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Help and advice for Inquests - 1879-1880

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

[printed in Plymouth.]

1879 - 1880

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Adams(2); Alford; Allen; Andrews(2); Ash; Ashley; Aspinale; Avery; Baker(2); Ball(2); Banks; Barten; Bartlett(3); Bawden; Baxter; Beauchamp; Bennett(3); Benton; Best; Bevan; Bird; Bishop; Blackmore; Blake(2); Blight; Bowden(2); Bowhay; Bracewell; Breale(2); Brendon; Bridgman; Brinsom; Brookland; Buckingham; Burge; Burley; Burnett; Burridge; Burrows; Butler(2); Call; Calvert; Cann; Chapple; Chown; Churchward; Clements; Clifford; Cloake; Cole; Colmer; Colwill; Cook; Cooper(2); Cooze; Cornish(2); Cory; Cosway; Crabbe; Crawley; Crews; Crispin; Crocker(2); Crute; Cuming; Cutts; Davey(2); Davis(3); Daw; Dawson; Delves; Denton; Dodd; Drew(2); Driscoll; Eastcott; Edwards; Ellacott; Elliott(2); Ellis; Evans; Ewksson; Ferris; Fitzpatrick; Floyd; Fogler; Foley; Ford; Forsey; Foster; Foyt; French(3); Friend(2); Furneaux; Gallaspie; Gaye; Geach; Giles; Gillard; Glanfield; Glanville; Gosling; Gowman; Granville; Gravels; Green; Greenslade; Gregory; Grey; Gribble; Haddy; Haggar; Hamlyn; Hancock; Hannaford; Harris(6); Harrison; Hatch(2); Hayman; Heal; Heard; Hedgeland; Hendy; Hepper; Hexter; Hill(6); Hilton; Hingston; Hoar; Hobbs; Hockings; Hodge(3); Holt(3); Hooper(3); Hooppell; Hopkins; Horsford; Horton; Hosking; Hoskings; Howard; Hunter; Hurrell; Husband; Hutchings(2); Hyne; Jackson(4); James; Jarvis(2); Jenkins; Jenn; Joel; Johnson; Jones; Joslin; Karisson; Keats; Kellond; Kelson; Kendall; Kenshole; Kerberg; Kerr; Kilminster; Kingcome; Knapman; Knill; Landon; Lane; Langman; Lawrence; Leach; Lee(2); Lock; Lowe; Luscombe(2); Lyne; Mackney; Mallett; Malone; Mann; Manning; Marker; Marley; Marshall(2); Martin; Martyn; Maskell; Matthews(4); Mayne; McDermott; McLaughlin; McQuillen; Micks; Millar; Miller; Mitchell(3); Moore; Morris; Mushby; Nicholson; Norman; Norsworthy(2); North; Northey; Nutt; Oldrey; Oliver; Olver; O'Neill; Osborne; Oxenham; Paddon; Page(2); Parr; Parrick; Parsely; Partridge; Pascoe; Pearse; Pedlar; Pellew; Penfould; Penny; Perking; Perriam; Perry(2); Peters; Petit; Phillips; Pinsent; Pitts; Polkinghorne; Pook; Pope; Potter; Prideaux; Prout; Pulleyblank; Pym; Quance; Reddicleave; Reed; Richards; Rickard; Ricketts; Risdon; Roach; Roberts; Rogers; Rounsfull; Row; Rowe(2); Russell; Salway; Sambells; Saunders(3); Sayers; Scoble; Scoins; Scott(2); Segar; Sercombe; Shaddick; Shepherd; Shillson; Shinner; Simpson; Sinclair; Skelton; Skinner; Sloper; Smith; Smyth; Snell; Sorlie; Sowden; Sparkes; Squance; Square; Squires; Stapely; Steed; Steere; Stevens; Stitson; Stone; Street; Sugars; Sweeney(2); Symonds; Tapp; Tate; Taylor; Tester; Thomas; Thompson; Tippett(2); Tonkin; Toogood; Tothill; Tozer; Travers; Tregaskis; Tremeer; Tremlett; Tucker(2); Tullock; Turpin(2); Unwin; Vandelberg; Vosper; Wakeham; Wallis; Warde; Ware; Warne; Warren(2); Webb; Weeks; Wellaway; Werry; West(2); White(2); Whitely; Whitfield; Wilkinson; Williams(2); Willmott; Wilton; Wolland; Wood; Woolcock(2); Worthley; Wotton; Wyatt; Yard; Youlden

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 January 1879
EXETER - Fatal Fall At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday by Mr Hooper, Coroner, on a widow named ELIZABETH VOSPER, aged 66 years. On November 2nd the deceased fell over two stairs, and was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found that she had fractured her right leg, and hurt the back of the heel. For some time she did well, but tetanus set in, and proved fatal.

EXETER - Another Inquest was held on a labourer named WILLIAM TESTER, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Deceased had received injuries through falling over some stairs whilst intoxicated, and died from inflammation, probably arising from the injuries resulting from the fall. Verdicts in accordance with the medical evidence were returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 January 1879
HARTLAND - An Inquest was held at Hartland yesterday on a man named PARRICK, head coachman at Clovelly Court. The deceased was driving a young horse, which became very restive, and PARRICK was thrown out of the trap. He fell on his head and received injuries from which he died in the course of a day or two. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Fatal Attempt At Rescue. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of ANN LYNE, aged 50 years, the wife of a shoemaker. The deceased had been employed as a "sorter" in the Trews Weir Paper Mill, and in December last a woman named Trump was handing her a cup of tea across a machine when her arm caught in the cogs, and as MRS LYNE was trying to release her, her own right arm was caught in a similar manner. Both women were taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and for a long time MRS LYNE seemed to be recovering, but tetanus set in, and proved fatal. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 January 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Depravity At Devonport. Censure By A Jury. - The Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening into the circumstances attending the death of the newly born infant child of EMMA HOSKING. - THOMAS HOSKING, shoemaker, residing at 2 Monument-court, said that early on Sunday morning his daughter EMMA was confined in his house. this was the second child she had had, although she was not married. He went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock on Sunday night, and during the night - he could not say at what time - he was aroused by hearing his daughter moaning and groaning and got out of bed. Soon afterwards the deceased was born in his presence. He and his second daughter - CLARA - attended to the mother at the birth. There was not time to call anyone else. The child was washed, but it did not cry, and he thought that it was born dead. It was handled and they found no life in it. The umbilical cord was cut by witness with a pair of scissors, but it was not tied, the child being dead. He admitted that a midwife or a doctor ought to have been present, but there was not time to get anyone. He did not know before the birth that his daughter was pregnant. She fell over the stairs about a fortnight or three weeks since and injured herself, and he thought that his hastened the occurrence. - CLARA HOSKING, about 20 years of age, a woman of ill-fame, residing in Central-street, Plymouth, said that she was a sister of the mother of the child. On Sunday evening her father and sister came to her house, and they all went home together. Whilst on the road home her sister told her that she was pregnant. They slept together that night, and about half-past three o'clock on Monday morning witness was awakened by the groans of her sister. She at once knocked at her father's bedroom door, and he got out, and the child was born about four o'clock in her's and her father's presence. She did not hear the child cry, or breathe, or move at all. The moment she took up the child she said that it was dead. Witness positively swore that she saw the child born, and that her father was present at the birth, but on being severely pressed by the Coroner she stated that she did not see it born, and that when she first awoke and lifted up the bedclothes she discovered the child, which, of course, was born before she called her father. She tried all she could to bring life into the child. The mother said that she did not expect confinement so soon. - Eliza Vennay, residing at 3 Monument-court, said that HOSKING told her that his daughter had had a dead child, and asked how they managed to bury dead children. She replied that she did not know. - Susan Nicholls, a nurse, residing at Monument-court, said that HOSKINGS had asked her if she could tell him how to bury a deadborn child, and she advised him to go to a doctor. She had seen the child, and thought that it had come to maturity. - P.C. Irish, of the Devonport police force, said that on Monday evening, in consequence of an anonymous letter being received at the Guildhall, he went to HOSKING'S house, and the mother of the deceased admitted having been confined that morning. He found the baby in a cupboard wrapped in a piece of cloth. - Mr P. F. Delarne, surgeon, said that he had made a careful examination of the body of the child, which had arrived at maturity. The umbilical cord was only about half an inch in length, whereas it ought to have been fully three inches. There was a small, white spot on the tip of the nose, that seemed to have been caused by pressure. The lungs were half congested. The heart and lungs floated buoyantly in water, and did so after they were separated, and when divided into several portions. Air had entered them, and respiration had been performed. The other organs of the body were healthy. Between some bones on the surface of the brain and the brain itself there was a great amount of congestion. He believed that respiration had been interfered with, but whether accidentally or intentionally the external marks and signs did not enable him to form an opinion. He did not think that the mark on the nose was caused by sufficient pressure to cause death. - The Coroner asked whether, as it was found under the bedclothes, the child might not have died of suffocation? - Mr Delarne said that was quite possible. there was no doubt that it died from suffocation in some way. - The Coroner thought that it would be well to adjourn the Inquest in order to have the mother present. There seemed to have been no criminal intent in any way. The child had breathed, and he had no doubt that it was suffocated, probably through the bedclothes being over its head. He thought, however, that the father ought not to have done what he did in the matter. - A Juror: It is one of the greatest pieces of depravity that I ever heard of. - The Coroner told the Juror that he must not give vent to his feelings in that way. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict "That the deceased died from Suffocation, but there was no evidence to shew whether it was suffocated intentionally or otherwise." They severely censured the father for acting as he did, and for the very unsatisfactory manner in which he gave his evidence.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 January 1879
PLYMOUTH - Deaths At Sea. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, yesterday, relative to the death of ADA MATILDA KARISSON, about 30 years of age, wife of the captain of the Russian barque Alodia. - It appeared, from the evidence of the captain, that the deceased accompanied him on board the barque, which was bound to St. Nazaire, from Gefle, with a cargo of deals. She had been very ill for some time, but appeared a little better previous to her death, which occurred early on the 8th inst., whilst the vessel was coming down the English Channel. The ship at once bore up for Plymouth, where she arrived on Tuesday. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - The Coroner explained that he was compelled to hold an Inquest, as the deceased died out of the district, and he had not the power to give a certificate without an Inquiry; if he did the registrar would not register it.

PLYMOUTH - In the evening Mr Brian held an Inquiry on JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, about 45 years of age, a native of Dundee. - Henry Rothbarth, captain of the steamship John Wells, of Goole, said that the deceased was an able seaman on board his ship, which was on a voyage to Rouen from Cardiff with a cargo of coals. Between ten and eleven o'clock on Tuesday night, whilst the vessel was off Trevose, the deceased was taken suddenly ill with severe pains in his abdomen. He at once went to bed, and witness gave him some brandy, which greatly relieved him. On Wednesday morning witness applied a mustard poultice, and deceased said he felt a little better, but seeing that the man was dangerously ill, he bore up at once for Plymouth. The deceased died about 10 o'clock in the forenoon, when the vessel was about four miles west of the Eddystone. He arrived at Plymouth about four o'clock the same afternoon. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and stated that they thought that the captain had done all he possibly could for the deceased.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 January 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday relative to the death of ELIZA WOOD, aged 48 years. The deceased is the wife of a pensioner residing at Ann-place, Stoke, and of late she has complained of pains in the region of her heart. On Friday morning the deceased ate a good breakfast, and appeared in her usual health. She was sitting on a chair attending to her grandchild in a cradle, when she suddenly fell forward and died immediately. The deceased had a very severe illness about eight years ago, and Mr Rolston attended her. Mr Rolston thought from what he had seen of the deceased that she died from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY THOMAS DENTON, aged 48 years, chemist and druggist, and lodginghouse-keeper, carrying on business at 128 Exeter-street, and 9 Windsor-place, Plymouth. - MRS KATE DENTON, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband's general health had been very good, but for some time past he had complained of a pain in the region of the heart. He had at times been intemperate in his habits, but latterly he had improved in this matter. On Thursday last, however, he again drank rather freely, and in consequence of this he had to remain in bed during the whole of Friday. He complained to witness of a fullness of the heart on Friday, and during the day he had a small quantity of whisky and brandy. He had been depressed for some time, and had been in the habit of taking sleeping draughts, but to witness's knowledge he had not taken any during the past week. Shortly before eleven o'clock on Friday night she went to bed, and the deceased was then alive, but when she awoke about five o'clock on the following morning she found him dead by her side. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 January 1879
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The Great Western Docks. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM KENSHOLE, aged 23 years, shipwright, in the employ of Mr Banks, shipbuilder. - Joseph Johns, a shipwright, employed by Mr Banks, stated that about twenty minutes past eight o'clock on Saturday morning he was engaged with the deceased in caulking the ship Red Jacket lying in the dry dock at the Great Western Docks, when he observed a hatch-cover falling on the stage on which he and deceased were working. In its descent it struck the deceased, precipitating him into the bottom of the dock, a distance of about 25 feet. - John Lang, shipwright, gave corroborative evidence. - Robert Robertson, boatswain of the Red Jacket, deposed that he and one of the crew were engaged in lowering the hatch-cover, about 3 ½ feet in length, for the purpose of erecting another stage above that on which the deceased was working, when the board accidentally canted and slipped, falling on the stage on which the deceased was working, and,. and thence into the dock. He knew there were men working on the stage below, and before he commenced to lower the cover he gave them notice of his intention to do so. - George Silvester, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Hospital on Saturday morning suffering from a severe fracture of the skull and concussion of the brain, from which he died about two o'clock in the afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and recommended the witness Robertson to be more cautious in future, and to secure hatch covers before lowering them.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 January 1879
DARTMOUTH - Sad Death By Drowning At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Dartmouth, last night by Mr R. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, touching the death of ELIZABETH DODD, a single woman, aged 56 years, formerly a domestic servant at Coombe, (about five miles from Dartmouth) and whose body was found in the river Dart. - JOHN DODD, labourer, of Dartmouth, nephew of deceased, said that he last saw deceased alive on Sunday morning at his own door (deceased being at the time living with him) shortly after seven o'clock, when deceased said she was "going out to Uncle Charlie's". Witness hurriedly finished dressing himself, and went to his uncle's, but found his aunt had not been there. Coming back he searched about for deceased and finally discovered the body near Horswill's Slip, it having been just taken from the water. Life was apparently quite extinct. On Saturday deceased gave up her purse to witness, and said she was in great pain; she had been in a low way for some time. - George Casey, of Kingswear, proved finding the body in the water near the Dartmouth Pontoon, and landing it on the beach. The water was only three feet deep where the body was found. - JOHN DODD, recalled, said he had several times heard deceased say that the pain she was in was enough to make her go and drown herself. - The Coroner thought there was little moral doubt that deceased threw herself into the water, but there was no evidence to shew that such was the case. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead in the river Dart, but there is no evidence to shew by what means deceased came into the water."

MILTON ABBOT - The Love Tragedy Near Tavistock. Inquest And Verdict. - The Inquest on the body of HARRY HOAR, who, on Friday last, shot at his sweetheart at Radford Farm, near Tavistock, and then shot himself, was held at the New Inn, Milton Abbot, yesterday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. It will be remembered that HOAR was removed on Saturday from Radford Farm to the house of his father, the New Inn, Milton Abbot, where he died about five o'clock on Monday morning. The Coroner opened the Inquiry by remarking upon the extraordinary circumstances of the sad event, which had caused, he said, a painful sensation in the public mind. He need hardly tell them that their duty was upon the evidence, and the evidence alone, to endeavour to ascertain whether this poor young man at the time he inflicted those injuries upon himself was in a sound state of mind or not. If, after hearing the evidence, they were of opinion he was not of sound mind, then they would return a verdict of suicide while temporarily inane; and, on the other hand, if they considered he was of sound mind when he committed the deed, they would have no alternative but to return a verdict of felo de se. He hoped they would be able to arrive at the first-named conclusion; but he might tell them that in law everyone was presumed to be sane until the contrary was proved. - Witnesses were then called, but they did not include Miss Mary Peardon, who, though going on favourably, was not able, the doctor said, to be present to give evidence. - Richard Peardon said: I am a farmer living at Radford, South Sydenham. I knew the deceased, HARRY HOAR, who was a tailor by trade, and was 22 years of age. I have known him several years,. He had been in the habit of coming to my house during the last two years. He was acquainted with my daughter, Mary Ann, and I believe there was an engagement between them. The engagement was broken off about a month ago. I don't know why; but I believe it was because of some tales that had got abroad. - The Coroner: You knew him for some time. Did you notice any difference in his manner after the engagement was broken off? - Witness: I do not know that I did. I always found him the same. The last time I saw him was last Friday, when he called at my house about eleven o'clock. My daughter was standing in the kitchen with me, and he came over and shook hands, and said, "Well, Polly, how are you?" and she said "Pretty well, thanks," and turning to me he said "Well, master, and how are you?" and on my replying that I was all right, he said, "Can I speak to you a minute?" and I said "Yes," and we went down to the lower room. When there he said "Master, what do you know about me?" and I said, "You ought to know best what tales are going about." He said, "I never saw any harm or knew any harm of Polly, and I am sure Polly never saw any harm of me." I told him if he would bring the man who started the tale we should think no more about it. He said, "You are going to Tavistock and so am I, and we will put it to rights." He added, "I am walking and you will ride and overtake me;" but I never saw him again until after the accident, and he has never spoken to me since he was injured. - The Foreman (Mr Henry Frize): Did he ask Polly any questions after he spoke to you? - Witness: No, because he went straight out of the door; and although I started five minutes after him I did not overtake him. - A Juror: He was in Lamerton village as you passed. - Mr W. C. Northey (the surgeon in attendance): Was he excited, did you notice? - Witness: No; he was quiet in his manner, and spoke as he usually did. - Henry Escott, assistant in his father's ironmonger's shop at Tavistock, said that last Friday the deceased, HARRY HOAR, came to his shop. He did not, however, know him, and the Coroner said he had better go and see the body, so as to be able to say whether he was the same person. This having been done witness deposed: When the deceased came into the shop he said, "I want a pistol," and I took out three and shewed him, and he selected one and said he would have another like it. I accordingly gave him a pair, for which he paid 6s. 6d., and had a quarter of a pound of powder, a pound of No. 4 shot, and also a box of caps, and he said "I shall now be able to have a spree as well as other people." Then he said "Good afternoon," and left the shop. He appeared to me quite sober, and quite rational and sane. - The Coroner: Didn't you think that an extraordinary remark that "He should be able to have a spree." - Witness: No. A gentleman in the shop asked him what he wanted the pistols for, and he said "It is only for a lark." Mrs Escott, who was also in the shop at the time, asked him if he was going to do any mischief with them, and he said "No, it is only for a lark. I have a friend coming down from London and we are going to have a spree by firing the pistols at a target." - Mr Northey: Did you notice anything excited about him? - Witness: No, nothing, except that when he left the shop he shook hands with mother, and I thought that was rather strange, as he had never seen her before. - The Coroner: Did he ask for bullets? - Yes; he asked for bullets, and when I said we didn't keep them he said he would take shot. - Dinah Cook, servant at Mr Down's Cornish Arms Inn, said: On Friday last I saw deceased at the Cornish Arms. he was there about an hour altogether, but I cannot say that he had anything to drink. He left about a quarter before four, and was "all that" the worse for liquor. When he wished me goodbye he took a pistol in paper from his pocket, and said, "That shall do it," and afterwards he took an uncovered pistol out, and said, "Either I or her shall die tonight." I did not tell anybody about it until after I heard of the accident. I thought he was only larking, because he also said he was going to have a game shooting birds going home. He did not appear to me to be like a man out of his mind; only like a man who had been drinking. - The Coroner: Did he say anything else? - Yes; he asked me if I knew his girl; and I said "Yes;" and he said he and his girl had fallen out a week or so before, and rather than that they should live as they were now, they should both die that night. He also told me he was going to Australia, and that he would never live to see Milton any more. - The Foreman: When he said they should both die, did you know who he meant? - Witness: Yes. - A Juror: Are you an old acquaintance of HOAR'S, to whom he might tell his secrets? - Witness: No. I have only known him during the two months I have been at Mrs Down's. - The Coroner: When he said this to you did you make any remark to him? - Witness: No; because I thought he was only joking, and was all the worse for liquor, and I told him I must be gone about my work. - Elizabeth Mason, the housekeeper at Radford Farm, deposed that deceased came back there on Friday about five o'clock. He said, "I'm come, mother," and I said, "Are you, HARRY." I had my things ready for milking, and went out milking, and had only been out five minutes when I heard Polly scream, and I went to her as fast as I could. She was all over blood, poor thing. Deceased did not appear strange when he came in. I did not see any difference in him at all. The last I saw of him before I went out was that he took Polly by the hand and said, "I want to speak to you, Polly;" and they went in the parlour together. He never complained to me of any grievance, nor did he appear despondent. I had only been out about five minutes when I heard Polly scream, and I had just got to her when I saw the deceased come out of the door and fall. He was bleeding very much, a stream of blood running down over his coat. He could not speak. I afterwards picked up one of the pistols from the parlour floor. - The Foreman: Did you observe what state he was in, in the morning? - Witness: I did not see the least difference in him. - To the Coroner: I was outside along with Polly when I saw deceased come out of the door and fall down. He came staggering out of the door. - Mrs Frances Bassett, the grandmother of Polly Peardon, said: I have known HOAR for two years. The last time I saw him at Radford was last Wednesday week. I never heard of any quarrel between Polly and the deceased. I remember him coming back on Friday evening. I saw him pass up along, and he said, "I hope Polly will speak to me;" and I said, "I suppose her might." That was all that occurred until I heard the report of firearms, and saw Polly come to the door bleeding. I ran to help her, and soon afterwards saw deceased come out of the door and fall. Deceased never appeared to me to be strange or insane, and on Friday afternoon he did not appear to have been drinking. - The Foreman: I suppose when he came out of the door you had got Polly in your arms? - Yes; I was holding her in my arms. - RICHARD HOAR, the father of the deceased, said: Deceased has been living with me and working at his trade as a tailor on his own account. He had said nothing particular about Miss Peardon, but I have observed him to be very low spirited during the last fortnight. He never ate anything hardly. Last Wednesday, seeing he was low spirited, I said, "HARRY, what is the matter with you?" and he replied, "I have been accused of things I have not said," and begun to cry. Nothing more was said then. He left here on Friday about 10 o'clock, but did not say what he was going to Tavistock for. About a week ago he said he should not stop about here; he should go abroad. I told him he would be a fool to go abroad, as he had a good home here. He was always a very steady, sober lad. While he was on his death-bed, I asked him how he came to do it? and he said, "All for love." On Sunday night, when he was very feeble, he held out his hand, and called "Father," and I went to him and asked him if he had anything to say; and he said, as well as he could speak, "Be kind to mother and bury me by the side of poor Polly," and then he was lost again. He was continually talking about Polly, and all through the night when he waked up a little he was asking where Polly was. He died yesterday morning about half-past five. - Mr W. C. Northey: What has been his state during the last fortnight. Has he slept well, do you know? - Witness: I think not. I have frequently heard him complain, and one morning in particular he came down and said he had not slept for the night. - Mr Northey: Has he been up earlier in the morning? - Witness: No; he has been rather later than usual. - Has he complained of headache? - Yes. - He has never talked incoherently? - No, sir. - Would he sit for any length of time and not make any remark at all? - Yes; he would appear to be lost in thought; and then, all at once, he would jump up and go out looking very wild. - Did he use to tell you where he was going? - No; within the past fortnight he has often been wandering about without any particular object. - Mr William Cornish Northey, surgeon, Tavistock, stated: At half-past five last Friday evening I was called to see the deceased at Radford Farm. I found him stretched upon the floor, pale, pulseless and cold. His face and neck were covered with blood, and he had a large wound on the right side of the neck. It extended far into the neck - three inches, I expect - wounding the large blood-vessels, the gullet and the upper part of the spinal cord. I should say the injuries were self-inflicted. He died yesterday from exhaustion from loss of blood. I have heard the evidence given today, and, especially from that of the father, I am of opinion that he was in a state of temporary insanity, caused by congestion of the brain. - This concluding the evidence, the Coroner said he thought, after what the Jury had heard from the father and the doctor, that the breaking off of the engagement with Miss Peardon had so worked upon the brain of the deceased that he became insane. He (the Coroner) was very glad the Inquiry had taken this issue, because it would have been a painful thing for them as friends and neighbours of the deceased, and his family to have felt it to be their duty to return a verdict of felo de se. - The Jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 January 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held at the Market House Inn, Stonehouse, last evening, by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of WILLIAM CRISPIN, who died suddenly at the Stonehouse Quarry yesterday morning. The deceased, who is a pensioner, was in the employ of Mr Hilson, and drove a horse and cart. Yesterday morning he was loading his cart with some broken rubble when he was observed to walk from his cart to a rock, a distance of three yards, kneel down and place his head against the rock. A man named Cock went up to him, and found blood flowing from CRISPIN'S mouth, and in about five minutes he died. The deceased's father-in-law stated that he had complained lately of a pain in his chest and loss of voice, and Mr Leah, surgeon, said that death resulted from a rupture of a large blood vessel. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMSTOCK - Drowned In A Tank. - An Inquest was held at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel, yesterday by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) relative to the death of MARY WOOLCOCK, a widow, aged 66 years, who was found drowned in a tank. - Sarah Nichols deposed that she saw the deceased about half-past nine o'clock on Wednesday morning, standing in her door and went towards her in order to speak to her, but the deceased stepped inside and shut the door in her face. Half an hour afterwards someone wanted the deceased, and witness went to her house and into the court, where she stood by the side of the tank. She got upon the stool and looked into the tank, where she saw the deceased on her face. With the assistance of two or three neighbours Mrs Nichols got her out, but she was found to be quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 January 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Morice Town. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Boscawen Arms, Morice Town, Devonport, by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan), relative to the death of ANN WAKEHAM, aged 35 years, residing at 17 Boscawen-place. The deceased, who was very delicate, partook of tea on Thursday afternoon, when she appeared to be in her usual health; but on her daughter returning home from school about 4.30 p.m., she was found lying on the floor quite dead. Mr Gard, surgeon, was sent for, and afterwards made a post mortem examination, which shewed that death was caused by diseased valves of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 January 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held on Saturday two Inquiries respecting sudden deaths. The first was on PHILIP HAMLYN, aged 57 years, a joiner in her Majesty's Dockyard, who died when about to leave work on Friday evening last. - EDWIN HAMLYN, brother of the deceased, and a schoolmaster, stated that he last saw the deceased on the 12th inst., when he was suffering from a severe cold and hoarseness caused by the cold weather, but he did not complain of the cold. - Samuel Slade, joiner in her Majesty's Dockyard, deposed that he and the deceased were leaving the yard together, when he observed HAMLYN spit some blood. He asked him if anything was the matter, but deceased did not reply, and fell into witness's arms. He was conveyed to the surgery, but before a doctor came he died. Mr F. Row, surgeon, said that death was caused by the bursting of a large blood vessel near the lungs, and that the deceased was suffocated by the flow of blood therefrom. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

STOKE DAMEREL - The other Inquiry was as to the death of the illegitimate infant child of ELIZABETH BURLEY, a woman living at 6 Trafalgar-court. The child, which was nine days old, had been very weak from its birth, and Mr Row, surgeon, after making a post mortem examination, formed the opinion that death had resulted from debility. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - On Saturday evening Mr R. I Bencraft, the Coroner of Barnstaple, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary on WILLIAM BENNETT, a carter in the employ of Messrs. Seldon and Manning. On Friday the deceased was engaged with other carters in removing furniture from the residence of Mr Brewer, of Castle Hill, when he left between five and six o'clock in the evening, with a load about a ton and a half in weight. Two other wagons left at the same time, and when going down a steep hill, called Mount Sandford, a wagon driven by a man named Harris, which was leading, pulled up on one side in order to let the deceased's wagon pass. The drag was not down, and the wagon was going at a rapid rate. Harris then saw something lying in the road just behind, and this proved to be the body of the deceased, who had been run over. He was lifted up, and after groaning three times he died. He was at once removed to the Infirmary, where it was found that his right arm was dreadfully smashed, and that several ribs had been fractured, and forced into the lungs. The horses and wagon went on to Barnstaple, and were there stopped. The Coroner suggested that the deceased was jolted off the wagon in going down the hill, and was then run over. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was a steady, civil man, and leaves a wife and several children.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 January 1879
PARKHAM - Suicide Near Bideford. - A labourer named SAMUEL CLEMENTS, aged about 30 years, committed suicide at Parkham, near Bideford, on Saturday, under peculiar circumstances. The deceased was the grandson of the late ANTHONY CLEMENTS, who was murdered at Parkham, and resided in the same parish. On Friday he was sent by Mrs Graves to Bideford for a ton of coals, and at Horn's Cross, on his way home, he sold 1 cwt. of Mrs Graves' coals to a woman who requested him to bring that quantity of coals for her from the town. A policeman saw the transaction, of which the deceased was accused on Saturday morning. He went to his work on the barn, but did not come out at the usual time, and on persons going to the place they found the door fastened. It was broken open, when CLEMENTS' lifeless body was found hanging by a rope suspended from a beam. An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr J. Toller, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. The deceased leaves a wife and three children.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Burning At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) relative to the death of MARGARET WORTHLEY, aged 78 years, who died from injuries received by accidental burning on the 9th inst. - Robert Faull, stepson of the deceased, stated that on the evening of the 16th inst., about 6.30 p.m., he heard his name called by the deceased, and on running upstairs found her on the staircase enveloped in flames. He did all in his power to beat the flames out, and at last succeeded in doing so. Mr Rolston, surgeon, was sent for, and came the next morning. - Mr Rolston stated that he had known the deceased, who was an imbecile, for several years. The burn, which was about her face, hands and neck were not of a serious character, but she was not strong enough to stand the fright, and in his opinion death resulted from shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Burning."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 February 1879
BRIDGERULE - Suicide At Bridgerule. - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday, touching the death of MARIA TAYLOR , a widow, residing at Bridgerule Churchtown, who had committed suicide by hanging herself in a shed. - SAMUEL TAYLOR, son of the deceased, stated that he last saw his mother alive about five or six weeks since. She then appeared in her usual health, and was not low spirited or depressed. She had money in the house, and wanted for nothing. He was sent for by his cousin to come and see his mother on Monday last, but did not go until next day, and before he started he heard that she had hanged herself. - William Bines had known the deceased for many years, and resided near her. Both before and since her husband's death, which occurred in July last, she had occasionally been in a low, desponding state. He last saw her on Tuesday morning; he had noticed a difference in her for some days before. He told her that her son was coming to see her. She appeared distressed at his coming, and feared to see him. - Dr Thomas Linnington Ash deposed that he had attended deceased professionally for many years. In October 1877 she consulted him for sleepless nights, and stated that she was tempted to destroy herself. She consulted him again about September last year and referred to the same temptation, and feared that she would not be able to resist it. He considered that she was impelled by an irresistible impulse depending on a morbid condition of the brain, and that in her attacks of despondency she was not answerable for her actions. She was hereditarily disposed to mental weakness. - Corroborative evidence was given, and a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Of A Brixham Fisherman. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall respecting the death of THOMAS CORNISH, aged 27 years, fisherman, serving on board the trawler Elizabeth, of Brixham. - George Lewis, master of the Elizabeth, stated that he was in the deceased's company at eleven o'clock on Wednesday night. They left the Custom-house Tavern, Barbican, together shortly before eleven o'clock, and the deceased, who was quite sober, left witness for the purpose of going to the vessel's boat, which was lying at the Fishermen's Steps, and bringing it over to the pier, towards which witness walked with a view of embarking for conveyance to his vessel. He waited at the pier until half-past twelve o'clock, and during the time called for the deceased several times, but got no answer. Before leaving from the pier he saw the deceased with the painter of the boat in his hand, but heard no splash. He did not think that the deceased would do any harm to himself, though he appeared to be depressed on Wednesday, and witness spoke to him about it. There had been no disturbance on board the trawler that day. He made no effort to find the deceased after he left him. - Thomas Hicks, fisherman, serving on board the trawler Comet, of Plymouth, deposed that he saw the deceased on two occasions on Wednesday, and that he appeared to be very low in spirits. During the evening the deceased went ashore with his sea boots on, and witness met him at the Custom-house Tavern. - P.C. Damerell deposed that he had no intimation of the fact that the deceased had been missed until he saw him dead at the Fishermen's Steps on Thursday afternoon. - The Coroner thought there had been an unfeeling dereliction of duty on the part of the captain of the trawler, Elizabeth, and advised the Jury to return an open verdict. - The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 February 1879
EXETER - The Fatality Near Okehampton. - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the deaths of HENRY SQUIRES and JOHN ASHLEY, labourers, employed on the South Western Railway line between Neldon Junction and Okehampton, who were severely injured whilst at work, and subsequently died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It was stated that on Friday last the men were employed with others shovelling earth from the side of a cutting into a wagon. They were standing on a "benching" six feet from the ground and about eight feet below the top of the cutting. Owing to the late frosts having hardened the ground at the surface of the embankment, the men had excavated the earth from the points at which they were standing, with a view to loosen the earth. Whilst at work a large quantity of earth, probably loosened by the thaw which so suddenly set in, fell upon them, sweeping them to the line beneath. They were removed by train to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where SQUIRE expired the same evening and ASHLEY died the following morning. The medical evidence was to the effect that death resulted from internal injuries and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMPTON - Strange Death In A Lunatic Asylum. Conflicting Evidence. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Castle Inn, Plympton, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY ANGEL BOWHAY, aged 33, who died in the Plympton Lunatic Asylum on Saturday. MR T. A. BOWHAY, brother of the deceased, watched the case on behalf of the friends. - Thomas Robins, attendant at the asylum, stated that he was in charge of the deceased, and saw him alive on Saturday morning about seven o'clock, when he was sitting on the side of his bed undressed with a blanket around him. He put him in bed and visited the room again about half an hour afterwards and found him quite dead in bed, properly covered with the clothes. Last Tuesday evening, about seven o'clock, witness and another attendant, named Stephens, were undressing the deceased in his room, in order to put him to bed, when the deceased rushed out behind witness into the day room adjoining, and Stephens, who was in that room, caught him in his arms, and with the rush the deceased and Stephens knocked their heads together. That was the cause of the mark on the nose and eyes of the deceased. There were nine other patients put to bed at the same time. The room in which Stephens caught the deceased was about twelve feet wide. - By the Foreman: The deceased had the mark over the eye since Tuesday last. He was very boisterous at times. Did not have any trouble to put him to bed. Saw the deceased three times after he was put to bed. Witness slept in the room adjoining that in which the deceased slept. The door was closed. The deceased said to witness several times, "My books is wrong." - By MR BOWHAY: Heard the deceased talk a great deal between twelve and one o'clock on Friday night. The deceased had no light in his room. Heard no noise there. when witness found the deceased dead he was lying on his back foaming at the mouth. The bedclothes were not disturbed. On Tuesday last, when trying to get out of the room, the deceased said nothing. He knocked his head against Stephens' nose. - Mr R. Ellery, M.R.C.S., said that at the request of the Coroner he made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and carefully examined the mark over the left eye and nose. The marks were quite superficial. The collision described between the deceased and Stephens, the attendant, would cause such marks, which had nothing whatever to do with death, and did not accelerate it. He carefully examined the brain and all the organs of the body. The internal organs were healthy, except the brain, which was in a highly congested state. The condition was sufficient to cause death in a very short time, and in his opinion it was the cause of death. Every portion of the brain was highly congested. - By MR BOWHAY: He should not think that the mark on the face was the cause of a blow from the fist. Thought that the deceased must have been excited in some way. He might have had an epileptic fit between three o'clock and seven on Saturday morning. thought that the deceased must have had some great excitement, but whether it was an epileptic fit or something else that caused the undue congestion of the brain he could not say. There was a loss of blood on one side of the face, which led witness to suppose that there had been faintness. If the deceased did not have an epileptic fit he had one of the attacks that he was subject to, which would congest the blood in the brain sufficient to cause death. The attacks would come on at any time. - MR BOWHAY asked witness whether, if the deceased was in a dark room and talking to himself for some time, it would cause him to have a fit. - Mr Ellery could not say how the fit was caused. - Joseph Stephens, attendant at the Asylum, said that he and Robins were undressing the deceased in his bedroom in order to put him to bed, and he (witness) was in the day room adjoining taking the clothes of the deceased from Robins, when suddenly the deceased made a rush, ran around the table, and tried to get away; but finding that he could not do so he rushed at witness, who held out his arms and caught him. One side of the face of the deceased struck against witness's nose, making it bleed profusely. The deceased was very boisterous just before. There was no chance of the deceased passing him because the place was only about four feet wide. On being asked when this occurred, witness said it was on Thursday last, about four p.m. The nose of the deceased did not bleed at all. The deceased had struck two or three other patients. He was very troublesome. There were no other patients put to bed at the same time. - MR BOWHAY remarked that they had to account for the excitement that brought on the fit. The deceased's face was very much discoloured, and the face of the attendant, although his nose bled, was not discoloured at all. - Mr Ellery said that the witness had stated that his nose bled profusely, and that accounted for his nose and eyes not being discoloured. - A Juror (to Witness): Do you make any report in any book about any collisions or anything like that? - Witness: We have no book, but merely report the occurrence to the master. - By MR BOWHAY: Just after the collision with the deceased there was some blood on his shirt that came from his (witness's) nose, and he was put to bed with the same shirt. There was some blood on witness's clothes. The deceased did not strike him with his fist. He did not know how many there were in the room at the time. There were no other patients being put to bed then. He had never struck the deceased. When the deceased ran out of the room he cried out, "Murder, murder." The day-room door was always open when any patients was being put to bed. - John Payne, attendant at the Asylum, said that he took the deceased his supper, in company with Robins, about half-past nine on Friday night. The deceased was in bed. He went to bed about half-past seven. Witness did not see the deceased alive afterwards. The deceased said when he gave him his supper. "Do you wish me to take it?" and he replied "Yes; it will do you good," upon which the deceased said "All right; I will, if you wish it." He was very calm, and soon after was talking very much. Witness thought that it was Tuesday night last that Stephens received the blow from the deceased because he saw Stephens washing some blood off his coat. the deceased would repeatedly say, "Let me get at such a man, I will kill him." - The Coroner thought that the Inquiry should be adjourned in order that Mr Cornish, the family doctor of the deceased, should be present. The Inquiry was accordingly adjourned until this morning. Several Jurymen remarked that the evidence was very conflicting.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 February 1879
PLYMPTON - The Sudden Death In Plympton Lunatic Asylum. - The Inquest on WILLIAM HENRY ANGEL BOWHAY, aged 35 years, was continued at the Castle Inn, Plympton, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. MR T. A. BOWHAY, brother of the deceased, watched the case on behalf of the friends; and Mr Woollcombe, of the firm of Pridham, Woollcombe, and Co., on behalf of Dr Aldridge, the proprietor of the Asylum. Mr Cornish withdrew, at the request of MR BOWHAY, whilst Dr Aldridge was examined. - Dr Charles Aldridge said that he was proprietor and surgeon of the Plympton Lunatic Asylum. The deceased, who was an implement manufacturer, came from Modbury, and was admitted into the institution on the 1st of January under proper certificates. He had been under witness's care and treatment ever since. On Saturday morning last, about quarter to eight o'clock, the witness Robins called him and told him that BOWHAY was dead. When the deceased was first admitted into the House, he suffered from emotional excitement and depression, and told witness that his business affairs had been a source of great anxiety to him for some year or more past. He also spoke of having had a fight with the devil. He had often spoken about his books and his business troubles. He was satisfied that the deceased was of unsound mind. For the first few days after he was admitted the deceased was all right. Witness saw the deceased on Thursday morning, and he was positive that he had no marks on his face then, but he noticed marks on Friday morning. He then appeared as usual. The deceased had been in a state of general excitement for the past three weeks. The mental excitement gradually increased, followed by very many furious out-bursts. On Friday morning last, between ten and eleven o'clock, the deceased was sitting in the dayroom on the sofa, when witness first observed the marks on his face. There was ecchymosis there at that time. The deceased was incoherent, and not capable of answering any questions. In answer to witness's inquiries Robins said that Stephens and himself were putting the deceased to bed on Thursday afternoon just before tea, and he handed MR BOWHAY'S trousers to Stephens, who was in the day room adjoining, when BOWHAY slipped past him (Robins) into the dayroom. Robins and Stephens both went after the deceased, who ran up one side of the table; and, seeing that Robins was following him, the deceased turned around and went down the other side of the table. Stephens came up the other side, and threw out his arms and caught the deceased, and their heads came in contact with each other. The deceased was then put to bed. Stephens's nose bled freely, but MR BOWHAY'S did not. witness had given a general order that if the deceased became excited he was to be put to bed earlier than usual. The deceased did not appear different after the collision occurred between him and Stephens. On Friday when the deceased was taking his lunch, he said "My mouth is full." Witness told him that it was not, and that the food would do him good and he ate it. The deceased was in a general state of excitement, and from time to time he would have great outbursts. He would repeatedly cry out "Murder," and say, "I will kill him;" and would talk very much during the night. He thought that the cause of death was congestion of the brain, and regarded the sudden attacks from which the deceased suffered as a sudden accession of congestion which lasted a short period. Did not think that the injury to the face of the deceased had anything to do with his death. The marks were superficial. There were no corresponding marks on the inside of the head. The day room was 33 feet long and 8 feet wide. The gangway where the deceased was caught by Stephens was about four feet wide. He was almost certain that the collision occurred on Thursday. The brain of the deceased had been in a congested state for more than three weeks. - By the Foreman: The attendants in the Asylum were supposed to be twenty years of age. The two attendants, Stephens and Robins, were aged 20 and 23 respectively. He was not told of the accident on Thursday. The deceased made his escape several days ago, and went across two fields and was found in a linhay. The attendants did not lose sight of the deceased, nor did they have to use any violence. - By MR BOWHAY: When witness was told that the deceased was dead he ordered the body at once to be taken to the bathroom. He had no reason to expect the death of the deceased. The deceased was more excited than usual. The brain was highly congested, but there was no effusion or inflammation. He did not think it necessary to particularly examine the organ of the nose where the blow was. He had not the slightest suspicion that the blow on the nose was the cause of death. Did not think that any blow on the head would bring the blood to the back part of it. There was more congestion at the back of the head. The extra congestion at the back of the head was the cause of death. When he examined the deceased he thought that he had been dead about an hour. The fits of the deceased were generally attended with muscular motion, and his limbs would become stiff. It was quite possible that he might have had an attack in bed without a muscular motion. He ought not to have ordered the body to be removed to the bathroom before he saw it when he was told that the deceased was dead. Did not think that the night draughts given to the deceased to induce sleep in any way affected his brain. He had them nightly for a week before he died. The draughts consisted of 25 grains of hydrate of chlorine, which was a small quantity. He had given the deceased a larger quantity. It would tend to lessen the fits. Robins, who slept in the room adjoining that of the deceased, told witness that he had often got out of the window in order not to disturb the deceased in the morning. The deceased's death was an occasional and ordinary one. - Mr Woollcombe said that he was present at the Inquiry, inasmuch as Dr Aldridge desired to have a searching Inquiry as to the deceased's treatment in the institution, and he wished to elicit the whole truth about the matter. - Witness, continuing, said that Robins, although young, was very quick and active. - MR BOWHAY: Is congestion of the brain ever due to a blow? - Witness: Inflammation of the brain is due to a blow, but not congestion. If death had been caused by a blow there would have been some marks. - Mr Philip Alfred Cornish, surgeon, said that he made an examination of the body of the deceased. The deceased had a black mark over the upper part of the nose and a black eye. He did not make a post mortem examination. He had attended the deceased for many years, and attended him about three weeks in his last illness. The deceased was suffering from great excitement and want of sleep. He considered the deceased of unsound mind, and he signed the certificate for his admittance into the Asylum. The marks were quite superficial. He was of opinion that the deceased died of a fit of congestion of the brain. He thought that no medical man could form an opinion as to whether the blow accelerated the death of the deceased. It was possible that a person might die so suddenly as the deceased did. - By MR BOWHAY: He examined the deceased in company with Dr Aldridge and Mr Ellery. the scalp was not removed in any way. He gave his opinion from the notes that Mr Ellery gave him. If he had not seen Mr Ellery's notes he should not have been able to give such a decided opinion. There were no external marks that shew the deceased died from congestion of the brain. - It was then decided that Mr Cornish should examine the brain internally. - MR BOWHAY said that he had a reason for objecting to another examination of the body, inasmuch as he had consulted one of the leading physicians in Plymouth on the subject. - Mr Woollcombe remarked that this was not evidence. - MR BOWHAY: I would like to have a physician from Plymouth. - The Coroner thought that the evidence of Messrs. Cornish and Ellery were sufficient. - MR BOWHAY objected to Mr Ellery going in company with Mr Cornish to examine the body. - Mr Woollcombe thought the objections of an extraordinary character. - The Coroner said that he had requested the doctors to examine the body together. - Thomas Robins, attendant at the Asylum, said that the collision between Stephens and the deceased occurred on Thursday last, and not on the previous Tuesday, as he had stated on Monday. Witness was away at Launceston all day on Tuesday. - Several of the Jury thought that it was a very serious mistake. - Robins, in reply to MR BOWHAY stated that he had never got out of his bedroom window in order to avoid going into the deceased's room and disturbing him. - Mr Cornish here came back and said that he had examined the head and face of the deceased internally. He was precisely of the same opinion as he was before. The marks were superficial. There was no connection between the external bruise and the internal part. There was no fracture. - By MR BOWHAY: He did not move the skin of the nose. The examination of the brain was sufficient. There was no bruise or contusion. The congestion had been coming on for some time. He was not prepared to say whether the blow had anything to do with the death of the deceased or not. There was no fracture of the base of the skull. There might not have been any muscular motion if the deceased had a fit in bed. There was no effusion of blood. If a blow had not been struck, his opinion would have been the same. - MR BOWHAY said there had been no independent doctor examined. Dr Aldridge had been with Mr Ellery at his examination, and Mr Ellery with Mr Cornish. He should like for Dr Hingston, of Plymouth, to examine the body. - Dr Hingston was telegraphed for, and Messrs. Cornish and Ellery, with the permission of the Coroner, left the court through pressure of business. The proceedings were adjourned and on the court re-assembling, Dr Charles Albert Hingston, of Plymouth, said that he made a post mortem examination of the head and face of the deceased. The bruises in the face were quite superficial. there was no injury to the bone whatever internally. The scalp was perfectly sound, without the slightest trace of injury. The death of the deceased was not caused by any external injury. The blow could not accelerate the death of the deceased. - By MR BOWHAY: The death of the deceased was a very rare one. If the blow had caused death there would have been a mark on the bone internally. It was very rare that congestion of the brain paralysed the limbs. It was quite possible that congestion of the brain would be so sudden and so extreme as to paralyse the movement of the limbs. - MR BOWHAY: Would any violent shaking at half-past three in the morning have caused the death of the deceased? - Dr Hingston replied in the negative. - Mr Woollcombe said there had been not one iota mentioned about shaking the deceased in all the evidence. MR BOWHAY'S questions tended to criminate people. - Dr Hingston thought that the deceased died from natural causes acting on a diseased brain. - John Payne, attendant at the Asylum, recalled, said that he had made a mistake in his evidence with regard to the day the collision occurred. It was Thursday, and not Tuesday. The deceased made a very great disturbance on Tuesday and broke two chairs, and witness confused one day with the other. Robins was away all day on Tuesday. - The Coroner then summed up. He said that if the issue had been that the wounds caused the death of the deceased, the Jury would have had to find whether the bruises happened accidentally or otherwise; but he thought from the medical evidence that the bruises had nothing whatever to do with death. During the Inquiry there had been a great deal of matter which, under ordinary circumstances, he should not have allowed to transpire. He admitted that there had been very serious discrepancies in the evidence on Monday, and he, therefore, thought that he ought to hold the fullest Inquiry into the matter, and this had been done. He thought that the witness Robins was a very bad witness; but still, at the same time, he did not think that the Jury need form an opinion of the conduct of the attendants, because they would have to decide on the medical evidence before them. He was sure that if Dr Aldridge knew of any of the attendants treating the patients in a brutal manner he would discharge them at once. - The Jury, of whom Mr H. S. Pearce was Foreman, were then locked up, and, after a long consultation, they returned a verdict "That the deceased died from Natural Causes - congestion of the brain." They censured the witness Robins for the very unsatisfactory manner in which he gave his evidence. The Coroner concurred in the verdict. - MR BOWHAY said that he felt assured that Dr Aldridge had treated his brother in the very best possible way as far as medical advice was concerned. His brother's case was a very difficult one, and he would cry out "Murder" and act in a very violent manner throughout his illness. It was unfortunate that the attendants did not agree in their evidence. He was perfectly satisfied with the evidence which Dr Hingston had confirmed, and had every confidence in Dr Aldridge and in his treatment and establishment. - The Inquiry lasted the whole of the day. - MR BOWHAY asks us to append the following communication to the editor to our report of the Inquest:- "Sir,- As a mere act of justice, I shall be grateful if you can allow these few words to appear at the end of the report of the Inquest held on my brother, who died in the Plympton Asylum. As you will find from Dr Hingston's testimony, and that of the other medical witnesses, my brother's death was a very rare case, and its rarity made it my duty to see that matters should be thoroughly sifted. Great credit is due to the Coroner and Jury for the earnest and thorough manner with which the Inquest was conducted, and I tender them my sincere thanks. The Coroner afforded me every help in arriving at a just conclusion; and the Jury, I feel, took an interest in the case which was second only to my own. Unfortunately, owing as it seems to me to excitement, the attendants were contradictory in their evidence; but this may under the circumstances be excused on their part. I regret the Jury should have thought it their duty to blame the witness Robins; he was, I think, overcome by his position. In conclusion, I deliberately express, as I did at the termination of the Inquest, my conviction that as far as I can judge my brother's death does not reflect in any way on the management of the Asylum. I have every confidence in Dr Aldridge, who seems quite worthy of his position and responsibility. - I remain, your obedient servant, T. A. BOWHAY. - The deceased, who has left a wife and family, had for some years carried on business at Modbury as an agricultural implement maker. For a few years all went well, but bad times came, and with them the loss of pecuniary prosperity. MR BOWHAY appears to have got at length into almost hopeless monetary difficulties and contracted many bad debts. Things went from bad to worse, and on April 2nd last a Mr Tucker, of Plymouth, appeared upon the scene, and, as was stated at the first meeting of the deceased's creditors after he had filed a petition in liquidation, the business transactions which were carried on between the two presented a complicated and extraordinary aspect. The arrangement appears to have been that Mr Tucker was to buy the entire business from MR BOWHAY, together with the stock and the whole of the debts. MR BOWHAY was to continue in the service of Mr Tucker, receiving £2 a week as salary, and the business was to be carried on in the name of BOWHAY, Tucker and Co. Consequently creditors and customers were informed that Mr Tucker had become a member of the firm, and MR BOWHAY attended the fairs and agricultural shows, and acted for Tucker until July. Soon, however, the deceased discovered that Tucker had not paid the debts, and a dispute arose between the two which resulted in the business being turned over to BOWHAY, with the understanding that he should pay the debts. Apparently all went smoothly enough for some time until Mr Tucker suddenly discovered that MR BOWHAY had not discharged the debts, and it was ultimately agreed that the business should be retransferred to Tucker, which was done in October. A deed was, in fact, drawn up and handed to BOWHAY that he might execute it; but he thought it advisable not to carry it out, and, acting on legal advice, he filed a petition for liquidation, and a similar course was soon afterwards adopted by Tucker. Subsequently meetings of creditors were held, in which BOWHAY was subjected to a very severe examination. But all these cares and anxieties were not without their results, and at last the severe mental strain became more than MR BOWHAY could bear. Signs of dementation appeared about two months ago, and the poor man gradually got worse, until it was found necessary about a month since to remove him from his home to the Plympton Lunatic Asylum, where he died suddenly on Saturday. during the time of his confinement his whole thoughts seemed to be centred on his recent business troubles; indeed, these appeared to be the world in which he moved, and as if tortured by the recollection, or perhaps fancying he was still in the midst, of his recent anxieties, he would frequently cry in piteous tones "My books are wrong, my books are wrong."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At A Railway Station. - An Inquest was held at the North-road Railway Station, Plymouth, last evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) relative to the death of JOHN WILLIAM BURRIDGE, aged 34, who died suddenly at the station yesterday morning. The deceased, who had watched the 10.20 a.m. narrow-gauge train for Waterloo off, was observed to fall down, and two porters picked him up, and laid him in one of the rooms. Mr Pearse, the station-master, was soon on the spot, and he sent for a doctor, and water was procured, but the deceased was too far gone to be able to swallow it. When Dr Thompson arrived he pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 February 1879
GREAT TORRINGTON - PHILIP SAUNDERS, a labourer, between 40 and 50 years of age, committed suicide at Torrington on Tuesday by hanging himself. Deceased had only been married a few months. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned at the Inquest.

EXETER - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest on Tuesday on MARY HOOPER, an aged woman, wife of a sawyer, who was found dead in bed. The medical testimony showed that the deceased suffered from disease of the lungs, and that death was caused by exhaustion. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 February 1879
STOKENHAM - At the Inquest concerning the death of MR R. H. OLDREY, farmer, of Darnscombe, Stokenham, who was found drowned in a shallow stream of water, an Open Verdict was returned. The deceased had been suffering from diarrhoea, and was also somewhat depressed in spirits.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, at the London Mail Inn, Richmond-street, last evening, relative to the death of SAMUEL FURNEAUX, aged 46 years, who died suddenly on Wednesday. The deceased, who was about to appear as a witness at the Stonehouse Police Court, in connection with a corn stealing case, met with an accident about three weeks ago, and from the effects of it he never properly recovered. - MARY HARVEY, aunt of the deceased, stated that the deceased came home on the 16th inst., in the evening, and complained that whilst carrying a sack of corn on board some vessel lying at the Plymouth Quay, he had knocked his chest against something. He continued his work, however, for another week, at the end of which he was so bad that he had to go to bed. - Me Eysley, surgeon, was sent for, and had been attending him for the past twelve days for a fractured rib. On Wednesday, in consequence of what one of the deceased's daughters had said, witness went down to his bedroom, and found him on the floor with his head hung down. With the assistance of two neighbours he was put into bed, and Mr Eyeley was again communicated with. - Mr Joseph Eyeley, surgeon, said that he had been treating the deceased for the past twelve days and he had been progressing very favourably up to Wednesday morning - so favourably that he had certified that the deceased would soon be able to attend the trial. About 3.30 p.m. on Wednesday he was informed of the death of the deceased, and it surprised him very much. In accordance with the Coroner's order he had made a post mortem examination. He found no external marks of violence, but on opening the chest he found an effusion of serum in the pleura. The surface of the breast bone was fractured, and it was also protruding into the right lung, as well as the pericardium or the bag of the heart. This would cause effusion, which would result in death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - A Public Danger At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Vine Inn, Admiral's Hard, Stonehouse, last evening, respecting the death of JOHN SAMBELLS, a farm labourer, about 78 years of age. On Sunday, the 19th ult., the deceased left his home in Durnford-lane early in the morning for Honicknowle, and, at his daughter's request, promised to return by daylight. About half-past seven o'clock the same day a baker, named Samuel Garland, was standing at his door in Newport-street, and heard loud cries for help proceeding from the quay. He at once went to the place in company with a marine, named Jones, and saw a merchant sailor in a boat holding up the deceased who was in the water. They got him ashore, and SAMBELLS told his name and said he resided in Emma-place, but he could not speak much. The sailor said that if it had not been for him SAMBELLS would have been drowned. The tide at the time was about three-quarters ebb, and the deceased was about four feet from the wall. There was a vessel about sixty feet off the quay. Garland thought that the sailor, whom he did not know, belonged to the vessel, and that on hearing the deceased fall into the water he at once proceeded to the spot in a boat. There were chains on the quay, but the boys who frequented the place had broken them down. There was only one light on the quay. Witness had frequently seen the chains repaired. - Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that on the 19th Jan., he examined SAMBELLS, who had a very large quantity of water on the lungs, and this caused him very great difficulty in breathing. he was very cold, and was suffering altogether from the immersion. He rallied a little after a day or two, but became very much worse on Tuesday, and died the same day from congestion of the lungs. He (witness) had been frequently sent for to attend people who had fallen into the water. The chains were merely a toy for the children, by whom he had seen the chains around the quay broken. - Several Jurymen also testified to seeing children break the chains &c. - Mr Martin, the lessee of the quay, attended, and said that he was constantly repairing the chains. He was not, however, bound to provide chains or posts as a protection for the public. - The Jury visited the quay, and some of them thought that the place was in a very bad state as regarded protection for the public. There were no chains there. - One Juror spoke strongly on the point, and said that the Jury would be wanting in their duty if they did not sift the matter to the bottom. The Inquest was then adjourned for a fortnight in order that the merchant sailor who rescued SAMBELLS, and who has left the town, might attend, if possible, together with the marine who helped the deceased out of the water, and someone from the Manor-office to whom the property belongs, to state whose duty it was to keep chains around the quay as a preventative against people falling into the water.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 February 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES BEST, 66, mate of the schooner Speedwell. On Friday the deceased was walking from the shore on board along a plank, when, being intoxicated, he fell alongside the vessel. He was picked up by a sailor, and placed in his cabin, and whilst the former went for a doctor BEST died. The Inquiry was adjourned for the purpose of having a post mortem examination of the body made, as there was no evidence adduced as to the cause of death.

EXETER - A Child Burned To Death At Exeter. - The Exeter coroner held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on Saturday concerning the death of GEORGE NORSWORTHY, an illegitimate child, aged 3 years. It appears that the mother of the child, whilst at work, was in the habit of entrusting the deceased to the care of a woman named Gillard, who rents apartments in the same house. On the 22nd ult. the mother was returning to her home when she heard her child screaming, and on going upstairs she found the little fellow in Gillard's room in flames. Assistance being near at hand the flames were soon extinguished. The poor little sufferer, who was much burned, was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remained until his death, which took place on Thursday night last. The medical evidence was to the effect that the cause of death was the shock to the system. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that there was not a criminal negligence on the part of the woman Gillard.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 February 1879
BARNSTAPLE - A Child Burnt To Death At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, by the Borough Coroner, Mr H. J. Bencraft, on a little boy, four years old, named EMANUEL NUTT, the son of a wood turner living at Derby, in the borough. Evidence was given by MRS NUTT and by Mr Kay, the house surgeon, showing that the child was accustomed to sleep with his grandmother. On Tuesday morning last she had arisen and gone to her work, and he was left in the bedroom alone. Between eight and nine o'clock his mother heard him scream, and on going upstairs found that his night-shirt was in flames. She took off the garment, but by this time the little fellow was so badly burnt that he was speechless. He was taken to the Infirmary, and lingered on until Saturday night, when he died. There was a box of matches on a chest of drawers in the bedroom, and the child's mother suggested that he must have got upon a chair and reached it, and that in playing with the matches he set himself on fire. She added, however, that she had not found any partly burnt lucifers in the room. - The verdict of the Jury was one of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH - The Fatality At Dartmouth. - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Dartmouth, by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, touching the death of LIEUTENANT JAMES ROGERS JOSEPH SIMPSON, R.N., eldest son of MR W. SIMPSON, of Ford Hill House, Dartmouth. Deceased, as was stated yesterday, was accidentally shot on Saturday, and died on the spot. The body was identified by Mr Roger Joseph Mostyn, uncle of deceased. - Mr Thomas Jones, farmer, of Lower Week, near Dartmouth, said that on Saturday he was out shooting with deceased and Mr R. B. Cleland, jun., over the Little Dartmouth Estate. Witness was ferreting a hedge for rabbits with Mr Cleland, and got over the hedge. He was followed by the deceased, and while he was climbing the gun which he carried went off, and he exclaimed, "I am shot," at the same time falling across the hedge. He lifted deceased up, and Mr Cleland went for assistance to Little Dartmouth, but when he got back MR SIMPSON was quite dead. Mr Soper, surgeon, subsequently arrived, but his aid could be of no avail. The gun which deceased carried was a breechloader, and one barrel was found loaded after the accident and the other was empty. - Mr R. B. Cleland, jun., corroborated this evidence and the Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Neglecting To Get Medical Advice. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Tandem Inn, Octagon, Plymouth, last evening on HARRIET CHEESEMAN TREGASKIS, , about 64 years of age. - ROBERT TREGASKIS, a shoemaker, residing at 34 Rendle-street, said that the deceased, who was his wife, had been in delicate health for the past five years, and during the last few months he had noticed that she was becoming emaciated. The last time she had medical advice was about two years ago. She had often complained of pain in her side, and had asked him to feel her side, saying, "Feel what a lump I have got here." He felt a hardness, which he thought was inflammation. She did not complain after Saturday, but on Sunday morning he noticed that she was worse, and went for a medical man, who gave him some medicine. She died about half-past ten the same morning. A woman named Bennett, residing in the same house as the deceased, said that MRS TREGASKIS had often complained of a pain in her side, and was frequently compelled to lie down. She had urged the deceased several times to get medical advice, but she replied that it would do her no good. - The Coroner read a letter from Mr T. Pearce, surgeon, who saw the deceased after death, and who said that the deceased apparently had a tumour of some kind in the bowels. The Coroner, in summing up, commented strongly on the conduct of the husband in not getting medical advice. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and said they thought that the deceased ought to have had medical advice.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - The Inquest on JAMES BEST, aged 66, late mate of the schooner Speedwell, now lying at the wharf of Mr Friend, coal merchant, Stonehouse, was resumed at the Market House Inn, Market-street, before the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd). - Emily Willis, aged 15, stated that she saw the deceased in company with the able-seaman Beaumont in Newport-street, and the deceased appeared to be very obstinate, and would not go on. She followed them, and saw the deceased go aboard on the plank as well as Beaumont. The deceased was about to step into the vessel, when he over-balanced himself and fell into the water. The man Beaumont then ran and got the boat and in less than five minutes he had the deceased in the boat. - Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and, in his opinion, death resulted from suffocation caused by drowning, and accelerated by the smallness of the left lung, and also by the state of intoxication the deceased was in at the time of the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 February 1879
LYDFORD - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Dartmoor Prisons on Thursday on a prisoner named ALFRED JACKSON, aged 25 years, who had died, after a brief illness, from disease of the brain. JACKSON was convicted at Clerkenwell Sessions in 1877 for larceny and receiving stolen goods, and was sentenced to five years' penal servitude. He has conducted himself very indifferently whilst in prison.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 February 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at the Artillery Arms, Devonport, yesterday, by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) relative to the death of SAMUEL WILKINSON, aged 62 years, who died suddenly on Saturday night. It appears that the deceased had been suffering from heart disease for the past three years, and was also asthmatical. On Saturday night he went into his garden about 6.30 p.m., as was his usual custom, and a short time afterwards was found by someone lying in the wash-house. Mr Horton, surgeon, was sent for, and pronounced life to be extinct. In Mr Horton's opinion death was caused by angina pectoris, and was accelerated by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 21 February 1879
PLYMOUTH - At a Coroner's Inquest at Plymouth yesterday concerning the death of MRS GOSLING, a widow woman, aged 46, living at Neswick-street, it was stated that the deceased had for some months complained of pain in her side. Yesterday morning she fell down in her house and died within five minutes. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 February 1879
PLYMOUTH - Death From Suffocation. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an adjourned Inquest at Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of KATE THOMPSON, about five weeks old. It appears that on Wednesday night the mother of the deceased, who resides in Frederick-street, went to sleep with the deceased on her arm and apparently in its usual health. The next morning the mother found the child dead by her side. The deceased was in a very emaciated state, and the Jury thought that a post mortem examination of the body should be made. This was done by Mr W. Cazeley, surgeon, who found the body in a wasted condition. There were no external marks of violence nor apparent signs of disease. The left lung had never been fully inflated, and both lungs were congested. There was a very large quantity of undigested milk in the stomach, and the condition of the abdomen indicated that the child was weak and delicate. On turning the deceased over a small quantity of milk came out of its mouth. He thought that the deceased had surfeited itself, and by lying by the side of its mother had been accidentally suffocated. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 February 1879
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - A Fatal Overdose. - An Inquest was held at St. Thomas, Exeter, yesterday, by Mr Crosse, County Coroner, on MARY ANN BRENDON, aged 6 years. It was stated that the child had been suffering from fever, and had been prescribed a tonic by a medical man, to be taken in teaspoonfuls at intervals during the day. During the temporary absence of her nurse on the 20th inst. deceased contrived to get the medicine bottle, containing about ten doses, the whole of which she drank. From that time she got worse, and died on the 24th. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at St. Thomas, Exeter, on MARIA COOK, aged 52. On Monday the deceased, who had been addicted to habits of intemperance, was taken to her home in a drunken state, and was put to bed, where she remained insensible until her death the following evening. John Franks, a neighbour of the deceased, deposed that COOK had borne the character of a drunkard. On Monday evening he saw her carrying a clock, and observed her fall three times in coming down Bridge-street. Witness carried the clock and assisted her home. On arriving at her home she fell backwards and struck the back of her head. He exchanged no blows with the deceased's son, and neither of them touched the deceased when she fell. A woman named Jessie Hawkes, also a neighbour, said she saw the lad COOK and Franks quarrelling, and deceased, who was very drunk, went to part them, but she fell back, knocking her head. She did not appear to have been injured. She had complained to witness previously of being subject to heart disease. - Mr R. J. Andrews, surgeon, said he saw the deceased just before she died. He could form no opinion as to the cause of death beyond what he ascertained from the neighbours. Death must have been occasioned by excessive drinking. He did not think the fall caused death. - The Coroner said the case appeared to him to be one of the most disgraceful and melancholy that had come under his notice. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted from Excessive Drinking.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 March 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening on an infant child named RHODA GOWMAN, about 6 months old. The mother, who lives at 63 Well-street, stated that the child appeared to be in its usual health on Saturday evening, but on the following morning she found it lying dead by her side in bed. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 March 1879
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Occurrence Near Tavistock. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest, at Bedford United Mines near Tavistock on Monday, relative to the death of WILLIAM CUTTS, aged 45 years. Deceased was a blacksmith working at the mine, and on the 18th ultimo he injured himself while pushing a chisel into its handle, with the sharp edge resting against his body. It appears that the edge of the chisel cut through his clothing and entered the abdomen, and death followed in a few hours. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 March 1879
ASHBURTON - The Strange Fatality At Ashburton. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at Ashburton, on JOHN HOCKINGS, who was found drowned in the river Dart the previous day. - James Westaway, landlord of the Duke's Head Inn, stated that the deceased, who was a grinder, of Totnes, came to Ashburton on the 24th February, and remained at his house up to Monday morning last, when he left, taking to a customer a knife which he had ground. - William Andrews, landlord of the Railway Inn, said the deceased came to his house on Monday morning, when he was not so cheerful as usual. He drank a glass of ale and took away a half-pint of gin in a bottle. - William Willis, a butcher, deposed that he was with deceased at the Railway Inn at the time and as he appeared downcast he offered to give deceased a piece of "sweetbread," or "frizzle," in the evening for his supper, to which deceased replied, "I don't think you will," and left, saying, "Good bye, old boy." Mrs Eli Andrews, staying at Holne Park Lodge, whilst fetching water from the river at one o'clock on Monday, found a hat and empty bottle on the bank near Holne Bridge, and in the evening sent the articles to Police-Sergeant Nott, who at once sent Police-Constable Binmore to search about the spot. Binmore not observing anything to arouse suspicion, the matter dropped until Thursday evening, when Sergeant Nott received information that deceased was missing. Nott, in company with Police-constables Binmore and Adams, began searching up and down the river, and on Friday morning, about half a mile below where the articles were picked up, they found the body of deceased in the river. - The Coroner considered the woman on finding the hat and bottle ought to have proceeded at once with the articles to the police, and not have waited until the evening. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 March 1879
DODBROOKE - Sudden Death Of A Child. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Dodbrooke, on ALFRED SHEPHERD, a child 2 years old. The deceased, which was an illegitimate child, and which was placed out to nurse with a MRS SHEPHERD, a relative, had always been delicate, and had also been subject to fits. On Friday last it was taken in a fit, and died suddenly on MRS SHEPHERD'S lap. As MRS SHEPHERD had six children of her own, and had charge of another illegitimate child, it became rumoured amongst her neighbours that the child had died from neglect, and the Coroner was communicated with. - Mr Webb, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination, stated that the cause of death was a diseased brain, and the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 March 1879
ASHPRINGTON - Death From A Fall. - A fall from a ladder to the depth of about eight feet has proved fatal to a lad named MITCHELL, the apprentice of Mr Coaker, farmer, of Painsford. When the accident occurred on Saturday MITCHELL walked away as though uninjured. Next day he complained of pain and died in less than an hour. Medical evidence taken at the Inquest held on Monday before Mr Gaye, County Coroner, proved the cause of death to have been rupture of the intestines.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 March 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at Devonport on JANE HEARD, a widow, aged 68 years, residing at 60 Princess-street. Deceased had been ailing for some time past, and on Saturday morning her landlady (Mrs Jinks) found that she was worse and sent for Mr Horton, surgeon, but before he arrived the deceased expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 April 1879
TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest At Teignmouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Teignmouth Infirmary, before Dr Gaye, County Coroner, touching the death of THOMAS HEXTER, who died from injuries received through falling from off a ladder. WILLIAM HEXTER, deceased's son, who was working with his father, said he believed that his father slipped whilst attempting to get on the parapet of the roof with a bucket in his hand. Mr Fenwick, surgeon, stated that the deceased was brought into the Infirmary on Saturday afternoon, and was perfectly unconscious. He had received a fracture of the skull, which doubtless was the cause of death. Deceased never regained consciousness. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 April 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest last evening on ELIZABETH BARTLETT, a child between 4 and 5 years of age, the daughter of JAMES BARTLETT, seaman, residing at 76 James-street. Just before 6 o'clock on Monday evening a boy, named Edwin Henderson, about 15 years of age, in the employ of Mr Mortimore, baker, Dockwall-street, was driving his master's pony through Pembroke-street, when the deceased (who was playing) ran backwards from the pavement into the middle of the road, and just in front of the trap. The boy shouted to her, and pulled up the pony as quickly as possible; but not before one of the shafts of the trap struck the child on the left side of the head and knocked her down. Henderson, however, managed to turn the pony aside, and thus prevented the wheel from going over her. The child was taken home and it was found that her left temple was bruised, that there was a scar on the left arm, and a bruise on the left leg. She died about 9 o'clock yesterday morning. The Jury thought that no blame could be attached to the driver; and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 April 1879
WINKLEIGH - Death From Lockjaw. - At Winkleigh, on Saturday, an Inquest was held on WILLIAM ELLACOTT, a lad 15 years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Down, of Durdon Farm; and on the 26th of last month he was employed in driving a horse and cart, which he upset whilst passing through a gate. He hurt one of his feet, but the wound was a very slight one, and he appeared to be recovering until the early part of last week, when he became worse. Mr Norman, surgeon, of Winkleigh, was sent for, and found the poor boy suffering from lockjaw, from which he died on Thursday. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Loft. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening on JAMES FITZPATRICK, about 24 years of age, late an able seam on board the brigantine Allen, of Dublin. The vessel was on a voyage from Dieppe to Weston Point, and whilst proceeding down the Channel about 9 o'clock on Sunday morning she was put about for Plymouth through stress of weather. The deceased was in the foretop, and had one of his legs on the foot rope endeavouring to get on the topsail yard, when, as the vessel was rolling at the time, he lost his hold and fell to the deck. In falling the deceased touched a seaman named McDonald, who was also in the foretop, on the head with his legs, knocking his cap off. The deceased, who died almost immediately after the accident, was brought to Plymouth and removed to the mortuary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 April 1879
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth on Saturday on SAMUEL SERCOMBE, who was drowned in the Teign on the previous day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) with a Jury, of which Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at the Workhouse, respecting the death of THOMAS SYMONDS, a pauper inmate. It appeared that deceased, who was 67 years of age, blind and somewhat infirm, was out visiting his friends on Good Friday, and on Saturday morning was found dead in bed. He had been an inmate of the House sixteen or seventeen years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Deceased was stated to have some time since made an attempt on his life by throwing himself from one of the quays.

STAVERTON - The Strange Death Near Totnes. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Staverton on Saturday on GEORGE MARLEY, who was found dead in a small pit of water on Friday. - Mr Shinner, jun., with whose father deceased lived, stated that he and the deceased were going home together about ten o'clock on Thursday night when he (witness) returned to a house that they had come from for something he had forgotten, whilst deceased went along alone. On arriving home he was told that the deceased had not come in, but no notice was taken of this; and when the family went to bed the door was left unlocked so that the deceased might come in. On Friday morning, on witness drawing up his bedroom window blind, he was surprised to see deceased sitting in a small pit within a few yards of the house used for the purpose of making mortar, and which contained three or four inches of water. Deceased appeared to be looking up at the window, but when witness got to him he found that he was dead and cold. No medical evidence was called, but the Coroner said he had no doubt that deceased fell into the pit, was seized with cramp, and died from exposure. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The deceased was unmarried, and about 36 years of age.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 April 1879
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Occurrence At The Great Western Docks. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM ANDREWS, a lumper, employed at the Great Western Docks. The deceased was working on board the steam collier Helmrook, of Glasgow, on Saturday week, and was employed to unhook the baskets as they were drawn up by the steam winch. About ten a.m. he was about to unhook a basket, when the winch gave a sudden jerk, carrying the basket out of the deceased's reach, and before he had time to have it lowered it came down and struck him on the shoulder, knocking him into the hold. He was speedily conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he died on Saturday evening. It was stated by some of the witnesses who were working on board the steamer that the donkey-engine which worked the winch was out of order, it having stopped several times before the accident. It worked all right again for about an hour afterwards, when it stopped, and it would not work any more. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that whilst they did not dispute that the steam gear might be well adapted for the purpose of raising coal out of a ship, yet it did appear from the evidence that the steam gear was scarcely in sufficient working order and that had anyone connected with its management been present they would have felt it their duty to caution him against again using the engine until it was put into perfect order. - It may be mentioned that the vessel having left the port more than a week ago, it was impossible to request anyone connected with her to attend the Inquest.

DARTMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Dartmouth. - A fatal accident befell a young man (RISDON), of Crediton, on Monday. It appears that he was on a visit to a gunner at the Dartmouth Castle named John Ryan, and had returned from Exeter by the 9.30 p.m. train in company with a few friends and Ryan and his wife. On account of the rough weather, Ryan's wife decided to remain at Dartmouth instead of walking to the Castle, about a mile distant. RISDON and Ryan, however, proceeded towards the Castle, and on nearing the turning leading to the pathway at the Castle, where a rather dangerous part has to be passed, whether from the darkness of the night, or some other cause, Ryan seems to have slipped over the path, a distance of some feet towards the water. RISDON then, apparently, went to the help of Ryan and fell into the sea. Nothing more was seen or heard of them until yesterday morning, when, as a pilot named Dyer was rowing his boat in the harbour, near the shore, he was attracted to the spot where the two men fell by groans and upon rowing towards it, he discovered Ryan in a very weak state, and much bruised and cut. Assistance was quickly at hand and Ryan was removed to his home and attended to with much promptitude by Mr Soper, surgeon. He is in a very low condition, and fears as to his recovery are entertained. Search for the body of RISDON was made immediately and it was found and landed at Dartmouth, and conveyed to the public mortuary. The Inquest was held at the Council Chamber last night by the Borough Coroner, Mr R. W. Prideaux, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how deceased came by his death there was no evidence to prove." RISDON was a very respectable young man and a good mechanic. He was to have been married shortly to a young woman who remained at Dartmouth with Ryan's wife on Monday night.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 April 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - An adjourned Inquest was held at Stonehouse last evening, by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of JENIFER HOSKINGS, aged 67, who died suddenly on the 5th inst. The deceased, who was a woman of intemperate habits, was visited about 11 p.m. on the 5th inst., by a neighbour, who gave her a cup of tea. The same neighbour went to the deceased's room, on the following morning, when she found her lying on the bed, with her clothes on, quite dead. Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He found the heart very flabby and soft, it also contained a quantity of fibrin. The remote cause of death was drink. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Suicide Or Accident? - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Buller's Arms, Exwick (Exeter), on an elderly man named JOHN BRINSOM, who had been found in the mill-leat. MRS BRINSOM, the widow, stated that her husband, who had worked for thirty-seven years at the tannery in Alphington-road, was discharged from his situation about two months ago in consequence of the slackness of trade. Since then he had earned a little at gardening, but had been ill and under the medical care of Mr Farrant most of the time. On Saturday morning he left his home about eight o'clock and she did not again see him alive. Witness spoke to having observed a little strangeness in her husband's demeanour during the week prior to his death, and this led her to believe that if he sought his death intentionally he could not have been in his right mind. She was of opinion that the loss of work had made him despondent, and it was her intention, had he come home safe on the Saturday, to have taken Mr Farrant's advice as to getting him "looked after." There was no evidence as to how deceased got into the water. - William Floyde, a journeyman miller, employed at Mr Mallett's mills, Exwick, proved finding the body at the grating by the mill-tail; it was a little warm, but dead, beyond hope of recovery. - P.C. Johns, who examined the body, said it bore no marks of violence. - It was stated by the Coroner that Mr Farrant, surgeon, had also examined the body, but he was unable to attend the Inquest. - He (Mr Crosse), however, thought there was no necessity for requiring the attendance of another medical man. - P.C. Johns informed the Jury that at a spot about seventy-five yards above the mill there were footprints on the bank of the stream, as if some person had walked down to the water's edge, and it was supposed that the deceased must have got into the water at that spot. - The Coroner observed that God only knew how the poor fellow got into the water, and it did not seem to him that the evidence of his being in an unsound state of mind was very strong. Under the circumstances, though he did not wish to dictate their verdict, he thought one of "Found Drowned" would meet the case. - The Jury, however, seemed to have made up their minds that the case was one of suicide, and returned a verdict to that effect, adding that they were of opinion deceased was of unsound mind when he committed the act. - After the verdict had been returned, attention was called to the state of the fencing which separates the mill-leat from the public road. P.C. Johns produced a piece of rotten wood which had formed part of the fence, but which had been recently broken, and it was stated that the railing near this spot (where the deceased is supposed to have gone into the water) is so slight as to afford no protection whatever for children. The Coroner hoped the reporters would take note of the fact that the fence was in a dangerous state. From the top of the bank to the surface of the water is a drop of from four to five feet, and the bank itself is so steep that it would be almost impossible for an able-bodied man to save himself after once stumbling over the edge. The mill-leat belongs to the Buller family, Crediton.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 April 1879
BRIXHAM - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Brixham yesterday on PHILIP GRAVELS, aged 21 years, who was killed by falling over a cliff at Overgang on Wednesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 April 1879
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Mr R. R. Crosse, held an Inquest yesterday at St Thomas, Exeter, on the body of JANE PARR, wife of a mechanic, who had died during her confinement. Various rumours against the person in attendance on the deceased had been afloat, but apparently without foundation. The verdict "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From False Croup. - The Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at Stoke last evening into the circumstances attending the death of MABEL WILTON, about 7 months old, daughter of a shopkeeper residing at 27 Tavistock-street, Stoke. The child was put to bed about eight o'clock on Saturday night, apparently in her usual health, taking her food as usual, and next morning was found to be dead. Mr G. Rolston, surgeon, was sent for, and found that the child had been dead about an hour. He thought the cause was an attack of false croup. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Scalding. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Octagon Coffee House, Plymouth, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH MAY FORD, infant daughter of ROBERT FORD, the resident manager of the house. It appeared that on Friday last the child's mother brought a bucket of boiling water to a top room, where she was at work, and the child was playing. Her back was turned when hearing a splash she found the child had fallen backwards into the bucket. She immediately stripped her and applied sweet oil to the scalded limbs, and used such other treatment as her knowledge suggested. With her husband she felt confident of its recovery, and no doctor was sent for, but death resulted on Sunday. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, expressing an opinion that medical assistance should have been obtained immediately the accident occurred.

OTTERY ST MARY - A young woman, 19 years of age, named MARY JANE FRENCH, who has resided with her parents at Wiggaton, Ottery St. Mary, was yesterday committed for trial by the County Coroner for the murder of her illegitimate child. The infant lived several hours after birth, but there was evidence of partial strangulation.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 May 1879
BROADCLYST - Suicide Of A Postman At Broadclyst. - The County Coroner for Devon - Mr R. R. Crosse - held an Inquest on Tuesday, at Broadclyst, touching the death of LEWIS TREMLETT, aged 31, a letter-carrier. Deceased, who lived with his parents, had always been extremely nervous and timid, and for the last three weeks or month behaved strangely. On Saturday he complained of illness, and on Sunday afternoon was found drowned in the river Clyst. The Jury gave as their verdict "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 2 May 1879
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Shipowner At Plymouth From Apoplexy. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM HILL, a master mariner and shipowner, about 59 years of age, who resided at 4 Nelson-street. Deceased went to bed on Wednesday night at half-past nine, appearing quite cheerful and well. About five o'clock next morning the servant, hearing a child cry who was in the room entered and noticed that deceased was snoring very loudly. She took the child away, and about an hour afterwards informed the daughter of the deceased. The immediately went into the room where the deceased was, and found him lying on the bed with his head on the floor. On examination he was found to be dead. Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon, who was sent for, thought the cause of death to have been a fit of apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 May 1879
NORTH BOVEY - Fatal Accident To A North Bovey Farmer. - Dr Gaye, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Yarde Farm, North Bovey, yesterday, touching the death of MR EDWIN CUMING, of that place. Mr Simon Bellamy, butcher, of Moreton, stated that on Tuesday evening he was riding homeward in company with the deceased, who had attended a grass sale at Barne, Lustleigh. About a mile from Moreton the deceased was thrown from his horse, and lay bleeding in the road. Witness at once despatched a messenger to Yarde for assistance; and after some little time the deceased was removed to his residence, where he died very shortly after. Mr Collyns, surgeon, of Moreton, stated that he was called to see the deceased, but death had taken place before he arrived. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was evidence death was accidental. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 May 1879
HONITON - Sudden Deaths At Honiton. - Inquests respecting the deaths of two men who had died suddenly at Honiton were held there on Saturday by Dr Macaulay. One of the deceased, named SLOPER, was identified by a lodging-housekeeper named Edwards, who stated that he was in the habit of sleeping at her house once every three months. He was seen entering the town on Friday evening by a woman named Bending, who spoke to him as he was walking very feebly, and he told her that he felt ill. She brought him assistance but he was unable to get along, and leant back against the wall at the top of High-street, where in a few moments he died. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, hastened by exposure" was returned.
The other Inquiry was concerning the death of a man named READ, who was found dead in a linhay on Northcote Farm. It appears that READ had been accustomed sleep in the linhays and plantations about Honiton, never occupying a bed. On Saturday morning Mrs Baker, of Northcote, saw him in the linhay, and he was then dying, but as he was of somewhat drunken habits she thought that he had been drinking the night before. She brought him a cup of tea, but could not eat, and in less than a quarter of an hour he died. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," hastened by exposure, was returned in this case also. It is somewhat singular that both men were in the same line of business and had been together the day before.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 May 1879
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident At Babbicombe. - A lad named KILMINSTER, aged about 13 years, whilst out on the Babbicombe Down gathering flowers on Saturday, approached too near the rock which skirts the down, and fell over a distance of 60 feet. The little fellow was conveyed to the Infirmary where he died on Sunday. Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict. - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Dartmoor Prison yesterday on a prisoner named HENRY ASPINALE, aged 40 years, who died on Friday last. A verdict of "Death from Exhaustion" was returned. The deceased was convicted at Preston, on February 21st, 1877, and sentenced to ten years' penal servitude for burglary, there having been a previous conviction against him. On both occasions during imprisonment his conduct was exemplary.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Harvest Home Hotel, Tavistock-street, last evening, on MARIA OSBORNE KEATS, aged 68 years. About noon on Sunday woman named Pearn, who had been sitting with the deceased, left her apparently in her usual health; but about a quarter-past two o'clock in the afternoon her grandson found he sitting on a couch dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT - The Fatal Carriage Accident At Newton. - An Inquest was held at the Newton Townhall yesterday by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, touching the death of MRS JANE PINSENT. - Henry Lowe, in the employ of MR PINSENT, stated that he harnessed the pony to the basket carriage of his employer on the 24th of April at two o'clock, and the deceased drove away with her mother-in-law. Everything was then secure. - Alfred Northey knew the pony well, having driven it frequently since his master (MR PINSENT) bought it six months ago. It was very quiet, and did not kick. On the Monday previous to the accident it was driven a very long journey. - Mrs Jessy Hancock, widow of a medical man, said on the day in question she was at her window in Lower Devon-terrace, and saw two ladies driving in a basket carriage. At the same time she heard a pair of trucks coming down the hill on the western side of the square at a terrific rate, and on nearing the pony the latter put forward his ears and started off at a gallop. The deceased tried to pull up but could not. Witness saw two boys riding on the trucks, and they did not appear to have any control over them on account of the hill being so steep. She thought there would have been a collision, and as the pony was turning the corner she ran out but the carriage cleared the trucks, and the pony ran on out of her sight. - George Snell, a carpenter in the employ of Mr John Steer, was going down Queen-street on the afternoon of the 24th April, and on nearing Mrs Gillard's he saw a pony and carriage, containing two ladies, coming down Devon-square at a tremendous rate. The pony tried to turn into Queen-street, but could not for its pace and ran against the kerb on the opposite side. The carriage was at once upset, and both ladies were thrown against the houses. The pony also fell on the road. He went to render assistance, and found both ladies lying unconscious, and they were shortly after removed to their homes. - Mr W. G. Scott, surgeon, was called to see the deceased after the accident, and found her unconscious, in which state she remained up to the time of her death, which occurred on Saturday. She did not regain consciousness sufficient to explain how the accident happened. Death was caused from concussion of the brain and severe lacerations. - Richard Luscombe, a lad 14 years of age, in the employ of Messrs. Michelmore and Sons, drapers, said he was driving a pair of trucks down Devon-square at a run, but did not see the pony until it was in a gallop. The trucks did not come into collision with the carriage as he pulled up on seeing it. - George Bridgman, another lad, who was with the last witness, gave corroborative evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, condemned the practice of boys riding on trucks down over hills, making a great noise, which was very dangerous. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Foreman (Mr Rees) adding that the Jury hoped the police would summon boys found riding on trucks in the streets. Mr Rees also asked the Coroner to reprimand the boys, Luscombe and Bridgman, for what they had done, and this Dr Gaye did.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 May 1879
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday, by Mr R. I Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on SOLOMAN BANKS, aged 37, an agent of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The evidence revealed that the deceased had enjoyed capital health, and had, in fact, never found it necessary to call in a doctor during the eleven years of his married life. He was attending to his duties as usual on Tuesday, and returned home about nine o'clock in the evening, when his wife noticed that he was looking very tired. After supper he retired to rest. Awaking at midnight, he impressed upon his wife not to fail to call him at three o'clock in the morning, as he had a long journey before him. At three o'clock she was disturbed by his groaning, and discovering that he was insensible and in a hot sweat, she sent for Mr Furnis, surgeon, who came in about a quarter of an hour, only to find that life had departed. He had no doubt that death arose from Natural Causes and his opinion was that syncope was the cause. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

NEWTON ABBOT - Sudden Death At Newton. - An Inquest was held at the Newton Cottage Hospital, on Wednesday night, by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, on a pedlar named THOMAS HAGGAR, who died suddenly that morning at the Jolly Sailor Inn. Medical testimony was to the effect that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly and gave their fees to the Hospital. The body of the deceased was very emaciated.

EXETER - Fatal Accident At Upton Pyne. - The Coroner of Exeter (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest last evening on a waggoner, named WILLIAM BREALEY, aged 25, who met his death through being run over at Upton Pyne. It appears that on Tuesday last the deceased's master, Mr Tozer, a farmer, of Bickleigh, near Tiverton, sent him with a horse to Newton St. Cyres to fetch a wagon. On returning home through Upton Pyne the animal started off at a furious rate, and the deceased, who was standing on the shafts with the reins holding in his hand, was thrown out. Assistance being close at hand the poor fellow was promptly conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but before his arrival at that institution death ensued. On the house surgeon examining the body, he found that the deceased had a wound over the right temple, exposing a bone of the skull to a great extent, and a fracture of the lower jaw and ribs on the right side, besides other injuries of a serious nature. It was stated that the horse that the deceased was driving though young was a very quiet animal. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 May 1879
BIDEFORD - A Lady Killed At Bideford. - A fatal carriage accident occurred at Bideford yesterday. MISS CAROLINE MARY STREET and her sister have been on a visit from the North of England to Captain Didham, who yesterday morning drove them over from Bideford to Westward Ho! They had returned and Captain Didham was about to turn into the drive leading up to his house, when the horses became somewhat restive, and one of the carriage wheels came sharply into collision with the stone of a gutter. The shock threw MISS STREET out of the carriage, and she was pitched violently head foremost against a wall, which fractured her skull. The other occupants of the carriage were unhurt. MISS STREET died shortly after the occurrence; and at an Inquest held last evening by Dr Thompson, the Coroner of Bideford, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased lady was about 30 years of age.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 May 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - A Sad Case. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday at Morice Town, relative to the death of JANE BURNETT, aged 58 years, who died suddenly on Sunday morning. The deceased, who was the wife of a retired chief carpenter of the Royal Navy, went to bed on Saturday night in her usual health, but rather the worse for liquor. On Sunday her husband, who did not sleep with her, went into the deceased's bedroom for the purpose of waking her, but not seeing her, and thinking that she might have gone to his brother's he went there, but the deceased was not there. A messenger came and requested him to return home, and he did so, and found his wife lying on the bed quite dead. It appeared that a servant in the house, after MR BURNETT had gone out, saw the deceased's boots, and upon this she went into the deceased's bedroom and found her lying on the floor between the bed and the wall. Mr Laity, surgeon, was sent for, and when he arrived he pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation, caused by the small space under the bed, and accelerated by drink."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 May 1879
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening relative to the death of MARTHA WILLMOTT, aged 45 years. It was stated that on Monday evening the deceased was going through Courtenay-street, when she became faint, and fell down. She was taken into the shop of Mr Burdwood, chemist, where a stimulant was given to her. Her husband was sent for, and he had her taken home and put to bed. During the night she got worse, and her husband went for Mr Thompson, surgeon, who, it was said, advised him "to leave it until the morning," and in the meantime to apply a mustard poultice. this was done, but the deceased got no better, and she died about half-past seven o'clock yesterday morning. The Coroner said that there was great blame to be attached to MR WILMOTT for not procuring other medical aid. However, the Jury in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, exonerating him from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 May 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening respecting the death of a child three years old, named JANE ANN TOOGOOD, who had died from injuries received on Wednesday, when it was knocked down and passed over by a wagon in Woolster-street. The evidence shewed that no one was to blame, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 May 1879
EXETER - Sudden Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on JOHN HILL, aged about 27, a private in the 2nd Regiment. It appears that on Sunday morning the deceased, who had recently returned from India, complained of a pain in his back. Some medicine failing to relieve him, a medical man was called in, but HILL died before he arrived. Mr Perkins, surgeon, stated that death was due to natural causes - probably heart disease - and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 May 1879
BARNSTAPLE - The body of the little boy HENRY KNILL, aged 4 years, who was drowned in the Taw at Barnstaple on Tuesday, the 6th instant, was found yesterday by Mr Farley Sinkins, vocalist of Exeter, about half a mile above the spot where he slipped in. The unfortunate little fellow was playing at the edge of the stream, with other children, when he fell in, and was carried away by the swiftly advancing tide. The Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner last evening, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Jury's Censure Of A Mother. - An Inquest was held last evening by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Laira Hotel, Laira-street, respecting the death of an infant named AMELIA JESSIE FLOYD, about nine weeks old, the daughter of a railway time-keeper. The body presented an emaciated appearance, and after carefully considering the evidence of the mother, the nurse, and a neighbour, the Jury, of whom Mr Seley was Foreman, returned the following verdict:- "We consider that the deceased died from Natural Causes, namely, atrophy; but, at the same time, we think that the mother is greatly censurable for having neglected her duty to her child in two ways - first, that she did not give the child more warmth when urged to do so by a neighbour; and secondly, because she did not call in medical aid when she saw her child was wasting away to a complete skeleton before it died."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 May 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Occurrence In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Plymouth Workhouse, relative to the death of CATHERINE FERRIS, aged 66 years. It was stated that on the 11th inst. a man named Ambrose Rollings, who works for Mr Henry Luscombe, of 55 Regent-street, was sent for by Miss Luscombe, and went to the house. On going upstairs he found Mr Luscombe, who is an invalid, lying on the floor naked, and he lifted him into bed. He then noticed the legs of the deceased, who was an attendant on Mr Luscombe, protruding from under the bed, but they were not moving. Rollings called the attention of Miss Luscombe to the circumstance and she advised him to go for a doctor. Mr Eyeley, surgeon, was fetched, and he ordered the deceased to be removed from under the bed, which was done. On being taken out the deceased was found to be unconscious, and there were very severe burns about her face. She was placed on a sofa and allowed to remain until the next day when she was removed to the Workhouse, where she died on Tuesday afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Paralysis, caused by Burning," adding that there was no evidence to shew how the burns were received.

EXETER - Suicide By A Ruined Bank Shareholder. - About six o'clock yesterday morning WILLIAM MAYNE, a gardener, left his house in John-street, Newtown, Exeter, to work in a green adjoining the Newtown infants' School, where he had been employed for some time. A woman named Stone, who was engaged in cleaning the schoolroom saw him enter the water closet between seven and eight o'clock. At about eight o'clock the woman, somewhat surprised at his absence, called him, but received no reply, and she opened the door of the water closet, when she saw the unfortunate man hanging by his neck by a rope attached to a chain which was suspended to a beam somewhat over six feet from the ground. Her screams attracted to the spot two lads, and they cut down the body, which was conveyed to the deceased's residence. A doctor was sent for, and on his arrival pronounced life to be extinct, although the body was still warm. The deceased, who was about 60 years of age, leaves a wife, but no children. Previous to the collapse of the West of England Bank, in which he was a shareholder, he had intimated to the neighbours his intention of settling down upon the proceeds of his shares, and since the closing of the bank he had shewn symptoms of despondency. The deceased was a sober, industrious man and generally respected. At an Inquest held last evening a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 May 1879
EXETER - Melancholy End Of A Drunkard. A Wife Driven To Insanity. - Mr Hooper, the Exeter Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Cowley Bridge Inn on the body of a man found drowned in a pool of water near Little Stoke Woods on Thursday afternoon, as already reported in the Western Morning News. From a memorandum in a pocket-book found among the deceased's papers, and from other evidence, it appears that the body was that of EDWARD DAWSON, a commercial traveller, OF 60 Ashwood, Longton, Staffordshire, in the employ of Mr Sampson Smith, china manufacturer, Sunderland Works, Longton. The case proved to be a distressing illustration of the results of excessive indulgence in drink. - Francis Carpenter, landlord of the Lord Nelson Inn, Spiller-street, Exeter, said that on Tuesday, the 29th of April, just before six o'clock in the morning, deceased came to his house and called for threepennyworth of brandy, which was supplied him. He was under the influence of drink before he had the brandy. Deceased remained until half-past nine, and in the meantime drank five more threepennyworths of brandy, but only paid for the first. Deceased was wearing a gold albert chain. On the following (Wednesday) morning deceased came to the house about ten o'clock, but the chain was then missing. Witness afterwards found that he had pawned the chain at Mr Brooking's for £2. Deceased asked if witness would let him remain in the house until he could get some money from his friends in Staffordshire. Witness consented, and at deceased's request wrote to his wife for a remittance of £5. In reply he received a letter from a Mr Sanders, stating that his (deceased's) wife was insane, having gone mad through her husband's "bad and unmanly conduct," that she was so ill that it required three persons to attend upon her, and that in the opinion of the doctor she was in a dangerous condition. When the letter arrived deceased had left the house and witness never saw him afterwards. Before he left, witness continued, he asked me to go to Mr Gardener's Half Moon Hotel, High-street, for some luggage which he had left there. Mr Gardener, however, refused to part with it because he had not paid his hotel bill, and said he should write to the firm he represented and advised me to do the same. On telling deceased that Mr Gardener had declined to give up his luggage, he said he should go to Mr Elmore of the London and South Western Hotel, where he had put up many years ago, and see if he could get some money. At his request I went to Mr Elmore, who stated that he had known the man for many years, but he had given him a great deal of trouble, and he should have nothing to do with him. While deceased was at my house he suffered from delirium tremens, and was delirious when he left. I never saw the deceased before the 29th ult., and I had no knowledge of where he was going when he left. Deceased would have had a great deal more drink than I supplied him with if I had not repeatedly refused to serve him. - Laura Phillips, 10 years of age, whose parents reside at the Elephant Inn, North-street, stated that on the afternoon of Thursday she was in Little Stoke Woods gathering flowers in company with another girl, when she observed a bundle of clothing on the bank of a stagnant pool. She got over the hedge, informed a stonebreaker named Clarke what she had seen, and he accompanied her back to the pool, where they found the body of a man floating with his face downward, and partially dressed. - Richard Clarke proved giving information of the discovery of the body to the police. - Sergeant Guppy deposed to removing the body, with assistance, to the Cowley Bridge Inn. Two pocket-books, 3s. in silver, and 1 ½d. in bronze were found on the corpse; and in one of the pocket-books was written the deceased's name and address. There were also several cuttings from newspapers, chiefly poetry. - Mr Bell, the police surgeon, stated that the condition of the body was such that it had evidently been in the water about three weeks, and the cause of death was drowning. - The Coroner said it was a most lamentable thing that a man in the position of the deceased should have come to such an untimely end. there was no evidence as to how the deceased came into the water, and he did not see that they could return any other than an open verdict. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. - The landlord of the Cowley Bridge Inn said he had received no communication from the relatives of the deceased, and he hardly knew what to do with the body. The Coroner recommended him to apply to the relieving officer.

LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dartmoor County Prisons yesterday, on a prisoner named WILLIAM WARREN, aged 41 years, who, it was shewn, had died from consumption. The deceased was convicted of housebreaking, at the Central Criminal Court, on Mary 11th, 1878, and having been previously convicted and sentenced to seven years penal servitude, he was sentenced to ten years' penal servitude, with two years' subsequent police supervision. During incarceration is conduct was good.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 May 1879
CLAWTON - Fatal Fall Downstairs. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held by Mr Fulford, County Coroner, at Clawton Bridge, near Holsworthy, on JAMES PERKING, a miller, residing at Beare Mills. The evidence shewed that PERKING returned late at night from Holsworthy market in a very intoxicated condition, and was helped upstairs by his daughter. Some time afterwards he must have got out of bed, and, it is supposed, have fallen backward down stairs, producing such injuries to his head as caused death within twenty-four hours. He was found about four o'clock in the morning at the foot of the stairs with his head in a pool of blood and in an unconscious state, from which he never rallied. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 May 1879
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Child. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, with a double Jury, of which Mr T. Higgins acted as Foreman, held an Inquest at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, last evening respecting the death of the illegitimate child of JULIA SWEENEY, a woman between 30 and 40 years of age, residing at 4 Quarry-cottages. SWEENEY is a married woman, and she called the child, who was about 13 weeks old, HENRY BUCKINGHAM. Mr Wreford, chief constable, watched the case on behalf of the police. - JULIA SWEENEY, the mother of the deceased, said she had not lived with her husband for four years. The deceased who was an illegitimate child, was called after its father. The child, which was born on the 13th of February, had been very healthy from its birth. On Monday the deceased was in good health, but had a slight cold in the eye. She went to bed with the child about half-past eleven o'clock that night. About two o'clock in the morning she awoke and attended to the child, which then appeared to be very well. She again went to sleep, and on awaking about seven o'clock found the child lying on her left arm, with its face towards her breast, dead and cold. She fetched Mrs Veale, residing close by, who examined the child. The child's left leg and side were then completely black. She could not account for the marks. The child did not fall out of bed during the night, and it was not struck by anyone. - By Mr Wreford: She was a little inebriated on Monday night. - By the Coroner: She knew a man named Duffy, and went to his house on Monday night. - Q.: Did you not go to his house for the purpose of knowing whether the child was dead or not? - A.: Yes; I went to know whether there was anything particular the matter with the child, because Mrs Slocum had said something about the child's eye. - Q.: Was the child then living or dead? - A.: The child was then living in my arms. - Emma Veale, residing in King-street, stated that she went to MRS SWEENEY'S house about 7 a.m. yesterday, and saw the child, which was dead. There was a dark mark on the back of the deceased, extending to the ear. The mother of the deceased, in answer to witness, said she had been drinking the previous night, but denied letting it fall, and said she thought that she had lain on it. SWEENEY was very fond of the child. - Jane Slocum, residing in Jay's-court, said that MRS SWEENEY brought the deceased to her house about 11.30 p.m. on Monday. She could not tell whether the child was dead or not, but it seemed to her to be living. SWEENEY, who was drunk, called a man named Duffy to see whether the child was dead or not. She followed SWEENEY to her house to see what would become of the child. She admitted saying to SWEENEY that she would not like the child to die in her house. She thought that the child was dying when SWEENEY came in, and said "I think the child is dying," to which SWEENEY replied, "It isn't. Mr Duffy shall see whether it is or not," and she then called Duffy. She thought that SWEENEY was capable of taking care of the child, although she was drunk. - The Coroner cautioned witness as to what she said. - Witness, continuing stated that she never heard SWEENEY threaten to knock the brains of the deceased out. She did not say to SWEENEY that the child was dead, and SWEENEY did not reply "It is your daughter's fault." her daughter had nursed the child during the day. - Mary Jane Slocum, daughter of the previous witness, said that she took the child for a walk about six p.m. on Monday. It was then apparently in its usual health. She was told on Monday night by a little strange girl that the deceased had had a fall, and she went to SWEENEY'S house to tell her that she had not let the deceased fall. She asked SWEENEY how the baby was, and she said "Never mind; my baby is all right; it is on the bed asleep." - Mr Eustace Boase Thomson, surgeon, said that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased. It was a well-developed child, and was well nourished. There were no external marks of violence. The dark livid mark on the child's back was a post mortem stain. The internal organs were very healthy, but they were all congested, including the head, heart, lungs, kidney and liver. He attributed that to some hindrance or impediment in breathing. He believed the deceased died from asphyxia, or suffocation, which could not have been caused by a fall. There were no marks of any blow whatever on the child, which had been well cared for. From the evidence he thought that the child had been overlain by its mother, but whether accidental or otherwise he could not say. - A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" was returned; but the Jury condemned the way in which Mrs Slocum and her daughter had given their evidence. Great excitement prevailed in the neighbourhood with regard to the case, as a report had been circulated that the child had had its brains knocked out. Large crowds of people assembled around the house where the Inquest was held for several hours, and nearly mobbed the mother of the child.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 May 1879
TORQUAY - Alleged Manslaughter At Torquay. - David Gray, a seaman, was brought before the Torquay magistrates yesterday on a charge of causing the death of a fellow seaman named O'NEILL, on board the Elizabeth Davey, schooner, of Fowey, on Monday evening last, by striking him on the head with a broom. The announcement of the death of the deceased appeared in Tuesday's issue, and at the Inquest in the evening of the same day, the Deputy Coroner ordered the apprehension of the prisoner, who is remanded until today, when also the adjourned Inquest will be held.

BARNSTAPLE - Death From Lock-Jaw. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, on a mason named WM. BLAKE, aged 34, who died from tetanus on Tuesday. In removing a fig-tree on Wednesday, the 30th of April, the deceased, who was described as a man who drank freely, met with a slight injury to his left hand. The wound festered, and as it grew worse, notwithstanding the poultices he applied, he went to the North Devon dispensary, and had it lanced. As it still did not improve he entered the Infirmary, and there several incisions were made at intervals by the house surgeon. The inflammation subsided, and deceased appeared to be going on well until Thursday in last week, when it was seen that the little finger was rotting away, and that there were indications of tetanus. On the next day there was a consultation of the medical staff, and he was advised to consent to the amputation of his arm in order to prevent tetanus. He refused, but on the following Monday the little finger was taken off, and while the operation was being performed, being under chloroform, the tetanus entirely disappeared, and he was able to talk. In the evening, however, the malady returned with aggravated force, and on Tuesday the poor fellow died. The Jury returned a verdict declaring that death arose from Tetanus. Deceased leaves a wife and two children.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 June 1879
ABBOTSKERSWELL - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at Abbotskerswell on Friday evening respecting the death of SAMUEL CREWS, aged 75 years, who had died suddenly from a tumour on the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT - A boy named CHAPPLE, aged 9 years, the son of a widow, was fishing at the Newton Marsh, on Saturday afternoon, when he fell into the Teign and was drowned. An Open Verdict was returned at the Inquest, which was held in the evening.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 June 1879
DARTINGTON - The Fatal Accident Near Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Belleigh Farm, Dartington, the residence of the deceased, by Mr Gaye, County Coroner, on MR EDWARD SHINNER, who was killed on Tuesday night by being thrown from his horse while returning from Totnes Market. MR THOMAS SHINNER, son of the deceased, said he last saw his father alive on Tuesday morning, when he left home to attend Totnes Market. The horse he was riding was about 12 years old, but was at times rather fidgety. Deceased had been accustomed to ride it for some time. About ten o'clock in the night they heard the horse come into the yard, and he went out to meet his father, but found the horse riderless. He went a little way down the lane, but saw nothing of his father, and he went back, mounted the horse, and rode towards Totnes. Just after getting into the turnpike-road, about a mile from the farm, the horse stopped, and it being a light night he saw deceased lying on his back in the middle of the road. He dismounted, and called to him, but received no answer. He then passed his hand over his face and found that he was quite cold, and, he considered, dead. He moved the body by the side of the hedge while he went for assistance, and on going back met Mr Wallis, to whom he stated his belief that his father was dead. - Miss Whiteway, daughter of the landlady of the Queen's Arms, Dartington, stated that she saw the deceased about a quarter-past nine. She served him with three-pennyworth of gin, which he drank without getting from his horse, and then went on. He was sober and cheerful at the time. - Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, Totnes, deposed to meeting the witness, MR THOS. SHINNER, who told him that his father was killed. He went to the spot and found the body lying by the side of the hedge. Deceased was then quite dead; blood was oozing from both ears and mouth. Death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 June 1879
LYDFORD - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Princetown yesterday respecting the death of a convict, named JAMES MCDERMOTT, B1,183, who, it was shewn had died from natural causes. On February 22nd 1875 the deceased, who was then only 20 years of age, but who had been previously convicted, was tried at the Central Criminal Court, Edinburgh, for assault, and sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. Whilst in prison his character was good.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 June 1879
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death From A Fall. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday, relative to the death of SAMUEL PASCOE, aged 56 years, shipping master, residing at 29 Woolster-street. It was stated that on Friday, about 8.30 p.m., the deceased was walking down High-street, and when just outside the Naval Reserve Inn he slipped and fell against the public-house breaking a pane of glass. He fell on the ground a second time, and blood was then found flowing from the bottom of his trousers copiously. Several men immediately conveyed him to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he received attention from Mr G. Sylvester, House surgeon, but died within ten minutes of his admission. On examination of the deceased it was found that he had a small wound about half an inch in length on the right thigh. The femoral artery was found to be severed, and the deceased consequently died from loss of blood. It is thought that a piece of broken glass entered deceased's thigh. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 June 1879
LYDFORD - Fatal Accident At Lydford. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Prescombe far, yesterday afternoon, on WM. COLE, a lad 12 years of age (son of MR COLE, of Prescombe farm) who was killed on Saturday afternoon. It appears that MR COLE had a cart load of coals brought to his house, and on its arrival the lad was standing behind the cart, when suddenly the horse backed the load, and the boy was jammed between the cart and a post, and killed on the spot. The Jury (of whom Mr Tavenor was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed." The lad was a very promising one, and much sympathy is felt with his parents.

KINGSBRIDGE - The Suicide Near Kingsbridge. - The Inquest on MR J. TUCKER, of Coombe Farm, near Kingsbridge, was held at the farmhouse yesterday by Mr Gaye, County Coroner. Mr B. Sparrow was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MR J. TUCKER, son of the deceased, and who resided with him stated that his father was 68 years of age. He took the estate from Lady-day last, and ever since he had resided at Coombe he had complained of pains in his head and not being able to sleep at night. Mr J. Elliot, surgeon, of Kingsbridge, attended him, and prescribed for him a few weeks since. On Saturday morning last, about 5.30, MISS TUCKER, sister of witness, called him and told him that deceased had gone out, and that the gun was missing from its usual place. He went in search of his father, and found him lying dead in the cowhouse, with the gun by his side. - Mr J. Elliot, surgeon, stated that when he attended the deceased, a few weeks since, he appeared to be depressed in spirits and laboured under delusions. He (witness) told the family that from the deceased's state of mind he ought to be looked after. - Mr Edmonds, surgeon, assistant of Mr Elliot, stated that he was called on Saturday morning to see deceased and found him dead. Judging from the wound (which he described) in his neck, he considered that the gun must have been close to him when discharged. He had no doubt the deceased shot himself, as the gun by his side had a walking-stick tied to the trigger, by which means he must have discharged it. The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 June 1879
NORTHAM - Strange Death Of A Sailor. - At Appledore yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr J. H. Toller, County Coroner, on RICHARD QUANCE, a seaman. It was stated that about 2.30 a.m., on Tuesday, the 3rd instant, WILLIAM QUANCE, the deceased's brother, was in bed in his berth on board the Dahlia, then lying in Newport river, and heard someone hailing the vessel from the shore. He found that it was his brother RICHARD (the deceased) to whom he immediately went. Deceased told him that "they had been beating him black and blue" on board his vessel, the Swift. W. QUANCE took him on board the Dahlia, and found that he was very wet and covered in mud. He took off his clothes, and gave him a dry flannel, and also examined his body. He found a large bruise on the right breast, and one on the right arm, also bruises on the right hip, and two scratches about six inches higher up. There was a cut underneath the left eye, and blood was flowing from it. Deceased said the captain had hauled him out from where he was sleeping and that finding the two Lameys were too strong for him, he had to go ashore or they would have killed him; and when going ashore he fell overboard. The deceased remained on board the Dahlia until about 4 a.m. and then, in company with his brother, went in a boat to the Swift, which was lying at Gloucester Wharf. The deceased went down in the cabin, when Charles Lamey said, "Where are you going, DICK?" and he replied that he was going to leave. He packed up his clothes and handed them up to his brother. Captain Lamey said, "We have had a scuffle and broken the table," and asked the deceased to stop, but he refused, and went back to the Dahlia, where he remained until Friday, when the Dahlia sailed, and came to Appledore. The deceased was assisted to his mother's house, and then to his own. The two Lameys were present at the Inquest and were asked by the Coroner whether they had anything to say, but were cautioned as to the use that might be made of their evidence. As they were not represented by a solicitor they declined saying anything. The Inquest was adjourned until Tuesday next.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 June 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. A Wretched Abode. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest at the Townhall yesterday afternoon respecting the death of ELIZABETH ROW, about 69 years of age, who had resided with her daughter, SARAH, an unmarried woman at 6 St. Stephen's-street. The daughter stated that her mother had a little income from property, but was mainly supported by her son. Until within the last eighteen months she had been in good health. She had been somewhat mentally deranged, but this passed away during the past month. She had, however, suffered very much from diarrhoea lately, and on Monday morning witness procured a bottle of mixture from Mr Pool, chemist, and, as it did not do much good, about nine hours afterwards she got a bottle of mixture from Mr Codd, chemist, which did the deceased a great deal of good. Three hours after witness gave her half an ounce of cod liver oil. Early on Tuesday morning her mother became very ill and died about two a.m. on Wednesday. She partook of an egg, bread and butter, &c., on Tuesday morning. Witness sent for a doctor twice on Tuesday, but he did not arrive until after her mother died. Deceased would not have medical aid, although witness urged her to do so. She had lost her appetite very much lately, and had to be compelled to eat food. The deceased had not been out of the room they rented for the past eighteen months. - Mr F. Row, M.D., stated that he examined the body, and found a long-standing ulcerated wound on one of the legs. The body was literally "skin and bone," indeed he had never seen anyone more emaciated than the deceased. He made a post mortem examination of the deceased. the stomach was nearly empty, and he thought that the emaciation and diarrhoea and her mode of living brought on fatal exhaustion. The room was a small dirty place, and quite unfit for human habitation. It was in a wretched condition, and he was not surprised at the deceased failing in her appetite. There was a sad want of judgment, he thought, on the part of the daughter of the deceased in giving her mother so many different medicines. The deceased certainly ought to have had medical advice long ago, but there was a growing habit amongst persons when their friends or relatives were ill to try all kinds of treatment, and when they found that the sufferer was dying they sent for a medical man, in order to get a certificate from him. He had never before seen such dirty premises as the place in which the deceased had lived; and representations ought to be made to the Sanitary Authority respecting it. - Inspector Matters said he believed that the daughter was very kind to the deceased; but she was very dirty in her habits, as was also the deceased. - The Jury, after a short consultation, found that the deceased died from Natural Causes, greatly accelerated by living in a place unfit for human habitation. On the recommendation of the Jury the Coroner promised to inform the Sanitary Authority of the filthy condition of the room.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 June 1879
EXMOUTH - The Fatal Boat Accident Off Exmouth. - Mr Cox, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of EDWARD THOMAS LYTTON and FRANCIS HORSFORD, two young fishermen, who were drowned by the capsizing of their boat off Exmouth under circumstances already reported. The accident occurred about two o'clock in the morning, and it was stated that the coastguard men were aware of it. One of the witnesses was Edmund Smith, a fisherman, who stated that when the boat capsized he went to the coastguard station, and on arriving there saw some of the men launching a boat He followed them in his boat, and a short time afterwards met them returning. He, however, went on, and discovered the deceased's boat, which he brought in. Finding that the men were not in the boat he went to the coastguard station, and appealed to some of the men to accompany him. At length he pushed off alone, but his search was unsuccessful. In his opinion the coastguard were afraid to venture out, and he would not give 2d. a dozen for all the coastguardsmen there. - George Bradford, a fisherman, proved finding the bodies of the men at noon on the following morning. LYTTON was in a stooping position, with his head in the water, and his feet entangled in the net. His back was out of the water, and he appeared to have been only recently dead, as there was no water in the body. HORSFORD was completely entangled in the meshes of the nets. In his opinion, prompt action on the part of the coastguard men would have saved the life of LYTTON. The body was not stiff when taken out of the water. Witness (speaking warmly) said he considered there ought to be a light at the coastguard station to enable fishermen to come on shore by night. (Hear, hear, from some of the Jury). When there were any accidents the coastguard ought to fire a gun and launch their lifeboat. It was no place for "the parcel of punts about." No coastguard men had been summoned to attend the Inquest, and the Coroner, in summing up, said there might have been an amount of cowardice on their part, but hardly, he thought, amounting to criminal neglect. It would be unsafe for the Jury to add to their verdict any expression of censure. The best plan was to publish the facts through the medium of the Press, and then the public would be able to judge for themselves. Great praise was due to Smith, who braved by himself such peril in endeavouring to save his fellow-creatures. He could not help admiring the spirit of the fellow, and he hoped such men would long be found along the coasts of England. Great praise was also due to the other witnesses who had rendered help. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict. - An Inquiry was held at Princetown yesterday afternoon, by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, respecting the death of a convict named LEON HENDY, aged 55 years, who, it was proved, had died from bronchitis. HENDY was convicted at the Central Criminal Court in May 1876, and sentenced to five years' penal servitude, for shooting with intent. During his imprisonment his character has been very good. HENDY was of French extraction.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 June 1879
EXETER - The Fatal Accident At St. David's Railway Station. - Mr H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest last evening, at the Topsham Inn, on the body of HENRY OLIVER, foreman shunter, whose death, in consequence of injuries received while engaged in his work on Monday, was reported in our columns yesterday. It was shewn in evidence that if the deceased had followed the rule of going under the buffers after the trucks have met, instead of passing between them as he attempted to do, the accident would probably not have occurred. Inspector Green gave him an excellent character for industry and sobriety. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NORTHAM - The Mystery At Appledore. - An adjourned Inquest was held yesterday at Appledore touching the death of a sailor named QUANCE, who met his death on the 9th instant, under circumstances previously reported. Medical evidence shewed that there was an injury on the right side of the chest, which might have been caused by a fall from a high place. The wife of deceased said that when he returned home on the 6th he complained of pains in his chest, but could give a clear account of how he had been hurt, beyond that he fell whilst leaving the vessel - the Swift. WILLIAM QUANCE said he went on board the Swift with deceased and the latter was then sober, but he wanted to fight William Lamey. Capt. Lamey afterwards said he was sorry he had struck him and cut his eye. Mrs Taylor, sister-in-law of deceased, said the latter made no complaint against the captain, and said he had hurt himself by falling. Another witness said deceased told him that they had "a drop of beer" on Whit Monday, and he fell from the jetty on board the vessel. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from certain injuries but there was no evidence to shew how they had been received.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Suicide Near Exeter. - A painful case of suicide was investigated yesterday by Mr R. R. Crosse, Coroner for the Cullompton district, at an Inquest held in the Buller's Arms, Exwick. The deceased was a young man named JOHN SHILLSON, aged 18, son of a farmer, of Spreyton, Bow, North Devon. He had been apprenticed a little more than a year to Mr Rattenbury, draper, of High-street, Exeter. On Wednesday, last week, his employer sought an interview with him on something which had come under his observation in connection with the deceased's conduct at the counter; and directed the lad to go to his (Mr Rattenbury's) private residence and write to his parents. SHILLSON, it appears, felt much distressed, and told a Miss Roberts, a fellow employee, that he should not write to his father as he was afraid to go home, and that he hardly knew what to do. Deceased left the premises, and was not seen alive afterwards. On Saturday afternoon a youth named Dawe, whose parents reside at Exwick Barton, and who had known SHILLSON for some years, saw on the bank of the mill-pond a hat, which he recognised as deceased's. He communicated the fact to his father, who at once caused he pond to be emptied, and at the bottom was found the body of the deceased, which had evidently been in the water a considerable time. Evidence was given by young Dawe, Miss Roberts, and Mr Rattenbury, to the effect that the deceased had for some time past been very nervous and excitable, especially since an attack of rheumatic fever, during which he was delirious. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Attempted Suicide At Mill Bridge. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, by the Borough coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) touching the death of ELIZA JENKINS, 68 years of age, who recently attempted to commit suicide by jumping over Mill Bridge. - Thomas Henry Stidston, a carpenter of the Royal Navy, said that on Friday, June 6th, at noon, he was passing over Mill Bridge, when he saw a woman clambering over the low stone wall near the toll-house. She fell into water that was out of her depth, and must have been drowned if he had not immediately jumped after her. With the assistance of Mr Alfred Wheddon, a butcher, who ran round to the beach, he conveyed her to the Edgcumbe Inn, where Mr Swain was soon in attendance, and ordered her to be conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital. After she had taken a little hot tea, she was driven there in Mr Wheddon's trap. - ELIZABETH JENKINS, daughter of the deceased, and wife of a mariner, said that she missed her mother on the morning of the day in question. Deceased had long suffered from asthma and from a cough, and she believed that this and the constant pain in her head affected her mind. She had never before shewn any symptoms of unsound mind. - Elizabeth Greet, a hospital nurse, deposed that deceased was admitted on Friday, the 6th June, and immediately attended by the doctor. She was very weak, but was conscious up to the time of her death. No question was put to her as to how she fell into the water, as she appeared too exhausted to reply; but, as far as the nurses could see, she was quite sane. The immersion brought on an aggravated attack of her old ailment, which developed into a severe form of bronchitis. She appeared "to sleep away", and was very quiet. - A verdict was returned to the effect that the deceased died from the consequence of immersion in the water, but that there was no evidence to shew how she came there.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 June 1879
Sudden Death At Compton. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday at Compton touching the death of ROBERT SALWAY, aged 14 years. - MARIA COOK, mother of the deceased, stated that she had lived at Compton about ten weeks. When her son was 12 years of age he was sent to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital with St. Vitus's dance, and had since frequently complained of headache. He went to work as usual on Tuesday and on coming home complained of tightness of the chest. He made a good tea, and went to play until 9.30 and went to bed at 10 o'clock. At 11.30 he awoke and complained of tightness of the chest and vomited, and died at one o'clock a.m. Mr Edlin, surgeon, said he was called for, and arrived at three o'clock, and saw the deceased dead in bed, and slightly warm. He could not state positively whether any of the internal organs were affected, never having seen deceased prior to his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 June 1879
EXETER - A Fatal Spot. - Another dead body has been recovered from the mill-leat at Exeter, at exactly the spot where the decapitated trunk of the child for whose murder Mrs Tooke awaits her trial, was fished up on the 17th of May. In this case, however, death was the result of accident. The deceased was a boy of 6 years named GEORGE HEAL. He and an older brother were playing truant. He was suddenly missed and just before midnight on Friday his body was discovered at the fender of Powhay Mill. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, when the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 June 1879
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Baby. - The Borough Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Old Ring of Bells, Woolster-street, relative to the death of BEATRICE HARRIET HUNTER, aged 15 months, who was found dead in bed on Sunday morning. The child, which was "teething" was in its usual health on Saturday night. About four a.m. the next morning the mother suckled it, and on again waking some time later she found it dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 June 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner for Plymouth held an Inquest last evening at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, relative to the death of ARTHUR REGINALD GLANVILLE, aged 4 months. The mother stated that deceased was feeding from a bottle when he appeared to be seized by a fit. Mr Pearse, surgeon, was sent for, but the child died before he arrived. The deceased was a very fine and healthy child up to the time of its death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Devonport Guildhall yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN PEDLAR, alias GREENSLADE, a labourer, lately in the employ of Mr John Pethick, contractor, who was killed while at work on Monday afternoon by the fall of two bricks on his head. Deceased, who was about 23 years of age, was a stranger in the town. - Henry Gordon, labourer, 23 Princes-street, a fellow workman, stated that a rope dislodged two bricks from scaffolding twenty-three feet over PEDLAR'S head. One struck deceased near the right temple, and the other on the face. Witness accompanied deceased to the hospital. The surgeon merely felt the wounds, said that it was not a case for hospital treatment, and advised him to get to bed as soon as possible. This statement evoked several unfavourable observations from the Jurors as to the claims of such treatment to be called "attention." The Jury retired to consider their verdict, and decided on "Accidental Death," but added that they considered the Hospital attention insufficient.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 June 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Mysterious Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at the Market House Hotel, on Saturday morning, into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ANN WARE, aged 21 years, who was found drowned near the Point on Friday afternoon last. - Corporal Griffin, R.N., stated that shortly after six o'clock on Friday morning he went to barracks for the purpose of drill. Finding there was none, Corporals Haydock, Johns and himself, all married men, went for a walk towards the Point. On reaching the fort they saw a woman lift up her head. they thought it somewhat strange, and went down towards the rocks. They then saw the deceased. She was seated on the grass close to the rocks; and was properly attired, and an umbrella was lying on the ground, a stone being placed upon it to prevent its being blown away. Witness spoke to her, remarking - "Young woman, you have a cold bed there." She made no answer either to this or to one or two other remarks made to her, and they left her, and went further on towards the Point. She appeared to be sober, but very low spirited, and her eyes were red, as though she had been crying. Near the Point they met a Coastguardman, and called his attention to the girl, but he replied that it was a common occurrence. Corporal Haydock, however, was not satisfied and thinking it was the wife of a marine whom he knew, went back to make certain. They then found her down on the rocks, several yards nearer the edge than before; and her jacket, hat, and cuffs were lying on the ground. They went down to her and asked her what she intended doing. As no satisfactory reply could be obtained, they persuaded her to return and put on her clothes. For some time they could not get her to do so, and they had almost to force her to leave the rocks. After a time Haydock and witness left her. Johns remained behind, and threatened her that if she did not come away he would give her in charge of the police. She then came up from the rocks, put on her clothes, and walked towards the road with them. On the way they got her to converse with them, and she then stated that she was in the employ of Mr Miller, stationer, in Union-street; that she had been out all night, that her companion and herself went for a walk around Mutley, missed their way, and did not return until one o'clock. They asked her if she had been turned away from her employ. She replied in the negative, and they sought to persuade her to return to her master. She made some reply which witness could scarcely understand, but he believed it was that she did not care to go back. When they left her she appeared to be in better spirits. When crossing the parade in the afternoon he heard that some clothes had been picked up at the Point. It occurred to Haydock and himself that they might have something to do with the young woman whom they had seen in the morning. They went out, searched with others for the body, and after a short time he found the deceased floating on the water near the spot where they had seen her in the morning. A hard south-west wind was blowing and this apparently had prevented the body from going out to sea. - Corporal Haydock, R.M., stated that he went to the Point in company with the last witness and saw a young woman on the rocks. They spoke to her, but could "get no sense" out of her, and they went further on. Returning, they saw her on the rocks with her hat and jacket off. they went down to her and persuaded her to come away. They asked her why she had taken off her clothes and she replied, "To give it an airing." As she appeared low spirited, and her conduct was very suspicious, they threatened to call a policeman. She then came away with them; they chatted with her, and when they parted she appeared in very much better spirits. - The Coroner and Jury expressed themselves perfectly satisfied with the evidence of the Corporals. - [Paragraph damaged]. - Mr Walter Miller, stationer, 193 Union-street, Plymouth, identified the body of the deceased, who had been in his employ as a general servant for eighteen months. She was a native of Gunnislake, where her widowed mother lives. She left his house shortly after six on Thursday night, and should have returned at ten. He waited up for her until after midnight, but she never came. there was a rumour that he had shut the door against her, but that was without the slightest foundation. She was a sober, steady girl, and was never in the habit of remaining away after hours. - The Inquiry was then adjourned until Thursday next at three p.m., in order to permit of a post mortem examination of the body and to obtain further evidence. The Jury strongly desired that the police should search for the Marine with whom the deceased was last seen.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 July 1879
NEWTON ABBOT - Determined Suicide By A Newton Woman. - Dr H. S. Gaye, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon held an Inquest at the Queen's Hotel, Newton, touching the death of ELIZABETH HURRELL, aged 31, wife of HENRY JOHN HURRELL, wharfinger to the Devon and Courtenay Clay Company, residing at Marsh Cottages, Newton Abbot. HENRY JOHN HURRELL, husband of deceased, stated that he had been married eleven years, and had always lived with deceased. They had three children. Deceased was subject to heart disease, but was otherwise well. When she had pain in her left side she would be low spirited, but she attended to her household duties, and nothing had occurred during the last week to cause her to be peculiar in her manner. On Sunday afternoon she left the house to go for a walk towards Kingsteignton, and he went out at the same time, and told her he would join her after he had taken his dog for a run towards Milber. An uncle of deceased had died in an asylum, insanity having in his case been brought on by fits. - EMMA HURRELL, daughter of the deceased, aged 8 years, said that on Sunday her mother went for a walk towards Kingsteignton with her and the other two children. When they had gone a short distance his mother, who was carrying the baby, gave the child and the key of the door to her, telling her to stay there for a short time and she would come back. Her mother then went to the river and shortly afterwards witness saw her "swimming in the water." - John Stancombe, foreman at the clay cellars, said that on Sunday afternoon about three o'clock he met deceased with her three children near the cellars. Deceased spoke to witness about the weather, and went on by the cellars. She did not exhibit any signs which made him in any way suspicious. - Israel Pardon, switchman at the Moretonhampstead junction of the Great Western Railway at Newton, said that from his box on Sunday afternoon he saw deceased walking along the bank of the Teign. She took off her hat and apparently walked right into the river. It was possible that she did not mean to get into the river, as the bank there was very steep, and the tide was high. Witness ran to the spot hoping to catch her as she rounded a bend in the river, but he reached the place too late. When he got to the water deceased's head was partly above water, her clothes, apparently, supporting her. She was making no struggle. If she had raised any cry when she fell into the river witness must have heard her. Witness ran to the river as quickly as possible, and on finding he could render no assistance, immediately went back to his box and telegraphed to Newton for a policeman. - Samuel Leng, labourer, said that at eight o'clock on Monday morning he was at Buckland Gate on the River Teign with a boat, when he saw the body lying in the water. Deceased's clothes were over her head. Brought the body to Newton. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, remarked that if they arrived at the conclusion that deceased committed suicide, it would be but just for them to add that she did it whilst in an unsound state of mind. There was a slight division of opinion amongst the Jury on this point, but after a brief consultation a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Borough Guildhall last evening touching the death of THOMAS BISHOP, carpenter, 36 years of age. - Inspector Farmer watched the case for the Plymouth police. - ELLEN WELLINGTON, sister of the deceased, residing at 69 Jubilee-street, said that the deceased lived with her. He was home all day on Sunday, but went out about quarter to ten in the evening, in order to see a carpenter who worked at the same yard with him. When he left he was in good health and spirits, and perfectly sober. The deceased was given to intemperance, but was not subject to fits. When he left his direction would be along the new road, past St John's Church, to the Starch Works. - William Dean, boot riveter, residing in St. John's-road, said that on Sunday night last about a quarter after ten he was passing at the back of Clara-place, when he heard loud groans, and on a heap of rubble about ten yards from the road found the deceased lying on his back. His hat was off, and he had one of his hands in his trousers pocket. He spoke to the deceased, but received no reply. A man who was coming towards him and a boy and a man named Lethbridge, living at hand, came to him. Lethbridge assisted in lifting the deceased up, when witness noticed that the face was covered with blood. Having been friendly with the deceased, he immediately recognised him. He sent the boy for a constable, but neither the boy nor a constable returned. Left the deceased with the other man and Lethbridge while he went to find out where deceased lived. When he returned he found Lethbridge only with the deceased. Lethbridge and he carried the deceased as far as Jubilee-street, and a constable assisted in carrying him to the Hospital. - By the Coroner: When I heard the groans I did not see any person running away. - P.C. Hutchings, of the Plymouth Police, stated that he was fetched by Deane, and assisted in taking the deceased to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - John Lethbridge, fireman, residing at 4 Clara-place, stated that about quarter-past ten on Sunday evening he was preparing to go to bed when he heard loud groans in the direction of his backyard. He went into the court and found the groans came from outside. Mounting the wall, he saw three persons in the road standing near a rubble heap, and was told a man was lying there in a dying condition. The three persons left him, but witness Deane came back shortly after. Deane and himself got the deceased into Jubilee-street, and a constable conveyed him to the Hospital. - The Coroner: Have you not said that when you got over the wall three men ran away from the deceased? Witness, after much hesitation, replied in the affirmative, but said that he meant that the men "went" away. - The Coroner said it was through the witness saying that the men ran away that those horrible reports respecting the man's death had got about the town. - Mr G. Sylvester, resident surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that the deceased was brought to the Hospital about eleven o'clock on Sunday night. He was quite unconscious, and, as witness told the constable, dying. The upper lip was badly cut and bleeding profusely, and the nose was also badly bruised. Deceased died about half-past six on Monday morning. Witness had made a post mortem examination. The marks on the face were quite superficial. On opening the head he found a large quantity of blood effused over the surface of the brain. The under part of the brain was lacerated, which might have been caused by a sudden and violent outpouring of blood. The blood-vessels were diseased, probably caused by drink; and one of the blood-vessels was ruptured. He thought death resulted from a fit of apoplexy, and was entirely due to natural causes. - The Coroner observed that he thought the case was divested of all mystery, and thoroughly cleared up. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 July 1879
EXETER - Fatal Gun Accident Near Exeter. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday touching the death of CHARLES WILLIAM PAGE, a blacksmith, aged 19. It appears that on Saturday afternoon a lad named Healey, in the employ of Mr Arden, Sautham Barton, Heavitree, took one of his master's guns to kill a crow, and the bird making its escape, placed the weapon, cocked and loaded, in a wagon and forgot it. On the following day he was talking to the deceased in the same yard, when he suddenly remembered the gun, and took it from the vehicle with the intention of removing it to the house. It exploded in PAGE'S face and his death was almost instantaneous. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 4 July 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Mysterious Death At Stonehouse. The Inquest Concluded. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest yesterday afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ANN WARE, aged 21 years, who was found drowned near Devil's Point on Friday last. The evidence given on the last occasion was to the effect that on Friday morning last corporals Griffin, Johns, and Haydock, belonging to the Royal Marines, went for a walk towards the Point, and saw the deceased there seated on the grass close to the rocks. They spoke to her three or four times, but she did not reply, and they went away. She appeared to be sober, but very low spirited, and her eyes were red as though she had been crying. One of them thought he knew her, and they accordingly went back. She was on the rocks several yards nearer the water than before, and although she was properly dressed when they saw her the first time she now had her hat, jacket and cuffs, lying on the ground behind her. They went down to the deceased, and asked her what she intended doing. As no satisfactory reply could be obtained, they persuaded her to return and put on her clothes. For some time they could not get her to do so, and they had almost to force her to leave the rocks. After a time Corporals Haydock and Griffin left her, but Corporal Johns remained and threatened her that if she did not come away he would give her in charge of the police. She then came up from the rocks, put on her clothes and walked towards the road with them. On the way she stated that she was in the employ of Mr Miller, stationer, in Union-street; that she had been out all night, that her companion and herself went for a walk around Mutley, missed their way, and did not return until one o'clock. They asked her if she had been turned away from her employ. She replied in the negative, and they sought to persuade her to return to her master. She did not care to go back. When they left her she appeared to be in better spirits. - Jane Allen, domestic servant, stated that she met the deceased about six on the Thursday evening and went with her for a walk. After a few minutes they were overtaken by a Marine. Deceased said it was "a young man of hers," and left her to go for a walk with him. That was the last time she saw the deceased alive. - Deceased's master, Mr W. Miller, stationer, 193 Union-street, Plymouth, identified the body, and said the deceased had been in his employ as a domestic servant for eighteen months. She left his house shortly after six on Thursday evening and should have returned at ten, but never returned. - Frederick William Barton, private in the Royal Marines, serving on board the Indus, stated that he had kept company with the deceased for the past four or five months. He met her accidentally in Union-street with another female early on Thursday evening. The deceased and himself walked to Milehouse. They afterwards went to Johns's Refreshment House, in Union-street, where they stayed all night. Witness left the house about twenty-past five in the morning. He left the deceased in bed. She did not appear low-spirited. - The Foreman: What made her stay out the night with you? - Witness: I decline to answer that question. - The Coroner observed that the witness was not bound to answer the question. Her staying out did not affect her death. - The Foreman: I think it did affect her death. - The Coroner said the man could not be legally responsible for the woman's death. - Examination continued: Deceased was perfectly sober. He had never slept with her before. She did not give any reason for being low-spirited or anything like that. - The Foreman: I suppose you promised to marry her? - Witness: I decline to answer that question. - The Coroner: You cannot press the question. - Examination continued: Did not promise to meet the deceased again. The deceased did not go back to her master's house after he met her. - Mrs Johns, refreshment housekeeper, Union-street, Stonehouse, stated that about ten o'clock on Thursday evening last the deceased came to her house in company with the last witness. Barton asked to be accommodated with a bed for himself and wife, which was done. Barton left the house about half-past five on Friday morning and the deceased about a quarter of an hour later. - John Brooks, coastguardsman, stationed at Stonehouse Point, said that about twenty minutes to seven he saw the deceased sitting on Bottle-nose Point. She was sitting on the grass, and her hat and jacket were on the grass immediately behind her. Witness advanced and said, "Good morning, miss;" and she said, "Good morning, sir." Did not see anything suspicious about the deceased. When he saw the deceased she was about thirty yards from where the body was discovered. - Benjamin Ridge, watchman employed at the Point, said that he saw the deceased about six o'clock on the morning of the 27th of June, going through the swing-gate in the field at the Point. He did not speak to her. She was properly dressed. About twenty minutes to seven he saw her standing at the very point of the rocks with her hat, jacket and cuffs off. Witness passed by her clothes at the time. Witness spoke to the three corporals of marines who were close by her, but he did not think they heard him. He afterwards saw the deceased walk away with the corporals. Did not see her afterwards alive. Witness was informed about eight o'clock that a man had picked up some females clothes and he found them to be the jacket, hat and cuffs he saw behind the deceased on the rocks. - Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that in a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased he saw that the neck was much scratched, probably by friction against the rocks. There were no other marks of violence whatever. He found death had resulted from suffocation by drowning. The womb of the deceased was healthy and unimpregnated. There were not races of poison. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that they had at last arrived at the end of a very painful case. It was satisfactory to know that they had traced the deceased from the time she left her master's house until she committed suicide. It had nothing to do with the cause of death that the deceased slept with the Marine, Barton. It would be for the Jury to consider whether they thought the deceased accidentally fell into the water, or whether she committed suicide. If they adopted the latter view it would be for them to say what her state of mind was at the time she committed the rash act. he thought himself that she must have been in a sudden fit of temporary insanity. He was quite satisfied with the conduct of the corporals of Marines in the case, and he thought that P.C. Lake, who was an excellent and intelligent officer, deserved praise for the complete and satisfactory manner in which he had laid the case before the Jury. (Hear, hear). - The Jury, of whom Mr J. C. Wills was foreman, thought the deceased woman Committed Suicide whilst in a Temporary State of Insanity. - The Coroner said he entirely concurred with the verdict of the Jury. He was, however, rather vexed at seeing in one of the morning papers, the Western Morning News, a paragraph saying that the matter should not be allowed to pass over without the strictest inquiry. The Coroner for the County of Devon and the Juries under him had never shrank from their duties. He did not think it right that the papers should prejudge a case by editorial remarks previous to an investigation, unless they had cause previously to find fault with a public servant.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 July 1879
PLYMOUTH - Horrible Murder And Suicide At Plymouth. A Man And Woman found With Their Throats Cut. Exciting Struggle With The Murderer. - Much excitement was caused in Plymouth yesterday morning by the news that a desperate murder and suicide had been committed at the New Market Inn, Cornwall-street, and the terrible facts of the occurrence, so far as they have transpired, are these:- About half-past nine in the morning a man and a woman entered the inn, apparently on perfectly friendly terms, and with nothing in their appearance to excite particular attention. They went into the front room on the lefthand side of the passage, a room known in the house as No. 2 room, and on being waited upon they ordered a glass of ale and a bottle of gingerbeer. This having been served them, nothing more was heard of them - nothing like angry words or quarrelling - but about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes afterwards Mr Black, the assistant manager of the inn, heard a noise as of some heavy weight falling. He went to the door, thinking the noise proceeded from the street, but finding everything quiet outside he was going back, passed the door of the room in which his customers were, when he heard a faint scream, and upon opening the door he saw the woman with her throat cut, and the man in the act of cutting his own throat. He immediately rushed to the street door, and raised a cry of "Police," and an elderly town porter, named Jordan, who was standing at the corner of Bank-street, just opposite the inn, lost no time in running into the house and into the room, where he found the woman on the floor, and the man leaning on the table, holding the razor across his throat. He immediately made a rush at him to try and get the razor out of his hand; but the man, uttering some inarticulate exclamation, turned towards him, and they struggled together for some moments. Jordan endeavouring to prevent the man getting the razor again to his throat. This, however, he did not succeed in doing, and having inflicted upon himself another fearful gash the man fell to the floor, and expired almost immediately. The police were soon upon the spot, and Mr Mecres, surgeon, who was sent for was not long in arriving, but the life of both the man and the woman was then extinct. No one at the time knew who they were, but a letter was found upon the woman addressed "MRS LAWRENCE, Anstis-street, Plymouth;" and one upon the man addressed "A. GREGORY, Queen's Hotel, Mews, Chester." These clues being followed up, led to the identity of both the man and the woman. The police went to Anstis-street, and found residing there a MR and MRS MARKER, who proved to be the father and mother of the deceased woman. MR MARKER is in the employ of Mr Bags, lithographer, and his daughter had recently been living with him. She was the wife of a petty officer, named LAWRENCE, who is now on board the Bacchaute, the ship which is being fitted up at Portsmouth for the cruise of the young Princes George and Albert Victor of Wales. From her husband, however, she had been separated since within a few months of their marriage, twelve or thirteen years ago, and during the greater part of that time she had been away from Plymouth. Rather more than eighteen months ago she paid her parents a visit. She was then with a lady, who was travelling in Wales, and who had given her a holiday. She had at different times, before and since then, followed her avocation as a dressmaker in Liverpool, Chester, Rugby and London. three weeks or a month ago she came home and obtained employment as a dressmaker at Messrs. Stidston, Moulder and Stidston, and yesterday morning she left home, as her father and mother thought, to go to work there. She came from Chester to Plymouth; but her parents state that for many years she had been passing under the name of GREGORY, and it is doubtful whether her acquaintance with the deceased is of recent date. She had had two children, the first of whom was born before marriage, and was living with her grandfather; and the other with LAWRENCE'S grandfather. But that she had been very intimate with GREGORY while at Chester recently was made abundantly plain from letters which were found upon the bodies. In one of her letters she informs GREGORY that she had quite recently been reconciled to her husband; that while she had "liked" him she had never "loved" him; and that he must now try to forget her. It is inferred from the man's subsequent conduct that though she might not have loved him he might have loved her, and might have found it very difficult to forget her. At all events, he came to Plymouth apparently with the intention of endeavouring to persuade her to come back with him to Chester. The woman's father states that a man whom he did not know called to see his daughter on Sunday morning, and as a telegram from Chester shewed that the deceased man left there on Saturday afternoon, there can be little doubt as to who the young woman's visitor was. On Sunday, it would seem he made an appointment to meet her near the market yesterday morning, and then, failing in his endeavour to win her back again from her husband, he committed the foul deeds described. It is needless perhaps to add that the New Market Inn, where the occurrence took place, was the object of the curious gaze of a great crowd all day long. The shutters of the lower rooms were closed, and the police took possession of the key of the room in which the bodies lay as they fell; and after they had been searched no one was allowed in the room until the Coroner's Jury had their "view." This was soon after five o'clock, but as the shutters were closed the gas was lighted, and the sight was consequently rendered all the more ghastly. To the right and left of the door of the room, which is a small one, there is the high back of a settle, forming a kind of passage into the centre of the room, and immediately at the end of this passage lay the body of the woman. She was evidently very good looking, and though she had died such a horrible death her face wore a placid expression, the blood having apparently been washed from the wound in her throat. She was 30 years of age, about the middle height and was neatly attired in a blue stuff dress and a long black jacket, trimmed with fur. The table which she had seemingly fallen against was tilted over on to the fireplace in the opposite wall. The man lay to the left, near the window. He had the cloth wrapped round his neck which Inspector Murch put there in the hope of staunching the blood until the arrival of the surgeon. His face, therefore, was not visible, but he appeared to be a well-built man of some 35 or 40 years, and was respectably dressed in black jacket and waistcoat and check trousers. The floor was, of course, in some places saturated with blood. Near the deceased man, on a small side table, was the glass of ale and the ginger-beer they had ordered. The Coroner's Officer, Mr Manning, and Inspector Murch deserve much credit for the way in which they acted under the exciting circumstances, and the Jury were so pleased with the courageous way in which Jordan, the porter - who was first on the spot after the manager of the inn - endeavoured to prevent the man from committing suicide, that after the Inquest, they subscribed 15s. and gave him. The result of the Inquest, as detailed below, was a verdict to the effect that the woman was Wilfully Murdered; but that the man when he committed the deed and killed himself was of Unsound Mind. -
The Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was opened at the Guildhall in the evening, before Mr Coroner Brian and a double Jury, of whom Mr John Bickle was Foreman. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said they had met to Inquire into the death of two persons named respectively HARRIETT LAWRENCE and ALFRED GREGORY. They would be obliged to take the cases separately, and he proposed to take the case of the woman first. No doubt from the rumours about the town they were acquainted with some of the facts of the event, which had taken place that morning; and he should not take up much of their time in referring to any further details which might have come to his knowledge, because they would come out in the regular way. It appeared that that morning just about ten o'clock the two persons entered the parlour of the New Market Inn, Cornwall-street, and soon afterwards a shriek was heard, and upon a man named Charles [?] rushing in he found a woman with her throat cut and the man cutting his own throat. They were the only persons in the room, and they both died directly afterwards. The police had found out who the woman was, and, as far as they could, who the man was. They found a letter on him shewing that he was a groom at the Queen's Hotel Mews, Chester, and he (the Coroner) telegraphed there to know whether they knew such a man, and when he left Chester; and since the Inquest had opened he had received a telegram to the effect that ALFRED GREGORY left Chester on Saturday last. He (the Coroner) thought this was sufficient for their purpose. As to the way in which those two unfortunate individuals came to their death there would be very little question. It would be shewn that they came to their death by their throats being cut, and it would be for the Jury to say in what state of mind GREGORY was at the time of the occurrence. - The Jury then went to view the bodies, and upon their return witnesses were called. - JAMES MARKER, a lithographer, residing at 20 Anstis-street, said: The deceased woman, whose name was HARRIETT JANE BUDD LAWRENCE, was my daughter, and was 30 last birthday. She was married; her husband, whose name is GEORGE LAWRENCE, is a petty officer on board her Majesty's ship Bacchante, at Portsmouth; as far as I know he is there still. They were married some twelve or thirteen years ago. He went away to sea shortly after he was married, and remained away ten years. He came to England a few months' since. He only stayed a few days at home. She had only received half-pay from him the first two or three months after their marriage. It ceased then, and was never renewed. Since then she had been at Manchester, Chester and Liverpool, where she had worked at dressmaking. I can't say whether during this time she was living with any other man. During nearly the whole of this time she went under the name of GREGORY. I don't know particularly why she went by the name of GREGORY. She had had two children, a boy and a girl, the former nearly 13 years of age and the girl about 11. The boy was living with me and the girl with her grandfather LAWRENCE. The boy passes by the name of MARKER, and the girl was considered to be the child of an officer. Deceased has been living at Chester during the past twelve months, with a Mrs McLean. Witness's wife was in the habit of writing to her, and addressed the letters to "MRS GREGORY," Foregate-street. never heard of the Queen's Hotel Mews. Deceased came to Plymouth about a month ago, and it was a year and seven months since I had seen her. I believe she returned to see her husband. A correspondence passed between them, and she came to Plymouth. They met at my house, and were reconciled. It was arranged they should live together as man and wife in future. Upon that he returned to Portsmouth - just a week since. It was understood he was to support her in the future. Could not say it was arranged between her and her husband that she should write to a man called GREGORY at Chester. She slept at home last night. Some man came to see her about quarter past seven yesterday morning. He did not come inside the house, and I did not see him. She went out in the morning and afternoon, but I do not know where she went. She returned just after ten o'clock at night, and went away this morning about five minutes before nine; but she did not intimate where she was going. Heard nothing more about her until I was informed of what had occurred at the Inn. The photograph in possession of the Coroner is that of my daughter and her son. It was done by Mr Curtis in the first place, and copied in Chester, I presume. - The Coroner then put in and read the following letters, the one signed "MRS GREGORY" being identified by MARKER as being in his daughter's handwriting:-
"Dear Tilley, - I rite to you to let you no about Mis Burns drest (dress) for she as ben to me 2 times to now about it, and Sexten as ben to me and he said that he shall take me if the drest is not forthcoming, and he wonce (wants) to now were you are gon to so I told him that you were gond to eastridlean(?). Then he seid that I nowd something about it and I shel hafe to find it. He said that it wase a scame (?) thing for to dow her out of the drest, so he said that he should call again and if I have not gout it he shell geat a warent for you, so then I told him that I nold nothing about it, so he left me then, so, my dear, you hade better bring it, ore send it, and if you have not the money, I will send you it sooner then you should be toke up; but you do not deserve it. Mis Burns has ben to Mr Dod, and she said that if it caust her 20 P she will have it, so answer this as soon as possible. Rite to A. GREGORY, Queens hotel mews, Chester. Do not rite at Dod, for they may hopen it, for they do no think about you ben at Plemerth (Plymouth). MR LAWRENCE - My Dear - do not rite no more untell you here from me agane for they are tring to find out your adrest. I will ritte on Munday after I have sean Mr Barnes (?) (Signed) ALFRED GREGORY.
MRS LAWRENCES ore MRS GREGORY - In answer to your letter which I reviced this day about Mrs Barns's dress I went to Mrs dodd that din time, and she that she hade not gout the ticked, but Sarhe Dood seaid that she pond a dress for you and give you the ticked back and they said that they do not heny think about it, and they said that they will not have any think to do with it and they are very sarers that they hade eny think to do with it never shell so Matilider you will wite to me agane so no more from your loving friend A. GREGORY. rite as soon as you can for these cards.
The following was the letter found upon the man:- MR GREGORY - In answer to your note which I received this day I am very much oblige to you for been so kind to me in sending about Miss Burns Dress. Well I will tell you the truth about it that is it is in pawn and Mrs Dood as got the ticket. So if you will be so kind as to ask Mrs Dood for it she will let you have it but I do not want you to pay for it if you will kindly ask Miss Burns to waite until Saturday next I will send you the money. So you can get it and Mrs Dod can give it to her. I would have sent the money now only I have not got it. I shall not have any until Saturday. Well ALFRED I am glad that you know how am I am happy that you whent to my husband for MR LAWRENCE is my husband and I never was a Mrs Bigwood thank God and the marriage lines you told my husband I put in the fire was not Bigwood's but my one. I have seen my husband and I have told him everything and I hope he will forget me and I hope you will as well I will confess to you now I never have been a happy woman that I live in hopes and he now as forgiven me all and I know he loves me and I will be candid that he is the only one I ever loved I have liked but never loved any but him since I have been parted from my dear husband and children I shall do all I can now to make myself and children and husband happy which I know you will think in your mind nothing but right I must conclude hoping you are quite well I remain, yours, MRS LAWRENCE. - P.S. Please do get the dress and I will pay you back without fail. I am going to write to my husband and tell him about your letter.
A letter from the deceased woman's husband, dated Telegraph House, Landport, Portsmouth, July 1st, 1879, was also put in. Some portions only were relevant to the Inquiry. He addressed his wife as "My hone dear HARRIETT," and then went on, "I cannott say I feel happy, because there is so mutch on my mind. It is all about you, you know, but I hope I shall be before long. You know what I mean. That will be when I have proved your faithfulness and true love, for no that you know would die for you. My dear HARRIETT, for God's sake don't never give me any more trouble if you love me." He then said he would think no more about a divorce. The letter throughout was written in very affectionate terms, and shewed a desire on his part for a complete reconciliation to his wife. - James Edward Black, assistant-manager of the New Market Inn, said: This morning about five minutes past nine a man and woman (the deceased) came into the house and went into a room on the ground floor. They called for a glass of ale and bottle of ginger beer. They sat down, and I served them, and then left the room. They were quite alone. They appeared to be very comfortable and on good terms. They were both strangers to me. I heard nothing of them for fully twenty minutes after they came in, and I was going out of the bar when I heard a noise as of a heavy fall proceeding from the room. Had heard no loud talking previously. Went to the street door and could see nothing outside to cause the noise I heard. I was coming past the door of the room when I heard a faint cry. I pushed open the door, which was ajar, and saw the woman in the act of falling, and the man cutting his throat. Her neck and face were covered in blood and I ran to the door and called for help, and Charles Jordan came to my assistance. I went to the market-place for further help. - Charles Jordan, a licensed porter, deposed: About half-past nine I was standing at the corner of the street opposite the New Market Inn, when I saw the last witness come out and call out "Police". I walked right across and into the room. I saw someone lying on the floor and a man leaning on the table holding a razor across his throat. I made a dash at him, and he jumped up and struck out at me, and we had a struggle to the window, and as we were going to the window he made another cut at his throat. When he got over to the window he fell and I took the razor out of his hand and laid it on the table. - The Coroner: I think you deserve very great credit for your conduct. I wish you had got there a little earlier. - Inspector Murch said: About two or three minutes to ten I went to the New Market Inn and saw the deceased woman lying on the floor on her back with her throat cut. She was not quite dead. There was nothing in her hand. On the other side of the room I saw the last witness struggling with the deceased man. On the table close by there was a razor covered with blood (produced). The last witness said, "That is the razor I have taken from this man." The deceased man only lived a few minutes. I got two cloths and bound up their throats, and then ran to the police-station hoping to catch the police doctor, but he had gone. When I went back I found Dr Meeres there, and he said they were both dead. - Inspector Hill stated that he arrived at the house about ten, and found both the man and woman dead. He searched the woman and found a purse, a letter, a wedding ring, and a pair of gloves upon her, and a hair comb upon the table. He locked the door and took charge of the room. - Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, deposed that shortly after ten he went to the New Market Inn and saw the deceased man and woman. He searched the man, and found amongst other things, a letter, four photographs, and a sheath of a razor in his pocket. The razor Inspector Murch produced fitted the sheath. Witness also produced the telegram received from Chester. - Mr John Veal, Coroner's clerk, said: This morning I sent a telegraphic message, at the Coroner's direction, to the proprietor of the Queen's Hotel Mews, Chester. It ran: - "Something has happened here today respecting A. GREGORY. Wire immediately when he left." The following reply was received:- "GREGORY left here on Saturday last, at four o'clock, for Plymouth, to see his brother, who is ill there, he told me." - This concluding the evidence so far as it had been collected, the Coroner remarked that they were necessarily very much in the dark as to the circumstances under which the crime was committed, because the man from some reason in his own mind, seemed to have kept everybody from knowing him or his business. They must clear the matter up as best they could, and if the Jury wished to ask either of the witnesses any questions he would have them recalled. - Mr Symons, a Juryman, said he wished to ask Jordan whether, when he rushed into the room, the man said anything? - Jordan: Not a word, sir. When I made a rush at him he got up from the table on which he was leaning and turned upon me with a sort of "Oh! oh! oh!" but I could not make out any words. - The Coroner said this was the whole of the evidence he had been able to get together. That was positively all the evidence they could get, and he believed all they should ever be able to get. The matter, though very sudden, had been gradually led up to by the relations existing between the parties themselves. The Coroner proceeded to detail and comment upon the facts brought out in the evidence, and when he had concluded, - As far as he could read the history of the case it would seem that the deceased woman was known to GREGORY many years. Some ten or twelve years ago it would seem she was married to a man named LAWRENCE, but they did not live together. He went to sea soon afterwards, and in the course of a few months the half-pay which she received from him was stopped. Of course at this distance of time, unless they had MR LAWRENCE there, they could not tell what led him to stop the pay. It was no doubt, as in similar circumstances, from something that he heard, that it was stopped, and they had heard from the father that it was never renewed. The father further stated that since then the daughter went about from place to place - Manchester, London, Chester, and elsewhere - and the Jury would probably mark this, that although, strange to say, the father ignored any knowledge of GREGORY, and said he did not know that there was such a man, yet he acknowledged that his daughter had gone by that name for several years. It appeared that she had had a child before she was married and one afterwards, the first one being a boy called by the maternal grandfather's name, and living with him; and the second, supposed to be LAWRENCE'S had been taken by LAWRENCE'S father. He thought the Jury might infer from this that the woman had been known all the time to the man GREGORY. That morning the man and woman went to the New Market Inn; and there, undoubtedly the man cut the woman's throat. There was no question as to how she came by her death. Strange to say, they had eye-witnesses in this case of the tragedy. In the first place, Mr Black, the proprietor of the Inn, when he opened the door of the room, saw the woman covered with blood, and in the act of falling, and saw the man cutting his own throat; and in the second place Jordan directly afterwards saw the woman lying on the floor and the man still cutting his throat. Therefore, what was very seldom in such cases, they had here two eye witnesses of what took place, and there was, consequently, no doubt how the woman came by her death, or who the person was by whose hand it was done. If the man Black had entered the room one moment before he did he would, in all probability, have seen the man cutting her throat. When the bodies were searched Mr Manning found upon the woman a letter bearing the name of A. GREGORY and upon the man was found the letter in two parts, which was sworn to by her father as being in the handwriting of the woman. There was no doubt the man was A. GREGORY who was addressed in the letter, and to that letter he would draw their particular attention, because it revealed the relations upon which the deceased had been living at Chester. In the letter the deceased woman referred to her married life, and her reconciliation with her husband, and added that although she liked GREGORY, she had never loved him. From this he thought the Jury would not be incorrect in inferring that the man and woman had lived together as man and wife at Chester. There was a letter written apparently in a "scrambling" way from him about the same subject, in which he said "Say no more about it." Yesterday (Sunday) morning the father said a man called upon her, and the Jury could have little doubt who that man was. The telegram that had been produced said that GREGORY left Chester on Saturday afternoon last, saying he was going to visit a brother who was ill, and he evidently called upon the woman yesterday morning. They had met probably by appointment in the market. Whatever his motive might have been he (the Coroner) did not think it had anything to do with the dress alluded to in the letters. The man had evidently been living with her, and she had now told him that she was reconciled to her husband, and therefore irrevocably lost to him. He consequently came all the way from Chester to see her, and yesterday (Sunday) morning he probably made the appointment to meet her. And having met her there could be no doubt that he cut her throat in a most determined manner. He (the Coroner) therefore did not see how they could come to any other conclusion than that this was a simple case of murder. That the poor woman did not do it herself was evident; there was nothing in her hand, and it was also quite certain that no one else could have inflicted such wounds upon him but himself. Besides, there was only one weapon, and that weapon the man had in his hand. There could be, therefore, no doubt that he killed the woman. They had ample evidence that the man had jealousy for his motive, and feelings of that kind, the Coroner remarked, went a long way. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against ALFRED GREGORY". - With reference to the Inquest upon the deceased man, the Coroner said he would take upon himself to ask them to apply their minds to the evidence already given, and he would not trouble them by reading it all over again. There was little additional evidence, and when they had heard that he should leave it to them to say how the man came by his death, and in what state of mind he was at the time. - Mr Dickerson was sworn as Foreman of the Jury. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's officer, was called, and stated; I searched the body of the deceased man and found in one of his pockets the letter I now produce. It bore the Plymouth post-mark June 30th 1879, and the Chester post-mark July 2nd, 1879. The envelope is addressed to MR A. GREGORY, Queen's Hotel Mews, Chester. I also produce a telegram from Chester in reply to one which was sent this morning saying, "GREGORY left here on Saturday last to see his brother who is ill, so he told me." - The Coroner said he thought that after the telegrams and letters that had been put in, the Jury could have no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that the deceased was ALFRED GREGORY, and from the evidence they could have no doubt that he came to his death by cutting his own throat. The difficult part of the matter which they would have to consider was what state of mind was he in at the time. They had not been able to find anyone who saw him at Plymouth. they did not know where he stayed at night; they did not know that he held intercourse with anyone, but he (the Coroner) had no doubt that yesterday morning he had made an appointment to meet the woman at the New Market Inn. From the letters they saw that his intercourse with the woman was to be terminated, as she had been very properly reconciled to her husband, and the question arose, What effect had that had upon his mind. She said she had never loved him, but he might have loved her. At all events, it seems to have affected him sufficiently to bring him all the way to Plymouth, and with regard to the motive he pointed out that jealousy, whether arising lawfully or unlawfully, was the same passion. The man might have conceived a love for the deceased woman, and although she had finally left him, and had asked him to forget her, it was a question whether he could forget her. He apparently felt a strong feeling of jealousy, which might have brought him to Plymouth and worked upon his mind, and ultimately brought him, when he found that he could not persuade her to go back with him, to commit this deed upon her and upon himself. He would have no objection, if the Jury wished it, to adjourn the Inquiry; but he did not see that there was any chance of their being able to find anything further to help them to come to a conclusion with regard to the state of mind the man was in. - Mr Mann, a Juryman, remarked that no doubt when GREGORY received that letter about her being reconciled to her husband, he came down determined to endeavour to make her go back with him. - The Coroner thought there was a great deal in that, and added that failing to do as he wished, the man appeared to have proceeded to the extremity he did. - The Foreman asked for the last letters that had been put in, and the Jury wished to return as a verdict "That ALFRED GREGORY came by his death by his own hand, but they had no evidence to show the state of mind in which he was at the time." - The Coroner said it was part of their duty to consider what was the state of his mind from such evidence as they had before them. The verdict they had given was no verdict. He might say they had only to get twelve men to agree. - Mr Foot, a Juror, thought the couple when they entered the public-house appeared to be perfectly rational and there was certainly no evidence to shew that the man was insane. He, however, would scarcely like to say he was of sound mind. After some further deliberation the Foreman put the matter to the Jury, and fourteen held up their hands for a verdict of "Unsound Mind," which was accordingly taken. - The Foreman remarked that the Jury wished to express their admiration of the witness Jordan's courage and promptness in connection with the affair in the morning. Instead of being merely a porter he was deserving of a position as a general in her majesty's forces. He had earned their commendation and respect. - The Coroner fully endorsed the opinion of the Jury. He had known Jordan for many years, and he had always found him a quiet, industrious man, performing his duties in cheerfulness and honesty. He had reason to know that he had been afflicted of late years. In the course of his duties he had come across cases - of hanging especially - where, if a man had acted as Jordan had done, the suicide's life might have been saved; but in many instances, instead of promptly cutting the man down, they turned round and ran away. He thought Jordan was deserving of a good deal of credit for the manner in which he had acted. - A collection was then made by the Foreman and resulted in 15s. 10d. being presented to Jordan.

TORQUAY - At Torquay yesterday an Inquest was held before Mr H. S. Gaye, Coroner, on the body of EMILY JANE CHURCHWARD, aged 2 years, whose death was caused by the upsetting of a teapot of boiling tea over her breast on Thursday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 July 1879
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - On Thursday evening the Coroner for Barnstaple, Mr R. I. Bencraft, held an Inquest on the body of an elderly man, which had been found in the river Taw that morning, and which proved to be that of THOMAS SHADDICK, aged 60, a gardener, who had been living at Bickington, a village about two miles from the Borough. The evidence shewed that the deceased came into Barnstaple on Monday to see one of his sons, who keeps a public-house at Pilton. He left his son's about six o'clock, saying that he should make some purchases, see a vessel launched and then go home. At seven a relative met him in the town, and he was then under the influence of drink, and complained of rheumatic pains. Later in the evening he called twice at a small public-house near the river, and left some parcels, saying when he left the last time, about nine o'clock, that he should be coming for them before going home. He was not seen afterwards, until his body was discovered by some mariners near the long bridge about eight o'clock on Thursday morning. A half-crown, a sixpence and some coppers, with other things, were found in his pockets. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and thinking that the deceased probably walked into the water near the Fish Market, they requested the Coroner to represent to the Town Council the desirability of having the bank there protected.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 July 1879
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Fall At Tavistock. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday evening at Tavistock, concerning the death of WILLIAM HODGE, a mason, aged 63 years, who met with an injury at the Bedford Brewery on the previous Monday, and which resulted in his death on Saturday. Deceased was repairing the roof at the brewery and fell from one of the ladders, his head coming in contact with a cask. He was taken up insensible and remained so until his death. Mr Northey, surgeon, was of opinion that deceased was seized with an apoplectic fit which caused him to fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Woman At Devonport. - The Mayor and Coroner of Saltash (Mr J. L. Clark,) held an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town yesterday on ANN SORLIE, a widow, about 68 years of age. P.C. Jones, of the Metropolitan Police, stated that about eight o'clock on Sunday morning he was on duty at the southern end of Keyham Dockyard, when he saw what appeared to be a large bundle of rags in the water in Moon's Cove Creek. A boat belonging to H.M.S. Indus was moored at the steps, and he at once got into it and went to the place, when he found that what had seemed to be a bundle of rags was the body of the deceased floating in the water. He handed the body ashore and Police Sergeant Webber, of the Devonport Borough Police, took charge of it, and found a shawl belonging to the deceased on the quay. - GEORGE SMITH, brother-in-law of the deceased, residing at 40 Gloucester-street, said that the deceased had been acting as his housekeeper for the last eighteen months. She had been in a very desponding state for the past three weeks, and frequently complained of pains in the head. She was in the house about seven o'clock on Sunday morning; but he missed her shortly afterwards, and subsequently learnt that she had been found drowned. - JANE SKINNER, niece of the deceased, residing at 32 Gloucester-street, said that the deceased had been in a very low state for some time, and frequently complained of pain in the head. Witness advised her to see Mr May, jun., surgeon, and on Saturday she went with a woman named Boyns and saw him. Mr May told her that on Monday he would give her a ticket for the infirmary in the Workhouse, and the deceased replied "All right." - Samuel Nancarrow, residing at 24 John-street, stated that about twenty minutes after seven o'clock on Sunday morning he was walking near Joll's-cottages, when he saw the deceased standing on the edge of the quay. She looked around, and on noticing him walked away. She did not then appear to be low spirited. Witness went away, and saw nothing more of the deceased until after she had been taken out of the water. At the time he saw her on the quay there were about three feet of water in the canal and it was about sixteen feet from the edge of the quay to the surface of the water. The Jury thought that the deceased Committed Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Warrant Officer. - An Inquest was held in the Pear Tree Inn, Stoke, last evening by the Devonport Coroner respecting the death of JOHN ROUNSFULL, carpenter, of the Valorous, who committed suicide on Sunday by cutting his throat, presumably in consequence of the anxiety caused by the sailing of his ship without him. Deceased lived at 35 Tavistock-street, and was well known in the neighbourhood for many years as a sober and very respectable man. - The first witness called was MR CAIN, father-in-law of the deceased, who stated that the deceased had, since the departure of the ship, shewn signs of mental aberration. According to his own statement, he and some lieutenants who had been similarly circumstanced by the early sailing of the ship, went to the Admiral's office and secured passes. He also told witness that he had had leave of absence until last Saturday night, but this he himself contradicted by another statement that the ship, which sailed at 3.30, went only an hour before he expected it to go. Another statement, to the effect that the passes signed by the Admiral were not afterwards recognised by the authorities, seemed to indicate insanity, since if passes of such a character had ever been obtained they could not be cancelled by inferior authority. If he had really met others who had also been left behind, of which there seemed to be some uncertainty, their departure had prevented the Jury from hearing their evidence. Another act which he (Mr Cain) thought was suggestive of insanity was his once rushing away frantically and hailing a cab to escape from a boatswain who, a week ago, came on shore to see him, and who was one of his most intimate friends. Witness had also heard the boatswain once say to the deceased that he did not think he could know what he was about. This was, of course, several days after the departure of the ship. He did not think that the deceased had been drinking at all unduly. Witness did not know that insanity ran in his family, nor was deceased of a very excitable temperament. - The blood-stained razor produced in Court was a ship razor. Deceased had been seen with it before, but his wife had for a time managed to get it away from him. - John Bond, bootmaker, Tavistock-street, gave evidence corroborative of Mr Cain's on the point of insanity. He saw a master-at-arms on Sunday and directed him to the deceased's house. Witness went to a public-house where he expected to find deceased and told him that he was wanted. Deceased then became very excited, and, grasping witness's hand, gave him a look which startled everyone in the room, and then rushed out by a back way. Witness knew that he had been in ill health for two years, and was only dragging out his time in the hopes of getting a pension. - Edward Stroud, master-at-arms on board the Royal Adelaide, stated that he called for the deceased at his house, to which the last witness directed him, at about noon on Sunday. Not finding him at home he went to the public-house, and was told that he had gone home by a back way. coming again to the house he found the body in the closet. He did not know that deceased had really any cause to anticipate punishment for having failed to go on board his ship, if it were really owing to mistaken instructions and if he reported himself to the Royal Adelaide, Indus or Cambridge, or better still, at the Admiral's office, which, in fact, deceased claimed to have done. - P.C. Armstrong said he found that the deceased had taken off his coat and tie. - The Coroner felt that the Jury must be satisfied of the temporary insanity of the suicide. In such a case as this the way for the man to have acted in order to retain his status in the service was very plain. The man's mind was all at sea, and he consequently could not grasp a situation in which, so to speak, he was embarked, but abandoned himself to a bewilderment which ultimately took the more serious form of insanity. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 July 1879
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Mast. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Guildhall, relative to the death of ROBERT WHITFIELD, merchant seaman, who fell from the mainmast of the schooner Messenger, now lying in Cattewater. - William Evans, captain of the schooner stated that about 10 o'clock on Monday morning the deceased was standing on the "gaff," about 40 feet aloft, engaged in scraping the mainmast. Witness, who was on deck at the time, heard a shout, and, on looking up, saw the deceased topple over. He fell on the deck on his right shoulder, and on being picked up was found to be unconscious. He was immediately conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital where he died the same evening about eight p.m. Mr G. Sylvester, resident surgeon of the South Devon Hospital, stated that the deceased, when he was received at the Hospital, was suffering from a fracture of the skull, from which he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 18 July 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Military Chaplain. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of the REV. EDWARD BUTLER, Roman Catholic Chaplain to the Forces, first class, stationed at Devonport, who died suddenly on Wednesday afternoon at his residence in Ker-street. Mr W. P. Swain stated that about two o'clock on Wednesday afternoon he was requested to go to the house of the deceased who was ill, and found MR BUTLER kneeling on the floor, with his head resting against a door. There was a clot of blood on the floor - just under his nose. - Surgeon-Major Johnston Ferguson, A.M.D, stationed at Devonport, stated that he had known the deceased for about five years. When he first made his acquaintance, MR BUTLER told him that he was suffering from heart disease, but he had never treated him. He had by the request of the Coroner made a post-mortem examination, and found that the deceased had ruptured a large blood-vessel, leading from the hart. In his opinion the deceased had died from aneurism of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - The deceased, who was of Irish parentage, was a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and was about 47 years of age. He was sent to Carlow College, Ireland, to be educated, and having completed his studies he returned to his native place, and served at the Cathedral and some French mission. When the Catholic chaplains were appointed after the Indian mutiny he received a commission in the army, and served about seven years in Nova Scotia, five at Portsmouth, and four at Colchester, and then volunteered for service as chaplain to the Ashantee expedition. On his return he was appointed to Devonport garrison as chaplain in succession to the late Canon Shepherd, and he had been there about five years at the time of his death. He was promoted to chaplain of the first class on April 1st last. The funeral will probably take place on Saturday and the body will be interred with military honours.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 July 1879
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - The Borough Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday evening last, touching the death of HENRY BURROWS, aged 5 weeks, who was found dead in bed. - The mother of the deceased child stated that she took him to bed with her on Friday evening last, and on waking up the next morning she found him lying in her arms dead. Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, stated that he had examined the child. He found no marks of violence or pressure. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAUNTON - Fatal Railway Accident. - Late on Friday night the dead body of a well-dressed man was found on the railway near Taunton Station shortly after the arrival of the down express from Bristol. From papers found on the person it was ascertained that the deceased's name was WILLIAM WALTER NORTH, and that he had travelled from Huddersfield to Dawlish, where his mother - MRS TETLEY - was awaiting his arrival. On hearing of a fatal accident up the line, she at once proceeded by a carriage to Exeter, to catch the first up train; and found her fears but too well grounded. After the Inquest the body was brought to Dawlish on Saturday night.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 July 1879
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening, at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, relative to the death of JOHN LOWE, 40 years of age. - LAVINIA ANN, widow of the deceased, said that her husband had been in the army and was pensioned from the 2nd battalion of the Rifle Brigade about three years ago. He became a licensed hawker, and on Friday returned to Plymouth from Exeter, where he had been hawking. He generally enjoyed good health; but on Saturday afternoon he was seized with a fit while alone with her in their bedroom. She ran immediately to fetch Mr Pearse, surgeon, who could not come, but who gave her a bottle of medicine. On her return she found that her husband was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Soldier At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, held an Inquiry last evening, at the Military Hospital, Stoke, touching the death of JOHN BENNETT, aged 45 years, private 20th Regiment, who committed suicide by jumping from a window of the Hospital on Sunday afternoon. Deceased was received into the Hospital on Friday last suffering from diarrhoea. - Sergeant Hobson, A.H.C., one of the witnesses called, stated that the man did not appear to have been drinking; he lay quietly in bed, and was calm and rational. He saw him at eleven o'clock on Sunday morning, within two or three hours of the occurrence, and he then appeared in his usual state. - Wm. Gowrie, a private of the 20th Regiment, also a patient in the Hospital, stated that he had known the deceased for the past eighteen months, but could say nothing as to his habits in relation to sobriety or otherwise. They were patients in the same ward, and early on Sunday morning several of the men in the ward complained that the deceased had been "capering about." Between one and two o'clock in the afternoon deceased went to the rear of the building. Witness had received instructions to "keep an eye" on him, and accordingly followed him. Deceased then said, "I have nothing about me. Search me." Witness searched him; there was nothing dangerous about him, and he accordingly permitted him to enter the lavatory, waiting outside for several minutes. Private Cox, A.H.C., then came up the stairs and told him that the deceased had jumped from the window, and had fallen on the pavement 40 feet below, killing himself on the spot. - Private Cox, who was in charge of the ward on Sunday, stated that he saw nothing unusual in the condition of the deceased, except that he was restless and that he annoyed the other inmates of the ward by talking, by persisting in getting out of bed and by walking about the ward contrary to orders. That was the only reason why instructions were given Gowrie to look after the man. The conduct of the deceased was that of a perfectly rational man, and he had no intention of protecting him against any rash act when he gave the order to Gowrie. - The Coroner pressed witness upon this matter, pointing out that Gowrie searched the man in order to ascertain if he had any dangerous weapon about him; but witness denied that his instructions were such as to lead the other patients in the ward to infer that the deceased was a dangerous man. On the contrary, he considered him a perfectly rational man, and he should not have considered it necessary to search him. He reported the deceased to the surgeon for disobedience of orders, and was directed to place two men over him to keep him in bed. About five minutes before the occurrence he saw the deceased in the ward. He was then out of bed, but he appeared to be perfectly reasonable. - George Wilson, private 20th Regiment, another patient, deposed that on Saturday night last he was directed by Cox to look after the deceased, and to be responsible for him for the night. He understood this order to mean that he was to prevent the man from getting up, and he thought it might also mean that the man was not in a fit state of mind to be allowed out of bed alone. On the night prior to his receiving this order the deceased got out of bed, took off his clothes, wound a sheet around himself, and sought to leave the ward. Witness, on being pressed by the Coroner, admitted that he considered the man was not in his right senses, and said it was wrong to put another patient to watch over him. - Private Bowers, 20th Regiment, stated that he had known the deceased for the past six months. He was not a sober man, and suffered from the effects of deep drinking. He got drink in the canteen as well as out of it. When in that condition he appeared as if he did not know what he was doing, and witness was positive that the drinking habits of the man had weakened his brain. His opinion was that the deceased, when admitted into the Hospital, was suffering more from delirium than diarrhoea. He was a single man, and had been eighteen or nineteen years in the service. On going to the Hospital he told witness he did not believe he would ever come out again. - Surgeon Major Baker, of the Army Medical Department, stationed at the Hospital, deposed to seeing the deceased on the morning of the 17th. He complained of diarrhoea, and admitted having drank to excess, but he certainly was not suffering from delirium. Habits of drunkenness would tend to weaken the brain, but he saw no signs of insanity. The other patients were told to watch the man simply because he was restless; but there was also a possibility that he might injure himself. He came to that conclusion not from his own observation of the case, but from the reports made by the orderly as to the restless condition of the man. But for these reports he should not have supposed the man was in any way inclined to insanity, and he was not surprised to find that others were deceived as to his mental condition. - The Coroner, in summing up, expressed his regret at finding that means were permitted a man to get an excess of drink in the canteen. He also considered it a very grave question as to whether sufficient restraint had been exercised over the deceased, and whether some more stringent regulations ought not to be enforced in cases where men gave evidence of a weakened intellect. He should have thought there would have been some special ward into which the man might have been removed, where more care might have been taken of him, and where he would have practically had no opportunity of doing himself an injury; and he was of opinion that it was to be regretted, in a large Hospital like this, with so vast a number of rooms, and such ready means at hand, some given regulation did not exist for dealing with cases of this character. He hoped, if they did not exist, that they would now be given, so as to render a suicide of this nature absolutely impossible, and that he would never have a case of this kind coming again before him as Coroner. Means should also be adopted to render it impossible for a man to get out of the upper windows. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity," and added a recommendation that means should be taken by the authorities for guarding the upper windows of the buildings. - The Coroner thought what ought to be brought under the notice of the authorities was this - that when any medical officer found a patient in an ordinary ward was in a dangerous condition some other ward should be provided to which the patients could be removed, and some precautionary measures there taken which could scarcely be taken in a ward occupied by ordinary patients. In this view of the case the Jury entirely concurred, and the Inquiry closed.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 July 1879
PLYMOUTH - Neglecting To Get Medical Advice. - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth on Saturday evening by the Borough Coroner into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, aged about 5 months, the illegitimate child of MARY WILLIAMS, a domestic servant. It appeared that the mother of the deceased is at present in service, and that the deceased had been taken care of by its grandmother, who resides in Granby-street. For about a week the child had been very ill, but no medical advice had been obtained and on Friday morning it was found dead in bed. The child was very thin and emaciated. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and censured the mother and grandmother for not procuring medical attendance.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 July 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, county Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of ROBERT ADAMS PHILLIPS, late a labourer in the Keyham Factory, who received injuries to his thigh at that place on the 16th instant, and from the effects of which he died on Saturday last. The Inquest was adjourned until Thursday.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 August 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - Singular Fatality At Keyham Dockyard. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday on ROBERT ADAMS PHILLIPS, a labourer lately employed in Keyham yard. - Henry Parkhouse, assistant boilermaker at Keyham, said that the deceased had been employed for several years in swinging boilers. On the morning of July 14th he had charge of the job of turning over a boiler. Whilst one end of the boiler was being lifted off the ground, in order to get it on its end, it canted over. The deceased tried to prevent this, and, not noticing the shell of another boiler close by, got jammed between the two, and received severe injuries to his thigh. It was a very frequent occurrence for boilers to cant whilst being slung. - By the Jury: There was a sufficient number of hands to do the work. Deceased was not bound to prevent the boiler from canting. He did it voluntarily. - Mr D. Parks, leading man of boilermakers, corroborated. The boiler weighed about four tons. Deceased had been employed in such work for the past seventeen years. - Dr Adam Brunton Messer, fleet-surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, stated that on the 14th instant the deceased was admitted to the Hospital suffering from a compound fracture of the left thigh, and a compound fracture of the femur, and he died on Saturday last from the injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 4 August 1879
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Stone Throwing At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening respecting the death of WILLIAM CORNISH, a boy 14 years of age. On Friday afternoon the deceased and several other boys bathed together under the Hoe, and afterwards were dressing, when CORNISH, who was sitting down putting on his boots, was observed to fall along the beach. It was then found that he had been struck on the head by a stone, and he asked to be taken to a chemist's shop, but his companions took him to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, to which place he walked. He was examined by Mr Sylvester, the resident surgeon, who found a wound about three inches long on the top of the head, and seeing that it was dangerous he had the boy put to bed. He died the same evening about eight o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" adding that there was no evidence to shew that the stone was thrown wilfully.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday on THOMAS CLIFFORD, a mason's labourer, 63 years of age. On Wednesday morning the deceased was at work in New-street, when he fell in a fit and cut his head severely, but the wound did not appear to be a dangerous one. He was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and shortly after his admission had a series of fits. He lingered until Saturday morning, when he died. Mr Sylvester, the house surgeon, afterwards made a post mortem examination, and found a large clot of blood in the brain on the left side of the head. This, he said, would be a token of apoplexy, to which he attributed death. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes".

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquiry respecting the death of HENRY EDWARD CROCKER, a child between three and four years old. The deceased was running about the wash-house in Edgcumbe-place, when it fell in a bucket of boiling water, and was severely scalded about the arm and chest, the injuries proving fatal. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquiry on Saturday afternoon on WILLIAM ADAMS, a rigger. - William Blyth, leading man of riggers at Devonport Dockyard, stated that on Friday morning he was on the forecastle of H.M.S. Curacoa unshackling the bow cable. He directed the deceased to wind a rope fast to the chain, and he had a bowline made to secure the deceased before he went into the bows. The bowline was not, however, used, for whilst he was absent for a moment deceased went out on the hawser pipe, and caught hold of the pennant chain, which was slack. Witness warned him of his dangerous position, and ordered him to come back. He paid no attention to the order, but laid hold of the pennant chain with both hands. It gave way beneath his weight and he fell into the dock, a distance of thirty feet, and was killed on the spot. - John Getty, a rigger, who was working with the deceased, stated that he went out in the bows through the hawse-pipe, and was surprised to find the deceased on the chain. He could have performed the task easily and safely through the hawse-pipe and there was no necessity for him to have ventured where he did. - George Rice, able seaman on board the Bruiser, stated that he saw the deceased go out into the bows of the Curacoa. The position struck him as being so dangerous that he watched the deceased, fearing what would happen, and not caring to call out lest he should startle him. Deceased tried the chain to see whether it would bear him, first with his left hand. It did not give, and he then let go the rope he held in his right hand, and his whole weight came on the chain. It immediately bent beneath him with a jerk, and he fell into the dock. The whole thing occupied little more than a minute. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the leading man from all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 August 1879
NEWTON FERRERS - Sudden Death Of A Customs Officer. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Wrescombe Farm, Newton Ferrers, relative to the death of MR JOHN HAMPDEN SIDNEY RUSSELL, aged 58, registrar of her Majesty's Customs at Plymouth, who fell down dead near the farmhouse. - Alice Tudor stated that she had known the deceased for several years, and that he had been registrar of her Majesty's Customs for about forty years. He left home about 10.30 a.m. on Monday and stated that he was going to Newton for a walk, and would return for tea about 6.30 p.m. She had never heard the deceased complain of heart disease. - Herbert Thomas, aged 13 stated that he was staying with his mother at the house of MR RUSSELL, and about half-past ten o'clock on Monday morning he left the house with him for a walk. they went to the Barbican, crossed over to Oreston, passed through Plymstock to Wembury, and thence crossed over to Newton Ferrers, where MR RUSSELL had a little whisky at the Dolphin Inn. They left the inn about half-past three p.m. for the purpose of going to Plympton. When they had gone on a little distance the deceased ran across witness'[s path on tip-toes and fell on his right side against the hedge. He did not complain of shortness of breath, and was very talkative. After he had fallen against the hedge deceased tried to speak, but could not. Witness ran to the farmhouse, whither MR RUSSELL was removed, and Mr Adkins, surgeon, was sent for. - Mr Adkins, surgeon, stated that he had examined the body of the deceased gentleman, and found it extremely well nourished. /there were a few slight abrasions on the face, which were caused by the fall. He considered that death was due to heart disease and was accelerated by the long walk the deceased had taken. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease." The Coroner said he could not allow the Court to be dissolved without publicly thanking Mr Button, on behalf of the friends of the deceased gentleman, for the kind manner in which he had acted in taking in the body and giving it every attention.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 August 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Late Bathing Fatality At Wilcove. - The Mayor and Coroner of Saltash held an Inquest yesterday morning relative to the death of THOMAS ALFORD, aged 20, a seaman serving on board H.M.S. Cambridge. William Bonstow stated that on the afternoon of the 29th July the deceased proposed to him and several other seamen to go for a bathe, and they went to Wilcove. Charles Weymouth, able seaman on board the Cambridge, one of the party, deposed he was in the boat at the time of the accident. He suddenly saw the deceased jump backwards from the stern of the boat into the water. He went under water, and never rose again. Witness thought deceased must have struck his head against some rocks under water, which he had found to exist whilst searching with divers for the body. Edwin Henry Richards, gunner, H.M.S. Implacable, stationed off Torpoint, deposed that seeing the body floating in the water he had it picked up and conveyed to the dead-house at Morice Town. The Jury returned a verdict "That death resulted from Drowning, deceased having struck his head against a rock."

BIDEFORD. - Death From Suffocation. - An Inquest was held at Bideford on Tuesday evening at the White Hart Inn touching the death of BEATRICE HANNAH JENN, aged 3 weeks, the illegitimate child of SARAH JENN, aged 19. According to the mother's statement the child was well and healthy on Monday night and on Tuesday morning, about four o'clock, she suckled it. At half-past five o'clock she took it in her arms and found it dead. The mother of SARAH JENN said that at about half-past five o'clock in the morning she took a cup of tea to her daughter, who lived with her, and found that she had the child in her arms. She handed it to witness, saying she did not know what was the matter with it. The mother took the child downstairs. She noticed the face was very dark, and at eight o'clock she sent for the doctor. The child was then dead. Mr Sinclair Thompson, who attended, said that on his arrival he found the child dressed and laid out. The face and trunk were congested, and the mouth and lips very dark. There was an absence of any indication of violence, and he considered the cause of death to be suffocation. The Jury returned as their verdict that the child died from Suffocation, accidentally caused by its being overlaid by the mother.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 August 1879
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident To A Somnambulist. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Torquay Police Station by Mr F. J. Watts, Deputy Coroner, on JOHN PATRICK SAUNDERS, painter, who died from injuries received in falling down a flight of stairs whilst walking in his sleep. The deceased was 59 years of age, and had been known for some years to be afflicted with somnambulism. On Tuesday night he went to bed about eleven o'clock, and shortly afterwards his son was aroused by a cry from his mother that "He's fallen over the stairs." The son at once went to his father, but found he had ceased to breathe, having broken his neck. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death through falling downstairs."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 August 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Accidents At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest last evening on JOHN CROCKER, aged 25 years, a mason, who sustained fatal injuries by falling from a scaffolding yesterday morning. The deceased and another man named Coram, were engaged in constructing a stone cornice and parapet wall around the upper part of a house in course of construction in Haddington-road. Owing, in the opinion of Coram, to the weather, the masonry of the cornice had not properly "set;" and whilst they were at work upon the parapet wall the whole of the cornice, weighing about two tons, gave way, and fell upon the scaffolding. This struck away several of the planks on which the deceased was standing, and he fell to the ground, a distance of about twenty-four feet, receiving injuries that resulted in death. Coram considered that too much of the cornice was built at once, and that it should have been partially built and then left to "stiffen." The wall of the house was eighteen inches thick, and the cornice overhung ten inches and overhanging so much as it did, it should not, according to Coram, have been built all at once. A question arose as to whether the work was "scamped," but witness declined to give to this a direct answer. - Mr Westaway, foreman to Mr Row, the builder of the house, stated that only a short time before the accident he spoke to the deceased and mentioned to him that as the cornice was a large one, and projected a good bit, he had better for safety "tail," the cornice well into the wall. Deceased promised that he would do so, and witness left, and did not again return to the house prior to the accident. He did not stay to see whether his instructions were carried out, and he did not fear an accident, inasmuch as deceased had built cornices of the same pattern to two other houses. He considered the accident arose through the deceased having neglected to put stays under the cornice, as was usual in constructing work of the kind, until the masonry over it had been erected. The materials used were all particularly good, and there was no attempt at anything like "scamping." The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all parties from blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 August 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest At The Royal Naval Hospital. - The County Coroner, Mr R. Rodd, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital yesterday touching the death of AUGUSTUS VANDELBERG, 47 years of age, a dockyard labourer, who was killed on Monday by an anchor falling on him. - William Hodge, rigger at the Dockyard, said that a few minutes after eleven on the previous day, he (witness), the deceased and others were removing mooring chains from one part of the wharf to the jetty-head for shipment. Deceased had been employed as a rigger for about fourteen years. There were a party of labourers at the crane heaving an anchor of about four to five tons weight when the selvige lashing was carried away, and the anchor swung up the yard, struck the deceased on the hip and he fell with the anchor on him. He was taken immediately to the surgery in the yard, and thence to the Naval Hospital. Witness had never known a lashing break before in that way. The rope was cut by the square of the anchor. The anchor was very old and rusty and had been under water for a long time. John Blake, who was superintending the removal of the anchor, gave corroborative evidence. Mr R. H. More, staff surgeon, stated that death ensued from crushing of the lower part of the body. The Jury gave as their verdict "Accidental Death." A Juror suggested the advisability of laying sticks between the rope and the anchor stocks to prevent the strands being cut; and the Coroner was desired to make a recommendation to that effect to the proper authorities. The Jury handed their fees to the widow of the deceased, it having been stated that she was in a very poor circumstances.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 August 1879
WEMBURY - At the Jubilee Inn, Wembury, yesterday afternoon, Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM PITTS, seventy-five, farm labourer. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Cain, fell from a hayrick on Wednesday last and sustained concussion of the brain. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

LYDFORD - An Inquest was held in the Dartmoor Convict Prison yesterday on the body of SAMUEL HORTON, a convict. HORTON was convicted in February 1877 at Leicester Assizes of an outrage on a girl 12 years of age, and sentenced to five years' penal servitude. His death resulted from chronic pleurisy.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 August 1879
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the infant child of JOHN FRENCH, a chimney sweep, who was found dead in bed. The medical evidence went to shew that death was caused by suffocation, and a verdict of "Accidental Death was returned.

BONDLEIGH - Fatal Fall In A Hayrick. - At Bondleigh yesterday an Inquest was held here by Mr Fulford, County Coroner, touching the death of HERBERT JOHN SPARKES, a boy 6 years of age, who was killed on Friday last by falling into a hole made in a hayrick at Hansford Farm. - WILLIAM SPARKES deposed that the child was his grandson and that his parents lived in Manchester. Deceased had lived with him for five years. He missed the child at about four in the afternoon, and searched diligently for him. He found the child's playthings near the hayrick, and on examining the rick found that the little fellow had fallen in the shaft made therein, with his head downwards. He was quite dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Attempted Suicide At Devonport. - MRS WEBB, aged 60 years, died in the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday morning from the effects of the injuries sustained by her throwing herself over the bridge near the Halfpenny Gate. It was shewn at the Inquest held last evening by Mr Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, that the deceased suffered at times from uncontrollable impulses, produced by heart disease and physical weakness. She left her residence in Morice Town on Friday night unknown to any of her friends, and was seen by two soldiers to mount the parapet of the bridge and throw herself over. She fell on the mud beneath, which she had evidently mistaken for water, and was picked up in an unconscious state, death resulting more from the shock to the system than from any actual bodily injury. She only recovered consciousness for a short time on Saturday night, and then, when asked by her son to account for the occurrence, she replied, "I could not help doing it." The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

- A Child Killed At Sticklepath. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday respecting the death of WILLIAM GEORGE GLANFIELD, a child two years old, the son of RICHARD GLANFIELD, a miner, residing at Sticklepath. Maria Endacott, a neighbour, stated that on Thursday afternoon she saw the child sitting on some steps near the house, when a wagon, driven by John Holman, of South Zeal, came along the road and ran over him. The driver who was standing on the shaft, pulled up, and the mother of the child picked him up. She saw the child creeping down from the steps into the road. The front horse had passed him, and the next moment the wagon was over him. Saw no reins in the wagoner's hands. No other children were near. Holman appeared to be sober. William Gimblett, a miller, stated that on Thursday afternoon he saw a wagon and two horses coming down the road. The horses were trotting. Two children were standing by MR GLANFIELD'S outside step, and just after the driver lifted his hand to turn the horses he could see but one child - the eldest of MR GLANFIELD'S children. Heard a scream, and saw someone run towards the spot. Holman smelt strongly of liquor, though he did not appear the worse for drink. The child was not dead when picked up, but died about twenty minutes after. He should say that the wagon wheels had passed about three feet from the outside step. There were no reins attached to the horses. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 22 August 1879
PLYMOUTH - Alarming Occurrence At Millbay Barracks. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian, held an inquest at Smeeth's Brunel Hotel, Millbay, last evening into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE WHITELY, about 5 years of age. - HENRY WHITELY, father of the deceased, a quartermaster-sergeant of the pensioners' staff, residing in Millbay Barracks, stated that the deceased, who had been a very healthy child from his birth, on Monday went to school as usual. He was put to bed at the usual time, and about ten o'clock the same night was taken ill with violent purging and vomiting. The child was very ill all night. Between nine and ten next morning Mr R. Batho, army surgeon, saw the deceased, and attended him up to four o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he died. Witness could not account for the deceased's illness. - Surgeon-Major R. Batho, medical officer in charge of the troops stationed in Plymouth, said that he first saw the deceased about twenty minutes to ten on Tuesday morning. He found the child lying on a sofa insensible, with internals of delirium. He was very haggard in appearance, his pulse was very feeble and quick, and he was in imminent danger. The deceased purged whilst witness was present, and blood, &c., passed from him. The symptoms were consistent with his having taken some irritant poison, and, in fact, strongly pointed in that direction, especially considering the quickness with which the attack came on. He prescribed for the deceased and endeavoured to keep him up with stimulants; stayed over two hours until deceased rallied a little, and saw him twice afterwards, but the case was hopeless from the first. On Wednesday morning he again called, but found the child dead. He had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found the stomach perfectly healthy. Could not find any traces of poison whatever. The whole of the colon was highly inflamed. He was satisfied that dysentery was the cause of death. It was quite an exception for acute dysentery to terminate fatally so rapidly, even in Africa or India, and he could not but think deceased must have been ill longer than was supposed. The cause of the dysentery was doubtful. It may have arisen from the bad quality of the water taken by the deceased, or from some other extraneous cause. - A Juror wanted to know whether the water was impure or not? - Witness said he had been looking into the matter. The pipes connecting the water to the quarters where the father of the deceased was residing for some time past had not been used, and consequently a lot of impure matter had got into them, and they had been used for some little time without being cleansed. He had examined the water that morning and found it very bad. There were worms in it more than half-an-inch in length. He intended to have the water analysed, as a large number of troops would be occupying the barracks in about a month. - The Coroner thought instant steps should be taken to prevent the consumption of the water. - The father of the deceased said another of his children was attacked with similar symptoms about a fortnight ago. - A Juror considered there was great negligence on the part of someone in the pipes not having been cleansed. - Mr Batho replied that he would see the matter was looked after. - The Coroner considered there was something very startling in the statement made respecting the pipes. He thought he was justified in saying the water ought not to be used until the pipes had been cleansed. - The father of the deceased said the reservoir supplying the barracks with water had not been cleansed for four years until a few weeks ago. - The Coroner hoped the authorities would see that the reservoir was cleansed a little oftener. - The Jury of whom Mr E. Monk was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr Batho was complemented by the Coroner and Jury on the very lucid manner in which he had given his evidence, and the great care and discretion he had shewn in the case.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 August 1879
EXETER - Mr Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest on Saturday touching the death of ELIZA FOYT, aged 48, living in Coffins-court, Smythen Street, who was found dead in bed by her husband that morning. The testimony of Mr Brash, who was called in after death, was to the effect that death resulted from heart disease; and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 August 1879
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr t. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, relative to the death of EVA BEATRICE SINCLAIR, a young lady thirteen years of age, who died on Tuesday from the results of an accident the previous day. John Hannah, groom, in the employ of Mr Cook, livery-stablekeeper, said he had ridden out with the deceased three times and on every occasion she has had the same horse, which was a very quiet one. She was a good horsewoman. On Monday he accompanied her out, and whilst passing a lane in George-street, leading to his stable, the horse turned; the deceased checked the animal, he reared and turned right over on his back. MISS SINCLAIR was underneath the horse when he reared. The animal regained its feet without help. The deceased was still in the saddle. She got off as quickly as possible, and seemed very much hurt, but was still conscious. She was placed in a cab, and taken home. He has since examined the saddle and found the pommel very much bent. Had known the horse about twelve months. After the accident he found a cut between its ears. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's officer, stated that the mother of the deceased was quite unable to attend. The death occurred at about eleven on Tuesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 29 August 1879
BIDEFORD - Strange Fatality At Bideford. - Between eight and nine o'clock on Wednesday evening JOHN REDDICLEAVE, a man in the employ of Mr C. Hopson, of Bideford, was sent to the stables to litter down the horse. As he did not return a boy went to the stables, and at the foot of a ladder outside found REDDICLEAVE lying in a pool of water and quite dead. It is supposed that when going up the ladder he fell off, and being stunned he was unable to rise, and was suffocated in the pool of water. The deceased was between 50 and 60 years of age, and leaves a wife and family. An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Thompson, the Borough Coroner and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 August 1879
LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, touching the death of a convict - FREDERICK CALVERT, aged 31, who was sentenced at the Clerkenwell Sessions in October 1872 to ten years' penal servitude, and an equal period of police supervision, for housebreaking. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

The sudden death of MR WM. MACKNEY, 63 years of age, at Ford, on Wednesday evening, from angina pectoris, was the subject of an Inquest held at the Ford Hotel, Alexandra-road, Ford, yesterday, by Mr J. Vaughan. It appeared that on Wednesday afternoon he complained of pain in his chest, and in the evening, while sitting in his chair, suddenly drew a long breath, and fell back dead. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Hy. Horton, who found all the organs impaired by fatty degeneration and ascertained cause of death

CORNWOOD - Killed On A Level Crossing. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Venton Farm, near Cornwood, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN HINGSTON, farm labourer, aged 70 years. On Thursday afternoon the deceased was passing over a level crossing, near Hemerdon Junction, when a goods train came along and knocked him down, and the wheels passing over his head he was killed on the spot. At the place where the accident occurred the line is visible for a distance of nearly a mile, and it is therefore evident that the deceased could not have taken ordinary precautions before attempting to cross. When about thirty yards from the deceased, who was deaf, the driver of the engine saw him and the whistle was sounded very hard, but the train could not be brought up quickly enough to prevent the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the family of the deceased in order to meet the funeral expenses.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At Batten. - An Inquest was opened at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday morning by the County Coroner ( Mr R. R. Rodd) regarding the death of JOHN GREEN, private in the Royal Marine Light Infantry. It appears that on Friday night last the deceased was conveyed from Plymouth to Batten by a waterman in company with another marine named Warde, who was inebriated. The marines were seen looking about the cove, and were afterwards seen going up the road towards the castle, but were not seen any more until the next morning, when Warde was found dead at the bottom of the cliff, and GREEN, in an insensible state, not far off. It is thought the two marines when on their way to Fort Stamford, where they were stationed, lost themselves and fell over the cliffs; but it is a remarkable circumstance that in GREEN'S case, as well as in Warde's, there was not a single indication of external injury, although the cliff it is presumed they fell over is about sixty feet in height. The Inquest was adjourned until Wednesday in order that a post mortem examination of the body might be made.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 September 1879
PLYMSTOCK - The Fatal Accident At Batten. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held the adjourned Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of PRIVATE GEORGE WARDE, of the Marines, at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel, on Saturday evening. The evidence given on the last occasion shewed that on Friday week last about quarter to ten p.m. two Marines stationed at Fort Stamford - the deceased and another Marine named GREEN - were landed at Batten by a waterman who brought them from the Barbican. The deceased was inebriated, and on landing both men seemed stupefied, so that Gover thought they had been asleep on the passage across. About five minutes afterwards they were seen at the cove near the beacon, where some coastguardmen were on duty. They said they wanted a boat to go to Plymouth, and on being told they could not get one, one of them said "All right, I have got some money, and we will sleep this side." They then went back by the road they came, but about ten minutes afterwards returned. On being asked what they wanted loitering about, they said "All right, we will get a boat." Instead of returning by the road, they walked across the quay towards the new breakwater. Next morning deceased and GREEN were found lying at the bottom of the cliffs, underneath the beacon. WARDE was dead; Green was alive, but unconscious. He was removed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, where he died on Wednesday last. As one of the men's caps was found on the top of the cliff, near the beacon, it is presumed they lost their way and accidentally fell over the cliffs. The Inquest was adjourned in order to see how Green progressed, and that a post mortem examination might be made on Saturday. - Mr Charles Albert Maunsell, surgeon-major at Fort Staddon, said he had made a post-mortem examination of WARDE'S body. It was well nourished, and there were no traces of decomposition. He found no internal marks of violence sufficient to cause death. There were two contused wounds on the scalp. One was situated over the left eyebrow, irregular in shape and one inch long, penetrating to the bone, which was not fractured. There was a slight oozing of blood from this wound. The other was on the oplex of the head, one inch long, penetrating the scalp, but not fracturing the bone. On opening the chest he found the pericardium to contain about twelve ounces of blood, the result of a rupture of the right ventricle of the heart. The rupture was three-quarters of an inch in length with ragged edges. The heart was fatty and weighed 16 ½ ounces, being 2 ½ ounces more than the normal weight. The cause of death was rupture of the heart, which was probably occasioned by a very severe fall. The Jury returned as their verdict, "Accidental Death caused by the fall over a cliff to the ground below." They recommended that some steps should be taken to fence the top of the cliffs, which were at present very dangerous.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 September 1879
TORQUAY - Dr Gaye, Devon Coroner, held an Inquest at the Police Station, Torquay, yesterday on a lad named ALFRED KELLOND, who resides at Ellacombe. It appeared that the lad was on Tuesday night walking on the Pier when a rumour was circulated that the Prince was landing. During the crush that ensued the lad was pushed on to the slip below, where he fell headlong. He received concussion of the brain and died a short time afterwards. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and the Jury asked the Coroner to call the attention of the Local Board to the spot, and to suggest that a fence should be put up to prevent a similar occurrence.

EXETER - A Man named PETER ANDREWS died suddenly at Exeter whilst driving a horse and cart. It is supposed that heart disease was the cause of death, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at the Inquest, which was held on Wednesday.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 September 1879
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening, by the Borough Coroner, Mr Brian, relative to the death of JOHN ASH, a merchant seaman, aged 42 years. It was stated that the deceased, who had been out of employ, had resided at the Golden Lion Inn, 9 Bath-street, for some time past. During the past week he had been suffering from diarrhoea, and was recommended to get medical advice, but did not do so. On Monday evening he appeared nothing worse than usual, and put up the shutters as was his custom. About half-past six o'clock yesterday morning the son of the landlord, named Tremlett, was called by the deceased who said that he was very ill, and asked the lad to fetch three pennyworth of brandy. The boy fetched the brandy and on returning into the room he found the deceased half out of bed. He drank the brandy, but died a few minutes afterwards. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 September 1879
LYDFORD - At Dartmoor Convict Prisons yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, on BERNARD CALL, a prisoner, aged 26 years. The deceased complained of being ill while employed knitting stockings, and was immediately removed to the Infirmary, where he died within a short time. A verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned. CALL was convicted at Glasgow in 1876 of assault and robbery and sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. His conduct in prison had been good.

MARYSTOWE - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Marystowe yesterday on MARY HARRIS, aged 72 years, who died from the effects of burns received by falling into the fire on the 2nd inst. JOHN HARRIS, husband of the deceased, who is 78 years of age, stated that he left the cottage only for a few minutes, and on returning found his wife across the fire in a blaze. Mr Doidge, surgeon, of Lifton, who was quickly in attendance, said he found the deceased suffering from severe burns about the hands, arms and neck and shock to the nervous system, from which she died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 September 1879
EXETER - Mr Hooper, Coroner for Exeter, held an Inquest on Saturday, on MRS ANN TOTHILL, a widow, aged seventy-five years, who had died in the county Hospital. Deceased occupied one of Duke's almshouses, Heavitree. Just before midnight on Friday, the 5th, cries of "fire" were heard proceeding from her room; and Mrs Gidley, a neighbour, discovered that her bedclothes had been set on fire by the upsetting of a benzoline lamp. Mrs Gidley extinguished the flames and sent for a doctor, who advised the removal of the injured woman to the Hospital. She had been burnt severely about the lower limbs and the shock was so great that she never rallied, but died late on Thursday night last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 September 1879
PLYMOUTH - Fatal "Skylarking." - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Corner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, respecting the death of WILLIAM STAPELY, a merchant sailor, about 17 years of age. George Setter, sailmaker, stated that whilst working in his loft at Commercial Wharf he saw the body of the deceased floating in Sutton Pool. Witness got a boat and brought the body ashore, and gave it in charge of P.C. Jones, of the Plymouth police. Samuel Knapman, a lad, about 15 years of age, stated that on the evening of Tuesday, the 9th inst., about seven o'clock, he was on Commercial Wharf, in company with another lad named Richard Rundle, when the deceased came down in company with other young men. The two young men who were with the deceased left him and went in a boat, leaving the deceased standing on the wharf. Witness knew the deceased well, and they commenced skylarking. The deceased threw some dirt at them, and witness and Rundle ran to the other end of the wharf, and almost immediately afterwards they heard a splash in the water. About five minutes afterwards they came up the wharf again, but did not see the deceased although they fancied they saw him behind some barrels. They did not raise an alarm, because they thought that the deceased had gone home. Mary Sandercock, residing in Friar's-lane, said that the deceased was a lodger of hers. He left home about seven o'clock on the Tuesday evening, and did not return again. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 September 1879
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, last evening, touching the death of MARY MATTHEWS, aged 73, wife of a pensioner, residing at 137 King-street West. It appeared from the evidence of the husband, who, after due caution, consented to be sworn, that on Thursday evening he returned to his room, taking with him a private in the 13th Regiment, both of them at the time under the influence of liquor. There he found the deceased, who was also intoxicated. The soldier, who went by the name of "Charlie," shortly afterwards procured a bottle containing about a pint and a half of whisky, and they very quickly became quite a convivial party. The bottle was nearly empty, when MATTHEWS lost his senses and fell on the bed asleep with his clothes on. From that time he knew, or remembered, nothing more until he awoke yesterday morning, when he found that the soldier had disappeared and his wife lying on the floor quite dead, which her face touching the fender. He raised no alarm for three parts of an hour, during which time, he stated, he was on his knees. On being pressed, by the Coroner, witness said that when he last saw the deceased she was sitting in her chair, apparently quite comfortable, and smoking her pipe. He further stated that the soldier had stolen his purse containing 4s. 6d., together with a penknife. - Several other witnesses were called, but no additional evidence of any moment was adduced, except that the husband was very much given to drink. The Jury were of opinion that it would be useless to adjourn the Inquiry in order t discover the soldier, whom MATTHEWS said he would be unable to recognise, and they came to the conclusion "The deceased had died from Natural Causes, greatly accelerated by habits of intemperance."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 September 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Fisherman's Arms, Richmond-walk, Devonport, on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of MRS CAROLINE PETERS, a middle-aged woman, who died suddenly on the previous day, whilst preparing to attend a funeral. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 September 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening at the Standard Arms, Morice Town, by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, relative to the death of ROBERT GRANVILLE, aged 37. The wife of the deceased stated that he went to work in the morning in his usual health, and came home to breakfast about eight a.m. When he came in, he told her not to take up his breakfast, as he could not eat it. She asked him what was the matter, and he then put his hand to his chest and fell down. She went to him and spoke to him, but he gave her no answer. She sent a person for a doctor, and when he arrived the deceased was dead. Mr William Gard, surgeon, deposed to having made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found it to be well nourished. On opening the chest he found the heart to be in a very fatty state. In his opinion, the deceased died from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 September 1879
TORQUAY - The Suicide At Torquay. Disagreement Of A Jury. - On Saturday evening an Inquest was opened by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, at the Police Station, touching the death of HENRY ADAMS, a mason, aged 56, who committed suicide by hanging himself the day previous at a house in the Teignmouth-road. The evidence of four witnesses - one a relative - was taken. Three of them deposed that since Whitsuntide the deceased had been a heavy drinker, and had been intoxicated, more or less, nearly every day since. The landlady with whom he lodged deposed that deceased was always in a desponding state, especially when he had been drinking to excess. A cousin of the deceased, who was working with him at the time, stated that ADAMS had been drinking on Friday morning before breakfast; and the deceased's employer cautioned him about drinking on the same day. It was further shewn that deceased had separated from his wife and family about twelve months since. The Foreman of the Jury (Mr R. Butland) proposed that they should return a verdict to the effect that "the cause of deceased's death was Temporary Insanity, and this state of mind was accelerated by drink." - This proposal was seconded by Mr Groves, one of the Jurors. Several of the Jurymen disagreed with the last clause, and asked the Foreman to withdraw it. The Coroner thought that they might insert the word "produced" instead of "accelerated", but Mr Butland objected, saying that he had put the mildest term he could conceive. The Coroner then took a show of hands, which resulted in the proposer and seconder being the sole supporters of the motion. The Coroner intimated that he could not receive a verdict until twelve out of the thirteen agreed, and expressed a wish that one of the two would give way. Mr Groves, after some hesitation, said he would waive his objection and verdict that the cause of death was "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 September 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry yesterday with respect to the death of JOHN PADDON, aged 61 years, who died suddenly on Saturday evening. He was drinking a glass of ale, when he was suddenly attacked by illness, and died whilst being carried to his house across the road. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was opened on Saturday evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, at the Sutton Harbour Inn, Plymouth, relative to the death of JAMES HANNAFORD, leading stoker of H.M.S. Agincourt, who was drowned from that vessel on the morning of Sunday, September 21st. MICHAEL HANNAFORD identified the body as that of his son, who was thirty-four years of age. - Andrew Easterbrook, one of the crew of the harbour-master's yacht, deposed that on Saturday morning when he was on board he heard someone calling from the Breakwater, and on going there he found the body of the deceased, which he brought to Sutton harbour. - Inspector James, of the Metropolitan Police, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Admiralty. The Inquiry was adjourned until Thursday evening, with a view of obtaining the attendance of witnesses from the Agincourt, which vessel is now at Portland.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 October 1879
NEWTON ABBOT - The Sudden Death At Newton. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest on MR WILLIAM TAYLOR BRACEWELL, who died suddenly on Saturday evening. Mr James Stooke, auctioneer, said that he and Mr Wilkinson died with the deceased on Wednesday afternoon, when he appeared as he usually did. Deceased did not eat much - a small quantity of sole and a wing of a pheasant - and drank one glass of champagne only. Witness went upstairs to a bedroom, and the deceased followed laughing and joking, and lay down on the bed with his hat on and a dinner napkin in his hand. He laughed whilst lying on the bed. Witness left in about two minutes. Deceased did not drink anything besides the glass of champagne, and he did not think he finished it. - Charles Memberry, waiter at the Globe Hotel, in the service of the deceased, said that during the three years he had lived at the Globe Hotel the deceased had been in good health and appeared as usual on Saturday; but did not eat his dinner with is usual appetite. It was his custom to lie down after dinner and as he could not be roused after doing so on Saturday a doctor was sent for. The deceased generally ate and drank freely and at times drank freely. - George Worth, boots at the Globe Hotel said that about two months ago, after riding home from Bovey on a hot day deceased was in an insensible condition, apparently faint or in a fit and breathing hard for three hours. - Mr J. W. Ley, surgeon, stated that the deceased had been his patient for nearly four years, and had constantly been treated by him during the last six months. He often lost his memory, suffered from pains in the head, and was gradually losing his sight. About six weeks since, he was called to him, and found him in a semi-comatose state, in which he lay for several hours. that, with the losing of his sight, led him to think that he suffered from progressive disease of the brain. On that day he had been riding in the sun, and that would cause the state he found him in. He was then certainly not intoxicated and, although he had heard that the deceased drank freely, he never saw him anything the worse for drink. He was of opinion that very little would upset him. He had that morning made a post mortem examination of the body, and found an extraordinary softening of the brain, but no clot on it. The heart and kidneys were healthy, but the liver was large. His stomach was very full of undigested food. In his opinion death was caused by congestion of the base of the brain paralysing his respiratory organs, the state of the brain predisposing him to sudden death. Mr W. G. Scott said he assisted at the post mortem examination, and quite agreed with the opinion of the previous witness. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, and gave their fees to the Cottage Hospital.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, last evening resumed the inquiry respecting the death of JAMES HANNAFORD, aged 34 years, a leading stoker on board H.M.S. Agincourt, who was drowned in Plymouth Sound, on Sunday September 21st. It seems that about four o'clock in the morning the deceased was ordered to light the fires in the steam pinnace, which was made fast to the [?] boom. Instead of getting another stoker to accompany him, as he should have done, he went out on the boom alone, with a lantern tied round his neck. According to the evidence, he ought to have pulled in the pinnace by the chain to which she was attached, and have then slipped [?] by means of a "li[?]" - a rope hanging from the boom. Apparently, however, he lowered himself down the lizard without pulling in the [?] and got too far down to be able to reach the chain. He then found that he could not haul himself up, and after shouting for assistance dropped into the water through sheer exhaustion. Immediately this occurred, a quartermaster named Wm. Daw, ran out on the boom and got into a boat, intending to jump after HANNAFORD directly he rose. he could not see him, however, and, although boats were very quickly manned and diligent search was made, the poor fellow could not be found. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 October 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Carriage Accident At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held at the Imperial Hotel, Millbay, on Saturday touching the death of WALTER SEYMOUR BLIGHT, tanner and currier, Devonport, who died on Friday at his residence, Buckingham-place, Stonehouse, from injuries received on Wednesday evening. It will be remembered that MR BLIGHT was returning home with his wife and some friends, when the wagonette which he was driving ran on a rubble heap and was capsized. The shafts were broken and the jagged end of one cut the arteries of MR BLIGHT'S throat as he fell from the carriage, inflicting fatal wounds. The accident occurred just outside the deceased's residence, the rubble heap having been thrown up in connection with a sewer that is being constructed there. The Inquiry was attended on behalf of the Local Board by Mr Curteis, the clerk; and Mr James Taylor, by whom the sewer is being constructed, was also present. Previous to the Inquest being opened a discussion arose as to the expediency of an adjournment until some of the party were so far recovered as to attend and give evidence. The general opinion of the Jury was averse to this, and it was decided to proceed. - MRS SOPHY BLIGHT was the first witness, and her evidence was taken in her bedroom, which she was unable to leave. She deposed that on Wednesday, as they were returning from Yealmpton, the deceased bought some ginger beer at the Greyhound Inn, and, as he complained of cold, at her advice he mixed some gin with it. He was perfectly sober. Deceased was a good driver. As they neared their house she remarked that she had enjoyed the ride very much, and would like for them all to drive on to Devonport, put the horse in the stable, and come back by train. They were not going very fast. She did not remember seeing a light on the heap. She had a confused recollection of the carriage overturning and becoming unconscious. After a time she remembered her husband saying "SOPHY, darling, you are killed." She was stunned at the time and bruised. Then she looked up, and seeing her husband, cried out, "Oh, you are all blood." Deceased said, "Never mind about me, dear, so long as you are all right." She did not remember hearing a boy call out to warn them against driving on the heap. - JOHN THOMAS BLIGHT identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his brother. He was in his 35th year. He (witness) knew the horse that was being driven that afternoon. It was occasionally used to work in a cart, and occasionally in the trap, and was a steady horse. - Thomas Leah, surgeon, said that about half-past eight o'clock on Wednesday night, he was called to the deceased's residence in Buckingham-place, Stonehouse. He found him with a severe lacerated wound across the throat, which communicated with the gullet at its right corner by a deep puncture. There had been profuse bleeding. Deceased complained of great pain in his chest. Death resulted from injuries received, through loss of blood, and shock to the system. In answer to a question from a Juror, as to whether he had any idea what caused the wound, witness said it had been suggested that it was the point of a shaft. A shaft was broken in two places. There was blood on one of the shafts. It was quite possible that the edge of the shaft caused the injuries. - William Collins, a lad 15 years of age, in the employ of the Local Board of Health said: I was watchboy in charge of this heap. On Wednesday last I saw the trap coming. The lantern pole was up and the lamp lit. I dare say it was getting on for nine. Deceased was not driving furiously, but at a good trot. I sung out, "Mind the rubble, sir, and keep close to the kerb." I was standing close by the lamp, and saw the wheels of the carriage go up over the heap. The pole broke right off. - By the Foreman (Mr G. H. Goodyear): The lamp was lit. there was plenty of width of roadway. - Up to this time unanimity had obtained amongst the Jurymen in respect of the total absence of blame attaching to the Local Board. It was not stated that a cabman was waiting outside, and would swear that the lamp was not lighted at the time of the accident. - A Juror said they ought to have him in. It was quite possible the boy might say the lamp was lit if it were not, since he was in charge. - Another Juror thought that if there were any doubt in the matter it ought to be cleared up. Others were disposed to believe the boy's evidence, but at the same time rather than there should be any dissatisfaction on the part of the Jury, wished to have the man in. Mr Curteis said he could call half a dozen witnesses to prove that the lamp was lit. - A Juror said he knew that the boy was provided with oil and wick in order to light the lamp. - The Coroner: I don't want the cabman in. I don't want the man to commit perjury. - A Juror: I think the Jury would be better satisfied. - The Coroner: MR BLIGHT does not make any allegation. - MR BLIGHT: Of course all the evidence I heard as yet is that the light was burning. - A Juror: It would be a satisfaction to the friends to know whether the light was burning or not. In the course of further discussion it was pointed out that MRS BLIGHT had said she did not see the light. - The Coroner did not wish to call the man. The boy' s evidence was clear. The Jury were satisfied. - A Juror (sitting near MR BLIGHT): We are not satisfied over here. - The man was then called. - Henry George Baker, cabman, said that on the night in question he followed the deceased's wagonette for some time, and passed it in Bedford Street. He passed the heap a little in front of the defendant. The street lamp was burning, but there was no red lamp on the heap. He had just passed down Hobart-street, and left a girl when he heard that a trap had upset and went to the spot as soon as he could to render assistance. - By the Coroner: He did not see a light on the heap when he passed. - The Coroner: Might it possibly have been there and you not have seen it? - Witness: There was no light. - The Coroner: You will swear there was no light? - Witness: There was no light on the near side of me. - The Coroner said that he wanted to know was this: Might it possibly have been there and witness not have seen it? - Witness: I must have been blind. Witness (continuing): said that when he came on the spot of the accident he said to the watch-boy, "There was no light, my son, when I passed." The boy said "I'll bet you a shilling." - MR BLIGHT: That is a very different thing. I am not satisfied now. - A Juror: One positive is worth a thousand negatives if each party is disinterested. - MR BLIGHT: That materially alters the case. - A Juror: I don't think a boy like that ought to be trusted with the light. - The Coroner: You must not express your opinion like that. They knew the road as well as he did, and knew that there were plenty of public lamps. It was stated that there was a public lamp just below on the right. - Mary Vane, servant, Buckingham-place, was called, and said that about five minutes before the accident occurred she happened to be out in the front of the house, and saw the lantern lit. The Coroner said that the cabman passed about six minutes before. The girl saw the light five minutes before. - A short discussion followed, in which one of the Jurors argued that in passing the narrow roadway between the heap and the kerb the cabman's attention would probably be entirely given to the horse, and he might not see the light. - The Coroner thought they had had enough evidence in the matter. The facts were concise and simple. They could only arrive at one conclusion, that the death was the result of accident. There was no blame suggested with regard to the Local Board of Health. - Acting on a suggestion of Mr Simon Hyne, Stonehouse, who had just entered, MR BLIGHT begged the Jury to grant an adjournment as he could get other evidence that the lamp was not lit at the time. - The Coroner said that if the light was not lit, the man knew the heap was there. - MR BLIGHT thought they ought to ask for an adjournment. - The Court was cleared, and after a short interval the Coroner announced that the adjournment was refused. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry at the Workhouse last evening respecting the death of an inmate named JANE HOOPPELL, 86 years of age. About a month since the deceased who was of unsound mind, fell whilst getting out of bed and knocked her head. Her face was very much bruised, and in the opinion of Mr F. A. Thomas, the house surgeon, death resulted from the severe shock caused by the fall. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

NORTH TAWTON - An Inquest was held at North Tawton on Saturday by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, respecting the death of MR WILLIAM DREW, a well known and much respected inhabitant of the town, who died suddenly on Friday, at the age of 81 years. It was stated that MR DREW had a long walk on Friday morning and after dinner, when he seemed to be in his usual health, he went out for another walk. He had not gone quite out of the town, however, when he fell down, and he was found lying prostrate on the ground. Mr Deene, surgeon, was quickly in attendance and pronounced life to be extinct. A verdict of "Death from Apoplexy " was returned. The deceased was a very strong and active man, and after attaining a good old age he had many an [?] run after the hounds, and oftentimes was the only one in at the death.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 October 1879
An Inquest was held on Monday evening at Horsebridge by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of a little child named MARTYN, aged about 16 months, who fell into a trough filled with water for agricultural purposes, and was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan held an Inquest at the Lifeboat Tavern, Devonport, last evening on the infant son of JOHN J. LUSCOMBE, of 217 Princess-street. The deceased, who was 3 years old, suffered from water on the brain, and some time since was attended by Mr Horton. On Monday it was taken seriously ill, and Messrs. Horton and Wilson were both sent for, but before either of them reached the house the child died. One or two of the Jurors thought under the circumstances an Inquest was unnecessary, and that Mr Horton could have certified to the cause of death, but both the Coroner and the gentleman named concurred in the opinion that it was desirable cases like these should be inquired into, and that a certificate of death should not be too readily granted. - Mr Horton, whilst expressing his conviction that the child died from natural causes, pointed out that five weeks had elapsed from the time he last saw it to the day of its decease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday respecting the death of MRS ELIZA DORCAS MARSHALL, who, as already reported, died suddenly whilst on her way to see Mr Prynne, surgeon. The deceased had been suffering from a tumour in the throat, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of ABRAHAM CORY, about [?] years of age. The deceased, who was a gardener, resided at 14 Arundel-crescent. On Saturday he went to work as usual, and returned home about three o'clock in the afternoon, when he ate a good dinner, consisting of a quantity of pork chops. Subsequently he complained of great pains in the face. He laid down, and about half an hour afterwards the daughter of the deceased noticing a change in his face went to him and found that he was dead. He was a violent tempered man, and was until recently greatly addicted to drink. It was thought that he broke a blood vessel in his head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of LILY BLANCHE STEERE, aged 21 months, the daughter of HENRY STEERE, landlord of the Brighton Inn, Stonehouse. Evidence was given to the effect that the child left the house unobserved about noon on Saturday, and ran into the roadway. Just at this time No. 10 tramcar, of which James Easterbrook was the driver, was ascending the incline between Manor-street and Battery-street, and going at the rate of three miles an hour. Just in front of it was a cart, which was partly on the tramway, and prevented the driver from having an unobstructed view of the road. Easterbrook heard a scream and felt a jerk, and stopped the car, and on going back he found the deceased child lying in the road severely injured, the car having passed over her. He took her into her father's house and she was at once conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she was attended to by Mr Fox, the surgeon for the day. She was suffering from a compound fracture of the right thigh and a very deep cut on the right side, and death took place about an hour and a half after her admission. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated Easterbrook and all parties concerned from blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 October 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening on JOHN COOPER, aged 57. The deceased was a dairyman, and on the 25th of September, on returning from his field, he told his housekeeper that when milking one of the cows the animal kicked him and [?] him back on a heap of stones. The deceased saw Mr Harper, surgeon, who attended him up to Friday morning when he died. In Mr Harper's opinion, death resulted from internal injuries caused by [?]. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 November 1879
BRIXHAM - Poisoning At Brixham. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Brixham by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, on MATILDA HYNE, who had died from the effects of poison taken on Tuesday last. - Mrs Jane Snell, [?] of the deceased, stated that deceased, who was 21 years of age, was of weak intellect and of a desponding frame of mind, and that owing to the application of setons she had become deaf. On Tuesday she was quite well, and in the evening of that day deceased told her that she had taken some rat's poison. Medical aid was not sought until Wednesday morning, and the deceased died in the same evening. - Julia Higston, another sister, deposed that she came over from Dartmouth on Tuesday morning to see her sister, who was then quite well, but in the evening the deceased told her that she had taken poison and [?] pot away. - David Snell, ropemaker, deposed that the deceased and her sister lived comfortably together. He had searched for the pot which had been thrown away, but could not find it. - Mr Samuel [?], surgeon, stated that he was called to the deceased on Wednesday morning and was told that she had taken poison, but notwithstanding his exertions she died in the evening. Death had resulted from inflammation of the stomach, caused by an irritant poison, of which 1 ½ rains was quite sufficient to cause death. The Coroner remarked that great blame was to be attached to the sister for not obtaining medical aid earlier. The Inquest was adjourned until Thursday.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 November 1879
PLYMOUTH - Unexplained Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Tandem Inn, Plymouth, by Mr J. Vaughan, Deputy Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH PULLEYBLANK, 73 years of age, residing at 4 Flora Cottages, Plymouth. - SARAH PULLEYBLANK stated that the deceased died in her house on Sunday morning about half-past nine o'clock. William Creber, labourer, living in the same house with the deceased, deposed to hearing her call out, and assisting her to a couch where she died. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held later in the evening, at the Guildhall, touching the death of JOHN MALONE, carman, in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company. - Isaac Pearse, canvasser, in the employ of the same company, said that about 6.35 p.m. on the 1st instant he was standing near the railway arch, Union-street, Plymouth, when he noticed a one-horse wagon going rapidly up the slope to the good's station. Seeing a crowd running towards the wagon he ran near and saw MALONE lying right across the road. He was conveyed to Dr Pearse's residence and thence to the Hospital. He was quite unconscious. - George Sylvester, resident surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that he received the deceased on Saturday evening. He was insensible, and remained so for about an hour, when he died. The appearance of the body and of the patient generally did not indicate plainly that he had died from injury received through the wagon passing over him. He appeared to have suffered from brain disease. Witness could not tell if he died from brain disease or injuries then received. - Robert Bragge, brother-in-law of the deceased, identified the body. - Mr Pearse said that carmen were in the habit of jumping off the wagon to ease the horse just where the deceased fell. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Coroner for Devonport, opened an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening into the circumstances attending the death of a woman named AMELIA RICKARD, aged 40 years, who had been residing at Wellsworthy, near Saltash. She was admitted into the Hospital on Wednesday last suffering from gangrene and diffused inflammation of the right arm. The disease was so developed that the tops of the fingers of the left hand had been destroyed, and her feet were in a fearfully bad condition. When she was admitted the house surgeon had no hope of her recovery, and death resulted on Saturday morning. Mr Doyle, the surgeon, stated that the woman had been a domestic servant, and was brought to the Hospital by two women who told him that RICKARD had no home. She came in the steamer from Saltash to Northcorner and then had to walk to the Hospital, and this he deemed to have been a highly unsatisfactory proceeding, looking at the debilitated condition of the woman. The Coroner, adjourned the case until Thursday afternoon in order to obtain evidence upon this point and upon the antecedents of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 November 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, relative to the death of JOSEPH JEREMIAH DRISCOLL. The deceased, who was a labourer, was employed at the Torpoint Manure Works. On the 24th October he and another man were raising a stone, when a piece of the stone was broken off and fell on the deceased's foot. He was taken to the Hospital, where it was found that his big and 1st toe were completely smashed. Tetanus set in shortly afterwards and he died on Sunday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 November 1879
BRIXHAM - The adjourned Inquiry respecting the death of MATILDA HYNE, aged 21 years, was held at Brixham yesterday by Dr Gaye, County Coroner. Sergeant Madden stated that he had made full inquiries in Brixham and Dartmouth as to the purchase of the poison, but without avail. He produced a bottle, which was labelled "James ' phosphorus paste, or vermin killer," which was found in the place where deceased stated that she had thrown the bottle after taking the poison. Henry Jeffard, aged 14, deposed to finding the bottle in a tar barrel in Mr Gilbert's garden when he was searching for fuel for a bonfire. He did not know that the bottle was wanted. The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict that "The deceased committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Swan Hotel, Cornwall-street, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of KATE JACKSON, aged 27 years, widow of the late proprietor of the Albert Hotel, Morice Town, who died on Thursday morning last in giving birth to a child. The deceased, following the death of her husband, has kept a beershop at Northcorner, and has been cohabiting with some man. On Tuesday morning she spoke to a constable and told him she had been to see the father of the child in order to get some money from him, but he had driven her away, and were it not for her three other children she would jump over the quay. The child was born on Thursday morning and the woman died before Dr Wilson, who came within a few minutes of being called, saw her. There were rumours that the deceased had died from either want or excessive drinking, but Dr Wilson, who made a post mortem examination of the body, found it well nourished, and could detect no signs of intemperate habits. Her heart was diseased; this induced constitutional weakness, and he was of opinion that extreme prostration was the cause of death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was accordingly returned. The children of the deceased, including the infant child, have been handed over to the care of the parochial authorities.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 November 1879
PLYMOUTH - Concealment Of Birth At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, with a double Jury, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Guildhall relative to the death of the newly-born female child of a domestic servant named MARTHA WERRY, living at 4 Woodland-terrace. - Miss Emma Steele, 4 Woodland-terrace, stated that Dr Pearse called at her house early on Friday, and in consequence of what transpired then made another visit later in the day to see the servant (MARTHA WERRY). At his earlier visit he told her his impression was that WERRY had given birth to a child, and he urged her to make a search for the body. On his second visit about six p.m., he went at once into WERRY'S room, and witness accompanied him. WERRY was in the kitchen at the time. In an unlocked box belonging to WERRY they found a large brown paper parcel tied round with a string. Dr Pearse opened it and witness retired to the other end of the room. She was frightened and did not see what the parcel contained, but went downstairs. She and Dr Pearse, who was carrying the parcel, went into the kitchen, where there were WERRY and a charwoman. She sent the latter away, and said to WERRY, "MARTHA, a dead child has been found in your room," upon which WERRY began to cry, but made no remark. Shortly afterwards, however, she said, "Oh, will you forgive me?" and witness replied, "I will certainly." Dr Pearse locked the body in a cupboard and handed her (witness) the key, and desired her not to give it up to anyone but the Coroner's officer or the police. An inspector of police came soon after, and she gave him the key. - The Coroner (warmly): Which you had no right to do. You had no right to give the key to the police until the Coroner had been communicated with. Such a thing was never done before in this Borough. - The witness said she was very sorry that she made such a mistake. WERRY had borne an excellent character, was the best of servants, and had been with her nearly five years. - Inspector Hill said that on Friday night he went to 4 Woodland-terrace, and told Miss Steele that he had been sent by the chief constable to take the body of the child to the deadhouse at the police-station. She handed him a key and he went to the cupboard where he found the dead body wrapped in cloth and paper. He took the child to the mortuary. He saw the woman in bed, but had no conversation with her. - Dr William Henry Pearse said that he called in the morning casually at No. 4 Woodland-terrace. As he was leaving it, he returned at Miss Steele's request to see her servant, MARTHA WERRY, who, she said, was poorly. He had an interview with her, and felt sure that she had been recently confined. She denied it for almost an hour and then said she had had a miscarriage. He was not satisfied and requested Miss Steele to search her bedroom, and the body was found as described. WERRY told him that everything occurred in bed: that she did what she could to help herself, and that she fainted. He had made a post-mortem examination of the body. The child had arrived at maturity, and was a fully developed, fine child. He had no doubt that it breathed. He could find no [?] marks of injury whatever. The child might have been accidentally suffocated. WERRY told him that it was born on Tuesday night, and that statement corresponded with the appearance of the child. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 November 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Torpoint Ferry-Bridge. - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, yesterday, respecting the death of MARY DAVIS, aged 70 years, who died from the effects of injuries inflicted upon her by the chain attached to the Torpoint Ferry. It was stated by Mr Holman, of Torpoint, and by one or two other witnesses that the woman was on Monday week standing on the beach, close to the chains, waiting for the approach of the ferry. When within a few yards of the shore the watchman on the ferry called out to the persons on the beach to stand clear of the chains. Deceased, who was dead, paid no heed to the warning, and the chain nearest her gave a "surge" upwards, threw her down and in its descent struck her heavily across the upper portion of her leg, inflicting a compound fracture. On being removed to the Hospital it was deemed necessary to amputate the limb. The deceased lingered until Saturday and then died. - The Coroner inquired whether it was not possible to erect a guard of some sort around the chains, so as to prevent mishaps of this kind arising, but Mr Benett, representing Mr Carew, the proprietor of the ferry, replied that the advice of an eminent firm had been taken upon the point, but the swing of the chains was so great that it was found to be impossible. Several of the Jurors pointed out that the board cautioning persons not to approach the chains was placed against the side of the tank, and was not easily discernible, and complained that there was no accommodation on the beach for passengers who were waiting to cross. - Mr Benett stated that the house which previously existed had been taken down by the War Department in order to enable them to erect a new wall around the Gunwharf. Mr Carew was very desirous that ample accommodation should be afforded, and had been in communication with the department in order to obtain permission to build a substantial stone waiting-house on the site of the old structure. But it was not until within the last fortnight that an answer had been received declining to grant the permission sought, and Mr Carew had, accordingly, determined upon erecting an improved wooden structure. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and whilst exonerating everybody concerned from blame, recommended that additional warnings should be placed near the chains.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 November 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry on Saturday respecting the death of WILLIAM TURPIN, late foreman of carpenters, in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, who had been injured whilst at work on the viaduct in Union-street. It will be remembered that a pilot engine was passing over the viaduct when the driver felt a slight jerk, and on looking back, saw the deceased lying across the metals. The wheels of the engine had passed over both legs, cutting off the feet, and at the North Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, whither the sufferer was promptly conveyed, it was found necessary to amputate both legs at the knee. The shock was, however, too great for the poor fellow to rally from, and death followed shortly after the operation. At the Inquest nothing material relative to the accident, [?] the information already published, was elicited, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the engine driver and all the [?] of blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 November 1879
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death In The Stonehouse Police Court. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at the Market House Inn, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of SAMUEL CRABBE, aged 62 years. It will be remembered that on Friday week CRABBE was summoned for assaulting a woman named Clase, who resided in his house, and whilst in the box he became very excited, and asserted that the woman had told a lot of lies. He had cross-examined the witness and was about to address the Bench, when his face became livid with suppressed passion, his whole frame quivered with excitement, and he suddenly fell down in the box with a low groan. P.C.'s McNallan and Reep removed the deceased to the retiring room, and he died within a very few minutes. Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, was sent for, and he thought that the deceased had died from natural causes. It transpired yesterday that CRABBE had for the past eighteen months suffered from heart disease, and was attended about ten months ago by a medical man. He suffered from shortness of breath very badly, especially early in the morning. On that particular morning he appeared, if anything, a little better than usual, and before going to the police court he did not appear to be worried or excited about the case. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. C. Wills was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 November 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Ferryhouse Inn, Newpassage, last evening, on the infant daughter of JAMES W. MALLETT, shipwright, living at 28 Moon-street. The child was a year and seven months old and became ill on Saturday. The symptoms were not alarming until Monday morning, when a change was observed, and within ten minutes the child was dead. Mr May, jun., who was sent for too late to render assistance, made a post mortem examination of the body, and came to the conclusion that death resulted from diarrhoea and congestion of the lungs. This of itself, he said, would hardly account for the rapidity of the child's death, but from what he had seen of other members of the family, and from the condition of the deceased's brain, he was of opinion that the suddenness of the death was to be accounted for on the ground of a family predisposition to cerebral mischief. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 November 1879
MAKER - The Dead Body Found At Cawsand. Painful Circumstances Disclosed. - Mr L. Glubb, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Cawsand yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES ROWE, a superannuated labourer from the dockyard, who was about 68 years of age. The son of the deceased, a butcher residing in Keat-street, Morice Town, Devonport, lately became bankrupt; deceased claimed a dwelling-house, 35 Keat-street, Morice Town, as mortgagee under a deed, the authenticity of which has been disputed. Contradictory statements were made, and a notice of motion served on the deceased, which it is thought alarmed him and led to his sudden disappearance. On the 4th November he was seen crossing from Newpassage to Torpoint in the ferry; but whether he arrived at Torpoint it is not known. On Thursday a body was picked up at Cawsand by the coastguard, and handed over to P.C. Jewels, of the Cornwall County Constabulary. The dress answered the description given of the deceased, and Jewels instantly communicated with the friends, who identified the body by the clothing. The features were not recognisable. - WILLIAM ROWE (son of the deceased), a labourer in Keyham Yard, identified the body. His father left home on the 4th of November, in the afternoon. Witness's brother had been in difficulties and deceased for the past month had been very despondent. At times he would burst out crying, and he seemed very much depressed in spirits. - Susan Saunders, a charwoman, said she had been in the habit of attending the deceased and his wife for the past nineteen years. Deceased wandered away on November 4th. For a month previously she thought he was going out of his mind. He seemed very low in spirits, and appeared not to know what he was about. He would often go away and cry. - Edwin Warwick, coastguardsman, deposed to finding the body on Thursday morning. - The Coroner said he thought that the Jury could come to no other conclusion than to return a verdict of "Found Drowned," and that by what means deceased came into the water there was no evidence to shew. The Jury concurred, and returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 November 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday morning on SUSAN MAUDE TONKIN, aged 13 months, the infant daughter of JOHN TONKIN, a shoemaker, residing in Pond-lane. The deceased was seized with a fit on the previous morning and died before a medical man could arrive. Dr Wilson deposed to death having resulted from purely natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 November 1879
BIDEFORD - The Poisoning Case At Bideford. Strange Proceedings At The Inquest. - The Inquest on MARY ELIZABETH PERRY was held by Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, at the Dispensary. The first witness called was Annie Greenoff, a fellow servant of the deceased, who stated that she and the parlourmaid slept in the same bedroom as the deceased. On Monday last deceased asked witness to go an errand for her, which she consented to do, and she gave her a small bottle, and asked her to go to Mr Codd, chemist, and obtain the smallest quantity of arsenic. She went, and Mr Codd said threepenny worth was the smallest quantity he could sell, and that if she would leave the bottle he would supply it on the morrow. She left the bottle and on the following - the Tuesday - evening deceased said to her "You had better go for that now." She went accordingly, and Mr Codd gave her the bottle, and told her not to poison herself. The bottle was wrapped up, and deceased seemed pleased on her giving it to her. When going up to bed deceased took the bottle with her, and placed it on a box. It was labelled "poison," and the contents were of a white colour. Witness said, "What if you should take that; what trouble it would bring." Her fellow-servant then caught up the bottle, and the deceased ran after her to secure it, saying "Don't, don't be foolish. Let me have it. It is used for killing blackbeetles." The bottle was given up, and deceased put it in a drawer. Deceased got up first on Wednesday about half-past six o'clock. Witness heard that she took the arsenic on a piece of bread and butter. Deceased got the breakfast as usual, and sat down and partook of it, and then shortly after she became sick, and Mrs Gottwaltz, her mistress, sent in some brandy and water, and deceased was put to bed. She had heard deceased say something about taking arsenic for spots in the face. Deceased was generally of a quiet disposition. About three weeks ago she remarked, in consequence of her not getting the dinner properly, that she had a "good mind to destroy herself;" but on Tuesday last she said that "life was sweet." - Elizabeth Cosier, fellow-servant of the last witness, said that the deceased was frequently very reserved, and would not answer questions when asked for some minutes. Witness corroborated the statement of the previous witness that the deceased said three weeks ago that she had a "good mind to destroy herself." Deceased said on her having taken the poison, and when in bed, that she "had done it," and that "it was silly for her to do it." - Mr E. Rouse, medical practitioner, said he was called to see the deceased shortly after ten o'clock on Wednesday morning, and found her quiet and not suffering any pain. On asking her what she had taken deceased replied, "Arsenic," that she had taken more than a teaspoonful, and that she had thrown the bottle with the remainder in the fire. He applied the usual remedies, but without avail, and she died the same evening. When he first saw her she was not suffering from any aberration of mind. He made a post-mortem examination of the body, and the contents of the stomach indicated strong symptoms of arsenical poisoning. Deceased was not pregnant. - Mr William Codd, chemist and druggist, said that he supplied half an ounce of grey arsenic to Annie Greenoff on Tuesday last. It was not much coloured, but the bottle was properly labelled "poison." He made an entry in the book of the sale, but he did not get the young woman to sign it according to the Act; but he knew the young woman very well as he had supplied similar poison to her father for killing rats. He thought it was for a similar purpose. The book was put in. - The Jury, on being requested to consider their verdict, divided into two sections, eight being in favour of a verdict that deceased destroyed herself by taking an overdose of arsenic administered by herself, but that there was not sufficient evidence to shew the state of mind she was in at the time; and four were for a verdict of suicide while in an unsound state of mind. Thus matters remained until midnight, and neither party seemed inclined to give way, when the Coroner suggested that a compromise might be effected by simply returning a verdict that death resulted from an overdose of arsenic, remarking that the case was analogous to that of a stranger washed ashore, whom they might simply return as "found drowned." The eight gentlemen so far moderated their views as to be willing to adopt this verdict, but the four would not, and one Juror in despair suggested that they should send for a dictionary and search for a word sufficiently comprehensive in its meaning to cover all their opinions, but this brilliant idea was not acted upon. The proceedings were taking place in a small ill-ventilated room, without a fire, and a request was made to the Coroner that the Jury might be allowed to smoke, but this Dr Thompson would not allow. Just before one o'clock, however, the doctor left the room, and the already vitiated atmosphere of the close apartment became doubly oppressive from the thick clouds of tobacco smoke. About three o'clock the Coroner returned, but the Jury, who had been chatting pleasantly, ever and anon returning to the question at stake, were still undecided, and dogged determination sat upon every face; indeed, by this time the twelve had almost despaired of ever agreeing, and the staple subject of conversation was as to when they would be released, and whether the Coroner had power to keep them there until starvation drove them to a decision. The Coroner again discussed matters with the Jury, urging the minority to give way to the majority, but without avail. One of the Jury now suggested a course that was ultimately adopted - that as Mrs Gottwaltz, a principal witness, had not been called, the Inquiry should be adjourned for her evidence. Dr Thompson, however, did not heed this suggestion, and intimated his intention of locking up the Jury. The superintendent of police, as officer of the Court, was sworn to allow them neither meat, drink, nor fire, neither to allow any person to converse with them, nor to converse with them himself, excepting to ask them if they had agreed. The key was then turned upon the twelve and there seemed every probability of their remaining imprisoned for some hours, and to make the detention more irksome now and again some loving wife would look stealthily through the uncurtained window in anxious wonderment as to what could possibly have become of her husband, while one gentleman openly expressed his fear that his jealous spouse would flatly refuse to believe that an Inquest had kept him abroad until that hour of the morning. Meanwhile the hours grew apace, the conclave could be heard laughing and talking, and occasionally whistling, and between three and four the Jury were discovered amusing themselves by taking the dimensions of the room, and ascertaining its cubical measurement, apparently with the object, should the unventilated little apartment in which they were locked prove a second black-hole of Calcutta of preventing a second Jury being placed in equal difficulties with themselves for lack of evidence. The only variation of the monotony was the officer of the court's occasional "Have you decided upon your verdict?" Invariably the answer came each time in lower and more despondent tones, "Not yet." At last, in reply to the question, a chorus of eager voices answered "Yes;" but in answer to "And have you all agreed?" came one stentorian "No" in accidents of calm despair and determination that must have gone to the hearts of the remaining Jurors. About four in the morning nine of the Jury drew up a written form to the Coroner asking him to adjourn the case for the evidence of Mrs Gottwaltz. But even as the Jurors acted so conscientiously on their oaths so the officer of the Court adhered religiously to his, and would even hold no more conversation with the tired Jurymen than the simple question permitted by Act of Parliament. At five in the morning the Coroner again returned, but the Jury then seemed as far from a decision as when they first received the order - "Consider your verdict, gentlemen." The Coroner said he would adjourn the case until the quarter sessions in January next, but to this the Jury refused to accede; and the suggestion of obtaining Mrs Gottwaltz as a witness was now fallen into, and the Jury adjourned until 10 a.m. - At the hour appointed the Jury were in their places, looking slightly refreshed. - Mrs Gottwaltz deposed that the deceased was generally of a quiet and even disposition, and, so far as she was concerned, there had been no unpleasantness with the deceased. On Wednesday morning, when she was taken so ill, the deceased said that she had taken more than a teaspoonful of arsenic. Witness said, "You have taken poison," and the deceased did not reply; but afterwards said that she had taken the poison for the spots in her face, and added, "I have been very silly." Witness replied, "You have been more than silly." This same statement she repeated to her mother in the afternoon. She was perfectly responsible for her acts, and seemed to know perfectly well what she was doing. - The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict "That deceased died by an overdose of arsenic." The Coroner remarked that it did not lay with the Jury to take any action against Mr Codd, the chemist, who supplied the poison, and who admitted having sold the arsenic without getting the girl to sign the book, and without colouring the poison. The matter of colouring was not important in this case, but had the girl taken the white powder in mistake for starch or anything uninjurious, it would have been very serious. The Jury could scarcely, he thought, let the matter pass without some cognisance. The Jury, however, declined to express an opinion on the subject.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday touching the death of HENRY BRIDGMAN, aged 33 years, a native of Starcross, and captain of the steamship Evelyn now lying in the Sound. - Mr Walter [?] chief officer of the ship, said that she was bound from Tazanrog to Aberdeen with a cargo of linseed. On the 4th inst. the captain, who had been up all the previous night, caught cold, and on arriving at Malta he went ashore and procured advice and some medicine. Shortly after leaving Malta the deceased became much worse, suffering from bronchitis and inflammation of the lungs, and despite all the care and attention given him by his wife, who was on board, he died about 3.30 p.m. on the [?] inst. in the Bay of Biscay when the ship was about thirty miles off Ushant. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 December 1879
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Boy From A Tumble. - A death ensued by a fall on one of the public paths on the Hoe, through the slippery condition due to the prevalent frost, was investigated last evening by the Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian), at the Golden Lion Inn, Bath-street. The deceased was a lad 9 years of age, named ORLANDO WEST. - Henry Rouse, 8 years of age, said the deceased was walking with him and another boy on the Hoe about quarter-past nine on Monday morning. they were on their way to St. James's National Schools. At the bottom of the steps witness fell twice, but did not hurt himself much. The deceased fell and struck himself about the ear on a stone. there was no blood. They went to school, and the master, at about eleven o'clock, was told of the fall. Deceased was crying all the school time and appeared [?]. Witness accompanied him home after school. He cried all the way. Witness left him at the door, and never saw him again. - The Coroner said the mother would not be called: it would be most inhuman to have her there. - Elizabeth Davis, grandmother of the deceased, identified the body. Deceased was his mother's only child. He came home after school crying, and soon afterwards sank into a sort of stupor, and never regained consciousness. - Thomas Edward Owen, F.R.C.S., said that about three o'clock yesterday afternoon he was called to the deceased, who was then hardly sensible. There were no external marks or bruises about the head. Witness's first impression was that it was a case of very severe concussion of the brain, but when he found deceased had been at school he concluded that there had been laceration of a vessel of the brain, resulting in haemorrhage, and that he died from effusion of blood on the brain. it was possible for the brain to be injured by a very violent blow on almost any part of the body. It would undoubtedly have been better for the child not to have attended school. He would have stood a better chance if he had been sent to bed as soon as possible after the accident. - The Coroner, in the course of summing up, said he never expected to hear evidence given better than by the little witness Rouse. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 December 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening, respecting the death of DANIEL GALLASPIE, master of the brigantine Roma, of Londonderry, who, as was stated yesterday, died suddenly on board that vessel. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased had been ill for some days. Early on Tuesday morning he relieved the mate in the charge of the watch, and the mate went below. Shortly afterwards the captain followed him to the cabin, but was almost immediately summoned on deck as a squall had come on. Ten minutes later he returned, and the mate saw blood coming from his mouth. The mate placed him on the sofa, and he died in the course of a short time. The Jury returned a verdict that "Death resulted from the breaking of a blood vessel due to exertion on the part of the captain, who was at the time in a bad state of health."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest last evening on the body of ROBERT JOHN HUTCHINGS, aged 8 months. The mother of the deceased, living at 97 Pembroke-street, went to bed with the child at 10 o'clock on Saturday night, and on waking, shortly before 8 o'clock on Sunday morning, found him dead by her side. Mr Horton made a post-mortem examination and came to the conclusion that death resulted from asphyxia. His opinion was that the child was seized with convulsions, and that, in struggling, the bedclothes accidentally fell over its mouth and nostrils, and the child had not the strength to remove them. The body was well nourished and seemed to have been carefully attended to, and there were no marks of violence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

PLYMOUTH - Medical Death Certificates. - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening respecting the death of MRS MARY BLAKE, who was about 67 years of age. At the commencement of the proceedings Mr Brian explained the circumstances under which he held the Inquest. He stated that on Saturday night, whilst he was in the Library, a young man, the son of the deceased, came to him, and told him that he came from Mr Greenway, surgeon, that his mother was dead, and that he had got a certificate from Mr Greenway. The young man gave him a piece of paper, but after reading it he told him that it was not a certificate, and he replied, "It is a certificate, and it is not a certificate," and added that he had been to the registrar, who stated that he could not register his mother's death. The certificate that Mr Greenway gave was to the following effect:- "This is to certify that MRS BLAKE died this day at 28 Harwell-street, and that she suffered from chronic bronchitis and asthma. I also certify I was sent for this day to attend her, and that she died before I reached her house, and that I believe the cause of death to have been from the above-named diseases. - Henry Greenway, surgeon." - Mr Brian then produced the usual form of certificate, and asserted that no surgeon whatever had any right to give such a paper as Mr Greenway had. The deceased died on Thursday, and had the son, who was he believed, a very respectable young man, come to him the morning after death, and he thought, after hearing the circumstances of the case, that all was right, he would have written to the registrar to say that he did not think there was any necessity for him (the Coroner) to interfere, and probably, the registrar would have given a certificate. Irregular certificates were frequently given in the town, and he should ask the Jury to say that medical man should hesitate before they took upon themselves to give such certificates. - Mary Ann Fowler, widow, residing in the same house as the deceased, said that she had frequently attended to MRS BLAKE. On Thursday morning the son of the deceased told her that she had been very ill, and that he had sat up all night with her. Witness attended to the deceased at his request, and at half-past two Mrs Cornish went for Mr Greenway, but he did not come until nearly seven o'clock. The deceased, who was anxious to have a medical man, died at six o'clock. - CHARLES JOHN RENDALL BLAKE, clerk to the town clerk, and son of the deceased, said that his mother had been asthmatical for about eighteen months or two years. On Wednesday night she became very unwell and he slept in her room, and attended to her frequently. She appeared no better the next morning, and he asked a neighbour to look after her whilst he was at work. About half-past nine o'clock he sent a letter to Mr Greenway. He returned home about half-past 12 o'clock, and his mother was in the same state. He anticipated no imminent danger, and went to his work at two o'clock. About half-past two Mrs Crocker, a neighbour in the house, went for Mr Greenway, but he did not come up to the time of his mother's death. About five o'clock witness was sent for, and on arriving home he found his mother dead. It was two years since Mr Greenway professionally attended deceased, and then it was only for a short illness. He went out shortly after his mother died, and on returning found that Mr Greenway had called, and left the certificate produced. On Saturday he went to Mr Pike, who refused to register the death, and said that he should not be justified in doing so, adding, "It is a certificate, and it is not a certificate." On Saturday he saw Mr Greenway, who said that it was not a certificate, and as he had not seen the deceased before death he could not give an official one, and that he merely gave that certificate to shew that there was no foul play. The certificate had misled him (witness) as if he had been told that it was a case for the Coroner he would have immediately acquainted Mr Brian. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and added that they thought that there was no blame due to the son of the deceased, but they considered that Mr Greenway ought not to have given the paper to which reference had been made.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr W. rundle, acting for the Mayor of Saltash, held an Inquest at Newpassage, Devonport, yesterday on SAMUEL PROUT, a porter, who was found drowned near the canal yesterday. Deceased had recently been discharged from his employ, and left his home, 6 Princess-street, on Wednesday evening, saying he would return shortly. Later in the evening he was seen at the cattle show, and from then nothing more can be ascertained of his movements. Yesterday morning his body was discovered near the Pottery Steps, at the mouth of the Newpassage canal, and it is supposed that he wandered along the quay and fell over. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening touching the death of MATTHEW TAPP, a shoemaker, aged 48 years. ELLEN TAPP, daughter of the deceased, stated that her father had been unwell for some time past, and that he had been confined to his bed about a week. He ate a little dinner on Wednesday morning last, and about three p.m. on the same day she went to his room to call him, but could get no answer. She then went for her uncle, who resided close by, and who returned with her to the house, and he examined the deceased and found him to be dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 15 December 1879
PLYMPTON - Suicide Of A Plympton Tradesman. - MR JOHN EASTCOTT, grocer and patent medicine dealer, Fore-street, Ridgway, committed suicide by taking strychnine on Saturday morning. The deceased, who was only 27 years old, had lately given way to intemperate habits. On Friday afternoon, about three o'clock, he went to bed, and rose about eight o'clock on Saturday morning and opened his shop. He served a customer, and then remarked that he would go upstairs as he was not feeling well. His wife heard groans proceeding from one of the bedrooms, and on asking her husband what was the matter he replied that he had taken a drop of strychnine on a lump of sugar, and that he had poisoned himself because he was ashamed to look people in the face in consequence of having been seen drunk. Messrs. Minter, Ellery and Langdon were immediately in attendance, but death ensued about half-past nine o'clock. An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, in the evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased leaves a wife and one child.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 December 1879
PLYMOUTH - Another sudden death in Plymouth was the subject of an Inquiry held last evening by Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner. A labourer named ROBERT CRAWLEY, lodging in King-street, was on Friday night seized with a violent fit of coughing, which lasted for about two hours, after which he became a little better. He refused to see a medical man and went to his work as usual on Saturday. Between three and four o'clock on Sunday morning he awoke a man living in the same house and told him that he was very ill. He was then again attacked by violent coughing and died in the course of twenty minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The deceased was about 55 years of age.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest yesterday on JOHN ROGERS, a shipwright, who died suddenly whilst at work on board the Miranda, in the Dockyard. Staff-Surgeon McMorris stated that the deceased suffered from heart disease and there was no doubt that death resulted from it. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A sudden death at Fort Staddon, near Plymouth, was investigated before Mr R. R. Rodd yesterday afternoon. JAMES HOOPER aged 55, a mason, who has been employed at the fort for the past seventeen years, was leaving his work on Tuesday morning and going home to dinner when he fell down and died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last night with reference to the death of a little boy named ERNEST HOLT, the son of a marine, who had died suddenly of an excessive tightness of the chest following upon measles. Mr Thompson was called, but could not arrive until after the child died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, on WILLIAM HANCOCK, aged 65 years, who died on Monday night from the effects of injuries received on the previous Saturday. The deceased, it seems, was working for his nephew, MR JOHN MAYNARD HANCOCK, of Trevithick Farm, near St Germans. One of the other men was engaged in driving a pair of horses, which were attached to a mill grinding corn. Deceased took the place of the man for a few minutes, and in walking round after the horses left his proper position, and his foot caught in the crank bar of the driving rod, and was severely hurt. Mr Kerswill, surgeon, attended him up to Monday, when serious symptoms developing he was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital. Gangrene set in, and in the course of the night he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that some protection should be placed around the bar, so that the person driving the horses might be secured against his own incautiousness.

Western Morning News, Friday 19 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. Strange Proceedings. - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday afternoon on the child, aged two years, of a lighterman named WARREN, living at 97 Pembroke-street. The proceedings at the Inquiry were of an undignified and excited character. The mother of the child was first called, and stated that on Monday week last the infant was unwell and she took it to Mr Lamble, chemist, Pembroke-street, who prescribed for it, but advised her in case more serious symptoms developed, to see a doctor. The child grew worse; but not until Saturday did she seek medical aid, and she then sent for Mr Horton, surgeon. She sent three or four times between the hours of seven and nine, and again on Sunday morning; but Mr Horton did not come until about noon on Sunday, and he then told her the child was suffering from inflammation of the lungs after measles. He called a second time on Monday afternoon, but the child was then dead. - Mr Horton, who was present, took exception to the time mentioned by MRS WARREN, and alleged that she was mistaken. - One of the Jurors asked if Mr Horton did not object to come on the Saturday night unless he had a certain fee? - MRS WARREN replied in the affirmative, saying the man whom she sent told her that Mr Horton declined to come without he received half a guinea. - Mr Horton replied that this was not so, and reminded the Juror that he (Mr Horton) would have to be heard before they came to a decision. - It was then suggested that the man named Stacey who was sent for the surgeon should be called, and Mr Horton intimated that if the times mentioned by this man were not correct, he should desire to examine his man-servant, who answered the call. - Stacey deposed to going three times on Saturday night for Mr Horton. The first time was a few minutes past nine, the second shortly after ten, and the third a few minutes before eleven. Mr Horton was not in on the occasion of the first and second visits, and on the third was in bed. Mrs Horton came to the door and said her husband could not come that night unless he charged double fee. - Mr Horton here put some questions to the witness, when Inspector Bryant (the Coroner's officer) interfered, with the remark that it was out of order. Mr Horton asked the inspector to have the goodness to mind his own business and not attempt to teach him what he was to do. In reply to Mr Horton, witness admitted having told Mrs Horton that he would go somewhere else for a doctor, as the child was very bad, and the Coroner remarked that he could not for the life of him see why another doctor was not sought. - A Juror was proceeding to comment on the evidence, when Mr Horton interrupted him, and asked him to kindly hear the whole of the evidence before he made any observations. - The Coroner intimated that the Juror probably did not know he was doing wrong, whereupon Mr Horton retorted that it was time he did know, and that he had no business there if he did not know. He then intimated that he should desire his man-servant to be sent for to testify as to the time at which the calls were made and the conversation that passed. - The Coroner said he would send for him, and directed his officer to obtain the servant. - Inspector Bryant intimated that he had no one to send, and Mr Horton directed him to go himself. - Inspector Bryant: I have no one to send. You had better go yourself. - The Coroner: I order you to go. - Inspector Bryant: I don't think I shall go. It is not my duty to go running after witnesses, and I can refuse to go if I like. - The Coroner: I hope you will not refuse. - Inspector Bryant: I know my duty as officer of this court, and I am not going to be talked to by Mr Horton. - The Coroner: For the sake of peace I will request you to go. - Inspector Bryant replied that he would do anything for the Coroner, but nothing at the command of Mr Horton, and left the room. - Mr Horton thereupon made some remarks to the effect that the inspector was a "cantankerous old man," and protested against being addressed in such a manner by a common policeman, who was paid out of the rates to which he (Mr Horton) had to contribute. - Several of the Jury expressed themselves in loud terms against the use of language of this kind and the Coroner requested that no further remarks of the sort should be used. He could deal with his officer in his own way. - The father of the deceased was next examined, and deposed to having gone with Stacey at eleven o'clock on Saturday night for Mr Horton. That gentleman was in bed, and he remembered Stacey saying "If he can't come tonight we shan't want him tomorrow." He went himself for Mr Horton at nine o'clock the next morning, but found that he had gone his rounds. He went again at twelve and whilst he was away Mr Horton called and saw the child. - Mr Horton intimated that this witness had given a correct version of the affair, and there would now be no necessity for his calling his man-servant. At the same time he expressed regret at having displayed some warmth of temper. - The Coroner: I object to anyone shewing his temper at a judicial inquiry of this character. I wish to preserve the dignity of my Court, and try to treat everyone kindly myself in order to ensure the same treatment. - Mr Horton was then examined and stated that he did not reach home until about eleven on Saturday night. he was suffering from bronchitis, and was particularly tired, having been working hard the whole day. He went to bed, directing his servant to tell WARREN if he called again, that he must get somebody else. Within a short time he was aroused and informed that WARREN had called, and he sent down to say that he was tired and unwell himself, and that if he came out that night his fee would be half-a-guinea. He said this intentionally, and mentioned the sum as a sort of prohibitory fee, because he had been so often called out of bed when there was no danger. - The Coroner: You did not do it for the sake of the money. - Mr Horton: No; but I did not want to go, and I put it as a prohibitory fee, thinking they would decline my services. Word was brought back that they would go elsewhere. On Sunday he attended to the case at considerable inconvenience and he felt very glad. He found the child suffering from congestion of the lungs after measles, and though he prescribed for it, he felt sure it would not live. The next day he called, and found it dead. - The Coroner inquired whether he thought the chemist prescribed rightly? - Mr Horton replied that he could not say, as he did not see the medicine, but the medical profession did not recognise the right of any chemist to prescribe, and valuable time was wasted in the treatment of the child. Under the circumstances he declined to grant a certificate. - At this juncture Inspector Bryant returned, and was informed that the witness was not needed, and Mr Horton tendered to him his regrets for having spoken so hastily. Inspector Bryant seemed disinclined to accept the expression, and remarked that it was very impudent, and that he did not want any more impudence. - Mr Horton protested against the use of such language, and called upon the inspector to withdraw the offensive word. - The Coroner: I must request you to withdraw it. - Inspector Bryant: I will not withdraw it. I have been told since I left this room by those above me that it was not part of my duty to fetch the witness. - Mr Horton: Withdraw that word. - Inspector Bryant: Oh, nonsense, I'll not withdraw it. - Mr Horton: You will not? - Inspector Bryant: No. - Mr Horton (Excitedly): Then if you were not so old a man I would make you. - Inspector Bryant: Now you had better withdraw that. - The Coroner (warmly): I will maintain the dignity of my Court, and if I cannot maintain it without recourse to strong measures I will have recourse to those measures (Applause). - Mr Horton thereupon announced his intention of withdrawing. - Inspector Bryant: You had better wait for your fee. - Mr Horton: You can bring it. - Inspector Bryant: I shan't bring it; you can call for it. - Mr Horton: No, I will not call for it. - The Coroner offered a £5 note in payment, but Mr Horton remarked that he did not carry sufficient change about with him, and left the room. - Order having been restored, the Coroner summed up, and remarked that there appeared to be a feud existing in the town between the medical men and the chemists, both of whom were very useful bodies of men, and discharged important functions. Poor people who could not afford a doctor had recourse to a chemist and although Mr Horton declined to give a certificate whereby this Inquest had to be held, yet Mr Lamble seemed to have acted in a perfectly straightforward manner, seeing that he advised the mother to call in a doctor. MRS WARREN seemed to have acted foolishly and ignorantly in not calling in a surgeon before she did, and then in not sending for some other medical man when it was ascertained that Mr Horton was away. Mr Horton seemed to have been misled by the remark of Stacey, and consequently did not attend to the case until the symptoms were too far advanced. He did not see that blame could be attached to anyone; certainly not to the chemist, and, in accordance with his direction, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Suffocation On Shipboard. Inquest At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquest at Coxside last evening respecting the deaths of HENRY MATTHEWS, aged about 20 years, ordinary seaman, and GEORGE SAVIDIN, aged 19 years, able seaman, who had been suffocated in their bunks whilst asleep in the forecastle of the ketch Bee, of Guernsey. It will be remembered that the captain (William Vaudin) and mate (Nicholas Ferguson), who slept aft in the cabin, and who, with the two deceased, formed the crew of the Bee, narrowly escaped a similar death, both being insensible when the fire was discovered. Vaudin was too ill to be present at the Inquest, but the mate was there and gave evidence. Mr Wolferstan watched the proceedings on behalf of the owners of the vessel. - Nicholas Ferguson, the mate, stated that on Tuesday they commenced taking in a cargo of coke in the Creek at Coxside. The coke was brought alongside in carts and run into the hold by a shute and the crew trimmed it in the hold. The coke seemed rather hot; but he did not perceive any smoke arise from it. They took in little more than half the cargo on Tuesday, and were to complete on Wednesday. The hatches, except the after hatch, were put on, but not battened down, and no tarpaulin was put on them. The deceased men "turned in" about nine o'clock on Tuesday; the master had done so about an hour previously. Witness retired to rest at nine o'clock, and up to that time had not perceived any smell, or smoke, or anything else wrong. When he got into the cabin he fell asleep almost immediately. The next thing he remembered was finding himself in bed in the Eagle Tavern with three policemen standing by the side of the bed. They told him that the ship had caught fire, and that he was taken out of the cabin insensible. - By Mr Wolferstan: The crew did not do anything to the cargo, except trim it. The heat in the coke was not sufficient to feel it through their clothing when kneeling on it, nor was it hot enough to burn the skin, but he should think that it would make him withdraw his hand if he had kept it there a long time. - By Mr Thomas: He did not think the coke when they took it in was hot enough to be dangerous to the vessel. He did not recollect either of the deceased men saying anything about the cargo being hot, nor did he say anything about the coke being too hot to take on board. - By the Coroner: The captain assisted to trim the cargo off and on during the day. It never occurred to him that there was any risk. The after hatch was open. - James Pollard, labourer, employed at the Gas Works, Coxside, stated that he was engaged in loading the Bee on Tuesday. On Wednesday morning about seven o'clock he went on board to resume loading the vessel, and found the ship on fire on the aft side of the mainmast. He went to the cabin and shouted and kicked, but could get no reply. Smoke was coming up through the deck in all directions. He ran to the gas-house and got assistance, and returned immediately and entered the cabin. The master and mate were in their bunks apparently fast asleep, and he thought they were dead. There were no signs of fire in the cabin, but there was a strong smell of sulphur and of burning wood. He could not perceive any smoke in the cabin. Witness and another man then went into the forecastle, which was full of smoke, so full that they could hardly stay there. There was no fire there, and the smell of burning wood was not so strong as in the cabin. The two men were lying dead in their bunks. A portion of the mainmast between the deck and the keel was burnt. On Tuesday he (witness) shook the bags of coke into the shute leading into the vessel. The coke was not hot, nor was there any smoke arising from it. The coke had been in stock for months. - By Mr Wolferstan: The fire, in his opinion, broke out by the mainmast. There was smoke coming from the after hatch. He could tell by the appearance of the coke that it was the old stock. Not a single bag of the coke was hot. He loaded the Silver Eagle last week. Did not recollect the captain refusing to take some coke because it was hot. Did not put back some bags of coke that the captain of the Silver Eagle declined to take on account of its being hot. Had never seen carts coming out of the works with the coke smoking or steaming. Water was always thrown on the coke directly it came out of the retorts in order to cool it. - Abraham Farmer, inspector of police, thought that the fire originated near the mainmast, and that that was the only place where fire had been. - John Thomas Browning, engineer at the Gas Works, deposed that all the coke put on board the Bee on Tuesday passed under his personal inspection. It was taken from a very large heap that had been accumulating for nine or ten months. None of the coke sent to the Bee was warm or steaming. It was impossible for the coke sent to the Bee to get alight from spontaneous combustion. Even if the coke were warm it would be impossible for there to be spontaneous combustion as there was no gas. They generally kept a large heap of about 1,500 or 2,00 tons for months together, and this was exposed to all weather. Spontaneous combustion was not a thing of hours, but of weeks, unless it was with very fine coal. He did not think that the smoke or sulphurous smell arose from the coke. - By Mr Wolferstan: He could form no opinion as to the cause of the fire. In taking away from large heaps they would not always take what had been placed there last, as this would be on the top, and they took from the bottom. No coke made that day was put on Tuesday on the heap from which the Bee was supplied. It was quite possible that coke made twelve or eighteen hours previously was sent to the Bee. All the coke that was made was thoroughly quenched with water before it came out of the retort and then it was thrown about the yard to cool. Sometimes a slight vapour came from the coke. If the coke that was sent to the Bee had been inflammable, it would undoubtedly have set on fire the canvas bags in which it was removed. He had never known of an instance of coke, however confined it might be, igniting from spontaneous combustion. He did not think that the smell that had been referred to arose from the coke. - Henry Hill, sergeant of police, stated that the mate and captain were in danger, and insensible up to half-past twelve o'clock. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the timely discovery of the fire, and the energy and promptitude shewn, undoubtedly saved the lives of the captain and mate, but unfortunately the two deceased men were too far gone, and they died within a short time of being taken from the forecastle. As to the cause of death, he thought they could have no doubt that they were suffocated by the fumes and smoke arising from the fire in another part of the ship. The question then arose - How did the fire originate? and they should consider whether there was any blame due to the Gas Company, and whether they knowingly and wilfully allowed the coke to be sent out in such a hot state as to be dangerous to the vessel. He thought that the only conclusion they could arrive at would be that the deceased men were accidentally suffocated; but how or by what the fire was caused there was no evidence to shew. - The Jury, of whom Mr H. Ede was Foreman, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation caused by the fumes, arising from a fire in the ship, but how or by what means the fire originated there was no evidence to shew."

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Narcotics For Children. - An Inquest was held at Devonport yesterday on the infant son, aged 1 and 7 months, of ABRAHAM HILL, a farm bailiff, residing near Worthing, Sussex, at present staying with Mr J. James, at 2 Tavistock-street, Devonport. The child was taken ill on Thursday, and the mother, thinking it was teething, gave it a Steedman's soothing powder. Soon after the infant was seized with convulsions and the mother called in Mr Horton, who prescribed a bath for it, but before the bath could be prepared the infant died. A post-mortem examination made by Mr Horton showed that the child had some time in its existence suffered from water on the brain, and that its system was unusually susceptible to any narcotic, like that contained in the powder. - The mother of the deceased stated that she had previously administered similar powders to the child, and no ill-effect had resulted therefrom, but Mr Horton was clearly of opinion that the suddenness of the death resulted from the influence of the narcotic which was too strong for so weak a child. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by the soothing powder," but expressed the opinion that no blame could be attached to the mother.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 December 1879
PLYMOUTH - A Sad Case. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening respecting the death of FRANCIS KNAPMAN, son of a dairyman, residing at 28 Kinterbury-street. It appeared from the statement of a brother of deceased that they were in a shippen at a field in Higher Compton on Monday last, when just as the deceased (who was a fine lad of 15) was about to milk a cow. His foot slipped and he fell heavily, injuring his left knee. He remained a short time on the ground crying; on getting up he proceeded to his home in a cart. Deceased took to his bed on Monday afternoon and died on Friday. - Mr Russel Rendle, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased lad on Thursday afternoon, and found him in a very dangerous and feverish condition. He entertained no hope of the case then. The lad undoubtedly died from effects resulting from the injury to the knee; he distinctly connected the death with that injury. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday evening relative to the death of JESSIE FEWINS, about five weeks old. The child, which had been very healthy from its birth, was found dead in bed on Friday. It had all the appearance of having died in convulsions and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 December 1879
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on MARY NORMAN, aged 67, who had committed suicide by drowning. It seems that the sum of £5 had been entrusted to her care by her husband, a porter, and she intimated to a neighbour that the money had been lost, and she seemed in great distress in consequence of it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 December 1879
PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death From Burning. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Coroner of Devonport, held an Inquest last evening on behalf of Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, who is in London, on SARAH HARRIS aged 65 years, who, as was stated yesterday, was found dead in her room. - FREDERICK HARRIS, a hawker, husband of the deceased, residing at 2 Alice-street, stated that he left home about ten minutes before nine o'clock on Monday morning. He gave the deceased her breakfast, and left her sitting up in bed drinking some tea. He returned home about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, when he heard that his wife was dead. There was a small fire in the room at the time he left. Deceased was his second wife, and they had been married seventeen years, during which time they had always lived happily together. - By a Juror: Deceased drank a little, but nothing to excess. He left no intoxicating liquor in the room, nor had she money to buy any. - By another Juror: Deceased was in the habit of smoking, but not to excess. When he left home she was not smoking. - Rosina Sage, residing at 2 Alice-street, said that about eleven o'clock on Monday morning she saw the deceased washing dishes in her room. Apparently she was in good health. She had a small fire composed mostly of cinders, and was cheerful and quite sober. She did not know whether the deceased was subject to fits. Deceased had a pipe in her mouth smoking near the bed. - HARRIS, recalled, said that his wife had a very severe fit, and several times she had fallen down in a fainting condition. - ANNIE HARRIS, grand-daughter of the deceased, residing at 2 Alice-street, deposed that about half-past three o'clock on Monday afternoon she went into the deceased's room and saw her lying on her face on the floor. She could not arouse her. There were no signs of burning, but she did not take any notice of the deceased's clothes. - P.C. Ede state that at 3.45 p.m. on Monday afternoon he was sent for and went to Alice-street, where he found the deceased lying on her face dead. Her hands were quite cold, and he thought she had been dead two hours. There was a pipe, matches and tobacco together on the corner of the mantelpiece. Her clothes were all burnt about the neck, chest and arms. The flesh had come off two places on the arm. The deceased was lying three or four feet from the fireplace. Her face was towards the fire, but her head was more towards the corner of the room. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's officer, said that just before 4 p.m. on Monday he was called by the last witness, and went to the house. There was something on the deceased's face like burnt paper or tinder. Some of the hair on both sides of the head near the forehead, and her right arm and shoulders were very much burnt. There was no fire in the grate, the ashes and cinders being quite cold. He did not discern any bruise on the body. He had made all possible inquiries about the deceased, and he could get no trace of anyone except Mrs Sage who saw or heard the deceased after her husband left her. - The coroner, in summing up, said that there was a mystery hanging over the case. There was no evidence as to how the woman was set on fire. Some portion of her dress being of an inflammable nature might have caught fire, perhaps, by a spark from her pipe, through her carelessly handling it; and then, probably, she hastily put it on the corner of the mantelpiece. Then finding that her dress was on fire she fell to the ground, and commenced rolling herself on the floor in order to extinguish the fire. He thought that from the position the deceased was found in that she was as much suffocated by the fumes arising from the fire as she was burnt to death. There was not the slightest trace of the cause of the fire. - A Juror thought, however, that the deceased must have had a fit, or otherwise when she caught fire she would have made an alarm. - The Coroner said it was quite possible that the deceased had a fit. He had, however, carefully weighed the matter over in his mind, and he could come to no other conclusion than the one he had stated. - A Juror said that if the deceased had a fit it was after she had put her pipe on the mantelpiece. - The Coroner observed that it was a matter that could never be thoroughly cleared up. - The Jury returned a verdict "That by some means unknown the deceased Accidentally caught fire and was burnt to death."

WEARE GIFFARD - Wife Murder In North Devon. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Hazlewood Cottage, Wear Giffard, by Mr Toller, County Coroner, respecting the death of NELLY WEST, aged 28 years, who was murdered by her husband, FRANCIS W. WEST, early on Sunday morning. Mr Sillifant was chosen Foreman of the Jury; and Mr Henry Rogers (Helston) watched the Inquiry on behalf of the accused. MR WEST was present, and seemed very thoughtful, apparently listening attentively. The examination in chief of the witnesses was conducted by Superintendent Rousham, who accompanied the accused from Torrington. The Jury having viewed the body, Mary Knight, nurse, in the employ of MR WEST, was called, and stated that she had resided with the deceased for fifteen months last Wednesday. The witness here fainted and on her restoration, said she remembered last Saturday quite well. In the morning she performed her usual work, and saw her master about eleven o'clock. Her mistress (MRS WEST) also was home. MR WEST was then quite sober. She left the house about 2.30 to go to Torrington, and her master and mistress then appeared on good terms. She returned at five and twenty minutes to nine in the evening and found both MR and MRS WEST in the drawing-room. At that time he was apparently in drink. She then went into the kitchen, and her master also came there about 9.15. He remained in the kitchen all the evening up to a quarter past twelve, during which time he was talking and smoking, and drinking beer with a little rum in it. He drank very little during the time he was there. Once during that time - about ten minutes to twelve - witness's master sent her for her mistress, who was sitting alone in the drawing-room. Her master sent witness for MRS WEST because he thought she was lonely. Returned to the kitchen with her mistress, who said when she reached the kitchen door, "Well, FRANK, dear, have you got a seat for me?" He replied, "Yes, NAN, there's one," at the same time pointing to a chair. They all sat talking together for a little while - a couple of minutes - in a quiet friendly way, wishing each other "A merry Christmas." He then took his pocket-handkerchief from his pocket, and said "It is the first time you have sat in the kitchen with the girls and me, and I will wipe your shoes." She laughed, and said, "Oh! FRANK," and he stooped and wiped her shoes with his handkerchief. He then said, "Now, NAN, you must give them (the girls) a treat;" and she said, "Yes, FRANK, I will," or something to that effect. She then rose up and left the kitchen, and returned shortly after with a bottle of brandy. She attempted to draw the cork, but could not, and her master did so, saying, "NAN, this is brandy." She said, "Yes, FRANK, they always choose it when they are poorly." Witness was frequently unwell. She gave the servants a small drop of brandy. this was five or ten minutes after twelve. They did not drink the brandy, and her master asked his wife for toasted cheese, and she said, "FRANK, do you know the time?" He said, "Yes, NAN, about half-past ten." MRS WEST replied, "No, dear, it is after twelve." Witness looked at her watch and it was past twelve. Her mistress then rose, saying she was going to bed, and put the brandy bottle away. She again returned to the kitchen and said, "FRANK, I am going to bed." He said, "All right, I will follow." MRS WEST then left the kitchen with a light in her hand. Up to that time not an angry word had passed between MR and MRS WEST. The latter went direct to her bedroom, and her husband followed not a second afterwards; they entered the same room and locked the door. He went direct to the bedroom. Witness then went to her room - the one next to her master's and mistress's. Witness closed the door of her apartment. It was about five-and-twenty past twelve when she entered her room and it was nearly an hour later when she undressed on account of the restlessness of the children. She had been in the room half an hour when she heard her mistress laugh. Her master was very tipsy when he went to bed. While her mistress was laughing she said, "Oh! FRANK;" she often said it. About half an hour later witness heard her mistress scream and say "Oh, FRANK, don't; oh, FRANK, don't." She next heard the report of a firearm - about two seconds afterwards - and then all was quiet. Witness undressed and went into bed. She did not go downstairs or make any inquiry; she was tired and went to sleep. - A Juror: Have you heard him fire before. - Witness: No, not in the night; I have heard him shoot birds in the day. - The Superintendent: It was unusual then to hear. - Witness: Yes, but I was not sure it was the report of a firearm. Continuing, she said the baby awoke her at five-and-twenty past three, and she thought she heard someone calling her. It proved to be her master, who was in the laundry. Witness opened the door and looked out and said "Are you calling me, sir?" He said "Yes, Mary." She asked him if he wanted her. He said "Are you undressed?" and on her replying "Yes," he remarked that he did not want her if she were undressed. He had a glass and a lamp with him, and told witness to go back to bed, which she did. She then heard him go down the stairs and up the back stairs, and, as she thought, go to the other servant's room. He then went to the beer cellar. He was apparently very drunk; but he never staggered. He next went into his workshop on the first landing. He closed the door and locked it. Witness went to sleep and awoke again at 7.30. At 8 o'clock she left her bedroom and went to her fellow servant's room. She then lit the fire in the day nursery to make her mistress some tea, as was customary. She carried it with a bun to her mistress's bedroom door, and knocked twice. Not receiving an answer her fellow servant came from the nursery, and said "I expect it's locked." Witness opened the door and entered. She placed the tray with the tea on the drawers, and said "If you please, ma'am, I have brought you a cup of tea." the clothes were turned down on the side her mistress usually slept, but seeing no one there she screamed "Oh! mistress is not here," and looking towards the window saw some rugs or clothes, and went over to move it, and saw MRS WEST'S face. She was lying with her head on the window with her mouth and eyes partly open. Witness touched her forehead, and said to her fellow-servant "Oh! mistress is dead," and then turned round and ran out of the room. [The rug that covered the deceased, with the exception of her face, was here produced.] The other servant said, "No, no;" and witness remarked, "I will see." She then struck a match, and went over to the window and held it over the body. MRS WEST was quite dead, and her forehead was deathly cold. Witness left the room, screaming for her master. She went to the workshop, and, with her fellow-servant, screamed for him and knocked at the door. She had no answer and heard no sound from within. She then went out of the house for the policeman, but felt faint and could not go. She went to the house of Mr Gomer, a mason, and said, "Mistress is dead." The rifle produced she had seen in her master's workshop; it looked like the same by the strap appended. She had never seen it in the bedroom. - The Foreman: When you heard the report did you smell powder? - Witness: No, sir. - A Juror: Was the report very loud? - Witness: No, sir, I have heard louder. - Cross-examined: during the time her master was in the kitchen he emptied a jug of beer and rum two or three times; it might have been four. It was a pint jug and there was not much rum used. He was quite drunk when he went to bed. She fancied she heard her master go downstairs before the report of the gun. Her mistress kept the keys of the spirit cellar. MR WEST was very good when sober, and she never knew him attempt a cruel act except when drunk. MRS WEST was a nice woman, but had a very quick temper. She had known her master do foolish and extravagant things when drunk; she did not at such times consider him responsible for his actions. A bundle of straw was brought into the premises from Mr Short's - about a hundred yards distance - and her master gave the carrier half-a=crown and a jug of beer. He was foolishly extravagant with his money when drunk. MR and MRS WEST quarrelled sometimes, and she had heard that there had been struggles between them. - Q.: You didn't dream of anything wrong that night? - A.: I didn't; I was afraid to go....... - What were you afraid of; you were not afraid anything had happened? - No, sir; I was afraid of master, he was so drunk. - Witness, continuing, said that MRS WEST got angry sometimes when MR WEST was drunk. Her mistress was not annoyed at her husband being with the servants that evening. For the last four or five months MR WEST had been drinking very heavily, and was frequently unaccountable for his actions. Had never heard a report of firearms in the bedroom either by night or day before. The conduct of MR WEST when not in drink was both rational and kind. - Re-examined: When she looked out in the night he was in his dressing-gown and grey hat. Had never seen MR WEST strike his wife. - Elizabeth Parr, cook in the employ of the accused, stated that she had lived at Hazlewood for fifteen months. Was in the kitchen with her master on Saturday evening, and supposed he drank about a quart of beer and rum. Both the servants drank with MR WEST. The jug was filled three times, but the rum was only put in once - about two tablespoonsful. About ten minutes before midnight MRS WEST entered the kitchen in reply to a summons from her husband. The evidence of the first witness up to the time of MR and MRS WEST going to bed was then read over to the witness, and confirmed by her. After Mary Knight had gone to bed, witness went to bed in her room over the kitchen. She was lying awake, and thought she heard the report of a firearm. She jumped up in bed and listened, and then lay down again. She was not very frightened, although she had never heard firearms before in the night. It was about half or three-quarters of an hour from the time she went to bed until she heard the report. Some time afterwards her master came and opened the door, and said, "Well, 'Tib,' you will get up at six tomorrow, won't you?" He had a lamp, and an empty glass in his hand, and was clad in his dressing-gown. He further said, "I have come down to draw a glass of beer and I thought I would say good bye to you." Witness replied, "All right, sir;" and he closed the door. She heard nothing more until the nurse called her about eight o'clock. Witness entered her mistress's room with the nurse, and saw the empty bed. Witness remained with the two children in her arms at the foot of the stairs while the nurse went for the policeman. Had never heard her master and mistress quarrelling. When MR WEST went to bed he was the worse for liquor, but not worse than she had ever seen him before. - A Juror: Have you seen MRS WEST with a black eye? - Witness: Yes; but I do not know how it was done. Had never seen MR WEST strike his wife. Had never seen the rifle (produced) before. - Cross-examined: MR WEST was very drunk on Saturday night, and did not know what he was about. The same evening he gave her half a crown to give a man as well as a glass of beer for bringing home some straw. There had been a lot of liquor brought into the house that week for Christmas. She had never seen her master use violence towards his wife. Had heard of scuffles between her master and mistress from her fellow-servant. When MR WEST went to bed he was as drunk as he could be; she had never seen him worse. - A Juror: Why were you afraid to go upstairs and make inquiries when you heard the report? - Witness: I was never afraid. The rug which was found on the body was on the bed at 9.30 on Saturday night. - Dr Charles R. Jones, Torrington, stated that he came down on Sunday morning with the superintendent to view the body. He was taken to the bedroom, where he saw the deceased, with a fur rug thrown over her. On examining the body, he found that a bullet had made its entrance into the neck immediately above the clavicle, on the left side. There was also a large wound visible on the front and inside of the left arm. The body was rigid, and must have been dead some hours. On Monday he made a post-mortem examination, and found on the posterior and inner side of the left arm a bullet mark. It passed over the bone of the arm, and ploughed through the thick muscle in front, and left a wound three or four inches in extent. It passed through the neck severing the vertebrae, and was found above the spinous process of the right scapula. Death resulted from the injury to the backbone, and must have been instantaneous. The lungs and heart were perfectly healthy. He made no further examination as he considered it irrelevant to the cause of death. He thought that MRS WEST must have been standing when shot, and that she fell into the chair. - Cross-examined: If MRS WEST had first taken the rifle into her hand, thinking her husband might use it, he did not think the same result would have occurred during a scuffle. It might have gone off during a scuffle, but there was no evidence of any struggle. It seemed as if deceased had been holding up her arm in fear. There was no singeing of the flesh such as he would have expected had the rifle been discharged at close quarters. - Mr Rogers: You will be asked by and by whether the result might not have been brought about by accident. - Witness: It is possible it might have been, but very improbable. - The gun may have gone off during a scuffle? - A.: It may, but it is most improbable. - Might the body not have been forced into the chair in which it was found during a scuffle. - I don't think so. - Do you suppose, then, she was sitting in the chair for the purpose of receiving the shot: - A.: My own impression is that she took off her clothes and placed them in the chair. She was standing near this chair, and something must have occurred which made her hold up her arm, and when she received the wound she fell into the chair. There was no evidence of a scuffle. - Do you consider that on the night in question MR WEST was accountable for his actions? - I should say he was not comptis mentis. You generally find that those men who keep their legs when drunk are worse in their heads. - Considering the state of MR WEST when he went to bed and at three o'clock in the morning, and the effect the drink would have on his brain, and assuming that he committed the murder, do you think it is possible he could have done it with malice aforethought - that he intended to do it? - There are many forms and degrees of drunkenness; it is impossible for me to answer that question. I should hope he was not sensible, for it seems he and his wife had been on good terms. I was told the other day it was a common occurrence for firearms to be discharged in the night and I am surprised I have not heard any evidence of it. - considering the accused's state of drunkenness, do you think he was capable of forming a deliberate intention, or that his action was simply the result of impulse? - I cannot say. - A Juror: He seems to have known the way to the beer barrel. - P.C. Harvey stated that on Sunday he was sent for to go to MR WEST'S house. He went up in the bedroom with the nurse, and after they had struck a light he saw a dead body there. He asked where MR WEST was, and went to the door of the workshop. It was locked, and he knocked, but got no answer. He went to the back of the house and took a ladder, and tried to look into the room through the window, but could not do so. He then went to the top of the stairs and called again to the accused. The latter opened the door a little way and said "Is that Harvey?" Witness replied "Yes," and he then said "Come inside, I want to speak to you." Witness said "What have you got in your hand?" and he replied "Nothing." He then said "If you won't come in stay there," and he went back and locked the door. Witness then locked the front and back doors of the house and waited for the superintendent. - Mr Hole, county magistrate, here entered the room, and remanded the accused to the Torrington Townhall until eleven o'clock this morning. - Superintendent Rousham stated that on Sunday, in answer to a summons, he came to MR WEST'S house and went outside the door of his workshop. He called "MR WEST" several times and at last he said, "Who's there?" Witness replied, "Mr Rousham," and added, "I want to speak to you." The accused said, "Will you come in here?" and he replied "Yes; if you open the door." He then remarked, "I hope there will be no violence," and witness said, "No, I hope there will be none on your part." MR WEST unlocked the door, and as it opened witness took him by the hand and drew him into the passage. He had on a dressing gown, vest and trousers, and shoes or slippers. Witness said, "Shew me your wife's bedroom," and MR WEST went on the top landing and pointed to a door. Witness then entered the bedroom and drew the blind on one side. He saw the body of the deceased lying back in a chair with the head resting on the window sill. The body was covered with a rug, and was clad in a nightdress. Saw that the muscle of the left arm had been ripped up, and there was a circular wound in the neck under the left jaw. There was blood under the chair. On the chair on which she was sitting were her day clothes. Somebody had been lying on the right side of the bed, but the left side had not been touched. On the top of a clothes' press in the room he found the rifle produced, with a loaded ball cartridge in it. Witness came out of the room and charged MR WEST with the wilful murder of his wife and cautioned him not to say anything. Whilst the accused was changing his clothes one of the servants asked him for the key of the beer barrel, and he said it was in the room Mr Rousham had the key of. Witness told them it did not matter, as he was coming back directly to look for the instrument it was done with, and MR WEST said, "Oh! I can shew you; I don't wish to give you any trouble." When he had finished dressing, witness said, "You said just now you would shew me something." He bowed and followed witness into the bedroom, where the body lay, and pointed to the rifle produced as it lay on the top of the clothes-press. Witness took it down and tried to take the ball cartridge out of the chamber, but could not manage it. The accused said, "Allow me," and witness held the rifle while he gave it a slight cant, and the cartridge dropped out. Witness then conveyed MR WEST to Torrington. On Sunday night the accused said to him, "Is she really dead!" and witness replied, "Yes, you knew that this morning;" and the prisoner remarked, "It seems all a dream to me." On the following day he saw Dr Jones take the remains of the bullet, which he now produced, taken from the body. - By a Juror: The bullet found in the body coincided with the empty cartridge, and weighed nearly an ounce. - This concluded the evidence, and Mr Rogers addressed the Jury on behalf of MR WEST, whom he had known for many years. The gentlemen with whom MR WEST was connected in Cornwall bore the highest reputation, some of them being county magistrates and others engaged in the most lucrative and important business in the whole of the county. The Jury could only deliver one of two verdicts - either that of accidental death or manslaughter. There was no doubt that deceased died by means of the bullet, but it was quite within the province of probability, and more so, that the bullet went into her neck by accident. Was not the occurrence perfectly consistent with there having been a scuffle, during which the rifle was discharged? If they were of this opinion they were bound to arrive at the conclusion that MRS WEST came to her death by accident. Very probably MRS WEST, who was irritable, got into a violent temper and said something which annoyed MR WEST, and made him angry; and the true solution was that the rifle being in the bedroom, she first seized it to prevent her husband taking it; he tried to get the weapon, they had a scuffle, and he threw her down, the rifle went off, and she was killed. He then placed her in the chair, threw the rug over her, and the servant found her in that position. Then he put it that MR WEST'S brain was so impaired by drink at the time of the death of his wife that he was not conscious or responsible for his actions. In that Inquiry they would have satisfied the ends of justice, and his client would surely suffer enough if they returned a verdict of manslaughter. - The Coroner observed that, having travelled from Barnstaple in the morning and having been all day without food, he felt totally exhausted and unequal to the task of summing up, and proposed an adjournment of the Inquiry. The Jury, however, objected to this, and the Coroner remarking that he did not feel equal to the task of summing up, dismissed them to consider their verdict, promising his assistance upon any point that might arise. - A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was agreed upon by twelve out of thirteen of the Jury after three-quarters of an hour's deliberation. The prisoner received the verdict in silence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Occurrence Near Horrabridge. - The Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening on the body of THOMAS DAW, aged 56 years, a stone breaker, who was fatally injured whilst at work in a pit near Clearbrook, Horrabridge, on Monday, the 15th instant. Deceased was engaged in shovelling out earth from the pit when the bank, which he had worked away beneath, fell in upon him. His son, a boy 11 years old, who was working at the top of the pit, called to some other men for help, but the deceased got out, saying "I'm all right." His right arm appeared to be broken and was very much cut and he went into the village and had it temporarily dressed. On the following day he went into Tavistock and saw Mr Northey, jun., who bandaged the wounded limb. On the following Friday he saw Mr Northey, sen., who ordered [?] poultices. The symptoms grew worse, and on Sunday he came into Plymouth and saw Dr Torbuck, of King-street, whose opinion was that the arm should be differently treated, and that there was considerable danger of mortification. Upon his advice the deceased went on the morning of Tuesday last into the Royal Albert Hospital, where it was ascertained by the house surgeon that the arm was affected by diffused inflammation and erysipelas, extending from the fingers to the shoulder. The deceased, who was in a very weak condition, grew rose, and died on Thursday morning from the effects of the erysipelas which had set in upon the wound. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 December 1879
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Pear Tree Inn, Stoke, last evening, on HENRY THOMAS MCQUILLEN, infant son of WILLIAM MCQUILLEN, residing at 3 Mayon-cottages. Deceased had been suffering from whooping-cough, but was growing better. On Saturday afternoon, whilst lying in its father's arms it was seized apparently with a fit. Dr George Rolston was sent for, but before he could arrive the child had died. Dr Rolston made a post-mortem examination, and found that the infant had been suffering from inflammation of the lungs, which, with the whooping-cough, probably produced a severe spasm, effecting the windpipe in a choking manner. This would account for the convulsive action and the sudden death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Drowned Whilst Washing. - Mr Brian, Coroner of Plymouth, held an Inquiry last evening respecting the death of BENJAMIN SAYERS, an inmate of the Workhouse, sixty-nine years of age. The deceased, who was formerly a coltbreaker, had been an inmate of the Fisherton Lunatic Asylum, Salisbury, from which Institution he was sent back to the Workhouse as incurable in December 1877. He was placed in the imbecile-ward, and there he had remained ever since. The deceased was subject to fits, which usually lasted about a quarter of an hour, during which time he would be quite unconscious, but otherwise he appeared to be in good bodily health. On Sunday afternoon he swept up the day-room, and was then apparently quite well and cheerful. After he had finished, he seems to have gone to the wash-house for the purpose of washing his hands, and whilst he was doing so to have fallen forward with his head and shoulders in the tub of water, in which position he was shortly afterwards discovered. Upon being informed of the occurrence Mr Avery, the master, at once sent for Mr Langford, surgeon, but all attempts at resuscitation were unavailing, the unfortunate man having, doubtless, been suffocated before he was found. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" but there were expressions of opinion that the supervision of imbecile inmates was insufficient, it having been stated that men were allowed to leave the ward without being attended or watched if there was nothing in their appearance to arouse suspicion. Another incident of the Inquest was a protest made by the Coroner against the manner in which the body was dealt with. When it became evident that life was extinct Mr Langford suggested that the body should be removed to the dead-house and it was then undressed and placed in a coffin and taken to the dead-house, partly, as it was explained, for decency's sake and partly as a matter of precaution, rats having a short time previously eaten away a part of the face of a dead man whose body was left in the place where he died. - The Coroner who was supported by the Jury, strongly objected to the course adopted, stating that if he had been communicated with he would have immediately visited the house and without doubt would have consented to the removal of the body. Mr Avery stated that he had acted in ignorance of the law, and that the occurrence would not be repeated.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 January 1880
PLYMOUTH - Shocking Accident To A Plymouth Lad. - Inquiry was made at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, touching the death of JAMES HAYMAN, who came by his death under circumstances which were stated yesterday in our columns. Deceased, who was sixteen years of age, had been two days in the employ of Messrs. Lang and Son, contractors, as stoker of a 4-horse power engine. He had had two years' previous experience of the same kind of work. - George Stephens, engine driver, in the employ of Messrs. Lang and Son, at the North Quay new works, said the deceased was stoker under him at a crane engine. On Tuesday about noon deceased obtained from him the key of a box in which oil was kept, and went under the shed which covered the works of the engine. Witness was making the fire outside the shed. Suddenly he heard the engine in motion, ran into the shed and stopped it, and could see nothing of the deceased. Then he saw the foot and leg of the deceased under the crank above the cylinder. He went outside, and found deceased lying on the cogwheel. In going to fetch the oil he would have to pass close to the lever by which the engine was sent in motion. If he had touched the regulator with his leg that would have set it in motion. With assistance deceased was taken out and removed to the Hospital. - Mr John Charles Lang, son and partner of the contractor, produced a plan of the engine. The machinery, he said, was enclosed, but a person who was crossing to the oil box and slipped would be very likely to come in contact with the regulator, and the engine would immediately be set in motion. Had deceased lurched forward his arm would be caught by the crank. He believed the deceased slipped and struck the regulator, and that the machinery caught his clothes and passed him right through between the piston-rods and the chain barrel. - Robert Lucas, second gauger in Messrs. Lang's employ, confirmed a statement of the witness Stephens that deceased moaned after being extricated from the machinery. He helped take him to the Hospital. - Mr Henry William Hubbard, acting house-surgeon at the South Devon Hospital, said he examined deceased on his arrival and found that life was extinct. The lower jaw was broken in several places, and he thought the vertebra of the neck were broken. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They exonerated Messrs. Lang from blame. All the Jurymen expressed an opinion that a boy so young as the deceased should not have been employed in such dangerous work, to which the Foreman replied that HAYMAN was experienced in the work, and was therefore as capable as a man.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 5 January 1880
BARNSTAPLE - Suspicious Death Of A Boy At Barnstaple [Special Telegram], Barnstaple, Sunday. - An Inquest was held at the Union Inn, Barnstaple, yesterday afternoon, on the body of a lad named JOHNSON, who died under singular circumstances. He was the son of a widow named JOHNSON, whose husband was Sergt. Major of the North Devon Hussars. The boy was ten years of age, and enjoyed good health until about a month ago his nose bled very much, and continued for some time. No doctor was sent for, and the boy having had another violent bleeding, took to his bed. He got worse and worse and only the day before he died did a doctor see him. The doctor was sent for by Mrs Westacott, in whose house MRS JOHNSON rented a room. When the doctor came the boy was in a dying state. He was ghastly pale and there was scarcely a drop of blood in his body, was too exhausted to be examined. The doctor ordered beef tea and wine, but the boy died the next day. Evidence stated that the mother was addicted to drink, and had been discharged from the North Devon Infirmary, as nurse, for drunkenness. The mother stated that she had given the boy what she could afford, but did not send for a doctor because she did not like the idea of having a parish doctor. The doctor could not say positively the cause of death, and the Inquest was adjourned for a post-mortem examination to be made.

PLYMOUTH - The Discovery Of A Child's Body In Plymouth. Magisterial And Coroner's Inquests. - At the Plymouth Police-Court on Saturday, before Mr J. F. Fortescue (in the chair) and Mr S. Jackson, MARY JANE PETIT, a married woman, was brought in, in custody, charged with having concealed the birth of her child. - Sergeant Samuel Prout, of the Plymouth Borough Police, stated that on the previous day, about one o'clock, from information he received, he proceeded to 7 Notte-street, in company with a Mr Weblin, where he saw the prisoner. He asked her to go upstairs with him to the room she occupied, to which prisoner replied, "I can't go up in that room." Witness then went up alone, but long before reaching the room - which was on the fourth floor - the stench became almost unbearable. At length witness reached the apartment, the door of which was securely tied with a piece of cord. Witness, however, managed to gain an entrance to the room by cutting the cord with his knife, and on making a close examination, found - underneath the foot of the bed - the remains of a child, wrapped round with pieces of carpet, &c. Before witness told prisoner that he had found anything, she called up over the stairs, saying "It is not mine." Witness then left Mr Weblin in charge of the room, requesting him to allow no one to enter it, and proceeded to the Guildhall for a constable, who, on his arrival, relieved Mr Weblin of his - not by any means too agreeable - duty. Witness afterwards went to 56 Notte-street, a house occupied by prisoner's mother, and as soon as he had entered the door prisoner said "It was dead born, I will swear it was dead born." After informing the mother of what he had found, witness removed the prisoner to the Guildhall, and, according to orders of the Chief-Constable, brought the remains of the body of the child to the Guildhall. - Mr Superintendent Frederick Wreford stated that he saw the prisoner at the station at about 6 o'clock on Friday evening, when he informed her that she would have to be detained on a charge of having concealed the birth of her child. He then asked her if she had anything to say in answer to the charge, but before doing so warned her in the usual way. Prisoner afterwards replied, "Well, sir, I was taken bad in the middle of the night, and I fainted, and on coming to myself again I found the child dead. I never heard it cry. This was about twelve months ago. I did not know what to do with it, and I was afraid to tell anyone about it." - Mr Wreford asked for a remand upon that evidence, until Tuesday next. - In answer to questions put by Mr Jackson, prisoner said her husband, who was a labourer, and employed at her Majesty's Dockyard, Devonport, deserted her about three years ago. - This was the whole of the evidence taken, and prisoner was remanded to Tuesday next, bail being refused.
The Inquest. - Later in the day Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, instituted an Enquiry at the Guildhall on the remains of the child's body found by Sergeant Prout. - Thomas Nicholl was the first witness called. He stated that he was a French polisher, and lived in a room at 7 Notte-street. On Friday last, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock in the afternoon, he was in his room at the top of the house, when his daughter presented herself at his door, saying, "There is a bad smell in Mrs Ardiman's room." Witness went to the room in question in company with his daughter, but detected nothing. On his way out, however, he perceived a very bad smell proceeding, as he thought, from the room occupied by MARY JANE PETIT. they then went into this room and looked around, but to their great surprise saw nothing. Notwithstanding their failing to see anything, from the stench that existed witness felt convinced that they had at last come to the right spot, and immediately rummaged the room. Under the foot of the bed he found a bundle, which he undid in part. When witness had so undone it he observed what he considered to be the scalp of a child. He believed that it was this bundle that had caused the disagreeable smell he had noticed for many weeks past. As soon as he had ascertained that it was the remains of a body of a child he sent for Mr Weblin, the landlord of the house, who, after satisfying himself also as to the contents of the bundle, proceeded to summon the police. Witness had not been living in the house (7, Notte-street) for more than about two and a half months, and during that time had heard MARY JANE PETIT, the woman who had confessed to being the mother of the child, coming in the house all hours of the night without any boots on, and never with a light. - MARY JANE TUCKER, living at 56 Notte-street, deposed to being the mother of MARY JANE PETIT, who was at present under arrest on a charge of having concealed the birth of her child. Her daughter married a man named THOMAS PETIT, who deserted her three years ago. Since that date her daughter had been in the habit of living with her (witness) during the day, and at night sleeping in a room at 7 Notte-street. The last time witness was in her daughter's room was about four months ago, but she perceived no disagreeable smell then. She had not the remotest idea that her daughter had been delivered of another child since the birth of her first, about three years ago. Her daughter had not heard of her husband since he deserted her. She had been in the habit of seeing her daughter every day, but had never noticed that she was pregnant, nor had her daughter made any communication to her whatever on the subject. Her daughter had of late been working at Mr Serpell's biscuit factory. Witness never knew prisoner to have been obliged to keep her bed for a single day since the birth of her first child. - Mr Superintendent Wreford, who watched the case on behalf of the police authorities, and Sergeant Prout both gave evidence similar to that reported above. - Mr Sedley Wolferstan said: I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons and practising in Plymouth. At the Coroner's request I made, as far as possible, a post-mortem examination of the body now lying in the mortuary. I found it to be that of a large-sized female child, in a very advanced stage of decomposition. There is scarcely anything left but the skin, and the bones of the scalp. I have examined these remains without detecting any marks of violence. All the internal organs are gone, and therefore I am unable to express an opinion as to whether the child had had a separate existence or not. - The Coroner: Are you in a position to tell us whether the child had come to maturity? - Witness: From the child's size, I should say it had come to the full period. - The Coroner: Can you from the indications presented give the Jury any idea as to how long the child has been dead? - Witness: I should say the child had been dead not less than 12 months, and from the size of the child I should think that it would have weighed 8lbs. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the case seemed to him to be wrapped in mystery. He believed they (the Jury) would agree with him in saying that it was almost incredible that such a state of things could have gone on so long without having been discovered. The first witness had said that he had perceived the stench for about six weeks at least. How the mother could have slept in the bed over the bundle was past his (the Coroner's) comprehension. He could not understand how the matter could have gone on, having neighbours right and left of her, on the same floor. He had been informed of the circumstance, but he did not think it necessary to call evidence to prove that the smell had existed there for nearly 12 months. He had also been informed that of late the stench had become so great that the landlord of the house thought it necessary to have the drains examined; yet the neighbours had endured this smell without giving an alarm before. It had been very clearly shown that the husband of the young woman had left her, and since that time she had been allowed to go where she thought proper. What the Jury had to consider was whether there had been any foul play or not, and there was not the least evidence to show that there had been any foul play, because the doctor had told them that he had made a post-mortem examination as far as possible, and detected no marks of violence whatever; therefore, they could do nothing with that question. Perhaps it might have been better for them if MARY JANE PETIT had been brought before them, but she had been tried by the magistrates that day for concealment of birth, remanded and consequently had been removed to the Queen's prisons. If there had been a charge of infanticide, or any other charge laid against her, he should have asked them to have assisted him in adjourning the case, in order that she might have been brought before them. Under the present circumstances, however, his advice to them was to say that the child was "found dead;" but if they liked to add that it was born dead they could do so. The doctor, as they all knew, would not express his opinion on the subject, and, therefore, he (Mr Brian) could not say that it was not born alive. He should, therefore, advise them not to go as far as to say that the child was born dead, but simply say that it was found dead, which would be quite sufficient. He did not think they would be safe in finding any other verdict than that. - The Jury, after not more than about three minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict "That the child was Found Dead, having been born dead, and that MARY JANE PETIT was the mother of it."

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - A Case of Suicide at Horrabridge was the subject of Inquiry before Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Saturday, at the London Inn, Horrabridge. The deceased was WILLIAM YOULDEN, a farm labourer, aged 62, and unmarried. YOULDEN had been in the employ of Mr Edward Vigors, a farmer, and lived in the house since September. On Friday morning he ate a good breakfast, and afterwards was sent by his employer to the hay loft to cut chaff. He did not return to dinner, and was found hanging by a stout rope from the beam. Life was extinct. Deceased had been despondent for some weeks and had also complained to one of the other labourers of being very weak. The Jury gave a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 January 1880
BARNSTAPLE - Painful Case Of Maternal Indifference. - The Coroner of Barnstaple, Mr R. J. Bencraft, held an Inquest on Monday respecting the death of JOSEPH HILTON, son of a sergeant-major in the North Devon Hussars, who died suddenly three weeks since. The boy, who was nearly ten years old, was described as a sharp, intelligent lad, but delicate, from having overgrown his strength. A few days before Christmas he lost a large quantity of blood from his nose, and in Christmas week he took to his bed. He became very weak and exhausted, but his mother declined to send for a doctor. On Wednesday last he had become so ill that Mrs Westacott, his mother's landlady, obtained a medical order from a the relieving officer. The mother did not take it until the evening and the boy was not visited until the following morning, when he was found in a dying state, too weak to speak audibly or to be examined with safety. Mr Cooke prescribed stimulants, but he saw that the case was hopeless, and death ensued the next day. Death was found to have resulted from acute inflammation of the heart. There was a possibility, though not a probability, that death might have been averted if deceased had had medical attendance. The Coroner commented upon the reprehensible neglect of the mother, but said that after medical evidence the Jury could not return any other than an open verdict. The Jury certified that "The deceased died from Natural Causes," but severely censured the mother.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 January 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Cause Of Death In A Child. - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Friendship Inn, Morice Town, last evening, upon the body of WILLIAM ALFRED BAKER, aged seventeen months, who died suddenly at 6 Pentamar-terrace. The infant was taken unwell on Thursday afternoon, and within five minutes died. Dr J. Rolston, who was called in, was unable to account for the decease of the child, and yesterday made a post-mortem examination. The body was healthy, but on opening the skull he found a small tumour, about the size of a grape, just at the base of the brain. It was so small that it almost escaped observation, but its action was sufficient to account for the suddenness of the death. Dr Rolston stated that no similar case had ever come under his observation. The slightest slip might have destroyed the tumour, and it was highly probable that he should then have been unable to fix upon the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry last evening at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, Plymouth, touching the death of an infant named REX CLAUDE WILLIAMS, aged nineteen months, the illegitimate child of TERESA WILLIAMS, a domestic servant. The child was out at nurse with a Mrs Oldfield, residing at 22 Neswick-street. It had been teething, but up to Thursday morning was in its usual health. It was given some food and shortly afterwards was seized with a fit of coughing. Convulsions set in, and a surgeon and the mother of the deceased were sent for, but before either of them came the child died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest last evening, at the Shades Inn, Cherry Garden-street, touching the death of RICHARD OSBORNE, a naval pensioner, 63 years of age, who resided at 16 Pond-lane. The evidence shewed that when the deceased drew his pension he was in the habit of drinking to excess. On Thursday night, after having drank heavily, he was found lying on the stairs at his residence. His head was hanging downwards, and he was quite dead. Dr Wilson, finding no external marks of violence, made a post-mortem examination, and ascertained that there had been haemorrhage of the stomach. His opinion was that the deceased slipped over the stairs, and being enfeebled by excessive drinking, was not strong enough to recover his equilibrium; and, haemorrhage ensuing, the man died. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 January 1880
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held before Mr T. C. Brian, last evening, at the Fisherman's Arms, Lambhay-street, Plymouth, touching the death of STEPHEN FRIEND, aged 38, a native of Salcombe. The deceased was a shipkeeper of the vessel Johanna, of Salcombe, which has been in port for a fortnight, during which time FRIEND lodged with his sister-in-law, at 22 Lambhay-street. On Sunday morning, after attending to his duties on board, he complained of a severe cold and went to bed. About 6 p.m. he partook of some tea, and shortly afterwards was found dead. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 January 1880
KINGSBRIDGE - It was elicited at the Inquest on the body of RICHARD JARVIS, herbalist, Kingsbridge, who was found dead in bed on Monday, that he had a diseased heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 16 January 1880
HOLBETON - Fatal Accident. - Mr Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at the George Inn, Holbeton, on Wednesday evening, touching the death of WILLIAM BOWDEN, a farmer, residing at Holbeton. - EDWARD THOMAS BOWDEN, son of deceased, said his father rode to Modbury on Monday last. The horse he rode was a quiet one. He did not see his father again till he was brought home injured at about 12 o'clock in the evening. - James Gosling, a labourer residing at Dunstone, said he found deceased lying near the Yealm Bridge Lime Kiln on Monday evening at 9 o'clock. Deceased's face was covered with blood and he was nearly insensible. The horse was standing three yards from the body of deceased, who was lying five feet from the mouth of the kiln. - Mr W. Froude, surgeon, said he saw deceased on the 13th inst. There was a small punctured wound over the right eye, the forehead was much bruised and the right hip was fractured. MR BOWDEN died at 3.30 p.m. the same day (Tuesday). In his opinion death resulted from concussion of the brain, caused by the fall. - The Jury of whom Mr E. Gally was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 19 January 1880
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Saturday evening relative to the death of WILLIAM FRIEND, aged 54. Deceased, who was a pensioner, was for sixteen years in the Indian army, and for the past three or four years has been working as an agricultural labourer. About seven o'clock on Friday evening, as FRIEND was returning from work, he suddenly fell outside Doidge's wine and spirit vaults in North-road, and died almost immediately. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 January 1880
OKEHAMPTON - Alleged Mercurial Poisoning At Okehampton. Important Inquest. - Mr R. Fulford, coroner for the district, held an Inquest at the White Hart Hotel, Okehampton, yesterday afternoon, into the circumstances attending the death of LILLIAN DREW, aged 5 years, daughter of MR SAMUEL DREW, auctioneer of that place. - The Coroner, in opening the investigation, remarked that he felt it to be his duty to explain why he had brought the Jury together. By law it was the duty of the public authorities to report to him, as Coroner of the district, when a death occurred where a medical certificate as to the cause of death was refused. It had been reported to him by the police in this instance that the deceased had been attended to up to the time of her death by Dr Waters, whose duty would have been to have certified to the cause of death, but that gentleman had refused to give a certificate, and this left him no alternative but to hold an Inquest. From the circumstances of the case, as reported to him, they were about to enter upon an Inquiry of a very serious and important nature, and those who were in attendance upon the child at the time of its death would be called upon to give evidence. He would not anticipate that evidence, but it had been reported to him that the child was seen not only by Dr Waters, but by Dr Northey, and they would be called upon to give their opinion as medical men as to the cause of death: and assuming it to be the case that death had resulted from the effect of medicines administered to it, not by medical authority or by medical sanction, although a doctor was in attendance, it would be for the Jury carefully to consider the circumstance. Calomel, mercury, and antimony were medicines in skilled hands, but were really poisons when administered by persons unskilled in their use, and persons unskilled in their use, and yet presuming to use them, were, in the eyes of the law, guilty of a very serious offence. If the death of this child resulted from poisonous drugs administered by unskilled hands, then this Inquiry would assume a very serious aspect, and, therefore, he must impress upon them that they were entering upon an important investigation. If the parents of this child had been poor and could not easily obtain medical aid there might be some excuse, but having a medical man in attendance and adopting other courses than those suggested by him, attached a very great amount of responsibility to the parents. The deceased, it seemed, had been suffering from measles, which had been extraordinarily fatal in this locality, and the opinion of Dr Waters was that the child had died through salivation with mercury, the drug having been administered by unskilled hands, and without his authority or consent. - SAMUEL DREW, auctioneer, &c., of Okehampton, the father of the child, stated that the deceased was 5 years old. She was taken ill on January 1st. and Mrs Edwards, a nurse, attended to her. On the 6th inst. he sent for Dr Waters, and that gentleman continued in attendance upon the child up to the time of her death, which occurred at noon on Sunday. To his knowledge, nothing beyond what was prescribed by Dr Waters had been administered to the deceased. On Wednesday last the child's head was swollen out of shape. Dr Waters told him not to be alarmed about the swelling; that her pulse was better, that she was in a fair way of doing, and there was no need of his calling again. The doctor did not call again, and on Friday night his wife came to him and told him the child's teeth were dropping out. His opinion was that the deceased had been deeply salivated, and early on the following morning he telegraphed to Tavistock for Dr Northey. Shortly afterwards Dr Waters called to see the other children, three of whom were suffering from the measles. He asked the doctor's opinion of the deceased, and the reply was that it was a very bad house, but that he still had hopes of the child's recovery. Up to that time not a word was said about any wrong treatment. Dr Northey came shortly after four in the afternoon, and was met by Dr Waters, between whom there was a private conference. After visiting the children Dr Northy came to him and told him it was very likely eh would lose two of them, the deceased being in his opinion, deeply salivated, so deeply that he was afraid the jaw-bone would drop off. Dr Waters then inquired whether Mrs Edwards had administered anything. Personally he was not aware that she had, but hearing what Dr Northey said he made inquiries, and found that Mrs Edwards had given the deceased a powder. He went into the kitchen and found on the mantlepiece five or six powders made up in small packages. One of these he gave to Dr Waters, and asked for an analysis. The powder was tested and was retained by Dr Waters, who said he should have it further analysed. - Dr Walters, practising at Okehampton, stated that on the 6th January, he was requested by MR DREW to see the deceased. He did so, and found her suffering from measles complicated with inflammation of the windpipe, which was a complication they did not often meet with. He prescribed for the child, and continued to visit her until the 13th instant, on which day he considered her better, as far as the inflammation of the windpipe was concerned, but he noticed for the first time a slight swelling of the face. He asked whether the medicine had been continued, and also whether anything besides his medicine had been given, to which he received a negative answer. As the swelling was so slight and the inflammatory symptoms shewed signs of improvement, he took little notice of it. He called again on the 15th when the face and neck were more swollen, and he again asked whether anything other than his medicine had been given. He was told no. Under the circumstances he was quite unable to account for the swelling, as no mercury whatever had been administered by him. He had a lurking suspicion that mercury had been given, but in the face of such a direct negative reply to his questions he was somewhat at a loss to account for the symptoms. He went again on Saturday and found that the child's face was swollen beyond measure, and was informed that several of the teeth had dropped out. From this and other symptoms he came to the conclusion that the suspicions he had entertained were fully confirmed by the state of the patient. He was about to suggest that another medical man should be called in when he was informed that Dr Northey had been sent for. What MR DREW had stated with reference to conversations said to have passed between them as to the condition of the child was utterly false. When he met Dr Northey he expressed the belief that the child was suffering from extreme salivation. They saw the deceased and Dr Northey concurred in the opinion that had been expressed. He then asked MRS DREW how many powders had been given the child and she replied, "Three or four." MR DREW brought him a white powder and he made a rough test of it, the result being to confirm his opinion. The child died on Sunday morning whilst he was in the room. He was of opinion that death arose from exhaustion produced by mercurial salivation. - Dr Northy, practising at Tavistock, confirmed the opinion of Dr Waters, as to the cause of death. - The Coroner then adjourned the Inquiry until 11.30 this morning and instructed the medical gentlemen to make a post-mortem examination of the body in the meantime.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 20 January 1880
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Infant. - Last evening Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Albert Inn, Morley-place, relative to the death of the infant son of EDWARD and ELIZABETH JANE GEACH, residing at 9 York-lane. The deceased - NICHOLAS JAMES GEACH - was put to bed on Saturday night and about 7 o'clock the following morning the child was found dead by its mother's side. From the appearance of the deceased, there was every reason to believe that death was the result of convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 January 1880
PLYMOUTH - Before Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, at the Prince of Wales, Russell-street, an Inquiry was held last evening concerning the death of PHILIP ROWE, 67, coastguard pensioner, who died on Saturday morning. The deceased had been in bad health for some time, and had been attended by Mr Pearse, surgeon, and his partner, Mr Lewis. The latter gave a certificate that apoplexy was the cause of death, but the registrar refused to accept it, Mr Lewis having treated the deceased for rheumatic pains. A post-mortem examination confirmed the opinion that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

OKEHAMPTON - Inquiry Into The Death Of A Child At Okehampton. The Nurse Censured. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of LILLIAN DREW, aged 5 years, daughter of MR S. R. DREW, auctioneer, was resumed by Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, at the White Hart Hotel, Okehampton, yesterday morning. Mr T. C. Brian, of Plymouth, watched the proceedings on behalf of Mrs Osborne, alias Edwards, the nurse, who was in attendance upon the deceased during her illness, and Mr Toby, of Exeter, appeared for MR and MRS DREW. - The Coroner, prior to proceeding with the investigation, remarked that he was pleased to see that the parties connected with the case were professionally represented, and it was a matter of satisfaction to notice that the case was being watched on the part of those against whom the evidence appeared to have a tendency towards a charge of a serious nature. At the opening of the Inquiry he ventured, without deference to the legal works on the matter, to mention to them what was the law, and he now desired to call the attention of the Jury to what was laid down in "Starkey upon Evidence." It was laid down upon undoubted authority that "If a person not of medical education, in a case where medical aid may be obtained, undertakes to administer medicine which may have a dangerous effect, and thereby occasion death, such person is guilty of manslaughter. He may have no evil intention, or he may have a good one; but he has no right to hazard the consequences in cases where medical attendance may be obtained." - MR DREW, having had the evidence given by him on the previous day read over, was subjected to cross-examination by Mr Brian. He affirmed that he had no knowledge of the administration of the powders, and that when he went into the kitchen to inquire about them they were pointed out to him for the first time, but he could not say who directed him where to find them. Mrs Edwards was a recognised nurse in the town, and had lived upwards of twenty years in the employ of a medical man. She was known in Okehampton by the name of Osborne. - Dr A. G. Waters, L.C.P., M.R.C.S., was also cross-examined. His opinion was that death resulted from exhaustion produced by mercurial poisoning. He was not infallible, and was open to correction; but he had not the slightest doubt in his own mind as to the cause of death. He first formed the opinion that the child was suffering from salivation on the 13th inst., when he noticed a slight increase of saliva. But had he not had information that powders or medicines, other than his prescriptions were being administered by a person who went about nursing, he should not even then have considered the discharge of sufficient importance to notice it particularly. On the 15th there was an increase of the symptoms, and he prescribed to counteract them. He had no experience of teeth dropping out in the way they did in this case except where salivation had taken place. Measles had been fatally prevalent in the district. It was one of the most fatal epidemics he had met with in an experience of twenty years, and the cases had presented great and unusual complications. But the symptoms presented in all the other cases differed entirely from those in this case. - Mr W. H. Northey, M.R.C.S., of Tavistock, deposed to having on Saturday last been requested by MR DREW to visit the deceased. On his arrival he met Dr Waters at the house. They conferred together, and he then went to see the child. He found her in a state of extreme prostration, almost pulseless, and suffering from severe salivation. The face was swollen and inflamed, the gums had become absorbed, some of the front teeth had fallen out, and the under jaw was in a state of incipient necrosis. He then had a consultation with Dr Waters, after which he told MR DREW his opinion. MR DREW thereupon produced a powder, and Dr Waters made an analysis, demonstrating that it contained mercury. His opinion at the time was that the child was sinking from extreme exhaustion, the result of mercurial salivation. By direction of the Coroner he had that morning made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased. On opening the larynx there were one or two detached pieces of lymph. The mucous membrane of the windpipe was inflamed, and had also lymph in it. The upper lobe of each lung was empty, but the lower lobes were congested, the smaller vessels being filled with dark blood, and the smaller air tubes filled with thin pus. There was no indication of pleurisy having existed, and the heart was also sound. He then examined the state of the mouth and found it in the condition previously described. His opinion was that death had been aggravated by the use of mercury, and that it was not a safe remedy in this case; but he was not at all satisfied that mercury was the entire cause of death, but thought it was also due to the disease from which the child was suffering, and to the condition of the atmosphere. - Cross-examined by Mr Brian: He did not attribute the inflammation of the larynx to mercurial action. In such a complicated case of measles as was in this instance presented, the symptoms might have been the same without the use of mercury. It was his practice never to administer mercury in cases of the kind. It was possible that congestion of the lungs and effusion into the air tubes might have been produced by the disease from which the child was suffering without the action of mercury. - By Mr Toby: He had no doubt but what the condition of the mouth was produced by extreme salivation. Looking at the state of the child, he was of opinion that the slightest quantity of mercury was calculated to have a most serious effect upon her. - MRS JEANETTE DREW, the mother of the deceased, stated that she had three children suffering from measles. Mrs Edwards, whom she knew by the name of Osborne, used to come daily to assist in nursing them. The medicine they had from Dr Waters was supplied in bottles. In addition to the medicine so supplied, Mrs Edwards administered a powder to the deceased. She was present when Mrs Edwards gave the powder. One powder was given before Dr Waters was called in, and one afterwards. She herself gave the child the second one upon the instructions of Mrs Edwards, who told her to administer one when required. Mrs Edwards gave the first powder. She (witness) only administered one; the nurse, Mrs Medland, gave a second, and Mrs Edwards gave a third. She believed no more than three were administered. The powders were kept in the room in which the sick children were lying. She did not know where the powders came from; Mrs Edwards brought them to the house. She did not know there were others in the house until the nurse told her that Mrs Edwards had put them in the kitchen and when Dr Northey came on Saturday last a parcel containing six powders was found on the mantelpiece in the kitchen. She herself pointed them out to her husband. They were intended to be administered to the baby, which was lying ill of measles, and were not so large as those administered to the deceased. Mrs Edwards told the nurse that she had brought them for the baby. She never knew until Dr Northey came that the deceased had been salivated. On Saturday evening Mrs Edwards came to the house and they told her what Dr Northey had said. Mrs Edwards replied that she could not tell how the child could have been salivated, but neither then nor at any time did she mention what the powders contained. The two other children who were ill with measles had each had one of the powders, and they were convalescent. - Mrs Edwards, acting upon the advice of Mr Brian, declined to give evidence. - The Coroner then asked Dr Northey whether it was possible the child had died from the disease from which it was suffering, and not from the effects of mercurial poisoning? - Mr Northey: There is a possibility, if not a probability. - The Coroner: But you also think it probable that the mercury may have accelerated the death? - Mr Northey: Yes, I should say so. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said it was clear that the child, whilst under the care of a medical man of knowledge and ability, had had administered to it by Mrs Edwards a medicine of a highly dangerous character. It was also clear that if death had not actually been occasioned by mercurial poisoning, it was accelerated thereby; and it would therefore be for the Jury to say whether, placing the most lenient construction upon the occurrence, it was not a highly improper and wrong act for anyone to attempt. It would also be for them to consider whether the party guilty of such an act was not criminally responsible, and whether or not the evidence was sufficiently conclusive to put Mrs Edwards upon her trial. - The Jury, after deliberating in private for some time, unanimously found "That the deceased died from Measles, and other disorders, and they request the Coroner to caution all persons not duly qualified to abstain from administering any drugs without medical advice." - The Coroner, in endorsing the view taken by the Jury, remarked that the evidence conclusively proved that a pernicious drug was administered the child by Mrs Edwards, not with the intention of doing harm, but for the purpose of doing good. But, notwithstanding the motive, the medicine was of a dangerous character, and he hoped the result of the Inquiry would be to induce Mrs Edwards never again to interfere in a province beyond her. There certainly was not sufficient proof that death was caused by mercurial poisoning to warrant the Jury in sending her for trial, but, at the same time, he must say that a worse case of a nurse interfering with the treatment of a skilled practitioner scarcely ever came before a Jury, and he hoped the ventilation of the circumstances of the case by means of this Inquiry would result in great good, and would be a warning to nurses. He felt it to be his duty, although not requested by the Jury, to make an observation upon the conduct of the child's parents. MRS DREW knew that the powders were being used, and MR DREW, if he did not know, might have known of the circumstance. He hoped it would be a warning to MR DREW and to all parents not to allow Mrs Edwards to carry on the mission which he was given to understand she had been carrying on in Okehampton. - The Inquiry thereupon terminated.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 21 January 1880
OKEHAMPTON - Inquest On A Child At Okehampton. - The Inquest on the body of LILIAN, a child five years of age, the daughter of MR S. R. DREW, auctioneer, who died on Sunday last from an attack of measles, accompanied by inflammation of the wind-pipe, was resumed yesterday morning before Mr Fulford, Coroner for the district. Mr Brian, of Plymouth, appeared for Mrs Edwards (otherwise known as Osborne), and Mr Toby, of Exeter, watched the case on behalf of the father, MR DREW. MRS DREW, who appeared to be much affected in giving her evidence, related the circumstances attending the death of deceased, and which did not differ materially from the evidence given by her husband the previous day. On being asked how many powders the child had been given after the doctor's prescription, witness replied "Two or three." In cross-examination, however, it was elicited that three powders had been given, one by witness, one by Mrs Osborne, and the other by the nurse, Mrs Medland. - Mr Northey, surgeon, of Tavistock, gave evidence as to the post-mortem examination. He said a large amount of mercury had evidently been taken. It was his opinion that death had been accelerated by the taking of the powders given by Mrs Osborne. After the hearing of further evidence, the Coroner summed up. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The result, on being made known, seemed to meet with the general approbation of the public, who have manifested great interest in the case.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 22 January 1880
KINGSBRIDGE - The Concealment Of Birth At Kingsbridge. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - At the Town Hall, Kingsbridge, yesterday, an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Gay, on the body of a female child found in a closet in Duncombe-street, Kingsbridge, on Tuesday last. - Mr B. Sparrow was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - ANNIE POOK, alias "PARSELY," the supposed mother of the child, was brought up by Sergeant Tucker and appearing to be in a weak state, she sat during the whole of the enquiry at the right of the Coroner. - The first witness called was Emma Hobbs. She stated the accused was washing for her on Wednesday last. On Tuesday, the 20th inst., she saw the body of the child found in the closet by Sergt. Tucker. She considered it was ANNIE POOK'S child. She knew her to have had three other children, who resided with her. Had seen the accused many times within the last few months. She considered she was in the family way. This was her opinion from the general appearance of the accused. On Wednesday last she accused her of being enciente. At lunch-time on that day she appeared to be ill. She said to the accused, "I suppose we shall have to miss you for some little time?" In reply the accused said, "I s'pose you are thinking like other people." The accused then returned to her washing. At one o'clock she called ANNIE POOK to dinner, but she was then in the closet. In about three minutes she came out. She did not know how long she had been in the closet. She appeared to be in great pain while taking her dinner and she told the accused she ought to go home, but she said she would go on with the washing. She left the room to go to the wash-house, but when she went there immediately after the accused was not there. She went to the closet-door and called her twice. She answered her. The witness said, "ANNIE, you are ill; why don't you go home?" The accused answered, "I shall be all right again presently." She then left her and went out on business. On her return Mrs Hill said, "Miss Hobbs, do come out to ANNIE." They went to the wash-house door and found the accused there. She was standing up looking very ill. She (witness) offered to go for a doctor. On enquiring of the accused how she felt, she replied "I am better." Soon after she knocked at her door, and said she was going home, but the accused did not make any allusion as to what had happened. - The Foreman: You say she was washing for you last Wednesday. When did you see the child? - Witness: yesterday. - By the Coroner: Went to the closet after the accused had left but could not see anything. There was access to the closet for all the houses. - Other witnesses were examined after which, Mr John Elliot, surgeon, was called. He stated that on Tuesday last, about 11 o'clock, he was requested to examine the accused. He did so in the presence of Mrs Tucker. The accused admitted having given birth to a child recently. On examination he found she had been delivered about five or six days. After this he was shown the body of a full-matured female child, which he was informed had been found in a closet. The body was washed. There was no fracture of the bone. The body was slightly decomposed, and the hands were clenched. there were two finger-nail marks on the surface of the chest, besides a scratch on the left side of the neck, and a few other marks which were probably caused by being pushed with a stick. The umbilical cord had been torn, not cut in the usual way. He had made a post-mortem examination and found that the heart and lungs on being subjected to the usual test floated entirely. He then tested the lungs in pieces with the same result. He found a piece of paper in the throat of the child, which might have been pushed in when the child fell into the closet, it having been taken out by the feet. He was of opinion that the child died of suffocation. Could not say that it had a separate existence. The condition of the lungs warranted him in stating that the child had undoubtedly breathed effectually, but probably death was due to immersion in the closet. - The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ANNIE POOK. - The prisoner will be brought before Kingsbridge magistrates today (Thursday).

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 January 1880
CREDITON - An Inquest was held at Crediton yesterday on the body of FREDERICK LEACH. Deceased was employed at Mr Dart's steam sawing mill, and was engaged on Monday last with another man in placing a piece of wood beneath a circular saw. From some cause the wood rebounded while he was forcing it inwards with his body instead of his hands, and struck him so severely that he died on the next day, though the visible injury was only a slight abrasion of the skin. Mr Alexander, assistant to Mr Edwards, surgeon, expressed his belief that deceased died from internal collapse, and the Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death." On the suggestion of Mr Moon, the Jury gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 January 1880
LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday on the body of a convict, GEORGE COOPER, aged 50, who died after a week's illness from acute bronchitis. COOPER was sentenced to ten years' penal servitude at Winchester, in 1872 for being a convict at large, having escaped from Australia while undergoing seven years' penal servitude.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 February 1880
TOTNES - At Totnes a child named MATTHEWS, seven weeks old, daughter of a labourer, was found dead in her mother's arms on Friday morning. At the Inquest on Saturday, before Dr Gaye, it transpired that out of ten children, seven were stillborn, and the other three had died while infants. The mother had noticed an eruption on this child about a month ago, and Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, who was called to view the body, said from what the mother told him he thought the child died from a hereditary disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TEIGNMOUTH - At the Inquest on MR C. KELSON, of 1 Waldon-place, Teignmouth, who died suddenly on Friday, as already reported, whilst walking on the seawall, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 February 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr Vaughan on the body of the infant son, aged 4 months, of JOHN H. KERR, seaman, living in Fort-street. The child died suddenly on Sunday morning. Dr F. Row made a post-mortem examination and attributed death to disease of the lungs acting upon a weakly constitution. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - DR SKELTON'S death was the subject of an Inquiry before Mr T. C. Brian, at the New Town Inn, Plymouth, yesterday evening. The evidence was to the effect published yesterday, that the deceased, who was 74 years of age, suddenly fell and died in the shop of Miss Pearse, stationer, Saltash-street, on Saturday evening. MR W. B. SKELTON, a grandson, and DR SKELTON of London, a son of the deceased, attributed death to heart disease, from which the latter considered his father had been suffering for three years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was at once returned.

PLYMSTOCK - The death of WILLIAM STITSON, aged 51, market gardener, Ellacombe, was the subject of an Inquiry before Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at the Church House Inn, Plymstock, yesterday. The deceased had for some time been suffering from a severe cough, and went to bed on Friday apparently in his usual health, but his wife called her son about four o'clock the next morning, stating that he was groaning and unconscious. Mr H. J. S. Liddell, surgeon, was sent for, but STITSON was dead before he arrived. A post-mortem examination shewed the existence of a quantity of effused blood at the base of the skull sufficient to cause death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 5 February 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry at the Railway Inn, Mutley, last evening, touching the death of WILLIAM MUSHBY, late porter at the Plymouth High School for Girls. Mr H. Edlin, F.R.C.S., gave evidence to the effect that he was called to the High School for Girls, North Hill, on Tuesday, the 27th January, and was informed that the deceased had had a fall from a ladder, while putting up a blind in one of the class-rooms. He complained of a slight pain in his head. Witness immediately ordered him to be taken home and put to bed. Witness saw him again on the following day and found acute signs of inflammation of the lungs, from which deceased died on Monday evening last. It was probable that death might have been accelerated by the fall from the ladder. - MRS MUSHBY, wife of the deceased, gave evidence to the effect that the deceased had been unwell for some time past. - The Jury, of whom Mr John Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from Inflammation of the Lungs, which was accelerated by the fall.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 February 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest on the body of GEORGE NICHOLAS PEARSE, 60, residing at Ford, who died suddenly whilst at the Pear Tree Inn, Stoke, on Wednesday, was held by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, yesterday. Mr L. P. Metham, who had made a post-mortem examination, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from heart disease, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 6 February 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport coroner, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Pear Tree Inn, Tavistock-street, Stoke, into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE NICHOLAS PEARSE, aged 60, and a pensioner, who has been working for the past five years as blacksmith to Mr O. Ralph. - Georgina Pearson said deceased went for his pension that morning, after which he went to see Dr Prim, who had been attending to him for the past six months, but finding he was out, the deceased returned and ate a good dinner. She saw him at twenty minutes to three. He then appeared quite well. He had complained of pains in his left side, and sometimes he would sit still, through the anguish of the pain and not speak for about two hours. She always thought deceased would be brought home dead. - Oratio Ralph, plumber &c., said deceased had been in his employ for the past five years as blacksmith. During the past three years he often lost time. Sometimes he complained of illness, and would have to stop work for two hours. He was a very steady and sober man. - Dr Metham said he was called that afternoon about three o'clock to see a man who had fallen down. He ran to the Pear Tree Inn, where he saw deceased, who was quite dead. Witness had made a post mortem examination, by direction of the Coroner, and his belief was that death resulted from heart disease, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 February 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From A Fall At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, touching the death of GRACE COLMER, aged 80, who was received into the Hospital on the 27th of November last. - The husband of the deceased stated that he was an agricultural labourer, that he resided at Milehouse, and that he was in the employ of Mr Harvey, farmer. On the day in question he had some bullocks, which he had to drive into Plymouth. His wife wanted him to take his breakfast before he did so. He told her he could not stay, and she tried to persuade him to, and he then gave her a push in "fun" and she appeared to trip and fall down. She got up and he then left her. In about half an hour he returned and found the deceased sitting in a chair, and she told him to fetch a doctor, as she thought she had hurt herself. He went for Mr May, surgeon, who went back with him and examined his wife, and found her to be suffering from a fracture of the thigh. Mr May ordered her to the Hospital. he then went for a trap and in his absence the deceased's son and son-in-law conveyed her to the Hospital in a cab. - Mr W. E. Cant, resident surgeon of the Royal Albert Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Hospital on the 27th of November last, and was suffering from a fracture of the thigh. An attempt was made to unite the bone, and splints were applied, but, as was often the case with old people, the bone did not unite. The deceased became very weak, and in consequence of having to be kept in one position, bed sores set in, and she died on Wednesday last. In his opinion the indirect cause of death was the fractured thigh. The deceased did not complain that anyone pushed her, but stated that she tripped and fell. - The Inquest was adjourned until today in order that the son of the deceased might attend, as it was stated that his evidence would materially differ from that of her husband.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 9 February 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Mysterious Death From A Fall At Milehouse. - An adjourned Inquest was held on Saturday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, on the body of GRACE COLMER, 80 years of age, who was thrown to the ground by her husband, on the 27th December, causing a fracture to the upper part of her thigh, from which she died at the Hospital on Wednesday. - The evidence given by JOHN COLMER, husband of the deceased, on Friday (who absented himself from the Inquiry on Saturday, for some unexplained reason, and which had been published in the Mercury) was read over. - JOHN BROOKS, employed at the Keyham yard, deposed to being a son of the deceased. On hearing what had happened to her on the 27th December, he went to her house and found her apparently in great pain. Witness asked what was the matter, and she replied, "Oh, JOHN shoved me just now, and I fell about the house. I was afraid to tell anyone for fear of what the consequence might be." Witness did not see deceased's husband until about nine days afterwards, when he asked him "if he was not ashamed of himself," and added, "If mother dies from this, you will hear more about it." COLMER then replied, "No, I didn't do it," but subsequently said, "Well, mother was aggravating me, and I gave her a push out of the way, and she fell down." Witness again said, "If mother dies from the injuries you have given her, you will hear more about it," to which COLMER replied, "Oh, no, don't you believe it, it's nothing like that." Witness believed that deceased was well treated by her husband when he was sober; but the worst of it was, "He always got drunk when he had the chance." - ANN BOND, wife of James Bond, painter in H.M. Dockyard, and living at 45 Tavistock-street, Stoke, stated that on the day in question, JOHN COLMER, husband of the deceased, came to her house saying, "Your mother is taken very ill, and "Go over immediately." Witness did not go herself, but sent her son to see what had happened. Shortly afterwards the lad returned, saying "Grandmother has broken her leg." Witness then went over, and on questioning the deceased, received the following answer:- "Oh, JOHN has thrown me down on the stones" (meaning the floor). Witness asked her why he did it, and deceased replied "He has been to Stoke drinking all the morning. When he came home I was very angry with him for keeping Mr Harvey's man waiting." She added, "A great many angry words passed between us." Witness saw her mother's husband a few days afterwards, when he informed her that the people had charged him with having thrown his wife down and broken her leg. Witness replied, "And so you did." He then said, "Well, your mother was very aggravating, and I gave her a push." - By the coroner: When COLMER came to witness's house he was in liquor, and could scarcely walk. COLMER told witness he was very sorry what had happened, and said he would not have injured her for the world. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned the following verdict: "That the deceased, GRACE COLMER, died from a fracture to her right thigh, which fracture was sustained from a push by her husband, but which push was given with no intention to hurt or injure her."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 February 1880
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at Tiverton yesterday on the body of a woman named SARAH COSWAY, who met her death by falling down a flight of steps, alighting on her head, and injuring her brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at Torquay Police Station on Saturday touching the death of JOHN BARTEN, aged 35, who was found drowned the previous day at Torre Abbey. During the week the deceased had been in trouble as to some money he owed, and had been heard to say he intended to drown himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 February 1880
EXETER - The Drowning Fatality At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of HARRIET ELLIOTT, who was found drowned in the Mill Leat on the previous morning. Deceased was seen on the Saturday previous to the accident by her brother, HENRY DARE, a plasterer, who noticed a strangeness in her manner. She carried on business as a fruiterer; and trade had of late been very bad. Shortly after seven o'clock on Monday morning, MRS ELLIOTT left her home, informing a boy named George Miller, an errand boy in her employ, that she was going to purchase some flowers. She was in the habit of going out early in the morning. - William Densham, a fireman, employed at Bonhay Foundry, proved seeing the deceased floating with her face downwards in the water. She held in her hand a basket. The deceased was taken ashore and found to be still breathing. Medical aid was sent for, but the assistance of a surgeon could not be procured until half an hour afterwards. Restorative measures were taken, but without avail. An umbrella which was identified as belonging to the deceased was found a short distance from the spot where the body was found. The wind was very boisterous at the time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - SAMUEL STEVENS, aged 45, tailor, Holland-street, Barnstaple, whilst walking along the Strand, on Monday, fell and died before medical assistance could be procured. At an Inquest yesterday evening a verdict of "Death from Apoplexy" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 February 1880
EXETER - Inquiry was made at Exeter yesterday into the cause of the death of SARAH DELVES, aged 85, a widow, living by herself in Trinity-street. From statements made by the deceased to a girl named Searle, who used to do little services for her, it appeared that on the night of January 13th she got out of bed and fell across the fender, burning the top of her head. When visited the next morning she said she did not know how she got into bed again. She died on Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, that death resulted from Natural Decay, accelerated by the accident.

PLYMOUTH - Inquests In Plymouth. - An Inquest held at the Golden Lion Inn, Bath-street, Plymouth, yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, as to the death of the female child, aged 2 years and 3 months, of MARY COLWILL, revealed the fact that the body weighed 12lb., whereas a child of that age ought to have weighed 24lb. Its height was 24in., and ought to have been 32, but this might have arisen from natural causes. Mr Jackson, surgeon, said the mother had told him the child had been fed on scald milk, but as it had been delicate from birth it ought to have been fed with raw milk. The child was found by its mother dead early on Thursday morning. It had previously been under medical treatment. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian held a second Inquest at the New Town Inn, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of the child, aged three months, of JOHN JAMES NORTHEY, of 29 Drake-street. When the parents of the deceased got up yesterday morning the child appeared in its usual health, and the father went to his work as usual. After breakfast the mother went over to the bed on which she had left the deceased to give it some food, but found it dead. There was every appearance that the child had died in a fit of convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 8 March 1880
BARNSTAPLE - Mysterious Death By Drowning At Barnstaple. - On Saturday the Coroner for the Borough of Barnstaple held an Inquest on the body of MR THOMAS PRIDEAUX, basket-maker of Pilton, which had been discovered in the river Yeo early on Thursday afternoon. The deceased was 61 years of age, and was in the employ of his brother, MR R. PRIDEAUX. His wife had been away for ten or eleven weeks on a visit to his son, and in her absence he had lived in the house by himself. He was not seen at his brother's after five o'clock on Tuesday evening; but he is proved to have spent the evening at the North Country Inn, and at dinner-time on Wednesday he was seen going from his house towards the town. From the appearance of the house his relatives and the neighbours were strongly of opinion that he did not sleep at home on Wednesday night, and they conjectured that he was drowned on his way home. In agreement with this theory was the opinion of Mr Fernie, surgeon, that the body had been in the water at least twelve hours when it was recovered. On the other hand, a woman, named Chapple, stated most positively that between ten and eleven o'clock on Thursday morning she saw the deceased - who was well-known to her - standing on the bank within a short distance of where the body was found, she being within a few feet of him; and her evidence was confirmed by that of a little girl, named Beer, who said that soon after noon on Thursday she saw an elderly man, who resembled the deceased, fall from the bank in the direction of the water below. She mentioned the circumstance the same day to Mrs Manley, with whom she lives. A woman named cook was also of opinion that she, from a distance, saw the deceased on the bank about the same time as the woman Chapple; and it was said that a county constable, also, saw him alive on Thursday morning. - The Jury returned a verdict declaring that he was Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence to shew how he got into the water.

TORQUAY - An Inquest was held at Torquay on Saturday on the body of a lady named BAXTER, who suddenly expired on Wednesday at Stanley Villa. A verdict that Death resulted from "Heart Disease" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 8 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough coroner, held an Inquest at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, on Saturday night, respecting the death of HENRY BENTON. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Watson, lodging-house keeper, 129 King-street, that the deceased and his wife had resided there in private lodgings for the last three years. The wife was very much given to intemperance, but both deceased and his wife were persons of very reserved habits. On Thursday morning last, Mr Watson knocked at their door, and getting no reply, entered the room. He found deceased lying unconscious at one end of the room. He obtained an order from one of the relieving officers. Later in the day Dr Jackson and witness visited deceased, who was still lying unconscious in a state of nudity. His wife was also lying at the foot of the bed, in a state of intoxication. She had drawn the coverlet from her husband, and wrapped it over herself. A person was appointed to watch the deceased during the night. Dr Jackson stated that deceased was 73 years of age, and had died from natural decay, but death had been accelerated through want of proper nourishment. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes. They wished the Coroner to severely censure the wife, who appeared at the Inquest too much intoxicated to give evidence. - The deceased was a man of great natural abilities, and some years ago was well-known in Plymouth because of his letter-writing propensities.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 March 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest yesterday morning on the body of MARY ANN GRIBBLE, aged 15 years, who died suddenly on Saturday. The deceased was the daughter of a shipwright in the Dockyard, and was employed as a servant at an eating-house in Catherine-street, kept by Mr Wills. She appeared a strong, healthy girl, was well developed for her age, and had never complained of illness. Shortly after one o'clock on Saturday morning she was sent upstairs with a dinner, and a few minutes afterwards was found lying on her bed speechless and black in the face. Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, was sent for, but before his arrival, within half an hour, the girl had died. Mr Laity made a post-mortem examination, and found the substance of the heart exceedingly soft, and wanting very much in muscular action, whilst the lungs were gorged with blood. All the other organs were perfectly healthy, and the surgeon's opinion was that death was caused by an accumulation of blood in the lungs which the heart, through its weakness, was unable to force along. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TEIGNMOUTH - The sudden death of CHARLOTTE JAMES, of Hampton-place, Teignmouth, on Sunday morning, was the subject of an Inquest yesterday. It was proved that she had been suffering from a complication of diseases, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The Jury, with one exception, gave their fees to the Infirmary.

PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Child In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday evening relative to the death of CHARLES HENRY TIPPETT MILLER. - Inspector T. Price, of the Borough Police, watched the proceedings on behalf of that body. - The Coroner, in opening the case, hoped that the Jury would direct their serious attention to it. He never prejudged a case by any remarks, but this was one which he felt, although against his wish, that he ought to say a few words so as to prepare them for it. The deceased was between four and five months old, and its father and mother were living together, but were not married. The child was born in the Workhouse, and the first that was publicly known of this case was a constable seeing the father of the child with it in his arms going to a doctor. Mr Brian added that he had a medical witness in this case, as he always had in any case where he thought it was necessary. He always had, and he always should, observe his own mind about medical evidence. (Hear.) He was the judge of what was proper, and not anybody else. (Hear, hear.) That morning the child received a blow against the table. Now, whether it was the blow that killed the child, or whether it died from croup, the medical man would probably be able to tell them. The mother was overheard by a constable to say that she was afraid to go into the house for fear of her husband, as she called him, cutting her throat for killing the baby in the morning. - John Stringer, seaman, 121 King-street, was the first witness, and he stated that TIPPETT (the father) and MILLER (the mother) with whom he lived were taking breakfast together that morning, MILLER having the child in her arms. It began to cough and as she was changing it from one arm to the other the child's head struck the corner of the table. It screamed a little and then turned black in the face. TIPPETT took the child from the mother and shook it a little in order that it might regain its breath. It then gave a gasp and struggled and witness believed it died at that moment. There had been no words between the man and woman. - MARY JANE MILLER, of How-street, said she had been living with TIPPETT for six years, and had had two children by him. She gave similar evidence that on passing the child from one arm to the other its forehead accidentally came in contact with the table. TIPPETT ran off with the child to a doctor. - Mr Thos. Harper, surgeon, stated that TIPPETT brought the child to him, saying he was afraid it was dead, and such was the case, it having apparently been dead about half an hour. There was a small black spot nearly in the centre of the forehead. TIPPETT took the child away, and witness afterwards saw it at the house. He had heard the evidence, and had weighed the matter very carefully in his mind, and he had come to the conclusion that death was not owing to the blow on the forehead. It did not die from brain symptoms, but from symptoms of suffocation. He believed the child was about to have an attack of spasmodic croup which causes spasm of the windpipe and sudden death very frequently. It was very likely that the blow on the forehead might have accelerated the death of the child, and therefore to some extent hastened the moment of death. - The Coroner remarked that the evidence had taken a different turn to what he expected, and they had had a very fair statement from an independent witness. TIPPETT was no doubt greatly agitated about the death of the child, and the woman when she made the statement overhead by the constable, was no doubt in fear at the time. He observed that the medical evidence was very straightforward, but they could have a dozen medical men if they liked, and a post-mortem examination if they wished. They had better be careful, or else a representation might be made to the Secretary of State. It had been his turn, and they might have their turn next. He did not intend to let a certain matter drop, and he would give some people an opportunity of venting their grievances before a judge and Jury at Exeter. He had got everything prepared for them. - The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 9 March 1880
REVELSTOKE - Death From Burning. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Swan Hotel, Revelstoke, village of Noss, touching the death of SARAH KINGCOME, aged 66. HELEN JANE KINGCOME, grand-daughter of deceased, stated that on Saturday evening, 21st February, she was filling a lamp with benzoline, which she poured from a jug. Her grandmother came into the room with a lighted candle, and by some means her dress caught on fire, and she was burnt about the face, hands and legs. Witness could not explain how the accident occurred. Mr Edward James Atkins, surgeon, stated that he saw MRS KINGCOME, on the 22nd February, and she had since been chiefly under his care. There were extensive burns on the face, arms, hands and legs, from which no doubt she died on Saturday last, and the injuries were such as would be caused by burning benzoline oil. - Thomas Henry Bunker )coastguard, in the course of his evidence, stated that on the 21st February, about seven p.m. he went to MRS KINGCOME'S house, but found her lying on her face and hands in the roadway. Her dress was burning, and witness extinguished the fire. MRS KINGCOME was quite sensible. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 12 March 1880
BRADFORD - Suicide Of A Devonport Clergyman. (Special Telegram). Bradford, Thursday. - A painful case of suicide took place in Bradford on Wednesday morning, by a clergyman of the Church of England, known as the REV. EDWIN WALROND JONES, said to belong to Stoke, near Devonport, about 50 years of age. For some months past the deceased has been lodging with Mrs Holden, at 45 Hanover-square, Manningham-Lane, Bradford. He had no definite occupation, but was stated to obtain his living by teaching. No one knew where he came from up to the time of his death, as he would give no information respecting himself or his friends. For a long time he remained at the above residence, until he commenced habits of intemperance, and Mrs Holden gavel him notice to quite her house. This he refused to do. He previously had been gentlemanly and well conducted, and had made himself agreeable in the house. His habits of intemperance, however, grew upon him, and Mrs Holden gave him notice to quit on Monday. He promised to leave in a fortnight, but continued to go to and from the house for the purpose, as was believed, of pursuing his avocation. On Monday he seemed exceptionally strange in his manner, was more than usually intoxicated, and was heard to exclaim that he wished his life was at an end. On Wednesday morning the servant at the house called him at half-past eight o'clock, and obtained an answer. As he did not come downstairs, however, Mrs Holden became uneasy, and went herself to call him. Not receiving a reply, she sent for a joiner, had the bedroom-door burst open, and the deceased was discovered lying across the bed. He was quite dead, and a razor, stained with blood, was on the bed near his left hand. The appearance of the room indicated that the deceased had cut his throat in front of the looking-glass on the dressing-table, as there was blood on the glass and the table, and along the floor. The bed-clothes were completely saturated with blood. The police were informed of the occurrence, and on searching a bag belonging to the deceased the following address was discovered:- "REV. EDWIN WALROND JONES, Exmouth House, Stoke, Devonport." The Chief Constable of Bradford, Mr James Withers, immediately sent a telegram to the Devonport police and received an answer to the effect that the deceased had no relations either in Stoke, Plymouth or Devonport, but that his brother was a bank manager at Andover in Hants. From the appearance of the deceased's clothes, he seemed to be in very low circumstances. Mrs Holden says he was frequently drunk; in fact, he had not been sober for ten days before he committed suicide. Mr Hutchinson, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body at the Town-hall, Bradford, this evening, when evidence was given fully bearing out the above facts. The Coroner remarked upon the peculiarity of the circumstances of the deceased being in Bradford for so long without having any friends or even acquaintances, and without anything like regular employment. It appeared to him that he had been struggling hard to get a living, and upon the face of the evidence it seemed as though he had introduced himself to various clergymen around the district in order to gain a respectable livelihood. He had, however, been unfortunate, and intemperate habits had crept upon him as the result of the misfortune and most severe privation. The man had fought or battled against the word as it were, and fortune had lowered on him, and the only means of drowning his sorrow was intoxication. The first point for the Jury to consider was whether the deceased was of a rational state of mind when he took his life, and that he was driven to the act by absolute poverty. If such was their finding they would have to return a verdict of felo de se. The second point was whether, at the time he committed the act by which his life terminated, he was temporarily insane. The Jury, after a very short deliberation, returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a State of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 March 1880
SHALDON - An Inquest was held at Shaldon yesterday on the body of CAPTAIN WALLIS, a native of Clyst St. George, found drowned in the River Teign. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

BRADFORD - [Extra information on the REV. WALDRON] - Mr Jones, head master of Exmouth House School, Stoke, died last autumn. He was, however, assisted by a brother, who was a clergyman, who bore the name of EDWIN WALDRON, and resided at 12 St. Michael's-terrace, Plymouth. He was chaplain to the Devonport Borough Prison, at Pennycomequick, and was formerly curate of St, Mellion. The friends of this gentleman resided at Andover, but nothing was known in Devon, or Plymouth last night establishing the identity of this gentleman with the Bradford suicide.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - The death in Plymouth Sound of SAMUEL KERBERG, a Swede, one of the crew of the vessel Helena, was the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr T. C. Brian at the Sailors' Rest, Vauxhall-street, yesterday. All the witnesses were Dutch, and Mr Bellamy acted as interpreter. Mr Hearle appeared on behalf of the Dutch Consul. The evidence of the captain and mate was to the effect that deceased was very weakly, and for that reason the captain scarcely ever sent him aloft. On Wednesday deceased complained of being ill and the captain told him to lie down. The following morning he said he was better, but did not get up, and refused anything to eat or drink. About three o'clock in the afternoon he called the captain, who went to see him and then sent for a doctor, but the man died about four o'clock, before medical assistance arrived. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - Death By Suffocation In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth Guildhall last evening, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of GEORGE SCOTT, aged 48, marine pensioner. About six a.m. on Wednesday morning a quarryman named Geo. Parsons, whilst on his way to work observed a man lying on a kiln at Harvey's Cement Works, Deadman's Bay, Cattedown. He went in and found that the man was dead, his head being about a foot from the mouth of the kiln. The wind at that time was blowing the fumes from the kiln, across the deceased. There were no marks of violence on the body, and the clothing was not disarranged. The body was identified by the landlady of the deceased, who stated that he left her house on Tuesday morning, and she did not again see him alive. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased had no right on the premises, to enter which he had to climb over a high gate, which was always locked after seven p.m.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening by the Plymouth Borough Coroner, touching the death of EDWIN BALL, aged 29, of 18 Claremont-street. Deceased had been in the employ of Mr Smith, printer, Old Town-street, and had been subject to fits for several years. He came from work on Wednesday evening, and went to bed in his usual health, but the next morning the deceased was lying on the floor of his bedroom dead. - Mr Netting, chemist, North-road, stated that he had prescribed for deceased for about seven weeks. The prescription was one which was used very largely for fits by nearly all medical men, and the drugs composing it would not affect a person if an overdose were taken. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquests In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, yesterday evening, touching the death on Sunday of SILAS WILLIAM AVERY, aged four months and ten days. - CHARLOTTE AVERY, mother of the child, affirmed that to her knowledge the child was living between three and four o'clock on Sunday morning, but said that when she got up at a quarter to eight she noticed he looked rather pale, and lay heavily in her arms. She called her mother, who took the child from the bed, and found that he was dead. Mr Manning, Coroner's Officer, deposed to having seen the deceased on the day of its death, and questioned the mother. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A further Inquiry was also opened by Mr Brian at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, last evening relative to the death of LILIAN ELIZABETH MILLAR, aged one year and seven months, whose parents resided in Looe-street. ELIZABETH JANE MILLAR, mother of the deceased, said she was preparing her husband's dinner on Friday, the 12th inst., and had put a can of tea, which was nearly boiling, on the table. She casually turned her back, when the child suddenly screamed, and witness, looking around, saw she had pulled the can of tea over her, severely scalding her chest and other parts of the body. Witness caught her up and called for help, which was soon forthcoming. The child was wrapped in sheets and conveyed to the South Devon Hospital, where Mr T. Parker, surgeon, was soon in attendance. Death ensued on Sunday night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Foreman, Mr Ager, expressing the wish of the Jurors entirely to exonerate the mother from blame, this opinion moreover being endorsed by the Coroner.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 23 March 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Canoe Accident Off Stonehouse. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of HUBERT WILLIAM THOMAS, aged 21, lately a pupil of Mr Hodge, architect and surveyor, Courtenay-street, Plymouth, and who had been living, up to the time of his decease, with his parents at Hill Park Crescent, Plymouth, who was drowned on Saturday afternoon. - Ernest Sydney Broadhead, who accompanied the deceased, and who is an apprentice at Copestake and Company, Plymouth, said he knew the deceased for about three years. On Saturday last, about half-past three o'clock, they went to a Mr Bond, who lends canoes, &c., under the Hoe, the witness having suggested that they should go out for a pull. They each hired a canoe and paddled to Drake's Island. When they arrived there the wind began to increase, and they proposed to go to Barnpool. They went in that direction, but when near Firestone Bay, Stonehouse, the wind increased more, and they pulled in towards the bay, arriving there safely. They next agreed to return to Mr Bond's place by the shore. Witness understood that deceased was following him. The wind was blowing very hard, and it was with great difficulty that he kept his canoe's head to the wind, but after great difficulty he managed to clear the point. After he got around the point he looked back expecting to see the deceased, and waited a few moments. Not seeing him, and being unable to paddle back again, he took his canoe into the shore and went to the Point by land to see if he could find him. Not being able to do so, he inquired of some persons whether they had seen deceased, and was told that someone was picked up drowned. Witness had kept about 10 yards in advance of deceased all the time they were out. He did not know that THOMAS could not swim. The deceased to his knowledge was not a good canoeist. It was not blowing hard when they started. - Captain Edward Hocken, a native of Cardiff, but now staying at 159 North-road, said on Saturday afternoon he was at the Point, on the beach under Winter villa. About a quarter to four o'clock he saw two canoes coming from Mill Bay. It was blowing very hard (half a gale) and the canoes ought not to have been out. One canoe - the one the last witness was in - appeared to be managed fairly, but the one that deceased was in was not. About five minutes after this he noticed the deceased turn his canoe to wind and make a little way, but he was driven back twice or thrice. He then appeared to rest a little and let her drift. When the deceased got half-way in Firestone Bay, the other side of the tower, occupied by P.C. Lake, of the Devon Constabulary, the canoe fell across the sea and capsized. Witness waited a moment to see if the deceased cold swim; finding he could not, witness divested himself of his coat and waistcoat and plunged into the sea in the hope of rescuing the deceased. He swam to him and spoke to the deceased, but got no answer. Witness got hold of him and struck for the shore. Witness was in the water ten minutes, and finding he was sinking let the deceased go, but he believed he was dead before he left him, as he was continually going under water. There was something supporting him below the middle of his body, but which had the effect of keeping his head down in the water. Seeing a boat coming towards him witness stayed by the deceased's side. The boat on arrival was pulled up hard to wind, but instead of coming inside of them it went outside and missed them. He then left the deceased and struck for the shore, but remembered nothing after, being so exhausted. The deceased was sick before the boat came to them, and that from witness's experience was a poor sign unless he was immediately taken out of the water. Witness added that he was heavily weighted with his clothes and had to hold deceased's head out of water with one hand while he swam with the other. Deceased struggled very little. - P.C. Hannaford said he went, in company with a private of the Royal Marines, to the Point. He saw a boat near shore with two military officers in it, and he asked them why they did not pick up the body. They said we are on the rocks. He went out - the water covering his legs - and pushed the boat off, and picked up the body, which was floating. As soon as they moved the body something, he did not know what, floated out from under the deceased. By the time they had got the body to the boat the chief-officer of the Coastguards came and tried to restore life, but could not, saying it was "a bad job." It was about twenty minutes to five when they picked deceased up. - Mr Bond, the owner of the canoe, was then asked by a Juror where he took his signal for bad weather from. he said he did not take it from any place - he used his own judgment. - The Juror: The reason I asked that question was for the future good of the public. - This being all the evidence relative to the accident, the Coroner, in summing up, said they had had before them all the evidence that was necessary, and it was for them to decide whether the deceased met with death accidentally or otherwise, and whether Mr Bond ought to be censured or not. - The Jury, after quarter of an hour's consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased met with his death by Accidentally Drowning, censuring Mr Bond, the owner of the canoe, for having let two young men go out in such weather, also informing the deceased's companion that it was a great pity such an experienced canoeist as he was should have gone out with a young man like deceased in such weather. - The Coroner, on behalf of the Jury and himself, tendered their thanks to Captain Hocken for the energy which he had displayed in trying to save the deceased, but which he unsuccessfully accomplished. He next on behalf of the Jury and himself asked the father of deceased to accept their condolence in his great bereavement, which they knew was great. The chief officer of the coastguard was also thanked for trying his best to restore life. - A Juror suggested that the Coroner write a letter to Captain Hocken expressing their thanks for his courage in trying to save the deceased, as it might become of some service to him in future days, and the Coroner consented to do so.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 March 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquiry last evening at the Pride of Devon Inn, Cecil-street, concerning the death of WILLIAM KENDALL, treadle-maker, for forty years in the employ of Mr Banks. The deceased, who was 55 years of age, had been in failing health for eighteen months, but was at work on Saturday, and made a hearty dinner on Sunday. But about five o'clock on that day he was taken ill and died before a medical man arrived. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 29 March 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Want At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Townhall on Saturday on the body of ELIZABETH EVANS, aged 49 years, a widow, residing at 52 Monument-street. It was stated that the husband of the deceased, a ship's tailor, had been dead about two months, and that all the woman and her son - 11 years of age - had upon which to subsist was 4s. a week, allowed her eleven weeks in each quarter by an elder son - a servant on board H.M.S. Indus. The deceased went to live at 52 Monument-street seven weeks ago, and, as she had paid no rent, she was under notice to quit. She was known to be poorly circumstanced, but she secluded herself from her neighbours, and none of them had any idea that she was in a destitute condition. On Friday last Mrs Weeks, a tenant in the house, found the deceased lying on the floor of her room. She sent for medical aid, and Mr De Larue was in prompt attendance. His statement to the Jury disclosed the deplorable condition of the woman. He found her lying on a straw mattress, with scarcely any clothing, and covered only with a sailor's mackintosh. She was perfectly unconscious, he saw at once that she was lying. Her condition was extremely filthy, and the room was in a very dirty condition. There was no fire, and the only food was a bun, a bit of bread, and two or three flatfish. There was no bed, bedding or furniture of any sort, and the woman appeared completely destitute. The neighbours behaved very kindly and carried out all his instructions and he himself conveyed things from his house, so that everything was done for her that could be done. Death ensued within two hours. He had that day made a post-mortem examination and came to the conclusion that death resulted from general debility and a want of nervous force, brought about by the insufficiency of proper food. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that death no doubt resulted from the deceased concealing her destitute condition, and from the kind way in which the neighbours acted when the circumstances of the case became known to them, it was evident that she would never have been driven into such extremities if she had only told them of her wants instead of seeking to conceal them. He tendered his best thanks to Mr De Larue for the kind manner in which he had acted. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by the want of proper nourishment," and also expressed their sense f the kindness displayed by Mr De Larue.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 March 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Golden Lion Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of EDMUND TATE, aged 33 years. It was shewn that on Saturday evening last the deceased, who was a gunner in the 19th battery 10th brigade Royal Artillery, stationed at Bovisand, applied for lodgings for a week at Mrs May's eating-house in Fore-street. He had some supper, and appeared to be very pleasant. On Sunday he had his breakfast, and on being served with dinner he asked that he might have a cup of tea and a plate of tart instead. This was given to him in his bedroom, and he said he would lie down on the bed as he was not feeling very well, but said he would clean himself, and come down to tea. As he did not come down about quarter to seven Mrs May went to his bedroom and the deceased was found lying on the floor on his face and hands in a large pool of blood with his throat cut. Dr Wilson was sent for, and his assistant arrived shortly afterwards, as also did Mr H. Horton, surgeon. It was found that the deceased had a deep wound on the left side of his neck, from which blood flowed freely, and there was a large razor under his left arm, as if it had fallen from his hand. He was spoken to, but did not reply. He, however, opened his eyes, and kept repeatedly saying "Oh, Lord." Although every attention was paid to the deceased he died about a quarter to eight. P.C. Moore, who went to the house, found on the dressing table at the head of the bed, a piece of black-lead rolled up in paper, on which was written "I have killed myself." The constable also found £3 13s. 3d. on him, and a quantity of private clothing, mostly new, in a bag. It was stated that the deceased appeared to be a pleasant, well-spoken man, and a good soldier. The deceased had been on furlough, and was in good health previous to his discharge. He came to Devonport for the purpose of attending the board. The deceased would have no pension, but would have deferred pay to draw. The deceased was a twelve years' service man, and he elected to take his discharge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suicide during Temporary Insanity." Major Stapleton Penny, commandant of the battery to which the deceased belonged, attended at the Inquest.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 2 April 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death From Choking At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at the Stoke Inn, Stoke, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWIN DAVIS, aged 59, master painter, who met with his death by choking whilst eating a piece of beef. Richard Gregory said he kept a refreshment-house at 14 and 15 Tavistock-street, Stoke. On Tuesday last, about 6 p.m., the deceased came into his shop and asked to be supplied with some beef, which was done. A little while after the deceased had been in the room, a young man named Butchers called him, saying he believed that DAVIS was choked. He went into the room and found the deceased leaning forward on the table. Witness struck him on the back, thinking it would clear his throat, and put his finger into his mouth, but without any effect. Gregory then sent for Mr Horton, surgeon, who arrived about ten minutes from the time he was sent for. With the assistance of Butchers they put him in a leaning position in a chair and took him into the court, where the medical man saw him. George Butchers, apprentice to Mr Gill, grocer, and residing at 16 Union-street, Plymouth, said he was in Mr Gregory's eating-house, Tavistock-street, Devonport, on Tuesday evening last, about six p.m. The deceased, who, to his appearance, was the worse for liquor, had some beef brought into the room. Deceased, who was standing up, took the largest piece of meat that was on the plate with his fingers and put it into his mouth. After DAVIS had the beef in his mouth he began to speak, but witness could not understand him. Deceased then leaned forward and Butchers noticed froth issuing from his mouth and heard a rattling noise in his throat. Witness then called Mr Gregory. - Mr Horton deposed that about five minutes past six on Tuesday evening he was called to go to the deceased at Tavistock-street, Devonport. Upon his arrival, he found that life was extinct. He attributed death to have been caused by suffocation. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 April 1880
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Deaths By Drowning At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at St. Thomas on the body of JOHN CHOWN, coachman in the employ of Dr Woodman, of Alphington, who was found drowned in a pond near the residence of his employer. It appears that during the day the deceased complained of pains in his head, and went out in the evening to see around Dr Woodman's premises. The body was afterwards found by deceased's son in the pond. Dr Woodman gave evidence to the effect that he believed deceased fell into the water during an epileptic fit. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - A second inquest was held at St. Thomas, on the body of --- PERRIAM, dairyman, of Ware Buildings, St. Thomas, who was found drowned on Monday. Deceased left his home on Sunday evening to tend one of his cows, and was found on Monday morning in the canal. The deceased some time back lost a quantity of cattle, and this seems to have preyed upon his mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 9 April 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Boat Accident At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death by drowning on Sunday last of JOHN THOMAS BENNETT, domestic on board H.M.S. Cambridge. James Lukes, also domestic on board the same vessel, said deceased and himself left the Cambridge on Sunday about one o'clock, and proceeded to Richmond Walk, where they engaged a small sailing boat from Mr Webber, with the intention of sailing in the Hamoaze. The wind was blowing rather strongly, and they had sailed some distance in safety, and were turning to come back, but the wind being against them, before they could bring the boat properly around, a gust of wind caught the sail causing her to dip considerably on one side. They were both thrown out and the boat turned over. BENNETT, not being able to swim, quickly disappeared, but Lukes was picked up by a man named Andrews, who being close by in a sloop and seeing the accident, he took his boat and went to the rescue. Andrews said he thought the accident was owing to the sail being kept too tight whilst the boat was being turned. James Nodder, gunner on board the Cambridge, said the body of the deceased was found about fifty yards from the spot where the accident occurred. The Foreman of the Jury then rose with the intention of speaking of the impropriety of lending boats to lads who knew nothing of their management, but the Coroner said he could not allow any remarks to be passed. The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 10 April 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In The Dockyard. - At the Royal Naval Hospital, yesterday, Mr R. Rodd, Borough Coroner, held an inquest into the circumstances attending the death of G. TULLOCK, 24, a stoker, of H.M.S. Indus. Deceased, whilst employed with several others in coaling H.M.S. Miranda, on 7th April inst., was injured by several bags of coal which were being lowered into the ship by means of a crane. He was told by the others to get out of the way, and, not doing so, the bags came and struck him in the face. Not having time to clear himself, the whole weight remained upon his chest for about three or four seconds. He was then removed to the Dockyard Surgery, and from thence to the Royal Naval Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from injuries of the spine. He died on Thursday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from injuries received."

PLYMOUTH - Last night, at the Octagon Spirit Vaults, Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an inquest with reference to the death of ETHEL HARRIS, age 10 months, the illegitimate child of ELLEN HARRIS. Since its birth the deceased child was placed under the care of Ann Fell, who stated that she had been receiving 5s. per week for its maintenance. About three or four days ago, it was seized with the whooping cough from which it died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 April 1880
TOPSHAM - A Child Crushed To Death In A Factory. - A fatal accident occurred yesterday at the Phoenix Fire Lighter Company's Works, Topsham. The works in question were established some time ago for the purpose of manufacturing patent fire lighters from peat, and the present is the first serious accident that has happened upon them. The deceased, THERESA PYM, aged 14, was engaged with her sister to pack the fire lighters and attach labels to them. During the temporary absence of the manager (Mr Gairdiner) the deceased went near the main shaft, the end of which comes through the wall parting the packing-room from the machine-room, and is about to be utilised for running some lifting gear. It does not seem that anyone saw what the girl was actually doing, but by some means her clothing became twisted about the shaft, and she was whirled round and round, her head striking the floor and some shelving close by with great force at every revolution. When the machinery was stopped the poor child was dead and her body presented a shocking appearance. The girl's dress was twisted around the shaft so tightly that it had to be cut to release the body. Mr Burrows, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and censured the company for not having had the shafting fenced.

EXETER - The Boating Fatality At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Burrows, Deputy Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS PENNY, a youth of Liskeard, who was drowned on Saturday afternoon while boating on the canal at Exeter. The deceased, who was in the employ of Messrs. Green and Son, drapers, of High-street, had gone down the canal in a canoe, two of his shopmates, named Tanner and Colebrooke, bring also in canoes. The two last named, after passing the second drawbridge, on looking back saw that the deceased had fallen into the water. Both landed, and Tapper plunged in and endeavoured to rescue his companion. PENNY did not rise, and it was a matter of some difficulty for Tapper to find the body. He succeeded eventually and with Colebrooke's help put it ashore. By this time life was extinct. The corpse was removed to the Welcome Inn. On the forehead there was a bruise, and it is conjectured that the deceased, being taller than his companions, struck his head against the bridge with such violence as to be stunned, and so was unable to make any effort to save himself. After hearing medical evidence on this point, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," appending a rider to the effect that persons resorting to the canal for boating should be cautioned to use more care in passing under the drawbridges.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 April 1880
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday by Mr Burrows, Deputy for Mr R. R. Crosse, on the body of CHARLES H. WHITE, mate of the Alice Burnyeat, who had been drowned in the canal. The vessel has been lying for some days in the basin. On Saturday night the deceased visited a friend, who resides in Melbourne-street, Holloway-street, and left at a late hour with the intention of returning to his ship. According to the evidence he was then sober. The deceased's body was found in the canal, near the entrance to the basin, on Sunday morning. The canal bank at the spot where WHITE is supposed to have fallen is in a dangerous spot, being neither fenced nor properly lit at night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and requested the Coroner to communicate with the Town Council as to the desirability of fencing the bank.

Western Morning Mercury, Thursday 22 April 1880
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Enquiry last evening, at the Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, into the circumstances attending the death of CLARA EMMA CANN, aged nearly three weeks. GEORGE VIVIAN CANN, father of the deceased, and who resides at 12 Richmond-lane-south, Plymouth, said the child just after its birth was very healthy. Late on Monday evening it appeared to be in perfect health. On the following morning his wife called him into her room saying that the child was dead. Witness went into the room and found that the child was dead, but quite warm. His wife told him that on giving a drink to another child, who had been seized with coughing, she found that the deceased was dead. Dr Thompson was immediately sent for. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted from "Natural Causes". The Jury were also of opinion that the house might be better ventilated.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 April 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - Drowning Of A Waterman At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Collins's Brunswick Hotel, Stonehouse, touching the death of JOHN SAUNDERS, licensed waterman, who was found drowned off the Admiral's Hard yesterday morning. The deceased was last seen alive about 1 a.m. yesterday morning, when he told a neighbour, named Harris, that he was going to take two men to one of the timber ships lying in Stonehouse Pool. He said he could not get his own boat off, and that he should take a boat belonging to a waterman named Knowles. He accordingly left the house, and nothing more was known of him until the same morning, about 7.30 a.m., when he was found lying very near Knowles's boat, with the painter coiled around his neck once or twice; it was very loose, and was not knotted. The man, Knowles, who was called as a witness, said the deceased, after putting the men on board their vessel, would not have come back to the Stonehouse Bridge, where he found the boat moored, but would moor in their usual place, just off the Admiral's Hard. It was high tide that morning at 3.26, and it was blowing very fresh. The place where the deceased was found would be about ten feet deep at high water, but perfectly dry at half-tide. The deceased in mooring the boat would, of course, have to throw out the peg of iron ballast, which weighed about half a hundred-weight, and to which was attached the painter, and in throwing the ballast out of the boat he would have to bend forward, and the sea being rather rough at the time the rope which was, of course, running out very fast must in some way or other have got entangled around his neck and dragged him overboard. He (the witness) himself had been dragged overboard by the rope getting entangled with his arm. Another man named William Marshall corroborated Knowles, and on being asked by a Juryman how he should account for the cut over the deceased's left eye, replied that he should think when the deceased was being dragged over by the ballast his eye came in contact with the gunwhale of the boat. In answer to another question, he stated that the ballast being so heavy would keep a man under water. - One of the Jurymen expressed a wish that someone should be sent to see if any of the seamen on board the two ships in the pool had been put off that morning by the deceased. - Sergeant Holwill accordingly went, the Court was then adjourned for an hour. At the expiration of that time the officer returned and stated that he had been on both the ships, and in one the Custom-house officer told him that no one had been ashore the previous night. In the other vessel he only found one person aboard. One of the Jurymen then explained that whilst out fishing one day his friend had been nearly dragged overboard in the same way as the witnesses Marshall and Knowles had described. Other Jurymen said they had witnessed the same thing. After a short consultation the Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" by drowning.

EXETER - Sudden Death In An Exeter Eating-House. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of WM. WOTTON, aged about 70, who died suddenly in a refreshment house yesterday afternoon. Deceased was a native of Cheriton Fitzpaine and entered the eating house of Mrs Gitsham, Goldsmith-street, shortly after one o'clock. He was supplied with dinner, but whilst eating it was seized with a fit. Medical aid was procured and the deceased was removed to bed but soon expired. Medical testimony having been given to the effect that the cause of death was apoplexy, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 23 April 1880
TOTNES - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the residence of the Rev. J. W. Burrough, in the Plymouth-road, by Dr H. Gaye, District Coroner, touching the death of a domestic servant, named ELIZABETH TOZER, who met her death by falling from a window on the previous afternoon. It appeared the girl was standing on the window-sill of a room in the upper story, cleaning glass, and had only just been cautioned by Miss Powning and another domestic in the house named Lamble to be careful, when she was seen to lose her hold and fall backwards to the ground, a distance of fully 25 feet. Death was instantaneous. Dr Jelly was called in, and found that she had fractured her skull and was otherwise dreadfully injured. A sister of the deceased was cleaning the glass of the window on the inside, and witnessed the accident, which had so much affected her that she was too ill to be present at the Enquiry. The Jury, of whom Mr M. F. Oldrey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 26 April 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday evening relative to the death of MARIA NORSWORTHY, aged 57. It appeared for some years the deceased had been subject to heart disease, and Mr Owen, surgeon, had attended her up to about five weeks ago. On Friday the deceased complained of being unwell and on Saturday morning she was found dead in bed. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 27 April 1880
SHALDON - Suicide. - A few days ago a man named WILLIAM SCOBLE, about 30 years of age, committed suicide by hanging himself to a branch of a tree in Butterfly-lane. The deceased, who had a wife and family, had been out of employment for some months, and this circumstance it would seem had occasioned him to become very dejected, for on two previous occasions he had attempted to take his life. Deceased was found hanging at the tree by Dr Cates, and was quite dead. An Inquest has since been held, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 May 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of JESSIE FRENCH, aged 49, who died suddenly on Saturday last. The deceased was subject to heart disease. On Wednesday last she complained of a violent palpitation of the heart. She did not complain again until Saturday morning, about 3 p.m., when a [?] poultice was applied. She did not get better, and she still got worse. Mr Lewis, surgeon, who had prescribed for her once before, was sent for, but before he arrived she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 May 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) at the Coronation Inn, Martin-street, Plymouth, yesterday, relative to the death on Tuesday of MRS JANE LUSCOMBE, aged 64. JOHN LUSCOMBE, dairyman, husband of the deceased, said his wife had not needed medical attendance for more than twelve months, and retired to bed in her usual health. He was awoke by hearing her complain of her head, and he at once sent for Mr Owen, surgeon, but he was absent, and Dr Rendle was sent for, but by the time he arrived the woman was dead. Dr Owen stated that he attended the deceased about fifteen months ago, and was prepared for what had happened. On that occasion he had two consultations with Dr Prance. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 May 1880
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday by Mr Hooper on the body of MR FRED SOWDON, a retired draper, who committed suicide the previous evening by leaping from an upper window at his residence in Bath-road. It was stated that two or three years ago the deceased went to New Zealand for the benefit of his health, but returned worse than when he left England. Dr Henderson proved that he was suffering from acute lung disease, and that his mind was affected. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 10 May 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at Morice Town on Saturday on the body of MRS SARAH ANN LANDON, aged 50, widow of the late REV. J. W. R. LANDON, vicar of Braunton, Barnstaple. Since the death of her husband in February deceased had been living with her sister, Mrs Mary Sampson, in Porland-terrace. During that time she had complained of pains in the head, and had been treated by Mr J. Gard, surgeon. On Friday evening, after attending service at St. J[?] church, she went for a walk and while returning, complained of her head, fell and became unconscious. Although taken home immediately she died shortly afterwards, and before medical aid could be procured. Mr Gard was of opinion that death resulted from rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - A labourer named JAMES SCOINS, of West Sandford, was missed from his home about a fortnight ago. He left with the intention of visiting his son at Exminster, but did not return at the time he promised, and no tidings of him could be obtained. On Thursday last Mr S. L. Gorwyn, of Countess Weir found the body of the deceased in the River Exe, just below Salmon Pool, about a mile from Exminster. There being no evidence before the Coroner's court on Friday to shew how the deceased got into the water the Jury returned an Open Verdict. The [?] stated the want of a public mortuary, the body having so decomposed that the occupiers of two public-houses refused to take it. The corpse was finally lodged at the Plymouth Inn, St Thomas, where the Inquest was held.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 May 1880
PLYMOUTH - Strange Case Of Drowning At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the waiting-rooms, Millbay Pier, Plymouth, on Saturday morning relative to the death of EUGENE SWEENEY. John Finlian, drover, residing in Ireland, stated that he knew the deceased, who was a drover in the employ of Mr Brunsley. He was about 40 years of age, and took pigs across the Channel, during which he was in the habit of sleeping on deck. He was about to return to Ireland in the Dodo, and when witness left the vessel at quarter-past eleven on Friday night the deceased was lying on the deck of that vessel. John Driscoll, able seaman, stated that he was on watch on Friday night, and about midnight he saw the deceased lying on the deck asleep, alongside the skylight of the captain's cabin with his head resting on a bag. The deceased appeared to be very drunk. Witness after stopping alongside the gangway for about an hour and half seeing the deceased was very bad, procured some water and splashed his face with it, but it did not seem to revive him. He then went forward to look after the bow ropes, and on returning to the quarter-deck a few minutes later a man who was on the pier called witness and asked if he had heard a splash. Witness asked what splash, but received no reply. He then went to where he had left the deceased, but found that he was gone, leaving his cap behind. The chief officer was called and the ship got away from the pier. The deceased was a man of intemperate habits. Samuel Mitchell, labourer, said he with others were working the steamer Dodo. Witness was standing at the after-gangway and heard a splash from the passenger gangway, the same side he was standing. He looked over board, but could see nothing. He hailed the last witness. Boats were manned, and grappling irons used, but the body could not be found. Witness put his paddle into the water and found the body underneath the passenger gangway. The body, which was brought ashore, was found between the vessel and the pier, close to the railings. At the time he heard the splash he did not see anybody moving about, or hear any conversation. The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt but what the deceased was drowned whilst in a state of intoxication, but as to how he got into the water there was no evidence to show. The questions were - did he throw himself overboard, or did he accidentally fall overboard? The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," but added that there was no evidence to show how the deceased came into the water.

MILTON ABBOT - At Down House, Milton Abbot, on Saturday, an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Rodd on the body of SYLVIA PERRY, aged 18 months, daughter of MR S. PERRY. The child drank some hot water on Tuesday and died the following morning and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatality To A Plymouth Shipbuilder. - Mr Brian, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening into the circumstances attending the death of MR WILLIAM THOMAS FREEMAN HILL, aged 46 years, until lately a partner in the firm of Messrs. Hill and Sons, shipbuilders, Coxside. From the evidence of Samuel Cann, messenger at the Municipal Offices, it appeared that the deceased fell whilst walking along the footpath in Westwell-street, towards Princess-square, and received a wound in the head from which a large quantity of blood flowed. Mr W. J. Square, surgeon, was passing, and gave attention to the case, and by his advice MR HILL was taken to the Hospital. Cann stated that the deceased did not trip; he fell of his own accord. - Mr A. H. Bampton, M.D., resident surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the deceased was received totally unconscious. He appeared like a man who was, or had been, in a fit, and it was to that and not to the fall he attributed unconsciousness. He did not recover consciousness until between nine and ten the following morning. He was not able to converse. He afterwards completely recovered, but on the Friday morning Mr Bampton was called, and found deceased in an epileptic fit, from which he never rallied, and died on Saturday morning. Witness had made a post-mortem examination at the request of the Coroner. The brain was fairly healthy. He did not find the cause of death in the head. The left kidney was excessively chronically inflamed. This would arise from over stimulation. In his opinion epilepsy was the cause of death. He could not have spoken with the same amount of certainty if he had not made the post-mortem examination. - The Coroner explained that under the circumstances he was obliged to hold an Inquiry, and in answer to him, Mr Bampton said he was more satisfied to have an Inquest than to have disposed of the case by giving a certificate. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," expressed their unanimous opinion that the Coroner had done quite right to bring the case before them. The Coroner said it was a painful duty, and he sympathised with the relatives.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 May 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, touching the death of ELIZABETH MARGARET HADDY, aged 2 years. The child had been weak from its birth and on Monday afternoon she was taken unwell and Mr Jackson, surgeon, was sent for. Shortly after the messenger had left the child was taken with convulsions, and died before Mr Jackson arrived. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 May 1880
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In A Plymouth Public-House. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) touching the death of WILLIAM MATTHEWS, aged 76, residing at 3 Moon's-lane. The deceased, who was in receipt of out-door relief, went into the Coach Office Inn, Exeter-street, on Tuesday evening about eleven p.m., and called for some ale, which the landlady did not draw. A man named Johns who was there said to the deceased, "You are not looking well." He replied "No" and sat down, and then appeared to be very ill. Sergeant Gill, of the Plymouth Borough Police Force, was called in, and he immediately sent for Mr Greenway, surgeon, and in the meantime administered some brandy to the deceased, but the deceased died before the arrival of the doctor, who said he thought death resulted from heart disease. A neighbour in the house stated that the deceased was hardly ever sober, and that he was in receipt of 6s. per week from the parish and he also earned a little money at gardening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 May 1880
NORTH TAWTON - Alleged Ill-Treatment Of A child In Okehampton Workhouse. - An Inquest was held at the Gostwyck Arms, North-tawton yesterday on the body of a child named JOHN ALBERT BREALEY. Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, said he considered it his duty to have the case fully investigated and various rumours were afloat that the deceased had received ill-treatment while at the Okehampton Workhouse. The Jury having decided that a post-mortem examination was necessary, the Inquiry was adjourned for two hours for that purpose. On the hearing being resumed, the mother said she had two children before being married to the father of the deceased. She and BREALEY could not agree about the children, and he left her after living together ten months. Witness then took the deceased to her husband's mother, who refused to receive it, but witness left it on the table. She subsequently went into the Workhouse, and the baby was brought there, but witness refused to take charge of it while there, and on leaving with her other two children left the deceased behind. She received a letter on May 8th that her child was dying. She went and found that it had bruises on the face. It had always been healthy. The Master of the Workhouse (Mr Northcott) stated that when the child was admitted, on March 27th, it appeared to be in pain; and the Matron gave similar evidence. It was alleged that the child had proper care. Marie Smale, an inmate, said it was part of her duty to assist in the sick ward. She left the deceased on a bed on the floor, with another child by its side. She was not away a minute, but when she returned she found the other child lying across the deceased, on the face of which was a stool. The medical evidence was to the effect that there were bruises on the body which were such as would have been caused by a stool, but that the child was not healthy when admitted to the Workhouse. After the post-mortem examination, Drs. Waters and Dunn gave it as their opinion that the bruises had nothing to do with the cause of death, which resulted from Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect, and entirely exonerated the Workhouse authorities from blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 May 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death Of A Devonport Tradesman. - An Inquiry was held at Devonport last evening, by the Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, at the Revenue Inn, Marlborough-street, into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL BARTLETT REED, bootmaker, Marlborough-street. - THOMAS REED, brother of the deceased, residing at 72 Princess-street, said he had seen his brother more or less every day for the last twelve months. On Sunday morning the deceased was in his house, and was then unwell through drink. The deceased formerly drank ale in the regular way, but latterly had taken nothing but spirits. He had, however, at one time been a teetotaller for six years, and saved a lot of money. On Saturday night he came to witness and shewed him a summons he had received from the superintendent of police. Witness told him to keep himself all right on Monday and Tuesday, and he would see what he could do to get him out of the predicament. This the deceased promised to do. On Sunday the deceased was at his brother's house, and drank very little all day, but ate three fair meals. On Monday morning, about six o'clock, witness was called by a policeman, who said the deceased was very unwell in King-street. Witness went to his other brother's house in Princess-street, where he saw the deceased. He was shaking very much, but being just the same as witness had seen him before he hoped that he would get all right again. The deceased walked to his own home in Marlborough-street, with witness. He had a cup of tea, and shortly afterwards had more, which he apparently enjoyed. Witness called at the house again between ten and eleven, and found his brother in the shop walking up and down. As the trembling had not decreased he advised the deceased to lie down. They transacted a little business, and the deceased afterwards had a cup of tea. Witness saw the deceased again at his house between one and half-past, and he was still shaking as much as before. Witness asked the deceased to have a glass of ale or spirit, as he thought it would do him good, but he refused, saying "I shall knock that off altogether now." Witness then left, and on returning at four p.m. found the deceased dead. He was 52 years of age. In answer to a Juryman, witness said he was not frightened at the state of the deceased as he had seen him worse. - MRS RACHEL REED, of 4 Princess-street, sister-in-law to the deceased, deposed that about half-past two on Monday afternoon she went to his house to put the place in order and to send for Dr Row. When she opened the door she found MR REED on the floor face downward between the shop and back room. She got assistance, and then found that he was dead. - P.C. Payne said that on Monday morning, about six o'clock, he saw the deceased in King-street. He was looking very ill and shaking very much. Witness asked him what was the matter, and he replied that he was very ill, and asked witness to take him home. Witness took him to a brother's house, 4 Princess-street, where he was placed in a chair. He then had a fit, and about ten minutes afterwards said he felt better. - Dr F. Row said that about half-past two on Monday afternoon he was passing through Marlborough-street when his attention was drawn to the house of the deceased by a crowd outside. He went in and found the deceased lying dead. He had made a post-mortem examination of the body. The cause of death was plainly the result of haemorrhage in the lungs through the bursting of a blood vessel. There was not a single organ in the state that it should be, and not one but might be expected at any time to give way. If it had been a man in a proper state who had broken the vessel he might have recovered, but the deceased was so shattered, shaky, and feeble that he could not. The Jury, of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict that the deceased died from the Breaking of a Blood Vessel in the Lung.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 May 1880
DITTISHAM - Inquiry was made at Dittisham on Wednesday concerning the death of MR MARTIN, aged 77, of Bowden Farm, who was found dead in bed the previous day. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 June 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Cruel Conduct Of A Carman. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Revenue Inn, Marlborough-street, Devonport, on Saturday evening relative to the death of GEORGE HOBBS, son of an upholsterer, about 4 years of age. From the evidence of H. N. Watson, a labourer, it appeared, as already reported, that on Friday evening the child ran in front of a tramcar in Chapel-street, was knocked down by the horses and one wheel passed over him, but the break was put on with such strength that the hind wheel of the car stopped upon the child's leg, and the car had to be backed before the poor child could be extricated. The witness stated that the driver was paying proper attention and stopped the car as quickly as possible. The driver, Jabez Easterbrook, Flora-street, Plymouth, stated that he did all he could to stop the car. As soon as the child was extricated the conductor of the car went for a cab, and took the first on the rank at Georg-street stand, Maunder, No. 84, who drove to where the child was lying, but when he found the child was bleeding he refused to take it. He was offered the fare, and some women took off their aprons, and bags were fetched to wrap the child in, but he refused saying he was not going to have his vehicle spoiled. The child was then carried to the Royal Albert Hospital by a labourer named Samuel Miller, but it died the same night after amputation had been performed. The Coroner, in summing up, said no blame could be attached to the driver or conductor, but the conduct of the cabman was disgraceful. Mr Bryant, Coroner's officer, stated that Maunder had written to Superintendent Lynn, explaining that he refused the fare because he was already engaged at Mr Venning's. The Coroner said that explanation would not clear the man, as he had accepted the fare by driving from the stand to the child, and when he found the state of the child he did not say he was engaged, but positively refused to take it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider exonerating all other parties from blame; but censuring the cabman, and suggesting that he should be summoned for refusing the fare. The Coroner said that would be decided upon afterwards.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 June 1880
NORTHAM - Death By Drowning At Appledore. - An Inquest was held at the Bell Inn, Appledore, yesterday, before Mr T. H. Toller, as to the circumstances connected with the death of MR EMMANUEL MARSHALL, retired shipowner. On Saturday afternoon the deceased was observed looking over the wall of a cornfield: about ten minutes afterwards a young man named Tucker went to the New Quay slip when he saw a walking stick and hat together, and then discovered the body of a man floating in about five feet of water, five feet from the shore. Mr Tucker called his father, who was in the cornfield with a Mr Mill, and when they came he entered the water and brought the body ashore. It appeared lifeless, but he ran for Dr Pratt who came at once. He found the body head downwards and having altered that position tried to resuscitate the body, but to no effect. Dr Pratt stated that the deceased suffered from shaking palsy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and recommended that copies of rules for the treatment of those apparently drowned should be applied for, and posted up for the benefit of the public.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital relative to the death of EDWARD CHAMPION TRAVERS, a mason, who fell from a scaffolding at Keyham Barton on Friday last. Mr F. R. Stanbury appeared on behalf of the friends of the deceased. The Jury having visited the scene of the accident, John Thomas Botterell, mason, stated that on Friday he was on the same scaffolding as the deceased. They were building the wall outwards. About 11.30 a.m. he found himself falling, but caught hold of some scaffolding, and landed himself on the joists. He was very much shaken, and when he had recovered from the fright he saw that about six or seven feet of the wall had fallen away. The scaffold on which they worked was in his opinion very safe. The deceased and himself assisted that very morning in erecting it. - By Mr Stanbury: The wall which they were building was about five feet higher than the plank on which they stood. - John Welch, mason, stated that he was working about sixteen feet from the deceased. He heard the putlock (a piece of wood lashed by one end to an upright pole, and inserted by the other end in the wall to the extent of eight inches) crack, and before he had time to give warning he saw the wall go over, and the deceased, who had just before stooped to pick up a stone, go over also. He could not give any reason for the putlock breaking, but its breaking was certainly the cause of the accident. The putlock produced had been in use for the last three months. The deceased was extricated from a heap of stones, and taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died on Sunday morning. - Mr W. Cant, resident surgeon at the Hospital, said the injuries were severe wounds near the left eye and on the left arm, the bones of his face were broken, and deceased had received a very severe shock. He was sensible up to a short time before his death, which was due to the shock to the system and from swellings in the neck, which stopped his breathing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all persons from blame.

PLYMOUTH - The Suicide Of MR C. POLKINGHORNE. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, last evening, before Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, respecting the death of MR CHARLES POLKINGHORNE, of the firm of Polkinghorne and Sons, Plymouth. Mr T. R. Bond was the Foreman of the Jury composed of tradesmen. - Thirza Morcom said: I am the cook in the employ of MISS POLKINGHORNE, 2 Windsor-terrace. The deceased, MR CHARLES POLKINGHORNE, lived there with his sister. He went out to Courtenay-street Chapel yesterday morning. He went alone from the house and returned at about twenty minutes to one, letting himself in with a latchkey. He walked directly into the dining-room. I did not hear him speak or go upstairs, but about five minutes afterwards I heard a loud noise in the yard at the back of the house. I did not hear any scream. I ran to the back door, which was open, and saw the deceased lying on the pavement of the yard. He was dressed, with the exception of his coat. A great deal of blood was proceeding from him, and I ran at once into the street for assistance. The Hoe constable came, and I went with him to the back court, and a doctor was sent for immediately. I had no conversation with MR POLKINGHORNE yesterday morning, but he came into the kitchen, and I did not notice anything particular in his manner. - Zapporah Mallet, nurse, said: I was sent for about three yesterday afternoon to attend upon the deceased gentleman. He was in bed then, and unconscious. Dr Pearse was there about six o'clock, and I understood deceased had broken his arm and leg, and shattered his jaws. I was told he had cut his throat; but the throat was bound up before I came. Dr Pearse said there was no hope, and deceased died at five-and-twenty to eight. I knew the family well, and attended the chapel in the morning. Deceased sat in a seat with the family of the late MR EDWIN POLKINGHORNE. I saw him as he was going out, and I noticed he looked very melancholy. He left the chapel alone and went on by himself. I did not speak to him then. He received a shock from the death of his brother, and had been much depressed every since. Deceased never recovered consciousness, but once he said "Oh my," and "My brother;" but I should not say he was conscious of what he was saying. - To a Juror: Deceased did not leave the chapel before the service was over. - William Henry Blight, coachman, deposed: I am in the employ of the deceased gentleman's family. I went to chapel with the family yesterday morning and after the service I met MR CHARLES in Locker-street. He was alone, and I cannot say he recognised me. He was walking as if very much cast down. From what I heard, I afterwards went to Windsor-terrace and found him in the room where the body is now lying. He was quite unconscious. I had noticed his hands were very shaky since his brother died and he has been more silent than usual. He was in his 56th year. - James Colton, Hoe Constable, said: About one o'clock yesterday I was coming from the Hoe, when I was called to the house by the cook, who said she was afraid her master had fallen out of the window. On going to the back yard, I saw deceased lying on the stone pavement quite unconscious. I obtained assistance and removed him into the house. In taking him in I saw his throat was cut, and there was a great deal of blood about the lower part of his face. I fetched Dr Clay and Mr Whipple came directly afterwards. They said it was a hopeless case. I went up to deceased's bedroom with Dr Clay and Mr Whipple and the cook. The room is at the top of the house with nothing but the attics above. The window is about 36 feet to the pavement, and was open about half-way. On the dressing table I found the razor and the washing flannel now produced. There is blood upon the razor and on the flannel. I only saw a spot or two of blood on the washstand. I did not find any letter or memorandum. A portion of the slating of a lean-to roof of the washhouse was broken, and if he had first struck that and then rolled into the yard. - Mr Caleb Boney said he knew the deceased intimately, and had seen him every day for years. He had seen him after his brother died, and knew he felt his brother's death very acutely. He had not been the same man since, but had been unusually reserved. On Saturday evening he seemed very depressed. Witness spoke to deceased, but he would say nothing more than "yes" or "no," and never began any conversation as he used to. He was not surprised at what had occurred after what he had seen of deceased on Saturday. He remarked at that time it was a bad job, deceased seemed so very low and desponding. - The Coroner said this was all the evidence they could possibly put before the Jury. The first question for them to decide was How did the deceased come by his death? There appeared no reason to doubt that having attempted to cut his throat he fell out of the window. The next question was - Did he throw himself out? And if they decided that he threw himself out, then what state of mind was he in at the time? If they were not satisfied without the medical evidence he would adjourn the Inquiry, but he did not think they would gain anything by it. - Mr Edwards, a Juror, asked Mr Boney whether the sermon preached at Courtenay-street was more powerful than usual: Mr Boney: Oh yes, it was. It was a very affecting sermon, and MR EDWIN POLKINGHORNE was alluded to by name. - Mr Bond: Would the sermon intensify the depression in which he was? - Mr Boney: Yes; I should think it would. - The Coroner: But that might be his fault and not the fault of the sermon. - Mr Boney: It was a very excellent discourse, and the preacher dwelt on the subjects of hope and consolation, but it was likely to have a depressing effect on a man of MR POLKINGHORNE'S temperament and circumstances. - The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 June 1880
MODBURY - Inquest At Modbury. - An Inquest was held at the police-station, Modbury, yesterday, on the body of JAMES STEPHENS DAVIS, who fell from his horse on the 29th of May, and was taken home in an unconscious state. He never recovered consciousness, and died on Sunday morning. The deceased had been the landlord of the White Hart Hotel for over twenty years, and was well-known and respected by the agriculturists and commercial men of the district. Mr Jeffery was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, on opening the Inquiry, referred in feeling terms to the death of MR DAVIS, with whom he had been friends for many years. The first witness was Mr Thomas cook, of Heathfield, Aveton Gifford, who said that he met MR DAVIS on the 29th of May, about quarter past eleven o'clock, at Mrs Cowle's, Langston Farm. He went on horseback with him from Langston to Oakenbury, and from there to Ching Mill, leaving that place at half-past seven. They went on to Orcheton Mill; when just on the top of the hill he went on in front as the road was narrow. He heard a sound behind him, as if something had fallen, and on turning around he saw MR DAVIS lying on the ground on his back, but before witness got to him he was on his face and hands. Witness shook him and said "Wake up, DAVIS." He replied, "All right." He then tried to lift him, but could not. A Mr Wyatt came to his assistance, and together they lifted him up and placed him in the hedge. Witness left him in charge of Mr Wyatt while he went for a trap. He was absent about half an hour, and when he returned he found deceased nearly over to Fancy-[?], about half a mile from the scene of the accident. He was sitting in the hedge, and a man named Lee was with him. Witness observed no marks over the left eye. Before he went away he asked Mr Wyatt to stay with deceased, but when he returned Mr Wyatt was gone. - Mr Wyatt was next called and he stated that while Mr Cook was gone for the trap deceased came round and said, "What do you mean by detaining me in this manner Cousins?" Witness replied that his name was not Cousins but Wyatt. Deceased then caught hold of him, and they fell together. Deceased gave witness a good shake. After this MR DAVIS walked towards Modbury. There was a mark on the eye and blood on the nose, but deceased seemed to walk very well, and witness left him in charge of Mr Hodder, who came up. Mr Hodder corroborated, and in answer to Mr Oldrey, Totnes, son-in-law of deceased, who watched the case on behalf of the family, said he did not see anything in MR DAVIS as if he wanted witness's assistance. Mr W. F. Langworthy, surgeon, who attended deceased throughout his illness, said he was suffering from concussion of the brain and a large contused wound over the left eye. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 June 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Monday on the body of CHARLES SQUANCE, aged 72, who died just before the commencement of a religious service at the Mechanics' Institute on Sunday afternoon. - Elizabeth Bennett, of 7 St. Mary's-street, Stonehouse, identified the deceased as her uncle. He left her home on Sunday afternoon for the purpose of attending worship, as was his custom. He ate his dinner as usual, and was in his usual health and spirits. He was a pensioned officer of the Bodmin Asylum. - Mr G. Adams gave evidence as to the sudden death of the deceased, and that Dr Prance was sent for, and although he came at once, was too late. - Inspector Farmer proved finding the dead body sitting on a form against the wall. The Jury of whom Mr Bidgood was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 June 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Tavistock Inn relative to the death of MARY JANE ELLIS, aged 40 years, who died suddenly at her residence, 14 Cross-street, yesterday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 June 1880
EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - The Suicide At Exeter. - The Deputy County Coroner (Mr Burrows) held an Inquest last evening at the Okehampton Inn, St. Thomas, Exeter, on the body of ABRAHAM WELLAWAY, 46 years of age, a hawker, who committed suicide on Saturday by drowning himself in the river Exe. It appeared that on Saturday deceased was at the Okehampton Inn, when he suddenly left the house, and, without the least previous conversation on the matter, said he would go and drown himself. No quarrel of any kind had taken place in the public-house previously. This wild expression was treated as a joke by the company, as he was in the habit of making use of such expressions. Deceased was at the time under the influence of liquor; and had been often, previous to this occurrence, seen in a state of intoxication. - A witness named Wellington was of opinion that deceased was not exactly of sound mind; and Mary Blake, the old woman with whom deceased lodged, was of a similar opinion, and stated that for the past month he had given himself up to drink. After leaving the inn, deceased was seen to go into the water, walk out of his depth, and then throw up his arms and disappear. - John Smith, a hawker, deposed to dragging for and finding the body. A man named Henry Tucker dived for the deceased, but could not find him and whilst in the water it was discovered that another man named Odaway was sinking, and Tucker then went to the rescue of the latter. Deceased had some time since been affected with rheumatic fever, and it appears that he has not since been of sound mind. - Mr Arthur W. Kempe, surgeon, who was called to see the deceased, said that when the body was taken out of the water there appeared no signs of life. - A Juryman stated that whilst deceased was lying level in the boat after being taken out of the water vomited a quantity of water and Mr Kempe stated that this would shew that life was not then extinct. Witness, in answer to the same Juryman, said that he could not say whether the deceased lifted his hand whilst lying in the brew-house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 June 1880
PLYMPTON - An Inquiry was held at Plympton yesterday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, into the circumstances of the death of WILLIAM JAMES HUTCHINGS, aged 47, plumber, who committed suicide by poisoning himself as reported yesterday. Evidence was given by BLANCHE HUTCHINGS, aged 13, who found her father in the workshop, by Mrs Sellick, a neighbour who was called by the girl, and who had noticed a strangeness in HUTCHINGS'S manner, and by Dr Stamp, who was called to the man's aid and found that he had taken nearly half a pint of spirits of salt. Dr Stamp having attended HUTCHINGS previously for irritation of the brain, and Mrs Sellick stating that he had complained to her that he did not know what he was doing, the Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst in a State of Unsound Mind. The Jurors gave their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 July 1880
BUCKFASTLEIGH - An Inquest was held at Ferrishall House, near Buckfastleigh on Saturday, on the body of MRS TUCKER, who committed suicide by hanging herself in that house, her residence, on the previous day. Dr Chidell considered her mind was affected, as three weeks previously he saw her downstairs in her nightdress and since then she had been under his care. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Cannon Accident At Plymouth. Adjourned Inquiry. - The Plymouth Coroner, (Mr T. C. Brian) held an adjourned Inquiry at the Guildhall on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of EPHRAIM MASKELL, aged 38, who was killed on the previous Saturday by the discharge of a cannon on board the yacht Garrion, 101 tons, owned by Mr Nouille Rogers, lying in the Cattewater. It was usual to fire a gun at one o'clock, and the deceased, who was one of the crew, was going ashore in a dingy when he, unobserved, got in front of the muzzle of the cannon, and was blown into the water, dying while being removed to the Hospital. The Coroner, in reopening the proceedings, said on Monday he wrote to the Home Secretary as to the advisability of a Government inspector being present at the Inquiry, which was adjourned from the Saturday evening for that purpose. He did not receive a reply up to Friday afternoon, and he then telegraphed, receiving a reply that afternoon from the Home Secretary that "The Secretary of State does not consider that when death has resulted from the simple discharge of a gun, as distinguished from the bursting or disruptive explosion of the same, a notice is necessary under sec. 65 of the Explosive Act, 1863". The Coroner remarked that there was another feature in the case; if the act of firing the gun was unlawful, or in contravention of the Harbour or Commissioners' Act, it would be a serious case to consider. He had, therefore, written to the Commander-in-Chief and the Queen's Harbourmaster (Captain D. Moore) on the subject. The latter had replied that the jurisdiction of the Cattewater was vested in Captain Short, but he was of opinion that the firing of private guns in harbour was not allowable and was most unusual. The reply from the admiral was to the effect that the only reference he could find to the subject was in the Dockyard Ports Regulation Act, 1865, which gave the harbour-masters and persons directed by the Admiralty permission to enter any vessel in a dockyard port and search for gunpowder, shotted, or loaded guns, &c. Section 5 of the same Act gave her Majesty in Council power to prohibit the discharge of guns in such ports. Captain Moore added that he was of opinion the Cattewater Commissioners could make regulations to stop the firing of guns from private vessels. The Coroner observed that he knew of no present restriction, but the practice might well be dispensed with. - The witness Cook, seaman of the Garrion, who witnessed the accident, was recalled. He said that about two minutes before the gun was fired he looked over the side of the vessel, and saw that all was clear. He thought the deceased must have been standing in the dingy, and stood up just as the gun was fired. It was explained that the deceased was going ashore to fetch the captain. - Captain Short, Cattewater harbourmaster, said he did not know of any regulation with respect to the discharge of cannon with blank cartridge from private vessels; it was an unusual thing in the Cattewater, and he thought there must have been neglect on the part of the look-out. It was undesirable to fire off this gun, but he did not think there was any harm in it. - The Coroner said he had not called Rilley who fired the gun, because he could only reiterate what the other witness had said. - Mr Prance, who appeared on behalf of the owner, said the Garrion was in the Cattewater for five weeks last year, and the gun was discharged daily, but no complaint was made. The same was done at Dartmouth, and the practice there was regarded as a boon to the inhabitants. For ten days this year the gun had been fired at one o'clock in the Cattewater, and no complaint was made, and no accident occurred until this occasion. He explained that from where the dingey lay to the top of the bulwarks was five feet eleven inches, and the witness Cook was four feet six from the side of the vessel, so that it was impossible to see the dingey. The look-out man simply saw that there were no passenger boats in the way; it was not thought of looking for boats belonging to the yacht, as all on board knew the practice of firing the gun. He thought the boat must have drifted while the deceased was mopping it, so that deceased did not notice where it was. Mr Prance suggested that under these circumstances no blame could be attached to anyone on board. - The Coroner, in summing up, mentioned that he had been told by an old yachtsman that it was not only the practice to fire a gun here but elsewhere, and in the Mediterranean he used to carry six guns and sometimes fire a Royal salute. he (the Coroner) was of opinion, however, that it was undesirable to continue the practice in the Cattewater. With regard to the accident, he drew attention to the fact that the deceased in the midst of his agony had exonerated Rilley from all blame. He did not believe there was any neglect amounting to a criminal charge. - Mr Prance mentioned that the gun had not been fired since the accident, and the owner had been so unnerved by the event that it would not be allowed any more. - The Jury, of whom Mr Stidston was Foreman, then returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a recommendation that the practice should be discontinued, and exonerating the owner and crew from blame. - Capt. Short promised that the subject of allowing such proceedings should receive attention.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 July 1880
TIVERTON - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at Tiverton on the body of a little boy named BAWDEN, who had died through injuries to his head received through falling out of an upstairs window.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 July 1880
TAVISTOCK - The Drowning Fatality At Tavistock. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Bedford Hotel, Tavistock, last evening, into the circumstances attending the deaths of THOMAS ALLEN, aged 30; JOHN CLOAK, 38; and HENRY HILL, 43, miners, who were drowned in East Wheal Crebor on Tuesday through an overflow of the river Tavy. - The Coroner, after commenting upon the peculiarly sad circumstances attending the deaths of the men, stated that it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquest in order that he might communicate with the Government Inspector of mines. the Coroner expressed his regret that Dr Le Neve Foster had been appointed to another district, and expressed the hope that his successor would be as courteous and competent. The Jury then went to the residences of the deceased CLOAKE, Westbridge Cottages; ALLEN, West-street; and HILL, the old round House, and viewed the bodies; after which James Rowe, of Calstock, captain of East Wheal Crebor, identified the bodies. The Coroner then adjourned the Inquiry until next Thursday afternoon. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr J. J. Daw) mentioned that this was a case needing some support from the general public. CLOAK had left a widow and seven children, one only 10 weeks old; ALLEN a widow and five children, the youngest 11 months; and HILL widow and one child. The first two families were very destitute, and were such as deserved the sympathy of the general public. At the suggestion of the Coroner Mr Daw said he should be very glad to receive subscriptions.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 July 1880
WHITCHURCH - Suicide Of A Devonshire Farmer. - MR HENRY OXENHAM, aged 46, a well-to-do farmer residing at Dinnathorne Farm, in the parish of Whitchurch, near Tavistock, committed suicide on Friday afternoon by hanging himself in one of his farm buildings. The rash act is the more surprising as it does not appear that there was any cause which should lead the deceased thus to escape from responsibilities or pain. The circumstances surrounding the event were detailed at the Inquest which was held at the house on Saturday before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. - Elizabeth Ann Reddcliffe, domestic servant at the farm, said it was usual for MR OXENHAM to go to Tavistock market on Friday mornings, but on the previous day, as the deceased was in low spirits, he did not go. He remained in bed until nearly 2 p.m., when he came downstairs into the kitchen, and told witness to put the horse out to grass. She did so; and on her return she found that her master had left. She took no notice of this, as she thought he had gone for a walk, but as he had not returned at six p.m., a search was made, and he was found in the hay loft hanging. - James Reddcliffe, farmer, of Whitchurch, said the deceased, whom he had known for the last twenty years, was always in good health, up to within the last two or three months, when he had been very strange and low-spirited. On Friday evening witness called at Dinnathorne Farm about 6 o'clock, and was told that the deceased had been absent about four hours. He went to look for him and found him in the hayloft, hanging to the key-piece by a bullock rope. Witness immediately cut the body down, but it was found to be dead and nearly cold. The feet of the deceased were about a foot from the ground, and witness supposed that in committing the act the deceased stood on a box which was in the hayloft, put the noose around his neck, and then kicked the box away. The deceased was in good circumstances and was not suffering from any money or other trouble. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 August 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry at the Albert Inn, Morley-place, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of THOMAS LOCK, aged 8 months, who was found dead by his mother on Saturday morning. Deceased was unwell on Thursday and the mother took it to Mr Steele, chemist, who prescribed for it. On Friday night the child took the last dose of the mixture, which it was stated, contained nothing injurious, but when the mother awoke in the morning the child was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 August 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquest On A Child At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at the Nottingham Arms, Mutley, touching the death of ERNEST JARVIS, aged 10 months, the parents residing at 6 Chester-place, Mutley. - ELLEN JARVIS, mother of the deceased, said the child had not been very strong since birth, and as it was not quite so well on Saturday lat, a portion of a Steedman's soothing powder was given it. On the Sunday it was still unwell and about one a.m. on the Monday morning she was aroused by the child breathing very heavily. Mr Wolferstan, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and he came and remained with the child until 5.30 a.m. when it died. She bought the powder from Mr Saunders, chemist, and she had given these powders very often to her other child and they had done him good. Mr Wolferstan, M.R.C.S., said he had attended the child since its birth; it was a very small child and if his orders had not been strictly attended to by the mother it would not have lived as long as it did. On Monday morning when he visited the house, he found the child unconscious and from its appearance and other signs he saw that it was suffering from an overdose of opium. He applied the usual remedies and after about three hours the deceased revived a little, but shortly after it relapsed into its former condition, and died about 5.30 a.m. The mother said she had given the deceased a portion of a Steadman's soothing powder. He could not, however, account for the death of the child, but he supposed the powder contained a narcotic and that the child was unusually susceptible of its influence. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the effects of a narcotic administered through inadvertence by the mother, but exonerated the mother from all blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 August 1880
EXETER - The Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of the man CHARLES HEDGELAND, which was found on the railway on the previous day, having been shockingly mutilated, resulted in a verdict of Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind. He had previously attempted suicide.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 August 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of JOHANNE R. EWKSSON, who died suddenly on board the Swedish ship Odin while proceeding up Channel on Wednesday. The deceased was married and joined the ship at Dunkirk on the 16th inst. It was stated that he was on good terms with the crew, and had very little hard work to do. Evidence having been given by the captain and second mate as to the manner in which the deceased was taken ill, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at Newton Town Hall last evening, by Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WM. SUGARS, aged 66, who fell downstairs, on Tuesday as previously reported. The wife of the deceased stated that he came home from Newton races on Tuesday evening about seven o'clock and complaining of feeling unwell lay on the bed, but would not take off his boots saying he should soon be better again. About five minutes after the bedroom door opened and the deceased fell over the stairs. She called for assistance and Mr Ley, surgeon, was fetched. Deceased recovered consciousness during the night, but died on Wednesday evening. Mr Ley stated that death was caused by a fracture of the spine and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the widow.

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Pride of Devon Inn, Cecil-street, relative to the death of SUSAN CHARLOTTE HARRIS, aged 2 years and 10 months, who was burnt on Tuesday morning so severely as to cause her death. ANN HARRIS, mother of the deceased, said on Tuesday morning about half-past seven, she placed the child, who was in her night-dress, at the corner of the kitchen table, about five feet from the fire-place, where she was accustomed to place her in the morning until she was able to dress her, and then lit the fire. Afterwards she told her son, whom she left in the room, that she was going to fetch some milk. On returning she saw the boy run into the street very much frightened. She hastened home and on going into the house saw deceased standing on the mat at the kitchen door with her night-dress very much burnt. She applied linseed oil to the burnt parts and sent for a doctor. - WILLIAM GEORGE HARRIS, brother of deceased, said that when his mother went out he went into the back-yard to clean his boots, and shortly afterwards heard deceased scream. He ran into the kitchen and found his sister in flames, sitting in the same position as his mother had placed her. He put out the flames by throwing water over her, and then ran to fetch his mother. He could not account for the child's dress catching fire. Mr L. Lewis, surgeon, said that he saw deceased shortly after the accident, and found that the chest, right side of the face and trunk of the body were burnt severely. Death, however, did not result from those injuries, but from the shock to the system. He gave the mother credit for what she did in applying linseed oil. The Jury agreed that a spark of piece of ignited coal must have been exploded from the fire, and caught the nightdress of deceased. They returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and exonerated the mother from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 August 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of An engineer Student At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD HOCKEY LANE, aged 18, an engineer student at Keyham Yard. On Thursday evening the deceased was walking over Newpassage-hill when he suddenly staggered, and blood flowed from his mouth and nostrils. Several persons went to his assistance and he was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital. - Susan Follett, residing at 51 Albert-road, said the deceased had lived with her for four years. About twenty months since he caught a chill and had to go home to his parents at Truro, to recruit his health. He came back much better, but suffered at times from a severe cough for which he took medicine. He, however, had left off taking the medicine for some weeks. On Thursday evening the deceased left home about half-past six o'clock, having made a good tea and appearing to be in his usual health. - Mr W. E. Cant, house surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, said the deceased was brought in between seven and eight o'clock in a dying state, and died about two minutes after his admission. He had made a post-mortem examination, and found that the deceased had been suffering from consumption. One of his lungs was nearly destroyed. There was a cavity in the same lung from which blood came, and this caused blood to flow from the mouth. In his opinion the deceased died from consumption. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 August 1880
YEALMPTON - The death of a child at Weston Mill near Yealmpton, was the subject of an Inquiry by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on Saturday. CATHERINE MARION PARTRIDGE, aged two years and three months, was found drowned in the mill leat on Friday and it was supposed that she had, unknown to him, followed her father when he left home to work, in a field, and fell from the bridge [?]. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 August 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth held an Inquest yesterday in connection with the sudden death of SARAH ANN GREY, aged 48, who died suddenly on the previous day. She had been in infirm health for several years, but had been able to keep a fruit stall in the market. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Sudden death of MRS ELIZABETH HARRIS, a widow, aged 70, of Fowey, who was on a visit to her son, at 3 Cheltenham-place, Plymouth, was the subject of an Inquest before Mr T. C. Brian yesterday. The deceased ate a hearty supper on Monday night, and retired to rest in her usual health, but was slightly unwell during the night. In the morning she was observed to be breathing peculiarly, and a doctor was sent for, but before Mr Wolferstan arrived she was dead. He gave it as his opinion that death resulted from heart disease and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 August 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall Into The Trench At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, last evening, on the body of JOHN CRUTE, seaman, H.M.S. Himalaya, who died in the Hospital from injuries received by falling into the trench new Newpassage-hill. Between three and four o'clock on Wednesday morning P.C. Sampson heard groans proceeding from the trench, and on looking into it he observed the deceased lying at the bottom. The constable procured assistance and removed him to the Hospital. On attempting to move him from the trench the deceased, who appeared to be very drunk, swore at them, and told them to let him stay, saying, "I'm drunk." On admission to the Hospital the assistant-surgeon considered that the man was not seriously injured, but that he was very drunk. He was asked how he got into the trench, but nothing could be elicited from him. The constable informed the Jury that a dense fog prevailed during the night. Upon inquiries being made on board the Himalaya it was ascertained that the deceased was an able seaman on board that ship, and belonged to Torquay. He left the ship on Tuesday evening on leave of absence until the following morning, but did not return. His age was 22, and he was a strong and healthy, but rather dissipated man. About three months since he fell off a cab at Torquay and broke his collar-bone. Mr E. Cant, house surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, stated that when the deceased was admitted he was very drunk. There were no external marks of violence, nor any appearance of serious injury, and no danger was apprehended. It was subsequently ascertained when the symptoms of drunkenness had passed away that the deceased was paralysed from his feet up to his chest, and his arms were also paralysed. It was then evident that he was suffering from injury to the upper part of the spine, and his opinion was that death, which occurred between ten and eleven o'clock on Wednesday night, resulted from paralysis. The fact of the man having been in a drunken state when admitted led to the conclusion at the outset that he was not seriously injured. As soon as it was ascertained that he was in a dangerous condition, everything that could possibly be done was done for him, but without avail. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr Murch) complained that the trench was generally considered to be a trap. - The Coroner replied that the trench was one of the military conditions of the town. It was fenced in all round, and when a man clambered over the fence to the other side he was a trespasser. - The Foreman: It is not an isolated case of a person falling into the trench. - The Coroner: It is not, and I shall be very glad if you can suggest anything that the authorities would be likely to adopt by which these frequent accidents can be avoided. I have thought over the thing and I certainly cannot see my way clear to suggest anything. - A Juror: This is the fourth accident that has happened of persons falling into the trench within the last month. - The Coroner: All I can say is that I will make any reasonable suggestion to the authorities that you may wish to have conveyed. I am not prepared to suggest any particular kind of representation myself, but I shall be happy to convey any suggestion of yours. - The Foreman thought the trench should be more securely fenced. At the same time it might be remembered that they used the Park on sufferance. The land belonged to the War Department and if the town pushed them to extremes it might be that the Department would prohibit them from the use of the Park. - The coroner knew plenty of places in the country where a drunken man could much more easily fall over than into the trench. - The Foreman was of opinion that it was not so clearly proved that the man was drunk, and medical men too easily mistook unconsciousness for drunkenness. - Thomas Brown, an able seaman of the Himalaya, was thereupon called upon to give evidence as to the condition of the deceased. He stated that CRUTE and himself went into several public-house together on Tuesday night and had a good many glasses of ale. They separated at ten o'clock, and he considered the deceased was then able to "take care of himself." They were both of them "pretty well on." - The Coroner, in summing up, said he did not think they could cast blame upon any person because a man happened to fall into a place which had been before the eyes of the public in the most palpable form for years past, for if it were so dangerous to human life, they all of them ought to have long ago joined in making proper representations. At the same time, whilst he was sorry these frequent accidents did occur through persons clambering over the fence, he did not see what could be suggested to prevent them. Still, if anything reasonable could be suggested by the Jury, he should be very glad to bring it under the notice of the authorities. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and whilst not desiring to cast blame upon any person, inasmuch as there was no evidence to shew how the deceased came into the trench, were generally of opinion that it should be suggested to the authorities whether further precautions for preventing these frequent accidents could not be adopted. - The Coroner promised that he would go in the name of the Jury to the office of the Royal Engineers and ascertain whether, by better lighting and fencing and at a reasonable cost, further precautions could not be effected in order to guard people against the results of their own rash acts.

CORNWOOD - Sad Death Of A Farmer At Cornwood. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday at Little Steart Farm, Cornwood, relative to the death of the occupier, RICHARD TURPIN, aged 60. - Edward Broom, farm labourer, who was in the employ of the deceased, said on Tuesday he accompanied his master, who took the wagon, drawn by three horses, to Eldon Clay Works, which was about two miles distant. they loaded the wagon with about 3 tons and 8 cwt. of china clay, and left for Cornwood Railway Station. On coming to the top of Tucker's-hill the horses stopped to have the drag put on, when the deceased told him to drive on a little further before they put down the drag. When the horses had got on a little further, the deceased called out to them to stop, but they did not. TURPIN then caught hold of the share horse and witness took hold of the leading horse. By this time the wagon was bearing down upon the hind horse, who immediately went off at the gallop down the hill. Witness held on until they reached the bottom when he had to let the horses go. It was so dusty that he could not see where the deceased was. He went on a little further and found the deceased lying on his face and hands. He immediately procured assistance, and had him conveyed home. The horses were stopped at Corn Town, some distance off. - Mr J. M. Randle, surgeon, Ivybridge, said he found the deceased suffering from a fracture of the left shoulder and all the bones connected with it. He also had a scalp wound, but it was not of a serious nature. The deceased informed him that in letting go the horse, the wagon knocked him down and a wheel passed over his left shoulder. The deceased died at midnight on Tuesday from a shock to the system, caused by the injuries he had received, which were quite sufficient to have killed a much younger man. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 August 1880
DARTMOUTH - Suicide At Dartmouth. - The man ROBERT HOLT, a pensioner of the Royal Artillery, who attempted to commit suicide on Friday, died the same evening from the effects of the wound which he had inflicted on himself. - Deceased was a quiet, inoffensive man, but a strangeness had at times been observed in his conduct. On the same day he was in town, and went as far as the Castle with his wife, and appeared then just as usual. About 5 p.m. he was in the sitting-room with his wife and was unusually low spirited. He suddenly went upstairs, and on coming down again went into the closet. He had been there a short time when his wife's suspicions were aroused, and she discovered him with his head over the pan of the closet and cutting his throat. A struggle ensued between them, during which her fingers were severely cut in attempting to obtain possession of the razor. Assistance came in answer to the wife's cries, but deceased had fainted through loss of blood. Medical aid was sought and Messrs. Dawson and Soper were soon in attendance and the wound was dressed, but the loss of blood had been too great and the unfortunate man succumbed in a very short time. He leaves a wife and three children almost entirely unprovided for. He was in receipt of £60 a year pension. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall by the Borough Coroner (Mr R. W. Prideaux) on Saturday afternoon. The wife stated that her husband had been in low spirits for some time, which she considered was owing to his leaving the army, the breaking up of his home, and fear lest he should not be elected as drill instructor to the volunteers in consequence of not having read up in drill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 August 1880
EXETER - Fatal Fall At Exeter. - At the Inquest held yesterday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, before Mr Coroner Hooper, the following distressing case was investigated:- On Saturday evening last, about five o'clock, MRS SNELL, wife of MR THOMAS SNELL, builder, Southernhay, was watering some plants placed on a roof, which was approached by a flight of steps when she suddenly fell to the ground and broke her neck, death being (according to the medical evidence of Dr Roper) instantaneous. The unfortunate woman also fractured her arm near the wrist, and received a large scalp wound on the left side of her forehead extending to the top part of the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 August 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Coroner for Plymouth held an Inquest last evening at Mr Usher's, Octagon-street, concerning the death of the child, aged six months, of MARY ANN HATCH. the mother gave evidence that her child was delicate from birth, but was worse on Friday, Saturday and Sunday last. On Monday morning she found it dead in her arms. She did not call in medical assistance, but about two months since she took the child to a doctor, and he said it was consumptive. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," censured the mother for not obtaining medical advice.

BRIXHAM - At the Coroner's Inquest held at Brixham, yesterday, respecting the death of ROBERT FOSTER, who was drowned at Brixham on Monday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 August 1880
EXETER - The Exeter coroner held an Inquiry last evening at the Cowley Bridge Inn, near Exeter, touching the death of a young girl named HOOPER, whose parents reside at Crediton, and who was found early the same morning in the River Exe. Deceased was employed as servant at the Cowley Bridge Inn, and between six and seven she was seen by her master going through the garden in the direction of the river, which is close by. A few minutes later she was seen in the water by a Great Western Railway employee, who succeeded in getting her out, but she expired shortly afterwards. Evidence was given shewing that the girl had of late been very strange in her actions, and the Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst in a State of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 August 1880
PLYMPTON ST MARY - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Colebrook Inn, Colebrook, near Plympton, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of ALICE MAUD GILES, aged nine months. The Coroner said that when the case was reported to him he felt it his duty to order a post-mortem examination as it was suggested that the deceased had received some injuries from a fall. He had since learnt that the deceased quite recovered from the fall, and that the death of the child was nothing whatever to do with the fall. The case was therefore very simple, and he should not trouble them with any further remarks. Mr William D Stamp, surgeon, stated that at the Coroner's request he made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. His opinion was that the child died from convulsions probably due from overloading the stomach. She was a weakly child. The Jury, of whom Mr Clymick was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - At the conclusion of the Inquest the Coroner referred in complimentary terms to Sergeant T. Hicks stationed at Plympton, who was present, and who was about to leave the force through ill health.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 August 1880
DARTMOUTH - On Saturday last a man named ROBERT MOORE, who has been during the regatta at Dartmouth, attached to a sparring booth, was found drowned in the pool at the north corner of the New Ground. It seems that he had been in the booth sparring, and having received a scratch on his face intimated his intention of washing it off in the salt water. It is supposed that in so doing he overbalanced himself and fell in, and although some children raised an alarm life was extinct when he was taken from the water. Dr Soper was soon in attendance, but his services were of no avail. Yesterday an Inquest was held on the body and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. Deceased was about 33 years of age, and had been for some time previous to this employed by Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell, of the Royal Menagerie.

DARTMOUTH - On Friday last, the second day of Dartmouth Regatta, a MISS MARIA PROUT MANNING, sister of MR DAVID MANNING, of Dartmouth, was riding on Hancock's steam horses, when she fell off, and fractured her skull. She was taken to her brother's and received every attention, but she died on Saturday. Yesterday an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was about 53 years of age, and was on a visit from Plymouth.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 September 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Singular Death In Cawsand Bay. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Albion Hotel, Millbay, last evening, respecting the death of MR ASHER JOEL, aged seventy years. - Mr Solomon Zeffertt, general merchant, residing at 16 Buckland-street, said that he and the deceased, whom he knew well, went on Wednesday afternoon to Cawsand Bay in a steamer from Plymouth. they went ashore and just before eight came off in a small boat, in which there were four passengers in addition to the two boys rowing. There were two steamers, and theirs was outside. Two passengers got into the nearest steamer, and then they rowed for the other steamer. There were several boats near. The boys made to catch hold of the steamer but missed, and the boat capsized, being overbalanced. Witness and the deceased were completely immersed in the water. He sank three times. As far as he could remember when he came to the surface the third time he saw the deceased in another boat. Someone dragged him into the boat and then he was removed aboard the steamer. he did not attach blame to anyone. The boys, no doubt, wanted to make haste and get ashore for more passengers. It was not due to carelessness; the whole thing was done in a second. - By a Juror: He could not remember whether he was standing or sitting at the time. He believed he was sitting by the side of the deceased. He did not hear the captain of either of the steamers call to him to sit down. - The Coroner hoped the Jury would not be sparing in their questions, as on account of the increasing number of excursions from Plymouth this was a case of great importance to the public. - Witness, in answer to another Juror, said that there was no extraordinary excitement just before the accident occurred. - Mr J. F. Bateman, chemist and druggist, residing at 7 Clarendon-place, Citadel-road, said that on Wednesday afternoon he was in charge of the steamer Empress for Mr W. H. Rowe. About eight o'clock he saw the deceased and Zeffertt coming towards the steamer in a punt. He had previously given instructions that no punts were to come alongside, and had told the passengers they had better use watermen's boats. The punt was about five or six yards off in charge of two boys. ~Coming alongside Messrs. JOEL and Zeffertt suddenly jumped up. He called to them to sit down, but before the words were out of his mouth the punt capsized. He attributed the accident entirely to the two passengers suddenly jumping up. Seeing them in the water he cut away the lifebuoy and threw it in the water in the direction of the men. In a few seconds they were both rescued, and Mr Zeffertt came on board. He was conscious and able to walk. MR JOEL was helped on board. He was conscious and could speak. He did not complain of anyone being to blame. After the deceased had been on board a few seconds he staggered and lay down on the deck. Mr Hearder and Mr Vinnicombe, chemists, did all they could to restore animation. The steamer proceeded for Plymouth as quickly as possible, but before they arrived at Millbay the deceased had expired. As soon as they sighted the pier witness signalled for a medical man, and Mr Russel Rendle arrived almost immediately they touched the pier; but he pronounced life to be extinct. - By the Foreman: There was no notice cautioning or warning the public against using the punts going to or returning from the shore. - By a Juror: Both passengers were perfectly sober at the time of the accident. - By another Juror: A punt was not supposed to ply at all. If passengers choose to come from the shore to the steamer in a punt they could do so; but he prohibited punts from taking passengers ashore from the steamer. - By another Juror: The boys in charge of the punt he judged to be 10 or 11 years of age. - MR M. JOEL, son of the deceased, identified the body. His father was about seventy years of age. He had been under medical treatment for disease f the heart. - In summing up, the Coroner suggested that the Jury should request that notices be placed on board the steamers cautioning the public against using these dangerous punts. - The Jury, through Mr L. Hyman, their Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Shock, produced by Accidental Immersion." They exonerated everyone from blame, and tendered their thanks to Messrs. Bateman, Vinnicombe and Hearder for their conduct in the matter.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 September 1880
EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper has held an Inquest at Exeter on the body of FRED BARTLETT, aged 16 months, child of a driver in K. Battery, R.H.A. (now at Aldershot, but lately at Exeter) who died on Thursday last from measles. It was proved that the mother neglected for a day or two to get the medicine and follow the advice of Mr Bell, of the Pauper Dispensary, and the child died. At the Inquest Mr Bell stated that the mother treated the affair very lightly; and he was sorry to say that this indifference on the part of poor parents in cases of the kind were not at all unusual. The Coroner severely censured MRS BARTLETT for neglect, which he described as [?] and culpable and stated that if another such case came before him he should feel disposed to advise a verdict of manslaughter. The Jury concurred in the remarks of the Coroner and returned a verdict of "Died from Measles". Mr Bell was thanked for bringing the case forward.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 September 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Boys Drowned At harbour Avenue, Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Brunswick Inn, Barbican, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the deaths of ALBERT WILLIAM MITCHELL and EDWIN MITCHELL, brothers, aged 10 and 8 respectively. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, said that considering the seriousness of this distressing occurrence in a large seaside population, he should conduct a separate Inquiry respecting each death. The case of the elder boy was taken first. - WILLIAM THOMAS GREENAWAY, fisherman, and half-brother to the deceased, residing at 30 New-street, identified the body. - James Toms, a lad of 18, said that about half-past five on Saturday evening he had charge of his father's horse and trolley. He had his brother Charles and the two deceased boys in the trolley with him. They went down to the "wash" near harbour Avenue to wash the horse and trolley. He intended to have turned the horse in order to tack the trolley into the water, but another horse was coming out, and the man in charge smacked his whip and said "Gee up," which started his horse into the water before he could pull it up. The horse, in trying to regain its feet, slid on the bottom and got out of its depth. The tide was ebbing, and the horse and trolley went under the arch. The trolley sank and was dragged along the bottom. Witness stood on the shafts and was trying to unfasten the harness, but the horse plunged violently and knocked him off. At that time witness's brother and the two boys who were drowned were on the trolley. He was out of his depth and could not swim, and he remembered sinking under the arch. Then he became unconscious, and he remembered nothing until he was brought to consciousness on shore. When he fell off there were three men in the water on horseback, and they were laughing at him. None of them came to his assistance. A man named Miners who was there laughed when he called to him to come and save the children. - The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that some allowance must be made in considering the statements of the witness as he was greatly terrified by the accident. He was surprised that the witness remembered so much as he did. - Witness, continuing, said he washed the horse and trolley at the same place about three weeks ago. He then backed the horse and cart into the water. He had seen a great many horses and carts washed thee, and the slip was generally used for that purpose. the carts were always backed in. - Thomas Miners, carter, said that on Saturday evening he rode a horse down to the "wash" and when he got there he saw the trolley with four boys in the water. The horse attached to the trolley had lost its footing. The fore part of the trolley was full of water, and he could just see the back of the trolley disappearing under the arch. Witness called to the children to turn, but they had lost all power over the horse, which was out of its depth. Witness went towards the arch as far as his horse could go without going out of its depth, but did not get at all near the back of the trolley. He could not swim, and he thought it would be silly to risk his own life. The horse was plunging very much to free itself from the harness. The children were screaming at this time. A man named Lucock jumped into the water and made towards the trolley. All the boys had disappeared under the arch except the elder Toms, who was swimming towards Lucock. Lucock brought him in, and then swam out and rescued another lad, who he had since heard was Tom's brother. Another man came and swam out to the other boys, but he could not get at them. - George Lee deposed that after the accident he with others hauled a boat from Sutton Harbour Quay and launched it at the slip. They dragged for the bodies, and after about forty minutes recovered them. They had to get the horse and trolley out of the way before they could use the drags. He thought the bodies were quite clear of the horse and trolley. - The Coroner informed the Jury that the eldest boy had a severe bruise, apparently from a kick, on the temple. - P.C. Warne deposed that at the time of the accident he was on duty at the Harbour Avenue Station, and saw the horse and trolley pass the station. About two minutes later he heard loud screaming and on running to the "wash" saw the trolley at the mouth of the arch disappearing. Witness did not see anything of the horse or the boys until he saw Lucock, and a man named Foss rescued two of them. The "wash" was much frequented for washing horses, but he had never seen a trolley or vehicle of any kind there before. He considered the place very dangerous for vehicles as the bottom is steep and smooth. - the Coroner said the question for the Jury would be whether the death of the deceased was an accident, and whether there was responsibility to be attached to anyone. As far as he could see there was not. But with what happened previous to the accident he was not at all pleased. He could not feel satisfied that every effort was made to save the life of the deceased up to the time Lucock came. There was the man Miners present on horseback, but he did not appear to have done anything. The man said he rode out, but this another witness said was not until afterwards. Be that as it may, Miners made no efforts to help the children. Lucock and Foss deserved their high encomiums for what they did, and he could not help thinking that if efforts had been made at first equal to those which were made afterwards they would not have been there as a Jury at all. - A Juror interposed the remark that it was not to be expected a man who could not swim was going to risk his own life to save others. - The Coroner: Everyone may enjoy his own opinion. They had to consider whether this boy came to his death accidentally or otherwise. Perhaps the Jury might wish to say something in order to prevent such an occurrence in future. If the solicitor of the company had been present he should have asked him whether gates could not be placed at the arch. - A Juror said that if posts were put along at the entrance of the slip that would prevent carts from going down. The place was not dangerous for horses. - Another Juror strongly recommended gates being put. - After a short discussion the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Coroner was requested to communicate with the Sutton Harbour Company for the purpose of urging that some safeguard should be placed either in front of the arch or at the top of the slip to prevent accidents in future. - An Inquest was held on the second body, and a similar verdict returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 September 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death Of A Cabman. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest at the Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS COOZE, a cabman, who was about 60 years of age. Deceased, who was employed by Mr T. Hacker, cab proprietor, had complained for some time of pains in the heart, and a flow of blood to the head, and at such times his cheeks became back and his nose bled. On Monday afternoon Mr Hacker sent him to a fare, and whilst he was driving up the North-road he suddenly dropped his whip and lost control of his horse. On help coming to him he was found to be unconscious and apparently dying. The cab was driven toward Stonehouse, but before it reached COOZE'S house he was dead. - Dr Bulteel, who had made a post-mortem examination, said he found the heart was loaded with fat and the arteries generally much degenerated, especially those of the brain. He believed the cause of death to have been sudden failure of the heart's action. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 September 1880
EXMOUTH - The Fatal Boat Accident At Exmouth. - The Inquest touching the death of EDWARD POTTER and JOHN MANN, who were drowned on Wednesday by the capsizing of a pleasure boat abreast of Exmouth bar, was held yesterday before the District Coroner (Mr Cox) at the Rolle Arms. - The Coroner opened the proceedings by briefly stating the facts as they were publicly known. - John Perriam, a pilot, was the first witness. He stated that he was on board the pilot cutter on Wednesday, anchored off the Maer Docks, and waiting for water to go over the bar. He saw a boat come away from Orcombe Point with three men in her, but he could not distinguish who they were. The boat was lugsail rigged with one sail up, and when about a quarter-mile from the cutter she turned over. He at once shouted to Edward and John Tupman and Pym, who were lying down in the cabin, that a boat had capsized, and in order that not a moment should be lost got ready the cutter's punt. The three pilots started at once, and thinking four would be too many for their small boat he stayed on board the cutter. Meantime he saw Barrett's yacht which was coming in the same direction, luff round and make for the overturned boat. Before the punt could get there the yachtsmen had succeeded in picking up Bradford, the boatman, and MANN. In reply to the Coroner as to the cause of the accident, Perriam said it was done by the gibing of the sail, but he could not say whether or not the sheet was fastened. - Edward George Tupman, also a licensed pilot, was examined and stated that immediately on hearing from Perriam that a boat had capsized he jumped into the punt with his brother and W. Pym (two other pilots) and pulled in the direction pointed out by Perriam. On nearing the boat he could only see one man clinging to it, who proved to be Nares. They at once took him aboard and then saw another body floating at a distance of about 18 feet, and having pulled the man into the boat discovered that it was POTTER. Apparently he was quite dead. They immediately turned their boat to the shore and met the coastguard galley, which took them in tow and landed them near the coastguard station. - In reply to the Coroner as to whether the sheet was fastened, he said whether it was or not it would not remain fastened in the water, as it was merely attached to a shunt cleat. - Andrew Barrett, a fisherman, stated that on the day of the accident he was returning with a pleasure party from a cruise. When off the double ledge buoy he heard cries of distress, and on looking round saw a boat on her side and three men clinging to her. He immediately hauled his wind and tacked in the direction of the boat, then at a distance of about 100 yards, and in passing threw a rope amongst them, which was caught by Bradford, who was then hauled aboard. He then made another tack, and succeeded in picking up MANN with a boat hook. Nares then swam towards Barrett's boat, but as the pilots would arrive at the spot before he could make another tack he bore away for the harbour for medical assistance on MANN'S behalf. - The Coroner asked the witness Edward Tupman what depth of water there would be where the boat was capsized. Tupman replied that there was about 10 feet where the boat went over, although to get to the spot where they were picked up they must have passed over shallower water. - Bradford, the boatman, was called, and stated that POTTER, Nares and MANN engaged him on Wednesday for a shrimping expedition. They left Exmouth at 10 a.m., and landed at Orcombe, and, after shrimping until about two o'clock , left for home. After hoisting the sail he asked Nares if he could steer, and, on being answered that he could, gave him the sheet and the tiller, and employed himself in picking shrimps from the weed. Their lug-sail was reefed, but there was no more wind than a boat could carry whole sail. About three minutes after they started the sail jibed before the men could shift their position, and the boat capsized. The Coroner: What happened then? - Bradford: All four of us were thrown into the water, and I saw MANN, who could not swim, trying to take hold of Nares by the neck, but he pushed him away. - The Coroner: Can you swim, Bradford? - A little, sir. - The Coroner: A little. Then you had better learn. - A Juror: I think it is Bradford's modesty, for I believe he can swim well. The Coroner: He is here to tell the truth, and the whole truth. - A relative of one of the deceased men asked Bradford if he was a licensed boatman. His reply was "No." Asked if he thought he was justified in giving up the control of the boat to an utter stranger, Bradford replied "Yes, any waterman would have done the same." - In answer to the Foreman, Bradford said that Nares had steered the boat when they were going out in the morning. - A coastguardsman was called and stated that at the first intimation of the accident a boat's crew put off, and were in time to take the pilot punt in tow. - Dr Turnbull and Mr Maberly also gave evidence to shew that every effort was used to restore animation. - A verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned. - MR POTTER, one of the deceased men, was in his younger days a noted swimmer, and had in his possession a ~Bible which was presented to him by the Rev. C. W. Wightman, formerly of Exmouth, in recognition of his having saved that gentleman's son, Henry Wightman, from drowning in the Passage Way at Exmouth in 1843. Soon after that occasion a boat capsized with two ladies and a gentleman on board, when crossing the Ferry and POTTER succeeded in saving the gentleman and one of the ladies. MR POTTER, who was 56 years of age, had been in ill-health for some time and it is supposed that the shock to his system deprived him of the power of swimming.

MORVAL, CORNWALL - The death of JOHN HEDLEY OLVER, a youth of 14, the son of MR JOHN OLVER, of Newton Abbot, was Inquired into at Corgorlon, in the parish of Morval, on Wednesday, before Mr Coroner Glubb. It appeared that deceased was turning the wheel of a threshing machine with his feet, and, slipping, fell into the pit. When taken out he could not speak, and was bleeding very much. He was got into the house as soon as possible, and died in a few minutes. After a careful examination of the circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 September 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Under Painful Circumstances At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Haddington Hotel, Benbow-street, last evening, relative to the death of ALICE MARIA BEAUCHAMP, wife of a clergyman, who was found dead in her bed on Sunday morning. Deceased was 38 years of age. - Ellen Reeve, servant who had been employed by the deceased at 56 Haddington-road, during the past year, said her mistress, during the time she had been with her, had greatly given way to drink. She was also subject to palpitation of the heart. Every effort had been made to keep her from drinking large quantities of spirits, but her husband allowed her a small quantity. To prevent the deceased from getting drink the doors were at times locked, and witness had been forbidden to provide her with any. When sober she had a good appetite. She was very quiet on Saturday. About quarter to nine on Sunday morning, witness went to her mistress's room and found her dead. She immediately called her master, who sent for Dr Rolston, and he pronounced life extinct. Deceased was not down on Saturday; she was so weak she could not stand. - Dr Rolston said he had known deceased two years. he was sent for on Sunday morning, and on going to the house found the deceased dead in bed. She had apparently tried to get out of bed and had fallen back from weakness. He thought death had taken place several hours when he saw the body, and that it had resulted from syncope and weakness of the heart. At the suggestion of the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

HENNOCK - A sudden death occurred at Chudleigh Knighton on Sunday. A man named ROBERT YARD, who was employed as gamekeeper at Messrs. Candy and Cox's brick works, Chudleigh-road Station, left his horse at an early hour to pick mushrooms. he returned at half-past six, and had not been in the house more than a few minutes when he dropped down dead. Deceased leaves a wife and three children. An Inquest was held at the Claycutters Arms yesterday, when Mr Hodson, surgeon, of Bovey Tracey, stated the cause of death to have been heart disease. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

PLYMOUTH - The Death By Drowning In A Brewery. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry at Plymouth Guildhall last evening respecting the death of JAMES BUTLER, aged 25 years, who was drowned on Saturday evening in a well at Frankfort Brewery, where he was employed. - George Andrews, mate of the Rose, tug-boat, residing at 28 Harwell-street, Plymouth, stated that about seven p.m. on Saturday he was coming up Frankfort-street and saw a crowd in Arch-lane, near the brewery, and hearing that there was a man down the well he offered to descend and render assistance if possible. He was admitted into the apartment where the well was in which there was a large crowd. Whilst he was there the man Warren, now at the Hospital, was brought up, and witness learning there was still another man in the well again volunteered his services. He made a bowline knot in a rope and sat in it, and was lowered into the well for about sixty feet. Then he got into a cavity in the side of the well about two feet above the water. A "creep" was lowered to witness, and, after several unsuccessful attempts, he got hold of deceased by the sleeve of the coat, and made the body fast to the rope. Both were hoisted to the surface. Witness was pretty certain the man was dead when he took him out of the water. There was plenty of room in the shaft for a man to go up and down. There was an iron rod on each side of the well and a pipe in the centre, with beams crosswise to keep it in its place. With ordinary care he thought the shaft was perfectly safe for use. The well was about two feet in diameter at the top and increased to seven or eight feet at the bottom. - HENRY BUTLER, father of the deceased, proved his son's identity. Deceased was 25 years of age, and was a single man. - P.C. Gidley, of the Plymouth police force, who had been specially employed by Mr Ryall's request at the brewery since the 2nd instant, the time during which men had been baling the well, said his duty had been to keep children away from the work. The well was situated in the malthouse. He was there about seven o'clock on Saturday evening, when four men were engaged about the work. Three were employed at the winch and BUTLER was emptying the bucket. The bucket - which was a nine gallon cask with the head knocked out, and with a well-secured rope handle - got entangled and could not be loosened from above. Deceased volunteered to go down the well. Witness had seen him descend before without the bucket, but suggested that the spare bucket should be put into use for the purpose of lowering him down. Deceased said it was not worth while to do that; he would slide down by the rope. Witness cautioned him to be careful, and again asked him to go down in the spare bucket, but deceased - who was quite sober - caught hold of the rope and slid down. A light had been previously lowered, and was burning. When deceased got about half way down he rested on one of the beams supporting the pump. He waited a minute or two, and again getting on to the rope immediately slipped off into the water. Witness saw him fall, and heard him drop into the water. There was the sound of a heavy blow as if deceased had struck the bucket or the side of the well. Witness and the other men shouted to him, but got no answer, and Warren - one of the men working at the well, who was now lying in the Hospital - got hold of the rope and went down, but after he had descended some distance suddenly slipped on to the bucket, and went to the bottom. Witness cautioned him several times before his descent not to go down on the rope. After he was in the water he groaned very much, and witness called for assistance, as the other men at the well did not care to go down. George Newland, another man belonging to the brewery, then descended by the rope, putting a bag round it to prevent its slipping through his hands. He rescued Warren, and the injured man was hauled up in the bucket, apparently much hurt. Newland remained down for about twenty minutes, searching for deceased, but could not find him. Andrews then went down, and the body of deceased was brought to the surface. Meanwhile Mr Ryall and Drs. Thomas and Owen had been fetched, and as soon as the body was brought up it was attended to by the medical men, who were about a quarter of an hour endeavouring to restore animation. When the body was brought up they expressed the opinion that life was extinct. More than forty minutes had elapsed from the time of the fall before the body was recovered. - Richard Toll Roseveare, brewer at Frankfort-street Brewery, said the well in question was sixty feet in depth to the adit, and two and a half feet wide at the entrance. The pumps were out of order and had been under repair for some time. Had frequently been down the shaft in the bucket. Witness descended on Friday week last; the shaft was free from improper obstruction. On Saturday he went to the brewery and saw that the bucket was caught at the bottom. Heard deceased offer to go down, and told him he was not to do so unless well secured. Witness was then called away to another part of the brewery, and deceased went down after he had left. The portion of the rope which entered the water was always very slippery, and he should think it impossible to hold on by it. - The Coroner remarked that the fact of Mr Ryall having specially employed a constable to preserve order and watch the operations at the well indicated a very proper care on his part to prevent danger, if possible. He thought Andrews shewed a brave and courageous spirit, and deserved approbation for his conduct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 15 September 1880
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Suicide At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Enquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening, late the circumstances attending the death of HARRIET HOPKINS, aged 73 years. - THOMAS NICHOLAS HOPKINS, a packer, and son of the deceased, stated that he resided at 23 Zion-street. For about seven months his mother had been suffering from paralysis, during which time she had been confined to her bed, with the exception of the last week. On Monday, at about 10 a.m., she appeared to be in a very unsettled mood, and at times would make use of strange observations to the effect that her brain was in motion. On the same day (Monday) between three and four o'clock, witness went from his workshop -which is close to the dwelling-house - to see if his mother was in need of anything, and found she was not. About ten minutes after he heard something fall and on going to the room he found deceased lying on the floor with a large gash in her throat, from which blood was flowing very freely. He at once called in a neighbour and medical aid was sent for. Dr Meeres came in a few minutes after, and suggested that the deceased should be removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and this was accordingly done. - Mr Bampton, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that on Monday, between five and six o'clock, deceased was received into the Hospital. About 8 p.m. he examined her and found her throat cut very badly, the left jugular vein being completely severed. - A Juror: How long was it before the deceased was attended to, after her admittance into the house? - Mr Bampton said that he was not in at the time of her admittance, but she was attended to at once by a substitute. Jane Bennet, a nurse at the Hospital, stated that on Monday about six p.m., deceased was admitted to the House, where she was attended by Dr Prynne and Dr Meeres. In the opinion of witness, deceased was conscious during the night, as she was heard to make a remark saying, "I am glad that I am not dead." All hopes of her recovery were given up, and deceased expired that (Tuesday) morning about 8.30 a.m. Sarah Warden stated that she was called in by the deceased's son and found a razor lying on a table (in the same room where the deceased was), covered with blood. The Coroner said there could be little doubt that the injuries were inflicted by the deceased. The Jury then returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 September 1880
EXETER - Remarkable Suicide In Exeter Prison. A Sad Story Of Bereavement. - The Inquest on FREDERICK JOSLIN, who committed suicide in her Majesty's prison at Exeter on Wednesday, as already reported, was held in the prison yesterday by Mr F. Burrows, Deputy for Mr R. R. Crosse, of Cullompton. Deceased was brought before the city magistrates on August 30th on a charge of having forged the name of Mr Huggins, solicitor, to a note requesting Messrs. Pinder and Tuckwell, outfitters, to supply him with goods. It was shewn at the examination that JOSLIN endeavoured to obtain some clothes on credit, stating that he should shortly be in funds as Mr Huggins had the management of some property belonging to him, but he was refused credit unless he could bring Mr Huggins's written authority. He then left the shop, but returned shortly afterwards with a note purporting to be signed by Mr Huggins, on the strength of which Messrs. Pinder supplied him with a coat. Mr Huggins proved that the signature was not his, and that he had given no authority for it; and other witnesses proved that the coat was pawned directly after JOSLIN obtained it. The magistrates, upon this evidence, committed the man for trial at the assize. On Wednesday morning at eight o'clock Assistant-Warder Richards supplied the prisoner with his breakfast. At that time there was nothing unusual in his manner, but an hour later another warder, named Head, on looking through the peep-hole of prisoner's cell, saw him lying on the floor under his bed. Head opened the door, and found that the leg of the iron bedstead was pressing upon the man's windpipe, and that he was, to all appearances dead. Instead of lifting the leg of the bed from off the man's throat, he called the chief-warder (Mr A. Jarman), who communicated with the governor and sent for a surgeon, and then proceeded to the cell, the governor accompanying him. Jarman lifted off the bedstead, and with the governor's assistance placed the body on the bed, when brandy was administered and other expedients for restoring animation were resorted to, but without success. A Juror asked Mr Jarman if he did not think that Head should have relieved the deceased's throat from the pressure of the bedstead before calling him. Witness replied that he should certainly have done so had he been in Head's place. - Mr Ed. Cowlan, governor of H.M.'s prison, corroborated the chief-warder's evidence. He added that on the day before the suicide deceased was seen by the visiting justices (Mr Moore-Stevens and Mr W. H. Ellis, Mayor of Exeter), to whom he stated that he had no complaint to make. He had never noticed anything peculiar in the deceased's manner. The man was generally well conducted, but on Monday last he was ordered to be punished for a slight breach of the prison rules by being deprived for a week of indulgences granted to prisoners awaiting trial. One of those indulgences was the reception of visits from friends. Mr Cowlan did not believe this deprivation had preyed upon the man's mind, or that he had taken the slightest notice of it. If the wife or friends had called he should not have refused to admit them. A prisoner's solicitor could see him at any time. Had he noticed anything in the deceased's demeanour he should certainly have placed two warders to watch him, as was done in all cases of that kind. Under the circumstances the deceased always appeared cheerful to witness. The Governor handed in two letters which had been written to the deceased by his wife. The first informed him that there was no chance of procuring the money for a solicitor to defend him at his trial, and persuaded him to plead guilty. His children were all well, and he was to be cheerful under the circumstances. In the second letter the wife asked the deceased to tell the truth, as it would be all for the best. - Mr J. D. Harris, the surgeon who was called in, said he considered the man had been dead three-quarters of an hour before he saw him. Had there been a surgeon on the spot it was highly improbable that life would have been saved. - P.C. Johns, of the county constabulary, said he had known deceased for two years. During two or three months prior to his arrest he had been out of work, and had spent his time wandering about, generally on the banks of the canal, and there were rumours that he had threatened to commit suicide. On the 28th of August P.C. Gillard, of the Exeter force, told witness he had a warrant for JOSLIN'S arrest, and witness went in search of him. He found him near Salmon Pool Bridge, sitting on the canal bank with his head between his hands. He said to witness, "I don't care what you do with me; I've not been a man since my wife and children were burnt alive." - By a Juror: Did not consider he was a sane man. - Several Jurymen said they were of opinion that deceased had not been in his right mind since his wife and children were burnt to death when he lived near St Thomas's Church. This occurred about twenty-two years ago. His wife went out to call him, leaving the supper frying, but on her return the house was on fire. She rushed upstairs to save her children, but was unable to do so or come downstairs. A man got a ladder and by its aid reached the window at which the poor woman appeared. He succeeded in catching her by the hair of the head, but could not rescue her, as he failed to knock away the iron rods which barred the window on the outside. The fire rapidly spread, and the unfortunate woman and her children fell victims to the flames. They were burnt to cinders. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. Serious Allegations. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, Devonport, touching the death of GRACE WEEKS, a married woman, aged about 41 years, who had for many years kept a brothel, and was also well known to the police. - Mary Lavis, wife of a pensioner, said the deceased and her husband lived at No. 1 Quarry-street, Devonport. Deceased had for many years been greatly addicted to drink, and for the last eight months had been in a bad state of health. On the previous afternoon deceased went to the Cornish Arms, Pembroke-street, and had a glass of ale. She had not returned long before she became faint, and in a very short time she died. - In reply to the Court, witness said she had never heard the deceased complain of her husband having kicked her. - SAMUEL BOND, naval pensioner, and brother of the deceased, said her husband had used her badly. One day in the first week of April he was summoned to see his sister, and found her lying on the bed very ill, and she told him her husband had dragged her through the passage by the hair and afterwards given her a severe kick in the body just under the heart. Since that time the deceased had been very unwell. - The husband of the deceased was called, and, after being duly cautioned, said he was a blacksmith by trade. His wife had been a very heavy drinker, and he had done all that was possible to keep her from having liquor. It was also against his wish for her to have kept a brothel. He denied ever having kicked his wife. Since she had come home from London in April last she had not been very well. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said that he and his wife were both unfriendly with the previous witness. - Mr Wilson, surgeon, said he attended the deceased about twelve months since. He was called on Wednesday afternoon to see her, and on arriving at the house found her dead. He had made a post-mortem examination and had made a special examination with regard to the statement of the brother of the deceased, that her husband had kicked her, but could find no traces of such a kick. Some marks would have been left even if a kick had been given as far back as April last. On examining the heart he found it soft and flabby, and there was a small quantity of serum in the cavity. The stomach was healthy but he found no solid food in it - nothing but liquids - and he could find no traces of poison. The liver was greatly enlarged, which he should think was caused by heavy drinking. He himself knew that the woman took a large quantity of liquor. The bad state of the heart was quite sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 18 September 1880
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Sailor At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at the Sailors' Rest, Vauxhall-street, on the body of FREDERICK LEE, a Swedish seaman, who was found dead in the Sailors' Home that morning. The Coroner, in his opening remarks, detailed the circumstances which led the deceased to take lodgings at the Sailors' Home. He formerly belonged to a ship in the Sound, but was stopped from going on a voyage on account of his health. - John Phillips, purveyor of the Sailors' Home, stated that the deceased came to the Home about four o'clock on the previous afternoon. He gave his name as FREDERICK LEE, and said that he was from the ship Northampton, lying in the Sound, but, being unwell, was discharged from the ship. No one from the ship accompanied him when he came to the Home. He had his tea, and did not go out during the evening. About 8 p.m. the deceased was sitting by himself, and had his head to his side, and witness, noticing that he was unwell, told him that he could go to bed if he liked. He said he would not go to bed just then, but he went about 9.30. Witness went up to the bedroom with him, and he then asked witness to give him a cup of water to wet his lips. This was supplied him, and witness took off his boots and saw him enter the bed. He did not see him until 7.30 that morning, when he had occasion to go to a bed near the deceased to see another sailor. He subsequently went into the deceased's bedroom, whom he discovered lying on the floor by the side of his bed. Witness spoke to him, but receiving no answer, shook him and told him that it was cold lying on the floor. He, however, received no reply, and he soon discovered that the man was dead, being cold and stiff. Witness had searched the deceased's clothes, and found on him 15s. in money, a knife, and two discharges from the merchant navy, one being from the ship Northampton, which ship he had only joined a few days before he was discharged. - Mr John Eccles, M.R.C.S., said he held an appointment as Inspecting Medical Officer of the Board of Trade at Plymouth. He visited yesterday afternoon the ship Northampton, now lying in the Sound. It was part of his duty to examine the crew to see whether or not they were fit to proceed on the voyage. He inspected the deceased, and found that he had disease of the heart, which he should say had been of long standing. He had also bronchitis on both lungs. He reported to the emigration officer that deceased was unfit to proceed on the voyage, and in consequence of that the deceased would receive his discharge. He saw nothing more of the deceased, having left the ship immediately afterwards. He was not surprised, in the least, to hear of LEE'S death. In answer to the Coroner, he said he considered the deceased died from Natural Causes, and that his death was not accelerated by excitement at his being discharged from the ship. The disease from which the deceased suffered was very serious, and quite enough to account for his sudden death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." There being no property found on the deceased, whereby he could be identified as a Swede, the money, &c., was handed over to Mr Cummings, the treasurer of the Sailors' Home. The deceased who has no friends at Plymouth, will have to be buried by the Guardians.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquest last evening at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, on the body of GEORGE TIPPETT, a child of three years old, the only son of MARY TIPPETT, the wife of a sapper in the army. - The mother deposed that she resided at 5 Stoke-road, having come to Plymouth from Aldershot two days previously. She slept on a sofa bed, with her child near her. She awoke at about midnight and attended to the child, who was then in perfect health. She went to sleep shortly afterwards, and upon waking early in the morning discovered that her child was warm, but dead. A neighbour named Cuddiford slept in the same room, and upon witness informing her what had happened she directed her to take it to the doctor, which she did immediately. This evidence being corroborated by Miss Cuddiford, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 September 1880
ILFRACOMBE - An Eccentric Verdict. - An Inquest was held at the Par Hotel, Ilfracombe, yesterday before Mr J. H. Toller, Coroner for the District, touching the death of JOSEPH JOHN FOLEY, who was drowned on the 4th instant off the Parade, while interesting himself in the rescue of a lady and gentleman who had been caught by the tide. Evidence as to how the deceased came by his death was given by P.C. Stentiford and Coastguard Rawley, who were spectators of the accident. Mrs Popham, deceased's landlady, identified the clothing and Mr Lovell testified to finding the body. The Coroner, in summing up, regretted that Mr turner and Miss Kipper, the persons who were in the cave, had left the town, as had they been in the locality he should certainly have called them before him and censured them. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and added as a rider "That they considered that great blame was attached to the two persons who were in the cave at the time for placing themselves in such a perilous position whereby the death of the deceased was caused."

Western Morning News, Monday 27 September 1880
PLYMOUTH - A Pensioner Fatally Burned At Plymouth. - Mr J. Vaughan, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Coronation Inn, Martin-street, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of MARK JACKSON, a naval pensioner aged 82, who was so seriously burnt, early on the morning of the 7th inst., as to cause of his death on Saturday morning. - JOHN GEORGE JACKSON, great-nephew of the deceased, who resides at 68 Union-street, said he went to bed very late on the night of the 6th inst., and after being in bed a very short time, was aroused by a crackling sound as if wood were burning. He ran to his uncle's room, from whence the sound proceeded, and on opening the door found the bed in which his uncle was lying and the table on fire. He called his father, who lifted deceased from the burning bed, and then put out the fire. He was sent to call a doctor; but could not waken anyone at the houses of three medical gentlemen at which he rang, though he remained a quarter of an hour at each. In the meantime flour and oil were applied to his uncle's burns. Deceased appeared not to be injured much. When questioned as to the cause of the occurrence, he said - "I suppose I have been smoking my pipe again." The doctor arrived early in the morning and attended to the deceased until his death. - George Richmond, coachbuilder and landlord of the house No. 68 Union-street, said he was called by the nephew of the deceased about one o'clock on the morning of the 7th inst. He was in the room within five minutes, and found deceased lying on the floor. Witness brought water to put out the fire, and then lifted the old man upon another ed. Everything which could be done for the comfort of the old man was done. Deceased said he had been smoking in bed, and it was his habit to do so, though he had been cautioned against it several times. It seemed that he had attempted to put out the fire before it was discovered, as his right arm was very much burned. He went to see him between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday morning and found him dead. - Mr Lewis Lewis, M.R.C.S., deposed that he was called early on the morning of the 7th to see the deceased, and he found him very much burned, but he could be made comfortable, and not apparently suffering from shock. He was on a clean bed, and there was every mark of care having been taken. His burns, which were serious, were carefully bandaged. He thought deceased must have been asleep at the time of the accident. He was burnt very much about the middle of the body. He told the friends then that deceased might linger on for a little while, but would ultimately die. Death ensued from exhaustion, the natural result of the burns. - The Coroner remarked that the death of the deceased was evidently accidental, but the Jury, after a very long consultation, considered the evidence insufficient, and could not return a verdict of "Accidental Death." There was nothing to prove that deceased was smoking, as no pipe had been found. - The Coroner: But the pipe might have been carried away with the debris. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Burning, the cause of which is Unknown." They exonerated the witnesses from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 September 1880
PETER TAVY - Suicide At Petertavy. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon touching the death of WILLIAM JACKSON, tailor, of Petertavy, who last Friday night committed suicide by hanging himself in a turf house on Reddiford Farm, occupied by Mr Palmer. Mr Bowhay was elected Foreman of the Jury. - Mr Palmer's son said he had occasion to go to the turf house for turf early on Saturday morning when he saw deceased hanging from a beam, his feet touching the ground. He was quite dead. - Mr Palmer said he had known deceased some time, and of late he thought he had been in a rather desponding state of mind. - Mr Maunder also said he had noticed that of late deceased was in a lower state of mind. He believed it was his gun which had troubled him. He had been in the habit of carrying one for many years, and now he was unable to buy a licence, and being afraid of the consequences, the matter had preyed on his mind. - The Coroner briefly summed up the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of An Old Woman At Plymouth. - Mr J. Vaughan, Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening, at Plymouth Guildhall, touching the death of MARY MICKS, an old woman, aged about 74, who was in receipt of parish pay. - Sarah Thompson, wife of a pensioner, who with the deceased resided in Nicholl's-court, said she last saw MRS MICKS on Sunday evening at half-past eight. Next morning she went to her room as was her custom, and on opening the door found the deceased hanging by some stout cord to a nail which was just over the lintel. She at once informed the neighbours what had occurred, and one of them, George Snowdon, a retired farmer, cut the deceased down. Mr Prynne, surgeon, was sent for, and he examined the body and said he thought deceased had been dead a considerable time. - Mr Snowdon said that when he cut the body down it was rather warm. He thought deceased, in order to commit the act, had jumped from a chair. - It appeared that MRS MICKS had been depressed lately, and the Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Friday 1 October 1880
TORQUAY - The Dangers Of Shooting Galleries. Fatal Accident At Dartmouth. - Dr Henry S. Gaye, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon held an adjourned Inquest at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, on the body of HARRY FORSEY, aged 17 years, a labourer of Taunton, who received a fatal wound at a shooting saloon at Dartmouth on the first day of the regatta (August 26th). - JOHN FORSEY, father of the deceased, said, on the first day of the Inquest that his son left home towards the end of August and witness never saw him until he was in the Hospital, on the 28th of August. When witness saw deceased, he saw him at the Hospital in company with the proprietor of the shooting gallery - a man named Gilbey - in which deceased had been engaged. Deceased told witness, in Gilbey's presence, that he had been shot in the back with a rifle by Gilbey; but deceased told Gilbey that he did not think that he (Gilbey) had done it on purpose. At the time deceased was shot he was putting up a bottle to be shot at. Deceased said that Gilbey had behaved well to him. Did not think there had been anything like foul play. - Mr G. Hamilton-Cumming, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said deceased was brought into the Hospital on the 28th of August, suffering from a gunshot wound, and he died from the effects of the wound on the 21st of September last. As far as witness could hear, there was nothing to intimate foul play. Deceased had pleurisy on both sides as the effect of the wound. - The Inquest was adjourned for the production of the man Gilbey, who, P.S. Ockford stated, was in the neighbourhood of Taunton. - Mr Hamilton-Cumming yesterday added to his previous evidence that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and had found that the bullet, after entering the body between the fifth and sixth rib, had passed downward through the diaphragm and lodged deeply in the liver. Pleurisy had followed the other effects of the wound previous to death. Deceased was a healthy and powerfully made man. - Robert Wills Soper, surgeon, practising at Dartmouth, said that on the 26th of August last, the first day of the Dartmouth Regatta, deceased was brought to him in the evening by the proprietor of a shooting gallery. Deceased was apparently in great agony. When asked what was the matter, the proprietor said that deceased had been shot accidentally by a rifle which was lying on a table at the shooting gallery. Witness examined and treated the wound until the evening of the following day when, suspecting that the walls of the chest had been pierced, he recommended that deceased be at once removed to the Torbay Hospital, which was done on the morning of the 28th of August. - By a Juror: did not have any conversation with Gilbey besides what he had mentioned, but Gilbey was very frightened, as witness told him that the case was a very serious one. - Edward Gilbey, the proprietor of the shooting gallery, described himself as an itinerant photographer, and stated that he was a native of London. Knew the deceased, but did not see or know him before August last, when he met deceased at Taunton flower show and engaged him as an assistant. Witness was also the proprietor of a lifting machine. On the 26th of last month they were at Dartmouth, and in the evening deceased was putting up some globes and pipes when the rifle (produced), which had a hair trigger, was accidentally laid down loaded and went off. The rifle had since been repaired, and now had a seven pound pull. No one was loading guns at the time. It was not customary to keep the rifles loaded when no one was firing, but at this time two rifles out of the five were loaded. The rifles were loaded with ball cartridge No. 1. Witness, whilst soliciting custom, heard the report of a rifle, and on looking round saw deceased stagger. The rifle had been laid down by witness about three seconds before it went off. Had been with a shooting gallery for six months, and had had but one accidental discharge of a rifle besides the one in question, and that was with the same rifle on the same evening. The second accidental discharged occurred whilst one of the boys was laying it down, about an hour after deceased was shot. The boy took out the rifle after witness had put it away. On finding that deceased was shot witness at once took him to the surgeon. Witness visited deceased in the Hospital in company with deceased's father, when deceased said to witness "You know you shot me, but I don't believe you did it on purpose." Witness and deceased had never had a cross word, and at the time of the accidental discharge both of them were sober. - By a Juror: Had loaded the rifle and forgotten that it was loaded when laying it down. Admitted that hair triggers were dangerous to use, and that the rifle was full-cocked. - JOHN FORSEY said that he forgot to say when giving his evidence that Gilbey made deceased walk from the Torquay Station to the Hospital. - Gilbey said that he did all he could to get assistance, but there was only one vehicle at the station, and that was full. Witness carried deceased most of the way to the Hospital, stopping to rest every few yards. - The Coroner stated that the object which they had in adjourning the Inquest had been obtained to a great extent by the evidence which Edward Gilbey had voluntarily given them. The rifle by which deceased as shot was one of those fitted with a hair trigger, and was likely to go off with the slightest vibration. There was seldom a miss-fire with one of these rifles. It was possible that in putting the rifle down the jar caused it to go off. Gilbey had apparently behaved very well to the deceased lad and also to deceased's father. The lodging of a bullet in the liver was most likely to prove mortal, and in this case it had done so. The question for the Jury to decide was whether the deceased was intentionally shot or whether the wound was the result of an accident. - The Jury, after consulting for a quarter of an hour, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding as a rider the request that "the attention of the police and authorities be called to the construction of these galleries and to the dangerous character of the rifles used in them." One of the Jurors pointed out that as the galleries such as Gilbey used, were made simply of canvas, there was great danger of a careless or intoxicated person shooting through the canvas and injuring persons outside. - The Coroner was requested to forward a copy of the rider to the chief constable for the county, which he promised he would do. - The shooting of FORSEY is the second fatal accident which took place at Dartmouth in the course of the last regatta there. On one evening a woman fell from a merry-go-round on the Newground, and received injuries which resulted in death.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 October 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Two Inquests concerning the deaths of infants were held at Devonport yesterday, before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner. In the case of the infant son of EMILY BLOCK BURGE, Newpassage, the Jury returned a verdict that "Death ensued from Suffocation which was caused in a purely accidental manner" in bed.
In the second case, that of the infant daughter of EDWARD GEORGE STEED, landlord of the Royal Exchange, Pembroke-street, the evidence was to the effect that the child died from Congestion of the Lungs.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 October 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Painful Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening on the body of WM. THOMAS BROOKS, aged 39 years, a painter, carrying on business in Albert-road, Morice Town, who committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself in his workshop. The evidence of THOMAS WM. BROOKS, a cousin of the deceased, and of Mr F. Chudleigh, a smith, living in Albert-road, was to the effect that for some time the deceased had been depressed in spirits and had frequently complained of pains in the back of the head and in the side. Yesterday morning, about seven o'clock, the witness BROOKS who was apprenticed to his cousin, went to the workshop in Albert-road, and found the deceased lying amongst the paint pots in an unconscious state. Thinking he had been taken ill, the witness went for Mr J. May, jun., who came at once and pronounced life extinct. - Mr Chudleigh, who lives near the workshop of the deceased, noticing something unusual in the shop went there, and saw the deceased before the arrival of Mr May. He found him lying "in a heap" amongst the paint pots and upon examining him came to the conclusion that life was extinct. After the departure of Mr May he assisted in removing the body, and whilst doing so found a cord tied in a loop and drawn tightly round the neck of the deceased. The heavy beard worn by the deceased had previously concealed the cord from view, and it was not until that moment he suspected death had resulted from suicide. The end of the rope appeared to have been broken, and on looking overhead he found a piece of cord, corresponding with that around the neck of the deceased, tied three times round a beam in the roof of the shop. A bucket was a little distance off, and the witness concluded that the deceased had at first stood on this and that the weight of his body had afterwards broken the cord. - MR LOUIS JOHN BROOKS, brother of the deceased, stated that his brother left his home as usual at six o'clock in the morning to go to the shop in order to prepare for the workmen. Press of work had been worrying him very much, and this, combined with the pains in the head from which he had recently suffered, had caused him to become very much depressed. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 11 October 1880
EXETER - Supposed Suicide. - Mr Burrows, the Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, on the body of GEORGE WEST, aged 26, formerly a porter in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company. The evidence adduced was to the effect that, on the previous day, as a man named Bolt was passing along the Canal banks, he discovered, near the water, a hat with a piece of paper attached to it. On the paper was written the words, "MR G. WEST, 2 Prince's Cottages, Bonhay-road, Exeter." Witness called at the address mentioned and ascertained that a man named WEST had resided there. The landlady told witness that the deceased had not been home for the night. The body was subsequently discovered in the water near where the hat was found. Witnesses were called to show that WEST was not of unsound mind, but a letter referring to his father's death was found in his pocket. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 October 1880
NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at the Newton Townhall yesterday by the County Coroner, Dr Gaye, touching the death of a little boy, about three years of age, son of a fitter at the railway works named TRUSCOTT. It appeared that the little child was missed from his home: at Knowle's cottage, adjoining which the river Lemon runs, and some hours afterwards his body was found in the Teign by bargemen. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 October 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident To A Gunner At Devonport. - Mr A. Gard, solicitor, acting for Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, who was prevented from attending through indisposition, held an Inquest yesterday at the Military Hospital, Stoke, into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS PENFOULD, gunner, 19th battery, 11th brigade, R.A. - Captain A. Browne, R.A., watched the proceedings on behalf of the military authorities. - Richard Bennett, acting bombardier, 11th Brigade, R.A., identified the body of the deceased. Witness was with the deceased at drill at Mount Wise on Tuesday afternoon, when deceased met his death. - John Hugh, gunner, 11th brigade, R.A., said he and the deceased were portion of a squad working at gun drill. The deceased was No. 7 at the windlass; his duty was to pass a handspike through the windlass to witness. It was witness's duty to assist in raising the cheeks or two posts of the gyn. Each cheek was as much as two could possibly carry. When witness and deceased had got their handspikes underneath the gyn the sergeant in charge gave the order for it to be lifted to the right. Just as they were moving it the deceased told witness to look out, and dropped the end of his handspike. Witness did the same, and sprang from underneath the gyn. He then turned around and saw the deceased on the ground and the gyn on him. Witness had had experience in gyn practice. The gyn was in every respects as it should be. It was properly fixed. He attributed the accident to the upright pole being too close into the cheeks before the order was given to move the gyn to the right. It was Sergeant Tooth's duty to see that the gyn was in order. It was possible for Sergeant tooth to think it was safe although it was unsafe. Tooth was watching the movement at the time. Previous to the accident they had to carry the gyn around, and no accident occurred, and they were in the act of carrying it around again, to put it where they took it from, when the accident occurred. It was generally a portion of their drill to move the gyn. The gyn, which was something similar to a tripod, and had three legs to it, was used for lifting guns. - By a Juror: When witness let go his handspike he saw the gyn falling, and the deceased saw it as well. There was no weight being lifted or carried by the gyn at the time. - Ernest Tooth, sergeant, 19th battery, 11th Brigade, R.A., who was in charge of the detachment drilling at the Mount Wise drill shed, said he saw the gyn before it was fixed. He fixed and raised it himself. It was in proper condition. When he gave the order for the gyn to be lifted to the right he was standing about ten or twelve feet from the working party. When it was fixed it was his duty to see that it was properly done and the gyn was in order. He took every precaution that was laid down in their drill. The gyn had to be first fixed on the ground, and could not be raised until it was properly put together at the head. Before he gave the order for it to be moved he saw that all the men were in their places. he had previously asked the men if they knew the best way to carry the gyn, and Gunner Taylor answered, "More upright the better." He adopted that course, as it was the proper course, and lighter for the men to carry. They could, of course, carry it too upright, and if he saw them doing so it was his duty to tell them. He watched the movement carefully, and saw that the gyn was going wrong, as the pry-pole was going in too close to the cheeks, and he immediately gave the word "Halt." After he had given the order he saw that the cheek numbers - meaning the men at the cheeks - had dropped their spikes, but that the pry-pole numbers were late in dropping theirs. He shouted to them to stand clear, and the deceased, instead of running at the side the same as the others, ran the same way as the gyn was falling. The gyn was some seconds falling and witness shouted to the deceased, and said, "PENFOULD, come out of that;" but he appeared in a "maze," and the gyn struck him on the top of the head, and fell on him, crushing his head in a frightful manner. He died in a few minutes. The accident was caused through the pry-pole being held too close to the cheeks, and on account of the pry-pole numbers being slow in dropping their spikes. The witness Bennett, recalled, said it was part of his duty to see that the gyn was in order. When it was fixed he looked at it and keyed it up tight. He had had very little experience in gyn practice. The Coroner briefly summed up the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all parties from blame. A military court of Inquiry was held yesterday which lasted four hours, At the close, the sergeant in command of the party who had been put under arrest immediately after the accident was still retained, under arrest.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday as to the death of ROSINA WHITE, aged 62. The deceased, who had suffered from two seizures, had not been in her right mind for some time and would get into the street when only partly dressed. On Saturday she was going down High-street, but reeled very much and suddenly fell in front of a cart, which went over her and she died from the injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and, with the friends of the deceased, exonerated the driver of the cart from blame.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 October 1880
NORTH TAWTON - An Inquest has been held at Northtawton touching the death of HENRY MORRIS. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Powlesland, of Ettan Farm, and while driving a pair of horses jumped on the shaft of the waggon, but on turning a corner immediately afterwards was thrown off, and the wagon went over him. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 October 1880
PLYMOUTH - Death From Lock-Jaw At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening, before Mr T. C. Brian, on the body of JOHN TREMEER, aged about 37. The deceased, who was a drayman in the employ of Messrs. Derry and co., was delivering beer from a trolley at Mr Griffin's, in Tracey-street, on Wednesday week. He was in the act of shifting a cask to get at another when he slipped and fell over the trolley, and the cask with him. The latter fell on one of his hands, the fingers of which were smashed. Wm. Stoneman, a labourer, in the same employ, stated that the deceased was quite sober at the time. The injury was attended to by Dr A. H. Bampton, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Mr Bampton ordered the deceased to attend at the Hospital every morning, and no serious effects were noticed until Wednesday last, when the deceased complained of a stiffness in the jaw. He was then detained in the Hospital and treated for tetanus, from the effects of which, however, he died on Friday morning. Dr Bampton attributed the lockjaw to the injury to the hand. The nerves of the deceased were injured to such an extent that the result could not be averted. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

IPPLEPEN - Fatal Railway Accident Near Totnes. - On Saturday evening Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Wellington Inn, Ipplepen, on the body of FREDERICK HILL, a carpenter, aged 42. On Friday afternoon HILL had been to Torquay, and left that town by train, arriving at Kingskerswell a few minutes after eight o'clock. From thence he started to walk home to Ipplepen, a distance of about three miles, it being noticed at the time he started that he was not sober. Nothing more was heard about the deceased until between twelve and one o'clock the next morning, when the fireman of a goods train which had arrived at Newton station from Plymouth reported having seen the body of a man lying on the bank adjoining the railway at Dainton Bridge, near Dainton Tunnel, in the direction of Totnes. The driver of the next goods train to Totnes was directed to stop at the spot, which he did, and there found the body of the deceased frightfully mutilated. It is conjectured that the deceased was struck by the up mail train which passes just before nine o'clock at a very swift rate, and blood and human hair were found on one of the vans of the train. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and gave their fees to the widow, who is left with four children.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 20 October 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Raglan Barracks. - An Inquest touching the death of JOHN SMITH, private of the 13th Regiment, who died suddenly on Sunday morning in the Raglan Barracks, was held at the Military Hospital, Devonport, yesterday by Mr Albert Gard, Deputy Coroner. From the evidence it appeared that about nine o'clock on Sunday morning, the deceased was in his barrack-room preparing to go on parade, when he suddenly fell down dead. Surgeon-Major Hodgson made a post-mortem examination of the body, and was of opinion that the deceased died from a rupture of the aorta, ne of the vessels connected with the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Painfully Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr Albert Gard, solicitor and Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the King's Arms Hotel, George-street, Devonport, yesterday, on the body of FREDERICK J. DAVEY, 37, seaman belonging to the Indus, and who died suddenly at his home, 2 Mount-street, Devonport, on Monday morning. ELIZABETH JANE DAVEY, wife of the deceased, said she went upstairs, leaving her husband downstairs at his breakfast. Attracted by the cries of her little girl, she rushed into the kitchen, and found the deceased speechless. Dr Rowe was sent for, and arrived at the house in about three minutes. - Dr Rowe said he saw the deceased stretched on the floor, quite dead. Witness made a post-mortem examination. He found that a blood vessel had formed itself into an aneurism, and the blood vessel, instead of bursting externally, as was usually the case, broke internally, and the blood flowing into the bag of the heart, stopped its action immediately. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Inquest In Plymouth. - Last evening Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Inn, Stillman-street, Plymouth, on the illegitimate child of MARINA NICHOLSON, a domestic servant, in the employ of Mrs Rickard, of the New Inn. Mrs Rickard, who manages the inn for her brother, said that MARINA NICHOLSON was the only servant in the house, and had been there about four months. Witness was not aware down to Monday that NICHOLSON was pregnant. About half-past six yesterday morning she called NICHOLSON at the usual time, but as she did not come down she again called her. NICHOLSON then answered that she would be down in a few minutes. As the servant, however, failed to come downstairs, she again shouted to her. NICHOLSON then replied that she was ill and had been confined, but that the child was dead. Witness sent for Dr Prynne, who arrived soon after. Dr Prynne stated that when he reached the New Inn, he found the child on the floor. It was quite dead. He had made a post-mortem examination, and was of opinion that the child had not reached maturity. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the "Child was Born Dead, birth having been Premature."

Western Morning News, Friday 22 October 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, last evening at the Clifton Hotel, Clifton-street, concerning the death of WM. EDWARDS, first-class petty officer of H.M.S. Cambridge, who has been living with his wife at 15 Clifton-street, on leave. After dinner on Saturday he was taken very ill, and Mr Eyeley, surgeon was sent for. He prescribed some medicine; but the deceased afterwards became worse, and the medical man was again sent for, but before he could arrive death had taken place. A post-mortem examination revealed that both lungs were greatly congested and the heart was in a very weak state. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 October 1880
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At The Plymouth Gasworks. - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest yesterday at Bloye's Eagle Tavern, Coxside, relative to the death of WILLIAM ELLIOTT, aged 58, a blacksmith in the employ of the Plymouth Gas Company, who was killed by falling from what is termed a scrubber to the ground, a height of 37 feet, on Tuesday afternoon. - EDWIN GEORGE ELLIOTT, son of deceased, identified the body, and said that he had never heard his father complain of giddiness in the head. He was always sober. - John Holman, a labourer in the employ of the Plymouth Gas Company, said that on Tuesday he was ordered to clean out one of the three scrubbers. About four p.m. he was on the top of one of them with deceased, leaning over the manhole unscrewing a pipe. Deceased, who was there to assist him, was about three feet from him. He (witness) was unscrewing the spill which deceased was holding, when he felt it become unsteady. He looked up and saw deceased tumbling back. He made a spring at him, but only succeeded in just touching the bottom of his trousers. He had known deceased three years, and during that time had never heard him complain of giddiness in the head. Immediately after deceased fell over he descended and found him quite dead. - John Thomas Browning, engineer and manager of the Plymouth Gas Works, stated that he gave orders that the distributing apparatus should be cleaned out. He did not order deceased to do so, but he was sure that he was quite competent to do the work if he were ordered. Deceased could not have inhaled any effluvia, for Holman had his head over the manhole, and if any gas were escaping it would have killed him. It was very seldom that the scrubbers were cleaned out. Deceased had been in the employ of the company about three weeks. When witness heard of the accident he sent for Mr Greenway, surgeon, who pronounced life extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that railings should be put on the top of the scrubbers in order to avoid an accident of a similar kind.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 28 October 1880
PLYMOUTH - Fatality At Sea. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Enquiry at the Sutton Harbour Hotel last evening, relative to the death of THOMAS HOWARD, aged 34 years. George Nicholas Manning, master mariner, of the schooner Plymouth, of Plymouth, stated that the deceased was an A.B. on board the same vessel. On Friday, the 22nd inst., about 9.30 [portion missing] her to turn to the southward. The main boom shifted from the port to the starboard side. Witness was struck severely by the main sheet. The leading bolt of the main sheet parted, and the block came away towards the boom, striking the deceased in the head. The deceased then fell on the deck, and, in the opinion of witness, died instantaneously. On removing deceased to the forecastle it was found that his head was bleeding profusely. Witness made for Plymouth, arriving late on Monday night, landing the deceased on the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 October 1880
The Fatality At Battten Break-Water. A Defective Light. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Castle Inn, Batten, into the death of THOS. MITCHELL, captain of the brig John May, which went ashore on the new Batten Breakwater during the gale on Wednesday night. The first witness called was FREDERICK MITCHELL, brother of the deceased, who stated that he resided at Southwick, near Shoreham. His brother had been master of the John May for thirteen months, He identified the body of the deceased as that of his brother, who was 24 years of age. - David Howard, mate of the John May, said on Wednesday night they were moored in Plymouth Sound with both the anchors down. Early on Thursday morning through the violence of the weather, they parted from their cables. they immediately put up their sails, but about twenty minutes after five o'clock they struck on some rocks, and a few minutes afterwards were driven against the new breakwater. The distance from the brig to the breakwater was about two widths of the vessel. A line was thrown from the vessel to the breakwater where it was fastened by someone. The deceased wound the rope around his wrist and attempted to jump from the ship's sail to the breakwater and failed. He saw the captain hang on to the breakwater about five minutes and then fall off. - Samuel Richards, coastguardsman of the Batten Coast-guard Station, said he was on watch with another coastguardsman, named Willis, and on seeing the brig go aground he ran off for assistance, and a few minutes after came back with the chief officer of the Bovisand station (Mr Hoskins) and brought lines and life-buoys, but the captain had fallen over. Witness found the body at one p.m. on the same day, about fifty yards to the southward of the wreck. He did not think deceased was drowned, but was killed by being dashed by the waves against the breakwater. he might, however, have been stunned at first and then drowned. - Richard Willis, another coastguardsman station at Mount Batten, said he was stationed on Thursday morning at the new breakwater. A line was thrown to the breakwater for him to secure. He secured the line to a large ringbolt which was fastened in the breakwater, and someone then sang out asking if the line was secure, and he replied, "Yes." A few minutes afterwards he saw two men in the gunwhale by the main rigging, one of them was holding a flare. He afterwards saw the captain, who was about ten yards from the breakwater, take the bite of the line which was fastened to the breakwater, and wind it around his right wrist. The deceased then made a jump from the rail of the vessel for the breakwater, and dropped about five feet below the top of the breakwater. He struggled very hard, and witness, who had hold of the rope, tried to haul him up, and in doing so was nearly washed off the breakwater by the very high seas which were breaking over with great force. The line was not broken and he never let it slip in any way. The deceased might have become exhausted and let go his handfast, or else he would have come on the breakwater all right. The deceased held on to the top of the breakwater for about five minutes and said to witness once, "Hold on, officer, and then fell below." The chief officer and men arrived a minute or two afterwards, and they threw out lifebuoys, but nothing more was seen of the deceased. One of the Jurors asked that the mate might be recalled. This was done, and in answer to a question, the mate said they took the breakwater light for the light of a ship riding at anchor,. The Juror said his reason for asking was that he himself had been out in the Sound very late at night and he knew that at a distance there was very little difference between the breakwater light and the light of a vessel riding at anchor. People who did not know would thus go right in the breakwater, and he thought it would be better to have a red light. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought great praise was due to the coastguard authorities for the manner in which they acted. If the Jury thought a light of greater brilliancy or of another colour ought to be placed on the Breakwater, he should be happy to communicate with the Cattewater Harbour Commissioners. The Jury after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Drowning," and requested the Coroner to write to the Cattewater Harbour Commissioners on the subject of the light.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 November 1880
WOODBURY - The Suspected Murder Near Exeter. - An Inquest was held by Mr S. M. Cox, at Woodbury Road, on Saturday, on the body of the young woman, MARY ANN HARRISON, which was found on the beach of the estuary of the Exe, on Thursday last near the railway station, under circumstances which led to a suspicion of foul play. The body was identified by ELIZABETH HARRISON, mother of the deceased, a charwoman living in Mary Arches-street, who stated that she last saw her alive on Saturday, the 9th instant, when she left her home, as the witness supposed, to take a walk, but she said nothing as to where she was going. Deceased was between 18 and 19 years of age. She has never threatened to commit suicide. MRS ELLEN HARVEY, a sister of the deceased, stated that she saw her at eleven o'clock on the same night at the Oat Sheaf Inn, Fore-street, when she was in the company of a woman named Stapleton and three Norwegian sailors. The two women had been fighting. Deceased, who was crying, said she was going to spend the night with one of the sailors, and asked witness to tell her mother she should not be home again until Sunday morning. Nothing had been seen of her since. - Betsy Stapleton, a laundress, stated that the deceased was at the Oat Sheaf Inn on the Saturday night in company with a woman named Hall and a soldier. HARRISON, who was the worse for drink, wanted witness to fight, but she refused, though she afterwards did fight with the woman Hall. Witness left the house, but returned shortly afterwards with a woman named Lorey, and three Norwegian sailors. The soldier who had been drinking with deceased had left, and one of the sailors sat down with her, and treated her to drink. At eleven o'clock deceased and the sailor went up the street. On the following Monday witness and the deceased's mother went to the Norwegian ship, which was then lying at Exeter Quay, and questioned the sailor in whose company deceased had left the public-house. He denied having slept with her, and said he did not know where she went after he left her. - Mr H. W. Turnwall, surgeon, of Woodbury, described the condition of the body as revealed by a post-mortem examination. The only mark of violence was a slight jagged wound on the scalp, but this he was decidedly of opinion was caused after death, and that the woman met her death by drowning. It was probable the wound in the head was produced by the body striking against some object while floating in the river. The body had evidently been in the water several days. There being no further evidence, the Coroner advised the Jury that they could only return a verdict of "Found Drowned," leaving it to the police to follow up any clue that might be found as to the immediate cause of the poor woman's death. A verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Chloroform At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, on Saturday afternoon on the body of ANNIE PELLOW, aged 18 years, who died in the Hospital from the effects of chloroform. The deceased had been an inmate of the lock-ward for a short time, and it is stated that for the purpose of undergoing an operation. Chloroform was administered in the presence of Dr Archer, the visiting surgeon, and Mr Cant, the house-surgeon. The effect of the drug was too powerful, and notwithstanding that a galvanic battery was applied, consciousness could not be restored and the girl died. In consequence of the accidental omission of the ordinary intimation from the police that an Inquest was to be held, the investigation on Saturday was not attended by any representative of the press. The Coroner was, however, subsequently applied to for permission to see the depositions, but he declined to permit it. It is understood that the Jury desired to obtain medical testimony independent of that of Dr Archer and Mr Cant, and for this purpose the Inquiry was adjourned until tomorrow. In the meantime a post-mortem examination of the body is to be made.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 November 1880
TIVERTON - At Tiverton yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of ROBERT PAGE of Burlescombe, who died from injuries received in an accident at the railway station on the previous Tuesday. His foot was cut off by a passing train, and his leg was afterwards amputated in the Infirmary, where he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth. - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, Plymouth, concerning the death of WILLIAM HENRY SKINNER, who resided at 55 Notte-street. - FANNY LUCY SKINNER, wife of the deceased, said her husband was 35 years of age, and that he was formerly employed at Mr Scott's brewery, from which he was dismissed a fortnight since. This appeared to have preyed upon his mind a great deal. On Monday night, as she found that he had been drinking, she was afraid to stay at home, and she went to her sister's house, where she slept that night. On Tuesday night she slept there also, and early on Wednesday morning she was sent for. She went home and found her husband in bed very ill, and he continued so until Sunday morning when he died. - Margaret Widger, who resided in the same house, said on Tuesday night the deceased, who had been drinking, came home about a few minutes after eleven. She afterwards heard him pacing to and fro; he stopped for some time, and shortly afterwards she heard him fall. The deceased commenced to groan and called out to her saying he was dying. She called Mr hare, the landlord of the house, who went upstairs with her, and they met the deceased on the landing, and he asked for some water. Her husband inquired of him what he had done, and he replied that he had taken some tartaric acid. Mr Morris, surgeon, was fetched. The circumstances of having been discharged from his situation, witness added, appeared to have preyed greatly upon his mind. - Mr Edwin Morris, M.R.C.S., said he found the deceased lying on a bed suffering excruciating pain. A glass containing a white substance partly power, was shewn to him, and there was a fluid at the bottom of the tumbler which smelt like beer. A bag containing about 1 lb. 2 oz. of matter, which he afterwards found to be tartaric acid, was also handed to him. The deceased admitted to him that what he drank from the tumbler was taken from the paper bag, and from what he told witness he thought that the deceased took about half an ounce of the acid. In his opinion death was caused by the violent shock to the stomach caused by the acid. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 November 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death From Chloroform At Devonport. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ANNIE PELLOW, aged 18 years, who died in the Royal Albert Hospital whilst undergoing an operation under chloroform, was reopened yesterday morning at the Townhall, before the Coroner, Mr Vaughan. Mr G. H. E. Rundle watched the proceedings on behalf of the friends of the deceased, and there was also present Mr E. St. Aubyn, chairman of the Hospital Committee; Capt. Edye, R.N.,; Mr J. Bourne, the Treasurer, and Mr C. A. Shapcote, the Secretary to the Hospital; Dr Archer, the visiting surgeon; Mr W. E. Cant, the resident medical officer; and Mr C. Bulteel, surgeon, and Mr W. Gard, junior surgeon to the Hospital. Inspector Anniss, of the Metropolitan Police, as well as an agent of the Anti-C.D. Acts Association, were also present. - The Coroner opened the proceedings by referring to the circumstances which attended the Inquiry on Saturday last. It was through no fault of his, he said, that the police did not give to the Press an intimation of the holding of the Inquiry. It had passed from his hands into the hands of the authorities to whom he gave his warrant, and he believed that as a rule every information was afforded the Press. He could not account why in this instance it was omitted. He knew nothing of the cause, but when a gentleman came the Sabbath-day and when he (the Coroner) was ill, and when a case was sub judice, he could only say that he could not give the information. He did not think it right that the evidence should be published without the Press having an opportunity of seeing the demeanour of the witnesses and of hearing all that was said, otherwise they would naturally only get half a statement. He always desired the greatest publicity, and was ready whenever possible to give information, but he was ill at the time. - Dr Row then gave evidence as to the result of his post-mortem examination of the body. He stated that the examination was made in the presence of Mr C. Bulteel, Mr Delarne, Dr Archer, and Mr Cant. The general appearance of the body was that of a well formed young woman. The only noticeable external appearances were the indications which were represented by one part of the body as having suggested the necessity of a painful operation, and there were evidences in the body that something was required to be done justifying the operation. On making an examination of the internal organs the aspect was that of a generally healthy character. None of the organs were diseased. The lungs were, with the slightest possible qualification, free from disease, and there was an absence of that amount of engorgement which marked suffocation. The heart was not diseased, but was in itself pretur-naturally small - a very small heart, taking into consideration the size of the body, and so small that they were disposed to verify their senses by weighing it, when they found it was considerably below the average weight of the heart of a person in the condition in which the deceased was. It weighed only about seven ounces, whereas the average would be one or two ounces over that. Another peculiarity of the condition of the heart was that it contained no blood. Those facts enabled him to form a distinct conclusion - that the woman was not suffocated by chloroform or by the abstraction of atmospheric air, as might have been done when chloroform was administered, but that the heart's action had been arrested by the direct action of the chloroform through the medium of the nervous system. The action of chloroform was intended to arrest muscular capability or power; ordinarily it arrested simply the action of the voluntary muscles. But in this instance the effect was to arrest the action of the heart, and a fatal result was a necessary consequence. - The Coroner: If the heart had been of the ordinary size this would not have happened? - Dr Row: As far as one can judge, I should say it would not. It was not a favourable heart for the administration of chloroform, but I am not aware that was a circumstance which could have been detected during life. - The Coroner: What is the average number of deaths from chloroform? - Dr Row: I do not know the number of deaths in proportion to the number of cases in which chloroform is used. I suppose there are no statistics nor any possibility of ascertaining correctly. I am not aware of any reliable statistics, but deaths from this cause are of comparatively frequent occurrence. I may state that I have seen the amount of chloroform used and the apparatus for its administration, and I have nothing to say of a reproachful character concerning it, but rather on the contrary. And I may just mention that I am as independent of any interest in the class of patients dealt with in that particular part of the Hospital as any person living in London or elsewhere. - A Juror asked whether the heart would not have been found larger if the examination had been made immediately after death? - Dr Row emphatically replied in the negative. - Another Juror asked if it was not a general rule to examine patients by means of the stethoscope before putting them under the influence of chloroform? - Dr Row said as a general rule that was the plan adopted but he was not aware that the speciality in the formation of the heart could have been detected. - The Coroner: You do not believe it could? - Dr Row: Well, I have no evidence to guide me. But I must say I think the number of fatal cases arising from the use of chloroform is increasing so much that before long it will become a necessity with every chloroform administration that the apparatus and arrangements for the administration of the drug should contain as a part of themselves a galvanic battery. The battery should never be out of hand. It is not so now anywhere, but really in the interests of the public I do hope prominence will be given to the fact that chloroform ought never to be disassociated from a galvanic battery at once to resuscitate under circumstances like these. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr W. Murch) asked what effect chloroform had on the system generally. They now had it in evidence that the whole of the organs of the deceased woman were in a healthy state, and the Jury were consequently led to believe that the entire system, brain, heart, and every other organ was influenced by the use of chloroform. - Dr Row replied that it was a very broad question to answer, and he could not answer it according to his experience, because the death of the woman was a solitary instance in this neighbourhood and therefore none of them had had any experience of such cases. He could imagine a person receiving chloroform administered in such quantities that, irrespective of whether the heart and muscles and other parts of the body wee influenced by it or not, death would really result from suffocation. But according to his ideas in this case it was impossible that that could have been the cause of death, because there was not a single indication of suffocation. He had seen the quantity and the mode of dropping it, and there was nothing exceptional in the quantity or the manner. It was a moderate quantity. Then came the question could death ensue without leaving a trace? To his mind they had traces enough in the condition of the heart, and to him the traces were most extraordinarily marked as to how the chloroform acted. The heart, being an involuntary muscle, was beating until the chloroform touched it, and, it being so small as to be incapable of resisting the action of the drug, it ceased to beat, the last drop of blood was quickly pressed out, and death resulted. - At the request of Mr Rundle, the Coroner then read the evidence of Dr Archer and Mr Cant taken before the Jury on Saturday last. - Archibald Leslie Archer, surgeon, of Stoke, stated: I was requested by Mr Cant, the house surgeon, on Thursday last to administer chloroform to the deceased whilst he performed an operation. The patient was not a stranger to me, as I had administered chloroform to her about six weeks previously for a similar purpose. On that occasion nothing particular occurred. She took the chloroform well and readily recovered. On the last occasion I administered it in the usual way. The girl took it calmly and tranquilly for about three-quarters of a minute, when I noticed a faulty respiration with some lividity about the lips. I immediately removed the inhaler, and drew forward her tongue to relieve the respiration. This failed and finding she had little or no pulse I called Mr Cant's attention to the case. We immediately commenced artificial respiration, and finding that the heart's action was not perceptible, the poles of a galvanic battery were applied in order to rouse the heart's action. This and other ordinary means were resorted to for three-quarters of an hour without avail. She was dead. Death was evidently caused by the cessation of the heart's action. She died almost immediately after I threw down the inhaler. - Mr Edmund Cant, the house surgeon, stated: ANNIE PELLEW was admitted on July 12th last to the Hospital. She suffered from syphilitic excrescences. She underwent an operation for them under chloroform soon after her admission. The excrescences were all removed but grew again. She was operated for them a second time again under chloroform. On both occasions the drug was administered by Dr Archer. On the present occasion whilst I got the instruments ready, Dr Archer proceeded to administer chloroform. I do not think he had been administering more than a minute before he called my attention to her. For a grown up person the administration took a very short time in this case. When I went to her she was livid in the face, and was drawing her breath fairly. I found she had no pulse, and I could feel no heart's action. We got the galvanic battery at once and applied it to the heart, and took other means as well. Her pulse did not return, and her breathing got slower. Then we commenced artificial respiration. The pulse did not return, and her breathing gradually ceased. We went on with the galvanic battery and with artificial respiration for a long time, but she made no attempt to rally at all. Sudden cessation of the heart's action was the cause of death. She was 18 years of age, in good health as far as could be seen, and always during the three months whilst under my care appeared well. Nothing in the Hospital had deteriorated her health, an she was not bodily ill. - Dr Row intimated that the evidence quite corresponded with his opinions. The cause was clear, the post-mortem having revealed the cause in a very emphatic manner. - The Foreman asked whether the administration of chloroform was not very dangerous. If it were, then he thought the public should know that it was not to be played with, that it was not to be accepted immediately to relieve pain, but must be very seriously considered before it was used. - Dr Row said he had always thought so. - The Foreman: From your evidence it would appear that chloroform would be unsafe to administer to anyone. - Dr Row: Without a galvanic battery; I have said that before. - The Foreman: Then do you imagine that there was an overdose of chloroform? There must have been something that had an immediate effect upon the heart. - Dr Row said he should be sorry to create an impression in the mind of anybody that it was immaterial whether the dose was large or small, but he could conceive that a moderate quantity, barely sufficient for some persons, might be a great deal too much for other patients. But the difficulty might as well be faced and owned to at once. The difficulty was in determining beforehand which were the persons that could take the drug safely, which were the hearts that would bear it without giving way beneath its influence. The medical profession tried to take every precaution, and where persons of certain age and build betraying certain weaknesses were concerned chloroform would not be administered; but here they had a person signally presenting every appearance of health, and yet that very person gave way beneath the influence of the drug. A man in the present day with the knowledge the medical profession possessed must be a conjuror to find out what was the peculiarity of the woman's heart in comparison with other people's hearts. It was a very common thing for surgeons to decline to give chloroform to certain persons; but so far as he could judge there were in this case none of the indications which acted as warnings to medical men, and which they always attended to as warnings. - The Coroner: Did the other medical gentlemen concur in the opinion you formed? - Dr Row: I do not think there was a single expression of dissent from the conclusions which I have now clearly expressed. - In answer to a series of questions put by Mr Rundle, Dr Row stated he considered it perfectly necessary from the evidences he had of external disease that an operation should be performed, and inasmuch as it was of a painful character there was good reason why chloroform should be administered. Moreover, he was informed that it was administered at the girl's own request. - Mr Rundle: Was it a disease that ought to have been treated in a Hospital or was it a case that could have been very much better treated at home by the girl's friends? - Dr Row: The circumstances which have conspired to render a lock-ward necessary are pretty well known. My knowledge of the entire working of it permits me to say that certain persons who lay themselves open to certain charges of immorality are bound to report themselves there. It is a necessity by legal compulsion that they are bound to submit themselves, and they are provided for in the Royal Albert Hospital. - Mr Rundle: But if the girl had had a disease which had nothing to do with the C.D. Acts she had no right to be kept there. If she had been removed to her home fatal results might have been avoided. - Dr Row: But the disease from which she was suffering necessarily precluded the house surgeon from permitting that person to go at large. - The Foreman remarked that the object of the Jury in asking for a post-mortem examination was to obtain a clear idea as to the cause of death, and was not in any degree intended to reflect upon the Hospital surgeons. It was perfectly clear that Dr Archer and Mr Cant had acted cautiously and with discretion, and they were in no sense open to blame. - The Coroner, in summing up, agreed with the Foreman that there was no ground for reflecting upon the Hospital surgeons, death having entirely arisen from the exceptional circumstances of a very small heart. Never before had the Hospital authorities lost the life of a patient through a misadventure of this kind, and certainly in this instance nobody was to blame, because a fatal result ensued solely from an organic defect. He was sorry, however, that the fatality had occurred, because of the shock it would give to the public mind. Operations, of course, had to be performed, and it was almost necessary in a great many instances to administer chloroform. He was afraid the effect of this case would be that patients might be averse to submitting themselves to the influence of chloroform, and that thus a good deal of pain might be occasioned which otherwise might be alleviated by the cautious use of the drug. He, therefore, did hope that it would not go forth to the public that chloroform when carefully administered, and after care had been taken to ascertain that the patient was a fit subject, was dangerous; but that it would be shewn that death in this case resulted from the exceptional state of the heart. - The Jury, after deliberating in private, returned as their verdict "That the deceased died from the Administration of Chloroform, but that there were no grounds for casting blame upon anyone, everything having, on the contrary, been done that was possible to be done."

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 November 1880
NEWTON ABBOT - Shocking Death At Newton. - An Inquest was held at Higher Staple-hill Farm, near Newton, yesterday, by Dr Gaye, Coroner, to elicit the circumstances connected with the death of CATHERINE CULL SEGAR, 5 years of age, the eldest child of MR JOHN SEGAR, jun. The deceased and some younger children early on Thursday morning saw where the nurse put a box of safety matches. During the absence of the nurse the deceased climbed a chair and reached the box, some of the matches of which she struck and set her nightdress on fire. MRS SEGAR hearing screams, ran upstairs and found her child in flames and dreadfully burnt about the body. Medical help was called but the little sufferer died during Thursday night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 10 November 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - Mr W. Gilbert, the Saltash Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, at the Portsmouth Passage House, Cornwall-street, Devonport, on the body of DANIEL BLACKMORE, second-class boy of H.M.S. Implacable. Stephen Harris, first-class boy of the Implacable, said he was standing by the side of the deceased, at work, on the morning of October 30. Deceased slipped off the gangway into the sea. Witness raised an alarm. George Woolett, petty officer, jumped after deceased, but could not get hold of him. Witness saw the deceased rise once, but he had sunk for good before Woolett had risen to the surface. George Wollett corroborated Harris's evidence, adding that he picked up deceased's cap. John Miles, waterman, yesterday morning, observed the deceased floating, and took it to Northcorner, where he handed it over to the police. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed their appreciation of Woolett's gallant conduct. A number of sailors from the Implacable, afterwards conveyed the body to the burying ground at Eldad. The band of the ship was present, as was also a firing party.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 November 1880
HOLSWORTHY - Inquiry was made at Holsworthy yesterday, before Mr W. Bird, of Okehampton, Deputy coroner, on JOHN HODGE, aged 82, an inmate of the Workhouse, who died while being carried out of church on Sunday. - Dr Linnnington Ash stated that he saw the deceased in the church porch and pronounced him dead. In the absence of evidence to the contrary he had no reason to suppose death arose from other than natural causes. The Foreman submitted a verdict of Natural Causes, but another suggested "Death by the Visitation of God," to which the Foreman objected that the deceased was much too old for such a verdict as that; if he were younger it would be a different matter. The original suggestion was adopted as the verdict on a show of hands.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 November 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Morice Town, on the body of ELLEN MAUD MARY BALL, aged 19, residing at 12 Martin-terrace. Deceased was taken suddenly ill on Tuesday morning whilst walking out with her mother. She complained of a choking sensation, and on returning home, Mr May, jun., was sent for, but before he arrived the deceased expired. Mr May made a post-mortem examination, and found the left lung highly congested and gorged with blood, whilst the right lung bore evidences of long existing pleurisy. Death, in his opinion, resulted from failure of the heart's action and pulmonary apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 16 November 1880
BRIXHAM - Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at Mr Philip's Queen's Hotel, Brixham, yesterday, before Dr Gay, County Coroner, on the body of ANN ELIZABETH BIRD, wife of WILLIAM WARREN BIRD, a discharged soldier, who was found drowned at Fishcombe Cove, Brixham, on Sunday. there was no evidence to prove how the body got to the cove, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

LYDFORD - The Mutiny At Dartmoor Prison. Inquest On The Convict. - The Inquest on the body of the convict BEVAN, who was last Friday shot by a warder whilst attempting to escape, was held before Mr R. Fulford, the Coroner, in the prison yesterday morning, Mr C. L. Duke being elected Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said the death of the deceased resulted as they all knew (living as they did in the immediate locality) at the hands of his fellow-man, namely, one of the warders of the prison; therefore it devolved upon himself and the Jury the duty of instituting a serious Inquiry, inasmuch as taking the life of a fellow-being was a matter of grave responsibility But there were circumstances connected with this death of peculiar character. Death resulting as it had done in this case might be, and he hoped the Inquiry would prove that it was, not only justifiable but absolutely necessary, when they remembered that there were placed in that prison as many as 950 criminals, many of whom, he was informed by the Governor, were of a desperate character. The fact of their being criminals shewed what a desperate lot they must be, and as over nine hundred of the worst class of criminals were entrusted into the custody of the governors and the officials under him to preserve order and keep them within the custody of the law, it was necessary that they should have powers vested in them beyond those ordinarily given in order that they might keep within the prison the criminals placed under their charge. In order to secure the safe custody of the men the Governor and his officers were empowered, if occasion required it, to adopt such means and use such weapons as might be deemed necessary to retain and keep in custody any person who had been mutinous in his conduct and had attempted to escape from the place in which he was kept. The result of the Inquiry would shew that one of the principal warders, who with others, had been in charge of the prisoners employed in the quarries, was attacked by a weapon they saw on the wall - a murderous weapon in itself - and it was a wonder that the attack made upon the warder by the deceased did not make him a victim prior to the deceased himself falling a victim. It would be for the Jury to investigate into the matter, and if it were proved to their satisfaction that the deceased was shot at by the warder, whose duty it was to keep him in safe custody, it would be their duty - and he believed the law empowered them to do so - to say that the warder who inflicted the deadly wound on the deceased, was not only justified but that he was not exceeding his duty in so doing. If they considered the act of the warder necessary they would then discharge their duty to the public by saying that the death of the deceased resulted from justifiable homicide for which the warder was not criminally liable, and not subject to be sent before any tribunal beyond that which was now inquiring into the matter, because for the safety and well-being of society it was necessary that criminals should be treated as such with severity. The Jury had a duty to perform, and he hoped they would be able to discharge it satisfactorily. - The Jury then viewed the body, and on returning the Coroner said he did not think they could usefully pursue the Inquiry any further than to hear the evidence of the officer in whose charge the deceased was placed, after which they would have to adjourn the Inquest for a post-mortem examination. - Captain Osborne William Avery, said he was the Governor of the prison. He produced the copy of the order under which the deceased was brought to the prison. He was convicted at the Taunton Assizes on the 29th April, the crime being house-breaking and attempt to maim and disable, after a previous conviction of felony, and the sentence was twenty-five years' penal servitude. On conviction he was described as a carpenter and married, and his number on the prison register "F.32e." His age was 35 years. Since conviction he had been confined at Pentonville, Portland and Dartmoor. He was received at the last named place from Portland on February 2nd this year. His conduct was described as being bad at Taunton, good at Pentonville, indifferent at Portland but at Dartmoor his conduct had been good. While there his employment was "jumping" in a quarry, and being employed as such the weapon he used in the assault would be the one with which he worked. On Friday last, about five p.m., it was reported to him that the man was shot. Witness had been in Plymouth on duty, and returned to the prison just after the deceased was shot. Warder Lord was in charge of the deceased. There were about thirty in the gang. Lord was assisted by Assistant-Warder Parker, while Principal Warder Westlake was in charge of the quarry. The last-named and Parker were attacked by the deceased. - The Governor then read communications which he received from the Governor of Portland Prison when the deceased was transferred to Dartmoor. One was received with him from Pentonville, and called the particular attention of the Governor of Portland Prison to convicts BEVAN, Hart and Hughes. At Taunton station their conduct was so desperate and their attitude to the warders so threatening that the assistance of a police constable had to be obtained. They had repeatedly threatened to murder the warders, and the dastardly offence of which they were convicted would shew to what lengths they would go if they had the opportunity. Two others - Spring and Avery - were convicted with them, but such bitter feeling had been expressed towards them by the three others because they would not assist them in their schemes that, although mentioned on the same warrant of committal, he (the Governor of Pentonville) had not sent the latter two to Portland with the others, they being much better men. The Governor of Portland called particular attention to BEVAN. While there, after service on a Sunday, he had given S. Ellis, a fellow-convict, a tool, with which he had removed the iron ventilator of his cell. He regarded BEVAN as a shrewd, unscrupulous man, and one who required looking after. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Thursday morning. Dr Northey afterwards made a post-mortem examination. - The adjournment of the Inquest is thought in the neighbourhood to be a wise proceeding of the Coroner, as it will give time for the consideration of the peculiarities of the case, the Jury having a difficult duty to discharge towards the public and the prison authorities. The case is without precedent, there never having been, so far as is known, an instance of a convict being shot by a warder whilst attempting to escape, and before explaining the law in such a peculiar case the coroner will doubtless consult the Home-office. It will no doubt be proved that the shooting of the convict BEVAN was justifiable homicide; but at present the inhabitants of Princetown feel strongly on the subject. they say that such means as were resorted to on Friday to prevent to prevent the escape of the convict should not have been tried until others had failed. When BEVAN was shot he was only a few yards away and they think he might easily have been captured. A policeman has not power to resort to such means, except in his defence, and when a prisoner escaped from his custody he must either capture him or let him escape. Escape from Dartmoor is, they say, impossible; many have made the attempt, but during the whole time the establishment has been on the moor only one has succeeded in getting away, and they think other means would have sufficed. Without outside assistance the prison garb could not be changed and the penalties are such that no one living in the neighbourhood would render assistance. Although BEVAN made a savage attack on the principal warder, it was some minutes after that he attempted to escape and then he had no weapon of any sort, and ordinary means of capture might have been used. On the other hand it is urged, with good reason, that considering the desperate character of the convicts, and that to over a thousand of them there are but 160 warders, all of whom cannot be available for duty at the same time, exceptional powers must be entrusted to the officials for dealing with such emergencies as occurred last Friday. BEVAN'S conduct shewed that some of the convicts are ripe for any desperate deed, an impenetrable Dartmoor mist was coming on, a general mutiny was suspected and this act seemed to be the commencement of it, when the runaway called on his companions to redeem their promise. It was a time for immediate and effectual action, for had BEVAN got a few yards further he would have been lost in the fog, and to have left the other convicts whilst pursuing this one man would have been but to invite them to make their escape. It is not improbable that it was part of the scheme that some of the five warders might run off after the runaway, and then those in the quarry would have had [?] in overpowering the one or two warders who remained. The prompt measures taken on BEVAN, however, had the effect of cowing his companions. It is easy to imagine what violence might have resulted if thirty desperate men had been roaming the country in search of clothes and food. It is said that the post-mortem examination shews that the shots were fired low, it being the intention of the officers merely to arrest and not to kill the fugitive. It was also necessary to fire in order to warn the warders of the other gangs, for that there was a conspiracy to escape there is no doubt, as O'Brien, who followed BEVAN, and received such wounds that he cannot recover, is said to utter imprecations against what he terms the "cowards" of the gang who did not second BEVAN'S effort when called on to fulfil their promises. It seems strange that O'Brien should have attempted to escape as there were but fourteen months of his sentence to run.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 November 1880
SAMPFORD COURTENAY - At Sticklepath, near Okehampton, on Tuesday, Mr W. Burd, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a woman named MARY BROOKLAND, which was found in the leat,. No evidence being forthcoming as to how deceased met her death, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", with a recommendation as to the advisability that the rules for restoring consciousness should be more generally known.

Western Morning News, Friday 19 November 1880
LYDFORD - The Mutiny At Dartmoor Prison. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of THOMAS BEVAN, the convict who was killed last Friday while attempting to escape from the granite quarry near the convict establishment at Princetown, was held in the prison yesterday before Mr R. Fulford, the coroner. Mr c. L. Duke being Foreman of the Jury. Captain Avery (the governor of the prison) and Lieut-Colonel Ouchterlony (deputy governor) were present, and Mr W. Eastlake, of Plymouth, watched the case on behalf of the prison authorities, the Prison Commissioners and the Home Office. - In opening the proceedings, the Coroner said it was to further examine the governor and then call before the Jury Principal Warder Westlake. He would call all the other warders concerned, and if necessary after that they will hear the evidence of the surgeons. - John Henry Westlake said: I am one of the principal warders of this prison, and on Friday last I was on duty. I was in charge of the quarries where there were seventy-three convicts. I was the principal warder over all these men. THOMAS BEVAN, the dead prisoner, was one of the men engaged in the quarries that day. The prisoners work in gangs, and the deceased belonged to No. 18 gang, which was composed of twenty-six men. The deceased was employed in "jumping" and worked with a tool known as a jumper. In the same gang were prisoners named O'Brien, Hughes and Darby. they had been at work during the day, but it was not till evening that anything unusual occurred. In the afternoon, about 3.45, I gave the usual signal to the warders on duty to make their men fall in. There were two parties, Warder Lord being in charge of No. 18, and Warder Delaney of No. 19 party. Assistant-Warder Parker was the assistant-warder attached to No. 18 party, and Assistant-Warders Adamson and Rowland were in charge of the blacksmiths attached to the quarry. Civil Guards Toms, Stapley, Shale, and Mc[?] and Sergeant Ashwick were outside the quarry. All the warders and civil guards but Adamson were armed with rifles. The rifles are charged with buckshot. In such charge there are about twelve shots. When I gave the order BEVAN was in the centre of the quarry, and he was standing near a heap of granite stones facing No. 18 gang which was the one in which the accused was working. At that moment I missed the deceased and was looking for him. He had been working in a separate block in the next quarry. I did not move, but I cast my eyes in front, when someone from behind struck me a violent blow with a "jumper." It struck me on the right side of the head and shoulder. I turned [?] I could and received another blow on my left shoulder. I saw it was THOMAS BEVAN and that he had the "jumper" up to strike me the third time. I had not time to draw my sword and ran into the blacksmith's shop. I drew my sword and made towards the prisoner, and BEVAN turned back to his gang. I then ordered them to fall in. Three or four of the warders were at that time at the entrance to the quarry. The men fell in, and marched to the tool-shed with the tools, which were put away and locked up. I heard muttering among the men, and they appeared to be in a very mutinous and restless state. This was in No. 18 gang. The conduct of the convicts appeared to be different to what it usually was. I observed BEVAN particularly, because he kept on examining the formation of the quarry and the manner in which the sentries were posted. The warders reported the numbers correct and I then ordered them to march to the prison. Gang 18 was under Warder Lord and would be the last to march in. Lord received his seventeen blacksmiths with his gang, and reported his forty-three prisoners as being all present. I counted these men as they marched past me. then I heard someone shout "There is one off." I looked and saw prisoner BEVAN making off towards the quarry, and then up the slope on the right of the entrance to it. I heard several officers shout to the prisoner. They shouted to him to stop, but I can't say the exact words they used. Immediately afterwards I heard several shots fired. I ran up the slope on the right, and saw that the prisoner continued running until he got to the head of the quarry towards the right, when he gradually fell down. He ran about fifty yards after the shots were fired. I saw from his appearance that he was wounded. Assistant-Warder Parker and Civil Guard Shales also came up. When I got up to him he was not dead, but he did not speak. I then left him in their charge, and went to look after prisoner O'Brien, who had also escaped, and had run in another direction. I did not see him run, but I heard the warders say, "There goes another" as I was following BEVAN. Shots were also fired. I found O'Brien just over the wall, near the leat close to the quarry, in a small plantation. When I came up he was lying, I think, on his back. I said, "Get up," and he said he was wounded. He got up, assisted by me, with some difficulty, but then said his thigh was broken and he could not stand. I then called Assistant-Warder Adamson, in whose charge I left the prisoner. When I lifted him up I think he made use of the remark, "I forgive you." All this occupied only a few minutes. By the time several warders arrived from the prison, I left the two wounded prisoners in charge of Principal Warder Alston. The rest of the prisoners had been standing all this time outside the quarry, and on leaving the wounded prisoners I marched the remainder of the gang into the prison. The prisoner was a tall, violent man, and struck me a severe crushing blow, and I was severely bruised. My left arm was much discoloured. I saw nothing of any attack on any other warder. - By Mr Eastlake: I was excited at the time, but I don't remember BEVAN making any remark. - By the Foreman: The time I gave the prisoners orders to fall in was the customary time for leaving work. BEVAN had not threatened me or either of the officers, as far as I know. I had not of late been stationed in the quarry [?] within the past fortnight or three weeks. At this time I had no other gangs near the quarry to look after, and I confined my attention solely to the quarry. The dead prisoner had been employed in the quarry all the time. I have lately been in charge of it. No complaints as to his conduct have been made by any of the officers, but from his manner and information from prisoners to other warders it was understood that he intended over-powering the warders and using their arms. From the governor I heard that there was a mutinous spirit exhibited in the quarry, and from him I received special directions to the extra care in looking after them. My attention was particularly directed to some of the prisoners, BEVAN amongst them. My reason for not placing BEVAN under arrest was because I had no means of doing so. At the time I was quite single-handed. Simultaneously with the attack on myself, I understand that O'Brien made an attack on another warder (Assistant Warder Parker), but I did not see it myself. I did not exceed the instructions which I and every other officer are ordered in our discretion to use. I had received no special instructions as to how to act in such a case - our general instructions suffice. I was ordered to be extra watchful, and use extra precautions in the discharge of my duty. These orders I communicated to those under me. I could not say how many shots were fired. - William Lord said: I am a warder in this prison, and in this capacity I was on duty last Friday. That day I was on duty in the quarry, in charge of No. 18 party, which consisted of twenty-six prisoners. BEVAN was one of the party. Principal Warder Westlake was in charge of the quarry district, where seventy-one men in all were employed. Nothing occurred until between four and five in the evening, when on the principal warder giving the notice to cease labour, I at once gave orders to my party to fall in. Their duty was to fall in two-deep where I was standing, bringing their tools in their hands. The prisoners were all coming to fall in, but the deceased went from his work, strolled round behind where Principal Warder Westlake was standing about ten or twelve feet on my left watching the main body. He had an iron "jumper" in his hand and held it over his shoulder and struck Westlake on the head from behind. Westlake was only about two feet from BEVAN. The principal warder then ran towards the blacksmith's shop, and I at once loaded my rifle, seeing that some of the prisoners were coming towards me. It is not customary for warders to carry their rifles loaded except when occasion requires it. My rifle was charged with the usual charge - a cartridge containing twelve buckshot. I have written instructions as how to act in such a case. The copy produced is hung up in different parts of the prison, and the first two rules are:- "Sentries will allow no prisoner to effect his escape, using their arms if necessary to enforce their orders. They are required to render immediate assistance in the event of an officer being assaulted in the vicinity of their posts, making use of their arms if necessity required." - The Governor then put in a copy of the standing orders for the guidance of prison governors, issued by the Secretary of State. In one dated May 19th, 1852, was the following clause:- "I was anxious you should impress upon officers of the prison and the sentries that it was only in cases of absolute necessity that they would be justified in making use of firearms, and I should still strongly enforce that consideration on all concerned. But convicts must not remain in error as to the state of the law on the subject, whereas that if no other means are at hand for stopping a convict in the act of making his escape, a prison officer or sentry would be justified in firing upon him. - The Coroner informed the Jury that this was not a mere expression of opinion, but was in accordance with the common law of this country. - Warder Lord (continuing) said: I with two other warders then took up positions at the entrance to the quarry, and on looking round saw BEVAN in the middle of the quarry in charge of a warder who had his sword drawn. Principal Warder Westlake then gave me orders to march my men out of the quarry. BEVAN being one of my party. This I did, BEVAN also falling in. By my orders the men deposited their different tools in the tool-house. Westlake then gave the order to march to the prison. They started, and deceased, who was in the second file from the rear, then made a rush over the embankment. I shouted to him to stop and heard other officers do the same. Seeing he did not stop I at once fired at him. - Before taking this down, the Coroner said he must caution witness that he was not bound to say he fired a shot, because in case of this Inquiry being taken to another court it might be used against him. Still he thought he should have no fear. - Witness repeated that he fired, as in less than another minute BEVAN would have been out of his sight. After I fired he still continued running up the embankment. He did not get out of my sight. I saw him drop. I heard two distinct shots fired besides mine. I only fired once. There was a very dense fog at the time. - By the Foreman: I have been stationed at the quarry six or seven months and deceased had been employed there all the time. The Governor of the prison had informed me that BEVAN was a dangerous character, and cautioned me to be particularly watchful of him, as he believed he would make his escape at the first opportunity. He had never threatened me, but I had heard that he had used threats towards other officers. Others in the gang were regarded as particularly dangerous. When firing at a prisoner I have instructions to aim low, which I did. I was about forty yards from the deceased when I fired. When the men were outside the quarry altogether there were forty-three under my charge. Besides myself Assistant Warders Parker and Adamson were in charge, and there were a sergeant and four civil guards stationed on the outposts. One of these guards was on the top of the quarry, and BEVAN ran towards him. These could not leave the convicts, and if shots had not been fired BEVAN must have got away. I did not see an attack made on anyone else, but I heard one was made. O'Brien had his cap off, and on my asking him where it was he said he left it in the quarry, but could not find it. Shortly after the cap was given him by Westlake. From this I thought he might have been concerned in an assault, and I afterwards heard that Assistant-Warder Parker was attacked by him. - The Coroner said he thought this witness had given his evidence in a very straightforward manner. He thought the Jury had all the facts before them, and he only proposed to call another witness after which the surgeons would give the result of their post-mortem examinations. - In answer to Mr Eastlake, the last witness said when he first saw BEVAN strike Westlake he heard him say something to incite the other convicts, he believed it was "Now boys, come on." Another man in the gang said "Now you have agreed together, but you funk it." The deceased must have been near enough to hear him when he shouted "Stop." He ran a few yards before firing. - William Joseph Parker said: I am an assistant-warder, employed in the prison. On Friday I was assistant to the warder in charge of No. 18 gang. After the order was given to fall in I noticed BEVAN go towards the tool-house, and after BEVAN struck the principal warder I was struck from behind with a jumper, but I did not see who struck me. I was told O'Brien struck me. - By the Foreman: I was armed with a rifle, and as deceased did not heed my call to stop, when he was about forty-five yards away, I fired. Deceased was then disappearing in the fog. There was a heavy fog, and if he had not been brought down he must have escaped. He has never threatened me. Shots were fired before I did so, but none after. I think no officer fired more than once. I had a cartridge ready in my hand, in accordance with my general rule when a fog comes on. - The Coroner said they had now the evidence of two men that shots were fired, and that, although other shots were fired, each man fired but one shot, and as it would be but repetition he asked the Jury if they thought it would be necessary to call all the officers before them? - The Jury thought as they were there they might as well hear all the warders. - James Shipley, a civil guard, corroborated the evidence given by other witnesses, and said when BEVAN escaped he fired at him, and fearing he would escape in the dense fog he fired again, and then deceased disappeared, but whether he fell down or was lost in the fog he could not say. - Civil Guard Shales also said he fired a shot, and the deceased ran twenty yards after. - Civil Guards Louis and Warder Delaney said they fired shots, but at the convict O'Brien, who also tried to escape in another direction. - Herbert Smalley said: I am the medical officer of this prison. On the 12th instant the body of THOMAS BEVAN was brought into the prison. I saw him about half-past four in the Infirmary. He was dead. With the assistance of Dr Northey, I have made a post-mortem examination. The right side of his face was covered with congealed blood. There was a superficial wound on the right cheek, the shot coming out at the nose. There was a wound on the right elbow, and the shot settled amongst the muscles. There was one on the back of the right shoulder, a shot over the eleventh rib, another two inches lower down, and one in the calf of the left leg - six shots in all. On internal examination the upper wound in the back was caused by one shot, which broke a rib, passed through the lung, and entered the pericardium. The shot which caused the lower wound passed into the abdomen, proceeded through the stomach, diaphragm, pericardium, heart, out of the pericardium, along the great vessel and out through the thorax beneath the skin, under the left collarbone. This latter shot was the cause of death. All the shots appeared to have been fired low, and took an upward tendency. - W. C. Northey, surgeon, Tavistock, who assisted Dr Smalley in making the post-mortem examination, endorsed what Dr Smalley had said. The immediate cause of death was the penetration of one shot through the lung to the heart. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said they had arrived at the end of what had been a lengthy, important and serious Inquiry, and he was only pleased to think that he had had an intelligent Jury around him. The Foreman had rendered especial assistance to him by his suggestions and cross-examination. He had endeavoured to make the Inquiry as exhaustive as possible, and he was only pleased to find that everyone who took part in the scene had been brought before them, inasmuch as every witness who had been called gave a different view of the scene, because he related what actually came under his own personal observation, and had so completed the chain of evidence without contradicting what another had said. The manner in which the officers had given their evidence reflected the highest credit on them. In order to keep discipline among such men as those now in the convict establishment it was necessary that the officials should have extraordinary powers of endorsing it. It was not customary in this prison to keep all the prisoners in constant confinement. Some were, as they had heard, employed in out-door work, and to do this it was necessary that they should be supplied with tools. they had heard that two convicts had made use of their tools in making an attack on their officers, and it was wonderful to him that one had been able to appear to give an account of what had actually taken place on the commencement of the fray. The deceased was not the only one who attacked the warders; another was lying in the prison, who simultaneously tried to make his escape in another direction, and he thought they had heard enough to be convinced that these men were the ringleaders and organisers of the mutinous spirit among their fellow-labourers and fellow-prisoners. The Coroner then remarked that there were seventy-one prisoners in charge of those few warders, and if these men had been able to carry out what was evidently a scheme for escape it would have been fearful to contemplate what would have been the issue and the number of lives which might have been lost. This man was sent to prison by the laws of his country, his offences being more than one, and the last of the most brutal character that could possibly be conceived. He broke into the house of a lonely poor old lady, and to make her tell where her money was to be found he actually put her on the fire to extort the information he required from her, and for this brutality and the breach of the law he richly deserved the sentence which had been passed upon him. It was the duty of the officials of the prison to keep in safe custody the criminals who were placed under their charge, and rules were issued as to the course they should pursue when any attempt was made to escape, and it was their duty to take the life of the convict sooner than let him escape. Taking the life of a fellow-man was homicide, either direct murder had been committed or it was justifiable. He thought this was a case of justifiable homicide; to make it justifiable it must be owing to some justifiable cause. According to the common law of the country, if a person arrested for felony breaks away from those who have charge of him, they may kill him if they could not otherwise take him, and if a criminal assaulted his gaoler, he might be lawfully killed to prevent his escaping. In this case he thought the action of the warders was not only justifiable, but it had been such as to deserve almost commendation rather than blame. The post-mortem examination shewed that although six men fired charges containing, at least, twelve shots each, but six shots lodged in the body of the deceased, and, as these appeared to have been fired low, it shewed that the warders fired to wound, and not to kill. In this case one shot only hit a really vital part. - The Jury then retired, and on returning into Court the Foreman said they were unanimously of opinion that the warders had not exceeded their duty or violated the law in shooting the deceased while attempting to escape and therefore the homicide was justifiable. At the same time they felt bound to say that for the sake of honest men they thought it wrong that such a desperate man as the deceased, who was known to be strong, powerful, and determined should not have been separated from the others and certainly he should not have been permitted to use such an instrument as a "jumper", which became murderous in his hands. They thought it wrong that he should even have been allowed to mix with the others because of the bad effect his influence might have on them. They hoped this recommendation would be forwarded to the Home office. - The Coroner quite agreed with the Jury's recommendation, and said he would undertake to convey it to the proper authority. - The Inquiry commenced shortly after ten a.m., and was not finished until four p.m.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 November 1880
CREDITON - Sad Fatality At Crediton. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Crediton, before Mr Burroughs, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr Buckingham was Foreman, on the body of FANNY LEE, servant in the employ of Mr Gillard, baker and confectioner on the Green. The deceased went into the yard behind her master's house about seven o'clock on the previous evening for the purpose of going to an outhouse, and fell into the pump pit, the wooden covering of which had been raised by Mr Gillard's assistant, a young man named Arnold, a few minutes before, for the purpose of enabling him to draw water from the well, the pump itself being out of order; but the handle of the bucket which he was using getting loose, he took it indoors to repair it without thinking of letting down the cover of the well before leaving. Meanwhile the poor girl passing in the dark fell into the well where she lay for some time. At last her mistress not being able to find her, though it was known that she had not gone from the premises, the young man feared that she had fallen into the well so carelessly left open by him, and on a search being made his fears were realised. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and Arnold was admonished to be more careful in future. The deceased was but 11 years of age.

LIFTON - Sudden Death At Lifton. - At Tinney, half a mile from Lifton, last evening Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD BARTLETT, the son of a farmer who held a respectable position in the neighbourhood. Reports were freely circulated that deceased, whose father hung himself about nine months ago, had died from poison, and that he had mixed it with some potatoes which he had also given to his six children. The following evidence will shew that these reports were unfounded. - William Gloynes, of Lifton, said he knew the deceased, and on Monday last one of the children of the deceased asked him to call and see his father, and he sat down and talked with him for some time. He appeared in his usual health, and was as cheerful as ever he saw him. After leaving, witness went to bed, but about 11.30 he was called. He went into BARTLETT'S house and found him lying on his bed flat on his face, and apparently dead. He immediately ran for a doctor. Deceased was 41 years of age. - Dr Doidge said he found the deceased dead. Nothing in his appearance led witness to think anything had been taken in the way of poison. The wife explained the symptoms and from them he should think, from the weak state of his head, death was caused by apoplexy. He believed death resulted purely by natural causes. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. As the Jury had been kept waiting some little time, the Foreman (Mr Kellaway) demanded something extra for the Jury, and the Coroner gave each an additional sixpence; and, although the Coroner at the opening of the proceedings had apologised for his unavoidable delay, the Jury accepted the sixpence each with thanks. All the Jurors appeared to be respectable farmers.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 November 1880
ASHWATER - Inquest at Ashwater. - Inquiry was made at Henford, near Ashwater, on Friday by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, as to the death of MARY ANNE HATCH, aged 41, wife of JAMES HATCH, labourer, who died on Monday. The husband stated that his wife had had eleven children, and when she died she was again near her confinement. She had complained of suffering more pain than usual for several weeks. At midnight on Monday he heard a noise and found her on the floor. She appeared no worse, but complained of faintness. The next morning he went for Dr Pearce, of Holsworthy. He told him how she felt, but quite forgot in his hurry to say what condition she was in. Dr Pearce gave him some medicine and told him to call again about ten in the morning. When he got home the neighbours told him his wife was worse, and expressed fear of giving her the medicine, and then he immediately returned and said his wife was near her confinement. Dr Pearce then gave him some other medicine, and on returning with it he found that affairs had taken a more serious turn. He went for Dr Pearce, but before he returned his wife was dead. - Dr Pearce said HATCH came in the morning and described the symptoms of his wife and asked for medicine. He said she had been eating some swede turnip pie for supper which was a very indigestible meal. At breakfast time he came again, but did not request witness to go and see his wife. He gave the man some medicine and he went home. Some time later he told him his wife was in labour, and then witness went immediately and arrived about half an hour before the husband, who was on horseback. He believed death resulted from internal bleeding, caused by the fall from the bed. - The Coroner remarked that no blame could possibly be attached to the medical officer, who had done all in his power; and the Jury returned a verdict that death resulted from Accidental Haemorrhage, caused by a fall. - The Jury gave their fees to the husband of the deceased, and, owing to the liberality of the Coroner, and Dr Pearce, a total sum of 25s. was raised.

TORQUAY - On Saturday at Wood's refreshment-rooms, Torquay, Dr H. Gaye, Coroner, held an Inquest as to the death of THOMAS HENRY UNWIN, who had for many years been in the employ of Messrs. Smith and Son, at Luton, Bedfordshire, and who had been compelled by the state of his health to remove to Torquay. Deceased arrived at Mr Wood's on Wednesday afternoon in a weak and failing condition, accompanied by his wife, who assisted him to bed immediately after tea. During the night deceased became suddenly worse, but after a time he appeared to be easy and to go to sleep; in the morning, however, he was found by his wife to be dead. During the Inquest a brother of the deceased entered the room, and in an excited manner exclaimed to the Coroner and the Jury, "Gentlemen, I feel it hard that my poor brother could not be allowed to depart this life without all this humbug!" The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, pointed out that in such a case as that, where a stranger to the town died at a hotel it was right that an Inquest should be held to satisfy the public that the deceased came by his death in a natural manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 23 November 1880
EXETER - Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of WILLIAM RICHARDS, aged 59, a baker, of Lapford. On Friday last the deceased came to Exeter by rail for the purpose of purchasing yeast at the City Brewery. About four o'clock he returned to St. David's Station, carrying the barrel of yeast in a bag. As he was mounting the stairs on the down platform he stumbled, and the bag which he was carrying on his right shoulder swung over the banisters, carrying the deceased with it. He fell a distance of about eleven feet. He was picked up in an unconscious state, and removed to the Hospital, where it was found that he had sustained severe injuries to his lungs and a fracture of the spine. He expired about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Sudden Death. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday on the body of HENRY WYATT, aged 39, a pensioner from the 19th Regiment, residing in Preston-street. On Saturday the deceased complained of giddiness, but refused to see a doctor, saying that he had felt worse in India. On the following day he vomited, and shortly afterwards expired. Medical evidence showed that the deceased died from a convulsion and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 November 1880
EXETER - An Inquest was held in Exeter Gaol yesterday on a prisoner named POPE, sentenced to penal servitude for horse and cattle stealing in North Devon, who had committed suicide by hanging himself in his cell. Evidence was given that the prisoner has believed himself under the influence of witchcraft, and the Jury found that he committed Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Value Of Provident Dispensaries. - An Inquest was held at the Carlton Hotel, Devonport, yesterday, by the Borough Coroner, as to the death of a child 13 months old, named ARTHUR HUSBAND. It was stated that the deceased was sickly from its birth. On Wednesday week it was taken ill, and shewed symptoms of an affection of the throat and chest. MRS HUSBAND, the wife of a labourer, took the child to Mr Codd, chemist, in Duke-street, who prescribed medicine for it, and it subsequently appeared better. On Monday morning, however, it had a fit, and died within a quarter of an hour. The chemist told MRS HUSBAND that the child was suffering from bronchitis, and that whilst the weather remained mild there was no danger, but if it came in cold it would be advisable to see a doctor. MRS HUSBAND did not, however, follow this advice, because the child appeared to grow better after taking the medicine prescribed by Mr Codd. - Mr P. F. Delarne, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, stated that there were indications of general debility. He had inquired into the nature of the medicine given by Mr Codd, and from what he could ascertain he was of opinion that it could not have harmed the child, and that the mixture had in fact nothing to do with the cause of death. There were clear indications that the infant was not in a strong or healthy condition, and he believed it died from convulsions, the result of general ill-health, disease of the lungs, and troublesome teething. Mr Delarne added that he did not wish to reflect upon anybody, but he thought it would be prudent in cases of this kind if parents obtained medical assistance. Their neglecting to do so often led to much pain and inconvenience and seeing that medical attendance was so easily procurable it was to be regretted that it was not more frequently sought. In answer to the coroner as to what the charge would have been for the services of a medical man in a case of this kind, Mr Delarne pointed out that there were plenty of facilities in Devonport for persons to obtain medical relief. In addition to a large parochial medical staff there was the Devonport Provident Dispensary, from which, by the payment of a small weekly subscription, persons could obtain medicine and medical advice and attendance whenever they required it, a whole family being entitled to the benefits of the dispensary by the payment of 3d. a week, and he repeated it was much to be regretted that the advantages conferred by these societies were not more widely utilised. - The Coroner concurred in these expressions of opinion and hoped they would be given publicity. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 November 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Trench At Devonport. The Inquest. - The Coroner for Devonport - (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday relative to the death of HENRY CHARLES SCOTT, who received fatal injuries by falling into the trench in the Brickfields. - Evidence was given by HENRY SCOTT, son of the deceased, residing at 25 Mount-street, Devonport, that his father was about 68 years of age. The deceased, who was an army pensioner, did not drink. Mr H. Cant, house surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, said the deceased was admitted to the Hospital between eight and nine o'clock on Monday evening. He had a fracture of the left thigh and was suffering from collapse or severe shock to the system. He was extremely faint and weak, and was so bad that they could not attempt to reduce the fracture. He became worse and died within about half an hour. In answer to witness's questions deceased said he went on the top of the trench on account of suffering from diarrhoea. The deceased also said he did not lose his senses and lay in the trench about an hour. Witness thought that by a post-mortem examination they would find some internal injury to account for death, but he found that he was mistaken. He attributed death to the shock to the system and the exposure to the cold. - Henrietta Rowe, about 18, or 26 Clowance-lane, Devonport, said she had known the deceased about three months. On Monday evening she was passing through the Brickfields, and met the deceased just at the top. He said "Good evening," and she answered him. He asked how she was and she told him, and she then saw the deceased put his head through the railings and within a minute after come out again. The deceased picked up a white bundle and went inside the railings again. The deceased went to turn his head to her, slipped his foot and fell. Just after she heard the deceased say, "Oh, my leg is broken." She ran away and told a gentleman, who informed the piquet of the occurrence. They procured a stretcher and he was got out. About half an hour had elapsed between the time the deceased fell and the time he was got out again. The witness, who seemed of rather weak intellect, in the course of her evidence made a remark to the effect that she and the deceased walked to the spot together, but on being directly asked by the Coroner if that were so she denied it. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the deceased was perfectly sober, and knew quite well what he was about. Since the last case of that kind, when the Jury very properly made a recommendation, he had communicated with the colonel commanding the Royal Engineers, and shortly afterwards received a letter from him stating that the War-office authorities would give the town authorities permission to do anything that would not interfere with the fortifications. He took that letter to the Town Clerk, who intimated that he would consult with the Mayor, and that it would be laid before the proper committee. No doubt that had been done, but he had never heard any result of the deliberations of the committee. The Coroner remarked that this trench was a fortification made at a vast expense on the authority of the Government, and he could not see that there was anyone individually responsible. They must bear in mind also that this man was a trespasser directly he got over the fence, and he must have known it was a dangerous place. He thought that just about this particular spot the piece of ground behind the fence was narrower than in some parts. It was most unfortunate thing that these things should happen, and he was quite sure the Jury as well as himself would say that if any means - no matter at what expense - could be adopted consistent with the trench being a fortification, to remedy the evil it should be done at once. If they wished it he would adjourn the Inquest and make any inquiry they wished. He could not see his way at present to find a verdict against any individual. - A Juror remarked that the best plan would be to fill in the trench as had been done at Portsmouth. After a short discussion the Coroner decided to adjourn the Inquiry until Wednesday week, in order that he might communicate with the Secretary of State for War in the meantime. - It was mentioned that just where this accident happened was a public path which the authorities could not block up.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 November 1880
An Inquest was held at Beer town by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of WM. BURROWS FOGLER, aged 46, bargeman on board the Gazelle. On Friday he was unfurling the mainsail in a heavy south-westerly gale, when the sail knocked him overboard. The deceased could not swim and he was quickly taken away by the strong tide which was running. The captain put off to his assistance in a boat, but deceased sank before the captain could reach him. He was picked up about an hour later. The Jury, of whom the Rev. T. W. Wintle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and handed their fees to the widow and five children, who are left totally unprovided for.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 December 1880
TIVERTON - At Tiverton Infirmary on Monday evening an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN WOLLAND, aged 23, who died on the previous morning. The evidence tended to show that deceased, dressed in female attire, took part in a "Guy Fawkes" celebration on November 5th and was so severely burnt with a tar-barrel that he was removed to the Infirmary, where he lingered until he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 2 December 1880
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of SELINA JANE ROBERTS, aged one-and-a-half years, daughter of EDWIN ROBERTS, a mason's labourer, of London. the medical evidence showed that the child died from natural causes, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 3 December 1880
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening, at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, on the body of JOHN WOOLCOCK, stonemason, aged sixty-eight, who was found dead in his kitchen early that morning. The deceased, who resided at 181 Exeter-street, suffered from dropsy. He appeared on the previous evening to be in unusually good health. He was left by a neighbour named R. Thorn about twenty minutes past eleven sitting on a chest in the kitchen smoking a cigar. This was the last time he was seen alive. About quarter past six on Thursday morning, Henry Hall, a lodger in the same house, found the deceased lying on the floor in the kitchen, quite dead. Mr Harper, surgeon, was immediately sent for, but his services were not required. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 3 December 1880
LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday before the Coroner, Mr R. Fulford, on the body of a convict named EDMUND HOLT, who died on the 29th ult. The deceased was under a sentence of twenty years' penal servitude, and had been in prison almost all his lifetime, having had sentences of penal servitude passed upon him amounting to forty-five years. His death was caused by an abscess in the stomach, and the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 4 December 1880
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Accident At Keyham. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Enquiry yesterday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of CHARLES HARRIS, aged 23, late a labourer in H.M. Keyham yard, who died from injuries sustained by a fall on Wednesday last, and as reported in the Western Daily Mercury. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - Dr H. Gaye, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Torbay Infirmary, on the body of FREDERICK WHITE, labourer, about 28 years of age, who died at the Institution from injuries received on the previous day. The deceased was at work near Torre Station on Wednesday afternoon, and a large plank fell on him, inflicting serious injuries at the back of his head, from the effects of which he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 December 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Supposed Suicide At Devonport. - The Mayor and Coroner of Saltash (Mr W. Gilbert) held an Inquest yesterday at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, as to the death of MARY ELIZABETH GILLARD, a young woman, who mysteriously disappeared from her home at Newpassage a few weeks since. - George Davis, lance-corporal, R.M.L.I., said on Thursday morning he was on the deck of H.M.S. Dublin, in the Hamoaze, when some men who were passing in a steam-launch told him that a body was floating a little way down the harbour. He called a private of Marines named Radford and they took a boat and went and found the body. They towed it to the Torpoint passage and then carried it to the mortuary. - The witness, having given his evidence, asked to be allowed to make an observation. He stated that when he and his companion landed the body, there was nothing kept at the mortuary by which it could be conveyed there, and they had to lash their oars to the body and carry it in that manner. Neither was there any covering provided, and the body would have had to be carried through the streets as it was found in the water, had they not been able to obtain an old covering from the water police hulk, and that was not large enough to completely cover the body. He thought a stretcher, with movable handles, should be kept at the mortuary, and also a proper covering for cases of this kind. The jury asked the Coroner to call the attention of the authorities to this matter, and the Coroner promised he would, and thought the suggestion of the witness a very wise one. - The next witness was PHILIP GILLARD, the father of the deceased, who stated that he was a labourer, and that he resided at the Tamar Wharf, Newpassage. The deceased had lived in his house for the last three months with a man named James Shephard, a mason. On Saturday, the 6th ult., the deceased and Shephard came home about eleven p.m. from Plymouth. they had some words in his presence about money matters. The man Shephard went upstairs to bed, but the deceased would not go with him. Some time after Shephard came down and wanted to be friends with the deceased, and they then went upstairs together. About two o'clock on the Sunday morning witness heard them quarrelling again, and he also heard the deceased say "Don't Jim," and he then remarked to his wife that Shephard was ill-using the deceased. The quarrel appeared to have passed off, and all was quiet until about 4 a.m. when the deceased passed through his bedroom dressed, but without her hat or boots. He asked her where she was going, and she said to the back of the house. As she had not returned in about twenty minutes, his wife went out for her and could not find her. He then searched around the wharf, but without effect. He found the gate from the house to the wharf open, although he had shut it the previous night. When deceased passed through his room she appeared to be rather low spirited. The man Shephard when in drink would occasionally ill-use her, and on these occasions she would become very low spirited. She had twice when ill-used tried to commit suicide, once by drinking paraffin oil, and the other by trying to strangle herself. He thought Shephard did all he could for the deceased when he was out of drink, and that it was as much his daughter's fault as Shephard's that they were not married. At the time the deceased committed suicide it was nearly low water, and from the wharf where she jumped into the water was twenty feet. He identified the body as that of his daughter's by the body of the dress and the stockings. Shephard left his house a week after the disappearance. - The Coroner said this was all the evidence he had to offer. The question was whether the Jury would like to have the man Shephard there. Sergeant Blackler had told Shephard to be present at the Inquest but he had not come. - Sergeant Blackler here informed the Coroner that the man was then wandering about outside, and he had asked him to come in, but he refused to do so. - The Coroner then told the sergeant to find the man, and inform him that if he did not come a warrant would be issued for his apprehension. In a few minutes the officer returned with Shephard, who after being told by the Coroner that his not coming in a proper way looked very suspicious, and having been cautioned, stated that on Saturday the 6th ult., he gave the deceased 28s. which was his wages, and they went to Plymouth together. While the deceased went to pay his club money he stopped at Glanville's Royal Oak, Cecil-street, where she called him and told him to go home, but he said he should have some more drink. After having it they left the house in company with a young man named Cunning, and went to Usher's public-house, Octagon-street, where he and the young man had some gin, the deceased refusing to have anything. He asked her for some money and she told him that she had none, having left it at home. They then went to Devonport and before going home he had something more to drink at the Tamar Inn. On getting home he asked deceased to let him see the money, and she refused. He went to bed about 11 p.m., leaving the deceased downstairs, and on not finding her in the room on waking up at 1.30 a.m., he went downstairs and found her asleep on the floor in her father's bedroom. He awoke her and they went upstairs together, where he caught her hold in fun and she called out "Oh my." At two o'clock he dropped off to sleep and knew nothing more until he was awakened and informed that the girl was missing. Witness said he thought there was something wrong with the deceased as she appeared to be of weak intellect and had a very quick temper. - The Coroner thought it was quite clear that after the quarrel the poor girl in frenzy committed suicide. He thought no sane person would act in such a manner. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned, and that there was no evidence to shew how the deceased came to be in the water.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 December 1880
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at Tiverton on Monday evening on the body of the man JAMES HEPPER , who committed suicide by taking poison, as he intimated in a letter to the Mayor on Sunday. The deceased had lived apart from his wife, and had lately appeared greatly dejected; and after about half an hour's consultation, the Jury, of whom Mr W. Bartlett was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 December 1880
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, at the Navy and Army public-house, Castle-street, last evening, as to the death of a child named JAMES HENRY ROACH, aged three months. The mother ,ELLEN ROACH, stated that on Wednesday night, she went to bed with the child lying on her arm, and on Thursday morning it was in the same position, but bed. From its appearance the child probably died from convulsions; and the Jury, of whom Mr James Smith was Foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - THOMAS WARNE, 47, pensioner, Plymouth, died suddenly during Wednesday night at his lodgings, 93 King-street, although he had not been well for some days. At ten o'clock yesterday morning a man named Coaze, who slept in the same room, got up, but did not notice anything with reference to the deceased. About seven o'clock the deceased was in a peculiar position, and on going over to him found that he was dead. It was mentioned that WARNE had been in India for twenty-nine years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of WILLIAM DAVEY, aged 83, a dyer, residing in St. Sidwell's. On October 21st deceased fell down stairs and so injured himself that he expired on Tuesday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 December 1880
PLYMOUTH - The Death Of MR E. SQUARE. The Inquest. - The Inquest touching the death of MR ELLIOT SQUARE was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, yesterday afternoon, at the house of the deceased, No. 5, Athenaeum-terrace. The Jury empanelled consisted of the following well-known residents of Plymouth:- Mr C. C. Edwards, Mr Henry Davey, Mr J. H. Page, Mr F. H. Goulding, Mr J. Bruford, Mr W. Heath, Mr R. Risdon, Mr C. Limpenny, Mr E. Earwicker, Mr Ralph Plimsaul, Mr T. P. Bond, and Mr F. B. Westlake. Mr Edwards was elected Foreman. Besides the Jury there were present MR SQUARE and MR W. SQUARE, the uncle and cousin of the deceased, and Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon and the witnesses. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings said: It is not my practice to deliver any remarks before the conclusion of the Inquest, but I think we shall all feel that this is an occasion upon which, if I did not say a word or two, it would appear as if I were wanting in ordinary feeling. I am sure you must, and certainly I do, feel it a most arduous, irksome and unwelcome task to have to preside on the present occasion. I could not open the Inquest without saying that anybody who knows the circumstances must feel that this is a most appalling accident, and it has happened to one known to us all, greatly respected by nearly everybody, and very much liked for his remarkable talents and genial disposition. And I think I may sincerely say that he has died without an enemy, and leaving a host of friends behind him. He died in the very prime of life, and at a time when he was probably offering more of expectation of future services than he had ever done before in his career. He is a great loss to the profession and to the courts in which he has worked, and it strikes me he is a loss to the public, because the late MR SQUARE possessed in his character elements of a high order - power of thought, assiduity in practice and general knowledge, perhaps beyond what most were aware of. Of these he had given some evidences, and probably had his life been spared he would have come out more as a public man in Plymouth. On that ground his loss is the more to be deplored. Of course, I am aware that wholesale accidents take place elsewhere. We have not to do with them now, but when an accident like this occurs in our midst so suddenly, and in a manner which may have happened to anyone in this room, we all feel it. When it has happened to one who was loved by those around him, one who adorned the sphere in which he worked and a man of so much promise as MR SQUARE was, I think we shall agree that we are met on as mournful and melancholy an occasion as could possibly have happened. I must apologise, gentlemen, for making these remarks. They do not, and I cannot, express my feelings. MR SQUARE and I had been intimately connected from the time of his commencing practice, and I knew him before, when he was with Mr Rooker. But at a time when I was lying ill for four months, and was not expected to recover, he held six and thirty Inquests right away for me and I believe he gave entire satisfaction to the Jury and all with whom he was concerned. I am glad to say that previous to his death he and I were on the most intimate terms, and in the past week he kindly offered to resume the deputyship for me, and if he had lived he would have done so. this is to me, therefore, a personal loss, but it is a greater loss to many. - In conclusion the Coroner apologised to the Jury for the limited space at their disposal, but observed that there were circumstances that almost compelled him, with their consent, to hold the Inquest in the house. That, he believed, they would understand and agree to. - MR WILLIAM SQUARE, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, practising at Plymouth, said: I knew the deceased perfectly well. He was my cousin. His age was 40 at his last birthday, two months ago. The first I knew personally of the occurrence is that I was sent for to come and see him on Saturday afternoon. I arrived at the house at a quarter before three. He was lying on the table in the back dining-room. I found his left eye destroyed and that portion of the brain was protruding into the orbit, taking the place of the eye itself, and that even brain had been lost so that it was found on the face outside. I did not find any other injuries then, but I sat up all the night with him, and I found out during the night other injuries. The injuries to the head formed a necessarily fatal accident, and the other injuries were also sufficient to have caused death. He had a fracture of the sternum (the breast bone), fracture of the right collar bone, seven ribs were broken, the lungs were punctured, he had one of the intestines burst and there was a fracture of the tibia on the right side. It was a hopeless case from the first. He was only sufficiently conscious to say he was in a great deal of pain, but he soon even got beyond that. He was never sufficiently conscious to say anything about the occurrence. In my judgment the injuries were such as would be caused by the shaft of a cab coming violently into contact with the deceased. He died at half-past eleven yesterday morning. - Mr Alexander Marshall said:- At twenty minutes past two on Saturday afternoon Mrs Marshall and I left No 1. Athenaeum-street in a four-wheeled cab which I had brought from the stand in Osborne-place. It was the cab of a man named Perkins I have been told. Our in[?] was placed in the cab before we started. Outside there was a large trunk, a [?] box, a black leather bag, and a hamper. I think that was all, but I cannot be certain. The trunk was a heavy one; the other boxes were not. Mrs Marshall and I got into the cab. At that time I noticed the horse was very fidgety, and a boy was holding it. My wife said "Whoa" to the horse before she got in. The horse moved, I think, about a yard. The driver mounted, and the vehicle proceeded down the street. I noticed nothing until I saw a man running by the side of the carriage. At that time I was not conscious that the horse had started. The road was rather out of order, and the carriage jolted pretty much. Just before getting opposite the Rev. Dr. Wilkinson's house I was conscious that the horse had run away. I looked forward to the driver, but could not see what he was doing - whether the reins were in his hand - as he was sitting on the opposite side. I knew practically nothing more until there was a crash. Whether the driver was doing all he could to pull the horse up, I could not say. I had not seen a railway wagon, or gentlemen standing. I could see nothing. The result of the crash was that the door on my side was smashed, the horse fell down, my wife was thrown into the bottom of the carriage, and my own arm was slightly hurt. The driver, I understand, was thrown off. I was told the luggage was thrown off. That I saw nothing of. I jumped out of the carriage, but did not see either the driver or the deceased gentleman. Afterwards I saw the deceased carried away on a shutter. - You saw the deceased carried away. Tell us what became of you then. Did you go away or stay? - I stayed about twenty-five minutes or half-an hour. Then I got another cab and took my wife to the station. Then I came back to this house to inquire. - MR WM. SQUARE; I met Mr Marshall as I was coming out. He inquired of me personally. - Examination continued: One of the trunks was a very large and heavy one, about 80lbs, or 90lbs. It was placed in the space between the splashboard and the driver's seat. It could not have fallen off on the horse. - Mr E. M. Russel Rendle, member of the Royal College of Surgeons, residing at No. 1 Athenaeum-terrace, said: About twenty minutes past two on Saturday afternoon I had just got out of my carriage on the pavement in front of my house. I met MR ELLIOT SQUARE and he was on the pavement walking towards George-street. He usually walked on the terrace. He stopped to speak. My carriage had gone down the lane. I was standing with my back towards Millbay and he was facing Millbay, with his back to the town, about 18 inches or a couple of feet apart. We were close together and he was just going on. - What occurred, Mr Rendle? I heard a call, but what attracted my attention was seeing the horse's head at my side. I just saw the horse's head. I turned on one side, there was a crash, and then I was knocked down by a box. - You did not notice either of the shafts? - No; it was so instantaneous. I was knocked down, and the box fell on my back. It did not occupy a second of time. It shewed what force it had come with, that at night I found my back heavily bruised. The first I saw when I got up was the horse lying on the very spot where the deceased and I had been standing, the wheel was close up by the steps, and one shaft was broken. The luggage was scattered about. Hearing a cry I clambered over the cab thinking that the driver must have been injured. When I saw the deceased he was being lifted up. His feet were about 2 ½ feet from where he had been standing. I saw what had happened to him - the injury to his eye - and that he was bleeding very much and quite unconscious. I sent for a shutter, got a rug, and different things from my house and deceased was removed to his residence. - You were standing on the pavement at the outside of the terrace; the cab must have come the whole width of the pavement from where it ought to have been? - Yes; so far that the wheel was locked in the terrace. - The thing was so sudden it was utterly out of his power or yours to get out of the way? - Completely. - Edward Perkins, of No. 4 Summerland-street, cab proprietor, was next called. After being cautioned by the Coroner that he need not be sworn if he feared that anything he said would imperil him or cause blame to be thrown upon him, Perkins was sworn. He said: Some time after two on Saturday I was called to No. 1, Athenaeum-street. I went to the house to bring the luggage out, having placed my horse and cab heading down the street. I have had the horse for nearly two months I should think and have driven it all the time. Before that it belonged at the Bodmin Hotel, I am told, and used to work in the 'bus. The horse was aged. The luggage I placed on the outside of the carriage was four or five packages. There was nothing very large, nothing was on the roof of the cab at all. The large trunk was on the footboard in front and the others on top of that and on the seat. - The Coroner: Was it all put snug so that nothing could roll on to the horse? - It was, sir. - Did you notice the horse was restive? Well, when I stopped at the door it was as I have seen it before, wanting to get away. It had not been in the stable, but had been at work every day. - Was it restless? It was rather restless. There was a boy looking on and I got him to hold it till I started. The reins were across the dash and I took them in my hand at once. The moment I got up the horse started as fast as he could go. I had not used the whip, it was in the socket. I don't know whether I had sat down. - How were you holding the reins? - I had one in each hand, and my left arm on the luggage, but that did not interfere with my power to hold the horse. I pulled as hard as I could and kept him straight. When I got to the bottom a wagon - as well as I could see in the fright a goods wagon - was passing in front. The horse saw the wagon and swerved to clear it a little to the right. He was going too fast for me to turn him. He dashed across as fast as ever he could go right toward the gateway of the terrace. I noticed the two gentlemen standing there. I saw who they were, and I shouted all I knew. They were standing right at the entrance to the gate. I just remember seeing the left shaft strike MR SQUARE in the eye. He was standing sideways. I don't remember anything for two or three minutes afterwards, but someone told me I was thrown over on the steps of the terrace. When I got up the horse was on the pavement, the cab was on the pavement, and MR SQUARE was being lifted up. I gave my name to the policeman who asked for it. - MR SQUARE: What is your age, Mr Perkins? - Two-and-twenty, sir. - How long have you been a cabdriver? - Ever since I was of age, sir, that is four years. - Of whom did you buy the horse? - I exchanged for it to Mr Westlake, a cab proprietor. He had not had it more than a week. He had driven it, but it was too heavy for a hansom, which was all he wanted it for. - Is he a hard-mouthed horse? - Not at all sir. I always drove him with a double-ring snaffle. - If he is not a hard-mouthed horse, why didn't you pull him up at once? - I couldn't sir. I tried all I could. - You don't know your work. If he was not a hard-mouthed horse you could have pulled him up when he started. you can always pull up a horse when it starts unless it is hard-mouthed. Did you jag his mouth? A man who knew his work would do that. - I pulled as hard as I could. I ought to know my work; I have been with horses all my life. - have you a drag? - Yes, I had the break on tight, sir. - When did you put it on? - Before I stopped at the door, sir. - Is there any connection between your shafts at the back? - Yes, sir; there is a fixed rod. - Is there any evidence of its having struck the horse? - Oh, no, sir. - MR SQUARE remarked that the connection of the shafts in the way indicated was a source of danger. - MR SQUARE: Has he ever bolted before? - Never that I am aware of, sir. - Has he ever tried to do so? - No, sir. - Were you certain about the strength of your reins and so on? - Yes, sir, they were all right. Nothing at all was broken. - There were stones in the road part of the way, I understand? - Yes, sir. - And yet you could not pull up the horse there? - No, sir, I could not. - Mr Russel Rendle: Most of the road is newly stoned. - MR SQUARE: You could not pull up your horse there, and yet he was not hard-mouthed. - By MR WM. SQUARE: I had been on the stand since about 11 o'clock. This was my first job. - MR SQUARE remarked that he thought the Jury ought to see the snuffle with which Perkins was driving, and the Coroner directed the witness to fetch it. Before he left a few other questions were asked. - Mr Bruford: Can you account for the horse running away? - Witness: The only reason I can give is that it has been very quiet in our line this last month, nothing at all doing, and the horses get a bit fresh. That is the only reason I can give. - Before the witness left MR SQUARE said he hoped it would be understood that in asking these questions, he was not seeking to incriminate Perkins in any way, nor thinking he had been doing wrong, but only seeking the exact facts. He did not want to ask Perkins a question that would in any way involve his character, or anything of the sort. He wanted to know the facts. (Hear, hear). - The Coroner: I believe, Perkins, you are a total abstainer? - Witness: I never tasted any intoxicating liquor. - You have been a total abstainer from your birth, I believe? - Yes, sir. - The Coroner: That settles the question of sobriety. - Mr Bruford: Is your carriage in good order? - Witness: It has not been out of the coachbuilder's hands two months. - P.C. James, of the Borough police force: At half-past two on Saturday I was standing outside the Victoria Hotel, on my beat. Before the accident occurred I had seen a goods van pass, and as it passed I heard a cry "look up." Looking to Athenaeum street I saw a horse in a four-wheeled cab abreast of the Crescent Lodge. It had evidently run away. It was heading straight across the road but just cleared the tail of the van. The horse seeing its danger swerved to the right. It went over the pavement and the cabman was knocked off his seat. Who it was I could not see, but a man was struck down, and I found it to be the deceased. - At the time you saw the cab was it possible for the driver to prevent the horse going upon the pavement? - No, sir, I should not think it was. He was pulling both reins very tight. - Was it at all possible for the deceased to get out of the way? - If he had seen the danger as soon as I did he might. But he could not see it, because of the van passing along. - Edwin Perkins (recalled) produced he snaffle which was in use on his horse at the time of the accident. - By MR SQUARE: I never drove the horse with any other bit but this. It is the same I had in use at the time of the accident. - MR SQUARE: This bit is a very, very smooth one, and the horse that is driven with such a bit ought to have a very tender mouth indeed. - A Juror: Do you think it likely this horse had a tender mouth after being driven in a 'bus. - MR SQUARE: I should not like to say. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought there was no need to prolong this very painful Inquiry. They had had several witnesses, and he thought it would be admitted by all the thing had been exhausted. He did not think anybody could charge them with neglecting to obtain information bearing directly upon the points in question. He did not know that it had ever occurred to him to have had a more painfully graphic description it would be impossible, he thought, to get a more exact and graphic description of the whole occurrence. They could almost fancy themselves on the spot. They had the description of two gentlemen meeting, Dr Rendle's carriage just gone round the corner, the cab at Mr Marshall's, the horse a little restive and a boy put to hold it. Mr Marshall and his wife get in, and then, according to the cabman, the horse immediately started off. The horse ran with great violence down the street, and then at the bottom there came a van, which it just cleared, and the momentum was great that it was driven across the pavement and the result was the poor deceased was caught in this cruel manner and destroyed. How it occurred there could be no question. The two gentlemen had no power to get out of the way. The van prevented them from seeing the danger. You could scarcely count ten before all was done. The only marvel was that there was such a providential deliverance by which Mr Russel Rendle escaped with his life. The only wonder was they were not sitting to Inquire about the death of two instead of one. The point for the Jury was whether they thought there was blame to be fairly attached to anyone in the matter. With regard to the luggage, it was not on the roof of the cab; it was properly stowed, and the man seemed to have exercised proper care. The man also got a boy to hold the horse. What he could not understand was what made the horse the instant the driver got into his place start off in this extraordinary manner. That the going down hill over stones further excited the horse there could be no doubt, he thought. The only thing for the Jury was to say whether they thought the deceased came to his death purely by accident, or whether they thought there was sufficient ground for throwing blame on the driver or anyone else. They were indebted to DR SQUARE for the exhaustive questions he had put with regard to the antecedents of the horse and he did not think anything prejudicial to the man had come out. If the Jury thought there was any necessity for it he would adjourn the Inquest and endeavour t procure more evidence, but he did not see what could be added. - In answer to Mr Bruford, the witness Perkins said he was sure the boy he asked to hold the horse did not spur it in any way. - The Coroner left the question to the Jury, and after a momentary consultation, the Foreman announced the unanimous verdict to be "Accidental Death." - The Coroner remarked that it was absolutely necessary to have held the Inquest to see whether blame was to e attached to anyone. - Mr Westlake: I should like to exonerate Perkins. - The Coroner: Oh! certainly. - The Foreman: We think no blame whatever attached to Perkins. - Mr Goulding questioned whether that was the opinion of the whole of the Jury, and after a little discussion, it was decided not to append any rider to the verdict. - MR SQUARE: If I might be allowed to say a word, I have driven for a great many years, am always driving in fact, and always have been, and I know the difficulty of driving. I know horses vary in temper remarkably, and they are harder mouthed at one time than another. I myself should wish to exonerate Perkins, if I may so ay, from all blame. I would say to him though, "I never would drive the horse with that bit again; never." - Perkins: I assure you, sir, I never saw the horse as he was then before. - MR SQUARE: I have a horse now that is quite different at one time than another. - The Jury wished to express their deep sympathy with the widow and friends of the deceased, in which the Coroner said he cordially joined, and MR SQUARE undertook to convey the expression of feeling on their behalf. - The Coroner: I may say I was in court today when the Judge of the County Court was so affected he could not proceed for several minutes, and gave the most handsome testimony to MR ELLIOT SQUARE'S character and ability that I think I ever heard expressed in public in my life, as well as his feeling would allow him. MR SQUARE said he hoped it would be understood that in the questions he had asked he had acted from no animus, and the Foreman, on behalf of the Jury, said they fully recognised the fact. - The Foreman: At the same time we cannot but express some kind of sympathy with Mr Rendle. - The Coroner: I think we may go further, and congratulate him sincerely that through the goodness of Providence he has been saved, a second time one may say, from such terrible danger. - Mr Russel Rendle: I do feel most deeply how mercifully I have been again preserved. - The Coroner: We all feel it, Mr Rendle. We trust that never during your lifetime you may be placed in such perd again. - The verdict having been signed, the Coroner thanked the Jury for their services, and they withdrew.

BERE FERRERS - Fatal Gun Accident At Beeralston. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of MR WILLIAM LANGMAN, farmer, of St. Dominick, Cornwall, who was accidentally shot while returning from a shooting party near Beeralston on the 16th ult, was held at the Edgcumbe Arms, Beeralston yesterday, before Mr W. Burd, of Okehampton, Deputy Coroner. Interest appeared to be taken in the Inquiry from a report having been circulated that the deceased died from an overdose of ether. Mr J. Loye, of Plymouth, watched the case on behalf of Mr Constable, in whose hands the gun was when it went off. - In opening the proceedings, the Coroner said that the medical gentleman for whose attendance the Inquiry was specially adjourned had not yet returned from his wedding tour, but as other medical men who assisted in the performance of the operation on the deceased were in attendance, he did not think the Inquiry need be further adjourned. - The first witness called was Benjamin Charles Constable, a student at the Western College, Plymouth, who before giving evidence expressed his great regret at the accident, and his sympathy with the friends of the deceased. He then stated that on the day in question he was present at a shooting party at Leigh Farm, and as he was not a sportsman he had not a gun of his own, nor was there one prepared for him. He was standing with MR JOHN LANGMAN, junr., and his friend suggested that he (MR J. LANGMAN) should lend witness his gun for a minute, so that he might fire at a rabbit if one should spring up. He lent him the gun. After a lapse of five or ten minutes, no opportunity having occurred to fire at a rabbit, it was suggested that as there seemed no chance of any more sport the party should go home, and acting on the suggestion the party moved away towards Leigh Farm. After walking some distance it was suggested that a live rabbit which had been captured should be thrown up in a field they had entered in order that he or his friend might have an opportunity of having a shot. It was decided that witness should fire and he accordingly did so, and killed it. The party then walked on towards home, he following with the gun under his arm. Within a few seconds he remembered lifting the cock of the barrel which had been fired, with the intention of seeing that all was right, and as he was in the act of pulling the trigger to put it down the other barrel went off. He did not know how it went off; but he concluded that his finger must have accidentally touched the trigger of the other barrel. The gun was being carried with the muzzle pointing to the ground. He did not remember seeing anyone directly in front of him; but immediately the gun went off he heard the deceased cry out as though he were hurt, and saw him fall. On examination it was found that he had been shot in the left ankle. The wound was temporarily bandaged by some of the party, and deceased was conveyed in a cart to Leigh Farm. Previous to that day he had never seen the deceased. Doctors were sent for from Horrabridge, and witness went to Tavistock for the purpose of hastening on Dr butters, whom he understood would pass through Tavistock on his way. As he did not meet him, he saw Dr Phillpotts, and accompanied him to the farm, and then found that Dr Butters was already there. - By the Jury: I knew both barrels were loaded when I handled the gun. Had not lately been in the habit of carrying a gun. I need hardly say that it was a great surprise for me when the gun went off. My reason for raising the cock of the barrel which had been discharged was for the purpose of seeing that it was all right. - William Roberts, a boy in the employ of the father of the deceased, gave similar evidence as to the proceedings before the accident, but could not tell how the accident occurred. - In answer to the Jury, witness said that the deceased was only about six or seven feet from Mr Constable. He did not notice Mr Constable do anything to the gun with his hands, besides the lifting of it and the latter he saw by looking back. Mr Butters, surgeon, of Horrabridge, described the injuries. Both bones in the leg were completely shattered, and all the blood vessels blown away. He attempted to feel the pulse of deceased, but it was prostrate. His appearance was blanched, and he was evidently suffering from a severe shock to the system. Witness suggested that deceased should take some brandy, and as he refused to take it from his friends he administered it himself. Dr Phillpotts afterwards arrived, and they examined the leg together. Witness suggested to the friends that nothing could be done that night, and on the following day Dr Phillpotts, Dr Swain, of Devonport, Dr Thom and himself met at the house, and after examining the leg they considered it necessary to remove it. After making the necessary arrangements, deceased was placed under the influence of ether. They then proceeded to remove the limb. Shortly before the completion of the operation Dr Phillpotts, who was administering the ether remarked that deceased's pulse, which had been better in the morning, had become weak, and very shortly afterwards the pulse was imperceptible. Brandy was administered, and artificial respiration performed in order, if possible, to resuscitate him. After half an hour or more it was found that there was no chance of restoring animation. His opinion was that deceased died from a shock of the system immediately after the removal of the limb. In his presence deceased consented to the operation being performed. - Dr Paul Swain, of Devonport, said he was called about twenty-four hours after the accident occurred, and found deceased suffering from one of the worst gunshot wounds he ever saw. There was no doubt as to the necessity of amputation, and, in conjunction with the other medical men present, he decided on using ether. Dr Phillpotts placed deceased under ether, and witness amputated the leg below the knee. Deceased died, he considered, at the moment the limb was separated from the body. He believed the immediate cause of his death was the shock of the operation. It was a well-known fact that patients often died at that moment. He advised the use of ether because it was well known that ether was a great stimulant to the heart's action and was therefore not only safe but advisable in the case of a person in deceased's depressed condition. He watched the administration of the ether very carefully, and considered that it was administered with every possible care, and the patient took it unusually well. - The Coroner briefly summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 14 December 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - Yesterday afternoon the Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Standard Inn, Queen-street, on the body of KATE BOWDEN, aged four months, the daughter of a joiner residing at 48 Queen-street. The infant had been in a delicate state of health from its birth, and on Sunday morning the mother found it dead in bed. Mr Cutcliffe, M.D., gave it as his opinion that the child had died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 December 1880
OKEHAMPTON - The Explosion At Okehampton. The Inquest. - Mr Fulford held an Inquest at the Fountain Inn, Okehampton, yesterday, on the body of RICHARD HODGE, who, as reported yesterday, was killed on Sunday afternoon by the explosion of a shrapnel percussion fuse shell. At the base of Yes Tor is the range where the different batteries of Royal Artillery stationed in Okehampton Park for a certain season of the year meet for experimental artillery practice. In the course of the practice many of the shells discharged do not explode, owing to defects in construction, and although the soldiers are supposed to collect these and bury them, on such rugged land as Dartmoor it is impossible to recover all. Considering the large amount of iron which is left on the range as the remains of exploded shells, it would be matter of surprise if on the departure of the soldiers poor people did not collect it for sale, and when by any chance an unexploded shell is discovered, the find is doubly valuable by the large number of lead bullets which are inside it. Shells with time fuses do not explode unless fire is brought in contact with them, and as children have often opened these without any dangerous effect, people living in the neighbourhood have come to regard all shells as harmless. Hundreds of shells are now lying about in the immediate vicinity of the range, and in many houses in Okehampton unexploded shells are rolled about the floors by children as playthings. Shells with a percussion fuse cannot easily be distinguished from others by the uninitiated, these are much more dangerous engines to handle, because a blow is sufficient to make them explode. Since the accident travellers on Dartmoor have experienced uneasiness because shells are very plentiful in the neighbourhood of Yes Tor and the weight of a cart wheel, or the effects of an accidental kick might be sufficient to make one explode. It is also a common thing for people to set fire to furze in order to clear land for pasture, and the flames would be sufficient to explode any time fuse shell which might be near, and the two hundred bullets it contained would be blown a considerable distance. - Mr J. W. Boon, Mayor of Okehampton, was elected Foreman of the Jury. - SAMUEL HODGE, labourer, of Okehampton, said: The body I have seen is that of my father, RICHARD HODGE, who lived here, and was a hay cutter and binder. He was 54 years old, a married man with a grown up family. On Sunday morning he appeared to be well, and left home about ten in the morning, but I don't know where he intended going. He did not return home that night and on Monday morning I went and informed my uncle of his absence, and we searched for him on the moor. On Sunday I was out catching birds, and heard a shell burst on the moor and I remarked to my companion that someone "had got it this time." After searching some time on the moor, about 10 a.m., WILLIAM HODGE, my cousin, found a hat, which I recognised as my father's. We afterwards found a piece of bone and a bit of flesh near. - George Seymour spoke to having met the deceased, who said he was looking for shells, and witness said, "Be careful you don't pick up any full ones," and deceased replied that there was no danger, as one of his sons had knocked a 16-pounder open in his house. - SAMUEL HODGE, recalled, said one of his brothers did bring a shell home about three weeks ago, and broke it open. His father had often been from home, but we did not know where he went. Sometimes he brought home the brass tops of shells. - George Seymour, continuing, said where deceased's hat was found was a hole from which, apparently, a shell had been dug up. Witness found a bag containing about 250 bullets, knife blown to pieces, pocket blown out, and a purse from which the contents had been blown a considerable distance from the spot where the accident occurred. He had seen many of these unexploded shells lying about, and had always buried them or thrown them in water. - Richard Yeo gave evidence as to the finding of the body, and stated that the distance between where the bullets and the other things were found and the deceased was lying was 256 paces. - Mr Waters, surgeon, stated that he found a large lacerated wound on the upper and inner side of the right thigh. All the important vessels were shattered, but the bone of the thigh was not broken. There were no internal injuries. The left hand was completely blown away at the wrist joint, and there were minor injuries. He presumed that deceased was holding the shell against his thigh, and was hammering it when it exploded, the major portion of the charge flying from him. He had made particular inquiries and found that one trace of blood could be found between where the shell burst and the body was found, so that he must have been blown to where the body was lying, as, from his condition, he could not possibly have walked or crawled. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the deceased appeared to be in the habit of spending that day which Christians usually spent in the bosom of their families in work which was not sufficiently lucrative to make it worth his while to devote any other day to it. He suggested that unexploded shells should be carefully searched for after the artillery practice and removed as the leaving of them about might lead to serious accidents. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from the Accidental Explosion of a Shell which he was breaking open. A rider requested the Coroner to communicate to the War Office the facts of the case, and advise the authorities to take steps to remove unexploded shells.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 December 1880
TORQUAY - Inquiry was made at Torquay yesterday by Dr Gaye, District coroner, into the circumstances of the death of JOHN OWDEN SMYTH, aged 22, who received fatal injuries by being thrown from a bicycle. Deceased, whose parents reside at Underwood, Torquay, left home with his bicycle on Monday morning. He was inexperienced in the art of riding the machine, having commenced to learn but a few days previously. About an hour after leaving his father's house the unfortunate young fellow was found lying upon the road near Soloman's Post, in the parish of Maidencumbe. He was in a dying state, and expired about ten minutes afterwards. No one witnessed the accident, but it is conjectured that the machine having just descended an incline must have gone over a heap of rubbish by the side of the road, tilted over, and thrown deceased on to a large boundary stone, with which his head came violently in contact. The bicycle had no break attached to it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 December 1880
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday afternoon on the body of BENJAMIN RICKETTS, aged 71, pensioner, 34 John-street, who died suddenly in the surgery of the Dockyard on Saturday afternoon. The deceased who was in his usual health, went to the surgery for the purpose of obtaining medicine for his grandson, a man named SAMBELLS. He had not been in the surgery a minute before he fell forward upon the floor. Dr Fisher, the dockyard surgeon, was sent for, but within two minutes of his arrival and before anything could be done the deceased expired. Dr Fisher afterwards made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found organic disease of the heart to such an extent, that it was a matter of astonishment life could have been sustained so long. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 27 December 1880
NEWTON ABBOT - Death By Poisoning Of A Coroner's Wife. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday last, at Newton Abbot, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH EMILY GAYE, 42 years of age, the wife of DR H. GAYE, Coroner, who died from the effects of taking carbolic acid on the previous night. The Inquest was held at the residence of DR GAYE, Devon Square. It appeared from the evidence of DR GAYE and his servants that on Thursday evening the doctor attended a dinner-party. He left home just after seven o'clock, his wife being at the time perfectly well, and in very good spirits. The deceased lady retired to rest about half-past ten, and DR GAYE returned home about eleven o'clock. He went to his bedroom about quarter to twelve, when he noticed his wife, who was in bed, was breathing very short and peculiarly. He spoke to her, but getting no answer he touched her, when he noticed she was unconscious. By the side of the bed was a tumbler which evidently had contained carbolic acid. DR GAYE, considering she had taken carbolic acid, sent for his partner, Dr Scott, and in the meantime used the stomach-pump. Dr Scott was soon in attendance, and every means was taken that medical skill could suggest to restore the deceased, but all proved futile, as she died shortly afterwards, evidently from the effects of having taken carbolic acid. As nothing peculiar had been noticed in the conduct of MRS GAYE, the presumption was that she had taken the carbolic acid by mistake for a sleeping draught. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 December 1880
NEWTON ABBOT - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at Newton Abbot, touching the death of a little boy, 2 ½ years of age, named WILLIAM BAKER, the child of WILLIAM BAKER, a tailor, residing in Fairfield-terrace. It appeared that a fortnight since the child fell backwards into some hot water, so severely injuring himself that he died on Monday after suffering severe agony. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 30 December 1880
KINGS NYMPTON - Suspected Murder In North Devon. (Special Telegram), Barnstaple, Wednesday Night. - A Christmas festival at the village of Kingsnympton, near Southmolton, appears to have ended in an unexpectedly tragical manner. It seems that a number of men from the parishes of Romansleigh and Kingsnympton met at the New Inn, Kingsnympton, on Monday evening. The Romansleigh men were giving a Christy Minstrel entertainment, and all went well until ten o'clock, when the landlady - Lucy Bowden - asked P.C. W. Blackmore to clear the house. He cleared out all except the Romansleigh men who went into the back kitchen for their top-coats. Whilst there the other men were heard to say something which alarmed those inside, and in consequence the landlady asked the policeman to see the Romansleigh men out of the village. This the constable did, following with a few others at some distance behind. When they had got about a quarter of a mile on, he heard several men holloa, and after that he heard William Symons, of Kingsnympton say, "I'll balls the b....." He hurried on and a short distance ahead he saw a body lying on its face and hands in the road. The night being dark he lifted the body by the right shoulder and heard a moan. John Symons assisting him, they got the man up, and finding he was then dead, took him back to the New Inn. Dr T. Daly, of Chulmleigh, was sent for, and the body was first examined by him, and then by Dr Furze. There were not many marks of violence, but the principal one was behind the ear, which was considerably swollen, was full of blood and the flesh beaten into a pulp. There was no other fracture of the skull, but, on opening, he found a quantity of blood on the base and the left side of the brain, which was sufficient to cause death. RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, son of the deceased, whilst walking with his father towards home, heard some remarks which led him to advise his father to go inside a hedge. Someone then was heard to say, "We will kill the first we come to." Deceased replied, "They won't hurt an old man like I am." The son walked on, and when he had got a short distance ahead of the deceased, he heard a blow and his father screaming "Murder, murder." He turned and saw his father fall. He ran then about a quarter of a mile and overtook those in front. He asked a man named Andrew Crang to go back with him and both returned, but the deceased had been taken to the New Inn before he got there. There was some ill-feeling exhibited at the Inn during the evening, when one of the men (Crang) threatened to turn the house inside out. Wm. Symons and another repeated similar words. On the following night Constable Blackmore apprehended Walter Leach and John Halland, and the next morning he apprehended Wm. Symons. In the course of conversation Symons said that Walter Leach never touched the man. The officer had examined the place where he found the deceased, and there saw marks of a scuffle, which led to the apprehension. An Inquest on the body was held yesterday at the New Inn, before Mr J. H. Toller, Coroner. Leach and Symons, agricultural labourers, made statements as to what they knew of the facts, but Halland declined to say anything. The deceased was sixty five years of age. The Inquest was adjourned until Monday for further investigation.

EXETER - Singular Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Teignmouth Inn, West Quarter before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of ANNIE STONE, aged 27, a single woman, which was found in the Rack Close Mill-leat on Monday last. Mary Ann Johnson, residing in Water lane, stated that she had known the deceased, who was a charwoman, for seven weeks. She had heard her say that she belonged to Bridgwater, and that she had no parents, brothers or sisters. She had been a lodger in witness's house and left on Monday morning, saying that she would be back soon. She saw nothing more of the deceased until the night, when she came to the door in a drunken state, and said she did not know what she was about. Witness advised her to come in and go to bed. She replied, "All right," came inside the door, took her hat off, and went out again. She then ran down the steps leading to the mill-leat and jumped into the water. Witness heard the splash and called a man and a constable, and they took her out of the water. She must have been in the water about twenty minutes, and when recovered she was dead. The deceased had an illegitimate child. She was in the habit of drinking a good deal. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 31 December 1880
OKEHAMPTON - Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Star Inn, Okehampton, yesterday, on the body of ANDREW HOWARD, aged 66, who had been invalided for about eight years, and died suddenly as he was going to bed on the previous night. The Jury, of whom Mr James Ward was Foreman, gave a verdict, in accordance with the evidence of Dr Waters, that deceased died from Heart Disease.