life. - Mary Tolley, recalled, said that under the pillow of deceased's bed a small bottle had been found containing a little rum and on the dressing-table another bottle which had contained spirits. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had been "Found dead in bed, and that her death arose from Natural Causes, greatly accelerated by her habits of Intemperance."

BARNSTAPLE - The Missing Landlord At Barnstaple. - It will be remembered on the 28th of December last ELIJAH COLE, the landlord of the Albert Inn, Diamond-street, left his home, and could not be found. The following day his hat was found on the bank near the river Yeo, in North Walk, and last Sunday his body was found two miles down the river Taw, near Ashford. An Inquest was held at deceased's residence on Monday night and from the evidence of the widow of the deceased it appears that when he left home on the 28th he was slightly under the influence of drink, the result of drinking some days previously. Another witness stated that a few yards from where the hat was found was a rope attached to a post from a vessel, and it was likely that the deceased fell over the rope. It was proved by the Superintendent of Police that deceased had been at three public-houses near the North Walk on the day of the 28th, at one of which he was refused to be served with drink. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Death In A Plymouth Tramcar. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening, relative to the death of MR GEORGE FIELD PARKER, a retired instructor from the Royal Navy. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who resided at 10, Albany-place, Plymouth, was 73 years of age, and was a person of strong constitution and very rarely complained of being unwell. About a week since, however, he said he was suffering from a slight pain in the chest, but treated the matter very lightly, and would not consult a medical man. The deceased partook of his breakfast yesterday morning, and left his house about a quarter past nine o'clock to attend the office of the Royal Naval Annuitant Society, Ker-street, Devonport, with which he was connected. He appeared in his usual health, and very cheerful. Deceased generally rode to Devonport in a tramcar, and about half-past nine o'clock he got into No. 3 car, which was at the terminus, and after taking his seat in one of the corners the driver, William Barraball, noticed deceased drop his head against the glass and groan twice. Barraball went to his assistance, and asked him what the matter was, but getting no reply he raised deceased's head. His body was motionless, and by the direction of Mr Pearse, surgeon, who was passing at that moment, and who was called into the car, deceased was stretched out on the seat, when he gasped three times and expired without making a single remark. Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, had been sent for, but MR PARKER had died before he arrived. - Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, was called, and stated that in June 1876 he attended the deceased, who was suffering from an attack of bleeding from the nose, and that saved him from an attack of apoplexy. He had not attended the deceased since. The cause of death was undoubtedly apoplexy of the brain, consequent upon fatty degeneration of the blood-vessels. Such an attack might be brought on by extra exertion in walking briskly, or being exposed to the cold air such as prevailed yesterday morning. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 January 1878
BRIXHAM - The Collision Off The Start. - Mr Gaye held an Inquest at Brixham yesterday respecting the death of ANDREW WOOD, belonging to the fishing smack Mazeppa, of Brixham, which was run into on Tuesday last by the brigantine Daniel, of Llanelly. - Samuel Burgoyne, one of the crew of the smack, stated that as soon as the Mazeppa was struck by the Daniel, the deceased jumped for the bobstay of the brigantine, and in doing it fell between the two vessels and got crushed. From the evidence of William Kenner, the boy who jumped on board the Daniel, it appeared that as soon as the vessels got clear of each other the captain of the Daniel tried to "heave" his vessel round to go to the assistance of the smack, but the violence of the wind was such that the vessel filled her decks and became unmanageable. - The evidence of Mr Searle went to prove that deceased died from internal injuries; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - A Neglectful Mother. - The Coroner of Exeter (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest yesterday on the child of a single-woman named CASTLE, living in a court in St. Sidwell, who was suffocated under circumstances reported yesterday. The deceased, who was about three years old, had been locked in a room with an elder sister while their mother went away on business, and during the absence of the mother one of them set fire to the table-cloth. When CASTLE returned, and the room was entered, both children were found to be insensible, and the younger died before medical aid could be obtained. - Mr Bell, the surgeon who was called in, informed the Jury that he had cautioned CASTLE against leaving the children in a room where there was fire, as one of them had on a previous occasion been taken to the Hospital, when he was house surgeon there, for a burn received during her mother's absence. The woman said it was not true that Mr Bell had cautioned her. - Mr Hooper told the Jury that if they considered the mother had contributed to the child's death by criminal neglect, they would have to return a verdict of manslaughter. - The Jury found that the death was Accidental; but were of opinion with the Coroner that CASTLE'S conduct was deserving of strong censure. - Mr Hooper said he hoped she would take a warning.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - The Coroner of Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of ELIZABETH BATER, aged 54 years. It was stated that the deceased, who resided at 13 Cambridge-street, went to bed about eleven o'clock on Saturday night, and was then very cheerful. About one o'clock on Sunday morning her husband came home and found her dead and cold. The daughter of the deceased, who was sleeping in the same room, had heard no noise during the night. The deceased was not a very healthy woman, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Death Accelerated By Drink. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of PETER MORGAN, aged 51 years. The deceased joined the schooner Sea Queen at Goole on the 13th of December. The vessel arrived at Plymouth on the 6th instant, and on Saturday last the deceased was paid-off from her. He fell in with another merchant sailor, named Walter Boynes, and they drank together; but the deceased, it was stated, drank only one glass of brandy all the day. He told Boynes that he was going to the Hospital on Monday (yesterday) as he had nearly killed himself with spirits in Goole, and his lungs were very bad. The deceased went to bed at his lodgings at 120 King-street early on Saturday evening and on Sunday morning he was found dead in bed by the side of Boynes, who had slept with him. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt that the deceased had been drinking very heavily of late, and that this had affected his lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Intemperate habits." The deceased belonged to Liverpool.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 January 1878
BLACKAWTON - The Fatal Accident Near Kingsbridge. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Woodford Farm, Blackawton, the residence of the deceased, by Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on MR NICHOLAS OLDRIEVE, a farmer, who was killed on Wednesday evening by falling from his horse. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased who was perfectly sober, left the London Inn, Kingsbridge, on horseback for his home at 8 o'clock on Wednesday evening. Some time afterwards Mr Sawyer, of Totnes, who was driving from Kingsbridge, in company with Mr Ball, of Plymouth, saw something lying in the road about two miles out of Kingsbridge and on Mr Ball getting out of the trap, he found that it was the body of MR OLDRIEVE. He raised the deceased, whose head fell back, his neck appearing to have been broken. As he had no doubt whatever that MR OLDRIEVE was quite dead, he and Dr Sawyer got in the trap again, and drove to Mounts, about half a mile distant, where they gave information of the occurrence. A policeman named James Wilford found deceased's horse about half a mile from the spot where deceased was found. The reins were broken. - The Coroner said the deceased had not been examined by a doctor, but there appeared to be no doubt that he fell backward from his horse, owing to the reins breaking, and that he thus broke his neck. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead." The deceased leaves a wife and nine children, all of whom are grown up.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 January 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Termination To A Soiree. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday afternoon at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY DULLING, aged 23 years, cabman, in the employ of his father, who resides at 7 Shaftesbury-cottages, Plymouth. The evidence adduced shewed that the deceased was at the soiree at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse on Wednesday evening last, and that between one and two o'clock on Thursday morning, whilst attempting to slide down the stairs by the hand rail, he overbalanced himself and was precipitated headlong on to the stone pavement beneath, a distance of 13ft. He was immediately conveyed, at the request of Mr T. Leah, surgeon, to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he expired soon after his admission. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Death Under Chloroform. - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest on Saturday respecting the death of JOHN TRACE, aged 17 years, the son of a labourer living at Haldon, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday, whilst under the effects of chloroform. The deceased was a butcher's assistant, in the employ of Mr Havill, of Whimple, and had been a patient in the Hospital for about seven weeks. - Mr Cummings, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the patient was suffering from a contagious disease, and was placed on the ward appropriated to that disease. He was under the care of Mr Bankart. Deceased progressed satisfactorily up to a certain point, and they were then waiting to complete his cure by an operation which Mr Bankart and himself considered necessary. The operation would be a painful and tedious one to complete. Mr Bankart directed him (witness) to undertake it, and it was arranged that it should be done on Thursday afternoon. The operation was to be performed under chloroform; it was usual to do this on the disease under which the patient was suffering. The chloroform was administered on the witness's own responsibility. Mr G. Crallan, who was a qualified man, gave deceased the chloroform in the usual way. The patient progressed satisfactorily for a little while. During the first few moments of the inhalation witness had felt his pulse, and it was steady. The patient then had a severe spasm, his appearance became rigid, and the chloroform was at once stopped. The change was very rapid. He first became pale, and there was an alteration of the pupils, which became suddenly dilated. Witness watched the patient very attentively during the administration of the chloroform. The amount of chloroform given was very small, and this he would draw the particular attention of the Jury to. Witness considered that he did not inhale more than a drachm. The period of inhalation was very short; when he saw the change the chloroform was stopped, and he dashed cold water on the patient's face and chest. The windows were thrown open and the air admitted, and attempts were made to restore the deceased by artificial respiration; but they were unavailing, and he died. Mr Crallan examined the heart prior to commencing the operation, and there was nothing to indicate disease or weakness of that organ; though there might have been something which was not obvious to the examination. In answer to the Coroner, the witness stated that a healthy adult male might take safely six or eight drachms of chloroform. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased died Accidentally from the administration of chloroform, and that proper care and attention were duly taken. - The Coroner said he entirely concurred in the verdict, and spoke of Mr Cummings as most attentive and careful in the discharge of his duties. - Mr Cummings thanked the Coroner for his remarks, and said it had been a time of great anxiety to him.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - A Child Burnt To Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM JOHN OSBORNE, aged 2 years and 9 months. - JANE ANN OSBORNE, mother of the deceased, stated that on the 6th inst., about 10.30 a.m., she was in her room with deceased, but having occasion to go out she left him sitting on a stool before the fire partly dressed. She was absent about five minutes, and as she was returning she heard him screaming and on entering the room found him standing before the fire with his clothes on fire. She immediately extinguished the flames and used various remedies, and subsequently took him to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The child told her that he caught his clothes on fire with matches. When she left him in the room there was a box of matches on the chimney-piece but when she returned from the Hospital they were on the dresser. Deceased could have taken down the matches from the mantle-shelf by standing on a chair. - Mary Ann Forrest stated that she helped MRS OSBORNE to cover the deceased with flour to relieve the pain, and had since visited him at the Hospital, and he had told her that he set himself on fire with matches. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH MULES, aged 45 years, a married woman, residing at 27 Claremont-street. - Mr Lewis, surgeon, stated that the deceased had been under his care for several days, and that she had been suffering from constant vomiting, which he could not account for. Deceased had informed him that her husband had pulled her about, and had treated her "as no woman should be treated." He had made a post mortem examination, and had ascertained that the deceased died from Natural Causes. The husband was examined, and denied that he had ever treated the deceased roughly, observing that he had done everything he possibly could for her during her illness. - A neighbour gave evidence to the effect that she had lived on the same floor as the deceased and her husband for upwards of two years, but had never heard as much as a loud word passing between them. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated the husband from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Plymouth Hoe. - An Inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at Plymouth yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS WILLIAM REEVE, aged 10 years. On Saturday afternoon the deceased was at play on the Hoe, near Tinside, and was on the outside of the rails overhanging the cliff, when, happening to take hold of a loose rail, he turned around to catch at another, lost his hold and fell to the beach, some fifty feet below. He was immediately conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from compound fracture of the lower jaw in two places and concussion of the brain. He died shortly after his admission. It was stated that the fence at the place where the accident occurred was not under the control of the Town Council, but belonged to the War-office, which had placed the railings there. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 January 1878
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of JAMES FERGUSON, lately in the employ of the South Devon Shipping Company. On Monday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, the deceased was found in the front parlour of his house, No. 4 Laira-street, hanging by a rope, fastened to the bracket of the window pole. He was cut down immediately, but life was extinct. It transpired in evidence that the deceased had been distressed for some time at being unable to get a ship. The Jury thought that the deceased was of an Unsound State of Mind when he committed the act, and returned a verdict to that effect. When discharged by the South Devon Shipping Company the deceased was given £20 as a gratuity for his services. He was very much respected.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 February 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Strange Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquest was held by Mr J. Vaughan, coroner of Devonport, at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday, relative to the death of JAMES JARVIS, aged 37 years, a naval pensioner. - James Bullivand, who was well acquainted with the deceased, sated that JARVIS, who had been in the army, entered the Royal Navy as a sick-bay assistant in June 1874, and was discharged at Bombay in August, 1876, suffering from dementia. The deceased had frequently expressed a fear that he should be again attacked with insanity. At times he was very eccentric, and asked him (witness) to strictly watch his actions. He was in deceased's company on the morning of the 10th of January, and later in the day deceased said that he should go to see his father, who resides at No. 23, Dockwall-street. He left witness shortly before 4 o'clock, when there was nothing unusual in his manner, nothing to make him apprehensive that he would commit suicide. JARVIS'S insanity first came on at Bombay, where he was an attendant in a small-pox hospital, and the fever he suffered from there brought on lunacy, for which he was sent to an asylum, and eventually invalided out of the service. - Margaret Clinton said she resided in the same house as JARVIS'S father, and on the 10th January deceased came there and asked to see his father. Witness told him to go to his room, but he refused, and, without making any further remark, took a six-barrelled revolver out of his pocket and shot himself through the head. The revolver was loaded with shot in each of the chambers. Messrs. Delarne and Bennett, surgeons, were immediately in attendance, and deceased was subsequently removed to the Royal Albert Hospital. He looked strange at times, but she never thought he would do himself any injury. - Esther Nelson, wife of John Nelson, general dealer, 89 Fore-street, deposed that deceased purchased the revolver at her shop on the afternoon in question, and gave 17s. for it. He said he was going to Africa, and wanted a small pistol to carry in his pocket. She gave him a quantity of shot with it. Deceased appeared to be perfectly sane. - P.C. Moore deposed that he saw the deceased after he inflicted the injury, when he spoke in a rational manner, and asked to be let alone, as he wished to die. - Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, said he attended deceased at the Hospital. His skull was fractured and the shot was fired through his forehead and entered his head some distance. The efforts of the medical staff to extract the bullet were unsuccessful, it having penetrated the brain. At first there was some slight hope of his recovery, but inflammation of the brain set in, and he became paralysed on the left side, and died on Thursday morning. Deceased exhibited suicidal tendencies whilst in the Hospital, having on more than one occasion asked for a knife to destroy himself, saying that he was very miserable. Looking at this, and his having been in a lunatic asylum, he was of opinion that deceased committed the rash act whilst labouring under temporary insanity. - the Jury returned a verdict that "Death was the result of deceased's own act whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 February 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of JOHN LAYFIELD, a marine pensioner, aged 46 years. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who resided at 3 Stokes-lane, had often complained of shortness of breath and pain in his chest. On Saturday night about 11 o'clock the deceased went to bed as usual. About 8 o'clock on Sunday morning he was found leaning on his bed, but dressed, and on examination it was found that he was dead. Mr Eccles, surgeon, had been attending the deceased, who was a fine robust man, for some time up to the 10th of January. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 February 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Through Drink At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday relative to the death of MATILDA LEARY, aged 54 years, the wife of JEREMIAH LEARY, a naval pensioner. The evidence shewed that the deceased had of late been much addicted to drink, spending nearly all her money in liquor. On Tuesday morning at five o'clock, when her husband awoke, she was sleeping by his side. He fell asleep again, and did not awake until eleven o'clock, when he found that she was dead. She was lying half on the bed and half upon a chair. - Dr J. Wilson deposed to having made an external examination of the body of the deceased, which he found in a very emaciated condition, and he believed from the state of the body, and from what he had heard from the husband, that deceased died from starvation, as, in consequence of her drinking so much, she could not take any food. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 8 February 1878
DARTMOUTH - Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at Dartmouth on Wednesday evening respecting the death of a child named HODGE, aged 4 years, who had died from severe burns. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 February 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Liverpool Shipowner. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Dolphin Inn, Barbican, Plymouth, by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of MR EPHRAIM ANGEL, of Hatherleigh, who died suddenly that morning at the residence of Mr T. W. Hoppin, stationer, Southside-street. MR ANGEL was the principal partner in the firm of ANGEL AND COMPANY, shipowners of India Buildings, Liverpool. The barque Fortuna, of Liverpool, belonged to the firm, had just discharged a cargo of coals for the Gas Works, and was lying in Cattewater, preparatory to undergoing some repairs, and MR ANGEL was on a visit to Plymouth to superintend the arrangements for those repairs. He was a tall and very stout man, and had latterly been suffering from heart disease. He arranged on Friday evening to sleep at Mr Hoppin's residence, and went to bed apparently in his usual health. Shortly after half-past three o'clock in the morning, he called for assistance, and Mr Hoppin proceeded to the bedroom, and at four o'clock MR ANGEL died in his arms. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes." A hearse left Plymouth at 11.30 a.m. yesterday with the body of deceased for Fishley House, Hatherleigh, MR ANGEL'S late residence. Deceased held large property in that neighbourhood. He was 57 years of age and leaves a grown up family, of whom one son is in the firm at Liverpool, and another is a shipbroker at Cardiff.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 February 1878
TOTNES - Perils Of Infancy. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Totnes yesterday respecting the death of the child of an unmarried woman named EMMA BOVEY. The woman was confined on Friday, and was attended by a nurse, an old woman over 80 years of age, who went home ill the next day. BOVEY was thus left to the care of the woman in whose house she had been confined. The child, who was ill from its birth, died in a fit on Monday Mr Wallis, surgeon, stated that the child died from congested liver and jaundice, and that he thought it possible that its life might have been saved had a medical man been called in. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 February 1878
HARBERTON - A Fatal Sleeping Draught. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday afternoon, at the Maltsters' Arms Inn, Harbertonford, near Totnes, by Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of ANN EDEN, the wife of a dairyman, who died on Monday. It was stated that the woman had been slightly unwell for about a week, and on Thursday last she was seen by Mr Hains, surgeon, of Totnes, who found her suffering from a cold and bilious attack. She complained of not being able to sleep. He prescribed for her, and told her that when she had taken the medicine she would probably get sleep. On Sunday she felt better, and asked the nurse who was attending her to try and get her a smelling bottle, or something to cause her to sleep. Deceased's son was sent to Mr Pestcott, the manager of the quarry where EDEN works, to borrow a smelling bottle. Mr Pestcott, however, had none, and sent her a draught. The deceased took it, and soon afterwards fell asleep. After some hours, as it was impossible to rouse her, Mr Hains was sent for, and attended immediately. He informed the Jury that he found her in a comatose state. He administered the usual remedies, but they were of no avail. He closely questioned the nurse, who ultimately admitted that deceased had taken a sleeping draught. From the colour of the fluid left in the bottle and the smell, he concluded that it was a preparation of opium. He had since made a post mortem examination of the body. The lungs were congested, the left ventricle contained fluid blood with white clots; the right ventricle contained fluid blood and no clots. The heart was healthy. The liver contained a great quantity of bile pigment, but was otherwise healthy. The membranes of the brain were greatly congested, but the structure of the brain itself was healthy. The contents of the stomach smelt of laudanum. In reply to the Coroner, witness said in the case of death by narcotic poisoning the vessels of the brain would be found congested. - The Coroner: Would the patient have lived had she not taken the sleeping draught? - Witness: Yes, certainly. - In reply to further questions, witness said the cause of death was directly due to the draught, which was either a preparation of laudanum or Battley's solution. - The Coroner and Jury then adjourned to the residence of Mr Pestcott to take his evidence, as he was suffering from a dislocated shoulder and was unable to leave his bed. - Mr Pestcott said the draught he sent was about half the quantity which he had been in the habit of taking himself to procure sleep, and which had been given to him by his medical man. He was ignorant of what it contained. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought the evidence before them would enable the Jury to arrive at the conclusion that death was due to misadventure. - The Jury returned a verdict of Homicide through Misadventure. - The Coroner, addressing Mr Pestcott, said he hoped it would be a warning to him for the future. Mr Pestcott replied that it certainly would be.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 February 1878
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening, respecting the death of a youth named THOMAS JOHN, aged 17 years. The deceased was employed on board the brigantine Hayle, of Llanelly, and on Tuesday night he had gone aloft, when the vessel gave a lurch throwing him to the deck. He was killed on the spot. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 February 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board The Valorous. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday relative to the death of ALFRED WHITE, aged 18 years, ordinary seaman, late of the Valorous, who, as was stated yesterday, had fallen and fractured his skull. On Thursday afternoon the deceased and another man were engaged in covering the spanker, and after finishing the peak, began to "work" down the mast. The deceased, instead of coming down by means of the rings around the mast, trusted himself to the distant lines, which, being unable to bear his weight, broke and he was precipitated to the deck, a distance of about 27 feet. He was immediately attended to by the surgeon of the ship, and was afterwards conveyed to the Royal naval Hospital where he died yesterday morning. The Inquest was adjourned until today, in order that further evidence might be procured as to the custom or rules of the service as to covering the spanker. Mr W. Eastlake, Admiralty Law Agent, watched the Inquiry on behalf of the Admiralty.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 February 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Valorous. - On Saturday Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, resumed the Inquiry at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, into the circumstances attending the death of ALFRED WHITE, aged 18 years, ordinary seaman, late of the Valorous, who died from the effects of a fall. Mr William Eastlake, Admiralty law agent, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty. The deceased and another man were engaged aloft on Thursday afternoon in covering the spanker, and, after the peak was finished, began to "work" down the mast. Instead of coming down by means of the rings around the mast, deceased caught hold of the distant lines, but, being too thin to bear his weight, they gave away, and he was thrown to the deck, a distance of over 27 ft. The Inquest was adjourned from Friday in order that testimony might be given as to the rules or customs of the service respecting the covering of the spanker. On Saturday Lieutenant Joseph Calwell, serving on board the Valorous, now lying in Barnpool, stated that he was on deck on duty at the time of the accident. Deceased had frequently been employed in covering the spanker, and was thoroughly competent to do the work. Stools were kept on board vessels to be used in such work for convenience sake; but it was usually optional on the part of the man to take them. - By the Jury: It was not usual for seamen to use stools in covering the sail, and deceased did not apply for one. There was a petty officer in charge of the men on the afternoon in question. - Richard Hoyle, gunner's mate, said he had never seen stools used in such work when ships were in harbour. Deceased ought to have come down by the brails. Witness had never seen anyone, during the time he had been in the service, hold on by the distant line. - By Lieut. Calwell: Men were constantly being cautioned not to run unnecessary risks in working aloft and in other parts of the ship. - The Coroner remarked that the deceased could have obtained a stool if he had cared to apply for it, and as he did not no one could be blamed for the accident. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 February 1878
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Torquay yesterday by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of a child named BASSETT. The deceased, who was six months old, was taken out on Saturday by a little girl named Coombes, who accidentally slipped and fell and caused such injuries to the infant that he died shortly afterwards. The bad state of the footpath was alleged to have been the cause of the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 February 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquiry was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of FREDERICK VOSPER, aged 67 years, plasterer. - Mr William D. Stamp, resident surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, stated that deceased was admitted there on the 20th instant suffering from two wounds on the right side of his throat. The larger wound was about four inches long and one deep, and the smaller was superficial and about an inch in length. From his appearance witness thought deceased had lost a considerable quantity of blood. He said that he had inflicted the wound whilst shaving, but witness did not think this likely. When admitted he seemed quite reasonable, but subsequently became delirious and shewed signs of unconsciousness of mind. On Monday congestion of the lungs set in, and that was the immediate cause of his death, although the wound in the throat had, in all probability, accelerated it. - JOHN VOSPER, son of the deceased, stated that on the 20th he came downstairs about 5.30, and saw his father sitting in front of the fire, and, on witness going to him, saw that there was a large wound in his neck. His father said he had done it about two hours previously, whilst shaving. He had been ill for some time, and frequently gave evidence of not being right in his mind. - The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from Congestion of the Lungs, accelerated by the wounds in his throat, which he inflicted on himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fall At The Great Western Docks. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD LAVIS, aged 78 years. - Mr G. Titley, residing at 6 St. Paul-street, Stonehouse, stated that he knew the deceased, and on Tuesday morning witness and deceased were fishing together. About 11 a.m. witness, deceased and two or three others were fishing on the quay near the Great Western Docks Gate, when they heard a fall, and on looking around saw the deceased in the water, head downwards. Deceased was promptly taken out of the water, and witness saw a large amount of blood flowing from his head. There was a large "hawser" on the quay. Just where the deceased fell the quay projected nine or ten feet from the top. Witness thought that the deceased struck the quay with his head before he touched the water. He was not pushed or touched by anyone before he fell into the water, but probably entangled his feet in the rope. The deceased had been sitting on a box for an hour and a half previous to the accident; but had been standing about five minutes before he fell. - Herbert Herbert, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that when deceased was brought to the Hospital he was suffering from a severe scalp wound and concussion of the brain, and there was a large quantity of water in his lungs. Deceased died about ten minutes after admission. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 March 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening respecting the death of ALICE ROSINA WATTS, aged 2 years. The child seemed to be in its usual health on Thursday night, but on awaking yesterday morning MRS WATTS found it lying dead by her side. Deceased had been weak from birth. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Suffocated In Bed. - Last night the Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM JOHN BARLOW, aged two months, the son of a seaman serving on board H.M.S. Valiant. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased, its mother, and two brothers slept in one bed, and that early on Thursday morning it was overlain by one of the boys. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 4 March 1878
CREDITON - A Dangerous Bridge. - Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Crediton on Saturday respecting the death of WILLIAM HOWARD, head gamekeeper to Major Buller. The deceased was found about ten o'clock on Thursday night in the river, near the railway station, and from the evidence of Mr Horgate, surgeon, it appeared that the actual cause of death was drowning, although there were some severe wounds on deceased's head, which was not under water when he was discovered. Deceased had been with a rabbiting party on Wednesday, and he went to the house of his employer about seven o'clock rather the worse for drink; but when he left it about ten he was much more sober, and despite the darkness of the night, he succeeded in making his way across fields and roads to the private bridge which leads to the village in which he resided. He succeeded in crossing this, but as the approaches are not properly guarded he evidently missed his footing at the end, and fell a distance of 15 feet on some large stones below. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" and appended to their verdict a recommendation that the approaches to the bridge should be better guarded. It appears that during Thursday many persons passed over the bridge, but did not observe the body; and still more strange a tradesman of the town caught a trout just about the spot, and passed twice within about four feet of where HOWARD lay. His double-barrelled gun was found under the water some distance from his body. About fourteen years since a man named Maunder, who resided in the same house which HOWARD afterwards occupied, fell during great darkness into a deep gutter near the bridge in question, and was found drowned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 March 1878
PLYMOUTH - A Child Burnt To Death. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of a child aged 8 years, the daughter of MR C. W. REEVE, carpenter, Ham-street. The evidence shewed that on Saturday night last the deceased was put to bed by her mother, who subsequently went out. About nine o'clock the deceased awoke, and finding that her mother had not returned she got out of bed and caught hold of a candle, which ignited her nightdress. Mr Greenway, surgeon, was sent for, and he attended the deceased until Monday night, when she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 March 1878
LYDFORD - Princetown As A Health Resort. - At an Inquest held at Princetown yesterday respecting the death of a convict named MARTIN GORMAN, who died on Wednesday, Mr Fulford, the newly-elected Coroner, remarked that the healthy state of Princetown was proverbial, and considering that the convicts sent to Dartmoor were mostly confirmed invalids, the fact of only one death occurring amongst the prison population (numbering upwards of 1,400 in all) would no doubt tend to induce medical men to strongly recommend the neighbourhood to patients. The deceased, although said to be only 25 years of age, looked like a man of over 50, dissipation and abuse of constitution marking his every feature. He was known as an "habitual" in prison parlance. The verdict of the Jury was "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 March 1878
DARTMOUTH - Child Killed At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Coroner of Dartmouth, concerning the death of WILLIAM SANTILLO, aged eight years, the son of a pensioner. It appears that the deceased was playing with other children in a timber yard on a wagon, the shaft of which accidentally slipped and struck him on the head, inflicting fatal injuries. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, on THOMAS WOODGATES, aged 51 years, a farm labourer, living at Higher Hoopers Farm, St. David's, who was found dead near a hayrick on the farm, shortly after he had been seen attending to some cattle. He had apparently been in good health previously, and the medical evidence favoured the theory that death was caused by heart disease. A verdict accordingly was returned.

TEIGNMOUTH - The Fatal Railway Accident At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary yesterday by Mr Michelmore respecting the death of THOMAS HANCOCK, who was killed at the railway station on the previous evening. - Partridge, the guard of the train leaving Teignmouth at 8.27 p.m., deposed that as he was unlocking the door of his van he saw the deceased running up the platform, and when he (witness) was about to enter the van he felt someone strike his heels. On looking round he saw that the deceased had fallen between the platform and the train, and that his head was beneath the carriage step. - Warne, a porter, stated that he saw the deceased running along the platform for the purpose of entering the train after it had started. He heard a knocking of feet, and then saw the deceased fall, striking the side of the carriage, and thus going between it and the platform. Deceased was dragged about 16 yards to the end of the platform, when witness dragged him out. - Mr Boundy, stationmaster, stated that just after the accident he asked HANCOCK whether he was hurt, and that the deceased replied, "I do not know." He was then taken to the waiting-room, and a doctor was sent for, but he died in the course of a few minutes. - Mr Webber, inspector of the telegraph department, gave the deceased an excellent character, and said that he had been employed by the railway company for twenty-nine years. The Coroner, in summing up, spoke of the dangerous habit of many of the men in the employ of railway companies of entering trains whilst in motion. He had frequently seen men who were not guards of trains doing this, and he wondered that there were not more accidents through it. It was the duty of these men to be in the train the same time as other passengers, there being no necessity for them to stand about until the train was in motion. He hoped that this would be a warning to railway employees. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 March 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - The Infuriated Cattle At Torpoint. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Morice Town, Devonport, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN ATWILL KING, aged 54 years, who died from the effects of an injury received by being tossed by a cow. Mr A. Gard, solicitor, watched the proceedings on behalf of the friends of the deceased. - James Wilmott, a cattle drover, in the employ of Mr Quance, butcher, Devonport, said that on Monday he was sent to Crofthole for a cow and heifer, and he, with the assistance of a sailor, named Willcocks, brought them to Torpoint, but was just too late to catch the half-past one bridge. The cattle were perfectly quiet up their arrival at the toll-gate. They had to wait for the bridge, and on its arrival three little boys, about 10 or 12 years of age, ran up the beach and waved their hands in front of the animals. the cow immediately made a rush at them, but missing them knocked down an old lady, and rolled her over three times with its horns. After the cow had attacked the deceased, the sailor left by the bridge to come to Devonport to obtain help. Witness drove the cow into a corner behind the toll-house after the woman was tossed; and, until the deceased came down, the beast was perfectly quiet. Directly the deceased made his appearance the cow made a bolt at him, and tossed him two feet; and he fell heavily on the ground. And then it rolled him twice with its horns. Witness, in beating the animal back to the corner, broke his heavy stick about its head. He had been connected with cattle for fourteen years. - By the Coroner: He considered it would be well when a vicious animal had to be driven for two men to be employed - one before and the other behind. - By Mr Gard: He told the deceased not to go inside the gates, but he persisted in doing it without making a reply,. Upon getting inside witness shouted "Come back, come back." Deceased did not answer but went on, and the cow charged him. He did not tell MR KING that the cow was vicious because he thought he knew it. Witness heard P.C. Couch caution deceased and others as well not to venture on the beach. - By the Jury: He believed he could have kept the cow quiet had no one come inside the gate, and if he had had proper assistance he might have stopped it from charging the deceased. - By the Coroner: Sometimes animals became restive on smelling the sea air. - Edward Seward, a seaman in the Royal Navy, said that he accompanied the last witness to Crafthole, and assisted in driving the two beasts to Torpoint, where they arrived between one and two p.m. The animals were very quiet the whole of the journey to the ferry gate, but one of them, when upon the beach, was frightened by some boys, who ran up in front of them. After the cow had tossed the woman he cautioned the deceased, whom he saw entering the tollgate, not to go upon the beach. He was sure that the deceased heard the warning, but he took no heed of it. Witness saw the cow attack MR KING and afterward toss him, and ran to his assistance. He (Seward) then went to Devonport by the bridge for the purpose of sending over a drover to assist Wilmott, whom he left at Torpoint in charge of the two animals. - By Mr Gard: Excepting the caution which he gave to the deceased, MR KING might not have known that the cow was wild, as it was standing quietly in a corner of the beach. - P.C. Couch, stationed at Torpoint, deposed to seeing the cow toss a woman who left the bridge. He (witness) stood at the toll gate and cautioned all who attempted to go inside, telling them to wait until the cow was secured. He warned the deceased, who made no reply to his caution, and upon getting inside the gate ran toward the shed used as a waiting room. The cow rushed after him and catching him in the side tossed him about four or five feet. Before the deceased attempted to get on board the ferry, three or four persons whom witness also cautioned, got on board in safety. He had no orders to keep persons from going on the beach, but he thought it his duty, if possible, to prevent them from going there. - By the Jury: He (witness) knew that a woman had been tossed, but there was nothing in the appearance of the beast that would make him believe that it was dangerous. The deceased was taken into the waiting shed by a naval pensioner named Broad, and Mr Ryder, the chief engineer in the employ of the Ferry Company, also went to his assistance. Witness believed that the accident might have been avoided had there been a shed upon the beach in which the cattle might have been placed while the passengers were passing up and down. There was a great traffic of cattle on the Torpoint side, and there ought to be, for the safety of the public, some place to keep them in for the time. - Nicholas Broad, a naval pensioner, residing at Torpoint, and who had only one arm, detailed the attack upon the deceased, and said that he was the first to go to MR KING'S assistance, and after carrying him into the shed he went for a plank to block the entrance as there was no door. - Mr W. J. Gard, surgeon, said that he was called to see the deceased who was brought to his home, 50 Haddington-road, Stoke, in a cab, about four o'clock on Monday afternoon, and was immediately put to bed. He examined him and found him to be suffering from a very severe shock. The hip was injured, and there was a peculiar fracture of the left thigh bone. Deceased also complained of pains below the ribs, probably from an injury to some internal organ, where he had probably been struck when tossed. He saw the deceased again about eight o'clock the same evening, when he was considerably worse; indeed, he was getting into a state of collapse. About half an hour later he died. Death was the result of shock to the system, consequent on the accident. - By the Jury: Deceased was not in a robust state of health, but he believed that such a shock to any person of deceased's age would have caused death. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he believed that the Jury would concur in his opinion that if there had been a proper place on the beach for the reception of cattle whilst waiting for the ferry, the accident would never had occurred. The ferry owners received good support from this traffic, and they could well afford to provide such a place. In speaking more particularly of the circumstances of the case, Mr Vaughan said that the policeman thought the man Broad deserved thanks for having fearlessly, and at personal risk, gone to the deceased's assistance. The animals seemed not to have been badly treated nor improperly driven, and it appeared from the evidence that the drovers did all they could to prevent the ferocious animal from doing injury. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and adding that they thought it would be advisable for the authorities to erect a shed on the Torpoint side of the water for the reception of cattle which had to wait for the ferry. - The Inquiry which lasted three hours, then terminated.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 March 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Naval Officer. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the King's Arms, North-road, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of GILBERT JOHN VAUX, aged 34 years, assistant paymaster, serving on board the Indus, Devonport. - FREDERICK L. VAUX, clerk at the Admiralty, Whitehall, stated that the deceased was his brother, and that he had a severe epileptic fit about three years since. At that time the deceased was suffering from a combination of diseases, and the attack nearly proved fatal. - Richard Munday, paymaster, serving on board the Indus, stated that on Tuesday the deceased attended to his duties on board his vessel as usual, but he was unwell. About three p.m. the deceased and witness landed at Keyham-yard, and he then appeared to be short of breath. - Eva Spring, residing at 16 Arundel-crescent, at which house the deceased also resided, deposed that she had known the deceased about fifteen months. About a quarter to four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon the deceased returned home from duty, and as he felt very ill he shortly afterwards retired to rest. At ten minutes to six he was seized with a fit, from which he rallied in a few minutes; and a quarter of an hour subsequently he had a second fit, when Mr Lewis, surgeon, was sent for, but he expired before his arrival. - James G. Netting, chemist, carrying on business in North-road, stated that about four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon the deceased came into his shop, and told him that he fancied he caught a cold, as he was suffering from tightness on the chest. He told the deceased that he had better see a medical man; but he made light of the matter, and desired witness to supply him with some medicine. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Of A Tramp. - At the Guildhall, Barnstaple, on Wednesday night, an Inquest was held by Mr Bencraft, respecting the death of JOSEPH STRATTON. The evidence shewed that the deceased was seen by a policeman walking in the street, at about half-past six o'clock on Tuesday evening, and shortly after a report was brought to the police-station that a man was in a fit in High-street. Two constables were despatched to his assistance, and ultimately he was conveyed to the police-station, where he had a series of strong epileptic fits, and expired at half-past eight. He was identified by papers found upon him; and it appeared that some years ago he contributed to the Scottish Coppersmiths' Friendly Society. Two women identified him as a tramp they had seen in Cornwall, who preferred turnips, swedes, "slops," sugar and liquor to proper food. It was considered probable that he had been suffering from diabetes. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 March 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN BOTERELL, aged 73 years. On Monday night, about half-past 10 o'clock, the deceased - who resided in Courtenay-street - went to bed in his usual health. At half-past 3 o'clock yesterday morning the deceased's son awoke and saw his father sitting on his bed and breathing very hard. Soon afterwards the deceased fell back on the bed, and died within a few minutes. Mr Owen, surgeon, who was sent for immediately, thought that death was caused by heart disease. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 March 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - Death Accelerated By Exposure. - Mr Michelmore County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Newton Workhouse yesterday respecting the death of JOHN HELMORE, who died in the Workhouse on Wednesday two days after being received there from Dawlish. Mr Alsop, the clerk to the Board, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Guardians. - John Moxey, Master of the Newton Workhouse, stated that the deceased was admitted into the house on Monday evening, about six o'clock. He came alone, and had walked from the railway station. He was seen by witness about half an hour after his arrival. The deceased did not appear to be very well. He was admitted by an order from the relieving officer. [The order was here produced. It was signed Joseph Yolland, and dated March 14th.] He was put into a warm room, and was supplied with bread and butter and warm tea; and the nurse took charge of him. Witness did not speak to him until the next day, when he complained that he was unwell, and said, "If I could have had a little relief out doors I should not have come in." The doctor saw him shortly after his arrival. The man died on Wednesday morning, about ten o'clock. He (witness) saw him about an hour before his death, and also when he expired. - Susan Bartlett, nurse at the Workhouse, said she saw the deceased in the bath ward on Monday evening, and said, "What is the matter?" to which he replied, "I have heart disease and asthma." She told him to keep himself quiet, and that the next day he should see the doctor. The doctor saw him about 5 p.m. on Tuesday, and also on Wednesday morning. On Tuesday evening the doctor prescribed medicine, which she gave him, and also some gin and water. When she saw him the Wednesday morning early he was much worse. She could see this by his face, and his legs were much discoloured. He died about an hour after she put up a plaister and gave him the gin and water. There were five other inmates in the ward with HELMORE when he died. The doctor was not sent for when he was seen to be so ill on Wednesday morning. As he was so ill she thought it was of no use to send for him. - FANNY HELMORE deposed that she was the wife of HENRY HELMORE, and lived at Park-hill, Dawlish. She had seen the body of JOHN HELMORE and identified it as the body of her husband's brother. He had been wandering about, and had been to the Forest of Dean, and came to her house about a fortnight ago. He was 58 years of age. He complained that he was ill, and he got worse every day afterwards. When he first came he said that he had walked a good many miles. Some few days afterwards she went for Mr Parsons, surgeon, of Dawlish, after getting a medical order from Mr Lorram, the assistant-overseer. Mr Parsons came to see him, and ordered him some meat, which deceased went to Mr Lammacraft's and got himself. The doctor came and saw him several times and at other times he went to see the doctor himself. She asked Yolland, the relieving officer, for something for him, as he stood in need of it. He told her that he had no orders to give him any out-door relief, and he was to go into the House on Thursday week. He received the order, and on Monday, the 18th instant, he came into the House. She did not see him off. - Arthur Daniel Parsons deposed: I am a surgeon in practice at Dawlish, and am one of the medical officers of the Union. On the 8th of March I saw the deceased, JOHN HELMORE, in consequence of a medical order. He came to my house, and I found that he was suffering from asthma and heart disease. I gave him first of all some stimulants. I gave him an order to take to Mr Loram for some mutton, and told him to take mutton broth and go to bed. I saw him again on the 11th, and found him in a much better state of health, but I found him suffering from asthma, and he was not in a fit state to be removed. I saw him every day after up to the 14th March, and on the 11th gave him a second recommend to take to Mr Loram for mutton broth. The reason why I marked the recommend "important" the second time was because he was so faint and poorly. The first order was not attended to by Mr Loram. He said the deceased must come into the House, and that was my reason for marking the second order "important." The order was returned to me again in its present torn state. During my attendance on deceased I supplied the little things I thought necessary myself, as Mr Yolland, the relieving officer, told me he could do nothing for him. I told both Mr Loram and Mr Yolland that if they removed the man to the Workhouse they would be responsible, and not me, for he was in a dying state. I never knew that the man was removed to the house until Wednesday last, when I went before the Newton Board of Guardians to know what my position was as a medical officer of that Board. He was in the habit of calling and seeing me, and I thought the man was better, as I had not seen him since the 14th inst. Knocking about by train would be dangerous to anyone suffering from heart disease. - Samuel Loram said I reside at Dawlish, and am assistant-overseer of the parish. On the 8th March I first saw JOHN HELMORE, the deceased. He came to my house between one and two o'clock, and said he wanted an order for the doctor as he felt poorly. I asked him who and what he was; he was a perfect stranger to me. He told me his friends were residing in Dawlish. I told him to go to my office at the Townhall, and, after asking him the usual questions, gave him the order. At the same time I told him I had no power to grant him out-door relief. I next saw him on the 11th March. He then handed me the medical order for 2lbs. of mutton, but I reminded the applicant of the way in which I was placed as to granting the order for the mutton, as he had not been before the Newton Board of Guardians. I said, "I really can't help you until Thursday." Mr Parsons said he should give him 2lbs of mutton himself, and that the man was not fit to be removed to the House. I gave the same explanation last Wednesday week as I have given now, and the chairman said I had acted quite right. I had no more to do with the case, but handed it over to Mr Yolland, the relieving officer. The assistant-overseer is not allowed to give any out-door relief except on his own responsibility. I paid his fare to Newton, and gave him 4d. to have a drop of beer, and gave him tobacco. - Joseph Yolland said: I am a relieving officer of the north-east district, residing at Teignmouth. The first time I knew anything about the deceased was last Wednesday week, when Mr Parsons stated in his report that he had ordered meat for JOHN HELMORE, and I had refused to give it, but at that time I did not know the man or anything about him. When I saw the deceased I thought the best place for him was the Union House, and he consented to go. I told him Mr Loram would pay his expenses down to Newton. I had heard from Mr Parsons that it would be dangerous to remove the deceased, and that he would not be responsible for the man's removal. If the doctor had given me a certificate that it was "very" dangerous to remove the man, I should not have allowed him to go; but he refused to give me a certificate to that effect. - Nathaniel T. J. Haydon, the house surgeon of the workhouse, stated that he first saw the deceased on Tuesday evening last, and examined him. He appeared to be suffering from disease of the lungs, and very irritable heart disease. He was very ill, and his lips were purple, but witness did not think he was seriously ill. He told him to keep himself warm in the ward, and told the nurse to give him some medicine which he prescribed, and also hot gin and water. Did not see him again until after his death. He had made a post mortem examination of the body, which appeared to be well nourished. The left lung was full of frothy air; the right lung shewed signs of inflammation. The walls of the heart were thin, but the valves were healthy. He thought that the immediate cause of death was diseased lungs and kidneys, and secondarily the heart. In his opinion the removal by train of a man in the state HELMORE was in would hasten death. - The Jury found that the deceased died from "Natural Causes" accelerated by exposure to cold in removal to the Workhouse, and they were further strongly of opinion that relief should have been given at Dawlish. - the Inquiry lasted from 2.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 March 1878
BRIXHAM - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Waterman's Arms, Higher Brixham, on WM. STONE, aged 36, a stonemason. From the evidence of Sarah Ann Green, with whom deceased lodged, it appeared that STONE came home on Saturday at eight p.m., very tipsy, and asked for a light, which was given him. He then went to the closet, and not returning for a quarter of an hour or so Mrs Green sent her daughter to see what he was doing, and she found him lying insensible on the floor. She called STONE'S father, who was in the house at the time, and he was taken into the back kitchen, and placed on the floor, where he was allowed to lie until eight o'clock the following morning. As he then shewed no signs of returning consciousness, he was taken up and put to bed. Mr G. Searle, the parish doctor, was sent for, but on his arrival the man was dead. Deceased had, it was said, for many years been given to habits of intemperance. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from an Apoplectic Fit brought on by Excessive Drinking, and the Coroner severely censured the conduct of the lodging-house keeper, and also the father, for their gross neglect in allowing the deceased to lie on a cold floor so many hours unattended, either by them or any medical man.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 March 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From Aloft. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of THEODORE HUCKINS, aged 31 years, seaman on board the barque Will W. Case, of Rocklands, United States, now on her passage to Liverpool. - Fredk. Walter Smith, manager of the Plymouth branch of the firm of Smith, Sundius and Co., agents for the Hamburg-American Steamship Company, said that on Sunday last he boarded the s.s. Herder in Cawsand Bay, when the captain of the vessel informed him that he had a man on board whom he desired to land. The captain also gave him a paper, which he handed to Mr Fox, the United States consul. The paper was to the effect that on the 22nd of March the Herder, in lat. 50 deg. north, long. 19 deg. west, fell in with the American barque Will. W. Case, of Rockland, with a signal of distress flying. Upon boarding her it was ascertained that one of her crew THEORDORE HUCKINS, aged 31 years, had fallen from aloft and had broken an arm and a leg. The Will. W. Case was from Bristol, United States bound to Liverpool. The man was taken on board the Herder, where he received medical attendance. - Mr A. H. Herbert, resident surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, deposed that the deceased was brought to the Hospital about seven o'clock on Sunday evening last, and that he was then in a very exhausted state. He was conscious, but speechless. Upon examining him he found that he was suffering from a compound fracture of the right leg and of the arm. The deceased had received medical treatment to a certain extent, his limb had been bound up, and placed in boxes made for the purpose, shewing clearly that he had been treated roughly. From the first witness ascertained no hopes of his recovery, and at three a.m. on Monday he died. He had made a post mortem examination and had ascertained that the lock-jaw, from which the deceased died, was produced by the injuries to the limbs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 29 March 1878
TORQUAY - The Strange Occurrence At Torquay. - At Torquay on Wednesday Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry touching the death of a newly-born child, whose body had been found under a sofa in the house of a Mr Croker, of the Higher Braddons, under circumstances already reported. The Coroner stated that the circumstances were very suspicious and advised an adjournment until the 4th proximo, when the mother, LUCY CATER, a young woman from Exeter, would probably be able to attend. The Inquest was adjourned accordingly.

TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Torquay - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Torquay Police Station by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a little girl, aged 2 ½ years named ELLEN LIGHTFOOT, who resided with her parents in Queen-street. During the absence of her parents at church on Sunday, the 17th inst., the deceased was left in charge of an uncle. By some unaccountable means a saucepan which was on the fire fell over and its contents fell on the child and severely scalded her about the body. The deceased was removed to the Infirmary, where she lingered in great suffering until Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 March 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Starvation. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Morice Town last evening into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN BARNACOTT, a carpenter, aged 70 years. William Uglow, residing at 6 Emma-place, Morice Town, stated that the deceased, who resided in the same house, was very poor, and since Christmas had not done much work. He had done nothing for the last fortnight, and witness thought that he was actually in want of food. He had never applied for relief from the parish or any charity. He was a very proud and reserved man, and would never tell anyone that he wanted anything. During the past fortnight witness had occasionally given him some bread and butter and some tea. For some time past the deceased had been very weak and apparently ill, but he would not have medical aid. On Thursday evening witness knocked at his door, and, receiving no answer, the room was entered, and the deceased found dead on the bed. - Sarah Smith, residing at 6 Emma-place, said that lately the deceased had got very thin and emaciated and often complained of a very severe cough. She would have often give him food, but as he was a very proud and reserved man, she did not do so for fear of offending him. Lately he had been so ill that he had not been able to leave his room. About half-past three o'clock on Thursday afternoon witness heard a knocking in his room, but did not take any notice of it. P.C. Johns said that he was called by Uglow to go to the deceased's room, but he found the door locked and got in by the window. He found the deceased lying on the bed dead. He examined the room and found it in a wretched state. He could find no food or fuel whatever. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that without doubt the deceased died from utter prostration for want of food and proper nourishment. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of food and proper nourishment."


Western Morning News, Friday 5 April 1878
PAIGNTON - Sudden Death At Paignton. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Paignton yesterday afternoon respecting the death of MARY ANN BRIMMICOMBE, 61, widow, of Paignton, who was found dead at the foot of the stairs in her house on Monday morning last. Deceased lived alone, and had every appearance, according to the medical evidence of Mr Goodridge, of having died of apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 April 1878
KINGSWEAR - A Drunken Boatman And A Drowned Man. - At the Steam Packet Inn, Kingswear, yesterday, Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner for the County, held an Inquest on JOHN MALLOCK, seaman, who was drowned on Wednesday night. - Robert Bracey, of Yarmouth, captain of the brigantine Regalia, lying in Dartmouth harbour, identified the body as that of one of his crew. Deceased was a native of Perth, and was 24 years of age. - William Garwood, one of the crew, said that on Wednesday evening he came off from Dartmouth with deceased just before eleven o'clock, in a boat, after having had a quart of beer each. The boatman who was pulling them ran into another boat lying alongside of the schooner and their boat capsized, and they all went into the water. Deceased caught hold of his leg, and he was obliged to kick him off. Witness and the boatman were picked up by two men from the Regalia, but deceased was not found. Deceased could not swim. - John Wills, the boatman, said he was "three-parts tight" when he took deceased into the boat with the last witness, and could not swim. If it had not been for the drink he should not have taken the men into the boat, but he had had four or five pints of beer. - Samuel Gurney, quay-master at Dartmouth, deposed to having picked up the body of the deceased on Thursday, in the middle of the harbour. The body was taken in a boat to within about thirty fathoms of the Dartmouth side while witness went to Mr Hockin (the town Clerk of Dartmouth) and asked what was to be done with the body. Mr Hockin said that as it was found below low water mark, it must be taken to Kingswear, and it came upon the county. Captain Toms (a county magistrate) had called upon witness and asked him whether Mr Hockin had really used those words, as there would probably be a further hearing of the matter. - [The Jury requested Mr Hockin's reason for having the body conveyed to Kingswear should be entered upon the depositions, which was done.] - The Deputy Coroner, in addressing the Jury, expressed regret that the public-houses of Dartmouth should be allowed to remain open until eleven o'clock, as late drinking was the cause of many accidents, and said that while the man Wills was morally guilty of the death of the deceased, he could not say that he was legally guilty. - The Jury having returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Deputy Coroner called in Wills and severely reprimanded him for his conduct, telling him that it had been caused by that cursed liking for drink which he shared with so many others, and to which everything else was made to give way. He had, in fact, upon this occasion, taken so much that he could not tell how much he did take. He stood now really with the burden of the man's death upon him and though some Jurymen would have returned a verdict of manslaughter against him, the present Jury had thought it a pure accident. It was to be hoped that that sad case would make him a better man in future.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 April 1878
PLYMOUTH - Death By Drowning At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening at Coxside, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM THOMAS SYMONS, aged 23 years, labourer, in the employ of Mr Sparrow, Cattedown. The deceased was engaged in discharging ballast from an American vessel at Coxside, and was usually about the first of the workmen to visit the vessel mornings. On Saturday morning the deceased was absent from his work, and his fellow workmen, fearing that he had fallen overboard whilst crossing the plank by which communication was made from the ship to the shore, commenced dragging, and ultimately found the body. The deceased, who had been twice blown up in the Cattedown quarries, was short-sighted. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 April 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Devonport coroner, Mr Vaughan, concerning the death of the little child, HENRY WORTH, who was killed on Saturday morning on Stonehouse-hill, by being run over by a tram car. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - The Late Mysterious Disappearance At Exeter. - Some four or five weeks ago a boy named W. HENRY BARRETT, living with his parents in the Cathedral Close, Exeter, was reported as missing under the following circumstances:- It appears that the boy was sent to visit an aunt who resides in Alphington-street, very near the River Exe. He had not returned at a late hour and inquiry proved that he never reached his aunt's house. Nothing was seen of him alive afterwards. It was conjectured that he had fallen into the river, and so got drowned, and the river was dragged persistently for some days, but the lad's body could not be found. It was discovered on Saturday last in the canal near Double Locks, more than a mile from the place at which the boy was supposed to have fallen into the water. The body had got jammed between some stakes, and this had prevented it rising to the surface as is usually the case with a drowned person nine days after death. An Inquest was held yesterday at the Double Locks Inn by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner. Mr Bell, surgeon, of Exeter, deposed that on examining the body he found it to be in an advanced state of decomposition. There were no fractures about the body, the only hurt being a slight bruise on the right cheek, probably caused by it striking against some hard substance, just after death. MRS ANN BARRETT, deceased's mother, stated that on the day of his disappearance her son left home to go to his aunt's in Alphington-street, and the boy not returning at the time appointed she went to his aunt's, who informed her that she had not seen him. She had seen the body of the dead child, which she identified as her son. - William Hutchings, seaman, of Exeter, deposed that on Saturday last he found the deceased, for whom he had been previously searching, in the canal near the Alphington bank. The body was jammed between some stakes. He extricated it and with assistance conveyed it to the Double Lock's Inn. A verdict was returned of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 April 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Accelerated By Drink. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM HODGE CHAPPELL, superannuated shipwright, aged 88 years, lately living at 24 Dockwall-street. On Monday night about 10.30 deceased was discovered in Catherine-street, by a man named George Whittle leaning against a public-house, where he had been drinking. He was in a very weak and exhausted condition, and was taken to Pond-lane, as it was supposed that he lived there. On reaching that place, however, he was apparently lifeless, and was conveyed to the Hospital, where it was found that life was extinct. Deceased was greatly addicted to drink and on Tuesday, April 2nd, the day on which he received his pension, he was brought home about midnight very drunk, and did not properly recover. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Drink."

TORQUAY - Mysterious Fatality At Torquay. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the police-station, Torquay, by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of a woman named PATERSON, aged about 50 years. The body was seen floating in the sea off Hope's Nose, on Sunday, but owing to the roughness of the weather it could not be recovered until the following day. The deceased was a charwoman, and had not been seen by any of her acquaintances since Thursday last, when her daughter and a Mrs Pearce conversed with her. It came out in evidence that the deceased had had notice that her services would not be required at Mr Stark's, one of the houses where she had done work, and it also transpired that she had obtained goods under false pretences. Whether these circumstances weighed on the deceased's mind and induced her to destroy herself no one could say, but the Coroner advised an Open Verdict, and one of "Found Drowned" was accordingly returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 April 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatality In The Great Western Docks. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, relative to the death of ROBERT LAUNDER, aged 35 years, a shipwright, in the employ of Mr Marshall. - Richard Trevorrow, shipwright, stated that on Friday, about seven p.m., he and the deceased, with other men, were engaged on board the ship Norfolk, in the Great Western Docks. They were working at the windlass and deceased left them to go into the hold after a batten. As he did not return witness and another man went in search of him, and found him lying insensible in the hold, bleeding slightly at the forehead. He must have fallen eighteen or twenty feet through a hole a little abaft the main hatchway on the maindeck. The holes were for the purpose of loading guano, and the ship had recently been engaged in that trade. Deceased was immediately taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Mr H. E. A. Herbert, resident surgeon at the Hospital, stated that deceased was brought in on Friday suffering from two scalp wounds, one on the left side very extensive. He had concussion of the brain, and died on Tuesday afternoon. - Thomas Cross, who was working with deceased, corroborated the first witness's evidence. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 15 April 1878
TORQUAY - Alleged Concealment Of Birth. - At the Torquay Police Court on Saturday, before Mr W. Bridges, county magistrate, ELIZABETH BRAY, alias CATER, was brought up on remand charged with concealing the birth of her child. Mr Carter defended. - Mr J. B. Richardson, surgeon, gave evidence as to the discovery of the child underneath a sofa in Braddons-street. He said the infant had had a separate existence, and had died from exposure, accelerated by pressure on the large vessels of the neck. - The Bench committed the prisoner for trial. - An Inquest was held at the Police Station in the evening of the same day on the body of the child, and Mr Michelmore, the Coroner, after a lengthy investigation of 4 ½ hours, committed the prisoner for trial on a verdict of "Manslaughter" being delivered by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 April 1878
EXETER - Suicide At Exeter - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, respecting the death of a man named MILLER, formerly an accountant. From the statement of the deceased's son, it appears that deceased had been out of work for some time, and had been given to fits of despondency. On Saturday night deceased retired to rest in unusually good spirits; but the following morning at about six o'clock he complained to his wife of having passed a restless night. He dressed himself, and went downstairs. He was discovered about an hour afterwards in a lifeless condition suspended by the neck in a back kitchen, the door of which he had bolted from the inside. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 April 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Morice Town yesterday relative to the death of AMELIA FOLEY, aged 2 years and 8 months. About nine o'clock on Sunday morning MRS FOLEY, mother of the deceased, residing at 14 John-street, went out to work leaving the deceased, who had been delicate from birth, in charge of a young woman named Eliza Scoble. About three o'clock in the afternoon Mrs Scoble went out for half an hour, leaving deceased apparently in her usual health, but on her return the child was dead. Deceased had been sleeping with her brother, who had been suffering from measles. Mr J. May, surgeon, made a post mortem examination and found that death had resulted from congestion of the lungs and suppressed measles, acting on a very weak constitution. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 April 1878
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of a man named GATER, aged 46, who had died at the Anchor Inn very suddenly. The deceased was a shoeing smith, and recently broke a blood vessel, but recovered and apparently regained his former health. Yesterday morning he visited the Anchor Inn and ordered a glass of ale. While drinking it in the taproom he suddenly exclaimed to a person who was in the room with him that he thought he would go home, as "he was dying." He then commenced to vomit blood and before medical assistance could be obtained he died. - Mr Bell, surgeon, said it was clear that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel and a verdict to that effect was returned.

KENTON - Found Dead In A Ditch. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Turf House Inn, (near Starcross) on JOHN STANTON, an elder man, well-known in Exeter as a county court bailiff and a "runner" for the Conservative party at elections. Deceased was sent to Kenton to take possession of certain premises. On the evening of the 1st of April he was in Exminster, about two miles from that village, but he was never seen alive afterwards, and on Tuesday his dead body was discovered in a dyke near the canal a short distance from Turf. - John Parsons, landlord of the Railway Hotel, Exminster, stated that at eight p.m. on April 1st, deceased drank a glass of whisky in his house and when he left said he was going on business to Topsham. Witness advised him not to go, as it was very dark, but he persisted in his intention. When he left he was perfectly sober. Mr Parsons stated that the place where the body was found was out of the track to Topsham. - W. J. Trace, of Exminster, a Juryman, stated that he saw deceased early in the evening at St. Thomas, Exeter, when he seemed to be tipsy. At a quarter to eight he saw him in the road leading to Exminster Station, when he asked if he was in time to catch the Exeter train. On telling him that the train was gone STANTON said, "I have lost everything, I had better go and have a cold bath." At half-past nine witness saw the deceased a third time in the village of Exminster. He then appeared much more "reasonable". When last witness saw him he was walking towards the railway station. - John Clarke, assistant at Turf Locks, proved finding the body; the head was above the surface of the water, which was only two feet deep. - Mr M. Farrant, surgeon, attributed death to drowning; but added that there was a slight abrasion on the right cheek and temple, which seemed to have resulted from a fall on gravel before death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

VIRGINSTOW - The Suspicious Death At Virginstow. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Two Slough, Virginstow, on the body of ANN JENKINS, housekeeper to Mr Harris, who died suddenly on Sunday night last under circumstances already reported. Mr Richard Tapley, Solicitor, appeared on behalf of the parents of the deceased, and Mr C. Vicary Bridgman for Mr Harris. - The body was identified by JOSIAH JENKINS, of Palford, father of deceased, who stated that his daughter was 23 years of age, and had been housekeeper with Mr Harris for over a year. He saw her last Michaelmas, when she was home for a holiday, and slept there three nights. At that time she was not engaged to anyone, but she was in correspondence with a man named Johns. Witness had since heard that his daughter was pregnant, and had written to her on the subject, but received no answer. - Mary Perkin, servant to Mr Harris, gave evidence to the effect that deceased had gone to chapel on Sunday afternoon, and was then apparently in her usual health. Witness came home about nine o'clock in the evening, and found deceased sitting by the kitchen fire with William Box, a boy who lived in the house. She left them there, and went to bed. He room was between that occupied by deceased and the one in which Mr Harris slept. She heard them both go to their respective rooms shortly after ten o'clock, and about midnight she heard a moaning noise proceeding from the room occupied by deceased. The moaning or groaning was repeated and witness got up and went to the room. She spoke twice to deceased, but receiving no reply went and lit a candle and again went back Still receiving no reply to her question as to what was the matter, she became alarmed and roused Mr Harris, who came at once. He inquired what was wrong, and lifted deceased in the bed, but she said nothing, and died after drawing one or two breaths. Medical aid and the assistance of the neighbours was called in as soon as Mr Harris became aware that something serious was the matter. - Mr Thomas Harris, who tendered himself as a witness through Mr Bridgman, corroborated the statement of previous witness. He and deceased were the last in the house to go to bed on Sunday night and deceased was then apparently in her usual health. Shortly after midnight he was called by Mary Perkin, and on going to deceased's bedroom found her perfectly unconscious. He lifted her in bed, but she just drew a breath and died. - Dr Ash, of Holsworthy, said that about 2.30 on Monday morning last he was called to the house of Mr Harris, and on arriving there found the deceased dead. He had not known her before, and when he saw her she had apparently been dead about three hours. He saw that her skin was much discoloured, and on examination discovered that she was pregnant. From further observations and from what he heard he came to the conclusion that she had not died from natural causes. The result of a subsequent post mortem examination was a discovery that the bowels were much distended from gases. There were no marks of external violence, and the organs were uniformly healthy; but the gullet at the back of the throat was red and congested, its lining membrane raised and stripped off, and this condition extended to the stomach, which was more or less inflamed, one large black patch being almost gangrenous. The intestines were similarly inflamed. In the stomach, mixed with some partly digested food, were large quantities of coarsely powdered leaves. The appearances in no way corresponded with any known disease, but were those of some acrid poison. The deceased was between six and seven months advanced in pregnancy, and instruments had evidently been used. - Police-sergeant Thomas Stone deposed to finding certain herbs in decoction and a portion of yew tree steeped as tea; also some pills in a pocket belonging to deceased, and some powdered dry leaves. - Dr Ash pronounced the herbs produced to be Irish yew, cyprus and juniper, and the powder to be the leaf coarsely powdered. It corresponded with the substance found in the stomach. The use of these herbs was well-known, and he had no doubt they had been the cause of death. - Mr Edward T. Pearse, who assisted at the post mortem examination corroborated the evidence of Dr Ash, and fully concurred in the opinion expressed by that gentleman. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had administered to herself the noxious poison which caused her death.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 April 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Found Drowned In Hamoaze. - An Inquest was held at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, on Thursday evening by Mr W. Shaddock, mayor and coroner of Saltash, on the body of a man found on the West Mud, Hamoaze, at 12.30 a.m. that day by a Saltash fisherman named Beazley. Beazley took the body to H.M.S. Howe, supposing it to be that of the man Monk, who was drowned from that ship on the 11th instant, and from there it was taken to the dead-house, Morice Town, by Mr Honey, warrant officer. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The body was identified yesterday by relatives as that of WILLIAM ROGERS, a jobbing mason, late of Wolsdon-street, Plymouth, who was last seen alive about eight week since. It is rumoured that something unpleasant occurred in connection with his family, and that he then threatened to commit suicide.

PLYMOUTH - A Miserable End. Another Victim To Drink. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Thursday respecting the death of a woman named RILEY, about 50 years of age. The first witness was Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, who stated that on Tuesday evening he was called to see the deceased, whom he found lying on a mattress on the floor, with both her eyes blackened and her face bruised. She told him that she had been fighting with a woman, and was suffering from a pain in her side. Her lungs were, he thought, in a bad condition, and haemorrhage set in, ending in death. In January he attended her for a severe scalp wound inflicted by her husband. He thought that death resulted from natural causes, accelerated by the very intemperate and irregular life she led, and that neither her fight with the woman nor the injury to her head had anything to do with death. - The son of the deceased deposed that his mother, who drank heavily, had of late complained of pains in her side. She had been in Manchester Infirmary, and spat blood. - P.C. Harris stated that about one o'clock on Thursday morning he saw the previous witness crying on Granby-green. The lad said his mother was dying, and he (witness) went to the room, where he saw the deceased lying on the floor in front of the fireplace, but there was no fire in. The husband was on a mattress, and he asked him to get off and let his wife lie on it as she was dying, but RILEY refused, saying that he knew his own business best, and adding, "The ---- is only dead drunk." There was a bundle of clothes under the woman's head, and this RILEY pulled away and put under his own - the head of the deceased falling on the floor. She died about ten minutes afterwards. On being told that his wife was dead, RILEY got up and dressed himself, and the deceased's body was then put on the mattress. The husband of the woman said that the constable spoke the truth He thought that the deceased was only drunk. She was addicted to drink, and was in the Manchester Hospital for three months through drinking rum, of which she was very fond. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that no doubt the deceased died from intemperance, want and poverty. The room was in a most wretched condition. The conduct of the husband was really disgraceful, and there could be no doubt that he committed a great act of cruelty. - "Death from Natural Causes, greatly accelerated, if not brought on in the first instance, by intemperate habits."

EXETER - Supposed Suicide At Exeter. - Supposed Suicide At Exeter. - About three week ago ALFRED PARRINGTON, aged 17, son of Colour-Sergeant PARRINGTON, of the 1st Devon Militia, residing in St. Thomas, Exeter, was missed from home; and nothing was heard of him until Wednesday evening, when his partly decomposed body was found in one of the mill leats in the West Quarter. - MR PARRINGTON, the father, stated at the Inquest held on Thursday evening that his son left home on the morning of the 22nd March to go to his work in one of the counting-houses in the city; but he never returned home, although he was seen as late as nine o'clock by a young woman named Pulman with whom he had been "keeping company" for a few weeks, and at half-past ten by a compositor named Satterly. Deceased had been getting depressed in spirits for some months, which witness attributed to the effects of a sunstroke last summer. - Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that there were no marks of violence on the body, and that death was evidently caused by drowning. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 April 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of MICHAEL OSBORNE, aged 77 years, residing at 1 Morley-place. The evidence shewed that on Monday the deceased went to Torquay in company with his granddaughter and daughter-in-law, and appeared in his usual health. He returned to Plymouth about ten o'clock, and went to his granddaughter's residence in York-street. About eleven o'clock the neighbours, hearing a noise, went into the room where the deceased was, and found him lying on the floor quite dead. He was fully dressed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 April 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Occurrence At Devonport Dockyard. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CORNISH, aged 57 years. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was a labourer in the Devonport dockyard, went on the 4th inst., to a storekeeper named Chard, for two cwt. of oakum. The deceased said he would go down into the yard and stop people from going near the window, which was about thirty feet from the ground, whilst the oakum was being thrown down. He went down, and shouted to the doorkeeper that "it was all right." One of the bundles, 56lbs. in weight, was thrown down, and the deceased, who was standing over 20ft. from the store, was seen to walk towards it as if in thought, and whilst he was doing so another bundle was thrown out, and struck him on the head and shoulders, causing him to fall down. He was taken to the Naval Hospital, where he died on Monday. The deceased said that he blamed no one but himself, as the accident was due to a mistake of his own. Mr R. L. Bett, staff-surgeon, R.N., made a post mortem examination and found that the deceased died from severe injuries to the spine and spinal cord. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating Chard from all blame.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Mutley last evening by Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, respecting the death of a child 2 months old, who had died whilst in bed with its parents - from, it was supposed, suffocation. The father of the child - a dairyman named WILLIAM LUSCOMBE - said he found the deceased dead, but warm, about six o'clock yesterday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of a child named WALTER EVANS, aged 4 years, the son of a fisherman. On March 25th the child received a wound in the head from a stone thrown by a girl named Adams; but the evidence went to shew that dead was caused by measles and inflammation of the lungs, with which the child was afterwards attacked. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 April 1878
PLYMOUTH - Alleged Death At Plymouth From Neglect And Ill-Usage. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening relative to the death of CHARLES CURWOOD, aged 1 year and 6 months. - Henry Mitchell Drew, master of the Plymouth Workhouse, stated that on Saturday last deceased was admitted to the House together with four other children, his brothers and sisters. He was received by the matron about 3.15 p.m., and died on Tuesday morning. - James Annear, relieving officer, stated that about five weeks since his attention was called to the family, consisting of the father and five children, of whom deceased was the youngest, living at 23 Looe-street, and on visiting them found the father and four of the children in one room. Witness told the father that he had heard he neglected his children, and he said he was fond of them and took care of them. He also said he had left his wife in Jersey or Guernsey, as she was not of good character, and had brought his family who were looking tolerably well fed, over to England. On the 20th of April a constable called on witness respecting the same family, and he, in company with the officer, visited 24 Looe-street, where they were then living. The father was away, and the children, with the exception of the deceased, who was in charge of a woman named Pike, were running about the streets. Witness examined the deceased, who appeared very ill, but pretty well nourished, and found a bruise on each cheek, and slight abrasions of the skin about the back. Witness found in the room no firing, no food and a general appearance of destitution. An order was then given for the admittance of the family to the House. Subsequently CURWOOD called on witness, and asked if he could not contribute towards his family's maintenance. He said he knew nothing of the bruises or abrasions, but he had left the child in charge of Mrs Pike. Witness took him to the police-station, and brought him before the Board of Guardians on Wednesday. - Sarah Pike stated that about five weeks since CURWOOD came to live at her house at 24 Looe-street, but during that time she had seen little of him, although she frequently saw the children. She often visited the deceased child in CURWOOD'S room, where it would lie groaning throughout the day and night, and generally found it sitting on the mattress undressed. Witness frequently took it bread and milk, as it was crying for food. When CURWOOD first came there witness never found any food in the room, nor did she during the last week, although about a fortnight ago, when the father was in work, they had plenty of food. On Friday last about midnight, in consequence of a disturbance in CURWOOD'S room, witness went there and found a large number of people and a policeman. She took deceased and another of CURWOOD'S children to her room to sleep, the daughter saying she was afraid to stay with her father. When witness took the child she noticed two bruises on its forehead and one on each cheek, and told the father he ought to be ashamed of himself for pinching the child. He said in answer to witness, and to the other people who were charging him with ill-using the child, that he did not know how the marks came there. He went out in the morning without troubling to inquire after the child. Witness washed and dressed the deceased on Saturday morning, and, in addition to the other bruises, noticed several scratches and bruises in the neck. It was very thin and wasted, and refused to take any food, and witness took it to Mr Prynne, surgeon, who said the child was starved and ill. Deceased was admitted to the Workhouse with the other children in the afternoon. During Good Friday witness heard the children crying, and people had got into CURWOOD'S room, and were ill-using him, and, on Mrs Pike asking the cause of such conduct, they said he had been ill-treating deceased. Witness never saw CURWOOD ill-use the child. - By a Juror: During the last week deceased could only moan, and had no strength to cry. - Grace Dyer, living at 13 Looe-street, said that on Tuesday, the 16th, CURWOOD engaged her to look after the child, but he only gave her 6d. - BESSIE CURWOOD, aged 9 years, stated that she had been to school, but did not know what the Bible was. As the Jury appeared divided as to whether the child should be examined, it was put to the vote, and the majority were in favour of her evidence being taken. She said that since they had been living in Plymouth, her father had been away all day to work, but they always had plenty to eat. He was kind to all of them except deceased and another little one. He would beat deceased because he would not eat his food, and would often catch him by his throat. Her brother had let deceased fall, and caused a bruise on his face. She had never seen her father kiss the baby. - Dr Frederick Aubrey Thomas, surgeon of the workhouse, stated that on Saturday, about 7.30 p.m. he saw the deceased, who seemed to be ill, but not dangerously so, at the Workhouse. The child appeared to be fairly nourished, but he noticed several bruises on the cheeks and forehead, and the face was somewhat swollen. Deceased continued to get worse, and died in a fit on Wednesday. Deceased appeared to be suffering from a shock and general debility, and was beyond medical aid when he first saw it. Witness had made a post mortem examination and found a considerable bruising of the face and forehead and the scalp. The two bruises over the left temple, which were very distinct, were just such marks as would have been caused by contact with the knuckles of a blow had been dealt with the fist. On opening the head witness found the bruises on the scalp had penetrated the skin, and there were bruises on the lining membrane of the skull corresponding with the external marks. There was considerable effusion of fluid, the result of congestion of the brain. The lungs were congested, but there were no other marks of disease. The cause of death was congestion of the brain and lungs, both of which might have been caused by neglect, accelerated by violence. He could not say how the violence was inflicted. Witness omitted to mention that there were bruises on either side of the throat as though it had been squeezed, and those marks must have been done maliciously and intentionally. He thought that the marks on the cheek were also produced intentionally, but those on the forehead might have been caused by a blow; but in his opinion they had been caused by the knuckles of an adult. Altogether the child appeared as if it had recently been subjected to ill-treatment. - ALFRED CURWOOD, butcher, father of the deceased, after being cautioned by the Coroner, stated that he had been in Plymouth since June last with his children, the deceased being the youngest. He remembered Mr Annear coming to see him, and it was quite true what he had told him, that the children had plenty to eat. Deceased had been delicate from birth, and the last few weeks it had become weaker, but he did not get a doctor for it. He knew there were marks on the child, but did not know how they came there. He noticed the marks on the face about a week back, and on making inquiries his daughter told him that his son had thrown him off the bed. When the child had convulsions he had given it a shake, but he never struck it in his life, and what his daughter had said was untrue; one woman had given her 4d. to make the story worse. On Good Friday he sent deceased out with his sisters and Mrs Dyer took it to the police station and he went and fetched it; and the people came into his room and mobbed him. Mrs Dyer was not sober at the time. - The Jury, a double one, returned as their verdict "That deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by violence, but there was no evidence to shew how the violence was caused." The Inquiry lasted four hours.

EGG BUCKLAND - Sudden Death Near Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at the Rising Sun Inn, Crabtree on Wednesday evening by Mr Robinson Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of WILLIAM GOAD, aged 28 years, eldest son of MR JOHN GOAD, of Cambridge-street, Plymouth. The deceased was passing through Lipson on his way home when he suddenly fell and died immediately. - Mr Langford, surgeon was examined and stated that the deceased died from epileptic fits. - The Jury, of whom Mr G. W. Wadbrook was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 April 1878
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at Underwood yesterday respecting the death of JOHN LEAMAN, aged 47 years, who had died from an injury to the spine received on the 14th ult., by a stone about two cwt. falling on his back whilst he was at work in Wheal Maria Hutchings Mine. The Inquest was adjourned until Monday next.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Treatment Of An Imbecile. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, and a double Jury, of whom Mr Bickle was Foreman, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Workhouse into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH TOUTON, an inmate, aged 34 years. - Ann Allson, an aged inmate, who acted as an assistant nurse in the female convalescent ward of the imbecile department, deposed that the deceased was one of the lunatics in that ward, and that she had been there for about two years. The deceased suffered from fits prior to her admission in the House, but since her admission she had not been attacked by any. On Saturday she was in her usual health, but as the evening approached she appeared to suffer from a little lightness in breathing. The nurse, Mrs Colwill, noticed this, and applied a linseed-meal poultice to relieve her. At eight o'clock she was placed in bed, and then she commenced to make a sort of grunting noise, which indicated that she was in pain. Several of the other inmates complained of the noise disturbing them, and as she continued to make the noise the nurse removed her into the adjoining bathroom, where a comfortable bed was made for her. On a previous occasion the deceased was placed in the bathroom in consequence of her having disturbed the other inmates. At three o'clock on Sunday morning the deceased was seized with a fit, and upon recovery she commenced to talk about something which witness could not remember. Subsequently the deceased walked into the ward, went into her own bed, and seemed to sleep comfortably until seven o'clock, when she awoke. She was then quite well; but before an hour had elapsed a great change occurred, and death shortly afterwards ensued. Witness denied that the deceased was found dead in bed, or that she heard her making any noise whilst she was in the bathroom. The nurse informed her that she heard her groaning, and that that led her to go into the bathroom. The deceased was not put into the bathroom for punishment; she was merely put there to prevent her disturbing the other patients. - Henry Michell Drew, master, stated that the deceased was an idiot, and was so upon her admission in March 1876. He would not have sanctioned the deceased being placed into the bathroom, even if she had happened to be troublesome. - Elizabeth Colwill, nurse, employed in the imbecile ward, deposed that as the noise made by the deceased, and which she heard her make on a previous occasion, annoyed her (witness) and the others in the ward, she desired her to be quiet, and so she did for a short time. Upon her recommencing the noise witness had her removed to the bathroom, where a comfortable bed was made for her. Deceased did not protest against being put into the room; and when witness asked her if she was comfortable, sometime after she had been in the room, she replied in the affirmative. About three o'clock on Sunday morning witness heard the deceased groaning, and upon entering the room she discovered that she was suffering from a fit, in which she lay about half an hour. Upon recovery deceased was placed in her usual bed in the ward, and slept comfortably. About eight o'clock that morning she went to see how deceased was progressing, and discovered that she was dying. Witness sent for the matron, but before she arrived, deceased expired. There were no appliances in the ward to give a patient a warm bath at an early hour in the morning. - Mr A. Thomas, House Surgeon, deposed that he knew deceased, who always enjoyed good health. On Sunday morning the last witness informed him that she put the deceased in the bathroom because she was annoying the other inmates. If the deceased had been permitted to remain in the ward probably it would have been very prejudicial to the other inmates; but he considered it was very injudicious on the part of Mrs Colwill to put deceased in the bathroom, especially as she did it on her own responsibility. He had made a post mortem examination, and had found the brain considerably congested, which was quite sufficient to cause death. No person who understood the real symptoms from which the deceased was suffering would have removed her from the ward into the bathroom. Mrs Colwill was an excellent nurse. If the deceased had not been removed into the bathroom the result would have probably been the same. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it was clear from Mr Thomas's evidence that the deceased died from Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 May 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Last evening an Inquiry was held at Plymouth by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of ISABELLA CLATWORTHY, aged 40 years, wife of an engineer, residing at 49 King's Gardens. About three months since the deceased had a severe attack of apoplexy, but she recovered; and on Monday afternoon last she had a second attack, from which she expired shortly afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 May 1878
DARTMOUTH - The body of MR RICHARD NUNN, builder, of Dartmouth, who has been missing since the 23rd of February, was picked up in the Dart on Saturday a little above Dittisham. An Inquest was afterwards held, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall At Keyham. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday respecting the death of THOMAS SAWDAY, aged 41 years. It was stated that the deceased was employed as a rigger in Keyham Yard, and on Friday morning was engaged on board the Iron Duke. He was told to go down from the top of the foremast to the cap, and about ten minutes afterwards he was heard to exclaim, "Look out," and was seen falling from the cap. He struck the topmast, went through the man-hole, and then fell outwards from the ship's side, and struck the block belonging to the running tackle which sent him towards the ship's side. He pitched on the deck on his back, and died within a few minutes. On examination of the cap, which was seventy-nine feet from the deck, it was found that nothing had been "carried away," and it was thought that the deceased slipped whilst he was in the act of making a net to stand in. Everything was perfectly still when he fell. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 May 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of FRANK HARRY COOPER, son of MR A. COOPER, confectioner, George-street. The child, who was aged a little over three months, was found dead by its mother's side, having been suffocated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated MRS COOPER from blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 May 1878
KINGSBRIDGE - The Fatality At Kingsbridge. - The Inquest on MR WILLIAM CRIMP, who was found dead in a brook at Kingsbridge on Sunday morning, was held yesterday by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner. It was stated that he was intoxicated on Saturday night and went to the White Hart Inn between nine and ten o'clock and asked for a pint of ale. Mrs Hele, the landlady, seeing the state he was in, refused to draw him anything, and he then left. He was next seen in a sitting position in the lane that leads to the brook referred to, by William Court - who tried to rouse him, but deceased attempted to beat him with a stick and Court went away. This was the last time he was seen alive. The Jury, after deliberating for half an hour, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN HAYWOOD, aged 44 years, a pensioner residing at 1 Commercial-road, Plymouth. Deceased, who was apparently a very healthy man, left for his work about five o'clock on Monday morning in his usual health. About half an hour later a labourer, named Thos. Doney, saw the deceased walking behind a cart laden with sand, outside Messrs. Harris and Snell's timber yard, when he suddenly grasped the back of the cart and fell to the ground. Mr Greenway, surgeon, was promptly in attendance, but deceased was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 May 1878
PLYMSTOCK - Suicide At Oreston. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Oreston relative to the death of RICHARD ARTHUR DEAN, aged 54 years, baker and confectioner, carrying on business at Oreston. - Wm. Henry Quick, baker, in the employ of the deceased, deposed that on the previous day he found his master in the cart-house, suspended from a beam by a piece of rope. His throat had been cut, and a razor was lying in a wheelbarrow within the deceased's reach. Witness cut him down, and found him to be quite dead. - Mr W. Mould, surgeon, Plymstock, stated that he had known the deceased for upwards of forty years, and knew that he suffered from depression. The cut in the throat was not sufficient to cause death. He believed that the deceased hanged himself whilst in a fit of temporary insanity. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a State of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMPTON - Death Through Excessive Drinking. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at Plympton, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES FERRIS, an inmate of the Plympton Lunatic Asylum, aged 64 years. - Thomas Hodge, an attendant at the Asylum, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Asylum on the 4th inst., and that about half-past six o'clock yesterday morning he found him lying on the floor of his bedroom quite dead. During the night the deceased was continually getting out of bed, and was very restless. - Mr C. Aldridge, medical superintendent of the Asylum, stated that the deceased previous to his admission into the Asylum resided at 2 Bayswater-terrace, North-road, Plymouth, and was a retired chemist. He suffered from chronic alcoholism and heart disease. Witness anticipated that the deceased would die suddenly. The primary cause of death was inebriation, but the secondary cause was heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Drunkenness."

PLYMOUTH - The Suicide In Plymouth Market. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, relative to the death of RICHARD GEDYE, a porter, aged about 54 years. - Henry Luscombe, butcher, carrying on business at No. 9 stall, Plymouth Market, stated that on Thursday evening, about 6.30 he happened to look into an empty stall opposite his own and saw deceased, as he thought, sitting down asleep; but on going across he found him hanging to a hook in the wall by a cord, and he immediately procured a knife, but him down, and loosened the cord around his neck, but he was quite dead. He sent for Mr Julian, inspector of the market, and he came and took charge of the body. - John Julian stated that he was called to the stall by the last witness, and found the deceased in a sitting posture on the ground, and still warm. The hook to which he had hanged himself was about six feet from the ground. For some months he had been a porter in the market, but he had recently been in the Workhouse, which he left about a week since. He had some conversation with him at the time, but the deceased did not appear depressed, although his wife and daughter had left him and gone to Australia. Witness thought his name was GIDDY. - Samuel Pomeroy, porter at the weighing house in the Market, stated that he knew the deceased well, and had seen him on Thursday about five o'clock in the afternoon, at a public-house. He appeared to be in very good spirits, and was quite sober. He said he would give witness his coat as he was going to hang himself, and at the same time he put the rope around his neck, but afterwards commenced laughing. A bout a quarter to six o'clock he went into the Market with the rope in his hand. He usually carried about a rope in his work. - The Jury returned as their verdict "That deceased Hanged himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

ASHBURTON - Sudden Death At Ashburton. - Mr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Ashburton yesterday on WILLIAM WHIDDON, aged 37, a clerk, who had died suddenly. - John Maddick, cabinet-maker, said he saw the deceased at the Railway Hotel on Wednesday afternoon, between four and half-past four o'clock. He was standing, leaning on the table in the little room of the bar, and Mr Andrews, the landlord, asked him to take the deceased home. He did so, but on arriving at the garden of his house deceased fell and did not speak afterwards. - William Andrews, keeper of the Railway Inn, stated that the deceased was led into his house about one o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, and remained there until about half-past three o'clock, when the sergeant of police entered, and said that a complaint had been made about WHIDDON getting so much drink there. The report that deceased got drunk there frequently was untrue. He had asked to be allowed to sit down and read the papers, and had had food there. On the day previous to his death he took dinner and tea in the house. He had been fetched many times by two friends, and he said his home was uncomfortable. On Wednesday deceased complained that he was ill, and witness gave him half a glass of brandy, and afterwards he had some ale. When the sergeant left he trembled much. Witness told him that he gave him fifteen minutes to leave the house, and he replied, "Mr Andrews, don't you turn against me the same as all the rest have." - ELIZABETH WHIDDON, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband enjoyed good health, but that he would break out at times, and that he had drank more than usual since the early part of March. Before he went out on Wednesday morning he complained that he was ill. - William John Fraser, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased on Wednesday and found him lying on the floor dead. He made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the lungs congested, heart empty, liver enlarged, the brain congested and blood and serum infused in the substance of and around the brain. The effusion of blood on the brain was in his opinion the cause of death. There was a scratch on deceased's nose, but no other outward mark of violence. - The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 May 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - A woman named SARAH BRAY, between 40 and 50 years of age, residing at Newton, was found dead in bed yesterday. She appeared to be in good health on Thursday, and it is supposed that death was caused by apoplexy. A verdict to this effect was returned at the Inquest held by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Last evening Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest on WILLIAM WEEKS, a naval pensioner, aged 50 years, who died suddenly in Bedford-street, whilst on his way to church on Wednesday evening. The deceased had been in ill-health for several years. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Poisoning By Misadventure. - Mr Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, on EDITH ELIZABETH LAWLER, aged twelve months, the child of a private in the 17th Regiment, now serving in India. The deceased, who had been residing with its grandmother, named JANE NEWCOMBE, had been weak from birth. It had lately been attended by Mr Eyley, surgeon, and was, apparently, dying from congestion of the lungs, when a neighbour gave it a small quantity of liquor-ammonia in mistake for the medicine prescribed, and this accelerated death. A verdict of Death by Misadventure was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 May 1878
BERE FERRERS - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner at Bereferris, yesterday, on a farmer named JAMES FERRIS, who was found dead in his garden. Mr Norrish, surgeon, found, as the result of a post-mortem examination that the deceased died from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

LAMERTON - A little boy named THOMAS WILLIAMS, three years old, the son of a miner, was found drowned in Row's water, at Lamerton, on Sunday. It appeared that he went out to play with five other little children on Saturday, and was not seen alive again. An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

MARY TAVY - Fatal Occurrence At Mary Tavy. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Mary Tavy yesterday respecting the death of a little girl aged 3 years, the daughter of JOHN SMITH, a packer on the Great Western Railway. On Friday afternoon the mother of the deceased was engaged in washing, and whilst she was absent from the house for a short time the child fell into a pan of hot water, receiving injuries from which she died in the course of the following day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 May 1878
DARTMOUTH - A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned at an Inquest held by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Coroner, of Dartmouth, on MR W. BUCKPITT, who committed suicide by cutting his throat.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - A Child Drowned at Exeter. - Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest at St. Thomas, Exeter, yesterday, on GEORGE LEWIS MILFORD, aged 7 years. On Monday morning the deceased was sent on an errand by his aunt, with whom he resided. He did not return, and on search being made his lifeless body was found in several feet of water in a gravel pit, situate near his aunt's house. No evidence as to how the deceased got into the water could be adduced. The medical testimony shewed that death resulted from drowning, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 May 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Last evening Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN LEE, aged about 40 years, an excavator. On the 2nd instant the deceased returned from the Cape of Good Hope and went to lodge with a Mrs Luxon, in Batter-street, where, on Tuesday morning, he was found dead in bed. Since his return from the Cape of Good Hope the deceased had been suffering from a severe cough. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 May 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES GALE, aged 76 years. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been subjected to giddiness and that early last week he went to Calstock for change of air. On Saturday he was coming to Plymouth from Calstock in the steamer Aerial, when he experienced great difficulty in breathing, and was taken to the cabin, where he died in the course of a few minutes. Dr Nield, who saw the deceased about five weeks ago, said he thought that the deceased died from brain disorder and heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian held another Inquest at the Guildhall, relative to the death of JOHN GORDEN GAYLARD, aged 58 years. Deceased, who resided in Green-street, occupied the position of verger at St. Andrew's Chapel, and on Sunday evening shortly after entering the chapel, about six o'clock, he complained of feeling unwell and went into the vestry. A cab was sent for, and as he was about to enter it he staggered and would have fallen if a bystander had not caught him. He was then taken to the vicarage, where he died a few minutes afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Mr Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on JOHN BUTLAND, aged 67, who died suddenly at his residence in Exe-street early on Saturday morning. Deceased had been unable to work at his trade as a mason, and on Saturday morning, whilst in bed, he was seized with a fit, and shortly afterwards died. Mr Roberts, surgeon, who was called in, gave it as his opinion that the fit, which was of an epileptic character, was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER - Mr Hooper also held an Inquest on ELIZABETH BROWN, aged 72 years, who was found dead in bed early yesterday morning. Deceased was a widow in receipt of parish relief, and occupied a room in Bartholomew-street. For some time past she had been under medical treatment. On Monday between seven and eight o'clock she was discovered by a niece lying on the bed on her face in her room quite dead. The surgeon, who was called in, was of opinion that deceased died from natural causes - probably heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.


Western Morning News, Friday 31 May 1878
LYDFORD - Death Of Convicts. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held two Inquests yesterday at Dartmoor Prisons. The first was on JAMES RICHARDS, a man who had spent the greater part of his life as a convict. He was described as a sailor, 55 years of age, undergoing a sentence of eight years for larceny. His prison conduct has been good. This was his fourth term of penal servitude, and he had several times been summarily convicted.
The second case was that of a prisoner named, SQUIRE GREGORY, 56 years old. The poor fellow had moved in very comfortable circumstances, and was undergoing a sentence of 5 years for receiving 200 bundles of yarn. He was convicted at Manchester with his brother, who but a few months ago succumbed, the punishment being more than the constitution could stand. The son of SQUIRE took his uncle away and yesterday passed through Tavistock for his father. His grief was heart-rending and he stated that no two men ever suffered more innocently than his father and uncle. GREGORY was visited by his friends a few days ago, and he then stated that he received the greatest care and attention, his slightest want being anticipated. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned in each case.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 June 1878
NORTH TAWTON - The Carriage Accident Near North Tawton. - MR A. C. LEWIS, clerk in the National Provincial Bank, Okehampton, died on Friday evening from injuries received by being thrown from a carriage on Thursday evening at a short distance from North Tawton. MR LEWIS, as has been already stated, was removed to the Gostwicke Arms, North Tawton, where he was attended by Dr Budd, but, from the first, no hope of his recovery were entertained. An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was very much respected, and his death has cast a gloom over Okehampton. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 June 1878
NORTHAM - Murder And Attempted Suicide At Appledore. - Great excitement was aroused at Appledore on Sunday by a report, only too well founded, that a young female child had been murdered by its mother. The woman in question - ANNIE BERRY SYDNEY - is the wife of THOMAS W. SYDNEY, a seaman, and is about 26 years of age. She had two children, one 5 years old and the other only 6 months. Since her last confinement she has been desponding and nervous, but there seems to have been no evidence of actual insanity, and little fear of her doing harm was felt. On Saturday, however, she attempted to drown herself and infant child in the Torridge. This she was prevented from doing, and was taken to the house of her mother, MRS TATEM, a widow, where she remained the night, and had breakfast on Sunday morning. Subsequent to this meal the unhappy woman was left for a time to herself, and she took advantage of this to return home. Upon arrival here she seems to have placed the child on a bed and then to have plunged a table knife, which was exceedingly blunt, into its throat near the left ear, inflicting a large and fatal wound, two inches in length. The woman, red-handed left the house, and again attempted to drown herself, but was prevented by two sailors, named Lamey. When apprehended she told the policeman how she inflicted the wound, and the knife was found concealed under a toilet cloth. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr J. Toller, County Coroner, and a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 June 1878
TORQUAY - Strange Death Of A Young Woman At Torquay. - Last evening the Inquest on SARAH ANN UNDERHAY, a young woman 19 years of age, was concluded by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, at Torquay. The deceased lived in Higher Union-street, Torquay, and falling ill she was attended by a nurse named Courvoisier, wife of a painter living in Victoria Park. Mr Richardson, surgeon, also attended her. Some few days after the nurse had been with her deceased said she was four months advanced in pregnancy, and that she had taken something which someone had given her "to put the child away." The nurse asked her who had given it to her, and she replied, "The man living the next door but one," and in that house there resided a painter named Train. The nurse had never seen the deceased take any liquid, the bottles being always taken away before she arrived. Deceased told the nurse that she had paid the man 4 ½d. and a few glasses of beer for the "stuff," and had promised to pay him some more when she had the money. She complained to the nurse of a very great pain in her stomach. The pain increased, and she died early on Friday morning last. At the commencement of the Inquiry the nurse was examined, and also Mr Richardson, who attended deceased. Mr Richardson described the symptoms which her disease exhibited. She suffered from severe pains in the abdomen, and he had asked her whether she had taken anything to cause the pain, to which she replied that she had not. Mr Richardson told the Jury that he had seen the bottles, and he had asked the deceased "when she took the stuff in the bottle," and she replied "Three or four times just before I sent for you the last time." - At the adjourned Inquiry yesterday, Mr Richardson was further examined, and he stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body. In the external investigation he found no marks of violence, but there was protuberance of the abdomen, and post mortem discolouration was present over various parts of the body. The internal examination led to some greenish fluid being found in the gullet. The stomach was distended and contained a greenish fluid which he had put in a bottle. The intestines were distended, matter escaped freely from the gall bladder, the anterior and upper part of the bladder had ulcerated away, the uterus was small contracted and empty, and the liver was commencing fatty generation. The cause of death was peritonitis, produced by gall stones perforating the bladder. It was an uncommon cause of death. He never knew a case of gall stones in one so young, and the softening of the bladder he regarded as even more extraordinary. The deceased was not with child. He believed the case to be unique. The peritonitis was so intense that it must have killed her rapidly. The symptoms of peritonitis would not have led the deceased to imagine herself to be enciente, and she must have thought herself to be in that condition before the attack of peritonitis set in. - Mr Gay, surgeon, corroborated. - Miss Mary Ann Murray, a lady residing in Torquay, who visited the deceased during her illness, and she found the two bottles that had been sent to the analyst. The nurse Courvoisier told witness that deceased had taken some of the "stuff to take away the child," and gave a description of the man from whom the mixtures were obtained. Witness recognised him as Mr Train, who was said to collect herbs. When witness found the large bottle deceased said to her, "Don't taste it, it is poison. Don't let the doctor see it." When asked where she got it she would not give a straight answer, merely saying "she got it from a man." It was then that the nurse stated it was "the man who lived next door but one." - Mrs Edwards, wife of a coachbuilder, saw the deceased frequently, and she denied she was pregnant. She found the bottles and gave them to Mr Richardson. She took them away because she had heard Mr Richardson say that he could not account for the symptoms from which the deceased suffered, and he thought she might have been taking something improper. - Mr Blyth, county analyst, Barnstaple, said he received from Police-Sergeant Ockford, Torquay, two bottles containing one or two drachms of a thick, dark coloured liquid that was mouldy and another seven ounces of an orange coloured liquid. He analysed the contents of the first bottle and it contained three-fifths of a grain of soluble matter and no poison mineral or vegetable whatever. The sediment he examined microscopically, and it proved to be some fine powder of a vegetable substance not derived, he believed, from any poisonous plant. The liquid in the other bottle was almost tasteless, and contained a crystalline substance, which he found to be gallic acid. There was no other acting ingredient. Supposing deceased had taken these liquids - any reasonable quantity of gallic acid - they would have been harmless. He also received the contents of the stomach, and it contained 3 ozs. of a dark, chocolate-coloured fluid. He could detect no poison. The stomach was perfectly healthy. there was no trace of inflammation. Had deceased taken any irritant poison it would have shewn its effects on the stomach. The pains deceased suffered would not be caused by these liquids. - The father of deceased was examined, and he said he knew of no particular friendship between his daughter and Train. - The Coroner said the case was a curious one, but had been cleared up. But if Train believed he was giving the poor girl a decoction of a poisonous character she imagined, he was guilty in his own mind, at any rate, of wilful murder, and might have laid himself open to most serious consequences. - A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 June 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of PHILIP DANIEL CHENOWETH, aged 20 years, who committed suicide by cutting his throat with a chisel and plane iron. The deceased, who resided at 62 James-street, was a carpenter, and had been employed by a Mr Avery. His master failed in business a short time ago, and since then his parents had noticed that the deceased had been much depressed in spirits. This condition was brought on by his being thrown out of employment. Deceased had previously attempted suicide by taking poison - some bichromate of potash, which was used in his trade. Dr Wilson had been called to see the deceased, and he came to the conclusion from the lad's manner and appearance that he was mentally disturbed. Considering that deceased was unaccountable for his acts, the doctor ordered that all sharp instruments should be kept from him. The lad, however, was found in his bedroom on Thursday morning with a gash in his throat three inches long, from which blood was flowing profusely, and notwithstanding that he received prompt medical treatment from Messrs. Wilson and De Larne, the poor fellow died about noon. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 June 1878
WEMBURY - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned at an Inquest held at Wembury by Mr Fulford (in the place of Mr R. R. Rodd) on the body of a black man named GEORGE SHEPHEARD. The deceased was a seaman on board the schooner Reverioco, of Wisbeach, which went ashore at the mouth of the Yealm on the 13th May. He is supposed to have been drowned by the capsizing of a boat belonging to that vessel.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 June 1878
PLYMOUTH - Singular Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ANNIE BLIGHT, aged 21, a domestic servant. The evidence shewed that on Monday morning the deceased, in company with another young woman, was going along the Millbay-road towards Millbay Pier. Some blasting operations were going on near Messrs. Fox and Bayly's timber yard, and the deceased, being frightened by the explosion, ran across the road right on to one of Messrs. Wainwright's horses, which had also taken fright at the explosion. The poor young woman was knocked down, and the wheels of the wagon passed over her body. She was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was found her ribs were broken and her spine and lungs injured. The deceased died about an hour after her admission to the Hospital. Mr Moses, contractor for the works, said that, according to their usual practice, a bell was sounded before the blasting took place. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating the driver - a man named Lee - from all blame; and recommending that precautions should be taken to warn people from approaching the place when blasting operations were going on.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 June 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Scaffold At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY MITCHELL WHITING, aged 15 years, plasterer. - John Loney, plasterer, stated that on Wednesday afternoon the deceased was standing on a scaffold erected outside a house in Well-street engaged in lath work, and whilst endeavouring to obtain a footing on an adjoining scaffold he fell a distance of twelve feet on to some scaffolding below. The deceased was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where the house surgeon - Mr A. H. Herbert - discovered that the base of his skull was severely fractured, and he died about midnight on Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ST. CYRES - The Fatal Accident At Newton St. Cyres. - An Inquest was held at Newton St. Cyres yesterday, before Mr Hooper, coroner, relative to the death of JAMES WESTAWAY, a mason, aged 52. On Thursday when the down train arrived at Newton St. Cyres Railway Station, about six o'clock, eight workmen were standing on the platform, and six of them entered one of the carriages. The whistle had sounded and the train was in motion when the deceased and another man attempted to get into a carriage. The other man succeeded, but the deceased slipped and fell between the platform and the rails, the train passing over his legs. The deceased was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but he died on the way. The legs were fearfully lacerated, one being completely severed from the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 June 1878
KINGSWEAR - Found Drowned. - The body of a man much decomposed and the features disfigured, was found in Dartmouth Harbour, near the Kingswear Jetty, on Sunday afternoon. On examination of the pockets of the deceased, it was found to be that of PETER PETERSEN, a German, who was to have sailed in the schooner Zixine, Captain Lovering, which left for the West Coast of Africa on the 30th May. The body was landed at Kingswear, and an Inquest was held by the County Coroner, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 June 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday relative to the death of JOHN STIDSTON, aged 54 years, a carter in the employ of Messrs. Colwill and Almond, cement manufacturers, Plymouth. Deceased was engaged in removing some casks from the goods department of the Great Western Railway at Millbay yesterday, and was seen by a porter named John Thomas apparently in good health about ten o'clock in the morning. Soon afterwards Thomas was informed that a man was lying dead in the road, and on going to the place indicated he found STIDSTON almost lifeless. Thomas raised deceased, and he died almost immediately. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 June 1878
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident At Bideford. - An Inquest was held at Bideford yesterday by the Borough Coroner on the body of MR JOHN PYKE, who, whilst driving a pony in a Bath-chair on Tuesday evening, was thrown out upon a kerbstone, cutting open his forehead. He was at once removed to the Infirmary, where he shortly afterwards died. Deceased was about 70 years of age, and at the time of the accident his wife was in London.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Quarrel In The Marine Barracks. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of RICHARD MUGFORD, private 19th company, R.M.L.I., stationed at Plymouth. Lieut. and Adjutant J. H. Sandwith watched the Inquiry on behalf of the marines; Mr W. F. Salmon representing Mr W. Eastlake, on behalf of the Admiralty; and Mr F. Arnold for the deceased's friends. On the 8th inst. the deceased had a quarrel with private Charles Lemon in the Marine Barracks at Stonehouse and it resulted in Lemon dealing MUGFORD two blows in the face, knocking him over three or four stone steps to the flags below, and causing a fracture of the skull which ultimately resulted in death. The first witness examined was Richard Vincent McCarthy, surgeon, Royal Marines, who stated that about 10.30 in the evening of the 8th inst. he was called to see the deceased at the Marine Barracks, and found him lying on a table in one of the rooms. He was semi-unconscious and had a wound over the right brow, and another on the left cheekbone, the first being the most serious. He could discover no fracture at the time. Dressed the wounds, and had deceased sent to the Hospital. On the steps of the next room there was a quantity of blood, which was said to have come from deceased. Attended the post mortem examination, and found the body to be that of a strong healthy man. The wound over the right brow was almost healed. A quantity of blood, clotted and weighing about four ounces, was found effused under the coverings of the brain on the left side, and extending over the upper and under surfaces of that organ. The under surface of the middle lobe of the brain was found torn, and the haemorrhage appeared to have proceeded from this spot. The skull was fractured at the seat of the injury over the right brow. The brain and vessels were healthy, as were the heart and its vessels. The fracture of the skull might have caused death, but he considered the laceration of the brain, and the effusion of blood, were the immediate causes. Did not think a blow from the fist would cause the fracture of the brain, but a fall might have done so. Considered that the rupture of the brain was the result of the violence which caused the fracture. - Corporal William John Palmer, R.M.L.I., stated that he mustered the room which Lemon occupied - No. 65 - on the evening of the 8th. About ten o'clock he saw deceased and Charles Lemon standing on the landing outside the front door, facing the parade. Both were sober, and they were having an argument, as MUGFORD alleged that Lemon had tried to "run him in" by the garrison police as a deserter. Lemon said, "You are no man; I will fight you," and then struck him in the face with his fist, knocking the deceased back on the iron rails. As deceased was getting up Lemon struck him again, and deceased fell over the steps face downward. Deceased became unconscious, and the doctor was sent for. Witness then noticed a mark on the deceased's forehead. MUGFORD did not return the blows. Lemon and deceased did not occupy the same room, and at that hour were supposed to have been in their respective rooms. - By Lemon: MUGFORD fell on the rail when the first blow was struck. Deceased was in the act of getting up when the second blow was struck. MUGFORD did not strike Lemon. - By the Foreman: Witness saw a quantity of blood on the pavement after the deceased fell, which was not there before. - Corporal James Forster, R.M.L.I., stated that on the evening of the 8th he saw Lemon and the deceased outside the passage. Saw Lemon strike MUGFORD and he fell back against the rails; and as he was getting up Lemon struck him again, and he fell over the steps on the flags face downwards. Raised deceased up, and saw blood on his forehead. Witness then took Lemon to the guardroom. - By Deceased's Friend: The last blow was the cause of the deceased falling over the steps. - By the Coroner: Could not say if they were sober, but Lemon appeared excited. - By the Foreman: The second blow was struck in the face. - The Coroner then read the statement of the deceased, taken before his death, in which he said that on Saturday, the 9th instant, he had been drinking with some comrades, and they all quarrelled and began to fight in the barracks and he got knocked down. He believed Lemon was there, and struck him with his fist, causing the injuries from which he was suffering. No one else hit him. He could remember nothing more. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that the case was very clear, and he had no doubt that the Jury would consider it their duty, however painful it might be, to return a verdict of manslaughter against Lemon. Whatever provocation Lemon had received should make no difference in their verdict. - The room was cleared and after some deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Lemon. - The Coroner, in committing him to take his trial at the Assizes, remarked that he entirely concurred in the verdict.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 June 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - Last Evening the Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a little girl, named BESSIE CASTON, aged 3 years, daughter of a bootmaker, residing at 3 Moon-street. On Wednesday the deceased became rather poorly, and yesterday morning she was found dead in her bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 24 June 1878
LYDFORD - A Convict Killed At Dartmoor Prison. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at Princetown on the body of the convict who was crushed by a stone on the previous day. The chief clerk, Mr Turpin, said the deceased was B 1,317, FREDERICK WHITTY, who was undergoing a sentence of penal servitude for forgery committed at Manchester in 1875. He was described as a well-conducted prisoner, and his age was now about 51. His friends had been informed of the accident and death. - Mr John Hodge, principal warder, was the next witness. He stated that he had the general charge of the convicts employed in the particular district where the accident occurred. The prisoner was under the immediate charge of Warder Mayer, who called him when the stone caved in which occasioned the prisoner's death. He should think the stone was over a ton in weight. The depth of the hole in which the prisoner got crushed was not more than two feet deep. He was extricated within two or three minutes after the accident and conveyed to the prison. Warder Mayer said the deceased and another man were employed in draining some waste land near Rundlestone. They were in the act of undermining the stone which caused the death of the prisoner when the ground, which appeared perfectly safe, suddenly caved in, and the stone toppled against the prisoner. Dr Power, the surgeon of the prison, said the prisoner was received by him about half-past nine on the morning of the accident. He was severely crushed. Every attention was paid to him, but the injuries were such as no human aid could save him. He died fully conscious at about a quarter to nine the same night. The Inquest lasted over two hours and at the close the Jury returned a unanimous verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the officers from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 June 1878
EXETER - Sudden Death In A Boat. - The attention of an Exeter constable was called early the other morning to the body of a man hanging head downwards over the side of a boat. Another boat was at once obtained, and on the man being reached he was found to be dead. The deceased's leg was caught in one of the seats of the boat. The body was afterwards identified as CHARLES EBBLES, 74, tinplate worker and glazier. It appears that on the previous night deceased went out in a boat for the purpose of fishing. At the Inquest held at the Port Royal Inn last evening, Mr Bell, surgeon, stated as his opinion that the deceased had died from heart disease, there being none of the usual signs of death from drowning, and no appearance of strangulation. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 June 1878
LYDFORD - Mr R. Fulford, Coroner for the Okehampton district, held an Inquest at the Prisons yesterday afternoon on the body of DANIEL BARON, a convict, aged 57, who died on Wednesday morning in the Infirmary, where he had been detained for more than two years by chronic bronchitis. BARON, who was a well-conducted prisoner, and had undergone various terms of imprisonment, was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude for stealing money at Blackburn. The Jury, after a few minutes' consideration, gave a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Last evening Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of ALBERT S. W. EAST, aged 2 years, the son of a gunner in the 8th brigade Royal Artillery. On Tuesday afternoon the deceased, who lived with his parents in Princes' street, was taken ill after a slight fall and suffered more or less from convulsions until his death, which occurred on the following morning. From the evidence of the mother of the deceased, it appeared that the child had been very delicate ever since its birth, and was subject to fits. Mr Horton, surgeon, who was called to see the deceased, was satisfied that the child did not die from the effects of the fall, but from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of MARY SNELL, aged 75 years, the wife of a superannuated sawyer from the Devonport Dockyard. The deceased resided at 20 Morice-square, and on Sunday morning last whilst talking to a neighbour, named Keiffe, in the backyard of the house, she slipped and fell over several steps, striking her head against the stone pavement. When picked up it was found she had inflicted a severe wound at the back of her head, which bled very much. She was attended by a surgeon, but died from the effects of the wound late on Tuesday night. - The husband of the deceased, in the course of his evidence, stated that his wife occasionally suffered from giddiness in the head and that she was unconscious from the time of the accident until her death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 1 July 1878
ASHWATER - Suspicious Death Of A Child At Ashwater. - Mr Robert Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Henford, in the parish of Ashwater, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY HATCH, the illegitimate child of ELIZA ANN HATCH, a servant girl, residing at Mr Dennis's, The Barton. From the evidence it appeared that the child was born in the Tavistock Workhouse and was a year old. About last Lady-day the father of the girl removed both her and her child from the Workhouse, and brought them to his own house at Henford. The mother soon after went to service, and the child remained under the care of its grandmother, up to the time of its death. On Thursday last, when the child was dead, Dr Pearse was called in to see it, and found the body in a frightfully emaciated condition. He was unable to account for death, and the Inquest was adjourned until today in order that a post mortem examination may be made. The Coroner has requested Dr Ash to assist.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 July 1878
ASHWATER - Suspicious Death Of A Child At Ashwater. - An adjourned Inquest was held at the Manor Inn, Ashwater, yesterday, by Mr Robert Fulford, Coroner, respecting the death of an illegitimate child, named WILLIAM HENRY HATCH. The evidence shewed that the deceased was born in the Tavistock Workhouse on June 2nd, 1877. On March 26th, 1878, the child, with its mother, ELIZA ANN HATCH, was removed to Henford, Ashwater, to the house of the girl's father. Mother and child remained there until May 6th, when the young woman went into the service of Mrs Dennis, of The Barton, the child being left with its grandmother. Shortly afterwards Dr Pearce had occasion to visit the house, and happened to see the child, who was then looking plump and playful, but had something the matter with its head, for which he prescribed. Dr Pearce heard nothing more of the child until last Thursday, when happening to be in the village he was requested to give a certificate for the burial of the child, who had, he was informed, died at seven o'clock that morning. He went and saw the body, and judging from the appearance of extreme emaciation, lightness and shrivelled condition of the skin, he thought that the cause of death might be neglect and want of proper nourishment, and the Inquest was adjourned for post mortem examination. Yesterday, Dr Pearce stated that in company with Dr Ash he had made the post mortem examination, the result of which he detailed. He could trace no marks of violence, but he was of opinion that inasmuch as no disease could be discovered to account for the extremely emaciated condition of the child, death must have resulted from protracted abstention from food. - In reply to a Juryman, Dr Pearce said that a new-born infant weighed about 9 pounds, but this child barely weighed 8 pounds. - Dr Ash, of Holsworthy, said that he quite agreed with all Dr Pearce had said. He added that he was unable to discover any disease to account for such extreme emaciation of the body, and like Dr Pearce, he was of opinion that death probably resulted from prolonged want of nourishment either in quality or quantity. He found nothing that would lead him to suppose that the child had whooping cough, but he would not swear that it had not. - JAMES HATCH, aged 40, stated that the mother of the child was his daughter, and that he took her and her child out of the Tavistock Workhouse, and brought her to his house. - Owing to the interruption of telegraphic communication with Holsworthy the result of the Inquest has not been received.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - Mr Rodd held an Inquest yesterday at Tamerton Foliott relative to the death of BENJAMIN ADAMS, aged 50. The deceased, who was a farmer, had been in a desponding state for some time, and on Saturday was found hung to a beam in an outhouse belonging to Mr Wadding, of Tamerton Foliott. - The Jury returned a verdict: "Suicide whilst in a Fit of Temporary Insanity."

TEIGNMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Teignmouth yesterday by Mr Michelmore, Coroner, as to the death of LOUISA SMITH, aged 2 ½ years, who was scalded by falling into a pan of clothes and water, which the child's mother had just taken out of a saucepan of boiling water. After the accident three doctors were successively sent for, neither of whom went to see the child, but Dr Edward saw the child on Wednesday and ordered a remedy. He did not see the child again until it was dead. The Coroner strongly commented on the lack of medical attendance. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

REVELSTOKE - Fatal Accident At Revelstoke. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Revelstoke yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of DORCAS SMITH, aged 28 years, wife of a labourer. On Thursday last a carter named Bewkey was driving on the road near Revelstoke. The horse was walking along, when suddenly he commenced kicking, and started off at a furious rate. A part of the harness, it was afterwards found, had slipped under the horse. Bewkey tried to pull the horse up, when the rein broke, and the horse commenced kicking violently, and Bewkey was thrown down. The horse started off and the deceased, seeing it coming, ran across the road to protect her little children, when the wagon caught her dress, and she was dragged a little way, and the wheels went over her body. Dr Atkins was called in, and found her suffering from a fracture of the leg, incised wounds on the scalp and chin, and severe laceration of the heel; and the deceased died on Saturday. The Jury, of whom Mr Kingcome was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 July 1878
ASHWATER - The Suspicious Death Of A Child At Ashwater. - The Inquest held by Mr Fulford, Coroner, respecting the child WILLIAM HENRY HATCH, who died under suspicious circumstances at Ashwater, was adjourned on Monday night and yesterday morning the Jury returned a verdict equivalent to manslaughter. This, however, the Coroner refused to endorse, and the Jury again retired, and after consultation, lasting altogether two hours and a quarter, eventually agreed to the following finding:- "We, the Jury, find that the said WILLIAM HENRY HATCH did die, but there is no evidence to shew that the child died from any known disease; but whatever the cause of death is, it was no doubt accelerated by want of sufficient and proper nourishment; that the deceased was the natural child of ELIZA ANN HATCH, late of the parish of Lifton, and now residing in this parish, Ashwater; and that the deceased was born in the Tavistock Union Workhouse, and was brought into this parish by the mother on the 26th day of March last, and died in the house of JAMES HATCH, of Henford, on the day aforesaid." In this verdict the Coroner fully concurred. It is supposed that the police will now take the matter up.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 July 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Laira. - An Inquest was held yesternoon at the Plymouth Guildhall by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) relative to the death of MR JOHN ROBERT LUGG, of the Guildhall Wine Vaults, Whimple-street. Deceased, who was 59 years of age, was widely known in the town. In his youth he was a smith, and was then an advocate of teetotalism and a member of a Rechabite tent. Subsequently he went into the liquor trade, kept various licensed houses, and was prominent in sporting circles. For several years he has been a cripple, and latterly has occasionally driven about in a pony trap. On the evening of the 19th ultimo, when returned to Plymouth in the trap shortly after passing the Laira Embankment gate while his attention was momentarily withdrawn from the pony the animal swerved to the left side of the road, and ran the wheel of the trap up a heap of broken stones placed there for metalling the road. By the jerk deceased was thrown out and alighted on the top of his head, incurring a severe horse-shoe shaped scalp wound. Mr M. C. Lakeman, who was passing with some friends, stopped the pony, and deceased, who was perfectly sensible, was taken up and conveyed home in a cab. Mr Thomas Harper, and subsequently Dr Pearce, were called in to attend him. The injury to the head appeared not likely to prove serious, and the wound began to heal, but on the 29th ultimo jaundice set in and deceased died on Tuesday. Mr Harper said deceased had been for several years suffering from enlarged liver, which had quadrupled its normal size. that was the actual cause of death, but the rapid action of the jaundice was, no doubt, occasioned by the shock to the nervous system caused by the accident. Verdict in accordance with the medical opinion. Complaint was made by some of the Jurymen at the position of the heap of stones. The part of the road where the accident occurred belonged to the Great Western Railway. The heap of stones, which projected near three feet from the footpath, has been lying there for several months, instead of being distributed over the road, where they were much required.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday touching the death of W. SEARLE, shoemaker, aged 70 years, residing at Baker's-place. Deceased, who has for a long time been weak in his mind, went into his workshop on Tuesday evening, as he had been in the habit of doing, and was soon after found by his wife and some neighbours hanging to a nail in the wall by a rope. The body was warm. It was cut down, and Dr F. Row sent for, but the deceased was dead. - The Jury returned as their verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Soldier At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, at the Brunel Arms, Millbay, on the death of CHARLES BONNER, a private of the 8th company of the 25th Regiment, stationed at Millbay Barracks. The Jury viewed the body of the deceased, which was lying in an upper barrack-room, full dressed, with his rifle between his legs, a rifle ball wound under his chin, and the whole of the left half of his face and skull blown away.. The ball had passed up through the ceiling and into another barrack-room immediately over the body. From the evidence of Lieutenant Alfred W. C. Gaussen, in charge of deceased's company, Sergeants William Flack and George Cobb, and Private Henry Appleyard, also of the 8th company, it appeared that deceased, who was 27 years of age, joined the regiment in 1873, and had served three years in India, where he was much given to drinking to excess. Latterly he had exhibited aberration of intellect, so that recently Lieut. Gaussen had come to consider him "half-mad." On the 16th ult. he was sent to the military Hospital at Stoke, from whence he returned to the regiment on the 25th ult. with his head shaved. The day after his return he absented himself from the regiment for two days without leave. Private Appleyard then reported to his officers that from what BONNER had said to him there was a probability that he would destroy himself. BONNER laboured under a delusion that the men of the company bore him ill-will. On his return he was not punished for being absent beyond being admonished. Yesterday morning he absented himself from parade. Sergeants Flack and Cobb found him in his barrack-room, inquired what he was doing, and what was the matter with him, remarking that he did not seem to be well lately and appeared melancholy. His (BONNER'S) reply was, "The company know all about it." Ten minutes after the sergeants had left him and proceeded to other barrack-rooms, the report of a rifle was heard and on their return to the room they found deceased as the Jury viewed him. The questions arose with the Jury as to why the deceased was not placed under restraint, and how he became possessed of the ball-cartridge. It was replied that sufficient cause had not been observed to treat the man as insane. All ball-cartridges issued were accounted for, and the unused counted back. Lieutenant Gaussen suggested that the cartridge had been bought in the town. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 5 July 1878
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was yesterday held at Tavistock by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, touching the death of a waggoner named JOHN DOWN, aged 33, who was killed on Monday evening. Deceased was returning from Princetown with a wagon and two horses, and in descending Park-hill he observed the chain of the front horse unfastened. In getting off to adjust it he fell, and the wheels went over his neck, killing him on the spot. It was stated that deceased was intoxicated, but there was nothing in the evidence to shew that he had been drinking to excess. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 July 1878
ASHBURTON - Fatal Accident At Ashburton. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cottage Hospital, by Mr H. Michelmore, on the body of SIDWELL SHILABEER, a girl aged 7 years, who died from injuries received by using a lamp filled with oil to light her mother's fire. - Ellen Woolaway stated that the deceased ran down the stairs enveloped in flames, which, with assistance, were subdued. - ANN SHILABEER, mother of deceased, said she occupied apartments in Mrs Woolaway's house. She was called home on the day in question from Mr Beery's sorting shop, and on arrival found the child had set her clothes on fire by upsetting the lamp, which had a short time previously been filled with oil. Her clothing was almost all burnt off her body. - P.C. Knott deposed that he took the deceased to the Cottage Hospital, where she was attended by Dr Adams. Her sufferings were very great. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and commented warmly on the courage shewn by Ellen Woolaway; whose hands and arms were badly burnt in extinguishing the fire.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 July 1878
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held at Tavistock on Saturday afternoon by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, on the body of the little boy, named TUCKER, who was killed on the previous day by the backing of one of Derry's waggons. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 July 1878
EXETER - Fatal Occurrence At A Railway-Station. - The Coroner of Exeter held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of a man named SAMUEL PARR, who had died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he had been taken after being severely injured at St. David's Railway-station. The deceased, who was in the employ of the Great Western Company, went to work about six o'clock on the 109th instant, and, to save himself the trouble of going around a good's train, attempted to get to the other side by crawling underneath a truck. At that moment the train started, and the wheels passed over one of his legs. - Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the deceased sustained injuries to the left foot just over the ankle joint. The patient progressed favourably until the 15th instant, when it was found that tetanus (lock jaw) had set in. The foot was amputated, but the deceased expired on the following day. Death, in his opinion, resulted from tetanus. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 July 1878
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of RICHARD TOMS, aged 50 years. The deceased, who was a coach-trimmer in the employ of Messrs. Collins and Oyns, coachbuilders, fell down dead in Anstis-street on Saturday evening. He had been suffering from heart disease, but seemed to be in good health on Saturday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at St. Thomas, Exeter, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR HOW, a gentleman of independent means, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat. Deceased resided at Austwick-terrace, the whole of which was his property. He had been at sea during one part of his life, but had lived retired for some years. About eighteen months ago he fell from a horse while hunting, and sustained an injury to his head, which it is probable affected his mind, for of late he has been occasionally much depressed in spirits. On Sunday afternoon just after dinner deceased went into the garden at the rear of his house, and was observed by the servant to be walking about as if enjoying the air. At tea-time he was called, but made no answer, and on the servant going to look for him he was discovered in a semi-prostrate condition, with his throat cut almost from ear to ear. A carving knife, with which the wound had been inflicted, was lying on the ground close at hand. The evidence of Mr Dunn, a near neighbour, and of Mr Knapman, his brother-in-law, left the Jury in no doubt as to the condition of his mind, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 July 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Scalding. - The Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday relative to the death of ELLEN PEARCE, a child of about 15 months. The child's mother lives at 21 Granby-street, and last Sunday evening, when she was getting some bread and milk for the child, she put some boiling water in a cup, and, having put it on the table, turned her back a minute. The child at that moment put her hand in the cup and tipped the hot water on to her arm and breast, severely scalding herself. She was promptly attended to, and on Monday she was taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, but, despite all efforts, the child died on Tuesday afternoon from the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death Of A Woman At Plymouth. Three Weeks On A Landing. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening into the circumstances attending the death of SARAH BEHENNA, aged about 31 years. - Henry Mitchell Drew, master of the Plymouth Workhouse stated that the deceased was admitted on Monday morning. She was taken to the Hospital at once, and died in about twenty-four hours. Witness visited the deceased immediately she was admitted. She was very dirty, and appeared to be dying. Dr Eyly examined the deceased, and said that she was dying from starvation. She took wine, brandy, milk &c., ravenously. Witness thought that the deceased was not conscious. Her little boy, about ten years of age, accompanied her to the House, and was there now; he was suffering from a contagious disease, and was not fit to appear before the Coroner. The deceased was in the House about six years ago, and she then gave her age as 25. Her father resides in Devonport. Witness did not know whether she was married or not. - John Scannall, residing at 11 Granby-square, said that last Thursday he saw the deceased on a landing of the stairs of 8 Granby-square. He had not seen her there before, but he heard that she had been in the passage for about three weeks. She was in a very dirty state, and he had heard that she was suffering from the yellow jaundice. From Thursday until Monday he passed the house several times, and saw the deceased still on the landing. On Monday evening, about 9.30, he went to the police station at the Octagon, and informed Police-Inspector Price about it. Price sent a constable to see the woman. He found her in the passage, and said she was dying. The constable went to Mr Mayell, the relieving officer, who sent for a cab, and the deceased and the boy were removed to the Workhouse at once. - Sarah Collier, residing at 8 Granby-square, Plymouth, said that she knew the deceased for some time. When witness first knew her she went by the name of SARAH COX, and was in service. In 1874 the deceased told witness that her first husband was dead, and her second husband was called NICOLLS. On Sunday, the 7th of July, the deceased came to her house and asked her for a cup of tea, which was given her. She looked very dirty and fatigued. She said that she and her little boy had walked from Bristol and added that her father was in Tavistock. The witness went out, and on her return in the evening found her and her boy sitting on the stairs. The deceased slept in witness's room that night. Since that time she had slept on the stair landing. On Tuesday week witness noticed that the deceased was very yellow. Witness thought she had the yellow jaundice. The deceased had only some bags of matting to sleep on, on the landing, but both she and the boy had plenty of food given them. The deceased said her husband - who was a shoeing smith - had left her, and gone to Cornwall. She was in a shocking state, covering with vermin. - Charles James Mayell, relieving officer, stated that about 10 p.m. on Monday the case was first brought to his notice. He went to 8 Granby-square immediately, and found the deceased crouching on the stairs. The stench was fearful. She appeared conscious, but was unable to rise from the stairs; and when moved her screams were fearful. She was quite helpless, and was taken to the Workhouse. On being removed from the cab her screams were heartrending. Witness had never seen such a bad and deplorable case. The staircase where the deceased was found was very narrow, and he did not think the deceased could have slept there unless in a very crouched position. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that no doubt the deceased was in a very bad condition. She was destitute, and dependent upon what she could beg or what was given her. He did not think the women in the house did their duty towards the deceased in not informing the relieving officers or the parish doctor, both of whom passed the house several times last week, of the case. There could be no doubt that deceased and her son suffered great pain and privation during the three weeks that they slept in the staircase. The behaviour of the people in the house, in allowing the deceased to stay on a staircase for so long without telling the police or relieving officer, was very inhuman. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of proper care and by neglect, and that the people in the house were greatly to blame." - When the verdict was given Sarah Collier held up her hands, and said, "Oh! don't you say that, I don't like to hear stories told." - The Coroner strongly commented on her conduct and that of the other woman.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 July 1878
KENTON - Fatal Fall At Starcross Railway Station. - An Inquest was held at the Courtenay Arms, Starcross, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, on the woman killed by the train on Tuesday. She was identified by MR BARTLETT, saddler, of Kenton, as his mother. She was of eccentric habits, and has occasionally been known to enter and leave trains as if she did not wish to be seen. She took a ticket on Tuesday evening from Starcross to St. Thomas, and though the train remained at the station for three or four minutes, giving all who wished to do so, ample opportunity of entering, she appears to have attempted to get into a carriage after the train was in motion. Two passengers by the train saw her slip and the train was quickly brought up, and the poor woman extricated. The evidence fully exonerated every person from blame.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At The Plymouth Mechanics' Institute. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday relative to the death of CHARLES STEWART, aged 43 years, naval pensioner. Deceased was invalided from the service in consequence of a complaint in the head about nine months since, and on several occasions lately he had appeared very much depressed, and strange in his manner. He had been engaged at the Mechanics' Institute by Mr Cutmore, agent for the "Magneticon;" and on Wednesday afternoon he said he was going out for a short time. About ten minutes afterwards Charles Pearson, who was employed with deceased, went to the water-closet, and found large quantities of blood running from under the door. Assistance was procured, and on the door being burst open STEWART was found lying on the floor with a wound in his throat. Medical assistance was procured but deceased expired in about ten minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 July 1878
EXETER - The Death Of A Soldier By Drowning At Exeter. - Mr W. H. Hooper, Coroner for the City of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday at the Higher Barracks on Gunner PAYNE, R.H.A., whose death whole bathing at Duck's Marsh, near Topsham Barracks, has already been reported. It appeared that the body was recovered from the water by a lad named Ellacott and two companions, who dived into the gravel pit in which PAYNE disappeared, and brought it ashore at some risk to themselves. There were two soldiers bathing with PAYNE, and one of them very gallantly essayed to rescue his drowning comrade, persevering until his own life was in serious jeopardy. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning." In the course of the proceedings the Coroner complained that the body had been brought within the City bounds, which had unnecessarily thrown the expense of the Inquest on the rate of the Borough. Captain White, R.H.A., explained that the body was taken to the Higher Barracks because there was no fitting place for the reception of a corpse at Topsham Barracks. Deceased was a native of Somerset.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 July 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - Suspicious Death At Newton. - Mr Henry Michelmore, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at the Newton Townhall on Saturday evening touching the death of HENRY WOOD, a labourer, aged 38, who died late on the previous night under somewhat suspicious circumstances. Great interest was felt in the case, the hall and approaches thereto being crowded. - MARY ANN WOOD, wife of the deceased stated that her husband had been attended by Mr Haydon, surgeon, and had greatly complained of headache and "frailness of his stomach" for nearly the last three weeks, and the three previous days was very ill. He had also suffered from a very great pain over his eyes. Three weeks ago he came home very badly served, with his eyes blackened, a scar across his nose and a cut on his temple which had been bleeding pretty much. He told her that he was in the stable doing up his horse, and Sam Lock came in unawares and knocked him down, kicked him in the head and knelt on him. He shouted for his master, Mr Prince, who came and pulled Lock from him. She asked him what it was about, and he replied, "It was all about a wagon." She heard her husband say to Mr Tapson, a neighbour, "If my master had not come to my rescue and took me away Lock would have killed me." Early on Wednesday morning he left home to go to work, but was taken ill in the street, and did not rally afterwards. Deceased had a strong constitution. - Mr Nathaniel T. J. Haydon, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Wednesday morning, and continued to see him two or three times a day up to the time of his death. Deceased was suffering from intense pains in the head; the pain at times seemed to be quite bewildering, and the pupils of his eyes were dilated with it. He did not say he had received any injuries, and witness thought he was suffering from pressure and inflammation of the brain. He asked him several questions, but deceased could not answer them he was so bewildered. He had made a post mortem examination of the body, which was nourished and without external marks of violence. Upon his removing the skull cap a great deal of dark coloured blood escaped. The surface of the brain itself was very muscular, and contained a deal of blood. On his taking the brain out of the skull, he found about an ounce and a half of fluid in the base of the skull. There was a large clot of blood under the left lobe. The injuries to the brain might have been caused by a severe blow. With the brain in such a state as it was in, it would be impossible for a person to live long. He was of opinion that the blow, which it had been stated deceased received, was sufficient to cause effusion of blood on the brain. - Bernard Prince, the deceased's master, deposed to seeing Lock and WOOD in the stable together about three weeks ago, and said he took Lock away from WOOD, who was under him. - Mrs Prince, his wife and Sidney King, a little boy, also gave evidence, and at nearly one o'clock yesterday (Sunday) morning the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry to this evening.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 July 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - The Mysterious Fatality At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of THOMAS MURRAY, aged 23 years, leading seaman, serving on board her Majesty's ship Excellent. Mr W. Eastlake watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty. Evidence was given as to the discovery of the deceased in the quarry at Richmond Walk early on Sunday morning; and Police-Sergeant E. Harper stated that it must have been lying there for five or six hours. There was a very deep cut on the top of the head, and a quantity of congealed blood was at the nostrils, mouth and ears. He searched deceased, and found upon him a liberty ticket, a box of matches, and 1s. 6d. in coppers. - P.C. Donalton said that on Saturday night about eleven o'clock deceased came to him in Pembroke-street and asked for Fore-street, Plymouth. He told him that there was no such street in Plymouth but that there was a Fore-street in Devonport, and directed him to the London Inn, as he thought deceased wanted to go there. - Ann Neil, wife of a pensioner, said she saw deceased on Saturday night about ten o'clock in Fore-street. He was crying bitterly, and she asked him what was the matter, to which he replied that someone was always bothering him. She asked if she should take him home, and he replied "No," and went down the street and turned up a lane which would bring him to Mount Wise. The Coroner's officer stated that he had summoned an artilleryman, with whom deceased was last seen alive, but he was not present. The artilleryman told him that the deceased left him in company with a civilian. - The Coroner and the Jury thought that the Artilleryman was an important witness, and the Inquest was adjourned until Wednesday evening in order that he might be present.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 July 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - The Death By Violence At Newton. Verdict of Manslaughter. - The adjourned Inquest touching the death of HENRY WOOD, carter, of Newton, was resumed on Monday night at the Newton Townhall, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner. Mr F. Watts watched the proceedings on behalf of Mr Lock. The Inquiry created considerable excitement and the hall was crowded. The depositions taken on Saturday night having been read over, Barnard Prince was recalled, and stated that he did not see any blows struck by Lock during the quarrel between the two men on the 1st of July, but said he took Lock away from WOOD whilst the two were in the stables. - Emily Blackler, a domestic servant, residing at No. 11, Lemon-road, said the back windows of her house looked over Mr Prince's yard. She remembered that one evening, some three or four weeks ago, about half-past six o'clock, she heard loud and angry talking. On looking out of a back window she saw Mr Prince dragging Lock out of the stable. Saw WOOD come out of the stable with a pitchfork, and fathered from his features that he wanted to strike Lock with it. Could not hear what was said. Prince and his wife took the fork away from WOOD. Prince then put WOOD into the stable, and stayed there a minute or two. WOOD came out again, and took up the tipstick from the court and went to strike Lock with it; Prince tried to take it from him. Lock then went over, pushed Prince on one side, and seizing WOOD by the jacket, hit him on the head with his hand, got him on the ground and fell on him. WOOD said, "Let me get up." Lock replied, "Give me the stick," whereupon WOOD gave the stick up, and Lock let him rise. WOOD went into the stable, and Lock washed his own face and went away. Mr Prince, Mr King and Sidney King were present. - Grace Curson King, wife of George King, builder, of 64 Queen street, Newton, deposed that the yard in question belonged to her husband. On the evening named she saw Lock in the yard, with a good deal of blood upon him. His nose was very much swollen and he had had a blow, but she did not see any blood coming from him. WOOD did not come out whilst Lock was there. Lock said nothing to witness about what had happened, but he was swearing and in a very bad temper, and with an oath said he would give WOOD the second part presently; he went away, however. Soon after Lock left WOOD came out of the stable. His face was in a very bad state, and though he had evidently washed it there was blood upon it. Witness particularly noticed the eye, which had a large swelling under it. Witness asked him to let her look at his face, but he said, "Oh, no," and went up over Mr Prince's stairs, going away about half an hour after. - James Ponsford, chemist and druggist of Newton, said deceased came to him some days since and got a lotion for his eye which was swollen. He did not complain of his head. - Ebsworthy Tapson, china and glass dealer, of Wolborough-street, Newton, and a neighbour of the deceased, said that about a month ago he saw deceased in the street, having two black eyes and looking as though he had been bleeding at the nose. Witness asked him where he got that, to which WOOD replied "Mr Sammy Lock gave me this." WOOD then asked witness to feel his (WOOD'S) head, which witness did, but could feel nothing amiss. That was after WOOD had told witness that Lock had kicked. WOOD'S head was rather hot. - Richard Nicholls, sergeant of police, stationed at Newton, said that on Wednesday last, at about half-past four o'clock in the morning, he went to Courtenay-street, and at the entrance of Courtenay-street Hall, sitting on the step and leaning forward as far as he could without falling, he saw HENRY WOOD. With assistance he took him to his home in Wolborough-street. The man complained of feeling very ill in his head, and drew witness's attention to his chest, from which perspiration was fast falling. At first witness thought deceased was intoxicated, but he soon satisfied himself that he was ill. Assisted him upstairs, put him to bed, and advised that a medical man should be sent for. since the Inquiry on Saturday witness had visited the spot on which the quarrel took place and saw a post about four inches thick, which was pointed out to him by Mr Prince as the post by which deceased was lying. Examined it and found spots of blood upon it. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury retired, and at midnight, after a deliberation of about five minutes, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Samuel Lock, who was committed under the Coroner's warrant. The Hall was filled up to the close of the Inquest.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 August 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall At Devonport. - The resumed Inquest respecting the death of THOMAS MURRAY, a seaman of H.M.S. Excellent, who was killed by falling over the quarry at Richmond Walk, Devonport, took place last evening. The artilleryman who, it had been stated, was seen in his company on Saturday night appeared, and deposed that the deceased, who was very drunk, asked him the way to Plymouth, and went away with a man, who offered to shew him the road. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 August 1878
BRIXHAM - The Fishing Boat Fatality At Brixham. - At Brixham on Wednesday evening an Inquest was held by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS WILLIAMS, which had been picked up at Mudstone Beach. - Charles Stephens Beer stated that on the night of March 27th the deceased went to sea in a fishing smack of his (witness's) called the Gleaner, and that he was accompanied by three apprentices named William Harris, John Pethrick and Peter Wetter. One had been apprenticed five years, and the other two four years and their ages ranged from 19 years to 17 years. Did not see the Gleaner afterwards, but a boat and two oars belonging to her were picked up on Mudstone Beach on March 28th. Soon after she sailed a storm arose. Did not often send a smack to sea manned by three apprentices and a seaman. - In summing up, the Coroner remarked that Beer did wrong in sending a boat to sea so badly manned, and he would point out that if persons connected with the fishing business sent their vessels to sea insufficiently manned, and any accident arise therefrom, they were answerable for it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and recommended that a place for reception of dead bodies should be provided, so that they might not be left exposed to the public as was the case that day.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 August 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - A fatal accident occurred on board the French ship Augusta Maria, Captain Joseph Lavert, which is discharging coals at the Great Western Docks, Plymouth. ROBERT PALMER, a lumper, was standing on the deck when the hoist chain, which was supporting a basket of coals, broke, and striking PALMER knocked him into the hold. The poor fellow was killed on the spot, his brains being knocked out and his neck broken. An Inquest was opened at the Plymouth Guildhall by Mr T. C. Brian last evening, and was adjourned until Saturday, in order that an interpreter might attend on behalf of the captain of the vessel.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 August 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death From Burning At Stonehouse. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Stonehouse yesterday respecting the death of MARY ANN THOMAS, aged 53 years, who had died from shock to the system caused by burns. The deceased, whilst in bed, endeavoured to extinguish a lamp, but upset it, and the oil ignited. In her attempts to put out the flames her clothes were set on fire, and she was so severely burnt that she died the following day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 August 1878
DAWLISH - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Dawlish respecting the death of AMY ELIZA HOSEGOOD, aged about 2 ½ years, the daughter of MR ALFRED HOSEGOOD, baker, Brook-street. The child accidentally pulled over a bucket of boiling water on herself, and was so severely scalded that, although promptly attended to by Mr f. M. Cann, surgeon, she died in the course of a few hours. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 August 1878
EXETER - Fatal Occurrence At Exeter. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday on a lad named JAMES WHITE, aged 15, the illegitimate son of MRS SARAH HAYMAN, of Coombe-street. From the mother's evidence it appeared that on Tuesday, about one o'clock, the boy came home with his clothes very wet. She made him change, gave him his dinner and sent him to school, but he never returned, and despite all the witness's efforts, she could obtain no information as to his whereabouts. On the Wednesday morning a small boy told her that he had been playing with the deceased on the quay; that the deceased climbed a lamp-post close by the river's brink, and in doing so slipped and fell into the water and was drowned. The boy who saw this seems to have been so frightened that he said nothing about it until the following day. The Coroner considered him too young to be sworn, but that his story was substantially correct was proved by the discovery of the corpse in the river near the place mentioned by him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 August 1878
HAMPSTEAD, LONDON - The Murder Of An Okehampton Woman. The Coroner's Inquest. [Special Telegram.] - The Inquest on the remains of RHODA JEFFERYS, of Okehampton, until recently in the service of Mr Curwin, of Westridge, Prince Arthur-road, Hampstead, who was shot in the Manor-road, Hampstead, on Tuesday evening, took place yesterday at the Duke of Hamilton, New End; and also an Inquest on Edward Austin, with whom she was keeping company, who immediately shot himself after the event. the room was most inconveniently crowded. - ANN JEFFERYS, sister of the deceased, was the first witness. She said: I live at 13 Blandford-square, and am a domestic servant. My sister was 19 years of age. I was first told of this event on Wednesday, and I came and identified the body. I have seen Austin about six times. My sister said that he had never been unkind to her. I was not aware that there was any quarrel between them; and I never hears that he had been unkind to her. - W. Reeves, coachman to Mr Manning, of Hillside House, Arkwright-road, said: On Tuesday night I was going from my house to the stables, and I saw two people standing against a wall. I went into the garden, and whilst there I heard the report of a gun. I went back and saw blood, and then went up to the police station and gave notice. I heard no words passing between the two. - Police-Sergeant Sergeant said: From instructions received I proceeded to the spot and saw the two bodies. The woman was bleeding from the left ear, and there was a great deal of blood flowing from the head of the man. I found the revolver (produced) between his legs. Two chambers were loaded, and two had been recently discharged. I partly searched the man. There were some scraps of paper in JEFFERYS' purse. - These were read. One was asking JEFFERYS for her photograph, and another asking her for an interview. They were signed by Ernest H. Whitehome, of 20 Featherstone-buildings. - Dr. D. Sullivan said: On Tuesday evening I was called to the deceased. I found that the girl had a pistol shot wound in the head, through the temple bone. There was some clotted blood about the head, and there was no exit for it, so that it remained there. Death must have been instantaneous and caused by a shot. There were no signs of pregnancy. - The case in reference to JEFFERY was then adjourned for a short time in order that the Jury might hear the evidence in the case of Austin. - Mr Albert Austin, of Alexandra-road, Holloway, said: The name of my son was Edward Albert, aged 21; he was a butcher out of a situation, and he lived at home. He left the house on Tuesday; when he came in, he wrote a letter, and went out according to engagement to meet his sweetheart. A detective came to me at eleven o'clock and told me of what had occurred, and I went to the mortuary and identified the body. I saw a pistol at the police station which I had not seen before. I believed that he had it on Saturday and he had to conceal it. I accused him of having a revolver on the Saturday, when I asked him to give it to me, and as he would not I told him that I would go to the police station about it. He then ran out of the house and returned about eleven o'clock on the Sunday. I again asked him for the weapon, but he would not give it. He then went out to a friend's to dinner, and did not return until Monday. I saw nothing wrong with him. The deceased was rather excitable, and was at times rather inclined to indulge in drink. I (witness) lost my wife two months ago, and that seemed to prey on the mind of my son. The girl had visited my house, and he seemed much attached to her. - Dr Sullivan said he found that the man had a lacerated wound on the head, as if he had been shot in the mouth, and the bullet had passed through his head. If he had made an examination he could not have told if the brain was diseased. - Inspector Moorhouse, S Division, gave evidence of finding letters addressed by the deceased girl to the young man. - The Coroner then summed up, and the Jury, without leaving the room, found a verdict to the effect that RHODA JEFFERYS was shot by Edward Austin, and that he then committed suicide, he being at the time in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 August 1878
OKEHAMPTON - Sudden Death At Okehampton. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Okehampton by Mr Robert Fulford, County Coroner, respecting the death of MRS WRIGHT (wife of MR JAMES WRIGHT, china dealer), who died suddenly on Saturday evening. A verdict that "Deceased died from Heart Disease was returned." MRS WRIGHT was in her usual health on Saturday, and was returning from a short walk when she suddenly dropped down and died. The deceased had been married to her present husband but a few months only.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 August 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths Of Children At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY THOMAS, aged 15 months, the son of a labourer, residing in Finewell-street. The deceased had been weak from its birth, and had been under the care of Messrs. Neild and Prynne, Surgeons. About seven o'clock on Sunday morning the mother gave the child his food, and about an hour subsequently she found him dead in his cradle. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Subsequently Mr Brian held an Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of BESSIE LANGWORTHY BLATCHFORD, aged 4 years, the daughter of a merchant seaman, residing at 26 Looe-street. During the mother's absence from home, on Saturday evening, the deceased was taken unwell, and vomited freely, and whilst the mother was endeavouring to secure the services of a medical man on Sunday morning the child died. Mr Nield, surgeon, had on several occasions informed the mother that she would never rear deceased, who was a very small and weak child. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 August 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - An Inquest was held last evening at Newton Abbot touching the death of WILLIAM HOLLOWAY, a labourer, aged 30 years, who met his death on Monday night last by being knocked down by a passing train. From the evidence given it appeared that the deceased was in the act of crossing the line to meet a friend when he was overtaken and knocked down by an engine which was shunting some trucks. His injuries were of such a nature that he died within a short time of the occurrence. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BRIXTON - Suicide At Brixton. - Mr R. R. Rodd, county Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Brixton concerning the death of JANE PURSLEY, aged 66 years, wife of MR JAMES PURSLEY, retired farmer, residing at that place. The deceased, who has been in a desponding state of mind for some time, was left a home on Sunday morning, and when her husband returned from church he found her in an orchard, adjoining the house with her throat cut, quite dead. - Mr A. A. I. Atkins, surgeon, deposed that the deceased was of unsound mind; and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 August 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday respecting the death of a child named ISABELLA JOHNS, aged four months, which had died after a very short illness. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

IPPLEPEN - A child named WILLIAM BINMORE, aged 4 years, has been drowned at Ipplepen by falling down an open well. In returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Jury added a recommendation that Mr Farley, the owner of the property on which the well is situated, should be requested to fence it.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 September 1878
EXETER - Gross Case Of Neglect. - An Inquiry, which lasted several hours, was held by the City Coroner (Mr Hooper) at the Exeter Workhouse on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of the illegitimate child, aged nearly 3 weeks, of FANNY EWINGS, a single woman, living in Black Boy-road. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the mother had never suckled the child, but it had been nursed by a neighbour, Mrs Farley, who called several times a day for that purpose, the mother having to go out to work. About a fortnight after the child's birth, it was stated to have been suffering from "thrush" and, in consequence of this, Mrs Farley discontinued nursing it, having a baby of her own. The infant was then fed with milk from a bottle and also by the spoon. Mr Bell, surgeon, who was called in to see the child on several occasions, it being stated by the grandmother to be suffering from diarrhoea, on gleaning how it was fed, informed the grandmother more than once that if the mother did not suckle it naturally it would not survive. The mother did not act up to this advice, and subsequently both mother and babe were removed to the Workhouse, where the child died on Thursday last. By the direction of the Coroner, Mr Bell and Mr Woodman, surgeons, made a post mortem examination of the body. They found that the child measured 18 ¾ inches in length and weighed 4 lbs. 1` oz., the average weight of a child at birth being 7 lbs. The Coroner, in the course of a brief summing up, said he thought that if the mother or grandmother were committed for trial for the manslaughter of the infant, he did not think a Jury, under all the circumstances, would convict. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, being of opinion that there was not evidence of sufficient criminal neglect to warrant them in returning a verdict of manslaughter, although the case was one showing very gross neglect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 September 1878
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Sudden Death Of SIR F. M. WILLIAMS, Bart., M.P. - Our readers will learn with regret and surprise of the death of SIR FREDERICK MARTIN WILLIAMS, Bart., M.P. for Truro. The deceased arrived at his North Devon seat, Heanton Punchardon, on Monday for the shooting season, and had invited several friends to join him. He appeared to be in good health and even exceptionally cheerful spirits. He conversed pleasantly with his steward, Mr Hussey, and in the afternoon met two of his guests at the Wrafton Railway Station. Heanton House is at present undergoing some repairs, which induced SIR FREDERICK to stay at Manor House, the residence of his steward. He appears to have lunched and dined well, and sat smoking and chatting with his friends until shortly after eleven, when they retired to rest. They had arranged their plans for shooting over the estate, but SIR FREDERICK was not expected to take an active part in it himself, as since the gun accident which befell to him a short time since, and which destroyed the sight of one eye, he has not cared for sharing in the sport. Still, they thought he would probably join them at lunch. On the ensuing day (Tuesday), therefore, his two friends, the Rev. Geo. Francis Sydenham Powell, of Sutton Verney, Warminster, and Mr Alexander Pitts Elliott Powell, set out on their shooting excursion, leaving SIR FREDERICK at the house. He had some conversation with his steward, and appeared depressed. He thought he would benefit by rest, and retired to the dining-room, where he lay down on the sofa. As he was averse to being disturbed, he was left alone until the evening, but during the day his breathing was heard to be very loud. On a servant going into the room to lay dinner, at about seven o'clock, she noticed a change in his countenance. Mr Hussey hurried to the room, and it was found that the unfortunate gentleman was quite dead. Medical aid was sent for, but, of course, was of no avail. Such are briefly the facts, and it may be added that when the melancholy event became known there was a general feeling of deep sympathy with the family. A messenger was despatched that night to the deceased's brother, MR CHARLES WILLIAMS, of Pilton House, Barnstaple, and in the morning a telegram was forwarded to LADY WILLIAMS, who was at Goonvrea. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr W. H. Toller, County Coroner. The witnesses were the steward (Mr Hussey), Mary Ann Holmes (domestic servant), the Rev. Mr Powell, Mr Lane, surgeon, Braunton, and Mr Law, surgeon, Barnstaple. The former deposed to the facts as already detailed, and the medical witnesses stated that death resulted from the bursting of a blood vessel in the head, causing apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. - [ A detailed account of his life and career followed.]

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of JOHN JAMES WILLIAMS, aged 445 years, pensioner, living in Water-lane, Stonehouse. Deceased left his home about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning after making a hearty breakfast, and went to the Great Western Docks, where he was in the habit of selling sherbet and sweetmeats to the labourers. He carried on his business apparently in his usual health until about nine a.m., when he asked a person who was standing near to support him, as he felt unwell, and, falling down, died immediately. A post mortem examination was made by Mr T. Leah, surgeon, who found that the deceased's death was attributable to heart disease. - The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 September 1878
KINGSWEAR - Drowned In Dartmouth Harbour. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, last evening opened, at the Yacht Club Hotel, Kingswear, an Inquest respecting the death of FREDERICK CRANFIELD, aged about 18, one of the crew of the cutter yacht Tinae, owned by Mr Byles. Deceased was on board the yacht in Dartmouth harbour on the evening of August 30th, and at a late hour took a punt to bring one of the crew on board from the shore. He was not seen again until the body was found on Thursday morning last under Brook-hill by two men named Henn and Crocker. There being no one at Dartmouth to identify the body, it was viewed by the Jury, and the Inquest adjourned to Monday evening, in order that friends might have an opportunity of identifying.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 September 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - On Saturday evening Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the London Mail, Richmond-street, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of MARY STEED, aged 74 years. The deceased, who was a widow, had been failing in health for some time past, but had not been under any medical care. About nine o'clock on Thursday evening she retired to rest and at midday on Friday she was found dead in bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Death From Suffocation At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL EDGAR MEAGER, the infant son of RICHARD MEAGER, labourer, residing at 12 Wyndham-street East. - MARY JANE MEAGER, mother of the deceased, deposed that the child had been healthy since its birth, and that about half-past six o'clock on Saturday morning she left the deceased in bed with a coverlet over its head. Two hours later she heard a peculiar noise proceeding from the bed, and upon taking the coverlet off the child's face she found it convulsed and foam issuing from the mouth. She took the deceased up in her arms, and he died ten minutes subsequently. - Elizabeth Roberts, a neighbour, stated that she proceeded to the previous witness's room upon hearing her call out, and found the child dead. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

STOKE DAMEREL - A Strange Fatality. - At Devonport on Saturday Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry respecting the death of a youth named ROBERT FUGLER, aged about 16 years. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Trevethan, farmer, of Bere Ferrers, and on Saturday, August 24th, he was engaged during a thunder-storm in driving two horses, which were working a thrashing machine. A heavy clap of thunder startled himself so much that he jumped aside, and placed his hand on one of the wheels, just in front of the other wheel, which caught his fingers and badly crushed them. He received attention from Mr Norris, who amputated one of the fingers, and he was then taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, where, according to a letter received by the Coroner, he died on Thursday from tetanus. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Some of them wanted to add a rider, advising Mr Trevethan to call in an engineer to see if something could not be done to the machinery in the way of wire fencing, boarding, or something by the side of the wheels so as to protect persons from getting their clothes entangled; but several others protested against such a thing, and the rider was not added. The Coroner, however, at the end of Mr Trevethan's evidence advised him to call in a competent engineer to examine the machinery.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 September 1878
BARNSTAPLE - The Accidental Poisoning At Barnstaple. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, on a little boy named CHARLES SQUIRE, aged 2 years. The evidence shewed that on Saturday afternoon the child was at play with his little sister and a boy named Bassett, son of Aaron Bassett, a groom in the employ of Mr Gamble, surgeon. There was a bottle containing carbolic acid on the ground, in a corner of the saddle-room, where the children were. It was not labelled, and Mr Gamble was not aware that it was there, while the groom had never used it, and did not know what the bottle contained. The lad Bassett got hold of this bottle and passed it to the little girl, intending that they should each take a drink. It burnt her mouth and Bassett gave it to the deceased, who drank some and immediately screamed. Bassett dropped the bottle and it was broken. The child went indoors, and soon began to foam at the mouth. Its father, having just come in from work, took it to Mr Gamble, and that gentleman applied the usual remedies for irritant poisoning. The child was subsequently taken to the Infirmary, where it died from exhaustion, consequent on the effects of the poison, on Sunday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner commented on the danger of leaving poisons within the reach of children, who did not know what they were.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 September 1878
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident Near Tavistock. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM JAMES, a cattle drover, 76 years of age, who died on Tuesday last, was held at the New Market Inn, Tavistock, last evening, before Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr William Hill was foreman. It appeared that the deceased was at Romansleigh Farm on Tuesday, where a cattle sale was being held, and watched the animals being brought into the enclosure prior to their sale. One of the bullocks became frightened at the number of people standing around the ring, and bolted to near where the deceased was leaning on the rope. From the pressure of the animal a post gave way, and JAMES fell forward to the ground, where he was struck in the head by the post, which turned sharply over upon him. He was taken to his home and died shortly afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 September 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Drink. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Keyham last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH MOGG, about 56 years of age. - Louisa Stephens, residing at 8 Union-terrace, Morice Town, said that the deceased was her sister, and resided with her. For some years off and on she had complained of shortness of breath and was often the worse for liquor. On Saturday week the deceased had a large bottle of spirits which she (witness) believed she drank that day. On Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock, she went into the deceased's bedroom, and found her on the floor with her head on the fender. Mr May, jun., surgeon, was immediately sent for, and he pronounced her dead. The deceased used to drink gin very frequently. - Jane Prinn, residing at 2 John-street, said that for some time past the deceased had drunk rather heavily. Saw the body on Sunday and found it very dirty. She found a small ale bottle under her head containing a small quantity of gin. - Mr Joseph May, jun., said that about midnight on Saturday he was called to see the deceased and found her dead. He made a careful external examination of the body and found no marks of violence, excepting a slight scar on the chin made by the fender. He did not make a post mortem examination, as he thought the deceased died from excessive drinking. - The Coroner said that no doubt the deceased had shortened her days by slowly poisoning herself with alcohol. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes accelerated by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 September 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Devonport by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) relative to the death of JOHN HOOD, a naval pensioner, residing at 7 Morice-street. It appears that the deceased was in his usual health until about five o'clock on Sunday evening, when he was seized with very violent pains. He went to bed, and seemed to get better until 10 p.m., when he was again seized with violent pains. Mr Horton, surgeon, was at once sent for, but when he arrived HOOD was dead. Mr Horton thought that the deceased died from an internal ailment with a rupture of the bladder. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A Neglected Parent. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of MARY ANN WILLS, aged about 50 years. - GEORGE CARWITHIEN WILLS, son of the deceased, said that he resided in Cecil-street, but always had his meals with his mother, who lived in Hampton-street. The deceased had been delicate for some years, and the last two months the deceased had been confined to her bed, but was not under medical care. He had breakfast with her yesterday (Tuesday) morning about half-past nine o'clock, when she appeared to be a little worse, but had a cup of tea and a little brandy. About two months since Mr Harper, surgeon, attended her for an apoplectic fit, and he was then told that she had had several previously. She had not had medical attendance. She was maintained by him (witness) and his two brothers. - Susan Whiting, about 13 years of age, residing in the same house as the deceased, said that shortly before 10 o'clock yesterday morning she went into the room of MRS WILLS, who complained of being very ill. About twenty minutes afterwards she again went to the room and found MRS WILLS dead. - Mr Brian thought that the deceased's sons had greatly neglected their mother. She had not had medical advice, although they saw that she was very ill, and she was left to herself almost all day long. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and thought that the deceased had been greatly neglected and that a medical man ought to have been called in.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 September 1878
NEWTON ABBOT - The Accident At The Newton Railway Station. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County coroner, held an Inquest at the Newton Cottage Hospital, touching the death of WILLIAM GERMAN, aged 20 years, an engine cleaner in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, who had died that morning from injuries received on Wednesday through being crushed between the buffers. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the funds of the Hospital.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 September 1878
TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest At Torquay. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on behalf of Mr H. Michelmore, last evening held an Inquest at the Torquay Police Court on the body of a female child of CLARA TOZER, aged 20, domestic servant. TOZER comes from Paignton, but has been in service in several places in Torquay, having generally borne a very good character. Early in the week, however, she gave birth to an illegitimate female child in the house of Mr Clements, Fleet-street. At the Inquest yesterday evening, the first witness called was Mr Richard W. Clements, nurseryman, of Fleet-street, Torquay, who stated that the woman TOZER had lived in the service of himself and wife, but left them about twelve months since, having been with them about eight months. Last Saturday she came to witness's wife for a character, and Mrs Clements engaged TOZER herself, the girl going there on Saturday night to stay until she could secure a permanent situation. On Wednesday evening the girl, on being taxed with having been confined, confessed that such was the case, and said that the body of the child would be found in the back kitchen, under the shelves of the dresser. The police were at once communicated with, and P.C. Trott was soon upon the premises. Trott and witness found the body in the place indicated by the mother. - Dr John B. Richardson, of Torquay, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the child's body, and found no external marks of violence. The weight of the body was 2 lbs. 13 oz., and the length 16 in. The child had been prematurely born and died, in his opinion, from that cause, and not from any neglect. It had had a separate existence. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 September 1878
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Near Barnstaple. - An Inquiry has been held into the circumstances attending the death of a drover named JOHN HOLLAND, who was found dead in a field adjoining a lane, a little way out of Barnstaple. It appeared that the deceased was in the employ of Mr Elliott, Braunton, and brought some cattle into the fair. They were not sold and he set off on the return journey, but as he did not arrive, search was made and the body discovered. The medical evidence shewed that there were no marks of violence and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday respecting the death of Retired Commander WM. F. ESSELL, R.N. The deceased, who resided in South Devon-place, had been suffering from nervous affliction for the past five years, and had of late been very unwell. On Friday afternoon a servant in his employ was washing the step of the kitchen door when she saw her master's slipper fall in the court, and upon looking up saw the deceased sitting on the sill of a window on the third floor. She was frightened, and ran out of the house and shortly afterwards COMMANDER ESSELL was found lying in the courtyard with frightful injuries to his head and quite dead. It was stated that the room, on the window sill of which he was seen sitting, was the one above his bedroom, and that he was in the habit of opening all the windows in the house, and he seemed to be always panting for air. Ten minutes before the fatal occurrence he was seen in his bedroom, the window of which was open. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 September 1878
DAWLISH - The Mysterious Boat Accident Off Teignmouth. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon held an Inquest, at the Mount Pleasant Inn, between Dawlish and Starcross, upon the body of SARAH STEER, aged 25, who was drowned in the boat accident off Teignmouth on the evening of Saturday, the 14th inst. It will be remembered that on the day named the deceased, in company with her husband (THOMAS STEER), Henry Hartnoll, and his son, of Teignmouth, and two men named Staddon and Fowler, went in a boat belonging to Hartnoll from Teignmouth to Dawlish, and on the way back the boat capsized in smooth water in a most unaccountable manner, three of the occupants being drowned. STEER, on the body of whose wife the Inquest was held yesterday, was a widower with five children when he married the deceased. - THOMAS STEER, husband of the deceased, said his wife was 25 years of age. On Saturday, the 14th, he and some others hired a boat of Mr Henry Hartnoll, of Teignmouth. There were six in the party, the boat being quite competent to carry six. They sailed to Dawlish; there was but little wind. They stayed at Dawlish a short time. None of them were tipsy. They subsequently left Dawlish to return to Teignmouth. There was half a gallon of ale taken on board the boat, but this was not touched. Witness was sitting by the side of his wife, when the boat upset suddenly and all the occupants were thrown into the water. The sail was down and they were just going to pull into Teignmouth, as the wind had dropped. - The Coroner remarked that the upsetting of the boat was a most unaccountable and mysterious affair. - Witness, continuing, said he was looking over his left shoulder when the boat was upset, and he was thrown with the others into the water on the right side of the boat. He did not know that he was in the water until he rose to the surface. Deceased said, "Oh, TOM, what is the matter?" She then sank, and witness did not see her again. The others clung to the boat, which turned over three or four times. They (the survivors) clung to the bottom of the boat until they were picked up. - A Juryman suggested that the boat might have been overturned by a porpoise. - The Coroner could not agree with this theory. - Witness went on to say that they were all quite quiet, when the boat turned over from no cause which he could assign. They all had a narrow escape from drowning. His wife, Mr Staddon and Mr Fowler were drowned. A Brixham fishing boat picked up the survivors. - The Coroner said the affair was a most melancholy one, and he could not account for the accident in any way. There could not, however, be a better witness than the present one, as he had lost his own wife, and would be likely to give all evidence in his power. - Witness again distinctly averred that it was no indiscretion on the part of anyone in the boat that caused the accident. - Henry Hartnoll, owner of the boat used, said he had carried fourteen persons in the boat. He saw no drink on board, and knew none was touched. All the previous witness had said was perfectly true. Could not imagine how the boat had upset, as there was no "larking" and no one moved. Did not even feel the uplifting of the boat. - The Rev. H. Hutchins, resident at Teignmouth, said the boat used was a new one, and very good. - William Hartwell, farmer, said he found the body at about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday about half a mile east of Langstone Point. In company with a coastguardman he brought the body to that house. - This being all the evidence, the Coroner remarked that there did not appear to him to have been any impropriety upon the part of anybody in the boat at the time of the accident. The Jury had heard the evidence; they would now consider their verdict, and he would record it. It seemed to him that the occurrence was an accident, and God only knew how the boat was upset. - The Foreman (Mr Loram, of Dawlish, who has been a captain in the merchant service) remarked that he could only account for the upsetting of the boat by the rising under it of a large fish. He did not think a porpoise could have done it; though a "black fish" might have. "Black fish" had been known to upset a ship. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 September 1878
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of FLORENCE HORSWELL, 2 years old, who was accidentally killed in Arundel-crescent on Saturday last by one of Messrs. Polkinghorne's wagons. It appears that the deceased, who was in charge of an older girl, went into the road for the purpose of seeing a cart, which contained flags &c. Messrs. Polkinghorne's wagon was turning the corner at the time and the driver attracted the attention of the deceased, who, instead of running back, went under the horse's head, was knocked down and the wheels passed over her chest. She was immediately picked up and taken home and Mr Hughes, surgeon, was sent for, but all his efforts to restore consciousness were unavailing. The deceased died about fifteen minutes after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." No blame is attached to the driver, who had the brake on, and who pulled up the cart as soon as possible.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 September 1878
KINGSKERSWELL - Supposed Death From Opium Poisoning. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at Kingskerswell touching the death of CHARLES HENRY WILLS, aged 39 years, retired army lieutenant of Kingskerswell, who died under peculiar circumstances at his residence - Rose Cottage, Kingskerswell - at about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon. - ROSA DAY WILLS, wife of the deceased, stated that on Tuesday afternoon she came home with her husband from Torquay, where they had been together. Deceased, who had been living at Kingskerswell for about four years, was well and cheerful. On Wednesday he went out for a walk, and came home to late dinner, after which he went to bed apparently well. Between one and two in the morning he got up and went into his dressing-room, to get, as he said, some chloroform to put into his ear, which had been aching, and subsequently went to sleep, but at about six o'clock in the morning he became very restless, and as he had feverish symptoms she sent for Mr Brown, surgeon. Deceased said nothing more about what he had done beyond the statement that he had put some chloroform into his ear. He took this from a small medicine chest which he always kept in the wardrobe and which was labelled "Poison. Medicines." Deceased had never been desponding, nor had he ever said that he took anything to make him sleep. She had been married to deceased for sixteen years, and never had any suspicion that anyone had any ill-will towards him, or that he would ever think of destroying himself. - Mary Elizabeth Trevor, wife of Mr John Trevor, solicitor, of Bridgwater, said she had known deceased from infancy. His mother was her sister. Witness was staying at Torquay, but on Thursday she came to Kingskerswell at deceased's request to take luncheon. On arriving she found deceased very ill and he did not at all recognise her. Was not aware that deceased was in the habit of taking anything to make him sleep. His married life had always been happy. - Mary Ann Hall, domestic servant in the house of deceased, said she had been in his service for eleven years, having been with MR and MRS WILLS at Ascot, previous to their coming to Kingskerswell. Her master had generally been very cheerful. On Thursday morning at about six o'clock her mistress told her deceased was very ill and that she must send for Dr Brown, which witness did. Deceased used to suffer from pain in his arm. - David Brown, surgeon, of Kingskerswell, said he had known the deceased for about four years, during which time he had been occasionally under his care; but for nothing important. He had long suffered from a fractured bone in one of his arms, and on Saturday last he obtained some blistering fluid from witness to apply to the injured arm, which he used in witness's presence. Saw deceased on Sunday, when he said he was relieved. On Tuesday morning deceased sent to him for a renewed supply of tonic, consisting of phosphorus and iron. On Thursday morning witness received a message, between six and seven o'clock to the effect that deceased was dangerously ill. On going at once to the deceased he found him with his face and chest livid, lying on his back, breathing heavily, and apparently in a very deep sleep. The pupils of the eyes were greatly contracted and the pulse very low. MRS WILLS then made the same statement which she had made in her evidence. He roused deceased up and asked him what he had taken, to which deceased replied in a conscious manner, "Nothing, nothing," and then relapsed into sleep. There was no smell in deceased's breath of opium or alcohol. In the right ear was a small piece of cotton wool, which smelt of chloroform. Witness then ran into deceased's dressing room, where he found the small medicine chest (produced) open, and also on the table, closed and capped, a bottle of chloroform (produced). Could see nothing else in the room of the kind. Deceased got worse, and witness came to the conclusion that he had been poisoned by opium or its alkaloids. Witness poured strong coffee down deceased's throat, and walked him about the room. Deceased, however, soon dropped down, and witness put him back into bed, sending for Mr Symons, a resident surgeon and together they kept deceased alive for a time by artificial respiration. Dr Huxley, of Torquay, who formerly attended deceased, was sent for and shortly arrived and every known remedy was faithfully applied. Mr P. Q. Karkeek, surgeon, of Torquay, was sent from Torquay upon the return of Dr Huxley. Before leaving, Dr Huxley searched in the dressing-room, and under the cotton wool in the small box produced he found the box of pills produced, which were labelled "half-grain morphia pills," of which the box now contained nine. This pill-box was stamped with the style of "J. W. Cocks, pharmaceutical chemist, Torquay," and also with the style of "Arthur H. Cox, tasteless pill manufacturer, Brighton." The latter mark shewed where the pills were made. Such pills were unfortunately too commonly sold for the relief of pain and to produce sleep. The effect of morphia or opium upon different constitutions was very varied. It was dangerous for people to take pills of that sort without medical advice. Deceased died on Thursday, at about three p.m., up to which time he was never more than partially conscious after replying "Nothing." Witness, Mr Karkeek, and Mr Symons had that day made a post mortem examination of the body. On opening the skull the veins of the membranes of the brain were very much engorged, also the veins of the brain. There were also bloody points on sections of the brain, and on the cerebrum and cerebellum. The right lung had some old adhesions; the heart was thoroughly healthy. The coats of the stomach indicated the presence of no irritant poison. The liver was slightly darker than usual, but shewed no sign of disease. The other organs were healthy. The state of the brain would be caused by the use of opium or morphia, and it was his opinion that deceased died indirectly from the effect of poison. There were no signs of apoplexy. Deceased could not have died from the effects of chloroform placed in the ear, as he would have expired almost immediately from such a cause. A half-grain morphia pill was a dangerous one to keep a box of, and to take without medical advice. - Paul Quick Karkeek, surgeon, of Torquay, said that on Thursday he came from Torquay, at the request of Dr Huxley, to see deceased, with whom he found Mr Brown and Mr Symons. From what he saw he believed that deceased died from the effects of opium, or its alkaloids. He assisted at the post mortem examination, and fully agreed with all that the last witness had stated. A half grain morphia pill was a very large dose indeed, and should never be taken except under medical advice. Believed that everything that could be done had been done to save the life of the deceased. - At the conclusion of the evidence, the Coroner said that he felt he should not be doing his duty if he did not adjourn the Inquest in order that the Jury might have Mr Cocks, chemist, of Torquay, brought before them to say how it was that the deceased came into possession of so many morphia pills. They had it in the evidence of two medical witnesses that the pills were dangerously strong and from the evidence of the widow they knew that deceased had taken these pills unknown to anyone, except the chemist and himself. He would, therefore, adjourn the Inquest to Monday morning in order that Mr Cocks might be present.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 October 1878
KINGSKERSWELL - The Opium Poisoning At Kingskerswell. - The adjourned Inquest on CHARLES HENRY WILLS, retired army lieutenant, of Rose Cottage, Kingskerswell, was held yesterday at deceased's residence. As was stated in the report of the Inquest on Saturday in the Western Morning News, the Inquiry was adjourned in order that Mr J. W. cocks, chemist, Torquay, might be called to give evidence as to how deceased became possessed of so large a number of half-grain morphia pills as were originally contained in the box found in deceased's medicine chest. - John Walter Cocks, pharmaceutical chemist, Torquay, was called, and said he had known the deceased for about five years, during which time he had constantly had medicines of witness. On the 3rd of July last he sold deceased a box of morphia pills, similar to the box produced, which contained 24 half-grain morphia pills of Cox's make, Brighton. Deceased had never before bought any such pills of him. He came to witness some days before the pills were supplied, and asked for two dozen Cox's half-grain morphia pills. He did not then keep these pills, and was obliged to get a gross. The box was sent to Kingskerswell by Mr Crocker, butcher. When deceased ordered the pills, witness said to him, "It's a full dose, captain," to which deceased replied, "I know it. I have been having such pills from Dr Brown, and I don't want to be constantly troubling him for them." The supply was duly entered in his ledger, and he marked the box "Poison." Knew that a half-grain dose of morphia was a full pharmacopeia dose. Deceased had always conversed with him like a man who knew a good deal of medicine, and he was not an ordinary customer. He had furnished pills double the strength of those in the box to other customers, but this was from a prescription. Was well aware of the danger of such pills. Had supplied deceased with sedative medicines on various occasions previous to supplying the pills. Amongst these medicines had been syrup of chloral hydrate of double-strength and laudanum in one ounce bottles. Deceased had told him that he suffered from sleeplessness. The chloral hydrate was given under medical advice. - Mr John Trevor, solicitor, of Bridgwater, uncle of the deceased, said deceased had at one time, shortly after taking his commission in the army, acted as doctor on board ship whilst taking a number of convicts to Bermuda. - The Coroner, in summing up, characterised the case as a sad and important one. Mr Cocks, however, had satisfactorily explained the circumstances under which deceased purchased the pills, and had shewn that he had not sold them without giving proper caution. The evidence had been sufficient to shew that there was no reason for deceased's taking the pills with the intention of committing suicide. If the Jury thought that deceased took the pills unwittingly, and only for the purpose of alleviating pain, they would say so. - In reply to the Foreman, Mr Brown, surgeon, said it would be almost impossible to find in the stomach any traces of poison after the treatment employed. - The Coroner pointed out that narcotic poisons affected the brain and not the stomach. - After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict as follows:- "We find that the death of the deceased, CHARLES HENRY WILLS, was caused by an overdose of morphia, contained in pills taken by him for the purpose of allaying pain and procuring sleep." The Jury added that they hoped the press would warn the public against taking morphia pills without first consulting a medical man, and recommended that labels should be attached to the boxes bearing the words:- " One only to be taken at a time." The Foreman further added that the Jury desired to express their thanks to the medical men for the manner in which they had attended to and conducted the case. With this the Coroner expressed his hearty concurrence, as also with the verdict returned.

ASHBURTON - The Suicide At Ashburton. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of JOHN SATTERLY, a labourer in the employ of Mr Foot, coal dealer. The deceased was 56 years of age, and his wife stated that of late he had appeared to be troubled about his work, and often spoke on the subject, and that during the past fortnight his manner had been very strange. Mr Gervis, surgeon, said he was not at all surprised at the act, as the deceased suffered from rheumatism some time since, and was out of his mind at times, besides which his heart was affected. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.


Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 October 1878
TORQUAY - A Fatal Draught. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of JOHN HART, aged 17 years, labourer, who died at the Hospital on Monday morning from the effects of drinking sulphuric acid on Saturday afternoon, at the Lowe's Bridge Brick Works, situated on the Newton-road, between Torre and Kingskerswell, at which works deceased was employed. The first witness called was WILLIAM HART, father of deceased, residing at Park-place, St. Marychurch, brickmaker, who stated that on Saturday night, at about 6.30, witness met deceased at Hele, going towards St. Marychurch. Deceased was foaming at the mouth and said "Father, I have drank some poison in mistake." Witness at once took deceased to a chemist, at St. Marychurch, and then sent for Mr Finch, surgeon, but Mr Finch's nephew came in his stead, and said that what the chemist (Mr Hoyle) had given witness would do neither good nor harm. Mr Finch's nephew ordered linseed meal poultices and sent some medicine for deceased to take every four hours. On Sunday both Mr finch and his nephew came to see the deceased, and finding him worse, said deceased should be taken to the Infirmary, as he would die if an operation were not performed. Witness and Mr Finch's nephew together took deceased to the Infirmary. Deceased said he drank out of a bottle in which was kept stuff for testing for limestone in the clay. He died at about a quarter past nine o'clock on Monday morning. - Edwd. Norris, engineer at Lowe's Bridge Brick Works, said he saw deceased at work in the brickyard on Saturday, and on going down to a well in the yard he found deceased leaning forward and grasping the bottle; he was black in the face. The bottle was the one produced, and contained sulphuric acid. Witness guessed what deceased had done, and, after taking the bottle out of his hand, he ran for an emetic. The bottle was labelled "Poison." Witness also called to a lad, named Charles Maddock to bring some water for deceased to wash his mouth out with, and he himself administered about a pint and a half of salt water to deceased, which caused him to vomit. Maddock took deceased home. Should think that the process of testing the clay with acid would be the work of the manager, but did not know, witness being simply engaged in the engine-room. - Gilbert Howard, master brickmaker at the Lowe's Bridge Brick Works, said that the stuff used for testing the clay for lime was sulphuric acid, of which a bottle was always kept on the works, in the clay-pit, under the care of the ganger. On Friday witness used acid from the bottle, leaving therein about one wineglassful. Was sure that no more was ordered or put into the bottle from that time to Saturday night. Deceased had often seen the bottle, but had never used it to witness's knowledge. The only way in which witness could account for the deceased's drinking the acid was that, as the men had been sinking a well, deceased on seeing the bottle might have thought that it contained some kind of spirit which the men had been drinking whilst at their work, and so drained the bottle. - Frederick Grainger, clay cutter, employed at the works, said that on Saturday he used the bottle of acid to test clay at the well, and after doing so he placed it between some bricks ten or twelve yards from the well, intending to subsequently carry it to the clay-pit, which, however, he forgot to do. - Edwin A. Marsh, resident surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said that when deceased was brought to the Hospital he was breathing with great difficulty, and his face was dark. The tongue was very badly burnt. Mr Huxley was sent for, and an opening was made in the trachea in order to let air pass into the lungs, as the glottis was greatly swollen. the operation was successfully performed, but the lungs were so congested that no relief was obtained, and deceased died from congestion of both lungs, brought on by the effects of taking the acid. Witness did not think the case could have been better treated than it had been. - The Coroner having expressed an opinion that deceased took the acid in mistake, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they did not think there was any blame to be attached to anyone. The Coroner remarked to the witnesses, whom he recalled for the purpose, that the sad end of the deceased, who did not appear to have been able to read very well, should be a caution to them all, and induce them to take every precaution with such poisons in the future. Mr Howard promised that in future he would keep the acid locked up.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 October 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of MARY WORTH, a widow, aged about 33 years. The deceased was a machinist in the ropery of Devonport Dockyard, and on Tuesday afternoon she was going from the spinning loft to the dining-room for the purpose of changing her clothes before leaving work, when she ruptured one of the blood vessels of a diseased lung, and died in the course of a few minutes, before medical assistance could be obtained. The deceased leaves a family of young children, and a short time since she lost a little boy, who was run over and fatally injured by a tram car. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 October 1878
BISHOPS TAWTON - Fatal Accident At Barnstaple. - Last evening an Inquest was held at Newport, Barnstaple, on the infant daughter of a butcher named THORNE. The evidence shewed that on Saturday afternoon the child's aunt, a girl aged 12 years, was taking it down the street in her arms, when she stumbled and fell. The child fell and struck the back part of its head on the pavement. It was very sick and convulsed afterwards, and eventually died of concussion of the brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) respecting the death of JOHN SIXMOUTH, aged 53 years, a naval pensioner. The deceased, who resided at 22 Morice-street, had been employed for some time as porter at the Royal Albert Hospital. Of late he had complained a great deal of indigestion and on Saturday night he retired to rest shortly after eleven o'clock in his usual health. An hour later he complained of being unwell and Mr J. Wilson was sent for, but deceased had expired before his arrival. Mr Wilson stated that from the external examination he had made of the body of deceased he had come to the conclusion that death was the result of a rupture of a blood vessel. This opinion was confirmed by the surroundings of the case. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."


BOURNEMOUTH - The Late Boat Accident At Teignmouth. - [Special Telegram.] Bournemouth, Monday. - An Inquest was held today at Bournemouth on a dead body, which was washed on to the beach yesterday. In deceased's pocket was a Great Western Railway pass, made out for one SAMUEL STRADDON. His shirt was marked S. STRADDON, and the same name was scratched on the case of a watch found in deceased's waistcoat pocket. The evidence given by a man from London - James Hatton - proved that deceased was one of the party drowned at Teignmouth some three weeks ago by the capsizing of a boat, under circumstances which have already been detailed. The Inquest was adjourned until Monday next for further evidence.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 October 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Spread Eagle Inn, Treville-street, Plymouth, last evening relative to the death of FRANCIS GEORGE WYATT, about 68 years of age. On Tuesday evening, about six o'clock, the deceased was walking near Tinside, and towards the Citadel, when he suddenly fell down. Blood gushed from his mouth, and he died about ten minutes afterwards. P.C. Locke was soon on the spot, and had the deceased conveyed to his residence in Buckwell-lane. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

ASHBURTON - Fatal Fall Downstairs. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, at the Cottage Hospital, Ashburton, on MARIA DICKER, who had died from injuries received in falling downstairs. - WILLIAM DICKER, a gardener, and husband of the deceased, said his wife was 72 years old. At nine o'clock on the night of Thursday, the 3rd instant, they were going upstairs (he was so feeble that his wife went behind him to assist) and when about seven stairs up his foot slipped, and he fell, together with the deceased, who fell under. They lay at the bottom of the stairs for an hour, when he got up and lighted a candle and lifted deceased up on her knees, and so got her upstairs. It was then between ten and eleven o'clock. Next morning Mr Gervis, surgeon came and attended his wife and sanctioned her removal to the Hospital on Saturday night. She never spoke after Thursday night. - Mr James Adams, in practice at Ashburton, said the deceased was admitted on Saturday evening to the Hospital. He examined her, but found no fractures of the bones; she was unconscious, very restless, and could be kept in bed with great difficulty. She had bruises on her face, right hand, and right side, indicating that she had a severe fall. She died on Monday afternoon. The cause of death was injury to the brain, received in the fall. - The Jury gave a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 October 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr Elliot Square, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Ring of Bells, Woolster-street, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of MARY PETERS MEDLAND, aged 45 years, residing at 33 Vauxhall-street. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been suffering from heart disease for several years past, and that she was always afraid it would cause her death. Yesterday morning she was found dead in bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 October 1878
MODBURY - Strange Death Of A Boy. - An Inquest was held at Modbury on Friday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of GEORGE COLE, aged ten years. Deceased, who has been employed on the farm of Mr J. Adams, Holberton, has been suffering for some time past from mental derangement; and about a week since became so much worse as to be compelled to leave his employment. Messrs. Langworthy, surgeons, were called in and treated him for an effusion of blood on the brain, from which he died on Thursday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 October 1878
EXETER - Fatal Accident Near Exeter. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of a carter named THOMAS PALMER, aged 38 years. On the evening of the 10th September deceased was returning home from Crediton races, in charge of a wagon and two horses, when he slipped from the cart, and one of the wheels went over his feet. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, of which institution he remained an inmate until his decease, which took place on Thursday. Death resulted from blood poisoning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 October 1878
TIVERTON - Fatal Occurrence At Tiverton. - Yesterday Mr F. Mackenzie, Coroner of Tiverton, held an Inquest on a farm labourer named JOHN SALTER, aged 44, who, while walking through the Loughborough Fields late on Saturday night, fell into the Factory Leat and was drowned. When the accident happened deceased was it is stated, under the influence of drink. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and recommended that the trustees of the late Mr Heathcoat should be requested to place a railing along the bank of the leat, which is very dangerous to pedestrians owing to its close proximity to the public footpath.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 October 1878
DAWLISH - A Child Suffocated At Dawlish. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Dawlish yesterday respecting the death of the infant child of WILLIAM HENRY NARRAMORE, a blacksmith. The child was five weeks old. No medical man was present at its birth and none had attended it since. It seemed probable that death was caused by the child having been overlain by its mother, and a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was returned. The Coroner cautioned persons against going to sleep with children in their arms.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of MARY ALFORD, aged 34 years. The deceased, who resided in Clowance-lane, was the daughter of a naval pensioner. For a long time past she had been suffering from dropsy, and on Sunday afternoon she was seized with a severe illness, and expired shortly afterwards. The post mortem examination made by Mr Bennett, surgeon, revealed the cause of death to be impeded action of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 October 1878
PLYMOUTH - The Moorswater Fatality. - Mr E. Square, in the absence of Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening, relative to the death of THOMAS RICHARDS, aged 21 years, engineman in the employ of the Cornwall Railway Company. Deceased had been employed on the Moorswater viaduct, in the course of erection, near Liskeard, and some time since was engaged in working a new steam travelling crane employed in unloading a truck of heavy stones, one of them, in "slewing" caught in the side of the truck, but, suddenly clearing, obtained such additional momentum as to overbalance the truck, which supported the crane on the rails. The engineer in charge (Mr G. Cole) who was also on the crane, was crushed to death by the boiler and RICHARDS was so severely scalded by the escaping steam as to necessitate his immediate removal to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he lingered until Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 25 October 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Deputy Coroner for Plymouth (Mr E. Square) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of JOHN SHANKS, a merchant sailor, aged unknown. On Monday last the deceased went to the Sailors' Home, Plymouth, and complained of pains in his chest, but refused to have medical advice. On Wednesday morning he was sitting in a room at the Home by the fire, when he suddenly fell back and expired immediately. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 November 1878
EAST SUSSEX - The Coroner for East Sussex yesterday concluded an Inquest on the body of a man whose body had been found on the beach at Eastbourne on the previous Monday. James Goodman, bill discounter, Devonport, identified a portrait of the body, and also the clothes found thereon, as those worn by EDWARD JOHN BENNEY, secretary to the Devon and Cornwall United District of Foresters, residing at Hyde Park-terrace, Mutley. Medical evidence went to shew that death had resulted from drowning, and that the stomach was empty, proving that deceased had not had any food for some time previous to death. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 November 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest at Stonehouse on Saturday on ELIZABETH CHIPWIN, a widow, about 93 years of age. The deceased, who resided near the Royal William Victualling Yard, about six weeks ago was sitting on a chair fastening her garter when she suddenly slipped off, and, falling between the chair and a chest of drawers, broke her right thigh. She died on Thursday. - Mr Leah, surgeon, who had attended her, said he was of opinion that she died from the injuries received combined with old age. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 November 1878
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of SAMUEL JOHN SHERGOOL, a cabdriver, about 42 years of age. The deceased, who resided in East-street, went to bed apparently in his usual health at midnight on Saturday. At twenty minutes to five on Sunday morning he got out of bed and lit a lamp, and shortly afterwards got into bed again. About six o'clock his wife tried to rouse him, and found him dead by her side. Mr Leah, who had made a post mortem examination, found the heart very much enlarged, and thought that the deceased died from aneurism of the aorta. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 November 1878
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Death From Apoplexy - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Buckland Monachorum yesterday relative to the death of JANE MARKS, the widow of a miner. Deceased was found dead in her house at Buckland Monachorum early on Monday morning, and the evidence given by Mr Willis, surgeon, of Horrabridge, shewed that she died from apoplexy. The Jury, of whom Mr Thomas was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE CANON - Strange Suicide Near Exeter. - A strange case of suicide occurred at Stoke Canon, near Exeter, on Tuesday. It appears that shortly before five o'clock in the evening a respectable young woman, named ELLEN HOPKINS, aged 32, whose parents reside at Silverton, engaged a cab-driver (Philip Webber) at Exeter to drive her to her home. He drove along the Cowley Bridge-road as far as the Paper Mills, where MISS HOPKINS got out of the cab unperceived by the driver, who continued his journey to Silverton. After walking a short distance she was overtaken by a horse and trap driven by the owner, Mr Smith, butcher and baker of Stoke. A lad was also in the trap. On its coming up the deceased asked Smith if he would drive her to Silverton, but he declined, saying that he would take her as far as Stoke. She got into the trap, and Smith resumed his journey. On reaching Stoke Bridge, close by the horseway leading down to the river, which is unprotected at this spot, she jumped down, saying "This will do," and with the same walked straight into the river. There was a great quantity of water going down, and the deceased was instantly carried off her legs and swept down the river. After she had gone a distance of about 100 yards she was taken out of the water by some men who had been attracted to the spot by the shouting of Mr Smith. Efforts were made to restore animation, but they proved unavailing. Mr Puddicombe, surgeon, of Silverton, was also sent for and pronounced life to be extinct. On the cabman arriving at his destination, and opening the door for the young woman to alight, he was greatly surprised to find the cab empty. He at once drove back and learnt the particulars of the man Smith. An Inquest will be held tomorrow. The deceased had been employed at the Half-Moon Hotel, Exeter, as barmaid, for the last twelve months.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 November 1878
EXETER - Found Drowned. - Mr Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on a man named THOMAS SPARROW, aged about 50, who had been found drowned. It appears that the deceased was a member of the Typographical Association, and that on the 4th instant he went to the branch office at Bristol and obtained relief, on receiving which he told the secretary that he intended to travel towards Plymouth in search of employment. On Tuesday morning SPARROW'S lifeless body was found in the mill-leat, situate in the West Quarter, Exeter. No evidence could be adduced showing how the deceased came into the water, and the Jury, after hearing the medical evidence, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The deceased's funeral expenses will be defrayed out of the funds of the Typographical Association.

STOKE CANON - The Suicide Of A Barmaid Near Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Stoke Canon by Mr Cross (County Coroner) touching the death of HELEN HOPKINS, an unmarried woman, late a barmaid at the Half-Moon Hotel, Exeter, and formerly employed in Plymouth, who committed suicide by drowning herself, on Tuesday morning, in that part of the river Culm adjoining the Stoke Canon Bridge, under circumstances already reported. - Mr Gardiner, landlord of the Half-Moon Hotel, Exeter, said the deceased had been in his employ as barmaid for about nine months. From an anonymous letter which he received concerning her character he had a conversation with her, and she admitted the facts stated in the letter, upon which he told her she must leave his employ at a week's notice. After that her manner appeared very strange, particularly on Monday last. She was untidy in her dress. She was paid the money due to her, and left on Tuesday, with the intention, as she stated, of going to her friends at Silverton. - John Smith, butcher, of Silverton, stated that on the evening in question he was driving his trap on the Stoke Canon-road. A cab passed his vehicle on the road, going towards Stoke. Just afterwards he saw a woman standing in the road and the cab ahead of her with the door open. At her request he took her into the trap and drove rapidly with a view to overtake the cab. On reaching the crown of the Stoke Canon Bridge, they were within a short distance of the cab, when the deceased, who had conducted herself in a very excitable manner, took hold of the reins, told him to "pull up" and jumped out into the road. She then went in the opposite direction, towards the Exeter side of the bridge, where there was an unfenced spot, and plunged into the river. Witness, who was too far off to render assistance, shouted to her, and was joined by a man named Harris, who plunged into the stream and brought the body out - but all efforts to restore animation failed. - Mr Puddicombe, surgeon, of Silverton, stated that the deceased had suffered some years ago from an attack of fever, which might have affected her mind. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." It has transpired that on Monday evening the deceased visited her child, which she had placed out to nurse, and asked the people who had charge of it if she could stay there the night, but as they could not accommodate her she left.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 November 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday evening relative to the death of CHARLOTTE RICKETTS, about 68 years of age. The deceased, who resided at 22 Penrose-street, went to bed on Friday night in her usual health; but about midnight her husband was awakened by the deceased making a noise, and on his getting up she fell back on the pillow dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death At Devonport. The Diffident Poor. - On Saturday Mr James Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest at the Parochial-office, Chapel-street, respecting the death of MARY LACY, a widow, 64 years of age. The deceased, who had been an inmate of the Devonport Workhouse, but who had recently been residing at 38 Cherry Garden-street, went to the Parochial-office on Friday afternoon for the purpose of applying for relief. Whilst waiting in the building she complained of a pain in her side, pointing to the region of her heart, and without the slightest warning she fell upon the floor and almost immediately expired. The result of a post mortem examination of the body made by Messrs. Wilson, and F. A. Thomas, Surgeons, went to shew that deceased died through the bursting of the aorta of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 22 November 1878
BIDEFORD - Drowning At Bideford. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Infirmary, Bideford, on JULIA DASHWOOD, a little girl seven years of age, daughter of CHARLES DASHWOOD, a coachman. It was stated that on Wednesday the deceased and one or two other children, when returning from school, went down to the slip at Mr How's yard, where the deceased got into a boat, and in trying to get out of it she slipped her foot and fell into the river. Her companions ran for assistance, and Mrs Stevens came; but the deceased was thirty feet from the shore, floating on her back. Mr Bird was then called and he, with the assistance of another man, got into a boat and picked the deceased up, and conveyed her to the Infirmary, but notwithstanding al the efforts of the medical men there, respiration could not be restored, although the heart was beating feebly at the time the child was brought in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - Scarlet Fever At Stoke. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Millbridge Inn, Stoke, yesterday afternoon, into the circumstances attending the death of DONALD SYDNEY DENSHAM, about 2 years of age. - WILLIAM DENSHAM, father of the deceased, residing at 7 Mill Pleasant, said that on Monday the deceased became rather ill and apparently had a cold. Its breathing at that time was very good. On Tuesday evening about six o'clock, he became alarmed about the child, because it had changed greatly in its appearance and at once went for Mr Lewis, surgeon, but found that he was not at home. He afterwards found Mr Jackson, but that gentleman was engaged, and could not attend. He afterwards saw Mr Thomson, but he was also engaged, but wrote out a prescription. - Harriet Whiddicombe, residing at 7 Mill Pleasant, said that on Saturday last the deceased was running about apparently in a healthy state. She was called in about six o'clock on Tuesday evening, and thought that the child was dying. It was put into a warm bath, but it died about five minutes later. - Mr Lewis Lewis, surgeon, said that he had made an external examination of the body, and from the statement of the parents he came to the conclusion that the child died from malignant scarlet fever. The child was in a high state of fever. His opinion was confirmed by the state of the elder child, who was then dangerously ill, and died the same (Wednesday) evening from scarlet fever. - A Juror asked Mr Lewis if he noticed a dent in the child's forehead? - Mr Lewis replied that he had not. - The Coroner thought that Mr Lewis should go and examine the body, and this he did. Mr Lewis said that he was quite certain the mark was not on the child when he examined it, and he had ascertained that it had been done accidentally by the lid of the coffin. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 November 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths And Suicides. - Last evening Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANN ROWE, widow, aged 88 years. The deceased resided with her son at 21 Morley-street; and on Saturday last she became unwell. She continued to get worse, and about three o'clock on Sunday afternoon she expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of LYDIA MCKEER, aged 79, widow of a retired shipwright, and residing at 5 Treville-street. It was stated that the deceased complained of pains in her back on Saturday evening and that early the next morning her son, lived with her, was aroused by his sister and told that his mother was dying, and before he had time to get to the deceased's bedroom she had expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquiry, held by Mr Brian, was with respect to the suicide of GEORGE TALLACK LUCAS, alias TALLACK, shoemaker, aged 47 years. - WILLIAM TALLACK, son of the deceased, residing at 2 Gibbons-lane, deposed that the deceased had been very strange in his manner since the death of his wife, which occurred about six months since. Last week the deceased saw a surgeon about his health, and subsequently he became more depressed. On Saturday he complained of having a pain in his head, and on Sunday morning he was discovered by witness, who slept with him on Saturday night, hanging against the door of the bedroom. Witness denied that there was any truth in the rumour that he and his brother had been unkind to the deceased. - Mark Blackmore stated that he had resided next door to the deceased for upwards of twenty-five years, and that the deceased had been a tee-totaller for about twenty years. He heard that the deceased saw a surgeon last week, and that the surgeon informed him that he was in a consumption. During the past week there had been a marked change in deceased's manner. Witness found the deceased hanging by a piece of rope, which was suspended from a crook immediately above the door of the bedroom. He did not believe that the deceased would have committed the act had he been in a sound state of mind. - William Gruett, another neighbour, deposed that he cut the deceased down, and found that he was quite dead and nearly cold. - P.C. Wright stated that he had not heard of the sons treating deceased unkindly. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

EAST STONEHOUSE - At Stonehouse yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, held an Inquiry relative to the death of CAROLINE EMMA FISHLEY, about 54 years of age. - Mr T. Leah, surgeon, said that on Sunday afternoon, about one o'clock, he was passing through Chapel-street, and heard a tremendous crash, as of some heavy body falling. He looked around, and saw the deceased lying in the gutter immediately outside her house. He thought that she struck against the lid over the shop in falling. He assisted in getting her into the house and he attended to her. She was insensible, and had received severe injuries to the head and also fractured one of her thighs. At the time of the accident the only window that he could see open was one in the second floor front room, but he was told that this was occupied by a family. - WM. HENRY FISHLEY, shipwright, husband of the deceased, said that on Sunday his wife was in bed in a back room on the first floor. The youngest daughter of the deceased (who was too ill to give evidence) took the deceased her dinner about five minutes after one. Shortly afterwards an alarm was raised that the deceased had fallen out of the window, and he went out of the house and found his wife lying in the road. She was taken to a room, but remained insensible up to the time of her death, which occurred at ten minutes to three. He then went up to the garret, and found that the window, which was fastened before the occurrence, had been unfastened. About two feet from the window there was a chair, which was usually kept at the other end of the room. The deceased was not in the habit of going up to the garret, which was used as a lumber room. Mr Pearse, surgeon, occasionally attended the deceased, who had been very much depressed in spirits since the death of a daughter about three years ago. She was also very nervous at times. - By the Coroner: She did not appear more low spirited than usual on Sunday. - By a Juror: She did not partake of her dinner on Sunday. Witness added that the people who occupied the front room on the second floor said that they heard something rolling heavily on the roof, and suddenly saw the deceased falling. - It is thought that the deceased as soon as her dinner was brought up got out of bed and dressed herself, and then went into the garret, and placed a chair near the window, out of which she jumped into the street. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that he had sent for Mr Pearce, surgeon, to attend to give evidence; but found that he was not at home. He was not, however, then aware that the husband of the deceased was going to give evidence as to the deceased being depressed in spirits, but as he had done so the Jury would, probably, be able to do without Mr Pearse's attendance. There was no doubt that the deceased threw herself out of the window, and it would be for the Jury to say in what state of mind she was when she did so. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased threw herself out of the window whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." - The Coroner concurred in the finding of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 November 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at Plymouth into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM NILSTRIP, the infant son of MARY ANN NILSTRIP, widow, residing at 75 King-street West. The deceased, who was ten weeks old, had been a weakly child since its birth, and shortly after midnight on Saturday it was discovered by the mother lying dead at her side. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 November 1878
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Fatal Railway Accident At Horrabridge. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the London Inn, Horrabridge, yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS MARTIN, aged 29 years, goods' guard in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, and refreshment house-keeper, 7 Paris-street, Exeter, who met his death by the hinder part of a goods train, of which he was in charge, becoming detached on the top of an incline near Horrabridge, presumably by the sudden application of break power on the rear van. The detached portion of the train was at first left some distance behind, but when the accident was discovered, and the fore part of the train brought to a standstill, the detached vans coming down over the incline steadily increased their speed to an enormous rate, and, before the fore part of the train could be set in motion, came dashing into it, a heavy meat van coming with terrific force against the deceased's van, which literally collapsed, crushing and lacerating the chest of the guard in a fearful manner; indeed, from the nature of the injuries - as stated in the medical evidence - death must have been instantaneous. So firmly were the splintered vans jammed together that locomotives had to be employed in order that they might be separated to extricate the body. - In opening the Inquest yesterday the Coroner explained that it had been impossible for him to obtain satisfactory evidence in so short a time, and he proposed to formally open the Inquiry, examine the necessary witnesses, and adjourn the matter for a few days. He remarked that the manner in which the landlord of the inn had received the body, and the respect he had paid to the dead reflected great credit on him, for it frequently happened that licensed victuallers placed bodies in stables, cow-sheds, and such places, where it was impossible that the respect which should be always entertained towards the dead could be observed. Licensed victuallers could not be compelled to receive corpses into their houses; and hence arose a necessity, and he considered it a very urgent necessity, for the erection of mortuaries in every parish. This was not only desirable for meeting cases which resulted in Coroners' Inquests, but it would be eminently useful for receiving the bodies of those who had died from any infectious disease, in which case it was extremely undesirable that the bodies should be left to promulgate disease and death perhaps not only amongst one family, but amongst a whole community. - Mr Richard Willis, surgeon, stated that about 7.30 on Tuesday evening he was called to the Horrabridge Railway Station and there found the deceased quite dead, although the body was still warm. The cause of death was fracture of the ribs and compression of the lungs, resulting from the crushing of the chest. The injuries were such as would have resulted from the body being pressed between two vans in the manner described, and from their nature death must have been instantaneous. - Harry Hayne, inspector in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, stationed at Devonport, identified the body. Deceased was employed on the same line as witness as goods' guard between Devonport and Exeter, and on Tuesday left Devonport at 5.45 p.m. in charge of a goods train, which would be due at Horrabridge at 6.45. Deceased had been employed as guard for many years, and thoroughly understood his work. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Wednesday next, when full evidence will be produced as to the cause and nature of the accident. - Deceased, who was a steady, hard-working man, and a great favourite with his fellow-workmen and those with whom he came into contact along the line he worked, leaves a wife, but no family.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death In A Railway Carriage. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Millbay Station, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL HELLING, dispenser, in the employ of Messrs. Miles and Stamp, surgeons, Plympton. On Saturday afternoon the deceased, who was about 50 years of age, and who was a pensioner of the Royal Marines, ran to the Plympton Station and took a ticket for Plymouth by the 5.25 train. Soon after his arrival at the station he complained to the guard of the train of having a severe pain across his chest, and having been "a martyr to indigestion." The deceased entered the third-class smoking compartment of the train, but before the train had got any distance from the station he fell back and died in the arms of another passenger. The body was brought on to Plymouth, and Mr Stephens, surgeon, who was sent for, pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 December 1878
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Fatal Railway Accident At Horrabridge. - The Inquest concerning the death of THOMAS MARTIN, aged 29 years, goods guard in the employ of the London and South Western Railway, and refreshment housekeeper, Paris-street, Exeter, was resumed yesterday at Horrabridge, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. It may be briefly stated that the deceased was killed in consequence of the hinder portion of a goods train of which he was in charge becoming detached on the top of a steep incline near Horrabridge. On the fore part of the train being brought to a standstill at the Horrabridge Station, the detached vans having greatly accelerated their speed owing to the declivity, dashed into it, and crushed the guard to death instantly. Mr C. E. Compton watched the Inquiry on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company; Mr J. Tyler on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company; and Messrs. J. Luxmore and T. Higgs represented the locomotive departments of the respective companies. - William Powell, engineman, stated that on November 26th he left Devonport on the engine of the goods train of which deceased was in charge at 5.45 p.m. and at Laira twenty-nine vehicles were added. The Devonport portion was in the rear. On approaching Horrabridge station the signal stood at "danger" in consequence of a Great Western down train having not yet arrived; but after they had slackened speed the danger signal was taken off, and the train passed into the station, where they almost stopped whilst the "train ticket" was handed to witness's fellow-driver. They were about to increase their speed when witness, on looking round to see that all was right, perceived a danger light waved from the platform, and, not knowing what was the matter, told the other driver to put on his brake, but before he could do so something ran into the train, knocking them slightly forward - a distance of two or three feet. Witness got off his engine and went to the back of the train, where he found that a meat van had run into and mounted a brake van, which contained the guard in charge. Witness called to deceased but obtained no answer, and shortly afterwards he heard someone say that a man had been killed. Witness looked about with his lantern, and saw the deceased crushed between the ruins of the two wagons, with his arm around the rail of his van, as if, when the collision took place, he had been looking out for the signal from his mate in the rear indicating that all was right. The accident had no doubt occurred through the coupling chain of a Great Eastern Railway truck breaking, or the draw-bar coming out, and to the fact that the train was travelling over an incline having a gradient of one in sixty. He could not tell exactly where the rear vans became detached, as he did not know that anything was amiss until the collision occurred. - By a Juryman: There was no means of communication between the engine and rear vans, as in a passenger train, excepting signals by means of lamps as they were going round curves in the line. They were constantly on the lookout for such signals. - By the Coroner: By Act of Parliament means of communication were only compulsory in passenger trains travelling any distance exceeding twenty miles without stopping. They did not notice any difference in the weight of the train at the time the rear vans became detached, as they were going over an incline, and each van had a separate motion of its own. - John Steer, in the employ of the London and South Western Company, stated that on the day in question he was employed as brakesman in the rear van of the train of which deceased was in charge. After passing through Yelverton Tunnel witness applied his brake, and kept it on until the home signal at Horrabridge Station - which had previously shewn "danger" - indicated that the line was clear. Witness then took off the brake, and the speed gradually increased to about five or six miles an hour; and soon after passing the west-end "loop points" the train came to a stop, as if the brakes on the engine had been suddenly applied. Witness did not anticipate any serious accident, and remained in his van for several minutes expecting the train to start; but hearing some person call him by name he went to the front of the train, and found that a collision had occurred, and that the guard had been killed. Witness had not the slightest idea how, when, or where the vans became disconnected. - Thomas Hicks, driver on one of the engines drawing the train of which deceased was in charge, corroborated the main points of the evidence, adding that he afterwards found that the accident had happened through the draw-bar of a Great Eastern Railway wagon coming out or breaking, and that he did not know that anything had gone amiss until the collision occurred. Deceased was quite dead when extricated. - William Herd, brakesman, stationed in one of the centre vans at the time of the accident, also corroborated the evidence. - Benjamin Drake, stationmaster at Horrabridge, said he had handed the "train ticket" to one of the enginemen as the train was passing through the station at the rate of about four miles an hour, when he noticed that there were only six vans and no tail lamp, and almost simultaneously saw the side lamps of the detached portion coming down the incline towards the station. They were but a very short distance off, and as soon as witness had turned his "danger" signal towards the approaching vans collision occurred. The deceased was instantly crushed to death. - Francis Wright, foreman of the carriage department at the Millbay Station of the Great Western Railway, produced a broken bolt which had connected the spring with the draw-bar of a Great Eastern Truck, which had formed part of the train of which deceased was in charge. Witness was superintending a gang of men who were employed in clearing the line. The bolts would sometimes break, and the one he produced fitted very nicely and was of the ordinary size - an inch and a quarter. - By the Foreman: He knew from experience that bolts would break, and no person could account for it; although the very cold weather prevailing at the time of the accident might have had something to do with it. There was no flaw in the iron. The strength of the bolt produced was, in his opinion, quite equal to the strength of side chains, which were sometimes used. - Thomas Higgs, engineer, London and South Western Railway, produced a plan of a railway wagon. Witness examined the drawing produced and found no flaw in it, and it was quite strong enough to bear the strain. The face-plate produced also was sound, and of ample strength. On the London and South Western Railway the greatest part of their rolling stock was supplied with side chains, but the truck in question was not. Some companies did not use side chains, as they frequently did more harm than good, and he would not recommend the use of them. When side chains were not employed double couplings were always used. The draw-bar passed through the face-plate, and usually extended half the length of the truck, where the spring was placed. There were no side chains on most of the trucks forming the train in question, because they belonged to other companies; but they were all provided with double coupling chains, which was all that was necessary. - William Herd, recalled, said the trucks in question were connected by means of coupling chains, which were properly fastened. - Mr J. Tyler remarked for the information of the Jury, that side chains were being abandoned by all the large railway companies in favour of coupling chains. - Thomas Higgs, recalled, confirmed this, and said that side chains were rather dangerous, as if one should break the one remaining would have a tendency to throw the vehicle off the line. - The Jury, of whom the Rev. H. F. Tucker was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with which the Coroner said he fully concurred.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 December 1878
EXETER - Suicide AT Exeter. Incidents At The Inquest. GEORGE PARISH, a mason and plasterer, living at Mount Cottage, Longbrook-street, Exeter, and carrying on business in partnership with his brother in King-street, committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself in his back kitchen, where he was found by his wife about half-past eight o'clock. For the past month he had been in a low desponding state, in consequence of his embarrassed circumstances. He had told his brother that he was in difficulty about the rent, and this seemed to prey on his mind. The deceased, who was 39 years of age, leaves a wife and two children. - One or two incidents at the Inquest, which was held in the afternoon, will be very suggestive to those readers who have perused Mr Edward Jenkin's "Devil's Chain." The Jury assembled at the Poltimore Inn, and upon his arrival, the Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper, inquired of Sergeant Hosgood, the summoning officer, the reason of the Inquest being held there, he (the Coroner) having ordered the Inquiry to be holden at the Bristol Inn. Sergeant Hosgood denied that this was so, and persisted in asserting that Mr Hooper ordered it to be held at the Poltimore Inn. - The Coroner: We won't discuss the matter at present; you're not in a fit state to do so. I can dispense with your attendance. - Sergeant Hosgood: Then I may go, sir. - The Coroner: I have been waiting at the Bristol Inn. The warrant will speak for itself; if you read it, you would have seen that the Inquest was to have been held at the Bristol Inn. - Sergeant Hosgood: I ask how that .....; very good, sir. - The Coroner: This is very disgraceful; I shall report this to the proper authorities. - Several Jurymen said they were summoned to appear at the Poltimore Inn, and they heard nothing about the Bristol Inn. - Sergeant Hosgood was proceeding to make some observations, when he was interrupted by the Coroner, who said he would not be disturbed in this manner. - Sergeant Hosgood: Did I not tell you ....... - The Coroner (interposing): The warrant was issued for the Bristol Inn; we will now proceed with the business. - Addressing Sergeant Hosgood, the Coroner added: I am very sorry to see you in the state you are. - Sergeant Hosgood: Thank you, sir. - Hosgood then left the room, and the Coroner proceeded to swear the Jury and to take evidence. At the conclusion of his summing up, the Coroner said that he was extremely sorry to have had occasion to remark on the state of Sergeant Hosgood's condition. It was very unusual to see that officer in such a condition. - Several Jurymen expressed a hope that the Coroner would overlook the matter. - The Coroner said he was the more sorry because Hosgood was a respectable and usually a most steady man. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity. Before the Inquiry opened the Coroner found it necessary to dispense with the services of one of the "gentlemen" who had been sworn as a Juror.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 December 1878
EXETER - Another Sad Suicide At Exeter. - On Saturday Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held a third Inquest for the week on the body of a suicide. The deceased, ISAAC JOHN WEST, who was employed as boots and ostler at the South Western Hotel, Paul-street, was found hanging in a loft belonging to Mr Elmore, his employer. He was about 20 years of age, and was under an engagement to be married in a few days to a young woman, named Fanny Young. It appeared from a statement made by Mr Elmore that while in his former situation as boots at the Museum Hotel, the deceased became engaged to Miss Young, who was his fellow-servant there, and they had agreed to be married on Saturday next. During the past few days, however, the young man became strange in his manner; and a conversation he had with another female acquaintance, who thought he was not doing wisely to marry, seemed to make him very depressed in spirits. On the body of the deceased was found a letter from his intended wife, couched in very affectionate terms, stating that she would leave it to him to fix the day of their marriage. It was stated, in reply to the Jury, that deceased had once before attempted to commit suicide. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death In The Street. - The Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at Devonport on Saturday relative to the death of ANDREW BELL, about forty years of age. - The deceased, who resided at 47 Princess-street, Devonport, was a carpenter's mate, serving on board H.M.S. Gorgon, tender to the Cambridge, gunnery ship. On Thursday evening he purchased some pills and wafers of Mr Filmer, chemist, James-street, and stated that he had a very bad cough. Soon afterwards, as he was walking up James-street, he suddenly put his hand on the collar of a pensioner, named Bryant, and blood issued from his mouth and nose. His legs suddenly gave way, and he was lowered on the pavement, blood still flowing very freely from his mouth and nose. Sergeant Michell, of the Devonport Police-Force, arrived on the spot within a few minutes, and had the deceased promptly conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital on a stretcher, but he died before he reached there. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had frequently complained of a very severe dry cough, which strained his chest very much. The night before he died he was very restless, and had the cough severely. Mr B. P. S. McDermott, staff-surgeon, serving on board the Cambridge, was present during the Inquiry, and said that he had no doubt that the deceased died from Natural Causes. A verdict in accordance with this evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday relative to the death of PHILIP MOSS, aged about 3 months, son of HENRY MOSS, of 5 Kings-gardens. MRS MOSS retired to rest about ten o'clock on Sunday night, taking deceased with her, and about three o'clock yesterday morning it appeared all right, but an hour later MRS MOSS saw that it had its hands clenched and was to all appearance dead. Medical aid was at once procured, and everything done to restore animation, but to no purpose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 December 1878
EXETER - Drunk Or Dying? Shocking Neglect Of An Aged Parent. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Turk's Head Inn, near the Guildhall, Exeter, on Saturday afternoon, on an old man named MATTHEWS, a butcher, who had died while in custody of the police under peculiar circumstances. Shortly after nine o'clock on Friday evening the attention of P.C. Reynolds, who had just gone off duty, was called by George Denham, a gasfitter, to the deceased. It appeared that the deceased had been in one of the water closets at the Industrial Buildings, in St. Sidwells, for several hours, and being in a state of stupor he was taken to the Guildhall, and lodged in a cell. After he had been there a short time, the officers on duty fancied there was something more serious the matter with him than drunkenness, and they had him removed to the front office, and sent for Mr Bell, surgeon, but before that gentleman arrived he was dead. Capt. Bent, chief constable, in reporting the case to the magistrates in the morning, said he had been informed that MRS MORTIMER, a daughter of the deceased, who lives in the Industrial Buildings, had refused to receive her father into her house, and that he had taken refuge in the water-closet, having no other place to go to. - MRS MORTIMER, who was the first witness called at the Inquest, stated that she last saw her father alive about four o'clock on the previous afternoon, when he came to the Buildings. She was afterwards told that her father was in one of the water-closets; but thinking he was tipsy she did not deem it necessary to go to him, believing that he would "come round" in a little while. At six o'clock she learnt from a Mrs Denham that her father was still in the same place, and when Mr Denham came home the latter went to the closet, and tried to rouse the old man, but failed. Witness stated that the reason she did not have him brought into her own house was that he often came there intoxicated and caused a disturbance. Shortly before ten o'clock Mr Denham again tried to rouse the deceased, but he could not do so, and called in a policeman. - One of the Jurors stigmatised the witness's conduct as very cruel. - Captain Bent: Were you not asked to take him in, as he appeared to be in a critical state? - Witness: No. - Q.: did you not tell one of the neighbours that he should not come into your house? - A.: No; I said my husband would not let him come in. - George Denham, gasfitter, of Cotton's Buildings, said that on coming home at half-past seven he was told that MATTHEWS was in the water-closet drunk. Witness went out and found that the deceased was half naked and very cold. He rubbed the old man's head, arranged his clothes, and tried to rouse him. Deceased said "all right" several times and appeared to get a little better, when witness left him. Soon afterwards he learnt that the deceased had left the water-closet, and on looking for him found that he had gone to the wash-house, where he had again partly undressed himself. He then called in P.C. Reynolds, who assisted in taking deceased to the Guildhall, whither he was conveyed on a wheelbarrow. Did not think the man was drunk at that time, but nevertheless did not think it better to send for a medical man than to have him taken to the Guildhall. - By Captain Bent: Told the inspector at the Guildhall that MATTHEWS was insensibly drunk. - P.C. Reynolds stated that when he first saw the deceased he considered that he was drunk, and it was at the witness's suggestion that he was removed to the Guildhall. When he was put into the cell witness observed that he looked much paler than before, and he at once called the inspector, who ordered him to be brought to the front office. Mr Bell was sent for, but before he arrived the man was dead. - By the Coroner: Thought the man was drunk, as he smelt strongly of liquor. - ANN MATTHEWS, deceased's wife, deposed that about five or six o'clock, whilst in the Mermaid Yard, she was informed that her husband had been helped to her daughter's house in Cotton's Buildings. Witness went to the Buildings, and found her husband in a water closet, which was pointed out by her daughter. Witness spoke to him, but he did not answer. She then proposed to her daughter to get a cab, and went home and made up a fire for him, but he did not come home. He was not particularly addicted to drink. - Inspector Short deposed that on the arrival of the deceased at the Guildhall, P.C. Perriam said he thought there was something more the matter with the deceased besides being drunk. Witness ordered him to be brought into the office before the fire, and he then perceived that the man was dying. He was unable to swallow some gin and water which was poured into his mouth, and before Mr Bell's arrival life was extinct. - P.C. Perriam gave similar evidence. - Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said that on Friday night, at 11.15 he was called to see the deceased at the station-house. The deceased was in the charge-room, lying on the floor before the fire. The body was lifeless; no marks of violence were apparent. He perceived no signs of drink. In his opinion death resulted from failure of the action of the heart, caused by exposure to the cold. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that on the previous afternoon his attention was called to the deceased, who was sitting outside an inn in a drunken condition. He considered the daughter was highly culpable for the manner in which she had acted towards her father. He also thought the wife was culpable, though in a less degree. The police had acted in a very praiseworthy manner. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAVISTOCK - The Alleged Child Murder At Tavistock. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquiry at Tavistock on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of FLORENCE ANNE KATE WAKEM, aged 6 months, the daughter of JANE WAKEM, a married woman, living apart from her husband. About a week since the mother of the deceased was apprehended under a warrant charged with the wilful murder of the deceased; and, consequently, Mr C. V. Bridgman watched the case on behalf of the accused. - Mr Michael Leamon, surgeon, deposed that on the 7th instant he, in company with Mr W. Northey, made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found the body to be that of a well-nourished child. There were marks of abrasions on the right cheek, the nose, and the chin; and there was a slight congestion of the membranes of the brain. The lungs were partially congested, as also was the heart. These results might have been produced by suffocation, but he could not say whether it was accidental or intentional. The real cause of death was suffocation, which had been caused by pressure on the nose and mouth. Probably death was caused by a hard mat being pressed over the face of the deceased. There were no marks on the back of the head. - By Mr Bridgman: An abrasion would more probably be caused by a hard substance than by a finger. The marks on the face of the child might have been caused by the child lying on the mattress of the bed face downwards and some person lying on it. - By a Juryman: There was no fracture or displacement of the bones of the spine. - Mr Wm. Cornish Northey, surgeon, who assisted the last witness in making the post mortem examination, stated that there were five or six external marks on the body of the deceased; one was under the right cheek bone, another on the extremity of the nose, and third on the upper lip and three or four between the chin and under lip. These marks were, in his opinion, caused by pressure; and the pressure was probably caused by the hand. The marks between the chin and upper lip might have been produced by the extremities of the fingers and nails, as if the mouth and nose had been forcibly compressed by the hand. He could not say that the marks were caused by violence, but his impression was that they were. Unless the pressure over the nose and mouth had been kept up for some considerable time, the indentations might not have remained. - By Mr Bridgman: He was of opinion that all the marks he had described were caused at the same time. He was not prepared to swear that the marks were caused by some person's hand, but he could not imagine that they had been caused by any other means. - Mr Northey here pointed out that Mr Leamon had said that the marks might have been produced by a mattress; but neither the mother nor the child slept on a mattress. - By the Coroner: Presuming that the marks were produced accidentally, there must have been an instrument to have exactly fitted over the nose, mouth and chin of the deceased child. - Mr Richard West, surgeon, deposed that he was present at the latter part of the post mortem examination of the deceased child, and that on looking at the neck he saw what he presumed to be injuries to the neck. This, however, he subsequently found to be incorrect. He contended that the lungs were not extensively congested, though they were to a slight extent; and this was an important link in the chain of evidence, as it shewed clearly that death must have been very rapid. He did not observe any bruise on the nose, as if it had been pressed up, nor that the opening of the nostrils closed. Two of the marks were clearly abrasions - those on the cheek and neck - the cuticle having been torn off. He agreed with the other medical gentlemen with regard to the other details. Suffocation was the cause of death; but he would not say whether it was accidental or intentional, though evidently it was caused by violence. He very much doubted whether the marks were caused by the hand; he hardly thought the suffocation could have been produced by the hand, as it had evidently been of a very rapid nature. - By Mr Bridgman: If the suffocation had been produced by the pressure of the hand there would have been more congestion of the lungs, assuming that the supply of air had not been completely cut off. Possibly the marks on the deceased might have been caused by the child lying on the mattress, and the mother lying on her. - An adjournment of the Inquiry here took place in order that the witness might see the bed in which the mother slept at the time of the death of the deceased. On the Inquiry being resumed, Mr West stated that in his opinion the marks on the face of the deceased were most likely to have been caused by the child lying face downwards, and a heavier body - such as that of the mother - lying upon it. - By the Coroner: He was decidedly of opinion that the mother had been drinking. She was addicted to drinking. - By Mr Bridgman: A drunken woman would lie more heavily than a sober person. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that it was for the Jury to say whether they were satisfied that the accused deliberately, and with malice aforethought, killed the child; if so, it would be for them to return a verdict of wilful murder. If, however, they had any doubt in their minds, they should give the accused the benefit of the doubt. The medical men were all of the same opinion that the child was suffocated violently, and it remained with them to say whether the suffocation was intentional or unintentional. Whatever their decision might be, it would not affect the magistrates in their decision, as if there was a prima facie case made out they would be compelled to send the accused for trial. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met her death by Suffocation, but under what circumstances and how, and in what manner there was no evidence to shew. - The Coroner remarked that he concurred in this verdict. - Subsequently the accused was brought before Mr W. P. Michell and the Rev. H. J. Marshead charged with the wilful murder of the deceased. - Mr C. V. Bridgman again watched the case on behalf of the accused. - The evidence that was adduced before the Coroner was given before the magistrates. - The Bench, after a few minutes' deliberation, remarked that they had given considerable attention to the evidence which had been produced, but they felt that it was not sufficient to warrant their sending prisoner for trial. There were suspicious points in the case, and should the police be able to produce any further evidence she would again be brought before them. The decision was received with applause which was immediately suppressed.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 December 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death From Burning At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan), relative to the death of CHARLOTTE LOUISA ROWE, aged six years, whose parents reside at 64 Cherry Garden-street. It appears that the mother of the deceased had gone on an errand, and had left the deceased in company with an infant, which was in a cradle. Not long after the mother had gone out a Mr Saunders, who is a resident in the same house, heard shrieks, and found the deceased enveloped in flames. He tried to put the flames out, and in doing so burnt his wrist, but ultimately he procured a sack, in which he wrapped the deceased and thereby extinguished the flames. He then handed the child to Mrs West, the landlady of the house, who carried it to the Hospital, where it expired on Saturday. The nurse, in her evidence, stated that she had been told by some person, to whom the deceased had spoken on the subject, that the child was sitting near the fire, when a spark from a piece of wood ignited her pinafore. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of An Infant. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of BEATRICE MARY ROGMAN, aged 9 months. - MARY ROGMAN, mother of the deceased, stated that she resided at 35 Shaftesbury-cottages, and that her husband was a coastguardsman. On Monday evening she placed the deceased in a cradle about four feet from the fire place, and left the room for about ten minutes. Upon returning she discovered the room full of smoke, and on taking the child out of the cradle found that she was frightfully burned, especially about the head and was quite dead. The clothes which were upon the infant were on fire. In reply to the Coroner, witness said that she "made up" a good fire before leaving, and placed some damp articles near the fire to dry, and this she believed must have ignited and communicated with the cradle. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 20 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM CHARLES COLE, aged about 20 months. The parents of the deceased reside at 15 Harwell-street. The deceased, who had been very weak from its birth, had been slightly unwell for two or three days, and early on Thursday morning it was taken with a convulsive fit, and expired before a medical man could be obtained. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, Mutley, yesterday, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) relative to the death of EDWARD KNIGHT, aged 55, who was found dead in his bed at his lodgings in the above house. The deceased came from London on the 2nd instant on literary business. He returned to his lodgings on Wednesday evening about 6.20 p.m., partook of tea, and retired to rest about quarter to eleven, being then apparently in his usual health. The next morning he was not at the breakfast table at his usual time, which was 8.30 a.m., but was allowed to remain until 9.30 a.m., when the landlady called him, and obtaining no answer, the door was burst open. The deceased was found lying upon the bed, apparently lifeless. Dr Wolverstan was sent for and speedily arrived. He pronounced life extinct, but thought that the deceased had not been dead long. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 December 1878
EXETER - Sudden Death In Exeter. - The City Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest at the Nelson Inn, Exeter, yesterday on ELIZABETH TUCKER, an old woman, who died suddenly on the previous day. Deceased was walking through Spiller-street, on her way to church, when she was observed by a man named Rolestone to stagger. Rolestone ran to her assistance, and succeeded in catching her, and prevented her falling. With assistance the woman was removed to a neighbour's house close by, but she expired before she arrived. Mr Woodman, surgeon, who was called in soon after the occurrence, said that death was due to natural causes, being attributable to the failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the excessive cold weather. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER - A second Inquest was held by Mr Hooper yesterday on the infant child of a labourer named BOND living in Cheeke-street. The medical testimony shewed that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 27 December 1878
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday by the Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) relative to the death of WILLIAM WAYCOTT, an elderly man, who died from the effects of falling over a flight of stairs at his residence, in Pembroke-street, on Tuesday evening. The details of the accident were given yesterday. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Remarkable Fatality At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan held an Inquest at Morice Town, Devonport, yesterday, relative to the death of JANE HIGGINS, aged 34 years, wife of a gunner in the Royal Navy, residing at 3 Haddington-road. On Wednesday MRS HIGGINS ate some oranges and apples, and did not appear to suffer any ill effects from so doing until night; then, when in bed, her husband was awakened by a curious noise, and found her choking and she died quickly afterwards. A post mortem examination was made, and it was found that a large piece of undigested orange in one of her lungs had prevented breathing. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of ELIZA BROOKS, aged 51 years, the wife of WILLIAM BROOKS, drayman, in the employ of the Eagle Brewery Company. The deceased had been suffering from heart disease and shortness of breath for the past two years, and had consulted Mr Pearse, surgeon, Plymouth, who prescribed for her. On Tuesday evening she left her residence, at 32 Queen-street, and proceeded to the market, but upon returning was taken ill in the street, and was conveyed to her home in a cab in an unconscious condition. Dr Wilson was called in, but deceased expired before he arrived. A post mortem examination subsequently made by Dr Wilson revealed the fact that the deceased had been suffering from congestion of the lungs, effusion of blood on the heart, enlargement of that organ, and ulceration of the bowels. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 December 1878
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening concerning the death of WILLIAM ASHLEY, a shoemaker, aged 75 years, residing at 1237 King-street. It was stated that the deceased had been living in a miserable state lately, although he apparently had enough to eat; but he has been unwell and on Christmas evening he was left in his room apparently in his usual health. On Thursday morning he was found dead and cold on the floor, his feet being underneath the grate, and his head under the bed. He was partly dressed. A loaf of bread and other articles were found in the room, and he had about 3s. in his pocket. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 December 1878
TAMERTON FOLIOT - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Tamerton on Saturday concerning the death of KATE KNAPMAN, aged 6 years, who had died from injuries received through falling into the fire. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 December 1878
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of WILLIAM BUDD, 25, late a milkman, residing in union-terrace, who dropped down dead on Sunday morning, whilst on his rounds with milk. It appears that the deceased left his home in his usual health, and whilst in the act of supplying milk to one of his customers, fell down at the door of the house. Medical aid was procured, but life was extinct - the cause of death being heart disease. A verdict was returned at the Inquest of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, relative to the death of CHARLES WILLS CHOAKE, who died suddenly on Sunday morning. LOUISA CHOAKE, daughter of the deceased, deposed that her father appeared in his usual health on Saturday evening, and retired to rest about 11.30 .m. The next morning, about six o'clock, she had occasion to go into the deceased's bedroom, where she found him pacing to and fro. About eight o'clock the deceased came into the kitchen, where she was, and asked for a glass of cold water, which she gave him, and he then returned to bed. She visited the bedroom late on, and found him lying on the floor speechless. Mr Prynne, surgeon was called in, but pronounced life extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest was subsequently held relative to the death of GEORGE THWAITES, aged thirty-two years, a fisherman, residing at 4 Middle-lane, who died suddenly at his residence yesterday morning. Jessie Sheriff, with whom the deceased lived, said he came to dinner about noon, sat down in a chair, and asked what there was for dinner, and died almost immediately. Mr Prynne, surgeon, who speedily arrived, pronounced life extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."