Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted
Page 1 of 4

Help and advice for Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury 1881-1882

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it. We have a number of people each maintaining different sections of the web site, so it is important to submit information via a link on the relevant page otherwise it is likely to go to the wrong person and may not be acted upon.

Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

[printed in Plymouth.]

1881-1882

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

: Adams(3); Alford; Alix; Allen(2); Anthony; Arthur; Ashton; Bailey; Baker; Balhatchet; Ball; Barr; Barrett; Barry; Bartlett; Battershill; Bayley; Beckley; Beer(2); Begbey; Belmanno; Bennett; Bess; Bevan; Bickell; Billing; Bishop; Blake; Blight; Bond; Bonney; Boswarva; Bowden; Box; Braddick; Bramwell; Brealey; Bridgman; Brinham; Bromley; Brooking(2); Brooks(2); Brown(4); Buckingham; Buller; Burn; Burnet; Burnett; Burns; Burrows; Burt; Burton; Butler; Buzza; Byrne; Callighan; Carkeet; Carter(3); Chubb; Chudder; Clark; Coaker; Cole(2); Coleridge; Collier; Collings; Collins; Collom; Connet; Cooper(2); Corin; Creasy; Crispin; Crocker; Cummings; Damerell; Daniells; Davey(2); Davidson; Davis(2); Dawe; Dear; Dingle; Dixon; Dodridge; Doidge; Down; Downs; Drewett; Dunn; Eales; East; Eckhart; Edgecumbe; Edwards(3); Elford; Elliott; Ellis(2); Emmery; Evans(3); Evely; Ewings; Exworthy; Ezechiel; Farley(2); Finch; Firth; Fisher; Flashman; Fletcher; Flinn; Fourte; Fowell; Franks; Fulford; Furneaux; Fursman; Gale; Gallop; Garn; Gavagnin; Gerritt; Gibbings; Gibbs; Gilbert; Giovanno; Gluyas; Godden; Gomer; Gould; Green; Greenslade; Greet; Griffin; Guyett; Hallett; Halvosa; Ham; Hambly; Hancock; Handford; Hannaford; Hanson; Harris(5); Hartnel; Haskell; Hatch; Hawking(2); Hawkings; Head(2); Heale; Heard; Heath; Heathershire; Hellen; Helmore; Hicks; Hill(2); Hilton; Hobbs(2); Hocker; Hocking; Holdsworth; Hole; Holland(2); Holloway; Holman; Holmes(2); Hood; Hooper; Hopkins; Howard; Hurrell; Huxtable; Irish; Isaacs(2); Ivey; Jackman(2); James; Jarvis; Jeffery; Jenkins; Jenkinson; Jerred; Jewell(2); Johns; Johnsson; Jones(3); Jordan; Joy; Keane; Keeble; Keen; Kellard; Kempe; Kendle; Kerry; Kerslack; King; Kitt(2); Knight; Lacey; Langdon; Langtry; Lardean; Launder; Lavers; Leacher; Lee; Lethbridge; Lewis; Lillicrapp; Lister; Long(2); Loye; Luscombe(2); Lynch; Maconaghey; Madge; Manning; Marsden; Martin(5); Masters(2); Matcham; Matthews; Maunder; Maynard; McBridge; McFarlane; McGeorge; Metherell; Miller; Millman; Mills; Mock; Monaghan; Morgan; Mortimore; Murch; Murray(2); Nancarrow; Napper; Netting; Nicholls; Norman; Northey; Norton; O'Leary; Olivari; O'Neil; Osborne; Owen; Palmer(2); Parker; Parlby; Parnell; Parsons; Paul; Payne; Pearce; Pearse; Pedrick; Peek; Pengelly; Pennington; Penwill; Perham; Perkins; Perriam; Perry; Perves; Peters; Petherick; Phipps; Pike; Pile; Platt; Pomeroy; Pooley; Pope; Pordvin; Pound; Pratt; Prout; Purfitt; Quance; Raddon; Radford; Radmore; Ram; Ramson; Raper; Redhouse; Redwood; Reed; Reeves; Reilly; Rendle(2); Reynolds; Rice; Richards; Richardson; Roach; Roberts(4); Rousall; Rowden; Rowe; Russell; Salter; Saunders; Searle; Serl; Shambrock; Shapter; Shepherd; Sheppard; Sherriff; Sleep; Smale(2); Smith(3); Snell; Snow; Somerfield; Squires; Stanbury; Stapleton; Staplin(2); Stark; St. Clair; Steer; Stephens(2); Stevens; Stoate; Stoneman; Stowe; Stranger; Stuttaford; Symons; Tarr; Tavernor; Taylor; Teppett; Thomas; Tickle; Toal; Toll; Towey; Townshend; Trevethen; Tribble; Trott; Truan; Tucker(2); Tuckett; Turner; Turpin; Tyler; Underhill; Vigurs; Vinson; Viviani; Wakeham; Walling; Wallis; Walters(2); Ward; Warren; Webber; Webster; Wellington; West(2); Westacott; Westcott; Wheeler; Whipple; White; Willcocks; Williams(5); Willing; Willis; Willoughby; Wills(2); Wilson(3); Wollacott; Wonnacott; Wood; Woodley; Wooldridge; Yelland; Yeoman

Western Morning News, Monday 3 January 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devonport Police Court, on Saturday evening on the body of WILLIAM SAMUEL WILLIAMS, aged 41 years, a naval pensioner, who committed suicide on Saturday morning by hanging himself. The deceased was of weak intellect, and some time since was an inmate of an asylum. Recently he quarrelled with his relatives, and so late as Thursday last was summoned by his mother before the magistrates for an assault. The summons was adjourned for a month in order to see how the man behaved himself in the meantime, and since then he shewed signs of mental derangement. On Friday night he was very restless, and told the persons with whom he lived at 34 James-street that he wanted to see his mother. They promised that in the morning they would see her for him, and this seemed to satisfy him. Early on Saturday morning a moaning noise was heard in the passage, and a waterman named Hoskings, who lives in the same house, was aroused by the disturbance. On going over the stairs Hoskings found that the deceased had tied one end of a woollen scarf around the handrail of the banisters and the other end around his neck, and was trying to strangle himself. Hoskings released him and led him into his room, leaving him there for a few minutes, whilst he returned to his own apartments to dress. When he went downstairs again he found the deceased hanging from the door of his room, to which he had tied the scarf. Hoskings was so unnerved that he could not cut the deceased down; but his daughter ran for assistance and in a few minutes returned with Police-Sergeant Webber, who released the deceased and sent for medical aid, but it was found that the neck had been dislocated. Sergeant Webber informed the Jury that he had known the deceased for several years. He was a man of very weak intellect, and when in drink - as he occasionally was - appeared unfit to be at large. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 4 January 1881
LYDFORD - Princetown. Inquest. - An Inquiry touching the death of JAMES TOWEY, aged twenty-seven, was held by Mr Fulford, Coroner, at the Prison yesterday. Death was attributed to consumption. The deceased was tried at Leeds Assizes for stealing, and sentenced to eight years' penal servitude, October 1878.

KINGS NYMPTON - The Alleged Murder In North Devon. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The Inquest on the body of the murdered man, RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, was continued at the New Inn, Kingsnympton, yesterday, before Mr G. H. Toller, Coroner for the District. The Foreman of the Jury was Mr L. Buckingham of Collacott Farm, and the thirteen others were all farmers from the neighbourhood. Superintendent Wood, of Southmolton, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police and the prisoners were absent and unrepresented. - The first witness was Sergeant Nott, who gave evidence similar to that at the magisterial Inquiry at Southmolton on Saturday, and which was in corroboration of the evidence of P.C. Blackmore, given at the previous Inquiry by the Coroner on Wednesday last. - In answer to a Juryman, the Sergeant said he had not found who was the owner of the hat he discovered in the field, but he had no doubt it belonged to Leach. - A Juryman: I am informed that Mrs Mitchell, with whom Leach lodged, would swear it was hit hat. - The Coroner thought such not material. - In reply to the Coroner, P.C. Blackmore stated that he had been informed that Hulland possessed a life preserver and, with a view to searched the house, he went to Southmolton for a warrant, but could not obtain one. He, however, had the consent of Hulland's sister to search his box. He searched his box and also a tool chest, but he could find nothing there of the description of a life preserver. He, however, found a piece of lead called a plumb bob. He walked with the three prisoners for some distance, but saw nothing in their hands, nor did he believe they had anything. - Superintendent Wood: It is rumoured that Hulland has a life preserver, but no one will say he has seen it in his hand. - A Juryman: Bob Gomer says he has seen him with it. - The Coroner: That is no proof that he had it on this occasion. - RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, son of deceased, repeated his evidence and again swore that he saw something long in the hand of the man who struck his father. - In answer to the Jury, Dr Daly said he did not think the mark on the deceased's head could have been produced by the fist, nor by a kick, nor by dragging along. The injury to the brain, the result of the blow behind the ear, was the cause of death. From the character of the wound behind the ear it was not possible for it to have been produced by a fist only; if so, it was a most extraordinary blow. It was such a blow as a blunt instrument or life preserver would give. - The Jury: If he had a life preserver with him he would not have carried it home. - Dr Daly: If BUCKINGHAM saw a man with a stick, as he states, he could have recognised the features. - The Jury said that on the last occasion young BUCKINGHAM said he saw the man give a side blow at his father. Now he stated (as at Southmolton) that he gave a blow from over the head. At the last Inquiry before the Coroner he also omitted to state that he saw anything in the hand of the man who gave the blow. - A Juryman: I know Hulland had a sailor's knife. - Dr Daly: that would not do. It would have broken the skin. - The Coroner then summed up the evidence, remarking that there were two courses open to the Jury - that of returning a verdict of manslaughter, or of murder. He did not think there was sufficient evidence of malice aforethought to justify a verdict of murder, and he did not think any Jury would return such a verdict. Murder was the killing of a person with malice aforethought or implied; manslaughter was killing a person without malice aforethought or implied. He did not think the person who struck the deceased intended to kill him; and, in fact, did not know him. There was no doubt from what had transpired that William Hulland struck the blow. It would be satisfactory to find out what the blow was struck for. Upon that would depend, to some extent, the nature of the verdict. There had been cases in which a man had been killed by a blow from a fist. If they thought Hulland was actuated by malice aforethought, they would return one of manslaughter. - The Jury considered their verdict for half-an-hour, consulting with the Coroner on two or three occasions. Ultimately the Foreman said:- "We have found a verdict of Manslaughter against John Hulland, and we also believe that Symons and Leach were accessories before the fact."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - A case of sudden death at Plymouth was investigated by the Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, last evening. SARAH JANE HALVOSA, aged 69, of 8 Friary-street, visited her daughter, MARY ANN HODGES, on Thursday; but the neighbours, not seeing her during Friday, sent to the daughter, who, on breaking into her mother's room, found her in bed dead. The deceased had been in ill-health for several years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TOTNES - Inquiry was made at Totnes yesterday by Dr Gaye, Coroner, as to the death of FRANCIS EDWARD MCBRIDE, journeyman painter, of London, who died suddenly on Saturday. The deceased came from London about a fortnight since, and was staying with his wife and son, who reside at Totnes. He was at Torquay on Friday and returned in his usual health. On Saturday he remained in bed, but did not complain of illness. About five o'clock his wife took him some tea, and shortly after he was heard to get out of bed, and his son, on going to see what was the matter found him throwing his arms about as if in great pain. He could not speak, and immediately fell into his son's arms and died. Mr L. Hains, surgeon, suggested heart disease, aneurism, or that some portion of food had filled the windpipe, as a probable cause of death, and the Jury did not order a post-mortem examination, but returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

EXETER - Last evening at Exeter an Inquest was held on the body of a man named JOHN ROWDEN, who committed suicide by hanging himself. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was a maltster and up to the time of his death was employed by Mr Salter at a malthouse in Exe-street. On Sunday evening he left his house, telling his wife that he expected to be at work in the malt-house the whole of the night as he was behind in his work. He called at the Paper Makers' Arms, an inn in the locality in question, the same evening, drank a half-pint of beer, and left in a sober condition. Between six and seven the following morning deceased was found in a loft adjoining the malthouse, suspended by the neck by a rope attached to a beam. The body when cut down was quite cold, and seemed to have been dead about two hours. At the Inquest it transpired that the deceased had suffered from a disease in the bone of his nose, and the medical witness stated that this might have affected the brain. A strangeness in his manner had been noticed of late, and he had complained of pains in his head and nose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind." Deceased leaves a widow and six children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) yesterday, at Snow Villa, Regent-street, relative to the death of ETHEL SNOW MADGE, aged seven weeks. Mr Smith was Foreman of the Jury. MRS GEORGINA MADGE, mother of the deceased, said that on Monday she put the child to bed as usual, and noticed that she cried in her sleep. She quieted her and then left the room, returning very late the same evening, when she found her insensible. She sent for Dr Besley, who came soon after and pronounced life extinct, giving as his opinion that deceased died from convulsions. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 5 January 1881
BIDEFORD - The Mysterious Death Of A Bideford Man. - We reported yesterday that THOMAS JOY, a labourer, an old man between sixty and seventy years of age, and residing at Portabello Farm, about three miles from Bideford, had been picked up dead in a field in the parish of Fremington, on Sunday night, and his body was removed to the above place in the parish of Bideford. Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Monday night, and from the evidence it appeared that the deceased went to a club dinner at Newton Tracey on Saturday; he was then in his usual health. He partook of dinner, and was seen to leave the place apparently quite well and his body was found about three-quarters-of-a-mile from that place in a path-field belonging to Mr Sanders. On an examination of the body there did not appear to be any marks of violence on it; and as the deceased had occasional fits the Jury came to the conclusion, and brought in the following verdict:- "That deceased died by the Visitation of God while in a Fit."

Western Morning News, Monday 10 January 1881
TORQUAY - At an Inquest held at Torquay on Saturday by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, on the bodies of the two Frenchmen - LEON PORDVIN and JACQUES ALIX - belonging to the French trawler St. John, who were drowned in Torquay Harbour on Thursday evening, evidence was given that seven men, including the deceased, got into a boat belonging to Thomas Ellis, of Torquay, at 7.30 p.m., with the intention of putting off to their vessel with provisions, when three of the men sat on the gunwale of the boat and the boat capsized, the result being that the deceased were drowned, though one of them could swim. One man was promptly picked up by Thomas Gooding, cook on board the Emily. All the men in the boat were sober, but the sea was rough and the three men were standing up at the time of the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, Gooding being commended for his humane conduct.

BARNSTAPLE - At an Inquest held by the Barnstaple Borough coroner on Saturday, concerning the death of a young man named HENRY BREALEY, who was drowned at Pottington Point, near Barnstaple, on Friday afternoon, it was stated that he and his father being on the opposite bank of the river gathering waifs, the deceased, who was of weak intellect, endeavoured to cross the river, as he had done in the summer and being unable to swim was drowned. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 10 January 1881
HOLSWORTHY - On Friday, before Mr Robert Fulford, Coroner, an Inquest was held on the body of MR JOHN YELLAND, late of Black Torrington, farmer, who was accidentally thrown from his trap and killed on his way to Holsworthy Market, on Wednesday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 January 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made yesterday by the Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) at the Clowance Tavern, relative to the death of GEORGE FREDERICK JARVIS, aged 10 months, son of a joiner in the dockyard. Evidence was given by the mother that it had been a weak child from birth. It continued in its usual condition until Monday morning, when it was seized with a violent fit of coughing, and before medical aid could be obtained it expired. Dr William Paull said that he had examined the deceased, and was of opinion that he died from spasms of the windpipe, caused by whooping cough. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical statement.

STOKE DAMEREL - Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday at the Barley Sheaf Inn, Catherine-street, as to the death of MARY ANN TUCKER, aged 65, who was found dead in her bed on Monday morning. Harriett Launder, residing at 4 Doidge's Well, said that about four months ago the deceased had a fall and injured her right shoulder. On the day in question about noon her shutters were not open, and this caused the witness to feel uneasy, as two of her children attended the school which deceased kept. Hearing that there was something serious, a young man opened the shutters and she volunteered to go into the room through the window, when she saw the deceased was dead. - Mr P. F. Delarne, surgeon, said that he had examined the deceased internally and found the heart diseased. The lungs were congested but not diseased. He believed death to be the result of a fit, the cause of which was a clot of blood sent from the heart to the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Guildhall last evening, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH HAM GREET, aged 54, a ropemaker in her Majesty's Dockyard, residing at 22 Bedford-street, Plymouth. - BESSIE GREET, daughter of the deceased, said her father left his home on Monday morning about seven o'clock to attend to his work, and he was then in his usual health, which had been rather failing of late. The next she heard of him was that he was lying dead at the South Devon Hospital. - P.C. Easterbrook said about five minutes past seven o'clock on Monday morning he was on duty in Cecil-street. He was informed that a man was in a fit outside King-street Wesleyan Chapel. On proceeding there he found the deceased in a kneeling posture, supported by two men, quite unconscious. He saw that the man was dying, and he sent for a stretcher and conveyed the deceased to the South Devon Hospital, where he was examined by the house surgeon, who pronounced life to be extinct. - Dr Bampton, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body and he believed that death was due to heart disease. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 January 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport yesterday the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest on the body of ANN RADDON, aged 57, residing in Ordnance-row. It was deposed that on Monday the deceased received a telegram which was intended for delivery by her husband to another person. The deceased, however, thought it was the news of the death of her son, who had been unwell, and the receipt of the telegram unnerved her. Four years ago she fell out of a window and sustained severe injuries to her head, and since then she had suffered very much. After the receipt of the telegram she complained of pains in the head. She was put to bed, but no medical aid was called in. The woman slept through the night and died early on Tuesday morning. - Dr Thom, surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, informed the Jury that he knew the deceased by reason of her attending at the dispensary. He had made a post-mortem examination, and found that death resulted from apoplexy. The blood-vessels of the brain were in a weak state and his opinion was that the sudden shock ruptured one of the blood-vessels, and that when it was thought she was sleeping she was really in an unconscious state. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Shock."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 13 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquest At The Plymouth Workhouse. The Medical Attendance. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening, as to the death of SAMUEL KING, aged eleven years, an inmate of the House. - William Newton, industrial trainer for boys, said that on the boys mustering, as usual, on Monday morning at 7.30 in the yard, for the dining-hall for breakfast, he missed the deceased, and, making enquiries, ascertained that he was ill downstairs. Witness went in search of the deceased and met him in the boys' yard. Deceased complained of feeling ill, saying it was in his head. Witness desired the deceased to accompany him to the dining-hall, where he would get him some tea, but deceased observed that he had already had some tea, and that he required no more. Witness then left the deceased, and went in search of two other lads who had failed to put in an appearance; at 8.10 witness again saw the deceased, who was then lying on a temporary bed downstairs, and which had been placed there by Mrs Wallis for the deceased. Mrs Wallis believed the deceased had a bilious attack, and observed that if the nurse were to give him some medicine he would soon be well. But witness, thinking it unwise to leave the deceased in the draught, procured a cape, which he threw over deceased, and with the assistance of a lad, led the deceased to the Hospital. Witness handed deceased over to the care of the nurse. Again he asked deceased how he felt, and he answered, "It's in my head." Deceased died that afternoon, and he informed the boys of it, at the same time remarking, "I wonder if the poor little fellow has fallen at all?" WILLIAM KING, a brother of the deceased, said deceased fell in the yard on the previous morning, striking the back part of his head. - Mr Robert T. Cooke, master of the Workhouse, stated that the deceased was admitted into the House on November 29, 1880, with his young brother. The boy had always been delicate and on several occasions had complained of headache. At a quarter-past three he was told that the deceased was worse, and he at once ordered that the doctor be summoned, and if Dr Thomson was from home that another medical gentleman should be fetched. Before Dr Thomson arrived the little fellow died. - Mary Manfrel was the nurse of the male Hospital. She gave the deceased medicine left by the doctor for children, but did not think the case was at all serious. About three o'clock, however, she detected a change in the deceased, and asked him if he felt worse, but he answered that he only experienced the pain in the head. She reported the change to the Master, and the medical gentleman was sent for. Witness did not recollect what time the doctor reached the House. It might have been dark, but she was so busy that day that she could not say. In the meantime the child died. She did not hear of the accident to the deceased on Sunday till after his death. - WILLIAM KING, an intelligent child of ten, described the accident to his brother on the Sunday when the two only were present, how the deceased complained of retiring to rest on Sunday night of the pain at the back of his head and how he became sick early on Monday morning. Witness did not mention that the deceased had struck himself to any of the officials before he was asked by the schoolmaster and the industrial trainer, although all the boys were aware of it. The fall was quite accidental. - Replying to a question the Master said every ward in the Hospital, down to the end of last week, was occupied. - The Coroner: Is it not usual for the medical man to visit the House every morning? - Mr Cooke: There is no special rule requiring the medical gentleman to visit the House early in the morning. He just visit the House once every day. Dr Thomas used to come about the middle of the day: Dr Thomson generally comes towards evening. - Dr Eustace B. Thomson was doing duty for Dr Thomas, the medical officer of the House, who was away for the benefit of his health. At dinner-time on Monday - between 3.30 and 3.45 - witness came home, and found a message requiring his attendance at the Workhouse. About a quarter to six he went to the House, and upon his arrival at the Hospital found that the child had expired. At the request of the Coroner he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. He first looked to see if there was an external mark at the back of the head, but there was not. All the organs were healthy except the brain. The blood vessels were greatly congested and there was an amount of extravasation in the front part of the head. There was no doubt that this was the result of the fall, and the two causes, together with the brain being in one part bruised, had caused death. He was of opinion that the boy's brain was weak, for had he been a healthy lad he might have got over it. Even if medical aid had been procured earlier it would not have averted the result. - The Coroner, in alluding to the evidence that had been adduced, thought it especially worthy of comment that the doctor had not arrived sooner, although he believed with that gentleman that in this case no medical aid could have averted the result. Still, that was not the first time he had had to refer to this kind of thing. He must say that he should have expected Dr Thomson would have been at the house before a quarter to six. Had that gentleman hastened to the Hospital when he received the message he would, probably, have seen the deceased ere he died. The medical gentleman, he thought, who had to attend to duties of that kind should visit the House before the end of the day. Both the Master and the nurse had stated that the Hospital wards were full; all the more reason, then, for the medical officer to attend before the evening. The Master and Nurse, in this way, bore too much responsibility. There ought, he was of opinion, to be a certain time for the medical man's daily visit - much earlier than the latter part of the day. He could only say this: Dr Thomas had frequently come up in the earlier part of the day. He believed he should carry the entire Jury with him in saying that this practice was the only satisfactory one, although he was only speaking for himself in the matter and did not want to influence them in any way. - The Juror: I think, sir, you have done your duty honestly. - Dr Thomson: My only reply is this, that I had a very hard morning's work, and came home very much fatigued. My dinner was waiting for me, which I ate. I had another message more urgent than the one here, which I complied with. Then I came here. I could not be in two places at once. - The Coroner observed that the Workhouse was one of the most important establishments connected with the Borough, and that as the ratepayers paid for their poor to be attended to, they should be visited first. - Dr Thomson: The ratepayers should pay a resident medical officer. - The Coroner: I think you should have come here at once. When the Master of the House sent for me I had a great deal of work to do, but the first thing I did was to come to the Master. I can scarcely believe that in this large House, so many old people and young children, should be left because there was a more lucrative thing to do. - Dr Thomson: The case was not a lucrative one. The person was one of the dispensary patients. - The Coroner said the case of the poor was more important than anything else, and thought, if the Jury added a rider to their verdict, that it would be very desirable that there should be medical attendance earlier in the day, it would be a wise action. - Several of the Jury: Certainly. - Dr Thomson: A very good thing indeed, but I don't see how you can do it. Dr Thomas suited himself in calling early in the day; and it is more suitable for me to call later. - The Master, replying to a question as to what were the terms of his message in sending for the doctor, said: "Send for the medical officer at once; lose no time; run no risks. If he is not there send for another doctor." - Dr Thomson: The message I got was to the effect that I was wanted at the Workhouse as soon as I could come. - A Juror: Then if you could not come you could have sent another doctor. - Another Juror: No; you could not expect that. - Dr Thomson: Who was to pay the money? - Dr Thomson was conversing with several Jurors, while the Coroner was signing an order, when The Coroner remarked: I request you to offer no more remarks to the Jury. - Dr Thomson: I have a perfect right to reply to the Jury. - The Coroner: I do think that when you received that message, it was your duty to attend at the House. I may be wrong, but it's my opinion. And, also, that you should come earlier in the day, but I may be wrong again. The verdict is not in your hands or mine. If the Lord Chancellor had been her I should not shrink from my duty. I was deeply impressed with the statements of the nurse and the Master as to the number of persons in the Hospital. - The Jury, of whom Mr John Bickle was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time recommending the Coroner to write to the Clerk of the Guardians pointing out the advisability of the Guardians requesting the medical officer always to visit the House daily before noon.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 January 1881
TOTNES -Sudden Death At Totnes. - An Inquest was held at Totnes yesterday by Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of ELIZA JANE PENWILL, aged 31, wife of JOHN PENWILL, postboy at the Seven Stars Hotel, who was found dead in bed on Thursday morning. - Mr Harris, surgeon, stated that he attended the deceased about five months ago for dyspepsia, and on the 27th ult. at her confinement. At her husband's request he saw her on Monday afternoon, and found her suffering from muscular rheumatism in the left leg. About four o'clock on Thursday morning he was called by her husband, who said she was dead. He had examined the body externally, but found no marks of violence. It was probable that a clot of blood might have lodged in a vein and thus have stopped the circulation. There was no appearance of suffocation. Corporal S. Tolcher, Royal Marines, who lodged in the house was roused by the mother of the deceased who said she heard the baby crying and in trying to wake her daughter found her to be dead. On the previous evening she was in good health. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 January 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Accident At Devonport Public Hall. Fatal Result - The Inquest. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, as to the death of TIMOTHY O'LEARY, a labourer, who met with an accident b y the falling of the wet wall of the new Public Hall at Devonport on the 5th inst., from the effects of which he died. Seventeen gentlemen, most of them practical men, were empanelled on the Jury, and they elected Mr James Haley as their Foreman. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquest, stated that they must be all fully aware of the importance of that Inquest. Large buildings in course of erection like the Public Hall were in a measure dangerous to passers-by and those engaged in erecting them unless they were being built very carefully and under skilful superintendence. It was not for him to say whether in erecting the Public Hall there had been any neglect. That would come out in the evidence. He, however, had taken care to have a body of intelligent men to form the Jury, and some of them were men who had had experience in building. He was sure they would elucidate all the facts possible, and eventually arrive at a verdict which would be satisfactory to themselves and the public. - The first witness was James Baber, a mason, residing at No. 1, Gun-lane, Devonport, who stated that on Wednesday, the 5th inst., he was at work on the east end of the new Public Hall. About the middle of the afternoon he heard a rumbling noise, and on looking round saw the west wall topping over. On the previous day he and five other masons were working on that wall, and on the morning of the accident he was told not to continue there as there was no stone suitable to complete the cornice, which was nearly finished, the only exception being that it was 8 or 9 feet short in the centre. The cornice projected about 2 feet 9 ½ inches, and the height of the wall which fell was nearly 70 feet. The thickness of the bare wall was 1 foot 10 inches. It was built of blue lias lime of good quality. he thought sufficient time had been taken in building the wall, after taking into consideration the time of the year and weather. A portion of the wall was built at certain times and then allowed to settle; two months elapsed before one portion was gone on with again. With five others he had been working on the wall eight or nine days previous to the accident, and in that time they might have raised he wall from eighteen to twenty feet. The only way in which he could account for the accident was the weight of the cornice overhanging the front of the wall, and there being no weight to keep it down behind. When he heard the wall fall, he made the best of his way to the front of the building, which was completed, for safety: But when he saw the deceased fall he went to his assistance, and found him lying on the ground. He was placed in a cab, and taken to the Hospital. He had seen the deceased during the time he was alive in the Hospital, and the only remark the deceased had made to him was to ask how much of the wall was down. The deceased at the time of the accident was working with eight or ten others in making a scaffold, and was standing inside the wall, about twenty-five feet from the ground. The scaffold on which deceased was standing was not hurt by the wall falling, and he could not say whether the deceased was knocked off from it, or whether he jumped from it. One portion of the wall fell east, and the other fell west. - By the Foreman: He had been working there from the commencement, and had used in building the best Pomphlete limestone and lias, and in making the cornice Larcom's large slate was used. - The Coroner here informed the Jury that this was all the evidence he intended bringing before them that day. This was rather a serious matter, and he should adjourn the Inquest until the 24th at the Devonport Guildhall for the purpose of obtaining skilled evidence. - The Inquiry was then adjourned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 January 1881
AWLISCOMBE - The Severe Frost. A fatal accident at Awliscombe, near Honiton, the result of the frost, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquest yesterday. MRS FRANKS, a widow, having on Sunday morning fallen in the court behind her house and broken her neck. several members of the family had gone to church, and deceased had been to feed the pigs, and it is supposed she was returning to the house when her foot slipped on some ice and she fell forward on her face. The only person who saw the accident was a little boy scarcely four years old who had gone out with his mother. He states that she said "nothing" after she fell, from which it is assumed that death was instantaneous. The husband of deceased was buried only six weeks' ago on Sunday. Six young children are left orphans. Evangelistic services are being held at the Awliscombe Baptist Church this week by a gentleman from London, and deceased had generously undertaken to entertain the Evangelist during his stay, and he was to have become her guest on Sunday evening.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 20 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - A Fatal Dream At Plymouth. Fall From A Three-Storey Window. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Workhouse last evening, touching the death of MRS MATILDA MARY DAWE, 33, of 7 King-street, Plymouth. The circumstances attending the death of the deceased are of a very peculiar character. The deceased was a widow, and went to reside at King-street about the middle of November last, occupying a room on the three-storey floor. She was subject to startling dreams, and during the day her thoughts also partook of a thrilling nature. On the night of the 24th November, Mrs King, who also lives in the house, saw the deceased before she retired to rest, and she seemed then to be in good spirits. Early on the following morning Mrs King was awakened by a loud noise, which she fancied was from a fall. Rushing to the window, Mrs King opened it and looked out and half through the roof of the kitchen at the back of the house observed the figure of a woman, undressed. Mrs King shouted several times and at last saw that it was MARY DAWE. Mrs King said: "Are you MRS DAWE, who lives upstairs?" ~And the reply came, "Yes." "How did you get there?" Mrs King asked; and deceased responded, "I fell out of the window." Hastily dressing, Mrs King summoned assistance, and the deceased was taken into the house and carried upstairs to her bedroom. Deceased told Mrs King that she was dreaming that someone was about to injure her niece, and that she was going to her rescue, and, afterwards, that she was to be murdered herself. There was no one in the room with deceased when she fell out of the window, for when the deceased was assisted upstairs it was found that the door was locked inside. Mrs King considered the deceased eccentric in her habits and conversation. Dr Edwin Mesres was summoned, when it was ascertained that deceased was severely injured, and upon his arrival Dr Mesres found she had sustained slight injuries to her left leg, and that her right leg was broken. To Dr Mesres deceased explained that she dreamt that someone was about to murder her, and that she jumped out of the window. Thinking it would be better for the sufferer if she were removed to the South Devon Hospital, as she lived by herself, Dr Mesres put up her leg in temporary splinters and sent her to the Hospital. Dr A. H. Bampton, of the South Devon Hospital, received the deceased into the Hospital and placed her in the family ward, where she remained until the 24th December, when she was removed owing to her having become insane. The deceased suffered from an attack of acute mania, and was always loudly talking and jabbering about different things. She had, said Dr Bampton, "delusions and illusions, and her presence in the ward being prejudicial to the other patients, she was placed in a special ward." Mr Annear, reliving officer, was communicated with, as it was against the rules of the South Devon Hospital to allow insane persons to remain there. Deceased was taken to the Workhouse in a vehicle. About ten days ago Dr Thomson, the acting medical officer of the Workhouse, took deceased under his care. Deceased was placed in a ward by herself, it being evident to Dr Thomson that she was out of her mind. Deceased died on Tuesday, and, not feeling at liberty to give a certificate of deceased's death, Dr Thomson desired that the coroner might be communicated with. Dr Thomson considered that death was due to progressive weakness, combined with brain disease, accelerated by the injury, and the Jury, of which Mr Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 21 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, on the body of NANCY LOUISA COLLINGS, infant child of P.C. COLLINGS, of the Plymouth Borough Police Force, who resides at 73 Cecil-street. The child, who had been healthy from birth, was taken to bed with its mother on Wednesday night. Early on Thursday morning the mother was awoke by the child crying. It was nursed, and the mother went to sleep again. Shortly after 6 a.m. when the husband returned from duty, he noticed that the child was dead. No medical man was sent for, as it was not thought necessary. About twelve months since a child of the parents, about five months old, died in a similar manner. Mr Manning, Coroner's officer, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased child. It was small for its age, but well nourished. there were no marks of violence on the body. The Jury, of whom Mr Nicholl was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 21 January 1881
DAWLISH - Yesterday, at Dawlish, an Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Inn, before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of ANNA MARIA BOND, of Brunswick-place, wife of HENRY WISE BOND, master mariner. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was of intemperate habits of many years duration. On Saturday, Sunday and Monday the deceased was very unwell and on the latter day fell out of bed, hurting her eye and shoulder. She refused solid food and also declined to have a doctor sent for. A draught and powders were procured, composed of effervescing saline and tartaric acid, and which the deceased always said did her good. Her husband went to bed on Monday night about 9.30. Deceased endeavoured to speak during the night, but could not. About two o'clock on Tuesday morning, on waking, BOND found that his wife was dead. - The Inquest was adjourned until Friday morning for the purpose of a post-mortem examination, and also for the attendance of Mrs Adams, of Teignmouth.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 January 1881
DAWLISH - An adjourned Inquest was held at Dawlish yesterday before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of ANNA MARIA BOND, wife of HENRY WISE BOND, master mariner. Mr A. de W. Baker, surgeon, who made the post-mortem examination stated that with the exception of the lungs, the whole vital organs were diseased. The body was well nourished. He attributed the cause of death to coma from urenic poisoning. Witness thought deceased was in a dying state when she received the blow on the left temple. Mrs Adams, a widow, residing at Teignmouth, stated that nearly all Monday she was with deceased. Witness asked deceased whether she should fetch a doctor, but deceased declined. Witness was told by deceased that she fell out of bed and gave herself the blow over the left temple. MR and MRS BOND always lived on the best of terms. Mr J. S. Whitborne, who appeared for MR BOND in addressing the Jury, considered a verdict of death from Natural Causes compatible with the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

PLYMOUTH - Death From A Fall. - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, on the body of WM. RAMSON, aged sixty-seven years, late a baker, carrying on business at Higher-street. On the 15th December last his sister, REBECCA RAMSON, was sent for, and immediately proceeded to the court, where the deceased kept some fowls. She found deceased lying on a granite trough, from which the fowls fed. He was conscious, but witness noticed that he had received a cut on his nose and two others on his head. He was unable to get up. With the assistance of a man named Bray, he was placed in a chair and taken into his house and Mr Harper, surgeon, was sent for. This gentleman deposed that on the day in question he found that deceased had, in all probability, fractured the upper spine of his back. He judged that the spinal cord was crushed and he immediately concluded that it was a hopeless case. Deceased lingered down to Thursday morning, when he died. He attributed death to the fall. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical gentleman's evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 22 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Killed Off The Start. - The Borough coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry last evening at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, relative to the death of EMMANUELL OLIVARI, boatswain of the Italian brig Zio, from Antwerp to Newport, now lying in the Sound, who died from the effects of a fall, when about twenty miles off the Start, on the morning of the 18th instant. Mr Achille Perossi acted as interpreter. - Francisco Taverna, a seaman on board the Zio, said he knew the deceased very well. On the day of the accident about 7.45 a.m., they were twenty miles off Start Point. Witness was on the windward side of the brig, and the deceased came by the skylight to windward passing leeward. Deceased was knocked to windward by the rolling of the vessel, and a sea carried him off his balance. Witness thereupon lost sight of him for a moment. The man at the wheel shortly afterwards called out "Help; there's a man dead." Witness immediately ran to the assistance of the deceased and found him lying against the skylight. The ship's company cried out to the captain, "Your father is dead," and he immediately came on deck and took him to his cabin. Witness believed that the deceased must have struck himself against the bulwarks to leeward, and subsequently fell against the covering board at the bottom of the bulwarks. They examined him, but there were no marks visible on his body,. The deceased had only just come out of the cabin, where he had been talking with his son, and came on deck for the purpose of changing the watch. Deceased was a temperate man. - In reply to a Juror, the captain said the quarter-=deck was a flush one. The bulwarks were about two-thirds the height of a man. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from an Accident."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 24 January 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Shocking Accident At Stonehouse. - The Inquest on the body of RACHAEL BRIDGMAN, widow, aged 56 years, who was found dead on her stairs at the Bridge Inn, Stonehouse, on Thursday evening by one of the neighbours, was held on Saturday. - WM. HOLMAN, a labourer, identified the deceased as being his sister. - Grace Rule, landlady of the Bridge Inn public-house, where the deceased resided, deposed that she knew the deceased for many years past. On Thursday evening about eight p.m. she came into her (witness's) kitchen, but did not remain long. That was the last time witness saw her alive. About ten minutes to eleven witness ascended the stairs, leading to the deceased's apartments, for the purpose of driving away some cats. It was then that she noticed the deceased, who was in a sitting posture, but quite dead. In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that there was no light kept in the stairs, and the deceased had been accustomed to go up and down the stairs for a great number of years. - The Coroner (to witness): She must have been up in those stairs after she left your kitchen until you found her. - Witness: No, sir; she could not have been. There would sure to be people going up and down the stairs during the time. I believe that she went out and returned again. - Emma Brennen, a married woman, and who resides in the house next to the Bridge Inn, was also called. Her evidence was to the effect that she had seen the deceased at ten p.m., thus showing that the deceased could not have been in the stairs as surmised. - The Coroner then briefly summed up, and, in his remarks, said that if the Jury came to a conclusion that day they would have to return an open verdict. He suggested that medical evidence should e given, and, the Jury agreeing, the Enquiry was adjourned until Tuesday.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 25 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr W. Harrison, acting as Deputy Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, on the body of MARY GALE, widow, aged 69 years, who was found dead in bed on the previous morning, at 3 Catherine-street. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was in the habit of sleeping with her sister. On Saturday deceased complained of being ill, but retired to rest at her usual hour that evening. About four o'clock the following morning the sister found the deceased quite cold, and it was soon afterwards discovered that she was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TIVERTON - The Infirmary Explosion. - The Inquest on the lad KNIGHT, who was killed by the explosion of the kitchen boiler at the Infirmary on Saturday, was held yesterday, before Mr Lewis Mackenzie. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 January 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made at Devonport yesterday, before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at the Carlton Inn, St Aubyn-street, as to the sudden death on Monday, at 15 Barrack-street, of EMMA DAVEY, 32. Deceased complained of a severe cold on Thursday. She breathed with difficulty and was subsequently confined to her room, but refused to be attended by a medical man. Dr Wilson was of opinion that the woman died from Natural Causes. The badly ventilated room in which she had been living, and her unclean habits, combined to make her health precarious, although she was apparently well nourished. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned, several of the Jury referring with disgust to the dirty condition of the house in Barrack-street.

EAST STONEHOUSE - An adjourned Inquest was held at Stonehouse yesterday, before Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner, at Rule's Bridge inn, as to the death of RACHEL BRIDGEMAN, widow, 56, who was found dead on the stairs at the Bridge Inn, where she resided on Thursday night. The Inquest was opened on Saturday, but no witness could be found who heard or saw the deceased fall. The deceased was supposed to have broken her neck, and a post-mortem examination was ordered. Yesterday, Mr Leah, M.R.C.S., stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body and found that the deceased was perfectly healthy with the exception of the heart which was unusually fatty, and in his opinion the deceased died from failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the excessive coldness of the weather. There was no injury to the neck and the fall in no way caused death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 28 January 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Down's New Town Inn, York-street, relative to the death of LYDIA LOUISA HOCKING, aged three weeks, daughter of FREDERICK HOCKING, mason and HESTER HOCKING, residing at 4 Gloucester-place. HESTER HOCKING, mother of the deceased, said the child was weakly from its birth. She (the mother) went to bed last Tuesday night at 10 o'clock, but the baby was put to bed previous to that. It slept very sound till about 12 o'clock. At 6 o'clock in the morning it began to be very restless. Half-an-hour later the mother could not hear it breathe, and taking it up in her arms she found it was dead. She then called her husband, who dressed himself and went for Doctor Thomson, who came an hour later and pronounced the child to be dead. A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatality Off The Start. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry yesterday, at the Sutton Harbour Inn, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of DANIEL WARD, aged 30 years, who was picked up off the Start by the crew of the fishing smack Sparkling Wave on Tuesday last. - The evidence given by the captain of the Sparkling Wave was similar to that already reported in the Western Daily Mercury. He stated that the ketch Sly Boots, of Brixham, to which the deceased belonged, was run down by a large steamer off the Start on the 3rd of January. He identified the body of deceased as being that of DANIEL WARD, although his features were greatly disfigured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at the Dartmouth Inn, East-street, yesterday by Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of LILY HOBBS, aged eleven years, the daughter of MRS HOBBS, of the Bill Inn, who died somewhat suddenly on the preceding day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 January 1881
PLYMPTON - An Inquest was held at the Foresters' Arms, Plympton, yesterday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, as to the death of MR C. F. HANSON, of Castle Hayes Cottage, Plympton, naval pensioner, who died suddenly at the railway station on Tuesday morning whilst waiting to see a friend off by train. Dr Ellery stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and attributed death to the excessive cold having obstructed the circulation of the blood. A verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr T. Hicks was Foreman.

EXETER - A sad death at Exeter was investigated by Mr Coroner Hooper yesterday. EMILY WESTCOTT, daughter of a sawyer living n St. Thomas, was at play with her brother, who was carrying her "pig-a-back," when she fell, and an umbrella stick which she held in her hand entered her throat. When taken to the Hospital the only injury that could be seen was a slight abrasion inside the lip, but the child could not swallow any food and shewed symptoms of lung inflammation. She died a week after admission. A post-mortem examination shewed that there was a serious laceration of the food passage, in consequence of which nothing could pass into the stomach; and, according to Mr Cummings, the poor girl actually died of starvation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 29 January 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Burned To Death At Stonehouse. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, and a Jury, of whom Mr Lake was Foreman, sat yesterday at Westaway's Market Inn, Stonehouse, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES FREDERICK HOOD, aged fourteen months, and infant son of CHARLES HOOD, a labourer, of 6 George-street, Stonehouse, who died from the effects of being burnt. - The mother of the deceased, LYDIA HOOD, deposed that on the morning of the 22nd inst., about 9.30, she left her residence for the purpose of obtaining a mug of water. She left the deceased, who was dressed, in bed. There was no other person in the room, with the exception of her little daughter, aged seven years, whom she left in charge of the deceased. When she left her daughter was sitting in the middle of the room. She had not left her house more than ten minutes, when, on returning, she heard her female child calling out "Mamma, mamma." She immediately ran up to the room where she had left the children, but to her consternation found the room full of smoke and the deceased on fire. A neighbour named Brown, who was attracted to the room by the cries of the child, extinguished the flames and attended to the burns which the child had received. The little girl, on being questioned as to how the accident occurred, said that she had taken a box of matches, which was left on the window ledge, and placed the matches on the floor. She then lit the box, and, from her statement, it would seem that finding that she could not hold the box in her hands any longer, she unconsciously threw it on the bed where her little brother, the deceased, was lying; hence the occurrence. - Mr Leah, M.R.C.S., said he was called on the day of the accident to see the deceased, whom he found suffering from extensive burns on the right side of the body. They were not deep, but they had destroyed a large surface of the skin, and thus interfering with the functions of the skin caused the child's death. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the child died from the effects of Burns Accidentally Received." As it appeared that the father of the deceased had been out of work for several weeks, in consequence of the weather, the Jury gave their fees, amounting in all to 13s. to the mother, who, in tears, thanked them.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 1 February 1881
BARNSTAPLE - At the Inquest held on the body of JOHN MANNING, butcher, of Barnstaple, yesterday, evidence was called which showed that deceased committed suicide on Sunday morning, by cutting his throat when in a state of temporary insanity. A verdict to that effect was returned. Suicide Of A Barnstaple Tradesman. - As reported in the Western Daily Mercury yesterday, a most determined case of suicide took place at Barnstaple on Sunday, when MR JOHN MANNING, butcher, of High-street, made a resolute and effectual attempt on his life by cutting his throat. On Thursday last, deceased had a fit, and he has, for the past few days, been in a delirious and feverish condition. In consequence of this a nurse has been employed to attend to him, and he has kept his bed a portion of the last week. On Saturday he was downstairs when there was nothing in his actions to lead anyone to suspect anything more than usual. He did not get up on Sunday and dress, but laid on through the morning, either the nurse or the young man who managed the business being with him almost constantly up to about one o'clock. Deceased then told them to go downstairs and have their dinner, and they went down for this purpose. They had not been down, however, a very long time, when they heard something fall heavily on the floor. The nurse went upstairs and saw MR MANNING lying on the floor in front of the table, on which was a looking-glass. She immediately went downstairs and told the young man that his master had broken a blood-vessel, upon which the young man went upstairs, when he saw that the deceased had cut his throat, and that a butcher's knife was lying on the table. He thereupon went and reported the occurrence to the police-station, when P.C. McLeod ran to the house; and the young man also fetched Dr Fernie. The deceased, however, was dead before any assistance could reach him. The deed was committed with a butcher's knife, and it is considered that the deceased must have made two or three deliberate cuts, the wound being nearly twelve inches in length and the head almost severed from the body. The looking glass and the table were covered with blood, so that the deceased must have stood in front of the glass and inflicted the wounds. The young man found him out in the room in front of the looking-glass in the morning, when the deceased made some excuse and returned to bed. As he had not been downstairs yesterday, it would appear that he must have concealed the knife on the previous day. An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr R. T. Bencraft, and after evidence bearing out the above statement had been taken, Mr A. Fernie, surgeon, deposed he first attended the deceased on the 13th January, and had continued to visit him until the 25th. He did not believe he had drank anything intoxicating from Tuesday last. On Thursday the deceased had an epileptic fit, and he attended him for it. The last time he had seen the deceased was on Friday, when he appeared to be quiet and free from pain, and sleeping regularly. He had never exhibited any symptoms of suicide, or used any language which would lead one to suppose that he had the matter in his mind. The witness had made enquiries but could not find that he had previously had any fits. It was his opinion that the deceased's mind was very much disordered by his despondency and the effects of the epileptic fit, and that he was in a state of temporary insanity when he committed the act. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide through cutting his throat when in a state of Temporary Insanity.

OKEHAMPTON - Drowned At Okehampton. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Mr Robert Fulford, Coroner, on the body of LIZZIE CROCKER, a little girl, twelve years of age, who met with her death on the previous day. It appeared that the deceased, with two or three children about her own age, were crossing a plank, which has lately been used as a temporary bridge, over the West Okment, about a hundred yards above the Workhouse. By some means the deceased lost her balance and fell into the river, dragging with her, her younger sister, whom she held by the hand. The stream was unusually swollen at the time in consequence of the thaw of snow on Dartmoor, and the bodies had washed several yards down before the situation was realised. A young man named Jordan, who was passing at the time, ran some way down the stream, sprang in, and with exertion managed to rescue the younger girl. The body of the other was carried down the stream for nearly two hundred yards, and when dragged out life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" at the same time strongly censuring the owner and builder of such a dangerous bridge.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, sat yesterday at Sibley's Tavistock Hotel, Devonport, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of LILIAN JANE BROWN, aged ten weeks, daughter of W. J. BROWN, able-seaman, of H.M.S. Royal Adelaide, residing at 7 Market-lane, Devonport. The evidence of Mr De Larne, surgeon, showed that death resulted from convulsions, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 February 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday at the Market Hotel, Tavistock-street, on the body of the infant child of MRS BROWN, living in Market-lane. The child, aged 10 weeks, was in its usual good health on Saturday night, but on Sunday morning MRS BROWN found it dead by her side. Mr P. F. Delarne, whose assistance was sought, in the course of his statement to the Jury, mentioned that he found the head of the child had been swathed in bandages almost immediately after death. This, he said, was a practice that was most undesirable, because marks were thereby produced upon a warm body, and it was very difficult to distinguish whether they were marks inflicted before or after death. In the present instance he could not say positively, upon a superficial examination, what was the cause of death, for from external appearances it might have been either due to convulsions or to suffocation, and it was consequently necessary to make a post-mortem examination. The result was to lead him to conclude that death resulted from convulsions. Mr Delarne also referred in the course of his statement to the practice of giving soaked bread to children, and said it was a great mistake on the part of mothers to feed infants with any such thing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 February 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Devonport Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest yesterday at Stoke Wine and Spirit Vaults, Tavistock-street, as to the death of MRS ANN SELINA PARLBY, aged 50, wife of a draughtsman in the Dockyard. - MR C. L. PARLBY, husband of the deceased, of 1 Wesley-place, Stoke, said the deceased had been suffering from a cold for the last four or five days, but in other respects her health was as good as usual. About 8.30 p.ml. on Tuesday she was seized with what appeared to be a fit whilst sitting in a chair. Shortly after she appeared to get better and went off into a sleep in the chair. At 10 p.m. his son came home and called his attention to the appearance of his mother, and he went for Dr J. Rolston, who came shortly after and saw the deceased and said she was dead, but witness up to that time thought the deceased was merely asleep. Dr J. Rolston said he had known the deceased for many years. When he came deceased might have been dead about an hour, but on first seeing her he did not think she was dead. He thought death ensued from failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 4 February 1881
NORTH MOLTON - A young man named RICHARDS, about 30, in the employ of Mr Webber, of Heaselly, Northmolton, as a farm labourer, hanged himself in a barn there on Wednesday. An Inquest was held yesterday; verdict "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening as to the death of JOHN BLIGHT, aged 59, a policeman in the Great Western Docks, who was found dead yesterday morning. MARY BLIGHT, wife of the deceased, residing at 30 Bath-street, said her husband was invalided from the R.M.L.I., in 1852 on account of a wound in his leg, and was in receipt of a pension. About six months ago Dr Owen advised him to have his leg amputated or mortification would set in, but the deceased said that he would sooner die. On Wednesday night he was on duty, until 6 a.m. yesterday morning. On arriving home he said he felt a slight attack of ague whilst walking home. She had asked him to stay at home during the frost, but he took no notice of her. About 7.45 a.m. yesterday she rose, leaving him asleep, and went about her household duties. An hour afterwards he drank a cup of cold tea and asked her to shut the door, as he was going to sleep again. She went to him again at 10 a.m. and found him dead. Corroborative evidence having been given, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes".

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 February 1881
EXETER - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Exeter on the body of NELSON BOWDEN, found in his bed two months after death under circumstances reported yesterday. A verdict was returned of "Found Dead". The medical evidence was to the effect that in all probability death was sudden and from natural causes, there being nothing to raise a suspicion of foul play.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 February 1881
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday as to the death of THOS. HENRY STEPHENS, aged 17, apprentice at Messrs. Willoughby's foundry. On Sunday the deceased was in his usual health, but about three o'clock yesterday morning asked his brother who slept with him not to call him at his usual time to go to work as he had a bad headache. About seven o'clock his mother went to the room and found her son dead. - Mr W. Square, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination of the body said the heart was very fatty and he thought deceased might have had a slight attack of indigestion, which filled the stomach and intestines with air; this would press the heart out of its position and after a short time the heart's action ceased, and death ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 11 February 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suspected Child Murder At Stonehouse. Inquest and Verdict. - The Devon County Coroner - Mr R. R. Rodd - and a Jury, of whom Mr Sparrow was Foreman, sat yesterday at Westaway's Market-house Hotel, Market-street, Stonehouse, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of a newly-born male child, whose body was found by P.C. Grills, of the Devon Constabulary, concealed in a coal cellar, at No. 39 Emma-place, Stonehouse, the residence of Mr Peek, a commercial traveller, by whom the prisoner had been employed as a domestic servant. - Alice Weaver, a nurse girl, at 39 Emma-place, was the first witness called. She said that her master - Mr Peek - was at present away from home. She knew PATIENCE WARREN. She was a general servant, and had lived at Mr Peek's house for about three weeks. On Tuesday morning, about quarter-to-eight, witness went to her work. PATIENCE WARREN opened the front door to her for the purpose of letting her in, as she (witness) did not sleep in the house. After opening the door WARREN went before her, leaving witness to shut the door, and went down the kitchen stairs. She sat down on arriving at the bottom of the stairs and complained of being ill and asked witness to sweep out the breakfast-room. This she did. Master Peek then came down to the kitchen, and asked WARREN to carry up some tea to his mother. WARREN said she could not go up so many stairs; she was too ill. Witness was asked to take up the tea, which she did. On returning to the kitchen she noticed marks on the kitchen floor. - The Coroner: That aroused your suspicion? - Witness: Yes; and I went and told my master, who told me to go and tell WARREN to go home and to fetch a cab for her. Continuing, witness said she told WARREN what her master had requested her to do, and that in reply she said that she did not want a cab as she "could walk as far as Emily's house, or further." She therefore would not have a cab fetched. She subsequently went up to her bedroom, accompanied by witness to "put on her things." After having dressed herself, WARREN left the house and proceeded home. Witness also went with her. On the way witness asked her whether what she surmised was correct, and she denied it, saying "She had not and didn't intend to." She was also asked by Mrs Peek's mother, but denied it. After returning from seeing WARREN home, Mr Peek instructed witness to go for a police-constable, which she did. - A Juror: Did she tell her mother what had happened? - Witness: I was not there. I only went to the door of her residence. - In answer to a Juror, the witness also stated that she had not suspected WARREN until she noticed marks about the kitchen floor. - By a Juror: She had not seen any men come to her master's residence for WARREN. - Thomas Grills, a constable and detective of the Devon Constabulary, said that on Tuesday morning, about ten minutes to nine, he went to 39 Emma-place, the residence of Mr Peek. The servant was not at home, having left a short time previously. - The Coroner informed this witness that he did not call him for any conversation which might have arisen between the prisoner and himself, as the prisoner was not present. If she had been present he would certainly have been willing to receive it, and would have cross-examined her on it. What he wanted the constable to dwell on was the finding of the body. The accused was too ill to attend, but, if the Inquiry had to be adjourned, she would, in all probability, be present at the adjourned Inquiry. - Mr Leah corroborated the Coroner's remarks that WARREN was too ill to attend. - Proceeding, the witness said he had had a conversation with Mr Peek. - The Coroner: That is not evidence. - Witness, proceeding, said that, from what he gathered from the conversation, he went, in company with Mr peek, to the bedroom which had been occupied by WARREN. He noticed certain marks about the bedclothes and floor. He searched the bedroom, but could find nothing. On going to the water-closet he found there what he had taken to Mr Leah. On returning again Mr Peek and himself searched every room, but found nothing. When they arrived at the coal-cellar, which was situated on the right-hand side at the bottom of the stairs, upon turning over the coals and ashes he discovered the body of a male child - the same as seen by the Jury. The body was on the right-hand side of the cellar, and was buried in about three inches of coal-dust and ashes. The left side of the face was a little disfigured. - A Juror: Did she acknowledge the birth? - The Coroner objected to this question being put, as the accused was not present. he thought that they ought to hear the medical evidence first. - Mr Leah (to witness): Was the child warm when you found it? - Witness: No. - Mr Leah: At what time did you find it? - Witness: Eleven o'clock. - Mr Leah, M.R.C.S., stated that the child had arrived at maturity. The lungs were partially inflated, and it was evident that the child had breathed, but, in his opinion, not fully nor freely. He could not swear that the child had had a separate existence. - The Coroner then summed up and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the child had breathed, but that it had not had a separate existence."

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the "Olive Branch" Inn, Wyndham-street, on the infant daughter of EDMUND JOHN BATTERSHILL. - ISABEL BATTERSHILL, mother of the deceased, stated that the child, which was three weeks old, was weakly from its birth. She went to bed at 10.35 p.m., on Wednesday, taking the child with her; but on awaking at 6.30 a.m. she found it lying dead by her side. Mr Miller, surgeon, was called in and he gave it as his opinion that the child died from convulsions. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 14 February 1881
EXETER - Sad Case Of Destitution. - The Exeter Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquiry on Saturday at the City Workhouse, touching the death of AMELIA VIVIANI, a single woman, aged forty-two, who died in the Union on the previous day. The evidence showed that the deceased had occupied an apartment in Magdalen-street, and went out to work as a charwoman. Latterly she appeared to have been in ill-health, and had not gone out as usual. Believing that she was in a state of destitution, information was given to the relieving officer for the district, and on his visiting her he found her in so deplorable a state that an order for her immediate removal to the Workhouse was given. At the Union deceased was found to be in a very filthy state and she was very weak and feeble from want of proper and sufficient food. She was also found to be suffering from dropsy and heart disease. She lingered until Friday last when she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 February 1881
ROBOROUGH - The Charge Against A Servant At Bickleigh. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an adjourned Inquest at the Court-house, Roborough, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of a newly-born male child, which was found on the 4th inst., by Mr Allen, chemist, Bedford-street, Plymouth, in the soil of a servants' closet at his residence near Bickleigh railway station. Since the previous sitting the mother of the child, a young woman named EMILY WALLIS, who until the day before the discovery of the body had been a servant with Mr Allen, had been arrested at her parents' home at St Levan, near Penzance, and she was now present at the Inquiry. - The evidence of Mr Allen having been read over, Sergeant S. L. Phillips, of the county constabulary, stationed at Roborough, said that on Wednesday morning he went to the prisoner's residence at St. Levan. She admitted, on being asked by him, that her name was WALLIS, and that she had lived at Mr Allen's and volunteered the statement that the child found in the closet was hers. She stated that the child was born in the closet, but she did not think the child was alive, as she had not felt it for more than a week. She afterwards went out from the house to look at the child, and as it did not move she thought it was dead. In answer to a question as to whether she had made any preparation for the birth of the child, she replied that she had not, but she had plenty of money, and should have got the things for it at Plymouth. A month previously the father of the child had given her a sovereign, and she had her wages as well. She added that if she had gone away when her month's notice was up (she was prevented by the severe weather) she would have been at home when she was confined. She did not expect to be confined as soon by a month. She denied that she pushed the child under the soil, and said the last time she was confined she was ill three days before. The prisoner did not put any question to the witness, and on being asked if she wished to make a statement before the Jury said she did not. - Mr Langford, surgeon, stated that since the last Inquiry, he had visited the mother of the child at the police-station, and her statement to him was that she was faint in the closet after delivery. This was a common occurrence. He believed the faintness of the mother accounted for the circumstances for there was no evidence of suffocation or of the child having been pushed under the soil. He did not believe there was any criminal neglect on the part of the mother. - The Coroner having explained the law on the subject, the Jury returned the following verdict:- "We find that there was no criminal neglect but that the child died of insufficient attention at birth through the mother being taken faint." The Coroner said that did not amount to a verdict of manslaughter, and the Foreman stated that the Jury did not wish to bring in a verdict of manslaughter. The proceedings then terminated.

NEWTON ABBOT - Inquiry was made at the Newton Townhall last evening before Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of a child 9 months old named MINNIE ANN NIEVE DUNN, the child of a poor widow living in Mill-lane. The mother went out on Friday last to attend a mothers' meeting, and left her four children in the kitchen with some others, the deceased being asleep in the cradle. Subsequently it awoke and was placed by her sister on a mat in front of the fire, where it caught hold of a poker and knocked a kettle of hot water over itself, causing such scalds that it died yesterday morning. The Jury, of which Mr C. Pope was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that the owner of the house be requested to put the grate in proper order so as to prevent a recurrence of the accident. The Jury gave their fees to the mother.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 February 1881
PLYMOUTH - An Old Man Burnt To Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening as to the death of JAMES BISHOP, about 88 years of age, who died from injuries received by burning on Monday afternoon. Mr A. H. Bampton, M.D., house-surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the institution on Monday evening suffering from extensive burns on both legs, the lower portion of the back and body. His wounds were dressed, but the old man gradually sank, and died at 9 o'clock on the same evening, being about two hours after his admission. Death was caused by the burns and shock. The deceased was almost totally blind. - GEORGE WATERHOCK, grandson of the deceased, stated that his grandfather had been a hawker and resided in a caravan, now stationed at Pottery-court, Coxside. The deceased had been blind about twelve months. About four pm. on Monday he left the deceased sitting by himself on a box in the caravan near the lighted stove. Witness was only absent about ten minutes, and when he returned he found the caravan full of smoke and heard the deceased speaking, but could not see him for the fumes. He groped about the van until he found the deceased, whom he tried to lift, but as he could not he obtained assistance. The deceased was then taken out of the van, and Dr Greenway, who was sent for, advised his removal to the Hospital. It is supposed that the old man had knelt by the fire to pick up the ashes around the fireplace when his clothing ignited, probably by a lighted coal falling upon it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Burning."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fall Of A Wall At Devonport. The Adjourned Inquest. - At Devonport yesterday Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, continued his Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of TIMOTHY O'LEARY, who was killed several weeks ago by the fall of a wall at the new Public Hall in course of erection in Fore-street. At the previous Inquiry Mr Hine, architect, expressed the opinion that there was an error of judgment in the designs, and Mr Knight, the architect of the new hall, asked for an adjournment in order to produce evidence in support of his plans. - At the opening of the adjourned investigation yesterday Mr G. H. E. rundle appeared on behalf of Mr Knight, and stated that he had in his possession the reports of architects eminent in their profession upon the plans which had been submitted for their criticism, and which he would lay before the Jury after calling two gentlemen who were present to give verbal evidence. - The Coroner first asked Mr Hine if he in any way sent in plans for the construction of the building? - Mr Hine replied that he was not himself a competitor in the designs, neither did he know who the competitors were. - Edward Adolphus Bruning, architect and surveyor, Gresham House, London, stated that he had been twenty years in business, and had been accustomed to build rubble walls, but not very frequently, nor of such size as the one in the present instance. He had been for twelve years a Fellow of the R.I.B.A., and had been on the council of the institute. He was at the present time a member of the Committee on Professional Practice, before which would come disputes between architects and contractors; also a member of the Board of Examiners of the institute. He was a pupil of Professor Donaldson, a former president of the institute, and gained great experience in district surveyance work in London. He was consulted and employed as assessor by the Directors of the Public Hall Company about eighteen months ago when Mr Knight's designs were selected and had therefore a previous knowledge of those designs. Prior to a week ago Mr Knight was a perfect stranger to him, but he had no hesitation in selecting his plans from amongst those sent in. Witness had examined the contract drawings particularly with reference to the thickness of the walls which would be required under the Metropolitan Building Act. He found the wall which fell to be considerably in excess of the requirements of the Act. A wall of that height and length would, under the Act, be divided into four thicknesses - the top, 16ft. in height, would be 13 inches in thickness if built in brickwork, with one third of that thickness added if the work were rubble; that would make the thickness, roughly speaking, 17 ½ inches. There was nothing in the Act regarding the thickness of the pediment or the weight of the cornice. The cornices generally were governed by the Local Management Act, which affected the drippings from the roof, and not the stability of the structure. The rule generally acted upon was that the cornice should not project more than the thickness of the wall. In the wall in question were two cornices; the upper, or "raking" cornice, which overhung, need not of necessity have been constructed together with the wall. It should not have been built until the mortar in the wall was sufficiently consolidated, not perfectly set, but set to such a degree of hardness that the mortar would carry the weight without compressing. Mortar would not fully set for some months. Under the Metropolitan Building Act a brick wall of this kind should be at the bottom 2 ft. 2 in. in thickness, making it 2ft. 10 ½ in. in rubble. The wall in this instance was 3ft. thick, and he did not think, seeing how it was constructed, that the one-third thickness extra to a brick wall would have been required under the Act. Rubble walls were never used in London except for Gothic or decorative work in connection with churches, chapels and halls. It would not pay. In the wall in question there were pillars and piers which gave support to the wall, in addition to its being beyond the requisite thickness. He found the work generally very well executed indeed, the mortar being especially good, and where it had set it was nearly equal to cement. He could find nothing in the designs to account for the accident. From all the information he could gather he thought the wall ought to have stood, and if built again under more favourable circumstances he believed it would stand. He was informed by the clerk of the works that the bricks over the windows were found inside the building after the accident, the pediment or large mass of masonry having fallen into the street. That led him to the conclusion that the pediment fell forward and in falling over-balanced the piers and threw them into the hall in an opposite direction. He had tried to establish the line where the wall parted, and found it in the piers near the windows. In the ornamental caps a "core" or indentation occurred right across each of the piers, and four inches deep from the face of the piers, consequently there was not the vertical support under the edge of the cornice which overhung the deep indentation as well as the other parts of the wall. This produced a point of weakness. Another point was that the masonry was carried up too rapidly in wet weather. The pediment, or wall, faced the west on the outside; the rain was a driving rain, coming from the south-west, and consequently the mortar remained wetter and less set on the face of the wall than at the back. The face was consequently heavier than its backing and the wall tipped forward owing to its greater weight and softness in front. It fell over from the point where the supports were missing owing to the indentations to which he had referred. He thought the indentations were deeper than they need have been, and as a matter of fact were not so deep in the new work being carried up. This was a question for the clerk of the works in conjunction with the builder's foreman. But no one would have supposed this accident could have occurred; he should not have seen any danger in it. It was the combination of the damp mortar, the heavier face of the wall and the depth of the indentations that caused the accident; neither of the points would alone have caused the disaster. Before the accident he should have acted in all probability as the builder did. It was easy to set up a theory after an accident had occurred. - Mr Knight asked the witness if, in his opinion, there were any error of judgment whatever in the design of the wall or conduct in the superintendence of the building. - Witness replied that there was not. - Mr Hine called the attention of the witness to the proviso of clause 6 in part 2 of the first schedule in the Metropolitan Building Act, which provided that where the thickness of a wall was less than one-fourteenth of its height the thickness should be increased in that proportion. - Mr Knight objected to any cross-examination on the part of Mr Hine, but the Coroner replied that Mr Hine had been called in by him to assist him in the technical details and any questions relevant to the Inquiry would be admitted. - Witness, in reply to the question said he had given attention to the clause, but he denied that it was intended for this class of work, or that the work put into the wall in question required it. - Mr Matcham, the contractor, intimated that the indentations referred to were only 2 ½ inches in depth, but the work was now being carried up solid, and the necessary indentations would be afterwards cut in the brickwork now being used in place of limestone. - Mr Cant, house-surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, deposed to the death of the deceased having resulted from fracture of the base of the skull; and Henry Davey, of 9 Pond-lane, Devonport, who was working on the building at the time the wall fell, deposed to having seen deceased jump from the scaffolding to the ground, a distance of 30 feet. The scaffolding on which the deceased stood did not give way, and if deceased had remained where he was he would have escaped uninjured. - Mr John Watson, architect and surveyor, of Torquay, stated that he had examined the plans, and had come to the conclusion that there was no inherent weakness, and nothing to lead a person to expect other than a very substantial structure. He generally concurred with the opinions expressed by Mr Bruning. The witness's practice, extending over a period of eighteen years, had been principally in rubble masonry, and he was well able to form an opinion. He could see no error of judgment in the design of the building, which he had personally inspected. He thought it undesirable to have raised so great a length of wall fourteen or fifteen feet in height within seven or eight days without a cessation of work to give the mortar time to dry, seeing how very wet the weather was. The wet weather caused unequal settlement. - Mr Knight intimated that he had no desire to call any other witnesses, but he considered it due to the inhabitants of Devonport that they should be thoroughly satisfied upon the substantial character of the work. Accordingly he had submitted his plans to certain eminent authorities and he now presented their reports. - Mr Arthur Cates, Fellow and Member of the Council R.I.B.A., and Crown Surveyor of H.M.'s Woods and Forests, reported - "When on the 8th inst. you submitted to me your drawings for the Devonport Public Hall I did not perceive any reason for attributing the falling of the pediment, &c., to insufficient strength in the wall. Had those drawings been submitted to me on behalf of the Crown for approval, I should not have objected to the walls as being too thin; as, subject to proper materials being used and due care being exercised in their erection, they appeared to me to be sufficient for the purpose. Considerable care is required in building rubble walling to secure even bedding and thorough bonding, while work carried up hastily in wet weather would not be unlikely to fall, which, if slowly built and protected from soakage, would be perfectly stable, and would resist any accidental concussion or leverage which would easily overturn the green work." Mr T. R. Smith, F.R.I.B.A., district surveyor under the Metropolitan Buildings Acts, and Interim Professor of Architecture to the University College, London, reported:- "It is part of my duty, as the district surveyor of Southwark and part of Lambeth, to examine the plans of buildings to be erected, and see that they conform to the regulations of the Metropolitan Building Act, and, in the case of public buildings, to such special principles as have been laid down. Had these plans been brought before me officially, as those of a rubble building to be erected n my district, I should have considered the thickness of the walls and the general distribution of piers and openings as satisfying the requirements." Mr G. B. Williams, F.R.I.B.A., district surveyor under the Metropolitan Buildings Act, surveyor to Brasenose College, Oxford, Morden College, Kent, and to the City of London Coopers, Mercers and Vinters' Companies, reported:- "I have carefully examined the drawings belonging to the contract, and am of opinion they are properly and carefully designed, and that if carried out with care and without undue haste the work would have stood properly." - The Coroner then asked Mr Hine whether he thought the reasons set forth that day accounted for the fall of the wall. - Mr Hine replied that the causes set forth had no doubt something to do with it. That was all he could say about it. - The Coroner, in summing up, expressed the opinion that the fall of the wall was a pure accident over which none of the parties interested had any control. It seemed that the accident was to be attributed to the indentations, combined with the excessive wet weather, which prevented the mortar from setting and it was certainly very satisfactory to find the cause so clearly set forth. The clerk of the works might have been a little too sanguine and a little over-anxious to get on with the work, but he confided in the apparent solidity of the structure, and proceeded with the work perhaps a little faster in the wet weather than he otherwise might have done. But the accident was attributable not merely to one cause, but to a combination of causes, and the danger was not apparent until the wall had fallen and a searching investigation had rendered it perceptible. - The Jury, after a brief deliberation in private, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all concerned from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 18 February 1881
BARNSTAPLE - Strange Death Of An Infant. - The County Coroner (Mr J. H. Toller) held an Inquest last evening at the Rolle Arms Inn on the body of an infant one month old, the child of parents named SOMERFIELD, the father being a carpenter. The evidence given was to the effect that the child was nearly one month old, and that the midwife had left it in the care of the mother about a fortnight ago, that Thursday morning at six o'clock the child suckled, but at seven the mother took it up in her arms while in bed and found it was dead. It was not, however, until nine o'clock that she sent for the nurse, who then went for Dr Fernie. The doctor could not give any reason for death, especially as the mother said she did not believe she overlaid it. The body was of a peculiar yellow colour when he saw it. The Inquest was adjourned in order that a post-mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 February 1881
TORQUAY - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Torquay Townhall on the body of ARTHUR SMALE, aged 4 years, son of a coachbuilder, residing in Melville-street. From the statement of HARRIET SMALE, the child's mother, it appeared that on Thursday last deceased was taken ill with the measles, but MRS SMALE thought she could prescribe properly for him herself and did not call in a medical man. On Monday the child was worse, but still the mother sent for no medical aid, and on Tuesday morning the symptoms became alarming, and a doctor was called, but before he could arrive the child was dead. - Dr Midgley Cash stated that in his opinion the child's life could have been saved had the mother sent for medical assistance earlier. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury after a consultation, the Coroner informing MRS SMALE that he thought the Jury had taken a very lenient view of the case.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 February 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, at the Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, last evening, as to the death of WILLIAM STUART COLLOM, an illegitimate child, aged 12 months, which died suddenly on Wednesday. Mr L. Lewis, L.R.C.P., who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, said the lungs were much congested and sufficiently to have caused death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Case Of Drowning At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday evening at the Guildhall, Plymouth by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, as to the death of EDGAR EDWARD MORTIMORE, aged 17, whose body, as stated yesterday, was found under the Hoe on Thursday morning. - THOMAS MORTIMORE, father of the deceased, and a shipwright in the Dockyard, stated that his son left his home - 10 Fellowes-place, Stoke, on Wednesday evening about a quarter to seven to attend a night-school at Stonehouse, and that was the last time he was seen alive by witness. The deceased was a store apprentice in the Dockyard, and there had been no quarrel or any words with the deceased on the day he left his home. - A young man named Thomas Wills stated that on Thursday morning about a quarter to twelve he was under the Plymouth Hoe in company with another young man named Smith. On looking over the wall near the West Hoe Baths they saw the body of a man face downwards in the cove in about two feet of water, and sent for the Hoe Constable. The tide at the time was on the ebb, and they looked about the rocks to see if they could find the hat of deceased, but could not. In answer to a Juror, the witness stated that there were no stones tied to the body. - Thomas Henry Smith corroborated. - James Colton, the Hoe Constable, said about noon on Thursday he was sent for, and on going to the cove under the Hoe near the West Hoe Baths, he found the two last witnesses and a body on the beach. He had the body conveyed to the mortuary and on searching it found a piece of india-rubber and a button on it. By the appearance of the body he thought it had been in the water about five or six hours. It was impossible to walk around the cove except at the low neap tides. The deceased to have got to the cove must have got over the wall, which was about 5f. 6in. high on the inside and then have scrambled down over the rocks. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said the only facts before them was that the deceased had been drowned, but how he came into the water they had no evidence to shew, and their safest plan would be to return an open verdict. - After a short consultation the Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned" and passed a vote of condolence with the friends of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 February 1881
BARNSTAPLE - The adjourned Inquest at Barnstaple on the body of an infant child named SOMERFIELD, of Rolle's quay, who was found dead by it smother on Thursday morning, a post-mortem examination having been made. Dr Fernie stated that the child was so constituted as to be easily suffocated, and a verdict of "Death from Suffocation" was returned.

EXETER - Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter on Saturday morning as to the death of SOPHIA NAPPER, wife of an engine driver, in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, living at No. 12 Exe-street, whose body was found in a mill leat near her home on Friday morning. HENRY WALTER NAPPER, husband of the deceased, said his wife was 29 years of age. She was enciente, and had been unwell and in low spirits for some time past. About four years ago she attempted to destroy herself by taking poison. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 February 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at Saltmarsh's Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, Plymouth, yesterday, relative to the death of ERNEST BURRIDGE ALLEN, aged 3 months, who was found dead by his mother on Sunday morning. MARY ANN ALLEN, wife of a seaman, and mother of the deceased, residing at 11 John-street, stated that deceased had been healthy from birth. On Saturday night she retired to rest as usual. She nursed the child in the evening and through the night. On awaking on Sunday morning she found deceased dead. She immediately called a Mrs May, who resides in the same house and sent her daughter for a doctor. Mrs May gave corroborative evidence, and the Jury returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 February 1881
DAWLISH - An Inquest was held at Dawlish yesterday, before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of HENRY CHOWEN COLE HELMORE, aged five months, an illegitimate child. The medical evidence was to the effect that the child had been overlaid, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated."

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by the Devonport coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) at the White Lion Hotel, King-street, yesterday, as to the death of LILIAN QUANCE, aged 11 months, the parents of whom reside in Cannon-street Ope. On Monday morning the child was given some food, and shortly afterwards was seized with a fit of coughing in which it died. It had been suffering from a cough for two or three days. Dr Wilson was sent for, but before he had time to leave the house another message came that the child was dead. Dr Wilson thought that the deceased being seized with a cough so quickly after taking the food some of the food or phlegm got on the top of the windpipe and choked the child. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 February 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide At Stonehouse. The Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at the Stonehouse Police Court yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM TONKIN WILLS, who committed suicide on Tuesday by taking a quantity of poison. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, said the Jury knew as well as himself that the surroundings of this matter were of a very painful and melancholy character to everybody connected with it, and he was sure the persons connected with it would have their sympathy, as they had his own, under the sad circumstances. At the same time he was sure they would be influenced by the oath they had taken, and that they would arrive at a proper conclusion, and carry out their duties in a proper manner. The law laid it down that everybody must be presumed to be sane until he was proved to be to the contrary. There were many circumstances which might lead to temporary insanity, such as pressure of business, quarrels at home, grief and other circumstances, which they as reasonable men would have to determine upon. Of course, in this case there was no question but what the deceased destroyed himself; the only question for the Jury would be as to what state of mind the deceased was in at the time he committed the act. If they were not satisfied with the evidence, one conclusion they could arrive at was that the deceased committed suicide, but that there was not sufficient evidence before them to justify them in saying what was the state of mind of the deceased at the time. - Richard Chegwyn, a carpenter, stated that he was at work on Tuesday at the shop of Messrs. Phillips, outfitters, Union-street. He saw the deceased walking about the shop. He had frequently worked at the shop and knew the deceased, who appeared to be very excited about the robbery from Messrs. Phillips, and he said to him on several occasions that he knew nothing about it, and that he could not eat anything in consequence of it. Shortly before eleven o'clock on Tuesday morning witness was in the fitting-room and saw the deceased come in from the passage, go to a high shelf in the shop and take away a small jar. Witness said to him, "What have you got there, WILLS; pickled cabbage?" His reply was, "No, Chegwyn," and he left the room. Shortly afterwards witness heard screams proceeding from upstairs. He went upstairs and saw the deceased staggering about the front room. MRS WILLS said, "He's poisoned himself." The deceased said "Yes, I've done it; I am an innocent man, but I could not stand the worry any longer." He fell to the ground within a minute and witness ran for assistance. - Elias Adams, working at Messrs. Phillips's establishment, produced the jar from which the deceased obtained the poison. On Monday the deceased spoke to him in a very childish manner, but on Tuesday he appeared to be quite rational. He had, however, worried himself very much about the robberies. - Mr George S. Phillips, jun., stated that he knew the deceased well. He was about 44 years of age, and had worked for the witness's father about twenty-three years. On Tuesday witness was called from the Octagon by Chegwyn, who told him that the deceased had poisoned himself. He first of all sent for medical assistance and then proceeded to the shop at Stonehouse. On arriving there he found that the deceased was still alive, but was insensible, and appeared not to be suffering in the least. The deceased had been very much excited of late owing to the robbery, and had several times said he could hardly realise that it had occurred. Witness had said to him, "Well, there is one thing, WILLS, you are not in it." he said that in order to assure the deceased that they did not suspect him, but deceased still continued to labour under great excitement. The deceased used to be subject to fits, but had not suffered in that way for the last four or five years. After having a fit he used to be very stupid, and would not be able to attend to business for the remainder of the day. The jar produced contained cyanide of potassium, but the contents looked as if it had been used in cleaning lace. The cyanide of potassium itself was kept in a cupboard, under lock and key and was in the sole charge of the deceased, who, when he wanted to use it, dissolved it in water in the jar produced. - Mr Phillips, sen., stated that the deceased had been in the habit of using cyanide of potassium every day for years past, and was always very careful to throw away the contents of the jar after he had finished with it. The chemical was used in cleaning lace, and after the deceased had finished with it the jar would be put away by him on the highest shelf. The deceased consequently, knew perfectly well what were the contents of the jar. Since the detection of the robbery he had been in a very excited state, and seemed to be in great trouble lest he should be thought to be implicated in it. Witness was, however, perfectly satisfied that the deceased was not in any way connected with it, and had told him so, with the intention of allaying his excitement. But the deceased was very excitable and sensitive, and after being out in the town would return to the shop and become greatly excited regarding what he had heard people say of the robbery out of doors. Witness did all he could to pacify him and for a few minutes he would appear to be satisfied, but after a little time he would again refer to the subject and grow just as excited as ever. - Sergeant Holwill, at the request of Mr Phillips, produced an order-book belonging to the deceased, and read the following entry:- "Good-bye my dear wife and children. I cannot stand the trial. I have had nothing to do with the matter. Ask Mr Phillips to do the best he can for you. You will find my bank-book in the ......" - The entry, which seemed to have been written in a very hurried manner, terminated abruptly, giving rise to the inference that the deceased wrote it after taking the poison, and had not sufficient strength to finish it. - Mr Phillips, sen., expressed a desire to explain the incomplete sentence. Twelve years ago, he said, he offered WILLS an increase of wages, but the deceased said he had enough to carry his family and himself on with from week to week, and they then arranged that he (Mr Phillips) should put the proposed increase aside for him. From that time up to the present he had banked 5s. every week and there was now nearly £100 standing to the credit of the deceased. Neither MRS WILLS nor her eldest son knew anything of this, only the deceased and himself knew of the provision thus being made for the ultimate benefit of his family. As far as the honesty of the deceased was concerned, he did not entertain the slightest suspicion. The deceased held the keys of the cupboards where all the gold lace was kept, and there never had been a single piece lost, neither did any of the goods that had been recovered from a portion of the stock over which the deceased had control. But he was a man of very excitable temperament and the robberies seemed to prey upon his mind. - At this juncture the Coroner announced that the contents of the jar had not been analysed, and consequently Dr Leah could not testify as to the cause of death. - Dr Leah remarked that the case seemed to be already pretty clear, and, though he could not say what the narcotic was, he could swear that death resulted from the deceased taking a narcotic poison. - The Coroner said that would not do. The evidence must be as to the actual cause of death. There was no doubt sufficient evidence to enable to Jury to say what the state of mind of the deceased was when he committed the act, and if they were of opinion that it was a case of temporary insanity he could order the burial of the deceased. They could then adjourn to enable proper medical evidence to be offered. - The Court was then cleared to enable the Jury to deliberate in private, and, after the lapse of a few minutes and without the Court being re-opened, the Jury dispersed, the Coroner subsequently intimating to those in waiting that the Inquest was adjourned until Tuesday next. No announcement was made as to whether or not the Jury had agreed upon the state of mind of the deceased, but inasmuch as the Coroner granted an order for burial, it is presumed that the Jury were of the opinion that the deceased was labouring under temporary insanity.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Clarendon Inn, Summerland-place, last evening as to the death of MARK TREVETHEN, landlord of the Fox Inn, Summerland-street. - ELIZA ANN PENHALLIGON, daughter of the deceased, said her father was 56 years of age; lately his health had been failing, and within the last week he had been drinking very heavily. About two p.m. on Tuesday she was called from the bar to the deceased's room, and she found him very ill in bed. She sent for Mr Rendle, surgeon, but before he arrived the deceased died. - Mr Russel Rendle, M.R.C.S., said he knew the deceased, and had treated him in 1879 for dropsy, disease of the heart and enlargement of the liver. This latter ailment was caused by his drinking heavily. He then warned him of the consequences if he continued his drinking habits. Lately the deceased had fallen back into his old ways, and he had no hesitation in saying that the cause of death was disease of the heart and liver, accelerated by intemperate habits. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, as to the death of ROBERT COAKER, labourer in the dockyard, who died, as previously reported, from injuries inflicted whilst a piece of wood was being hoisted by the steam-capstan. It was supposed that a piece of rope coiled around his feet and tripped him up. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 February 1881
TAVISTOCK - The Suicide At Tavistock. The Inquest. - An Inquest on the body of HENRY EXWORTHY, mine labourer, of Tavistock, was held before Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Boot Inn last evening. Mr Hole was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - In opening the proceedings the Coroner remarked that in 1874 he held an Inquest on the body of an elder brother of the deceased, who had committed suicide, and the verdict then returned was that he did the rash act while of unsound mind. This, he thought, went to shew that there were symptoms of insanity in the family. Deceased had lately been in low spirits, and had before tried to commit suicide. The Coroner added that he thought he ought to say that he understood from the police that deceased had nothing to do with the larceny at Stonehouse, of which his brother was accused - at least as far as they at present knew. - Mary Ann Cocking, of Barley Market-street, said the deceased was aged 46 and was her son-in-law. She was in the habit of seeing him daily. About ten days ago someone read to the deceased an account of the arrest of his brother at Stonehouse, and he dropped down and said "I can't bear it." Ever since Christmas he had been very low-spirited and since he heard that report he had been worse. The same day he tried to hang himself from a beam in his house with a scarf. His wife, however, stopped him. He seemed in a great rage, and said "If you stop me now I'll do it." He had asked witness to take care of money and jewellery for fear he should get robbed in going to his home, which was in the next street. The day he committed suicide witness saw him, and he then appeared very low. Before he married her daughter (about four months ago) he used to drink very hard, but he had abstained since then. He had recently told her that he had once been in some sort of confinement - it was not an asylum, exactly. Deceased's sister told him the day he committed suicide that someone in the employ of Mr Phillips had poisoned himself. Witness wondered whether deceased thought it was his brother. All the family appeared to be very low spirited. Deceased was constantly watched, and had only been left for ten minutes when he committed suicide. - Richard Hiscox, a hawker lodging in the house, gave evidence as to the finding the deceased hanging from a peg behind the door by a piece of thin blind cord. He was dead and witness cut down the body. He had nothing but his shirt on. - Bessy Spry said she went to clean the bedroom, and finding deceased behind the door gave an alarm. - Sergeant Richards also gave evidence. Deceased's wife was too unwell to attend. - In summing up, the Coroner said there was no doubt deceased had been very much worried lately. He again alluded to the fact that a brother committed suicide six years ago whilst of unsound mind; and he left it to the Jury to say in what state of mind deceased was when he committed suicide. He was so satisfied in his own mind that he thought there was no occasion to adjourn the Inquiry to find out whether he had been in an asylum. A verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 February 1881
EXETER - Suicide Of An Exeter Hotel-Keeper. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Globe Hotel, Cathedral-yard, Exeter, before Mr Coroner Hooper, as to the death of MR CHARLES LANGDON, aged 42, proprietor of the Globe Hotel, who committed suicide by throwing himself out of a window. Mr Brewster said the deceased was his son-in-law. He had been much addicted to drink of late, and witness stayed at the hotel in consequence of the deceased's illness. About 5 o'clock that morning MR LANGDON was missed from his bedroom and was subsequently found in the courtyard below lying on his back. He was breathing heavily, and witness thought that he had had a fit. A medical gentleman was sent for, but MR LANGDON expired before his arrival. A window about three stories high had been left open by the paper-hangers who had lately been in the house, who had also left a pair of steps leading to the window. - Mr J. Moon, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased during his last illness. He was suffering from the ordinary symptoms of delirium tremens. When he arrived at the Globe Hotel he found, to his surprise, that Mr Bell had been sent for. He considered that most unfair, as the nearest surgeon should be sent for. - The Coroner added that the Act gave the Coroner the right to call a surgeon to his aid, but he found that in nearly every case the police fixed on a surgeon, which was usurping the authority vested in him. - The Chief Constable (Captain Bent) complained that the Coroner should reprimand the police. The Coroner said he had done no such thing, but Captain Bent persisted in saying that he had, and eventually the Coroner ordered him out of the room. Captain Bent then left exclaiming that the Coroner had reprimanded the police. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 2 March 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Suicide At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, yesterday resumed the Inquest at the Stonehouse Police-court on the body of WILLIAM TONKIN WILLS. The facts of the case have already appeared in the Western Daily Mercury. The Inquest was adjourned in order that an analysis might be made of the contents of the bottles that were found near the deceased on the day of his death. The following letter was read:- "Plymouth, February 28, 1881. - Sir - The results of my analysis of the contents of the jar, cup and bottle, which I received from you, through Sergeant Holwill, are as follows: - Jar - three-and-a-half drachms of cyanide of potassium. Cup - about half-a-drachm fluid contained two grains of cyanide of potassium. Bottle - fluid contents, one pint "vomited," contained from twelve to fifteen grains of cyanide of potassium. - H. P. Hearder, M.P.S." - The Coroner, in summing up, said that now there could be no doubt that the deceased destroyed himself by taking poison, it would be for the Jury to say what state of mind the deceased was in at the time he took his life. It seemed to him (the Coroner) that he was not in a sound state of mind. He had rather a weak mind. - The Foreman said that they had pretty well agreed on the state of the mind of the deceased. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide by taking poison whilst in an Unsound Mind."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Young Lady At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, held an inquest at the Stopford Arms, Stopford-place, Stoke, yesterday, on the body of EDITH RAPER, daughter of a retired military officer, who committed suicide on Monday evening at St. Aubyn's Chapel-of-Ease Schools, Devonport, by taking a quantity of strychnine. - AUGUSTUS FREDERICK RAPER, formerly a captain in the 23rd Regiment of Food, residing at 3 Stopford-terrace, said the deceased was his daughter, and was about twenty-one years of age. She was for some time engaged as a teacher in a school at Plymouth. Deceased was well educated, having passed her examinations very creditably. She was somewhat talented, and attended the Bible Class in connection with St. Aubyn's Chapel-of-Ease School. - The Coroner: Have you any reason to think your daughter was unhappy in her mind, or dissatisfied? - I have noticed her to be depressed almost ever since she lost her appointment as a teacher. I think it was due to her not getting another post. She became more depressed every day. Deceased tried on several occasions for other appointments, but it was invariably thought she was too young. - The Coroner: Do you think she showed anything like aberration of mind? - Well, she has for some time past appeared most peculiar. She used to like her sister's society, but by degrees she became more and more reserved, and had latterly been in the habit of taking long walks alone. She would also sit alone upstairs. A letter has been found in the pocket of my daughter, which, I think, you should have read privately - that is, I should like the Coroner and Jury to hear it, but should not care for it being made public. - The Coroner said that there could be no evidence admitted that the Jury would not be entitled to. It would be their verdict, not his. - Witness said he did not at all wish to interfere with the Coroner's feelings in the matter. - The Coroner asked the representatives of the Press if they would withdraw while the letter was read. But it was intimated that this would entirely depend upon the nature of the communication. - The Coroner remarked that witness would exercise much sounder judgment in allowing everything to go before the public, for this reason - that if the reporters were asked not to publish the letter referred to, the public would probably place a different construction upon the matter than was intended. It would be much better to give a fair idea of its contents than a garbled one. - Witness said he would not press his objection further. Deceased lived at Torpoint last October. In June or July she was at Horrabridge, and although she appeared cheerful, witness could scarcely ever get her to converse with him. She always seemed to have something on her mind. - A Juror: While she was at Torpoint she was in a situation or merely visiting a friend? - Merely visiting. - A Juror: Was there any unpleasantness at home yesterday? - No. There was nothing unusual, though I was not at home the whole of the day, having to go to my office at the Dockyard. - The Coroner: You have heard of her walking about the house at night? - Yes. One morning she got out of bed, walked downstairs, unbolted the back-door, and passed into the yard. - Was she dressed? - No; she was in her night clothes. Her mother brought her back. - A Juror: Did she actually walk out of the house? - Oh, yes. She unbolted the door and walked out, but this is some time since. - A Juror: Was she awake or asleep? - Walking in her sleep. - Emma Jefferies, wife of a seaman, 24 Chapel-street, Devonport, stated that she was present at the Bible-class Meeting on Monday evening. Deceased came out of a dark room and sat by her side. She put out her tongue and asked witness to look at it, and the latter asked her what she had been taking. To this she replied "Something very nice." The tongue of the deceased was very black. Witness said, "If you are going to sit by my side, I hope you will be good," and she remarked, "Yes I will be very good." In a moment afterwards witness fancied deceased had the toothache, and asked her if this was so. Deceased replied "No, thank you," immediately giving a scream, and falling into witness's arms. She was placed on the floor and witness asked her what she had been taking. Deceased replied "I am dying. I have taken poison - vermin killer." The class-room she emerged from was dark and empty. - The Coroner: What made you ask deceased if she would be good? - Because she had had such queer ways ever since I first knew her, now some twelve months ago. For instance, she would sit and "make faces," draw likenesses and do other things not at all proper. - The Coroner: She would make faces? - At whom? - At those present. - The Coroner: What kind of likenesses would she draw? - Anything but what was proper. - The Coroner: Caricatures? - Yes. - Henry Maddock, of the Devonport police force, was called into St. Aubyn's school-room about nine o'clock, and had the body conveyed to Stoke. The following articles were found on deceased - a blank post card, part of a pill box, fourpence, a letter, locket, a bunch of keys and a small white packet of powder. - The Coroner, prior to taking any other evidence, read the following letter found on the deceased. - "3 Collingwood Villas, Stoke, Devonport, February 7, 1881. - Dear MISS RAPER, - I am extremely grieved by your conduct last evening. It was an insult to the memory of my Lord and I must forbid you coming to the Lord's Supper n future until you have professed repentance for such a gross act. If you come I shall pass you over. I have been pained above measure by your conduct lately, and this above all. I beseech of you to think of your sin, and ask the Lord to forgive you. It was an outrage on His memory and a grievous sin against His people. Remember there is a judgment to come, and I lovingly warn you to seek repentance and remission of your sins. I shall not cease to pray for you. - Yours truly, Pitt Johnson." - The Rev. Pitt Johnson, Incumbent of St. Aubyn's Chapel-of-Ease, was sworn. In reply to the coroner he said he had known the deceased for some years. About a year ago she got into a very depressed state of mind, gave up her class at the Sunday school, and one evening after service handed witness a packet of tracts, saying "These are the cause of all my troubles." When he opened the tracts he found they were Mr Bradlaugh's publications. Witness spoke to her about them. She seemed very unhappy, and shortly after told Mrs Johnson that if she could persuade herself there was no God she would destroy herself. She continued in that state of mind for some time, coming very frequently to his house as well as visiting his late curate. She would sit for an hour or two sometimes without saying a word, except answering just what was asked. Deceased had been worse than usual lately at the class. She would laugh, and try to divert the minds of others from what was being said. Her conduct was noticed by every member of the class. Last May - after she gave him the tracts - deceased accompanied witness and several others on an excursion, but her conduct was so strange that it was thought necessary she should be watched. With reference to the letter, it was due to witness to say that on the Sunday prior to the communication being penned, deceased came to the celebration of the Lord's Supper. In administering the elements on that occasion, the rev. gentleman gave her the bread, and thought she had received it in the usual manner. On giving her the cup, she put it back into his hands without tasting the wine. The rev. gentleman again offered deceased the cup, but she once more returned it without putting the wine to her lips. After the service deceased returned the bread back to him, folded up in a bit of paper, while he was in the vestry. On the Monday following, witness wrote the letter referred to. He did not consider it necessary for her to be present if she did not receive the elements. In his opinion, deceased had not been of a perfectly sound state of mind for some time past. On Monday evening her mother told witness that, when her servant left the house some time ago, MRS RAPER asked deceased to assist her in washing some plates after dinner, and that she said "Yes, for the last time." - Mr Walter Dyer was sworn. He had known the deceased about four years. On December 17 last witness sold her a sixpenny packet of "Battle's Vermin Killer." Witness asked her the usual question, "What is it for?" Deceased answered that it was for killing mice. She signed the "Poison Book" containing such particulars as the law required. The poison deceased had used was a preparation of strychnine. Witness did not believe the white powder produced to be a virulent poison. In fact, he thought it burnt alum. - Emma Jago, 13 Tavistock-road, Stoke, was called. She had known deceased, but for some time had thought her conduct strange. - The Coroner then read a letter written by deceased to witness, the contents of which went to show deceased's state of mind on religious matters - her general belief being that she believed "That if there was a God He was a God of vengeance, and not of love." Deceased had taken chloroform to make her sleep before writing the letter, as he told witness she had not slept for three nights. She also procured a bottle of salts of lemon about the same time to see how much she could take without it killing her. - The Coroner: Did she make any trouble about losing her situation? - Oh, no; that was not her trouble. She stayed more as a friend at Torpoint, where she remained three months. - Dr Wilson stated that he was called into the School-room about eight p.m. He saw deceased on the floor apparently in a fit. Witness spoke to her, and she said she had taken some vermin poison she had bought at Mr Dyer's. Dr Wilson sent for an emetic and also sent to Mr Dyer's to ascertain if the statement was true. Mr Dyer at first thought it was not, but afterwards found he sold deceased poison in December last. Witness, when he saw her, came to the conclusion that if she was not suffering from hysterics, she had poisoned herself with strychnine. Deceased expired in his arms before he could procure the stomach pump. She had taken a considerable dose of the poison. At the request of the Coroner, he had made a post-mortem examination, being assisted by Mr Cutcliffe. - The Coroner briefly summed up, remarking that he could not see how a young lady, brought up in good society, and well educated, could have behaved as she had done in a sound state of mind. The letter the Jury had heard read from the Rev. Pitt Johnson was a highly proper one under the circumstances, and had her mind not been already unhinged it might have had the effect of reinstating her, and have thus prevented her committing suicide. He had no doubt that Mr Dyer had complied strictly with the Act of Parliament and that the deceased had taken the poison while in the class-room. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 March 1881
ALPHINGTON - The Supposed Suicide Of An Exeter Solicitor. The Inquest. - Mr Coroner Burrows held an Inquest yesterday at The Briars, Alphington, Exeter, the residence of MR R. T. HEAD, on the body of that gentleman's son, MR ROBERT WILLIAM HEAD, aged 46, who had been in practice as a solicitor for many years and was secretary to the West of England Peat Company. Mr E. Maxwell Brownlow was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr B. C. Gidley, solicitor, town clerk of Exeter, appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the family. - The first witness was Henry Arthur, gardener at The Briars, who spoke to having seen the deceased walking in the snowstorm at a part of the grounds near the brook about eleven o'clock. Two hours later the witness was called by Colonel Trevelyan to help take the body out of the brook. Deceased was lying close to the bank, with his head partly covered with water and his legs wholly. The bank is high on each side. - Colonel H. A. Trevelyan, who is connected with the HEAD family by marriage, and is the chairman of the West of England Peat Company, said he had known the deceased since August and had been staying at the Briars for several days. On Sunday morning witness and deceased were in one of the sitting-rooms. On leaving to get some postage stamps he (the colonel) remarked that he would be back directly and smoke a pipe with him, to which deceased replied "All right." On returning after an absence of a quarter of an hour witness met MRS ROBERT HEAD, who asked whether he had seen her husband, as he had been observed to go out by the back door, wearing his hat and carrying an umbrella. Thinking he might have gone to his office at Bedford-circus, Exeter, for a deed which witness wished to see, he went there, but found that nobody had been at the office. After returning to the Briars witness traced footsteps of the deceased, as he believed them to be, as far as the turnpike-gate, and there lost them. He searched about the neighbourhood, but failed to strike the trail again; and when in the act of trying to find a convenient spot at which to cross the brook he saw the body of MR HEAD lying on the opposite side in the position described by the witness Arthur. The body was at once removed to the kitchen, and placed before the fire, when witness adopted what remedies he could think of and despatched a mounted messenger for a medical man. The water at the spot where the body was found was about three feet deep. Witness examined the snow by the brook-side and found a long mark on the side of its bank at the foot of which the body lay, as if a man had slipped on his heel. - In examination by Mr Gidley, Colonel Trevelyan said the strain of business during the past few weeks - owing to the appointment of a committee of inspection by the shareholders of the Peat Company, and also to the illness of MR HEAD, sen. - had been very heavy on the deceased, who appeared to be quite unhinged. There was so much correspondence in connection with the Peat Company that deceased's time had been wholly occupied for the last fortnight, to the detriment of his other business. Deceased felt very keenly the remarks of certain shareholders at the meeting, in London, remarks which were quite unfounded, and it was the one topic of his conversation. As chairman of the Peat Company, he (witness) believed there was no ground whatever for impugning the manner in which deceased had discharged his duties. Everything he had charge of in connection with the company was in perfect order, and his accounts were perfectly correct. He had been very unsettled and melancholy during the past month, and witness had often noticed him become flushed and tear at his collar as if half-suffocated, and as though he suffered from an apoplectic tendency. Witness did not believe the deceased was responsible for his actions on Sunday morning; indeed, they were watching him as well as they could without his noticing it, and had talked of calling in a medical man. The position in which the body was found was, in his opinion, compatible with the theory that deceased fell into the water accidentally. - Mr W. R. Trevelyan, brother of the widow, spoke to having been in company of deceased on his last visit to London, and on his miserable state of mind in consequence of what he spoke of as "slanderous reports" and "unfounded accusations" made against him by a director of the company. The witness described the symptoms of apoplectic tendency which he had noticed in the deceased, and for which on one occasion late at night he gave him some medicine. Witness saw him to Paddington when he returned to Exeter, and almost his last words were a bitter complaint of his honour having been impugned, and an indignant protestation that his "hands were clean." Deceased used to be a man of very clear head, and was at one time a celebrated Alpine mountaineer. Since this pressure of business, and calumnious accusations came, however, he had become melancholy and sedentary in his habits, and neglected food so much that witness was obliged to scold him. - By the Foreman: When he was taken ill in London witness suggested that he should have a doctor, but he refused and got very angry. - Mr A. J. Cuming, M.D., said death was undoubtedly caused by drowning, though it was probable a sudden rush of blood to the head might have caused insensibility before drowning. He had noticed recently that deceased's face would become inordinately flushed, and that he was in low spirits. - The Rev. J. Juyle, rector of St. Olive, gave evidence as to the marked contrast between the deceased's demeanour during the past few weeks compared with his cool and clear-headed manner in former times. - In reply to the Foreman, he stated that he was not, and never had been, a shareholder in the Peat Company, and did not intend to be. - Mr George W. Couch, deceased's clerk, was called to speak to the position of his money affairs. he said: I have been MR HEAD'S clerk for nine years. Lately I have observed a very great alteration in his mental condition and his demeanour. I met him in London on the Sunday before the Peat Company's meeting. he was then very much altered from what he had been when he left Exeter on the previous Wednesday. He has not been the same man since. - Q.: I believed you considered his mind was unhinged? - A.: Oh, very much. - Q.: I understand there were no pecuniary difficulties of any kind whatever? - A.: None whatever; in fact I made up his book on Saturday, the last thing before he left, including his own private cash-book. He had a considerable balance on his private and on his business account. - By the Jury: Deceased was in a low state of mind the day before the Peat Company's meeting. - The Coroner: Is it a fact that various charges were against MR HEAD as to mismanagement? - Yes. - Did MR HEAD seem to feel it very much? - Yes; very much. In fact he called me over to him in the midst of the meeting, and asked me if I didn't think it very hard that such charges should be made against him. He also asked me if I was called upon whether I could not state that the books were kept perfectly straight. I said of course I could, because I had kept them myself. - The Coroner pointed out that the question of sanity or insanity did not arise, inasmuch as there was no evidence as to how the deceased got into the water. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" and expressed their sympathy with the family.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 4 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - A Wife Driven To Suicide At Plymouth. Heartrending Disclosures: A Miscreant Beyond The Pale Of Law. - Last evening Mr Coroner Brian, and a Jury of twenty-three, held an Enquiry at the Municipal Buildings, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHANNA HOOPER, the wife of a photographer, carrying on business in Union-street, Stonehouse. - The Coroner, before inviting the Jury to proceed to view the body, remarked that they would gather from the fact of his having empanelled a double Jury that this case was one of an unusual character. The facts were so peculiar that he was himself unable as yet to suggest how the Enquiry was likely to shape itself. The case was first brought under his notice by Dr Jackson. That gentleman, it appears, was called the previous day to 50 Woolster-street, to see a woman who had been found lying dead there. A neighbour had entered the room for the purpose of supplying the woman with some refreshment, and found the woman's life had departed. The deceased was the wife of a photographer, and it seemed that she left him on Friday morning last. They would find from the evidence that one of the deceased's eyes was completely blackened, and that she was more or less covered with bruises all over the body. In the side, back and chest were evidences of this. On the previous day it was reported to him that the woman had attempted to commit suicide by drowning. He asked the Jury to exercise patience until they had heard the evidence of the medical man, inasmuch as there were indications that the woman had taken cyanide of potassium. He had requested Mr Jackson to make a post-mortem examination. He should have been treating the Jury with disrespect had he not done so. He had also summoned the husband of the deceased and some of his neighbours in order that the Jury might be able to elicit the whole of the facts. - The Jury, of whom Mr W. Bayly was Foreman, then retired to view the body of the deceased. Mr Chief Constable Wreford, on their return, was present to watch the proceedings on behalf of the police. - Frederick Murton, a little lad, stated that he had known the deceased "a good many years." During the last few days she had been staying at his father's house. She came on Friday and stayed until Sunday evening, when she went away with the mother of the witness. One day this week his mother took a room for the deceased at 50 Woolster-street. She did not like to sleep by herself, and the first night, therefore, he shared her bed with her. After he delivered her the breakfast she asked him to fetch a noggin of gin, and he did so from the nearest public-house. He took a little blue jug to fetch it, and on his return she gave him a penny and said to him, "Good-bye, God bless you." He did not think that remark a strange one, as she generally said the same thing to him. On returning from school, he was told to take her up some dinner. He went up accordingly. The door was shut, but not locked. He opened it and found the room the same as he left it. On looking towards the bed, he saw the dead body of the deceased stretched upon it. Deceased did not send him to any chemist, and, so far as he knew, no one visited her during his absence. - Mary Ann Murton, mother of the last witness, stated that she knew the deceased very well indeed. She had been married to HOOPER thirty years and witness had been in the habit of visiting them. Formerly the deceased was a woman of temperate habits, but latterly she had taken to drink brandy, "to keep her heart quiet." The husband had been a great drunkard during recent months. He always made use of "very rash language" to the deceased, but never struck her in the presence of the witness. Deceased had, however, repeatedly complained of her husband's ill-usage, frequently in his presence. And witness had several times seen her with blackened eyes. On Friday last the deceased came to her in great distress, and very ill and exhausted. She was quite sober, but evidently much alarmed. She told the witness that she believed her ribs were broken, so great was the pain in her right side. At the same time witness observed frightful marks about her face and stains of blood about her clothing. Witness removed her to bed, the woman being so helpless that witness had to undress her. After she had been in bed some time, deceased said she must have her stays on again, in consequence of the pain. Her body was at that time covered with dreadful marks. She said that her husband had "done this," and she could live with him no longer. She pointed out to witness bare places in her head where he had torn out her hair, and when she washed more hair fell from her head. She told witness that her husband had beaten her every day for a week, and that there were handfuls of her hair lying about at home. She explained that he had kicked her and struck her, and, catching her hold by the hair, had thrown her from one end of the room to the other, kicking her again while she lay on the ground. This had brought on dreadful palpitation, and she remarked, "If I went home again, and he were to put his hand on me, I know I should die. I shall not live long, I'm sure." Deceased remained in the house until Sunday, when her husband came to fetch her. He behaved with great violence and witness feared that he would then have killed her if she had not allowed deceased to accompany him home. Witness consequently went with them to Union-street, Stonehouse, and remained there more than an hour. HOOPER himself never entered the house with them, but went into a neighbouring public-house, where he continued drinking. having put the room into a comfortable position, the witness induced the deceased to return with her. During the time they were there, the deceased asked her to place some pictures in another room. Witness was not aware if, during this time, the deceased went to the chemicals; but there were various bottles of chemicals in the room which HOOPER used in his business and deceased was acquainted with their various properties. On going back to the house of the witness deceased appeared to be very despairing and depressed. She sat in a half sleepy state and continually exclaimed, "What shall I do? I wish the Lord would take me. I want to die. I cannot live any longer with him." On Monday morning deceased was afraid to remain in witness's house, dreading lest her husband should come and take her home. Witness's husband thereupon gave her ten shillings to go to Liskeard out of the way. She left at half-past ten to catch the train. She did not return until four in the afternoon. Up to that time witness had been under the impression that she had gone. She then explained that she had been out to her daughter-in-law's, and she had then left her without saying where she had gone. Witness remonstrated with her, telling her that her daughter must be in alarm. Deceased then returned to her daughter. The following day the daughter-in-law came to witness to tell her that deceased had left them again without saying where she had gone. The relatives made a search in all directions, and ultimately the deceased came home at four in the morning. She had been wandering about all night. She told them that she had been to Laira for the purpose of drowning herself, but she had not the heart. She then laid down on the banks to go to sleep, and after staying some time there she grew numbed with cold and resolved to go home to her daughter's again. Witness begged her to go to the Hospital, but she refused, and consented to occupy a room which was found for her. None of the friends suspected that deceased carried any poison about with her. Throughout the Tuesday the deceased was terrified by the fear of her husband's coming to fetch her, and she several times declared that she would rather die than go back with him. But she had put up with so much that witness did not believe her. - The Coroner here remarked that he had rarely known such an instance of charitable dealing as Mrs Murton had shown. She had fairly earned the title of a Good Samaritan. - The evidence of the witness was then read over in the presence of the man HOOPER, whom the Coroner thought it proper to call in for the purpose. During the reading HOOPER interrupted with groans and deprecating nods. He was evidently the worse for liquor, and when asked if he intended to put any questions, he rambled incoherently - "I shall have this postponed. How do I know it's my wife? I have not seen the body. Oh! Lord, have mercy on me! Oh! gentlemen, you shall have it all out yet." The man was then removed. - Elizabeth Clapp, who occupies a room in HOOPER'S house, was next called, and proved a very reluctant witness. She stated that HOOPER was addicted to drink, and that she had heard him hallooing during the night. Continuing to display an indisposition to give evidence, the Coroner sternly addressed the witness and told her that he quite understood the cause of her reluctance, and meant to have out all that he knew she knew. The witness then communicated what she knew without hesitation. There had been frequent rows during the past three months, and HOOPER had been continually drunk. MRS HOOPER told her that her husband had been in the habit of ill-treating her. On Friday last the deceased left the house, saying she should not live with her husband any longer. When deceased complained to her husband in the presence of witness, he would reply, "Then you should not go away." His drunkenness and noisy behaviour was an everyday occurrence, and she had frequently heard the deceased scream. The witness again exhibited here a disinclination to speak, saying that she wanted to have nothing to say in the case. The Coroner, however, said he should insist on her giving a full statement of what she knew. The witness, resuming, stated that her husband had been frequently obliged to go down and beg HOOPER to leave his wife alone. Witness had repeatedly heard deceased cry out "Let me alone, JO." At this juncture the Jury interposed, and protested against the manner in which the witness gave her evidence, causing everything to be dragged from her. - The Coroner thereupon told the witness that she would stand in peril of committal if she did not speak out freely. - The witness thereupon said "Well, he did treat her badly, sir." Continuing, she stated that on Thursday last she saw HOOPER and deceased in the courtlage, and he took her up and carried her indoors, saying "JOHANNA, get into bed, there's a dear" - (laughter). Witness added "I did not see him kick her over the steps." - The Coroner remarked that he had not asked her whether she did or did not. - The witness then stated that she did see the deceased kicked by her husband last week. HOOPER was kicking her and she was kicking HOOPER. The Jury expressed their opinion that the witness knew a great deal more than had been drawn from out of her. - Mary Ann Gidley, who occupies another room in the same house, deposed that HOOPER was very kind to his wife "when he was not drunk." He had been very tipsy during the last three months, and when in that condition he had been "very rough" to his wife. By "rough" she meant that there had been swearing and holloing in his room, and he had been making use of threats. The witness, who seemed to treat the matter as a good joke, proved just as reluctant a witness as the last, and the Coroner could with difficulty drag any evidence from her. She said she knew nothing about the case, and she never saw HOOPER strike his wife. - The Coroner remarked that there was an evident determination on the part of the witness to give no evidence, and it was worthless to attempt to pursue her examination any further. - Dr Jackson stated that he was passing through Woolster-street, about one o'clock yesterday afternoon, when he was called to see the deceased. On entering the room where she lay, he found MRS HOOPER lying on the bed quite dead, life having been extinct two hours. The countenance was quite placid, but a little foam issued from the mouth. He found on the table a jug, with a little fluid in it which smelt slightly of gin. There was also on the table a teapot, containing tea, and a glass containing water, and he took possession of the various vessels. By the Coroner's order, he had made a post-mortem examination of the corpse. It was well nourished, but the right eyelid was very bruised, the right cheek was bruised all the way down, there was a belt of bruises around the right arm, there was another bruise on the breast, another on the abdomen and a very bad bruise on the right thigh. There were bruises on the legs of older date. On the buttocks there were severe bruises all across, and they were presumably the result of heavy kicks. The internal examination proved the heart to be in a state of slight fatty degeneration, and the lungs indicated a tendency to congestion. On cutting the oesophagus there was a distinct odour of cyanide of potassium. He found on opening the stomach that the larger cul de sac was intensely reddened, and it gave forth the same smell. On testing the remains of the jug there was evidently cyanide of potassium in it. On testing the stomach it had evidently come in contact with a strong irritant poison. He had no doubt death was due to the taking of cyanide of potassium. He had found no one bruise sufficient to account for death, and he did not physically connect the bruises with her death. - The Coroner interposed at this point, and remarked that he felt that it would be useless to pursue the Enquiry further. As he had stated at the commencement, the case was a peculiar one, and he did not at the time know the manner in which it was likely to go. The case, as it had been presented to them, was, he might almost say, one of the most heartrending, one of the most painful cases certainly, that it had ever been his lot to assist in elucidating. the man HOOPER and the deceased had lived together for thirty years, and, as they had heard from most reluctant witnesses, during the past three months they had lived together on most unhappy terms. He begged them to contrast the inhumanity of the husband and the indifference of the neighbours with the wonderfully-kind conduct of Mrs Murton. The Murtons were not even relatives of the deceased, and yet they showed her the utmost consideration and kindness. The people living in the house, however, behaved in a very different way, rendering the wretched woman no sympathy and doing the utmost now to screen the man who had driven her to her death - (hear, hear). Whatever credit was due to Mrs Murton, and she deserved the highest praise, he said unreservedly that not a [?] of commendation was due to the female neighbours of the deceased who had appeared before them. He could only show his sense of their behaviour in court by with-holding from them the fees usually tendered to witnesses and that he should certainly do - (hear, hear). With regard to the case, the duty of the Jury was simply to ascertain the cause of death. The medical evidence only too clearly proved that the deceased was a mass of bruises when her lifeless body was discovered and that whilst some of them were old, others had been recently inflicted. Some of them showed that the grip as of a tiger had been fastened on the woman's arm. And at length it was clear that she felt unable to stand this treatment any longer and she flew to her only friend for refuge. The Jury had heard how the unhappy creature's heart failed her when she had determined to drown herself, and there could be no doubt that finally she destroyed herself by swallowing the deadly poison, cyanide of potassium,, which was twenty times the strength of prussic acid. The one question for the Jury was what the state of the deceased's mind was at the time she took her life. He deeply deplored that such was the state of the law that no finger could touch the man HOOPER in any way. If his wife had lived he might have been made to suffer severely for his brutality. But as for the Jury, they had no power over him. HOOPER, however, knew full well the feeling his fellow-man must entertain of his fiendish behaviour, and that, such was their abhorrence of his conduct, for no amount of wealth would any of them care to occupy the position in which he stood before them that night - (hear, hear). Sooner or later he must come to a sense of the heavy responsibility resting upon him. Personally, he (the Coroner) could not repress his feelings - (hear, hear). - The man HOOPER, during these remarks, was casting his eyes about in a somewhat silly manner, and, at the conclusion of them, he broke out, "Well, I gave her one bruise, that's all, and that was on the thigh. That was in the shop." - The Coroner commanded the drunken fellow to hold his tongue and leave the room. The Jury, however, expressed a wish that he should remain to hear their verdict. This was delivered by the Foreman in the following terms:- "We find that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, brought on by the brutal behaviour of her husband." The Jury added a special acknowledgement of the services rendered by Mrs Murton to the deceased, which they regarded as of the most kindly and humane description.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - Alleged Death From Want At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, last evening on the body of ELIZABETH MARY DOWNS, or HASKELL. Deceased was 36 years of age, and was a married woman, her husband being a quay porter named JOHN HASKELL. She was not, however, living with her husband at the time of her death, nor had she been for the last twelve or thirteen years. During the past five or six years she had been living at 32 Kinterbury-street, with a man named RICHARD DOWNS. She died suddenly on Wednesday morning and Mr E. M. Prynne, M.R.C.S., who was called in, certified that the primary cause of death was disease of the lungs and dropsy, and that the secondary cause was debility from want of the necessaries of life. Mr Pike, the district registrar, refused to register the death upon this certificate and a Coroner's Inquiry was accordingly rendered necessary. The investigation was mainly directed towards ascertaining whether there was any want of food in the case. A sister of the deceased, named ROSE TOMS, living at 17, Lower-street, stated that the deceased had been in bad health for some time past, but she did not believe there was any want of food. DOWNS, the man with whom the deceased had been living, was a hawker, and during the late severe weather had been able to earn very little. The mother of the deceased had, however, supplied the deceased with food, having frequently sent her beef-=tea, and broth and every day, Sunday excepted, had shared her dinner with her. Witness was consequently certain the deceased did not want food. - Ann Cook, who resides in the same house as the deceased, gave corroborative evidence stating that every day during the week dinner was sent by the mother, whilst on Sundays, when DOWNS was at home, they had a cooked dinner to themselves. There was always a loaf of bread on the table, and she never heard the deceased complain. During the severe weather, when DOWNS was out of work, the deceased shared in the help afforded the poor from the town, and witness believed there was no want of the necessaries of life. Both witnesses agreed that DOWNS treated the woman kindly and the man himself, on being examined, affirmed that the deceased never did want food, and stated that Mr Prynne never mentioned to him that there was any want of the kind. Deceased had had three meals a day, and when he had been unable to earn sufficient money he had pawned his goods. She had never complained to him of the want of food. - Mr Prynne stated that he was first called to see the deceased on the 20th January upon an order from Mr Annear, relieving officer. He found her suffering from disease of the lungs and general debility, and the state of the room was so filthy and there were such evidences of abject want that he recommended her removal to the Workhouse Hospital. He saw no food in the room and she told him that she had no food and that she was in very great want. She, however, expressed a disinclination to go into the Hospital. His certificate of death was founded upon what he then observed, his belief being that the woman was suffering from want of food. He visited her two or three times and reported the circumstances to Mr Annear, who told him that he would try to remove the woman to the Hospital. He ceased visiting the woman on the 2nd February, and knew nothing of her condition from that date. He reported to Mr Annear that she wanted the necessaries of life and concluded that she would be removed to the Workhouse. His certificate was founded upon what he observed a month ago, and he concluded that she had died from lung disease and dropsy. The room was in so dirty a condition that he could scarcely enter it, and he stood at the door. He also warned the neighbours that it was not in a fit state to enter, or it might result in their being infected with typhoid fever and he mentioned these circumstances to Mr Annear. He concluded that the deceased would be removed to the Hospital, but now supposed that she would not go. - The Coroner expressed his opinion that the registrar acted most properly in refusing to accept the certificate, but thought the evidence was insufficient to prove that there was any absolute want of the necessaries of life. The only evidence of starvation was the statement made by the deceased to Mr Prynne, and yet she refused to be removed to a place where she would be well looked after. The certificate of Mr Prynne was founded upon conditions that presented themselves to that gentleman a month ago, and there was the more recent evidence of the sister of the deceased that there was no want. As to the condition of the room, he was afraid there were scores of houses in Plymouth which were far from being so clean as they could wish. - MRS FRENCH, the mother of the deceased, was, at the request of the Jury, called upon to testify to the amount of food supplied the deceased. She stated that there was always food in the house and she herself sent daily supplies. She advised her daughter to go into the Workhouse, but the deceased positively refused. Her daughter certainly did not want the necessaries of life; she would not have allowed her to want. Her belief was that her daughter died neither from want nor from ill-usage, but solely from disease. - The Coroner expressed the opinion that this was conclusive evidence, but one of the Jurors thought that there must have been a little neglect somewhere either on the part of Mr Prynne or the relieving officer, in letting the woman lie in her room for a month without medical attendance. The Mother of the deceased said if Mr Prynne thought her daughter was dying of want he should have represented her case, and not left her to die. - Mr Prynne replied that it was his duty to report the case to Mr Annear, and he did so. - A Juror asked whether Mr Annear had visited the woman during the past month, and DOWNS replied in the negative. - The Coroner pointed out that the deceased had positively refused to be removed to the Workhouse, and consequently he could not see that any blame attached to Mr Prynne or to Mr Annear. There was no power to compel removal in these cases, though he sometimes wished there was that power. The Jury then returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 8 March 1881
MODBURY - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of WILLIAM FLASHMAN, a painter and decorator of Modbury. The evidence showed that the deceased was engaged in his business on Saturday and that in the evening he fell down in his shop. On being picked up it was found that he was dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

NEWTON FERRERS - Drowned. - At the Inquest, held at the Dolphin Inn yesterday, on the body of JOHN LOYE, aged sixty-eight, which had been found floating in the river, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death In St. Andrew's Church, Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at the Western Law Court, Plymouth, yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of MR PHILIP HENRY WEST, principal verger at St. Andrew's church, which took place suddenly at the Church on Sunday evening, as reported in yesterday's Western Daily Mercury. - ALFRED HENRY WEST, son of the deceased, said he lived at 19 Clarence-place, Stonehouse. The deceased was 48 years of age, and for the past few years had complained of heart disease. He had not been under medical treatment for some time. He had, up to Saturday, been able to attend to his avocation as storehouse-keeper at her Majesty's Victualling Yard at Stonehouse. On Sunday he left home about three in the afternoon, and seemed to be very cheerful. - Prebendary Wilkinson, vicar of St Andrew's Church, stated that the deceased attended to his duties at the Church on Sunday and up to eight p.m. was well. A lady intimated to witness that the deceased had fallen in a fit in the Church just after witness had entered his vestry at the close of the service. Witness came out and found the deceased outstretched upon the flags at the back of the pulpit. Mr Bazeley and Mr Lewis came, and both used restoratives and stimulants and the deceased revived sufficiently to audibly utter a prayer. Mr Hingston came shortly after, but in a few minutes the deceased suddenly relapsed into unconsciousness and expired. He lived about three-quarters of an hour after the first attack. The rev. gentleman said it was impossible for him and the churchwardens to hold any man in higher esteem than they had the deceased and he was worthy of it, so great was the care with which he discharged his duties. - Mr George Jackson, J.P., saw the deceased fall and strike his head against the top panelling of a seat. He ran forward and held up deceased's head. - Mr Bazeley, M.R.C.S., was at the church when the deceased fell. The restoratives he applied were without avail; the deceased was livid, and his heart pulseless. He thought the cause of death was from failure of the heart's action. There was no snoring, which accompanies apoplexy, and under the circumstances he did not feel justified in giving a certificate. The Jury gave a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - Dr Hingston, as churchwarden at St Andrew's, also bore testimony to the faithfulness with which the deceased discharged his duties. He, as the deceased, during the 23 years that he had been closely associated with them, had earned their highest esteem and had their greatest confidence; and it was a great grief to them to think of their loss at his death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 March 1881
MARY TAVY - Inquiry was made at Mary Tavy yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, as to the death of GRACE NANCARROW, aged 63, which took place suddenly at the railway station as reported yesterday. Dr Northey stated that heart disease was the cause, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday on the body of a man named JOHN JONES, aged 74, who was formerly a tradesman of the town, and who expired suddenly on Saturday afternoon whilst sitting in front of the fire in an arm chair. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 March 1881
TORQUAY - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, touching the death of FREDERICK HEAD, one of the brig George, lying in Torquay Harbour. On Thursday last deceased was engaged with others of the crew in moving the vessel in the harbour in accordance with the orders of the harbourmaster, and was working at the capstan when the pail missed its hold and the capstan spun round, one of the bars striking deceased on the head, inflicting injuries which resulted in death on Sunday morning. The poor fellow blamed the harbourmaster for having ordered the removal of the vessel in unfit weather. The Jury, however, exonerated the harbourmaster and returned a verdict of Accidental Death, at the same time requesting that the owner of the vessel should be asked to supply a better capstan.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by the Devonport Coroner (Mr Vaughan) on Monday, on the body of ELIZA BRIDGET BURNS, aged 9 years, daughter of a pensioner living at 14 Prospect-row. The girl was taken ill on Friday last, vomited very frequently and continued to grow worse until four o'clock on Sunday morning, when she was found dead in bed. No medical aid was obtained, and the mother of the deceased only gave her child some medicine that had been prescribed for another member of the family. Dr Row, who was called in after death, spoke of the case as a glaring disregard of medical advice. The vomiting was a symptom of pneumonia, and death resulted from that cause, accelerated by neglect to obtain proper medical assistance. - The Coroner spoke of the conduct of the mother as very reprehensible, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 10 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, (Plymouth Borough Coroner) held an Inquest last evening at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ROSE BROMLEY, aged seven weeks, the infant daughter of JOHN and MARY JANE BROMLEY, residing at 21 Morley-lane, Plymouth. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 March 1881
MALBOROUGH - Inquiry was made at Salcombe yesterday by Mr J. Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of the man and woman whose bodies were recovered from the wreck of the Italian barque Velere. From a photograph of CAPTAIN GAVAGNIN and his wife, taken at Truro in 1879, there was no difficulty in identifying the body of the female as that of CAPTAIN GAVAGNIN'S wife; the body of the seaman could not be identified. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and the bodies were immediately interred in Malborough Churchyard, Abbe Ray, Roman Catholic priest of Dartmouth officiating.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Prospect Inn, Prospect-row, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES BOX, an illegitimate child, aged about nine months. In opening the Enquiry the Coroner said the first intimation he had of this case was from Dr Lewis. The deceased was an illegitimate child, and that in connection with a sudden death was sufficient to justify him holding an Inquest. When Mr Manning went to make inquiries a girl about 18 said the child was an orphan, its mother having died last August, but when Mr Manning returned to his (the Coroner's) office the mother of the child was waiting for him. This was a peculiar thing, and it only justified their strictly inquiring into these cases. - MARINA BOX, in service in Union-street, said she was the mother of the child. She saw it alive on Tuesday afternoon; it was then well. She had been supporting the child herself. - JESSIE BOX, sister to the last witness, said she resided at 5 Prospect-place. She had been taking care of the deceased. It had been a very healthy child, and yesterday morning she gave the deceased his breakfast, which he ate heartily. As the deceased was crying she nursed for a hour and a half. Some time afterwards the deceased coughed a little, and appeared to be getting stiff. She called for assistance and gave the child to a neighbour while she ran for Dr Lewis. When she came back the child was dead. She admitted telling Mr Manning that the deceased had no father or mother, but she said that because she did not want her sister to lose her situation, or any discredit to attach to her. The neighbours did not know it was her sister's child and she wanted to keep up the delusion. - Mr Lewis Lewis, L.R.C.P., said he was called to the house and found the child dead. He had made a post-mortem examination. Most of the organs were healthy, but the lungs were slightly congested and the brain somewhat congested. The teeth were clenched, and in his opinion the child died from slight convulsions, produced by the state of the brain and lung, probably produced by cold. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 March 1881
ILFRACOMBE - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Ilfracombe as to the death of GEORGE BROOKS, who died from the effects of a fright caused by a bull on Saturday evening last. The Jury having found that death was thus brought about, added a rider that the Local Board should take immediate steps to pass a bye-law restricting the hours during which cattle should be driven through the streets and requiring that when being taken to the steamers the animals should be properly secured.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 14 March 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Washington Hotel, Stonehouse, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN RADMORE, aged seventy-three, who expired suddenly whilst at his work at Moir's Foundry, on the previous day. The Enquiry was adjourned until Tuesday next, in order that a post-mortem might be made.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 March 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Tavistock Hotel, Tavistock-street, Devonport, concerning the death of an infant child named THOMAS EDMOND KEANE. It appeared that the child, whose parents reside at Tavistock-street, was put to bed with his sister, a little girl about 9 years old, about 5.30 o'clock on Saturday morning and about an hour after on the mother going to the bed she found the baby dead lying close beside the little girl, who was sound asleep. In the same bed there was a little boy aged three years. - Mr Wilson, M.R.C.S., stated that he was sent for and found the child dead. He had since examined the body, and a mark on its face, he had come to the conclusion that it had been overlain. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 15 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr Harrison, solicitor (acting as Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, in the absence of Mr Brian), held an Inquest last evening at the Jubilee Inn, Jubilee-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of GEORGE ROBERTS, 55, residing at 10 Friary-street, Plymouth, who yesterday morning committed suicide by drowning. From the evidence of the wife of the deceased (NANCY ROBERTS), and that of a person who lives in the same house, it appears that the deceased, who was a watchman on board a vessel in the Cattewater, had been very depressed in spirits for the last two years, and had been frequently heard to exclaim: "I wish I was dead," "I wish the Lord would take me." He left home about five o'clock yesterday morning and two hours afterwards his dead body was brought back to his wife. The deceased, who was a very sober man, had lived very happily with his wife for a great number of years. P.C. Coombes deposed that he was on duty yesterday morning, in Harbour Avenue, a few minutes after six, when he heard splashes in the Pool not far from where he was standing. He went to the water's edge and saw something floating along with the tide. He plunged into the water and brought out what proved to be the body of the deceased. Getting help from two of Mr Wainwright's men, the body, in which there was still life, was carried to the Police-station. Dr Harper was sent for, and arrived twenty minutes later, but he could do no good, as life was then extinct. Everything that could have been done was done before he arrived. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that "The deceased committed Suicide while in a State of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, by the Deputy Coroner (Mr W. Harrison), into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGIO GIOVANNO, a Greek sailor, who died on the previous day from the effects of eating a quantity of poisonous herb. - Mr Podesta, of Plymouth, acted as interpreter. - Andrew Grammior, a seaman on board the barque Chios, stated that he did not know the deceased until he met him on the beach at Jennycliff on Saturday afternoon. The deceased was a seaman on board the Orpheus. There were four other men belonging to the barque, and three belonging to the brig on board which the deceased was serving. They went to the cliff for the purpose of getting a supply of water. The deceased found the herb under the cliff and ate about a root and a half of it. The herb was something like celery. Seeing the deceased eat the herb, witness also went to the spot and ate a quantity of the leaves. He also saw another seaman, who was now at the Hospital, eat a small quantity. They all afterwards went to their respective ships, and witness, soon after reaching his vessel, found that his limbs were contracted and he felt very weak. He immediately drank a shilling's worth of rum, which, in his opinion, prevented the poison from taking effect. - Micaele Alafuso, a sailor on board the Orpheus, also gave evidence. he accompanied the deceased to the vessel Orpheus with the water. As soon as the deceased got alongside of the vessel, he began to vomit and cry out. Witness then came ashore to convey the news to the captain of the vessel, and took Dr F. Fox back with him to see the deceased. After the doctor had seen him, witness conveyed the deceased and his companion - who had also eaten of the herb - to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Not more than an hour-and-a-half elapsed from the time the deceased had eaten the herb until he was taken ill. The herb produced was similar to that eaten by the deceased and was exactly like the celery grown in their country. Mr A. H. Bampton stated that he was a doctor of medicine and the house surgeon at the South Devon Hospital. He saw the deceased and the other man immediately after their admittance to the Hospital. The deceased was put to bed directly. He foamed at the mouth, and seemed to be choking. Remedies were at once applied, but the man was unable to swallow anything. The deceased expired about ten minutes after being admitted. Witness had made a post-mortem examination of the body and found the throat and mouth of the deceased were filled with thick gummy matter, as were also the bronchial tubes. The lungs were intensely congested, the heart fatted, and contained a small quantity of thin dark-coloured blood. The intestines and stomach were inflamed. In the stomach there was about a quarter of a pint of dark-coloured liquid. In his opinion death resulted from paralysis of the heart and the muscles of the respiratory organs, caused by eating the root of hemlock or water dropwort, which was one of the most deadly poisons, and most active at this time of the year. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased was Accidentally Poisoned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 16 March 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Late Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN RADMORE, aged 73, who died suddenly at Moir's foundry, on Friday last, was resumed yesterday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. The facts have already appeared in the Western Daily Mercury. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 March 1881
LYDFORD - At Dartmoor Convict establishment yesterday, Mr R. Fulford, the County Coroner, held an Enquiry as to the cause of the death of a convict named WILLIAM PRATT. After hearing the medical evidence the Jury, of which Mr Row was Foreman, found that deceased died of Natural Causes.

CHAGFORD - An Inquest was held at Chagford yesterday before Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, as to the death of JAMES GERRITT, son of a carrier. Deceased was driving home in a cart, and it is supposed that a wheel passed over a large stone and jolted him off into the road, when the wheels passed over his body and killed him. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was a steady young man and much sympathy is shown towards his relatives.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 March 1881
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - An Inquest was held at Moretonhampstead yesterday, before Mr Deputy Coroner Watts, as to the death of MR W. UNDERHILL, builder, Chagford, who was killed on Tuesday last by being thrown out of a trap whilst returning home from the Moreton market. The Inquiry, which lasted four hours, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death" being returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 19 March 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr Harrison, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest, last evening, at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of LUKE PEARSE, a seaman of H.M.S. Impregnable, who did suddenly at his residence, 36 Cambridge-street, Plymouth, yesterday morning. The mother of the deceased stated that he awoke yesterday morning about seven o'clock, and complained of a pain in his head. She looked at him and saw that his face was very much discoloured. By the advice of a person who lived in the same house - Mr Luke - a surgeon was sent for, but before he arrived life was extinct. Mr H. Hadlow, fleet-surgeon of H.M.S. Impregnable, said that some time ago deceased was sent to the Royal Naval Hospital suffering from rheumatism. From the evidence, he should think death was due to heart disease. A verdict was returned by the Jury of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 28 March 1881
EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - The Exeter coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest on Saturday, on the body of JOHN JOSEPH STARK, a labourer, of Heavitree, who died as the result of injuries which he sustained the same morning. Deceased, with other workmen, had been engaged in the construction of an oven on the premises of a baker in Holloway-street, and whilst at work in the interior the newly-made roof fell upon him, inflicting a fracture of the spine and other serious injuries, to which he speedily succumbed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMPTON - Sad Death Of A Seaman Near Plymouth. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest on Saturday at the Morley Arms, near Saltram, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES ST. CLAIR, aged forty-six, who for some time past had been following the calling of a merchant seaman. The deceased, who is a native of Poplar, London, where it is supposed he has a wife and children, had been lodging in Plymouth for some time, being unable to get employment on board ship. About a fortnight ago he went to the captain of the brigantine Brenda, then lying in the Great Western Docks, and asked to be taken on board. The Captain at first refused, but, after many subsequent solicitations, he agreed to take him as boatswain. In this capacity he went on board the Brenda on Tuesday last. On the 23rd he came on board in an intoxicated state and refused to take tea. The ship left the Great Western Docks for the purpose of proceeding to Pomphlete to take in ballast before leaving for her destination - a foreign port. Whilst the ballast was being shipped, the captain ordered the deceased to put some casing on the hatches, to protect them. The deceased had just completed the job, and was about to stand up, having been in a stooping posture, when he suddenly fell back on the deck. Assistance was immediately procured and it was soon noticed that the poor fellow was dead. The Jury, of whom Mr Coombes was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 March 1881
BERE FERRERS - An Inquest was held at Beeralston yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on the body of JOHN PALMER, 16 years of age, who was drowned in the River Tamar on Friday last. He was engaged in sculling a boat, in which was a young woman, from Calstock to Gawton Quay, when he overbalanced himself and fell overboard. His body was picked up about an hour afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 March 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made yesterday by the Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN LEACHER, aged 85, who was found dead yesterday morning. Deceased resided at Timber Pound, near the Raglan Barracks. He had complained of pains on Saturday and the following day, and Dr Wilson attributed death to spasms of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at Bloye's Eagle Tavern, Coxside as to the death of RICHARD ANTHONY, aged 63, residing at 2 Sutton-road. - Ann Brooks said the deceased had been her lodger since Christmas, excepting one fortnight when he was in the Workhouse suffering from bronchitis. The deceased had been out of the Workhouse about a fortnight and since then his health had been failing, and he had a bad cough. On Monday he was in his usual health and ate a very hearty tea. After that he went out and returned about 5.30 p.m., and then sat down in a chair before the fire, where he remained until a few minutes before 7 p.m., when he was taken ill and in a very few minutes died. He was not in a desponding state of mind and she was sure that he had not taken anything whilst in her house. The deceased earned his livelihood by gardening. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's officer, said he searched the body and found nothing of a suspicious nature on it. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 March 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Devonport. The Inquest. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, held an Inquest at the Military Hospital, Stoke, yesterday, on the body of LIEUTENANT and ADJUTANT PERCY DUKE COLERIDGE, R.M., who met with his death on Tuesday by a fall from his horse. - Lieutenant-Colonel S. J. Graham, who was first examined, stated that shortly after midday on Tuesday he had occasion to ride across the Brickfields with the deceased, who was on duty with him as adjutant. He was a stranger to the locality, and the deceased was shewing him over the ground, upon which a brigade parade was fixed to take place on the following day (Wednesday). They were riding in the same direction, the deceased being on the left side of the central pathway, whilst he himself was on the opposite side. He did not see the deceased fall, being several yards in advance, but, hearing a noise, he turned and saw the deceased on the ground, and his horse rolling over him. Owing to the noise witness's horse took fright and ran off, and not until he reached the opposite side of the Brickfields could he regain control over the animal. On returning he found the deceased lying unconscious. He was conveyed to the Hospital, under the direction of Lieut. McCaffery, R.A., in a perfectly insensible state; and when witness saw him in the Hospital between two and three o'clock in the afternoon he was still insensible. - Staff-Sergeant George Clarke, R.E., stated that at about 12.15 p.m. he was passing over the Brickfields towards the Hospital. Two officers on horseback passed him at a smart canter on the path leading from the Halfpenny-gate towards the Park. One officer was riding on the path and the other on the turf. After they had passed him about 150 yards, and when close to a surface gutter running across the Brickfields, he saw the horse in the pathway stumble. The horse came down upon its haunches and stumbled along for some distance before the officer was thrown. He ran forward, but by the time he reached him the officer was being carried away by some sailors and civilians. He did not think the horse rolled over the deceased; the animal seemed to him simply to stumble and throw his rider upon the stones of the gutter. He believed it was the gutter that caused the horse to fall, but it was not a deep gutter, it was very shallow. - A Juror remarked that the gutter was very dangerous. It ran across the footpath and ought to be deepened and covered in at that particular spot. - Surgeon Major Wiles stated that he saw the deceased on his being brought to the Hospital. He was then unconscious. On examining him he found that the deceased was suffering from a scalp wound at the left posterior part of the skull. There was no injury to the bone but he was suffering from what appeared to be concussion of the brain. He never recovered consciousness and died about half-past four. The cause of death, in his opinion, was owing to the giving way of a blood-vessel on the brain, and the injuries were such as would be caused by a fall from a horse. The scalp wound had apparently been caused by his head striking against a stone. There were no marks of the horse having rolled over him. Judging from the marks on the clothes of the deceased, and from the injuries, he was of opinion that the deceased fell head downwards, that his head turned under him and that as he was riding fast at the time he must have sustained a very severe shock to the system. There might have been internal injuries, but there were no external evidences of them. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased Accidentally met with his death whilst on duty," and recommended that the gutter be covered in so as to prevent the possibility of future mishap. - Colonel-Commandant G. B. Heastey, R.M.L.I., issued the following order yesterday:- It is with deep regret that the colonel-commandant announces to the division the sudden death of Lieutenant and Adjutant COLERIDGE yesterday afternoon, and, in doing so, cannot refrain from expressing his high opinion of the zeal, ability and soldier-like qualities of the deceased, who was justly and universally popular with all ranks in consequence of his good qualities and kindly disposition. By his death her Majesty and the country have lost the services of a promising officer. The colonel-commandant requests that the officers of the division will wear crepe on the left arm for one month in his memory. - The funeral of the deceased officer will in all probability take place on Saturday next and will be accompanied by full military honours, but the arrangements have not yet been completed.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 31 March 1881
ASHCOMBE - Shocking Accident Near Dawlish. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Ashcombe, near Dawlish, before Mr Coroner Burrow, concerning the death of a carter, named JAMES FARLEY, aged 55, late in the employ of Mr French, farmer, of Ashcombe. The evidence showed that on March 24 last the deceased was driving along the Ashcombe Road with a horse and cart containing a plough, the property of his master. It is supposed that the horse bolted and the deceased, having but one arm, lost all control over the animal. A miller, who came along the road later on in the day, found FARLEY in the road. He was dead and the plough smashed to pieces. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 1 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquest At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening as to the death of the female illegitimate child of SUSAN BUZZA, residing at 52 High-street. - Ellen Fox, cousin to the mother, and residing in the same house, stated that she was present at the birth of deceased on March 19th. The mother was very weak and ill, and quite unable to attend the Inquest. Witness had seen her nurse the child. Her cousin had another child, which was six years old. She did not have a doctor at her confinement. The child was alive and well on Wednesday afternoon and took to the breast freely. A little after eight o'clock yesterday morning witness was called and on going to the mother, who said that she thought the child was dead, saw that it was so, but it was quite warm. The mother was crying very much. She was too ill to even turn in her bed. - SARAH BUZZA, grandmother of deceased, said she was also present at the confinement, but she did not reside in the same house as her daughter. A seaman named Frederick Smith had lived with her daughter for the past eighteen months, and was the father of both her illegitimate children. She was now very ill and witness remained with her on Sunday and two following nights, but on Wednesday went to her own residence. Before leaving she took the child from the bed, and noticed that it was purple around the nose and mouth. As it would not take the breast she made it some food, which it ate heartily. Smith had been very kind to her daughter, and she had no cause to complain. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, deposed to examining the child and finding no suspicious marks on it as if he had been overlain. - The Coroner remarked that it was very unwise to leave a woman in the condition of the mother of deceased all the night without attendance. No medical man had been called and if the woman died he would certainly hold an Inquest. If the Jury wee not satisfied with the evidence before them, they must adjourn the Inquiry and obtain medical opinion. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but considered that a doctor ought to have been called for the mother, and he would then have seen the condition of the child.

EXMINSTER - Supposed Suicide At Exminster. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held by Mr F. Burrows, at Exminster yesterday as to the death of HARRIET REED, an attendant at the Devon County Lunatic Asylum, whose body was found in the canal on Saturday. - Annie Burridge, housemaid at the Asylum, said she last saw the deceased on Wednesday evening as she was leaving by the front door. Witness, who thought she was going to another part of the establishment, had not observed anything peculiar in her manner, and never had any conversation with her which might have led her to suppose she intended to commit suicide. - Lydia Parkhouse, head attendant at Exminster Asylum, said she had known the deceased 18 years. Deceased had been engaged there for about 20 years. Witness saw her about quarter-past seven on the evening of Wednesday, in her bedroom. She complained of a severe pain in the head, and did not apparently intend then to go out. witness had had no reason to suppose the deceased ever meditated suicide. She would have no business near the canal. - Mr G. S. Sanders, medical superintendent at the Asylum, said he had known the deceased for many years. She had been an attendant at the Asylum for twenty years. For a long time she had charge of one of the most responsible wards, where there were many severe cases - melancholy and suicidal. At one period the responsibility was unusually heavy, and as it somewhat affected her health, it became necessary to remove her to a ward where the work would be lighter. She had never evidenced any symptoms of insanity or of suicidal tendency, but had been under treatment for headache and debility. - Evidence having been given as to the finding of the body in the canal on Saturday morning, SAMUEL REED of High-street, Stonehouse, a quarryman, brother of the deceased, stated that she was about 40 years of age. He last saw her about two years ago, when she was in her usual state of health. Witness produced two letters which he received from deceased on Wednesday, the 23rd March, both being enclosed in one envelope. The letters were:- "Asylum Exminster, March 22nd. - Dear Brother and Sister, - I write to tell you I am not very well. Sometimes I think I shall not be very long. I suffer in my heart. If anything should take place before you, I should like for you to do what I wish. I have sent on for you to see. We must all go some time. - "Your affectionate sister. H. REED." - "Hope you are all well. You must not trouble because I have sent you this. I thought I should like for you to know my wish. I should like to be buried at Broadclyst." - "My dear Brother and Sister. Should it be the Lord's will to take me before you, and having what I have now, I should like for you to take it, and do according to my wish and no one to interfere with you. Give poor Harry 10 pounds. Take the rest yourself and carry out expenses - nothing out of the way, only respectable. Hannah is to have my clothes. Not forgetting Polly. Anything that can be made for her. I should like to be taken to Broadclyst." - In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that the impression caused on his mind by the letters was that his sister was ill bodily; he had no idea that she meant suicide. On the Thursday morning he received a telegram from the Asylum, stating that his sister was missing, and he at once went to Exminster. Witness was present when the body was found. Witness added that he replied to his sister's letters on the evening of the day he received them. His letter (which was delivered at the Asylum on the Thursday morning) was produced and read. It stated that the writer was sorry to hear of his sister's illness, expressed a hope that she would soon be better, and offered to come to Exminster to see her if she desired it. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no proof that deceased committed suicide, though her letters to her brother might be interpreted as hints that she contemplated it; and he thought the Jury would consider an open verdict sufficient. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 April 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of JANE HARRIS, aged 74, a widow, who was found dead in bed at her residence, 3 Princess-street, on Thursday. Deceased complained of being unwell on Wednesday, but refused to call in a doctor, and on Thursday morning was found lying in her bed dead. Dr Wilson made a post mortem examination, and came to the conclusion that death resulted from failure of the heart's action, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 4 April 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On board H.M.S. Adelaide. - An accident of a serious character was the subject of an Enquiry on Saturday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before the County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, and a Jury of whom Mr Retellick was foreman. The deceased, RICHARD ROACH, aged 23, was an able seaman on board H.M.S. Adelaide, and he died from injuries received in consequence of a knob of coal striking him on the head whilst he was engaged in the coal-hole. Mr Eastlake, Judge-Advocate to the Fleet, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty. It appeared that on the afternoon of the day in question the ship was being loaded with coal. The deceased was in the hole at the time, when a knob of coal fell out of a bag and struck him on the head, and caused injuries from which death subsequently ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EGG BUCKLAND - Sudden Death At Knackersknowle. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest on Saturday, at Mr Langford's surgery, Knackersknowle, on the body of CAROLINE LISTER, aged 32, domestic servant and wife of WILLIAM LISTER, a butler to the Rev. Halls Parlby, at Manadon. LISTER and the deceased have been residing at Knackersknowle for about ten months. Eighteen months ago, when they were living at St. Austell, the deceased was subject to severe fits. These seem to have died away, the deceased not having been seized with any since her stay at Knackersknowle. On Monday evening last LISTER left his wife, about twenty minutes to seven, for the purpose of going to his work. he did not sleep at home every night. She was, in his opinion, then in good health, as she had not complained. On Tuesday night, about twenty minutes to eleven, LISTER went home. He found the shutters closed, and, as was his custom, he knocked at the shutters and called out "CAROLINE, it is me." He then went to the front door, and when there he heard his wife's bedroom door open, and simultaneously a heavy fall. After having gained admittance, he opened the bedroom door, which was slightly ajar. On entering the room he found his wife, in her nightdress, lying with her head in the corner on the floor. Having turned her over, he noticed a mark on her forehead and chin, recently made. LISTER and his wife had always been on most friendly terms. - Mr Edwin C. Langford, M.R.C.S., said he saw the deceased about 12.30 on the morning of the 30th ult. He attributed death to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

NEWTON ABBOT - A Child Drowned. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Town Hall on Saturday evening, on the body of CHARLES DAVIS, four years of age, the son of CHARLES DAVIS, painter and grainer, in the employ of Messrs. Parker, Brothers, who was found drowned a few hours previously in the mill leat. The parents of the deceased live in Sherborne-terrace, at the back of which runs the mill-leat in question, and it is supposed that whilst the child was at play in the afternoon in the back garden he fell into the water, and was carried away by the current, for just after he was missed by the mother, the body was observed by a man in the employ of Messrs. Vicary, tanners, who was working in a garden plot, near the cricket ground, floating down the leat. He instantly took the child out, but life was extinct. The child had a piece of cord in its hand, to which was attached a piece of wood. It is therefore conjectured that whilst the little fellow was amusing himself with this piece of wood in the water he accidentally fell in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." This is the third death that has occurred near the terrace in a similar way. The Jury recommended that the leat should be fenced off.

STOKE DAMEREL - As the result of an anonymous letter received by the Devonport Coroner's officer, an Inquest was held on Saturday on the newly-born male child of ANNA BRADDICK, the wife of a seaman living at Devonport. The evidence showed that when the child was born no medical man was present, but there was nothing to indicate that there had been foul play, as alleged in the letter. The Jury returned a verdict of "Stillborn." The midwife was severely censured.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, yesterday, at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, as to the death of LOUISA MAUD TAVERNOR, aged 3 months. The parents, who reside at 2 Wyndham-street, are both deaf and dumb, and the sister of MRS TAVERNOR acted as interpreter. The mother stated that she took the child to bed with her on Sunday night, nursed it at half-past three o'clock, and two hours later found it dead. Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, stated that he had examined the body, which bore marks of having been over-lain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Neglect Of A Child At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Golden Lion Inn, Bath-street, Plymouth, as to the death of an illegitimate child, named ELIZA PEEK. - CORDELIA ADELAIDE PEEK, the mother of the child, and who presented a wretched appearance, said she resided in a collar attached to No. 5, Bath-street. She was confined of the child in the streets about 3 o'clock on the morning of the 31st of August last year. She was taken to the Workhouse by the police, and remained there until February last. At the time of her being taken in the street a man named Pascoe was with her, but he was not the father of her child; and they then had no home to which to go. Before she left the Workhouse she sent to Pascoe, asking him to meet her when she was discharged from the House. This he did, and they went to some lodging-house. For the past fortnight she had lived with Pascoe in Bath-street and had very little to eat; in fact, she was half-starved. She had given the child as much food as she could get for it. The man Pascoe drank a good deal and greatly ill-used her. Some time back he gave her two black eyes, the remains of which she then bore. The same morning that she found the child dead Pascoe kicked her in the stomach. She did not drink herself and the reason why she cohabited with Pascoe was for the sake of having a home. She also said that for the past twelve months she had been running about after Pascoe for him to take her back, although he had told her he did not want her. On Monday morning last they went to bed about half-past two and slept till noon the same day, when she got out and dressed, and on going to the bottom of the bed she found that the child was dead. She then called a neighbour. There were very little clothes to cover her and Pascoe, but she wrapped the child up in her own clothes. She placed the child at the bottom of the bed because Pascoe was so clumsy he might kill it. From 2.30 a.m. on the Monday morning till noon of the same day she did not either suckle the child or give it any food. She could not account for the death of the child as it was perfectly healthy when she left the Workhouse. - Mary Dart said she resided in the same house as the previous witness, and understood that the woman and Pascoe were husband and wife. She believed Pascoe had ill-treated the woman, but never in her presence. On Monday about 12.30 p.m. the woman PEEK called her to go and see the child. She saw that it was dead, but it was warm. They had resided in her house about a fortnight. - Thomas Pascoe, after having been cautioned, said he was a general dealer and had known the woman PEEK for about twelve months. At her desire he met her at the Workhouse when she came out. He was quite sure that both PEEK and her child had had sufficient to eat. He could not say that he knocked her about, but he might have touched her. - The witness was here asked by the coroner several times if he had blacked the woman's eyes, and whether he knocked her about or not. After trying to evade the question many times the Coroner threatened to commit him, and the witness then admitted ill-treating the woman. He did not drink and he never struck the baby. PEEK was a very quarrelsome woman. - Several more questions were put to witness, but no direct answer could be got from him, and the Coroner then said it was no use questioning him any further. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, said he had examined the body of the child that morning. It was fully dressed, was in a very dirty condition, and for a child of seven months old was very much emaciated. There was a mark around the neck, which might have been caused by the child not having been washed in a proper manner. There was no other mark on the body. He could get no intelligible account as to the death of the child from the mother. One of the child's fists was clenched. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said the case was one of a most deplorable nature. They had heard the evidence, and it revealed to them a shocking case of immorality. They must undoubtedly believe the evidence of the woman before that of the man, but they must not forget that the woman herself admitted that Pascoe was not the father of the child, and that she had been running about after him. He should advise Pascoe to have nothing further to do with PEEK, as it might end in something very serious if he carried on his course of ill-treatment; and to PEEK he advised not to live with Pascoe, but go to the Workhouse that very night, and he himself would write a letter to the relieving officer. If the Jury wished to have a post-mortem examination he would adjourn the Inquiry, but he thought the child died from natural causes, brought on by improper attention. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, greatly induced and accelerated by want of food, and warmth and improper attention." They also passed a vote of censure on both PEEK and Pascoe, and advised the woman to go to the Workhouse.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident To A Newton Tradesman. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at St. Paul's-road, Newton, as to the death of CHARLES STRANGER, aged 27, a butcher, carrying on business for his mother in Queen-street. On Monday deceased attended a cattle sale at Parsonage Farm, Staverton, and left in the evening on horseback in company with a man named Sweetman, who was mounted on a horse he had purchased at the sale. Soon after leaving they urged their horses into a fast trot to test the speed of the horse Sweetman had purchased, and after going some distance he drew ahead, and on looking back, saw STRANGER'S horse coming on riderless. Sweetman pulled up and went back when he found deceased lying on his right side by the hedge, unconscious and bleeding from the head. He was taken home, and Mr Ley, surgeon, called, but deceased did not rally, and died early yesterday morning, from concussion of the brain. In Mr Ley's opinion, the deceased was thrown off the horse and fell on his head. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. Deceased leaves a wife and three young children, and much sympathy is felt for them and also for his mother who was left a widow only a few months ago.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 April 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquiry was made at Westaway's Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, yesterday, by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) as to the death of JOHN PERRIAM, a watchman, who was found in the basin of the Great Western Docks on the morning of the 4th inst. Inspector James watched the Inquest on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. Deceased left his home on the 20th February with the intention of going to his work. In the evening he attended the service at the Dock Mission Chapel, but was not seen alive afterwards. He was to have remained on board a ship in the docks the Sunday night following his departure from home, but did not go there. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Devonport Guildhall, into the circumstances attending the death of SARAH HAM, aged 82, residing at 45 Monument-street, Devonport. The deceased, who was very weak and feeble, on the 14th of February last met with an accidental fall whilst in her room. The next morning she complained of a pain in her hip and back, and Dr Laity was sent for, and he examined her, but found no marks. A few days afterwards, however, two large bruises appeared, and these developed into bed-sores, which so weakened her that she died from exhaustion on Tuesday last. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the affects of an Accident.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 April 1881
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held in Tiverton on Saturday before Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, as to the death of WILLIAM BEGBEY, stonemason, aged about 50, who died from injuries received by being blown from a scaffold at the New Blundell's School buildings during the late rough weather. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TOTNES - An Inquest was held at Totnes on Saturday as to the circumstances connected with the sudden death of a postboy named W. T. SALTER, which took place on Thursday morning. Mr R. Jelley, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and found the kidneys, liver and heart considerably enlarged. He believed death to have been caused by serious apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

STOKENHAM - Inquiry was made at Chillington, near Kingsbridge, on Friday as to the death of the infant male child of BESSIE BROOKING, unmarried, aged 18, residing with her uncle, Edward Arundel, a bachelor, 46 years of age, who is a farmer residing at Chillington. The child was born in Arundel's house, and a nurse was engaged. Three weeks after its birth it died, and as no doctor was called in the Coroner was communicated with. From the evidence of the nurse it appeared the child was sickly from birth and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - The Coroner (Mr Watt) censured the nurse for not calling in a medical man, as there was one residing in the village. He also severely censured Arundel for his conduct in the affair.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at Saltmarsh's Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of ALBERT DOLTON ELLIS, aged three months and a half. Deceased was the illegitimate child of MARY ANN ELLIS, who had had two children before, and they were both living. The deceased was entrusted to the care of Mrs Mazeby, living at 13 St John's-lane, whilst the mother went out to work. It was taken to bed as usual on Friday night, but frequently cried during the night and died about half-past four. - Mr C. Whipple, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and was of opinion the death resulted from convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday, by Mr Hooper, on the body of SAMUEL EWINGS, 43, farm labourer, who had died in the Hospital from the effects of injuries sustained while at work on Allerdown Farm, Sandford, near Crediton. Wm. E. Thorne, the employer of deceased, stated that on March 25th EWINGS was working a drag when he became entangled in the gear and his leg was broken before he could get the horse to stop. Witness released him and got him carried to the house. He was afterwards removed to the County Hospital, at Exeter. Mr A. G. Blomfield, house surgeon, stated that deceased was suffering from a punctured wound in the fore part of the left leg, the bone being broken in two places. On Thursday last he fainted while trying to raise himself in bed and died without having recovered consciousness. Witness had made a post-mortem examination and came to the conclusion that death was caused by syncope, the result of exhaustion. The witness Thorne behaved in an extraordinary manner before and during the examination. While the brother of the deceased was giving evidence as to identification he interposed with a remark of some kind, when the Coroner requested that the witness should be left to him. Mr Thorne objected to being "snubbed." The Coroner then requested him to "hold his tongue." Which he did by putting it out and holding it between finger and thumb. He was cautioned; but when giving his evidence prevaricated very much and behaved in a most unseemly manner. The Coroner characterised Mr Thorne's conduct as disgraceful and insulting, a remark in which the Jury concurred. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 21 April 1881
SHAUGH PRIOR - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Monday, at Lee Moor Clay Works, on the body of JOHN LAVERS. A verdict of "Death from Apoplexy" was returned. The deceased fell backward at his work the day previous.

PLYMSTOCK - On Tuesday, at Staddiscombe, Plymstock, Mr Rodd held an Inquest on the body of JAMES KITT. The deceased destroyed himself in a trough of water eighteen inches deep, at Radford, on Sunday last. Mr Jacobs, surgeon, stated that deceased had a fit of Temporary Insanity. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide in a Fit of Temporary Insanity."

ERMINGTON - Yesterday Mr Rodd held a third Inquest at Ermington, on the body of JOHN YEOMAN. On Monday last he was found in an orchard by Mr Edwards, at Gaytor Farm, quite dead under a tree, a piece of rope (which had broken) around his neck, and which corresponded with the piece above, tied around the branch of a tree. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Sherwill was Foreman, returned a verdict "That deceased destroyed himself in a state of Unsound Mind," which was clearly proved by MRS COOPER, his sister, and others.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 22 April 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Suicide At The Plymouth Citadel. - Last evening the Borough Coroner - Mr T. C. Brian - held an Enquiry at the Plymouth Citadel into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN EDWARDS, aged twenty-one years, a gunner of the Depot Battery 8th Brigade Royal Artillery. The deceased (a Welshman) had only been in the army about a month. he was of an ill-tempered disposition. On Wednesday afternoon, about 2.40, he was amongst those who had to parade before being transferred to the fort at Bovisand. On falling in, the sergeant-major noticed that he was drunk, and consequently had him removed to the guard-room. Whilst there he behaved in such a noisy manner that he had to be handcuffed. Becoming quieter his hands were released. Although deceased was frequently visited during his confinement he defeated his watchers and took his life. Witnesses, who were called to give evidence at the Inquest yesterday, stated that they saw the deceased drinking at the canteen in the Citadel. The Coroner, in summing up, hoped that this fact would be noticed by the authorities. It was clear that the man got drunk in the barracks. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

WHITCHURCH - The Suicide At The Plymouth Cemetery. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at the Board-room of the Plymouth Cemetery Company, Pennycomequick, on the body of SUSAN LUSCOMBE, a young woman who died from taking poison on the previous day at the Cemetery. - SUSANNA DENHAM LUSCOMBE, widow and mother of the deceased, stated that her daughter was 22 years of age, and resides with her at Plymouth. Deceased was at her home at four o'clock on Wednesday afternoon. Witness did not notice her leave the house, as she was busily engaged in washing. Her daughter was in the habit of continually going in and out, but would never say where she was going. She was engaged to Mr Sparrow's son, who was killed five weeks ago, and who had been buried in the Cemetery. Pieces of a bottle which had contained poison - which was supposed to have caused the death of the deceased - were here shown to the witness, but she had never seen the bottle before. The pocket-handkerchief had belonged to her daughter. - The Coroner (to witness): Have you noticed any strangeness about her manner since young Sparrow's death? - Witness: She has been very strange in her manner since his death. She did not do much work. - By the Coroner: She had frequently been to the Cemetery to see the grave of Sparrow. She was there last Monday, when she laid some plants on her young man's grave. - By Mr Langford: Witness had never heard her daughter say that she would destroy herself, but witness had often heard her exclaim that "She did not wish to live; she wanted to be with her Bill." the witness, during her examination, wept bitterly and it was with great difficulty that she gave her evidence. - Mary Jane Crosiar, residing at 31 Cobourg-street, Plymouth, said she was at the Plymouth Cemetery on Wednesday. About twenty minutes past five she saw the deceased, who was a stranger to her, watering a grave with an old tin. She was crying bitterly. About two minutes afterwards witness noticed that she had left the grave which she had been watering, and was standing about three or four graves away. At half-past five witness saw the deceased fall. A man named White immediately ran over to her and placed her on his knee. Water was given her and her forehead bathed, as it was thought that she was faint or had a fit. - William White, a labourer employed at the Cemetery, said he first saw the deceased in the Cemetery about half-past five on Wednesday evening. He was about a dozen yards from her when some woman who were near her, called out to witness. He went over and picked the deceased up. She was unconscious and never moved. Witness raised her and placed her on his knee. He kept her in this position for about half-an-hour, when becoming tired, he placed her on the grave. He did not know what was the matter with the deceased, but there being so many females about, he thought they knew better than he did. Some said she had a fit, whilst others believed she was faint. Water was fetched and given her. After he had been about half-an-hour near the grave, someone smelt something and believed that she must have poisoned herself. Deceased was then removed to the Cemetery Lodge and Dr Jackson was sent for. Not arriving soon, he was again summoned, when he came in a cab. Three-quarters of an hour elapsed from the time the deceased was placed in the keeper's lodge before the doctor arrived. After the doctor arrived, witness put on his coat and went to the grave where the deceased fell, for the purpose of trying to find traces of what she had taken. As witness was passing about half-a-dozen graves from Sparrows' he found some pieces of a bottle, which were subsequently given to Mr Jackson. Witness had been to the grave that morning, and found the neck of a bottle which corresponded with the portion handed to the doctor. A cork was in it, and it seemed to him that the deceased, not being able to take out the cork, had knocked the neck off the bottle with a stone, which he had found near the pieces of bottle. The upper part of the bottle witness found concealed in some grass. - Mr George Jackson, M.R.C.S., on being sworn, stated that on Wednesday evening, about six o'clock, a man came to his residence and asked him to go to the Cemetery to see a young woman who had a fit. The man did not mention anything about a young woman having taken poison, or witness would have immediately gone. thinking that his services were not required in such a case, he told the man that he could not go with him, but if the woman was brought to his residence he would see her. The man then left, but a short time afterwards someone else came and said that the woman was very ill and that it was believed she had poisoned herself. He immediately drove to the Cemetery. He found the deceased at the keeper's lodge in a dying state. The piece of bottle given him by the last witness he had examined, and found it had contained carbolic acid. On examining the deceased he found traces of poison about her lips, and she was vomiting greatly. He could not apply the stomach pump in the case, but ammonia was injected into her veins. The deceased, however, died about half-past eight o'clock. The deceased was also bleeding from one of her hands; this seemed to have been caused by her breaking the bottle. The bottle found was a nine-ounce one. A small quantity of carbolic acid would not kill a person, but one ounce or more would. He attributed death to the deceased taking poison whilst suffering from melancholia. - By a Juror: He feared his services would not have been of much good had he immediately gone when first sent for. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 April 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday on the body of ELIZA SERL, aged 62, wife of ALFRED SERL, living in Manor-street. Deceased had complained of being unwell and on Friday morning grew worse. Dr Row was sent for, but death took place prior to his arrival. Dr row informed the Jury that from what he had been able to ascertain the deceased had long suffered from chronic disease, but had always refused to consult a medical man. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 27 April 1881
KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Town-hall, Kingsbridge, by Mr Coroner Watts, on the body of BETSEY SHEPHERD, an old woman (eighty-two years of age) who attempted to commit suicide on Wednesday night last, the 20th inst., in the Kingsbridge estuary. Mr John Cox was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - William Whiting stated that on Wednesday evening last he was on the Prince of Wales-road, and noticed a woman come down and look over the Quay wall. She then went further down and looked into the water. He turned his head for a minute and then he heard a splash. He at once thought it was the deceased had fallen or thrown herself in the water, and he ran for assistance. Although the night was dark, she was got out of the water in about five minutes. Medical testimony was given that after the usual remedies had been applied to secure reanimation, the deceased became conscious and the next day she was thoroughly recovered from the shock, but on Friday she was not so well, and showed symptoms of congestion of the lungs and gradually sank, the congestion of the lungs being the immediate result of the accident, from which cause she died on Saturday afternoon last. The Jury found that the deceased died of congestion of the lungs, but how she came into the water there was no evidence to show.

PLYMSTOCK - Fatal Accident To A Marine. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry on Monday at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel, as to the death of Private SAMUEL GALLOP, R.M.L.I., who died from injuries received by falling from a flight of steps on Sunday night. The Inquiry was adjourned until Saturday evening, the principal witness, a young man who was with the deceased at the time he fell, being absent.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 April 1881
TEIGNMOUTH - At Teignmouth an Inquest was held before Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS CREASY, a man of about 24, who met with his death by falling off his pony whilst on the road between Chudleigh and Teignmouth. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 28 April 1881
WOOLFARDISWORTHY - The Hanging Case Near Bideford. - It was reported in the Western Daily Mercury a few days ago that a boy nine years of age, named JAMES ALFRED BECKLEY had committed suicide near Bideford, by hanging himself. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, and from what came to the knowledge of the Coroner at the Enquiry he deemed it necessary to adjourn the Inquest until Saturday next. The following is the evidence adduced. FLORENCE GRACE BECKLEY, the sister of deceased, said on the day in question, at about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, she saw her brother standing outside the house. A short time after she went out into the garden for some furze, and while there she saw her brother hanging from the beam in the cart-shed by a rope. She went and lifted up his head and spoke to him, and asked if he was dead. He did not answer, and she became frightened and ran in and told her mother. Her mother and her both went out in the garden and her mother took down her brother from the beam, and he was quite dead. She never heard her brother say that he would hang himself. - MARY ANN BECKLEY, the mother of the boy, said she last saw the deceased alive between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday morning. She told him to go and do some work, and if he didn't she would tell his father. The deceased then went into the garden. She did not see him again until her daughter came running in to tell her that he was hanging in the shed. She took him down, and found he was dead. She lifted him in the air and tried to give him some hot milk and water and brandy. She sent for Dr Rouse, and told him the boy was dead, and he advised her to send for a policeman. - On being further questioned she said she ordered him to put the donkey in the trap, when deceased told her to do it herself if she liked. She told him that she would make him suffer if she could catch him. Dr Rouse, who was called, declined to give an opinion as to the cause of death, unless he made a post-mortem examination. The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Saturday next.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 May 1881
PLYMSTOCK - The Fatal Accident To A Soldier At Turnchapel. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of SAMUEL GALLOP, private, R.M.L.I., was held on Saturday evening at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel, by Mr Rodd, County Coroner. R. W. Tucker, private, R.M.L.I., stationed at Fort Stamford, said on the previous Sunday evening he was in the Boringdon Arms with the deceased, who was stationed at Fort Stamford as marker. They remained there for about an hour, and at ten o'clock when they left the deceased was capable of taking care of himself. The Boringdon Arms stands on an elevated terrace, which is reached at one end by the road, and at the other by a flight of stone steps about eighteen feet high. Witness stated that he and deceased went to these steps on their way to Fort Stamford. Witness was first, and on reaching the bottom of the steps he heard the deceased call out. On turning around he saw deceased falling over the rails of the steps and pitch on his shoulder or head. Witness ran to him and found him bleeding from the head and unconscious. He obtained assistance and took the injured man to the fort. Witness considered the rails too low. Evidence was given that the deceased died on Monday morning from a fracture of the base of the skull, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The Foreman expressed opinion that the steps were dangerous to the public, and the Jury concurred. - The Coroner elicited the fact that nobody knew to whom the steps belonged, but several of the Jury expressed the opinion that the steps belonged to the owners of houses in the terrace.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Supposed Suicide At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd on Saturday at the Market-house Hotel, Stonehouse, as to the death of MARGARET LYNCH, aged 65. William Hockaday, seaman, said about twenty minutes after five on Friday morning he saw the deceased walking by the sea-wall of the Victualling-yard. He spoke to her and she replied, and then continued to walk along the road to Longroom. He returned to the harbourmaster's office, where he was employed, and about forty minutes later he was looking through a telescope when he saw the body of a woman floating off the Flat Rock, which is just under Longroom. He got a boat and on reaching the body found it to be that of the deceased who was dead and floating about 150 yards from the rock. The witness stated that it was possible to go from the road to the rock and jump over. - Mr Bignell, relieving officer, said on the previous day the deceased applied for an order for the Workhouse, which was given her, and the order found upon the body was that given by the Guardians. He stated that the deceased was given to intoxication, and that it was not the case, as had been stated, that she applied for out-door relief, which was refused and an order given to go into the House. She applied for an order for the Workhouse. - The Coroner mentioned that he was present at the meeting of the Board of Guardians and then thought that the deceased answered the questions put to her in a very curious manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence to shew how the deceased got into the water."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 3 May 1881
WOOLFARDISWORTHY - The Strange Suicide Of A Boy. - An adjourned Inquest has been held at Woolfardisworthy, thirteen miles from Bideford, on the body of JOHN ALFRED BECKLEY, a boy nine years of age, who was found hanged on the previous Saturday, as already reported. The principal additional evidence was that of Richard Jones, who said he was passing on the afternoon in question when he saw the deceased in the garden with a rope in his hand swinging it about. There was another little boy with him. - Mr E. Rouse, surgeon, of Bideford, deposed that he examined the body on Monday, the 25th. He found no marks of violence on the body except a thin line and a bruise at the back of the neck. Death might have been caused by hanging. - The Jury, after a brief deliberation, decided that deceased committed suicide by hanging while in an Unsound State of Mind.

TOTNES - Yesterday Mr F. Watts (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Steam Packet Inn, touching the death of a child about fifteen months, the daughter of JOHN HEATH, a labouring man, living at St. Peter's Quay. The child appears to have got out by the riverside on Saturday, and fallen into the water. She was soon missed by the mother; and another daughter, about thirteen years old, observed the accident and very pluckily jumped off the quay into the water, which was from two to three feet deep and caught hold of her little sister, but by the time she had brought the child to her mother, life was extinct. Mr Watts praised the elder child for her noble conduct in trying to save the deceased, and added that he should bring the circumstance under the notice of the Royal Humane Society. The Jury, of whom Mr John Michelmore was Foreman, found a verdict of "Accidental Death." The fees of the Jurymen were handed back by them to the mother, who has a large family.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 4 May 1881
TAVISTOCK - The Suicide By Hanging Near Tavistock. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquiry was held at Higher Longford Farm, near Tavistock, before Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr W. Mashford was Foreman, touching the death of RICHARD HOLE, aged twelve, who was found suspended by a rope in the hayloft, at the above-named farm, on Sunday last. The deceased was a servant with Mr James Maddock, of Higher Longford Farm, and it appears that on Sunday morning Mrs Maddock went to chapel, returning about two o'clock. At that hour she missed the boy, and thinking he was gone into the loft to sleep, she went there and found him hanging. She at once informed her husband, who had also just returned home. - Mrs Maddock stated that the deceased was a very quiet boy and always did his work well. They had never had occasion to find fault with him. His aunt had told her that some time ago, when his grandmother died, he was quite out of his mind for a month and that a doctor had attended him. Mr Maddock corroborated his wife's statement, and said that when he took the deceased down he found him quite dead, but not stone cold. Miss Annie Cole stated that she saw the boy about ten minutes after 12 on Sunday morning, when he came into the house with a number of eggs, and appeared all right. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity, and gave their fees to his mother, who is a poor woman, residing at Middle Moor, in Whitchurch.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 May 1881
PLYMOUTH - Strange Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Jubilee Inn, Exeter-street, yesterday, as to the death of ANN ROWE, married woman, aged 41, who died from poison. It appeared from the evidence of SUSAN FOSS, of 10 Friary-street, a sister, that the deceased was the wife of a carpenter's mate, on board H.M.S. Bittern. He had been away for three years, but allowed his wife a substantial portion of his pay. Just after Christmas deceased and her daughter, aged 20, went to live with another sister at Penryn. But on Thursday evening she reappeared at her sister's house in Plymouth, saying that she came to see her friends and was going back to Penryn shortly. It appeared, however, from a letter from the daughter which was read at the Inquest, that deceased left Penryn to see a friend in the neighbourhood, and was expected back in the evening. The daughter wrote to Plymouth anxiously inquiring if her mother had been seen. Deceased left her sister's on Thursday evening to visit another friend, and did not return until yesterday morning, when she expressed a desire to rest a while. MRS FOSS'S son, going into the room a few minutes afterwards, found her lying across the bed and making a peculiar noise. MRS FOSS immediately went to her, called for assistance, and sent for Dr Harper, who arrived shortly afterwards. He found the woman in a state of collapse, and judging from the symptoms that she had taken poison, endeavoured to administer an emetic, but she was unable to swallow. It was a hopeless case and she died a little while after. Sergeant Hill, who arrived previous to the medical man, received the remainder of a packet of oxalic acid, which he found deceased had purchased from Mr Welsford, chemist, King-street. It transpired during the hearing that an uncle of deceased committed suicide in the Sound by jumping off a steamer, and the girl who lately poisoned herself in Plymouth Cemetery was a distant relative. The deceased had been in a very low desponding state and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

DAWLISH - An inquest was held at Dawlish yesterday by Mr Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of the REV. R. PARNELL, who was drowned off Dawlish the previous day by the capsizing of a boat in which he was sailing with his wife. Wm. Horsford, the boatman, stated that they were sailing towards Teignmouth, but as the wind freshened they decided to return. When wearing the boat he let go the sheet but a sudden squall capsized it. The lady and gentleman were sitting on the leeward side, and witness was sitting on the windward side. He thought he ought to have asked the lady and gentleman before "wearing" to change sides, but if they had done so the accident would still have happened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 May 1881
ASHBURTON - Inquiry was made at Ashburton yesterday, before Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of THOMAS WOLLACOTT, the lad who was drowned in the Dart on Saturday, as reported yesterday. A brother of the deceased stated that he called to a young man named Harrigan, who was nearing the spot, to save his brother, and Harrigan, who was called as a witness, stated that he could not go into the water, as he took a chill last year by doing so. In reply to the Coroner, the witness admitted that he asked a boy smaller than himself to go into the water and rescue deceased. - W. E. Abbot, a stoker engaged at the factory, stated that a lad came running through the village shouting that WOLLACOTT was drowning in the Weir pool. Witness at once ran off and reached the spot in five minutes and though out of breath and in a great heat, he jumped into the water with his clothes on and got out the body which was then lying in nearly four feet of water. The Coroner strongly expressed his disapproval of the conduct of Harrigan and disallowed his expenses. The Jury, of whom Mr E. Cruse was Foreman, found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave half their fees to the parents of deceased, and half to Abbot for his prompt endeavour to save the life of the lad.

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Sad Death Near Plympton. A Dangerous Bridge. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Inn, Ridgway, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN VIGURS, a billposter, aged 79 years, who was found under Peacock's Ford Bridge at Colebrook on Friday morning. - James Fizzey, a miner, said he knew deceased very well. About ten p.m. on Thursday he saw him sitting in the hedge, about forty yards from Newnham Lodge. Deceased was not drunk, although he rambled a little. He said he was tired and had sat down to rest. When witness continued his walk deceased followed and a companion asked him his age. He replied that he was in his 80th year, and that was the last that witness saw or heard of him. It was dim light and there was a little moon. - Trobridge Horton, a farmer, of Colebrook, said about 9 a.m. on Friday he found the body of deceased in the bed of the river under the bridge in question. Only the hands and feet of the deceased were in the water, and it was impossible that he could have been drowned. The bridge was a very old one and the parapet protecting it was only fourteen inches high. There was a railing protecting one parapet, but it was not the side over which the deceased was supposed to have fallen. The height of the bridge from the river was about seven feet. It was a very dangerous place, and the road had been raised lately, which only increased the danger. - A Juror remarked that the bridge was very dangerous and persons crossing over were compelled to be very cautious. Anybody who was not acquainted with the spot was likely to fall over at night. The Coroner asked witness if he did not think that something should be done to the bridge for public protection. Witness replied in the affirmative and added that if railings had been placed around the parapet the man would not have fallen over. - Mr R. Ellery, surgeon, said he saw deceased on Friday morning about ten o'clock. He was quite dead. He was lying on his left side, with his head on a rock in a pool of blood. The body was quite rigid and witness thought it had been there all night. He found a large scalp wound on the left side of the head. The cause of death was concussion of the brain, the result of a fall. Witness considered that the deceased had fallen from the bridge and in so doing had struck his head against one of the rocks. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by falling from the bridge," and added a s arider the following:- "The Jurors consider the said bridge dangerous, and recommend that the same be put into proper repair by the parochial authorities." - A Juror said he took great care in crossing the bridge and Dr Ellery said he was compelled to keep strict control over his horse and carriage, for if the horse bolted or "shied" the carriage and its occupants would be thrown over. The Jury gave their fees to the widow of deceased.

OTTERY ST. MARY - Suicide At Ottery St. Mary. - Yesterday an Enquiry was held at the Red Lion Inn, Ottery, before Mr S. M. Cox, Coroner, at the death of JAMES TUCKER, aged 18, in the employ of Mr R. Coleridge, J.P., of Salston, Ottery. The deceased had lately been dissatisfied with his wages and work and had asked his master to raise his wages. His master did not however give an increased salary but promised to consider the application. Deceased was of a reserved disposition and had been noticed to look peculiar lately and heard to complain of his head aching. The head-gardener, Mr Bolt, was returning to the garden from his dinner on Saturday when he saw deceased lying outside the seed-room door on his back with a double-barrelled gun between his legs. The gun was his master's and was kept locked and unloaded in the seed-room. The door of the seed-room had been burst open and the gun removed. A discharged shot cartridge was found in one of the barrels. A wound was found near the heart and the medical testimony was to the effect that death must have been almost instantaneous. There was no string attached to the trigger of the gun, and it is supposed that as the gun is a very short one, deceased must have placed the muzzle against his breast and have reached down to the trigger with his hand. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 May 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at the Penrose Inn, Penrose-street, as to the death of JOANNA MATTHEWS, a widow, aged 73, who died from the effects of a fall from a table on Tuesday evening. FRANCES COOK said deceased was her mother. On Wednesday, the 4th inst., she went to her mother's house, as usual, to do a little domestic work, and found her lying on the floor of the kitchen at her residence, 12 Hastings-street. After a short time deceased told her that she got upon the table to open the window, and fell back. Witness sent for Dr Wolferstan, but she died on Tuesday evening. Mr Selley Wolferstan, M.R.C.S., said the deceased died from a shock to the system the result of the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 13 May 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquiry was made at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd), as to the death of GEORGE COLE, aged 22 and second class stoker of the Indus, who died from the effects of an accident on the 9th inst. Deceased was engaged in painting the chain locker on April 20th, and was sitting on a suspended plank. Whilst painting with one hand the rope slipped from the other and he fell a distance of 16 feet. Staff-Surgeon More stated that deceased died from depressed fracture of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - An Inquest was held at Pounds, Buckland Monachorum, on Wednesday, by Mr Rodd and a Jury of whom Mr Soltau, J.P., was Foreman, as to the death of MISS BULLER, an account of the fatal accident to whom has appeared in these columns. The gardener Bennett stated that his attention being attracted to the drawing-room by seeing smoke issuing from the window, he entered the room and found MISS BULLER lying inside the fender, and flames rising from her back. The REV. A. BULLER, brother to the deceased, stated that she was in the habit of sitting in front of the fire and sometimes of sleeping there. Mr G. Butters, surgeon, stated that he thought the deceased fell into the fire while asleep, and not in a fit. The Jury returned a verdict that Death was the result of the Accident. The funeral will take place at noon today at Horrabridge.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 May 1881
HOLBETON - Inquiry was made at Mothecombe, Holbeton, yesterday, as to the death of the child MINNIE BURN, aged two years, daughter of a coastguardsman, who, while at play on Wednesday, fell over a cliff - a distance of twenty-four feet. The Jury, of whom Mr S. Lecra, was Foreman, returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and recommended that a railing should be put at the top of the cliff.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 19 May 1881
PLYMOUTH - Found Drowned In Cattewater. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, Plymouth, last evening, touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY EVANS, who was found drowned in Cattewater yesterday morning. - William Henry Potter deposed to being skipper of the smack Olmara, of Plymouth, on which vessel the deceased was employed. The Olmara came in from a fishing cruise on Tuesday night and dropped anchor about half-past eight in Cattewater. Witness last saw EVANS about half-past nine on that night. Himself and the two men, composing the crew, went ashore, the deceased, at his own wish, being left on board. It was customary to leave someone on board when a vessel was lying in Cattewater. One of the duties of EVANS would be to fix the riding light at the forestay. To reach this he would have to get on the bowsprit, and if he slipped his foot he would fall against the rail. Witness went on board again yesterday morning about half-past six, the two men being with him. When they got on board, they found the light in its place and still burning, but nothing was seen of EVANS. There was no means by which he could have gone on shore, and he could not swim. They then jumped into the boat alongside and were pulling ashore, when they met the father of the deceased pulling towards his own boat, and they told him that his son was missing. They returned to their own vessel again and MR EVANS came on board shortly after. Grappling irons were procured and after a while the body was found under the side. Deceased was a very good-tempered lad, and had been on friendly terms with the crew. - Mr Damerel, quay constable, stated that he received the body when landed at the quay, and had it conveyed to MR EVANS' house. The only things found on the body were two keys and a knife. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," but how, there was no evidence to show.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 May 1881
TOTNES - An Inquest was held at Bowden House, Totnes, yesterday by Dr Gaye, as to the death of MRS HOLLAND, who died on Wednesday afternoon from injuries received by being thrown out of her carriage on Monday. - MISS HOLLAND, who was driving the pony, stated that she could not tell what caused it to run away; and a groom in the employ of GENERAL HOLLAND stated that the pony was harnessed as usual, and he had always known it to be quiet. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 May 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall From Aloft. - Mr W. Gilbert, the Mayor and Coroner for Saltash, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon on board the Implacable, training-ship in Hamoaze, at Devonport, on the body of ALFRED BLAKE, second-class boy of that ship, who met with his death by a fall from aloft. Mr W. Eastlake, Admiralty Law Agent, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Admiralty. - James Lang, second-class boy of the Implacable, stated that yesterday morning the boys were at drill in the topmast rigging. On coming down from aloft the deceased was below him, and on looking down to see his way into the topmast he saw deceased "spinning through the air." The deceased fell about a hundred feet on to the deck below. They had finished their drill, and there was no hurrying to come down the rigging. He could not account for the deceased falling, except that he must have slipped. The deceased was between 15 and 16 years of age, and had joined the service about six months. - William Blackler, another second-class boy, stated that he was standing on the top of the topmast rigging. The deceased was above him and he saw his foot slip from the rigging. The fall was purely accidental. The deceased was resting on his toe instead of standing fairly on his foot, and this accounted for the fall. Mr Emanuel foster, gunner of the Implacable, stated that he was standing on the starboard side of the mainmast when he heard a fall, and turning round saw a boy lying on the deck, moving slightly. He went over and picked him up, but the deceased was unconscious and was taken below to the surgeon. Mr John Wood, surgeon of the Implacable, stated that the deceased when brought into the sick-bay was insensible and never recovered consciousness. Blood was oozing from the nostrils and left ear and there was a slight abrasion over the left eyebrow, but no other mark of injury. Death ensued within half an hour, the cause being fracture of the base of the skull. The Jury, which was composed of seamen belonging to the ship, with Mr Davis, the master-at-arms, as Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 27 May 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, Mr Brian, last evening, at the Lord Ebrington public-house, Ebrington-street, as to the circumstances attending the death of JOHN DOWN, aged 69, who died suddenly yesterday morning at his residence, 35 Ebrington-street. About 7.30 a.m. he was in the court adjoining his premises talking to a neighbour, and then appeared to be in his usual health, but half an hour afterwards was found on the floor of his room dead. Mr Harper, surgeon, was sent for, but he could only pronounce life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 31 May 1881
EXETER 0 A Militiaman Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Higher Barracks, Exeter, yesterday afternoon, touching the death of HENRY MORGAN, a private belonging to the 1st Devon Militia, who was drowned on Saturday last whilst bathing. Lieutenant S. G. Harding, of the 1st Devon Militia, stated that the deceased was training with the recruits at camp, near the Topsham Barracks. He was nineteen years of age, an engine-cleaner by trade, and resided at Wiveliscombe. Whilst bathing with about thirty of his comrades he was observed to be sinking. His rescue was attempted, but he was not taken out of the water until life was extinct. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 June 1881
TAWSTOCK - Suicide Near Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at Coombe Farm, Tawstock, near Barnstaple, yesterday, as to the death of JOHN CARTER, a farmer, of Tawstock, who committed suicide the previous day under very distressing circumstances. It appeared that deceased had been seen by a lad named John Cook in a field belonging to the lad's father guilty of improper conduct towards an animal. The fact of this being known to the lad's father and of his threatening to acquaint the police with the matter, seems to have preyed on CARTER'S mind. He was missed during Monday night and on the following day was found in a field hanging from the bough of a tree. A verdict of "Suicide whilst under Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) last evening at the London Mail Inn, Richmond-street, as to the death of EMMA JANE KENDLE, aged 2 years. It was stated that the child had been delicate from birth, and had been in a declining state for six months, but had had no medical attendance since November. The child had been supported by the grandmother since the mother's death, the father taking no concern of it. On Tuesday morning the child was found dead in bed. It transpired that the whole of the family slept in the room in which the corpse is now placed and during the day is occupied by another child dangerously ill. The Coroner said he could not wholly exonerate the grandmother, for although she had exhibited all ordinary care, having accepted the responsibility it devolved upon her to provide medical attendance. He strongly condemned the conduct of the father, who had been ordered to attend the Inquest but had not appeared. The Jury, of which Mr Vodden was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and strongly censured the father.

GREAT TORRINGTON - An Inquest was held at the New Inn, Well-street, Torrington, yesterday as to the death of WILLIAM BARTLETT, aged three weeks, the child of a railway guard named BARTLETT. The child was alive at five o'clock on Tuesday morning, but two hours later the mother found it dead by her side. Mr C. R. Jones, surgeon, said the child had either had a convulsion or had got too close to the mother to enable it to breathe freely, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 June 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Diving Fatality In The Hamoaze. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday morning as to the death of SAMUEL EVANS, aged 41, leading stoker of the Indus. - Mr W. Eastlake, Admiralty law agent, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty, and Mr Graves, solicitor, of Devonport, watched the case on behalf of friends of the deceased. - George [?] gunner's mate, serving on board the Ebony, and on Thursday between 9 and 10 a..m, the deceased presented to him for his usual quarterly examination in diving according to the rules of the service. At 9.30 a.m. the deceased went under water and after remaining below for ten minutes he signalled to be pulled up. This was done, and on arriving at the surface witness opened the glass face of the helmet deceased had on, and asked him how he felt, and he replied, "Never better in all my life, and I'll have another dip." He was accordingly lowered again, and after the expiration of about twenty minutes witness gave orders to one of the attendants to signal to the deceased to come up, and the deceased replied to the signal. They were conducting their operations off the Implacable, and where there were about 9 fathoms and 3 feet of water, and drawing the deceased up this distance occupied from 30 to 40 seconds. Just as the deceased arrived at the surface witness saw him make a grasp for the iron ladder which was hung over the side of the boat and miss it. thinking that something was the matter witness gave orders for the man to be taken into the boat, which was done, and he unscrewed the helmet and hearing deceased moaning called to a petty officer on board the Implacable to fetch the doctor. This was done and the doctor ordered the deceased to be divested of his diving suit and carried to the Implacable and taken down into the sick bay, and on being placed on the bed in the sick bay the unfortunate man died. The deceased had been a diver twelve years and knew his work. He was sure there was nothing the matter with the dress or gear, as he (witness) had had on the same dress just before the deceased. - By Mr Graves: The reason why he signalled for the deceased to come up was because he wanted to try some other men. In trying the divers they usually remained down about twenty minutes. Witness had been under water for 5 ½ hours. - Mr B. J. Barry, surgeon on board the Indus, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body and he found that the deceased had been suffering from pulmonary apoplexy and a kind of heart disease not easily detected during life. He attributed death to pulmonary apoplexy. - By Mr Graves: He could not say that diving had in any way accelerated death. - Mr w. D. Longfield, Fleet Surgeon, stated that on Monday the deceased was examined by Dr Drake, of the Indus, and he was then thought to be fit for diving purposes. - By Mr Graves: If a man were suffering from heart disease he would not be allowed to be a diver. The diseases which the former witness had spoken of were not easily detected in life and death might have been accelerated by the act of diving. The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury, if they wished, might add a rider of "possibly accelerated by diving." There was no evidence to shew that death was accelerated by diving. - The Jury, after a lengthy consultation, returned a verdict that death was from "Natural Causes, accelerated by diving." The Jury handed their fees to the widow, who will get twelve months' pay from the Admiralty by reason of the verdict which the Jury returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 June 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - An old man named SQUIRES, 78, died at the Newton Cottage Hospital yesterday from injuries sustained through being caught in a circular saw at Teigngrace a fortnight ago. An Inquest was held last evening, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A Child Suffocated At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, as to the death of FREDERICK ALEXANDER KERRY, aged 10 weeks, the parents of which reside at 17 Richmond-walk, Devonport. - JANE KERRY, mother of deceased, stated that on Whit-Monday she accompanied a party of friends to Oreston, taking deceased with her. She did not notice anything extraordinary about the child, and it was in its usual health. She went to Oreston about one p.m., returning about six o'clock. Deceased took the breast freely and often during the day, and when returning to the steamboat. Before landing at the Barbican she entrusted it to the care of a Mrs Bond, who was in company with her. Witness did not see the child again until it was returned to her in St Andrew-street. She saw that it was either dead or dying and rushed into Messrs. Balkwill and Elliot's chemist shop. Mr Elliot advised her to take it to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. A cab was hailed and on arriving at the Hospital the house surgeon pronounced life extinct. - Harriett Bond, an elderly woman, residing at Richmond-walk, corroborated. When the child was entrusted to her charge it was wrapped in a large shawl, but its face was not covered. When she returned deceased to its mother she would not swear that it was living or dead. - Dr A. H. Bampton, house surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that he saw deceased was dead. He had made a post-mortem examination, and was of opinion that death resulted from suffocation. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the doctor's evidence was unquestionable, and if the child died by suffocation it was purely accidental. Perhaps, as the child was restless, the witness Bond might have pressed it to her breast in order to pacify it, which was not unusual. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 June 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fall In The Royal William Victualling Yard. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of WM. HENRY POMEROY, aged 57 years, who died in the Hospital on Tuesday last from injuries sustained through a fall whilst on duty as a labourer in the Royal William Victualling Yard a fortnight since. - John Purdey, storehouseman in the Victualling Yard, stated that the deceased was a skilled labourer engaged on special duty in connection with the hydraulic lift. He had been so engaged for ten years and knew the work well. On the afternoon of the 23rd May the deceased was at his usual work upon the lift, hoisting barrels of sugar from the ground floor to the second floor of one of the stores as the goods were discharged from a steamer recently arrived from Deptford. Deceased was standing on the first floor, about 14 feet from the ground, and witness saw him within a quarter of an hour of his falling. - Constable Cox, of the Metropolitan Police Force, stated that whilst passing through the yard he observed the deceased lying on the ground, across the hydraulic lift. Nobody saw him fall, but he had apparently fallen through the hatchway to the basement. He was insensible and blood was flowing from his head. Witness raised him up and called for assistance, no one happening to be in the store at the time, and within a quarter of an hour the deceased was sent to the Hospital by order of the surgeon of the Royal Marine Infirmary, who was sent for immediately after the accident. - The witness, Purdey was recalled, and explained that the deceased was left alone in the store for a short time, as there was a lull in the work at that particular part of the store. Some men were working in another part of the store, but they did not see the deceased fall. There was no danger attaching to the work, and the deceased had performed the duties for ten years without the slightest mishap. - Mr T. J. Preston, surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, stated that the deceased was in a state of insensibility when admitted, having three severe scalp wounds and contusions of the right side of the head and face, and there were symptoms of concussion of the brain. Deceased remained under his care until Tuesday last, when he died from compression of the brain following upon concussion. During the fortnight he lingered in the Hospital he regained consciousness, but never explained to anyone how the fall occurred. From the position of the wounds, witness believed the fall was accidental and not suicidal. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 11 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, relative to the death of the illegitimate female child, aged seven weeks, of MARY ANN WALTERS. The evidence given went to show that up to the time the woman WALTERS was confined she had been leading a loose life. The child was born in the Liskeard Workhouse, and on Monday week last WALTERS brought it with her to Plymouth, since which time she had lived with a widow named Catherine Hoare, at 9 Looe-street. The child had apparently been healthy from birth, and was taken to bed by the mother on Thursday about midnight. All went well up to nine o'clock yesterday morning, when the mother noticed an unusual look on its face, a neighbour was immediately called in, but before her arrival the child expired. Mr William Bazley, M.R.C.S., made a post-mortem examination of the body yesterday, but found no external marks of violence. The internal organs were all healthy except the right lung, which was slightly congested. The infant had been seemingly well nourished and properly cared for. There was a deal of fluid blood diffused on the brain, and the symptoms were consistent with the child having died in convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EAST ALLINGTON - Death From Drink At Kingsbridge. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at Eastallington, by Dr Gaye, Coroner, as to the cause of death of RICHARD LEWIS, a labourer. Mr Chas. Fox, of Kingsbridge, was chosen Foreman. From the evidence it appears that the deceased had been on the "spree" at Kingsbridge for nearly a week, where he had been drinking heavily, and had also been robbed of his money. He returned to Eastallington on Saturday night. On Sunday night he was unwell and on Monday Dr Elliot was sent for, but no medical man arrived until Tuesday at about ten o'clock, and the deceased died in the morning; the order for the surgeon having been placed in the surgery and got mislaid, hence the cause of no medical assistance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Drink."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Suicide In Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN MATTHEW WILSON, a seaman, aged 54, who committed suicide by cutting his throat. - Mr C. J. Mayell said he was acting-master of the Workhouse and had been so since Saturday last. He produced the porter's admission book, and by it saw that the deceased was admitted to the House on the 4th inst. The deceased had been previously admitted in February and April of the present year. - Samuel Hawkings, inmate of the House, said he was acting as ward nurse. The deceased belonged to the ward over which witness had charge. He knew that the deceased had been a great sufferer night and day for the past fortnight. About ten minutes before eleven on Friday the deceased went out of the Ward into the closet on the same floor and closed the door. He had been there about ten minutes when witness, thinking he had been there longer than usual, opened the door and saw the deceased sitting on the seat with blood flowing freely from a gash in his throat. He was quite sensible and had a small pocket knife in his right hand. Witness said, "You have done something now," and the deceased made no reply. Witness immediately went after the nurse, who came back with him. Deceased was removed to the ward and placed on a bed. His throat was bandaged and Dr Thomas communicated with. During the time the deceased had been in the House he seemed in trouble, partly about his daughter and wife, and complained that he was in great pain, which was more than he could bear. He would also say, "I wish I was out of it." The deceased knew what he was about in witness's opinion. He was surprised at what the deceased had done. He was not more low than usual. - By Dr Thomas: The deceased was very restless at night and would wander about the Ward. He did not do this more than usual on Thursday night. - By Mr Mayell: The deceased had everything that was necessary for a sick man. He had whatever he chose. - By a Juror: He did not complain of a pain in his head. He reported the fact that the deceased was restless to the nurse. - Mary Remfrey, nurse in the men's hospital, said she knew the deceased since his admission. She knew him to be a great invalid. The deceased had been very restless at night and seemed afraid when the gas was turned out. He was a very discontented man, always finding fault and fancying he could be cured. On Thursday the deceased had a very bad night, wandering about the Ward. Witness told him he must stop in bed and not disturb the other patients. - By Dr Thomas: The deceased was on full diet. - By Mr Lang: When he was overcome with pain the deceased was not quite sane; at other times he was perfectly rational. - In answer to the Coroner, the witness said the deceased was not so affected mentally as to be called a lunatic. It was usual for the inmates to be allowed to have a knife like the one produced. The men cut up their tobacco with their knives. - Mr Lang asked the witness Hawkings if he had a knife to cut up the men's tobacco with, and the witness replied that he had not. - Mr Lang: Then you ought to have. There would be no risk of such cases as this if you had. - Mr F. A. Thomas, house surgeon at the Workhouse, said the deceased was under his care suffering from heart disease and dropsy at an advanced stage. It was reported to witness that deceased was restless at night, and he remonstrated with him about it. He prescribed for the deceased. On Friday he was sent for, and on arriving at the House at half-past eleven found the deceased lying in a chair with his throat cut. It had been bandaged and the haemorrhage partly stopped, but he had lost a large quantity of blood. The wound was a very dangerous one, but none of the large vessels were cut. The wind-pipe was cut, but not severed. He asked the deceased why he did it, and he said "I have been in such suffering for this last four months that I don't care to live any longer." He seemed quite rational then. Witness had him placed in bed and dressed the wound. He died on Sunday at seven a.m. Death was not directly due to the wound, but he had no doubt that it accelerated it. Had he been in a lunatic condition witness would have had him put in a lunatic asylum. It was quite possible from the mental condition of the man and the pain he suffered that he should have had a fit of temporary insanity. Had it not been for the condition of the deceased, probably he would have recovered from the wound. Witness was not surprised at what had occurred. - Mr Lang: Do you think he ought to have a knife like this? - Witness: We cannot call them lunatics. If they made up their minds to cut their throats they would do it, even if they used their dinner knives. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide in a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 15 June 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident. - SAMUEL BENNETT, a clay cutter, about twenty-six years of age, who met with serious injuries by a piece of timber falling on him whilst at work in a clay-pit at Kingsteignton last Monday week, died at the Newton Cottage Hospital yesterday. Last evening Dr Gaye, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Fatal Accident Near Plympton. - The County Coroner Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest yesterday, at the 'Old Ring of Bells,' Underwood, near Plympton, on the body of ROBERT HENRY DAVEY PAUL, aged twelve years, who died on Saturday night, from the effects of a kick from a horse. SAMUEL PAUL, the father, deposed that he was a colt breaker, and on Saturday last, went to Sherford Barton Farm, to work with two colts. His son, who accompanied him, did not work the horses on the farm, but on returning home, led one of the colts by a rein which was about 57 feet in length. Witness was informed of the accident by another son of his who had come from Plympton to meet him. Witness afterwards found him lying close to the hedge. He was insensible and blood was flowing from his right ear. - By the Coroner: The horse was a quiet one. ALFRED PAUL said his brother ROBERT, whilst leading one of the horses on Thursday with a long rein, was severely kicked. Witness had never known the horse to kick before. Dr Ellery deposed that on Thursday last he was called to see the injured boy. He was insensible and suffering from fracture of the skull. He was under witness's care till his death, which took place on Saturday. The blow on the skull might have been caused by a kick from a horse. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Death From A Fall At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Plymouth Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD SAUNDERS, aged 35, a labourer, who died from injuries received by falling from a ladder. - Robert Minton stated that he went to his work (as a baker) at Mrs Hilson's, 33 Exeter-street, about half-past eight on Monday evening. He saw SAUNDERS standing on a ladder placed against the back of the house in the court. He was about twenty feet from the ground in line with the second storey, and was brushing the wall preparatory to its being painted. Witness went into the bakehouse and, happening to look out of the window, saw SAUNDERS falling. He fell on the roof of the kitchen and bounded off into the court below. Witness went out, held him up and called for assistance, several persons coming forward. The injured man was lying on his back and, when lifted up, blood flowed from the back of his head. He was conscious, and, after having had his head bathed, he was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Witness did not know whether SAUNDERS was standing on the window-sill or on the ladder when he fell. Dr Bampton, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that SAUNDERS had received a small scalp wound on the back of his head. Several of his ribs were broken, and his left shoulder was injured. Witness saw nothing dangerous in his condition. He died at about ten o'clock that (Tuesday) morning. The Jury, of whom Mr William Stidston was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 16 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - A death occurred yesterday in the Plymouth market of a peculiarly sudden and painful nature. About noon, when the market was much frequented, MRS LANGTRY, a poultry dealer, living at 3 Hill-street, who was sitting on her chair in close proximity to her stall, was seen to fall suddenly to the ground. Dr Loney, a surgeon of the Royal Marines, who was passing at the time, was prompt in his attendance upon the poor woman, but on examination life was found to be extinct. The Market Inspector was sent for, and made his appearance without delay, when the deceased - who, it was evident, had died of heart disease - was removed in his care. She had just finished eating her dinner when she fell. Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body at the New Market Hotel last evening. - Evidence was produced in support of the above facts. - Mr Square, sen., said he and his son had been treating the deceased for a complaint in the eye. - The Jury viewed the body in the Corn Exchange Hall, and without hesitation gave a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - MRS LANGTRY being so well known and death occurring in the midst of business, an unusual sensation and gloom has spread over the market. She was seventy-three years of age, and had for many years kept a stall in the poultry market, and in that capacity was very much respected by customers and fellow-dealers alike.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, last evening, at the Seymour Arms, North-street, as to the death of JANE HARDY EVANS, aged 61, who was found dead in bed yesterday morning. Deceased was accustomed to drink freely and while under the influence of drink about a fortnight ago fell on the fender and bruised her forehead. Three days ago she fell from the bedstead and struck her eye against a chest of drawers. She retired to rest in her usual health on Wednesday evening, but on her husband, who resides at 4 Prospect-street, awaking the following morning, he found her dead. He gave an alarm and Dr Square was called, but he said deceased had been dead about an hour. The Jury, of whom Mr Wood was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 18 June 1881
PLYMSTOCK - Drowned In A Well AT Hooe. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an adjourned inquest yesterday at Hooe, on the body of SARAH JANE BROOKING, aged forty-two, who was drowned in a well on the 1st instant. - Thomas Ball deposed that about twelve o'clock on the night of the 1st inst. he had retired to rest, when he was awoke by his wife, who said that after someone had lowered the bucket in the well she heard a splash and gurgling noise. Witness opened his room window and listened, but could hear nothing. He then procured a light and went downstairs. He had but just opened his door, which is situated opposite the well, when he heard footsteps and the well door close. He went to the well and put the light in, but could not discern anything. he was returning to his house when MR BROOKING came out from his residence and asked what was the matter. Witness informed him what his wife had told him. To this BROOKING replied that he had just passed the well and shut the door and that he had been home but could not find his wife. A pole was then procured and, on searching the well, MRS BROOKING was taken out quite dead. The witness stated that the well was ten feet deep, but at times the water in it was only five feet deep and persons who fetched water had to lean over the mouth of the well for the purpose of obtaining some. Since the last Inquest a pump had been erected and consequently there was no further danger; but previous to this there was great danger, especially at night. - James Edwards stated that he last saw the deceased alive about half-past ten on the night of the accident. She was then waiting for her husband, who was frequently detained in his capacity as coachman. Witness noticed the bucket, which was found at the bottom of the well, hanging in its usual place when he retired to rest. - James Bestock, M.R.C.S., attributed death to suffocation, caused by being drowned. The Jury, of whom Mr Cole was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 June 1881
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, Exeter, yesterday, by Mr Coroner Burrows, as to the death of HENRY SEARLE, aged 46, a shoemaker, of Moretonhampstead. On Wednesday a railway porter named William Coleman saw a hat and other attire of a man lying on the bank at the basin. P.C. Frost having been communicated with a search was commenced and soon afterwards a man named Hutchings brought the body to the surface by means of a hooked pole. Deceased had on only his under linen, and in his clothes were found one halfpenny, a pocket-knife and a tobacco-pipe. Pecuniary difficulties seem to have recently caused deceased to become low spirited. An Open Verdict was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made at Devonport last evening as to a case of alleged death through vaccination. The Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held the Inquest at the Keyham Spirit Vaults. FLORENCE MAUDE WOODLEY, aged four months, and daughter of ALBERT WOODLEY, residing at Charlotte-street, was vaccinated by Dr May, a public vaccinator, on the 10th inst., and her arm progressed favourably until Thursday last. Then it became inflamed. The father of deceased went to Dr Row and informed him that he thought the child was dying. He immediately visited deceased, but it had died before he arrived. Dr Row expressed his opinion that the child died from exhaustion, caused indirectly by vaccination. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquest last evening at usher's Wine and Spirit Vaults, Octagon-street, Plymouth, Inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM EDGECUMBE, aged 55, a marine store dealer, residing at 60 King-street, Plymouth. - Stephen Robert Pethick, a boy in the employ of the deceased, said at a little before six o'clock that morning he went to the stable at the back of the premises for the purpose of harnessing the horse. He found the door open, and on looking in saw a man hanging by a rope from the ceiling. He immediately ran into the house and informed MRS EDGECUMBE that her husband had hanged himself. She procured assistance and the deceased was cut down. - Richard Smith said he cut down the deceased. The body was still warm, but life was extinct. The deceased was hanging by a stout rope from the purlin of the ceiling. He had known EDGECUMBE forty years. He was always a very quiet man, and during the past fortnight had been very low-spirited in consequence of some unfortunate family affairs. In his opinion the deceased tied the rope to the purlin, then got on a wagon that was in the stable, tied the rope around his neck and jumped off. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, Ilfracombe, yesterday, before Mr J. Bromham, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of HENRY GIBBS, who committed suicide on Sunday by cutting his throat. From the evidence given by Sarah Coats and Fanny Sergeant, neighbours of deceased, it appeared that he had been unwell for a long time from asthma, and since last Thursday had been much worse, and medical aid had been called in. For some week she had been much depressed in spirits and preferred to be along. The wife of deceased was certainly not unkind to him, but was compelled to leave him in order to obtain a livelihood for herself, husband and child, more especially as the club allowance had recently been reduced. Mr Foquette, surgeon, testified that the immediate cause of death was a wound, which he believed to be self-inflicted, in the throat, which had severed the vein but not the windpipe. He had attended deceased professionally and should say that he had committed the act while in a state of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Monday 27 June 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Plymouth Boy. - An Inquest was held by Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, at the Brunswick Hotel, Barbican-quay, on Saturday evening as to the death of FREDERICK WM. MURRAY, aged 10, who mysteriously disappeared from his home a few days since. - John Hurson, aged 7, was called as a witness, but he said he did not know the nature of a lie or of an oath and could not read. He was, therefore, not sworn. The lad's statement was that about ten p.m. on Tuesday the deceased asked him to go out in a boat "scruffing," which meant pulling about to the different vessels picking up the fish left lying on the decks by the trawlers. They left the quay in a punt belonging to the sloop Favourite, and pulled a short distance until they got to a trawler belonging to Mr Knox. Witness was sculling and when they got alongside the trawler the deceased attempted to climb up the side of the vessel, but in doing so slipped and fell into the water between the trawler and the boat. Witness did not see the deceased any more, and he immediately sculled ashore and called out a boy was overboard. There was a group of fishermen standing some distance off, but he did not know whether they heard him or not. He then moored up the boat and went home. - FREDERICK MURRAY, father of the child, stated that as the deceased did not come home on Tuesday night he made a search for him but could not find him. On the following morning he was informed by Mrs Hurson, the mother of the previous witness, what had occurred. Sutton Pool was then dragged continuously until Friday when he was successful in bringing the body to the surface. He did not blame the boy Hurson, nor anyone else, as this practice of "scruffing" was very common amongst the boys who frequented the Quay. Edward Damarell, Quay Constable, said he received the body when it was landed. The practice of "scruffing" was very frequent and they were unable to put a stop to it. The Coroner wondered that there were not more accidents as this practice appeared to be so prevalent. He hoped this occurrence would be a caution to the boy Hurson, who, he thought, was so frightened at the time of the accident that he did not raise a sufficient alarm. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" and exonerated the boy Hurson from all blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 4 July 1881
TORQUAY - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Torquay, on Saturday on the body of a child named THOMAS PEARCE, six years old, son of a shoemaker, living at Hatfield-terrace. The evidence showed that a few days ago the mother found a dark mark on the boy's loins. On being questioned the boy said that it had been caused by a teacher at the National School, Ellacombe, and who, he said, had given him a beating. Medical testimony showed that the child had suffered from inflammatory fever and slight eruptions and that death had resulted from natural causes. In consequence, however, of the rumours that had been circulated as to the boy having been beaten, a post-mortem examination had been made and the Inquest held. It was clearly proved that the boy had not been beaten at school. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 July 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Carriage Accident At Devonport. - Mr Albert Gard, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at Morice Town, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH ANN WILLING, wife of MR WILLING, secretary to the Devonport Gas Company. The deceased was 69 years of age, and on the 24th was driving home with her husband and daughter from Roborough in a one-horse carriage. On the road the horse shied at something and bolted down Dereford-hill. A pony trap was in front, but that MR WILLING succeeded in avoiding. The carriage of Mr F. Fox was, however, coming up the hill, and, notwithstanding all efforts to the contrary, a collision ensued. The vehicle driven by MR WILLING was violently overturned, and deceased and her daughter were pitched into the footpath, the head of the deceased coming in contact with the stone wall. After the collision the runaway horse again started off, and ran some distance before MR WILLING could regain control. Returning to his wife and daughter, MR WILLING found that the former was the most severely injured, the latter escaping with a severe shaking and several bruises. They were taken home in a cab and for a day or two the condition of the deceased did not occasion any alarm. Under the care of Dr Row she appeared to improve, but afterwards became worse, death resulting on Saturday morning. Evidence to the foregoing effect was given by MR WILLING and by Mr J. Randle, saddler, of Stonehouse, who was passing at the time of the mishap. Mr J. H. Anstis, from whom the horse and carriage were borrowed, stated that the horse had been in his possession about a month and he had driven it several times and found it free from vice. The only complaint made about it was that it was rather slow. - Dr Row stated that when he was called to see the deceased he found her suffering from severe bruises about the front part of the head, and conscious only in a slight degree. He considered the case very precarious, but the deceased rallied and he had grounds for hoping that she would recover. Afterwards, however, she was seized with convulsions, which continued with but slight cessation to the time of her death. The immediate cause of death was concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Child Poisoning At Plymouth. A Mother Charged With Murder. - Mr Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Wellington Hotel, Wellington-street, last evening, as to the death of the male illegitimate child, aged 1 month, of EMMA STAPLETON. This was an adjourned Inquiry from last Saturday, when the mother stated that she had given the child some borax for the thrush and diarrhoea. She had nursed it herself. On Saturday it became restless and died. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, stated that on Sunday morning, about eleven o'clock he went to 33 Providence-street, where STAPLETON resides. He did not find her at home. The key was in the lock and some neighbours informed him that she was gone to Mrs Martyr's, who resides at 18 Nelson-street. He went to this place and found the mother of deceased there. He told her that she must return to her room, as the doctor was coming to examine deceased. She began to cry and appeared in great trouble. He tried to comfort and encourage her. He told her that the doctor's examination would be for her benefit if it were "all right". He accompanied her to her residence, and on arriving she said "I am sorry, but I ought to have told you before; I gave the child some spirits of salts in mistake for lump borax." Witness said that spirits of salts was liquid. She then produced an unused teapot and abstracted a small paper parcel containing borax, and said that the lump she dissolved was much larger than the one produced. She did not know one from the other. Witness told her that she should have stated it to the Coroner at the Inquest on Saturday. She pleased in excuse that she was excited. He told her that it was at her discretion to inform the doctor of this circumstance. On Monday morning he went to her again and asked her where and when she had bought the salts. She replied several months ago at Mr Balkwill's. There was a label on it marked "Poison". She used it for iron moulds in linen. - Ellen Martyr, 18 Nelson-street, stated that STAPLETON had been engaged by her charring for the past two years. Witness knew that she was unmarried, but not that she had had an illegitimate children until the deceased was born. On Saturday about 11 a.m. she came to witness, saying that her child was very ill and making a curious noise in its throat. Previously she had heard that deceased was suffering from thrush and diarrhoea. After the child had died the mother told witness a story similar to that related by Mr Manning. - William Square, F.R.C.S., stated that he had made a post-mortem examination. The child was well nourished and of a fair size for its age. Decomposition had commenced. He questioned the mother previous to the examination and she told him about the poison. The stomach contained some black blood, which was very thick. He had no doubt that the child died from an irritant poison, the base of which he believed to be oxalic acid. It might have been salts of lemon, which contains a small quantity of oxalate. He should think that a large quantity had been administered, and that it was swallowed immediately. He could not ascertain how long the poison had been administered before the child died. It had severe thrush and diarrhoea. When he questioned the mother she volunteered the statement that deceased had had poison by misadventure. The appearance of salts and borax was identical. STAPLETON was requested to say anything she wished, but she declined. - The Coroner remarked that the doctor's evidence was unquestionable that the child died from poison, and, on her own confession, administered by the mother. He had not asked the doctor whether the salts of lemon was marked poison. [Mr Square: She told me so.] The Coroner added that the question of mistake was out of the province of the Jury; it was for a judge and jury to decide in some other place. - The Jury, after about an hour's deliberation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder of her Child" against EMMA STAPLETON. She was immediately given into the custody of the police, and was committed on the Coroner's warrant for trial at the assizes. Mr Davy was Foreman of the Jury and Chief-Constable Wreford watched the case on behalf of the police.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 7 July 1881
MILTON DAMEREL - Fatal Accident Near Holsworthy. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Coroner Fulford on the body of MR GEORGE WONNACOTT, of Oxenparks, Milton Damerell, near Holsworthy, farmer, and shoemaker, who died on Tuesday from the effects of injuries sustained, on the previous afternoon, whilst in charge of two horses and a waggon at Thornbury. It appears, from the statements of two children who were present when the accident occurred, that the horses suddenly started off, and on WONNACOTT endeavouring to stop them he was caught in the wheels and dragged for a considerable distance on the ground. Assistance was soon at hand, and the poor fellow was conveyed to his home, where his injuries were attended to by Dr Ash, of Holsworthy, and that gentleman then pronounced them to be not of a very serious nature. During the night convulsions set in and before Dr Ash arrived to see him the next morning, MR WONNACOTT died. The deceased leaves a widow and seven children. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 July 1881
PLYMOUTH - Strange Death In Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry last evening at the Passage House Inn, Cattedown, relative to the death of JOHN HOLLAND, a quarryman, aged 40 years. William Nicholson, mason, residing at Cattedown, said deceased on Tuesday morning came to work at Arch Quarry as usual. He worked for an hour and then stopped. Witness saw him again at half-past one in the quarry. The deceased at that time appeared very strange in his manner, and looked as if he had been drinking. He remained in the quarry for two hours, loitering about. Witness advised him to go home, and he left the quarry for that purpose, going up a "slope." When he reached the top of the "slope", where there was a fall of about 16 feet, the deceased fell over. Witness, on looking up, saw him staggering, and said to him "Look up, JACK," and with that the deceased fell over the rock backwards, pitching at the bottom on the back part of his head. The deceased became unconscious and blood oozed from his mouth and nose as well as from a wound in the back part of his head. Thinking deceased was dead, he removed him to his house. Mr Harper was sent for, and on his arrival, twenty minutes later, he pronounced life extinct. - Richard Cory, landlord of the Passage House Inn, said that at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday the deceased came into his house with two other men and called for three pints of beer, which were given him. He drank one pint, and witness then noticed that the deceased appeared to have had enough. The deceased asked witness to draw him some more, but he refused. The deceased then went to sleep until about quarter to two, when he woke up and left the house. Deceased complained of his head being very bad, and witness advised him to go home. He considered that, apart from the drink, the deceased was suffering in his head; the deceased appeared very strange. - P.C. Setters also gave evidence. - J. Martin, quarryman, gave corroborative evidence, and added that during the whole of Monday afternoon deceased was working in the sun without a hat, and witness believed he had received a sunstroke. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was no doubt the deceased's head was bad, and that he was suffering from a giddiness in the head previous to having the beer which probably accelerated that giddiness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 July 1881
TORQUAY - At Torquay yesterday Dr H. Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM JAMES POPE, tinplate worker, who on Wednesday night fell from the West of England fire engine whilst returning from Broadlands, where an alarm of fire had been raised, and was picked up lifeless. It appeared that deceased was riding on the splinter-bar when he fell; on being examined by Mr Branfoot, house-surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, it was found that the lower jaw was broken and the upper jaw smashed, death ensuing from haemorrhage. The Jury having returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," requested the manager of the engine (Mr Chilcott) to prevent the engine being over-crowded, and the men from riding in such a position as that in which deceased was sitting.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 July 1881
ILFRACOMBE - Inquiry was made at Ilfracombe yesterday by Mr Toller, County Coroner, as to the death of the young man HORACE DONALD PURFITT, whose body was found on the previous day on Carn Top, with a revolver in one hand, under circumstances reported yesterday. The deceased was a clerk at the Crystal Palace, and the police, having communicated with the company, put in a telegram which they had received in reply. It stated that the deceased was absent without leave, but that all his papers and accounts were quite correct; a strangeness had, however, been noticed about the deceased in small matters. A sister of the deceased, with whom he lodged in London, said he was in no trouble, neither was he strange in his mind, but he left his situation because he was tired of it. She attributed the death to accident. An Open Verdict of "Found Dead" was returned, the Jury expressing an opinion that there was no suspicion of foul play.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 July 1881
TOPSHAM - Suicide At Topsham. - The County Coroner, (Mr T. Burrow), held an Inquest at Topsham yesterday as to the death of JAMES BAKER, formerly a farmer of Exminster, but who lately resided in Topsham, who committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. - HARRIET BAKER, daughter of deceased, said on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock she heard her father groan, and she immediately called Mr James Ponsford. Mr Ponsford said that on going to the bedroom he saw blood about and a razor. Witness immediately sent for Dr Bothwell. Deceased was quite unconscious. After attending to MR BAKER, Dr Bothwell ordered him to be removed to the Hospital. - Jane Heales said she accompanied the deceased on his way to the Hospital. The deceased said he was "restless" and troubled and repeated the words "Lord have mercy upon me and my children." When about 2 ½ miles from Topsham witness saw the unfortunate man was dead, and he was removed to his home again. Dr Bothwell said that when he examined MR BAKER he found a deep gash on the right side of the throat. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 July 1881
PLYMSTOCK - Fatal Accident In Cattewater. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the New Inn, Turnchapel, as to the death of GEORGE ALLEN, aged 53, who was killed in Cattewater on the previous day. The Coroner, in his opening remarks, acknowledged the promptness of Dr Jacob in going to the beach and attending to the deceased as soon as he was brought ashore. The case, he remarked, was made more painful from the fact that deceased left a widow and five children. - John Brown, seaman on board the ketch Lion, now lying in Cattewater, said deceased was master of her. On Tuesday he was engaged in shipping timber and had been accustomed to this work. In the afternoon he was in the act of "bearing" the raft, when he fell from the gangway, alighting on his forehead on the raft. Witness conveyed him ashore and Dr Jacobs came in a boat to see him. He was insensible up to death, which took place about twenty minutes after the accident. - James Jacob, surgeon, stated that on Tuesday, about 1.15 p.m., he saw deceased at the beach. He was insensible and his skull was fractured, which was sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the widow.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 27 July 1881
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall last evening, before Mr L. Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN STEVENS, aged 50, a pensioner and a resident of Plymouth. Deceased fell down suddenly in Bridge-street on the previous afternoon. He was at once taken into the White Ball, and under the direction of Mr Reddopp, surgeon, who was immediately sent for, measures were taken to restore animation, but without success. Deceased was afterwards conveyed to Mr Davey's Wheat Sheaf Inn. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 July 1881
TOPSHAM - Shocking Boat Accident At Topsham. Four Children Drowned. - Mr F. Burrows, of Cullompton, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Topsham yesterday on three children named NORTON (two girls and a boy) who, with a fourth whose body has not been found, were drowned on Sunday under distressing circumstances. From the evidence of JOHN NORTON, seaman, of Topsham, father of two of the deceased, it appeared that on Sunday afternoon NORTON and his wife went out in a boat, accompanied by seven boys and girls, two of whom were his brother's children. The boat was rowed to Turf, and on the way back a sail was hoisted. A puff of wind blew off the witness's hat, and he put the boat "about" at the same time telling one of the boys to pick up the hat. When the hat had floated alongside, all the children rushed to make grasp at it, and a sudden lurch caused the boat to capsize, all the nine occupants of it being thrown into the water. NORTON seized two of the girls, named MAY and ALICE, carried them into shallow water and told them to hold on to a paddle while he went to the help of the others, who were clinging to the overturned boat. He then brought ashore his wife and one of his sons, and on returning again found that only one of the remaining four children (a boy) was visible. He took the lad safely to land. Meanwhile little MAY had let go her hold of the paddle and had disappeared. MAY'S body and those of two out of three who were washed off the boat were recovered, but that of a fourth child - a boy named CHARLES - had not been found at the time of holding the Inquest. The bodies bore marks of mutilation by crabs. - MR NORTON, in answer to the Jury, said the sail had nothing to do with the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the two bereaved families. The ages of the children drowned were:- WILLIAM, 14; MAY, 6; LAURA, 6; and CHARLES, 3.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 28 July 1881
LYDFORD - The Fatal Accident At Lydford. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Manor Hotel, Lydford, touching the death of MISS ELIZA ICELY SHEPPARD, late of Buckland-terrace, Plymouth, aged forty-nine years, who fell into the River Lyd on the afternoon of the previous day. Mr Phillips, solicitor, of Plymouth, watched the proceedings on behalf of the relatives of the deceased. Mr J. Whiteway acted as Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner said they had met, under exceedingly painful circumstances, to Inquire in what manner the deceased had met with her death. She was a lady who had taken an interest in every good work in Plymouth, and was celebrating the anniversary of the Charles' Church Lay Help Association when the melancholy accident befel her, which he had no hesitation in saying the Jury would certify to be the cause of death after they had heard the evidence. - Alma Rogers stated: I was a housemaid in the service of the deceased. The party left Plymouth to visit Lydford by the 11.20 a.m. train. Soon after arriving at Lydford I went to the Gorge with the deceased and four other ladies. The company was divided into several parties. We were walking along a narrow part of the path, having already passed the most dangerous portion of the Gorge, when the deceased, thinking she could get along easier, walked sideways, turning her back to the river. She must have inadvertently stepped too near the brink of the path backwards and fallen into the river, a depth of about 16 ft. Certainly no one pushed her. The water of the Lyd was very low at the time. I saw the deceased catch in a bush, then turn over and fall into the water, striking her head against a large rock. - By Mr Phillips: The path is dangerous unless people have plenty of nerve, but I do not consider it at all dangerous so far as I am personally concerned. I think if the deceased had not turned to the wall she might have gone along safely. We certainly passed more dangerous places before the accident occurred. The deceased wore galoshes. - Mr John Richard White deposed: I heard a shriek, and, on turning round, saw the body of deceased emerging from the abutment of a large rock and fall head foremost into the river. I at once ran to the other side of the river and, with the assistance of the Rev. Mr Fillow, picked her up. We moved her to a higher portion of the bank, but she soon died, after groaning once or twice. She was perfectly motionless. - Mr W. C. Northey deposed that death resulted from dislocation of the neck and laceration of the spinal cord. - Mr Phillips, who had asked Mr White several questions relative to the safety of the gorge, explained that he did not wish in any way to reflect upon the owner - Mr Radford - who so very kindly threw the place open to the public, and he certainly hoped what had transpired would not induce that gentleman to close the gorge. His sole object in dwelling on the subject was that elderly people and those of nervous temperament should know that the gorge was not a place that it would be judicious for them to frequent. Of course it was perfectly understood that when visitors availed themselves of Mr Radford's kindness and inspected the gorge they did so entirely on their own responsibility with regard to consequences. - Mr White added that those who had visited the spot wondered the deceased had not caught hold of the boughs which overhang the river, but she appeared to have had a waterproof cloak over her arm, which probably prevented her from saving herself. - The Coroner remarked that many thousands of people had gone through the gorge within the past few years and this was the first fatal accident which had occurred there. He thought the evidence showed plainly that no one was to blame. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," entirely exempting everyone from blame. They also expressed, through Mr Phillips, their deepest sympathy with the friends of the deceased lady. Mr Radford's gardener said he wished it to be distinctly understood that the accident occurred half-a-mile from the Gorge and not, as had been intimated by the evidence, in the Gorge itself.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 August 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening, at the No Place Inn, Eldad, as to the death of ALICE MAUDE LILIAN FURSMAN, aged 3 years. - Sarah Jane Reeves, aunt of deceased, residing at the Wolsden Inn, Wolsden-street, stated that deceased's father was at Madras and her mother at Brixham for the benefit of her health, and on this account deceased was entrusted to witness's care. She had been in very good health, but at noon on Sunday she was seized with a fit and died within a quarter of an hour. A doctor was called, but he arrived after death. Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, deposed to the condition of the body. There were no external marks. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Rogers was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated the aunt from all blame. Mrs Reeves afterwards informed the Jury that the deceased was the seventh child that had died young in one family, three of them from convulsions.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 August 1881
DAWLISH - An Inquest was held at Dawlish on Monday, before Dr Gaye, County Coroner, as to the death of JAMES COOPER COOPER, aged 66, a gentleman of Torquay, but who for the past fortnight had been residing at 3 Piermont-place, Dawlish, with his three daughters. Deceased was a medical man, but did not practice, and for eight years had resided at Torquay. Having been in the closet an unusual time on Sunday morning he was found dead, with his head leaning against the door. The medical evidence showed that the deceased suffered from heart disease and disease of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Last evening the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Prison into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM POOLEY, aged 52. - Mr W. Brewer, acting governor of the prison, said he received the prisoner under a warrant dated the 29th July. Prisoner was sentenced to seven days' imprisonment in default of a fine imposed for drunkenness. Deceased did not appear ill on his admission. On Monday morning it was reported to witness that the deceased was ill, and from that time up to his death the deceased was under the special care of the medical officer. He died that morning. - Mr s. Wolferstan, surgeon to the prison, said that the deceased came under his care at twelve o'clock on Monday morning, and he had seen the prisoner twice before in the usual routine of his duty. He was partially unconscious and suffering from the effects of an apoplectic seizure. He gave instructions for the removal of the deceased to the infirmary, and the necessary treatment and paid several visits subsequently. He believed death resulted from cerebral haemorrhage. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 August 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident To A Stonehouse Boy. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, Stonehouse, as to the death of JOHN PALMER, aged 7, who died from injury to the brain received whilst at play. From the evidence of Richard A. H. Lancaster, aged 10, it appeared that on Monday four weeks he and three other boys, among whom was deceased, went to one of the tea-houses at Milehouse. Lancaster was in a swing which was going at a rapid rate when deceased ran in front of it and was struck in the head. Lancaster picked him up and took him to his home at No. 11, St. Mary-street. The mother of the deceased stated that her boy told her when he came home that he was chasing a butterfly when he was knocked down by a swing. She did not think the blow was serious as the deceased did not complain of any pain, and for the following ten days went out to play as usual, but, becoming worse, she sent for Mr Bulteel, surgeon. Mr Bulteel having attributed death to the injury to the head, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 5 August 1881
BICKINGTON - Suicide Near Newton. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Wrigwell, Bickington, near Newton, by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, as to the death of MR W. FURNEAUX, brother-in-law to and residing with Mr Bickford at Wrigwell. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was a gentleman of means, had been in a low state of mind for some time, and on Wednesday morning he went to his bedroom soon after breakfast and, getting partly into a cupboard, shot himself in the head, death being instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity."

The Suicide At Plymouth Cemetery. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Boardroom, Plymouth Cemetery, as to the death of JOHN HENRY DAVIDSON, aged 50, a merchant seaman, who committed suicide in the Cemetery on Tuesday last. Mr T. C. Brian watched the Inquiry on behalf of Messrs. Jenkins and Co., of Lime-street, London and Mr Rickard, captain of the ship from which deceased had been recently discharged. - HANNAH DAVIDSON, wife of deceased and residing at 20 Cambridge-street, stated that deceased left his home on Tuesday morning about ten o'clock, stating that he was going for a walk, but she had not seen him since. He was not a pensioner, nor had he ever held the licence of a public-house in Richmond-street or elsewhere. [These questions were in consequence of erroneous statements in one of the local papers.] In may last he was discharged from the Merionethshire. He had been very despondent and low-spirited since. Examined by Mr Brian: She had been married several years, and had had two children. About three years ago deceased was a cabman in Plymouth and fell from his cab. When he had recovered from the effects of the accident a lady introduced him to Captain Rickard, who obtained a berth for him on board the Merionethshire. This ship was a large iron steamer, trading between Plymouth and New York. When in the Suez Canal about two years ago the ship grounded and the anchor "gave way," and the boatswain and deceased were injured. On recovering from this accident he obtained a voyage in another ship to Hongkong, where he again joined the Merionethshire. He was not an intemperate man. Since May last he had been in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital for two months, and afterwards under the care of Dr Eyeley. He complained of the conduct of Captain Rickard once, but she thought that he was "wandering." While he was in the Hospital she received £7 from the owners of the ship. - Mr Brian: Did you ever receive any money from the owners since May last, because I am requested to state that the owners did not know where he was? - No; because we did not think it was any good asking. - The Coroner read the letters found in the pocket of the deceased. They were very long, but the gist of them will appear from the following extract. Deceased wrote:- "May the curse of the window and the fatherless attend you by night and day. May the remorse of a conscience, if you have any, be yours as long as you draw breath, and finally may the curse f the 109th Psalm attend you, persecutor. And may the curse of a dying man haunt you by night and day. Trusting in God's mercy to forgive me for this deed, but the sin will be yours. You allowed the Falmouth men their passage money up, why not me? Because the owner is M.P. for Falmouth. Is not that corrupting the borough? Some of these men had votes at the general election and the mate was telegraphed for to London to come down and vote. Who paid his expenses? Not very likely himself. If I had been a Falmouth man I should have been differently treated, and whatever my fate may be the sin lies with you. You have driven me to destruction and the Lord will punish you before you die." This was addressed to Captain Rickard. - Thomas Ash, who is employed at the Cemetery, stated that he saw deceased about 11 a.m. on Tuesday walking in the Church ground. He was alone. - William Wingfield, gate-keeper at the Cemetery, stated that he saw deceased hanging to a tree about 12.30 p.m., near the boundary wall. He was hanging by his scarf, and was about eight feet from the ground. Witness immediately cut him down, but he was dead and cold, but not rigid. - Several of the Jurors wished to see the tree and Mr Wingfield escorted them to the spot. - Joseph F. Eyeley, M.R.C.S., stated that he had prescribed for deceased about three years ago, and also during the past month. He suffered from congestion of the brain, and was of unsound mind. - Mr Brian said that he was instructed to repudiate the charges in the letters found upon deceased. Captain Rickard and the owners had been very kind to him. He should ask the Jury to give no credence to the letters. - The Coroner endorsed all Mr Brian had said, and the Jury of whom Mr Moule was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind," and paid no regard to the letters.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 August 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Bruising A Finger At Devonport. - The Devonport Borough Coroner, (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday with reference to the death of a journeyman mason, named SAMUEL FREDERICK HANNAFORD, residing at 6 Tavistock-road, Stoke. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Smith, builder, Stoke, and on the 22nd July he was engaged on behalf of Mr Ralph, ironmonger, Stoke, to fix a new hot-plate on a stove at the residence of Mr Ross, Home Park Villa, Stoke. Whilst fitting the plate he jammed the second finger of his left hand between the heavy plate and the bar of the grate. It pained him considerably at the time, and he seemed a little faint, but the finger was bound up for him and he went on with the work and finished it. The skin was not broken, but there was a small clot of blood under the nail. Deceased, however, continued working until Tuesday lat. He squeezed some blood from under the finger-nail, and that relieved the pain, but on Tuesday morning his breathing was very bad and afterwards he went to the Hospital. The finger was a little swollen and the deceased said he was afraid he should lose the nail, but he apprehended nothing worse. - Mr Winwood Smith, the assistant house-surgeon, said deceased was admitted on Wednesday afternoon, suffering from tetanus or lockjaw, the result of injury to the third finger of the left hand. He received the usual treatment. Had the deceased seen a surgeon directly after the injury it was not probable that his life would have been saved. There were probably constitutional causes which predisposed the patient to tetanus. The symptoms first shewed themselves on Monday and deceased died on Thursday morning. MRS HANNAFORD, wife of deceased, said her husband came home and said he had knocked is finger with a stone, and she put a poultice to it and tied it up. He complained of pain the next morning, but went to work on Saturday. On Monday the finger seemed easier, but deceased complained that his tongue was sore and he could not eat. On Tuesday he was worse and his speech grew thick. Previously deceased had been in good health so far as she knew. On Wednesday she sent for Mr Tom, who recommended him into the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from Lockjaw, the result of an Accidental Injury to the finger.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 9 August 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry last evening, at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH CALLIGHAN, aged about eighty-three years. Mary Merrifield said she was a widow and lived at 1 Looe-lane. She knew deceased, who occupied a room in the same house, where she had been living about seven years. Deceased had been in failing health for some time, and had been under medical care. Witness last saw her alive on Saturday night, about quarter-past ten. No one stopped up with deceased at night. Witness went to her room the next morning, at eight o'clock, to give her, her breakfast, but, upon going to the bed, witness found that the poor woman was dead. Witness thought she must have passed off in her sleep. MRS CALLIGHAN was in receipt of 3s. a week, with a pound of meat, as out-door relief. Witness knew she had a great repugnance to entering the Workhouse, and had heard her say if ever she had to do so she hoped she would die the same day. All deceased's neighbours had been very kind to her. - Edward Michael Prynne, M.R.C.S., said he was one of the district medical officers, and had been attending deceased for about two years. She was suffering from a cancer, and that, combined with exhaustion, was the cause of death. She mentioned to him before her death the fact that her neighbours had been very kind to her. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 August 1881
EXMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday as to the death of the boy BELMANNO, who was drowned on Friday while bathing. The body was recovered after it had been under water for about 20 minutes. A verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 August 1881
TORQUAY - Yesterday at Torquay, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned at an Inquiry held before Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of JOHN HOBBS, a sawyer, of Torquay. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was going home on Thursday night the worse for liquor, when he stumbled against a door leading to a steep flight of steps. There being no fastening to the door it swung back and the man was precipitated down the steps. After falling a short distance he rolled under the protecting railings and fell over the edge of the steps into a courtyard below, a distance of forty feet. He was immediately picked up, but was dead, his skull having been shattered by the fall.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 August 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - Sad Bathing Fatality At Newton. - On Saturday morning a sad bathing fatality occurred at Newton. Between seven and eight o'clock a party consisting of WILLIAM JOHN FINGLE HOLMES, 24 years of age, a cashier at the Newton Bank of Messrs. Watts and Co.; the Rev. G. C. Percival, United Methodist Free Church minister; Thomas Olver, a clerk in the employ of Messrs. Vicary and Sons; a young man named Lees, and a younger brother of MR HOLMES, went to the river Teign near Buckland Point, and about a mile from Newton, for the purpose of bathing, with the exception of Mr Percival, who only went as a spectator, having a severe cold. On arriving at the spot MR HOLMES was the first to enter the water and he had to go some twenty yards from the bank before the water was up to his depth. The tide was running at an exceptionally rapid rate, and it carried him off his feet. He called for help and Mr Percival, who was on the bank, pulled off his coat and pluckily sprang in, being the only one of the party who could swim; but the current was so strong that he had to return to the bank, and take off the remainder of his clothes. he then swam out to the deceased, and caught him by the hair of his head as he was sinking for the third time. Mr Percival tried to swim ashore with him, but could not, and after holding him up for four or five minutes both began to sink and Mr Percival having had to let go his hold barely escaped with his own life. He reached the shore in a very exhausted condition. The body of deceased was recovered about four hours later, and conveyed to his father residence in Newton Bushell. Deceased's father is managing clerk to Messrs. Pinsent and Sons, brewers, and the deceased had been a clerk at the Newton Bank for some years. By his affable manner he had won the respect of all who came in contact with him. An Inquest was held on the body at the Seven Stars Hotel by Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned, the Jury expressing their deep sympathy with the bereaved family.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 August 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Dangerous Places At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for the Borough of Devonport, held an Inquest last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital upon the body of FREDERICK JAMES WALTERS, aged 6 years, who was killed on Monday evening by a fall over the rocks at the back of Baker's-place, in Richmond-walk. Deceased, whose parents reside at 34 Monument-street, went with another little boy to play at Mount Wise. Whilst there he clambered out upon the rocks overhanging the quarry in Richmond-walk, slipped and fell into the quarry, a distance of sixty feet. Some men employed on the railway works, who did not witness the fall, found him shortly afterwards sitting in the quarry, with his right leg doubled under him. He was able to say where he lived and was removed to his home. Dr Row was sent for and found that the right thigh was broken and that there were severe internal injuries. Deceased was afterwards removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died within half an hour of his admission. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and suggested whether some fencing might not be put around the spot over which the boy fell, other fatalities having previously occurred there. The Coroner promised that he would communicate with the Major-General Commanding, but remarked that children would wilfully go into danger around there, notwithstanding all the efforts of the sentry on duty. A Juror asked whether they could not make further representations to the Town Council on the subject of the Park railings. The Coroner replied that he had not lost sight of the matter, nor of the fact that another fatal accident occurred by a fall into the trench.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 23 August 1881
BARNSTAPLE - Bathing Fatality. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Barnstaple, on the body of a lad, twelve years of age, named WILLIAM PILE. He went out bathing with two or three other lads of the same age on the River Taw. The deceased got out first and attempted to swim to a sand bank in the middle of the river contrary to the wish of his companions. He was about to return before reaching the bank, when he stopped swimming and finding he could not touch the bottom, he became frightened. A lad named Robins swam out to his assistance and catching him by the hair dragged him in some distance, but getting his legs in under the deceased's arm he let him go and he sank. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and the Jury complained that the Council did not take steps to provide a bathing-place. The boy Robins was complimented for his pluck.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 24 August 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton Abbot. - Yesterday evening Mr F. Watts (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Newton Cottage Hospital on the body of GEORGE ELLIS a quarryman, who died that morning from the effects of injuries sustained while engaged in ripping stones in a quarry at Wolborough, on Saturday last. - Thomas Wallen, a carter, stated that he saw the deceased ripping stones with a bar which he had in his right hand. He was catching hold of a rope with the other. He saw a large stone fall on the deceased, knocking him down. He called the other quarrymen who were at work in an adjoining quarry, and they put ELLIS in a cart and took him to the Hospital. Dr Haydon said that he examined ELLIS when he was brought to the Hospital, and found that the fleshy part of the body was much injured, and that he was suffering severely from a lacerated thigh. That morning witness proceeded to amputate the thigh, but ELLIS died before the operation was completed. The Jury returned a verdict of "~Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the Hospital.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest at Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Pear Tree Inn, Tavistock-street, relative to the death of ALBERT JOHN WILSON, aged four months, infant son of MARY WILSON, residing in Tavistock-street. The evidence brought forward showed that the child had been well until yesterday, when it was found dead in its bed. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 August 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport last evening an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, on the body of PERCY EDGAR WILLIAMS, aged 4 months. The child, whose parents reside in Tavistock-street, Stoke had been healthy since birth, but yesterday morning was found dead in bed. Dr Rolson, having made a post-mortem examination of the body, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from convulsions, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 25 August 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest yesterday at Westaway's Market House Inn, Stonehouse, on the body of AGNES ROSE STUTTAFORD, who died early on Monday morning from injuries received by a fall. RICHARD ANDREW STUTTAFORD, a retired warrant officer of Her Majesty's Navy, said he resided at 32 Caroline-place, Stonehouse. The deceased, who was his wife, was 48 years of age. On Thursday evening, about seven o'clock, witness and his wife were in the garden. His wife, who was picking some beans, was standing near the end of the parapet, which was about fourteen feet deep. Witness suddenly heard a sort of rustling among the bushes, and on turning round he saw his wife falling over the parapet. Witness immediately went down to her and found her lying on her back in a helpless condition. She was, however, sensible. With the assistance of neighbours she was taken home and a medical gentleman sent for. - Mr Leah, M.R.C.S., deposed that he was called on Thursday evening to see the deceased, who was suffering from a very severe scalp wound extending across the forehead and from ear to ear. The wound might have been caused by a fall. Her lower extremities were paralysed from the effects of injuries to the spine. The case was a hopeless one from the first. Deceased was under witness's care until her death. The cause of death, to best of witness's belief, was injury to spine caused by the fall. - William Cook, residing at the house adjoining that of the deceased stated that on Thursday evening he was in his garden, when he heard a crashing of wood. He looked over the parapet and noticed MRS STUTTAFORD on the wires beneath. The Jury, of whom Mr Roberts was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time recommending that the landlord of the house should be asked to protect the parapet, so that a similar accident might be avoided.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 August 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquiry was made by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the death of MICHAEL MARTIN, aged 24, able seaman of H.M.S. Britomart. Deceased was found insensible at the bottom of No. 1 dock, Keyham, on Wednesday last. Edward Hammerton, quartermaster of the Britomart, deposed to seeing deceased about 1.15 p.m. on the day in question, standing on the top of the dock. The place where he was picked up was directly underneath. The hands had been piped on deck and it was feared that in hastening to get on board, deceased slipped and fell over. Mr Cooke, boatswain's mate, on board the same ship, gave evidence as to finding the deceased at the bottom of the dock. He was then unconscious and was conveyed to the surgery, and afterwards to the Royal Naval Hospital. Witness had seen him about twelve o'clock previously, and he was sober. Mr H. Crocker, surgeon, stated that deceased was admitted to the Hospital in the afternoon suffering from a fracture of the base of the skull. He died about 6 p.m. The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from the effects of a fall, but how he fell into the dock there is no evidence to show."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 27 August 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Recent Accident At Plymouth. Fatal Results. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Guildhall, into the facts connected with the death of ARTHUR WEBSTER, aged eleven years, who expired on Thursday night from the effects of injuries received by a bell falling on him. A double Jury had been summoned for the occasion. Several of the committee of the Plymouth Public School were present, among them being Major Briggs, vice-president, and Mr Cecil Bewes, J.P., and Mr J. N. Bennett. - The Coroner remarked that he was glad to see members of the School Committee present, as it showed they took an interest in the school. After viewing the body, the Jury resolved to visit the scene of the occurrence, and inspect the place from which the bell fell. After returning, MR WILLIAM WEBSTER, residing in Providence-street, waiter in the Naval Hospital, was called, and deposed that he last saw his son alive about nine o'clock on Wednesday morning. Mr Charles S. Jago, jun., assistant-master of the Plymouth Public School, stated that about two minutes before two o'clock on Wednesday afternoon he was in Cobourg-street, going towards the school entrance. He heard the bell ringing. When about fifteen yards from the school entrance the bell stopped. Witness was talking to Miss Jago at the time. Immediately afterwards he heard the bell fall on the pavement. Went towards the scene, and observed WEBSTER lying on the ground. Witness picked him up, and took him into Mr Hifley's shop, on the opposite side of the street. he did not see the other boy. - By the Coroner: The bell was put in its place on July 27, 1876, in the same turret, under the direction and supervision of Mr Treleaven. At Midsummer twelve months the bell was thoroughly overhauled and a new loop put in, the former one being worn. A model of the bar to which the ell was fastened was then produced and Mr Jago said that the cannon was fastened to a pair of jaws by means of a bolt, which went through it. - By the Coroner: The duty of ringing the bell was allotted to the senior monitors. There was nothing unusual in its being rung. - John Benson, stipendiary monitor at the Plymouth Public School, gave evidence to the effect that he was engaged in ringing on Wednesday, assisted by four others. It took four or five small boys to ring the bell. - Dr Bampton, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that shortly after 2 p.m. on Wednesday he saw the deceased lad TRIBBLE. He was unconscious and suffering from a compound fracture of the skull. He had a large fracture on the right side of his head, from which the brains were protruding. Witness noticed another fracture on the top of the deceased's head. TRIBBLE lingered until yesterday morning about ten o'clock when he died. WEBSTER was brought to the Hospital about a quarter-of-an-hour afterwards. TRIBBLE'S skull was fractured right across the top, and there was another fracture a little to the left. The injuries were such as might have been caused by the bell falling upon him from such a height. - James Smith deposed that about the time previously mentioned he was passing the Plymouth Public School with a handcart. He noticed the bell stop ringing, and saw it fall on the two boys, knocking them down. Other witnesses were examined, and an Inquest was then held on the body of ANDREW TRIBBLE, aged 10, living in Ebrington-street, whose death resulted from injuries received in a like manner. - Richard Whitelock, assistant of Mr Hifley, chemist, of Cobourg-street, stated that while standing opposite the entrance to the school on the other side of the road, he saw WEBSTER and TRIBBLE fall. Witness immediately ran over, picked up TRIBBLE and brought him into his master's shop. He did not see the bell. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned in both cases, the Coroner remarking, on behalf of the Jury, that he hoped when the bell was re-erected it would be placed in a less dangerous position, and adding that the Jury wished to convey their deep sympathy to the parents of the children in their sad bereavement. Mr Charles Jago, at the conclusion, remarked that at a meeting of the School Committee, held that day, it was resolved to place the bell in another part of the building. He also said that they had expressed condolence with the deceased boys parents.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 29 August 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT SMALE, labourer, who died suddenly. The daughter of the deceased stated that her father had informed her that he was forty-four years of age, but the Coroner and Jury expressed an opinion that he was much older. He had not been to work since Tuesday, but he received his full week's pay. - P.C. Farmer stated that on Saturday morning, about 6.30 he was on duty in Buckwell-street, when he noticed the deceased standing on the kerb. He was coughing and blood was flowing from his mouth. Witness spoke to him, and asked him where he lived. SMALE informed him and subsequently turned around, reeled and fell into witness's arms, blood still flowing from his mouth. Witness took him to his residence, 28 Howe-street, and sent the daughter for a doctor. Whilst she was absent SMALE, who was sitting in a chair, jumped up and falling into witness's arms, expired. Mr Prynne, M.R.C.S. and parish doctor, said the deceased was on his book as being sixty years of age, had been suffering from heart disease and disease of the lungs, from which he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 August 1881
ASHWATER - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at Ashwater into the cause of death of MR RICHARD JORDAN, a farmer and small shopkeeper, who died suddenly last Friday evening. It appeared that deceased, who, although 73 years old, had enjoyed good health, was mowing with a man named Richard Squire, and after finishing his swath, returned to begin the next, when Squire heard a noise and saw deceased lying on his back dead. It was thought death was caused by apoplexy and a verdict of "Death by Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A sudden death at Plymouth was investigated last evening at an Inquest held by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, at Penaluna's beerhouse, Ham-street. The deceased, ELIZA HEATHERSHIRE, single woman, aged 59 years, was an inmate of the Hele and Lanyon Charity alms-houses, Green-street, and had been in receipt of parish pay since the 15th of November 1879. She had been a strong robust woman, but latterly she had complained of a pain in the side and of giddiness. On Sunday morning about 7.15 she got up and lighted the fire, but whilst blowing it she complained of pain and almost immediately afterwards said, "Oh! my poor head," and fell to the ground. She died almost immediately. - Mr J. F. Eyeley, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, said he found the deceased suffering from chronic pleurisy and an old standing disease of the membranes of the brain. On the base of the brain there was a copious effusion of blood caused through the rupture of a large blood vessel, which was the cause of death. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Smith was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 2 September 1881
TOTNES - The Suspicious Death From Drowning After Totnes Races. - Yesterday morning Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the man identified as JAMES HILTON, of Oldham, Yorkshire, which was picked up in the Dart on Wednesday morning. - The Jury having viewed the body, the Coroner asked the superintendent of police what evidence he had of identification. The Superintendent replied he had none. The man Robinson, who identified the body, had promised him he would attend the Inquest if held that day, but he now understood he had left the town. He told him the deceased was called JAMES HILTON. The evidence of Superintendent Clarke was then taken. he said he was called about half-past six on Wednesday morning to see the body. On making a search he found some cards, a £10 "flash" note, and 17s. in silver, and a halfpenny. He thought one of the half-crows was also "flash." Nothing whatever was found upon the body to identify the deceased. he had no hat on. He saw the deceased the previous night in the street about 10 o'clock. Some people came from Plymouth the previous day and examined the body. They said a young man had gone from Plymouth to the races, but had not returned. They found, however, he was a stranger to them. - In reply to the Coroner, the Superintendent said he heard no more of the matter during the night. - Mr L. Hains, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased about seven o'clock on Wednesday morning. He examined him and found he had evidently been in the water some hours. There was a bruise over one eye and two small wounds on each temple. They were punctured wounds. He found gravel on the hands, which were partly clenched. Deceased's trousers were torn on each leg, but it appeared the rents had been caused by the deceased coming a stone or something hard, and not by a struggle. - The coroner then requested Mr Hains to make a more minute examination of the deceased to see if there were any marks of violence under his clothes. This Mr Hains did and he then informed the Coroner there were no marks of violence whatever. He considered death resulted from drowning. From the appearance of deceased's trousers he thought he might have gone towards the river and accidentally fell in. - In reply to the Coroner, the Superintendent said the body was in about two feet of water. It was high tide about 10 o'clock that night. Deceased appeared to be about 40 years of age. The Coroner summed up briefly, concurring with Mr Hains as to the probability of the deceased having accidentally fallen into the river; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 2 September 1881
EXETER - Sudden Death. - As a painter, named CHARLES GREENSLADE, aged 57, was at work yesterday morning at General Saxton's Victoria Park, he was seized with an apoplectic fit and fell down an area. Assistance was soon at hand and GREENSLADE was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but when the house-surgeon saw him life was found to be extinct. At the Inquest, subsequently held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 September 1881
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Fatal Accident At Buckland. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Manor Inn, Buckland Monachorum, yesterday, on the body of WILLIAM STAPLIN, wheelwright, who died from the effects of an accident on Thursday morning. The deceased, who was 41 years old, was last Monday engaged at his Saw Mills in cutting a small piece of timber, when the wood got out of place, and, catching the top of the circular saw, was thrown towards the deceased, whom it struck in the pit of the stomach. The deceased died on Thursday morning, and leaves a widow and several young children. Mr Blowey was elected Foreman of the Jury. - Dr Butters said the deceased was under his care suffering from peritonitis caused by an external blow in the bowels. He died on September 1st, and he saw him the previous day at one, when he had slight hopes of his recovery. From what he had heard of the nature of the accident, he was satisfied that it was sufficient to cause the injuries the deceased suffered from. - Charles Brown, of Lamerton, an apprentice with the deceased, said last Monday he was at work with the deceased at the Saw Mills at Milton Buckland, and at four in the afternoon the deceased was sawing a piece of timber about an inch thick, eight inches wide and seven feet long, through the middle with a circular saw. After the piece had got in about six inches it flew up on the top of the saw in a most unaccountable manner and fell on the teeth again, which were revolving at such a rate that it rebounded and knocked the deceased, who was guiding the timber, in the pit of the stomach. Deceased fell back, and said he had knocked himself. He was taken home in Mr Jeffrey's trap and the doctor reached the house about seven o'clock; the doctor saw him again on Wednesday at one o'clock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 5 September 1881
KINGSWEAR - The Fatal Accident In The Dart. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening by Dr Gaye, County Coroner, at Bunker's Ship Inn, Kingswear, Dartmouth, on the body of MR HENRY JAMES SHAPTER, of London, who met with his death by the capsizing of a boat on the Dart, on Thursday last. - Mr James Paddon was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MRS HILL, wife of Captain Hill, of Dartmouth, identified the body as that of her father. He was seventy-three years of age, and was on a visit to her, having been in Dartmouth about a week. She last saw him on Thursday morning, when he left her house to visit some friends at Dittisham. - Henry Brown, able seaman of H.M.S. Dapper, said that he, in company with three other sailors and the cook of the Dapper, was in a boat returning from Dittisham regatta. Deceased was also given a passage down to Dartmouth. On nearing Anchor Stone, the two men pulling asked to be relieved and in shifting places the boat capsized. Witness swam to the shore, but deceased and a man named Cook were drowned. They borrowed the boat, which was about 10 or 12 ft. long, from a man named Rogers of Dartmouth. They were all sober, and there was no larking or pushing. She was rather a crank boat, but capable of carrying ten persons. - William Egg, another seaman, corroborated. - George Nunn, a mason, proved picking up the body on Friday morning. It was floating near Brookhill, coming down with the tide. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and requested the Coroner to make a presentment to the authorities of Dartmouth on the necessity of having all boats marked with the number they could safely carry, and the men licensed. The Coroner said he should have much pleasure in carrying out the wishes of the Jury. The proceedings then terminated.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 September 1881
MARY TAVY - Inquiry was made at Higher Creason Farm, near Marytavy, on Saturday by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, as to the death of JAMES MAUNDER, whose body was found in the road near Lower Town on Friday morning. The deceased was 87 years of age, and had been driving cattle to Tavistock market. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 September 1881
HONITON - Inquiry was made yesterday at Honiton as to the death of MRS BURROWS of that town, and late of Fluxton, near Ottery St. Mary, who died of injuries sustained by being thrown out of a dogcart on Saturday, the 19th August. MR and MRS BURROWS and their two daughters were coming into Honiton from Plymtree, where they had been on a visit, when the horse fell and the occupants of the vehicle were thrown out, all escaping injury except the deceased, whose left arm was seriously cut and bruised and the bone broken. She lingered through much suffering until last Sunday evening, when she died, at the age of 77 years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

KINGS NYMPTON - An Inquest was held at Kingsnympton, near Southmolton, on Monday last, on the body of a labourer, named HANDFORD, aged 58, and living at Skibbow's Farm with Mr G. Drew. The deceased went out on Friday night to lock up the premises, and did not return. On the following day a straw hat was seen in a marsh near the river Mole, and on search being made the deceased was found in about four feet of muddy water. A few days previous he suddenly exclaimed in his work to another labourer that he would destroy himself, and a verdict was returned that he "Drowned himself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 September 1881
NEWTON ABBOT - Suicide At Newton. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening as to the death of a single man, about 35 years of age, named ALFRED HILL, whose body was found floating in an unused clay pit at Decoy that morning. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had been employed as a porter at the Globe Hotel for several years, but lately had given way to drink and appeared ill. He left the hotel on Monday, the 29th of August, and was last seen on the Wednesday morning following near the pit where he was found. A witness, named James Hibberd, a clay-cutter, was called, and said he was passing the pit about half-past nine o'clock yesterday morning, and saw the body of the deceased floating in the water which filled the pit. He did not then say anything, but went on to the other men and had his breakfast with them and then went back into the town and told P.C. Evans what he had seen and with him went back to the pit and told the other men of it, and they together took the body from the water. Around the neck was tied a handkerchief containing a large stone. The Coroner, in summing up, strongly remarked on the inhuman conduct of Hibberd in leaving the body in the water so long and said it was monstrous that he should have sat quietly a few yards off and had his breakfast. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind," the Foreman endorsing the remarks made by the Coroner on Hibberd's conduct. The Coroner then called up Hibberd, and after again reprimanding him, marked his sense of his conduct by disallowing his expenses as a witness.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 9 September 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Gilbert, Saltash Coroner, held an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, yesterday, on the body of JOSEPH GODDEN, 29 years of age, shoemaker on board H.M.S. Boscawen, Portland, who committed suicide in Hamoaze, Devonport, on Saturday week. The deceased had been under treatment at the Royal Naval Hospital, and was discharged on the previous Tuesday. On the Thursday prior to the suicide he was seized with a fit in the ship where he had been sent to await a passage round to the Boscawen, and was placed under the surgeon's care. Deceased was discharged in the evening as cured. Previous to that he appeared perfectly rational. At about twenty minutes past three on the Saturday morning the sentry on board the Royal Adelaide heard a loud splash in the water, and looking over the side he saw deceased disappear. After procuring a lantern and instituting a search, he found a shoemaker's knife covered in blood, and saw a pool of blood where GODDEN had been sleeping. It is supposed deceased first cut his throat and then jumped overboard, the body being found floating in Hamoaze about five o'clock yesterday morning. The deceased leaves a wife and four children. The Jury returned a verdict that GODDEN committed Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 September 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquest At Plymouth Workhouse. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening into the circumstances attending the death of FRANCIS TOAL, aged 43. - Mr E. G. Dyke, master of the Workhouse, said the deceased was an inmate of the House. He was admitted on the 18th of August as a casual pauper, and was placed in the casual ward, being in a dirty state. On the following day he complained of being unwell and he had the deceased removed to a ward where the doctor saw him. From thence he was sent to the Hospital, where he remained up to the time of his death, which took place on Wednesday at 3.30 a.m. He identified the body of the deceased, who described himself as a seaman. The deceased received every possible care and attention at the hands of Dr Thomas. - John Franks, an inmate of the House, said the deceased was put in the ward over which he was nurse. The deceased told him that he belonged to the schooner Stirling, of Brixham, and that he fell from the jibboom into the water and that the crew picked him up, and turned him ashore. The accident, he said, occurred in Sutton Pool. The deceased since his immersion complained of a pain in his chest. At the request of the deceased he went on board the Stirling to get some tobacco for him. When he got on board the vessel, the crew said the deceased was not right in his head, and he went out on the jibboom and fell over. They did not say whether they brought the deceased on board the vessel after he fell in the water, or if they put him on shore. - The Master, recalled, said the deceased on his admission said he had fallen into the water, but did not then complain of being unwell. - Dr F. A. Thomas, house surgeon at the Workhouse, said that he first saw the deceased on the 19th of August in the receiving ward, into which he had been removed from the casual ward. He was in a very dirty condition, and his clothes had the appearance of having been immersed in water. He appeared to witness to have been drinking heavily, and he was very livid about the lips. He asked him what was the matter with him, and he said "I have fallen overboard." Witness had heard that the deceased threw himself overboard, and he asked him why he did it, and he made no reply. He sent the deceased to the foul ward to be properly cleansed, and after that he examined him. He appeared in a depressed condition, and complained of a pain in the chest. In answer to witness he said he had not received a blow, and witness concluded that he was suffering from congestion of the lungs, and after this inflammation of the lungs set in. He had attended to the deceased since, but he never rallied and he died on Wednesday from inflammation of the lungs accelerated by shock to the system. He thought the inflammation was brought on in the first place by the immersion. The deceased admitted to him that he had been drinking heavily, and his death was accelerated by his intemperate habits. - Wm. Bently, porter at the Workhouse, said the deceased was admitted as a tramp. His clothes were wet, and he believed the deceased had fallen in the water that day. The deceased said he had fallen overboard. He asked the deceased how he had fallen overboard, and he said "I suffer from lightness in the head." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Inflammation of the Lungs, accelerated by shock to the system occasioned by a sudden and accidental immersion." The Jury also unanimously expressed their satisfaction at the kind and considerate treatment which the deceased experienced during his illness.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 12 September 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatality At Stonehouse. - A Jury was empanelled on Saturday at Westaway's Market House Inn, Stonehouse, with the object of viewing the body of MRS MARY ANN ELFORD, of 31 Caroline-place, who died on Thursday from the injuries received in falling over the stairs, and in order to allow of Mr Rodd, the Coroner, granting an order for the burial of the deceased. The husband having deposed as to the identification of the body, Mr Rodd adjourned the Inquiry till Thursday next, observing that he had only that morning had an intimation of the fatality, and as he had previously entered into an engagement which he was bound to fulfil there must necessarily be a postponement. There had not been time to summon the witnesses and he might mention that circumstances had been reported to him that would, under any conditions, have rendered an adjournment imperative.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 September 1881
EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, Exeter, as to the death of CHARLES CONNET, a coachman, residing in Rouse's Court, Paul-street. It appeared that the deceased was 63 years of age, and had been a bed-lier for years, having been suffering from rheumatism. On Saturday night about 6.30 his wife left him in bed reading a prayer-book. Before leaving she gave him a razor, he being in the habit of shaving himself. About eight o'clock he was found dead in bed, having cut his throat. Deceased appeared to have been of a cheerful disposition, but his great suffering is supposed to have affected his mind. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 16 September 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fall At Stonehouse. Unfounded Rumours. - The adjourned Inquest upon the body of MARY ANN ELFORD, the wife of a corporal in the band of the Royal Marines, was resumed yesterday at the Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, before the County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd. The Inquiry was opened on Saturday last, but as serious rumours were afloat that the deceased died from the effect of being thrown over the stairs by her husband, the Coroner took sufficient evidence only to justify the burial of the body, adjourning the Inquest until yesterday for the fullest possible evidence to be brought forward, and giving the husband an opportunity of being legally represented if he so thought fit. - The Coroner, in resuming the Inquiry, warned the Jury against allowing their minds to be prejudiced by the wild rumours which had been circulated in connection with the death of the deceased, but to return an impartial verdict upon the evidence which would be laid before them. MR ELFORD was present at the Inquiry, but he was not legally represented, and offered no remarks during the proceedings. - Elizabeth Rider, the wife of a shipwright, residing at 31 Caroline-place, was called and stated that the deceased and her husband had resided in her house for about two months. On the afternoon of that day week, shortly after three o'clock she heard the deceased fall over the kitchen stairs, which were very steep. Upon going out of her room she found the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs in an insensible condition, with her head against the wall and blood flowing from a wound on the left side of the head. She called for assistance and MR ELFORD, who was in the front parlour, and a tenant in the same house, Mrs Prior, rushed downstairs and carried deceased into the kitchen, and Mr Leah, surgeon, was sent for. Mr Leah attended deceased until her death, which took place the same evening. Deceased never recovered consciousness from the time she was picked up at the bottom of the stairs down to the hour of her death. MR ELFORD was in the house when his wife fell over the stairs. - By the Coroner: Considered the stairs dangerous, but had not complained to the landlord about them. The deceased went out in the early part of the day in question, and when she returned witness observed that she had been drinking. She was considerably the worse for liquor three-quarters-of-an-hour prior to the accident. Witness's daughter fetched the deceased drink during the day. MRS ELFORD was a person of intemperate habits, and witness had frequently seen her drunk. Her husband was a sober and respectable man, and she had never seen him the worse for liquor. She saw MR ELFORD two hours before the deceased fell over the stairs, and a quarter-of-an-hour prior to the accident deceased and her husband were "having a few words," but nothing to speak of. There was a mat at the top of the stairs, but it was not displaced after the accident, and she did not believe deceased tripped over the mat. She was of opinion that the high-heeled boots deceased wore tripped her up, and caused her to fall over the stairs. The husband was a quiet man and never struck his wife. If MR ELFORD had pushed deceased over the stairs she must have been aware of it. Denied having told any person that MR ELFORD pushed his wife over the stairs on the day in question. - Ann Prior, residing in the same house as deceased, deposed to assisting MRS ELFORD into the kitchen after the accident. Deceased had been drinking; indeed, she was unfortunately addicted to drink. Witness bore testimony to the steadiness and sobriety of MR ELFORD, adding that he was a most tender and affectionate husband. MR ELFORD was the first person to assist his wife after the fall. He never struck his wife or behaved otherwise to her than a husband should. Deceased had never complained that her husband had behaved harshly to her, or that he struck her. - Elizabeth Cook, residing in the adjoining house to the deceased, gave evidence to the effect that she assisted deceased after the accident, and that she was suffering from a wound in her head. - By the Coroner: Had never heard from any person that MR ELFORD threw his wife over the stairs; but some young children in the neighbourhood had circulated a statement to that effect. There was no truth in the rumour. - By the Jury: The two boys who raised the rumour were six and five years of age respectively. They were playing about the door of deceased's house when the accident happened. - Mrs Rider was recalled and swore that there were no children in the house when MRS ELFORD fell over the stairs, and that the rumour afloat was a false one. - A Juror: But how could children raise such a rumour without there was some foundation for it? - Mrs Rider: The rumour is not true. - The Coroner said that he should have called the children referred to had they been old enough to have understood the nature of an oath. - Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased shortly after three o'clock on Thursday last. He found her in the kitchen insensible, and with a small wound at the back of the head, which he enlarged to see if there was a fracture. He found no fracture, however, the wound being only a scalp one. He believed deceased was suffering from compression of the brain and rupture of one of its blood vessels, and he thought it quite likely that there was a fracture of the base of the skull. A fall over a flight of stairs would cause such injuries as deceased received. Compression of the brain was the cause of death, deceased dying three hours after the accident. MR ELFORD fetched him to see his wife. He was perfectly sober. Witness could not say whether the deceased had been drinking or not. - The Coroner said he was pleased he had adjourned the Inquest so that the matter might be so fully investigated as it had been. The husband, too, must also be glad that so searching an Inquiry had been held. He was sure they could lay no blame upon the husband on the evidence before them, but all must be satisfied that deceased was a woman who drank to excess. - A Juror asked Mr Leah whether he said when he visited ELFORD'S house, "This is a drunkard's home." - Mr Leah: I never said anything of the kind, nor did I hear such a remark from any other person. - The Juror said that he should not have put the question had not there been a rumour afloat that Mr Leah used the words he had stated. - The Coroner: That just shows how unfounded the rumours in this case have been. - The Jury then consulted in private, and after a short deliberation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but appended to it a rider to the effect "That death was accelerated by the drinking habits of the deceased." - The Jury desired it to be made known that the husband was exonerated from all suspicion or blame in the matter. - The Coroner mentioned that the verdict was unanimously agreed to by the Jury, and he was in perfect accord with their finding. Addressing MR ELFORD, the Coroner added that he was pleased the Inquiry had taken place, if only for his sake, and for the purpose of putting an end to the idle reports respecting his wife's death which had gone the round of the town. He quite endorsed what the Jury had said that no blame, or even suspicion, was attaching to him. The verdict spoke for itself and MR ELFORD would leave the Court with his good character unstained, or in the least affected, by the rumours.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 September 1881
TIVERTON - A little girl named BLANCH CARTER, of Grattan-terrace, Fore-street, Tiverton, was in Collipriest Walk on Friday, in company with other children. She got over the rails and seeing an apple floating down the river endeavoured to reach it, but over-balancing herself fell in, and before assistance could be rendered, was drowned. An Inquest was held at the Townhall on Saturday afternoon before Mr L. Mackenzie, Borough coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 September 1881
TAVISTOCK - The Fatality At Tavistock. - At the Bedford Hotel, Tavistock, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of WILLIAM JACKMAN, a water-bailiff, in the employ of the Tamar and Plym Board of Conservators, whose body was found in the river Tavy early on Wednesday morning. Mr Seccombe was elected Foreman of the Jury. In opening the proceedings the Coroner said although from the statements which appeared in the papers it seemed that the deceased was drunk, he asked them to dismiss this from their minds, and only base their opinion on the evidence brought before them. - Thomas Cowen, a shoemaker, said he had known the deceased for the past thirty years. He was 68 years old, and a tailor by trade. - Henry Williams, a labourer employed at the Tavistock Foundry, said just before six o'clock on Wednesday morning he was going to work, and observed a stick on the path at Abbey Mead. He picked it up, and, looking over the side into the river, saw a coat. It was covered with water. He did not pick the body up because he did not know he was allowed to do so. He went for Sergt. Richards, and assisted him in pulling the body out. The head was under water and the body was stiff. The path was about eight feet above the bed of the river. It was public property, and there was no fence, but had deceased kept on his right he would not have fallen over. Deceased's head rested on a rock, but there was no blood there. - Sergt. Richards deposed that he took the body, which was quite stiff, out of the river. There was a wound on the head. On the brink of the path was a mark where his foot appeared to have slipped. His clothes were in such a state as to give him no reason to suspect foul play; and there was money in the pockets. - Francis Friend said on Tuesday night between seven and eight o'clock he last saw the deceased alive; he was at the Golden Lion Inn and seemed very tipsy. Deceased had, he thought, part of a glass of ale while there; he did not know who supplied him, but Mr Reddicliffe (the landlord) advised him to have a bottle of ginger beer and sleep the night there, and to this the deceased replied he could get home very well. He left to do so, and rambled very much on leaving the house. - The Jury were asking further questions as to the state of the deceased, when the Coroner interrupted, saying the question of drunkenness would not have to be considered that day. - A Juror asked whether Mr Reddicliffe was justified in supplying drink to the deceased. - Mr Rodd: Excuse me, I can't answer any question of this sort. that is not a question for you to ask. - Sergeant Richards said he had made inquiries, and it was not certain whether the deceased had drink from the landlord or whether someone in the room gave him drink. - The Coroner remarked that a matter of that kind was for another court to inquire into, but the Jury had simply to discover how deceased met with his death. The Coroner then summed up the proceedings, and advised the Jury to return an Open Verdict. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and some of the fees were given to the widow. - Some of the Jury thought Mr Reddicliffe should be commended for offering deceased a bed.

SOUTH MOLTON - Shocking Fatality At Southmolton. A Young Lady Burnt To Death. - A sad occurrence happened at Southmolton on Wednesday evening by which a young lady, MISS EVA BICKELL, youngest child of MR ALDERMAN BICKELL, about 25 years of age, was burnt so severely that she died within two or three hours. MISS BICKELL had been unwell for some time, and on Monday her father took her to Barnstaple to consult Dr Forrester. This gentleman recommended her to remain at Barnstaple for a short time in order that she might be under his immediate care, and that he might be able to visit her often. MR BICKELL accordingly placed his daughter in lodgings at Barnstaple and left her there. The next morning MISS BICKELL left the home without the knowledge of the other inmates and as she could not be found a telegram was despatched to her father. MISS BICKELL had, however, gone to the Barnstaple Station of the Great Western Railway only partially dressed, and with nothing over her head but an antimacassar she had taken from a chair in her room. At the station she was seen by a gentleman of Southmolton whom she well knew, who entered into conversation with her, but she talked incoherently and seemed very absent minded. She got into the train just before it started and all went well until it neared Swimbridge; when she opened the carriage door, and but for a commercial traveller in the same compartment would have leaped from the train while it was in motion. She was sitting in the compartment next the engine, and the driver and fireman, noticing that something was wrong, pulled up the train, and came very slowly into Swimbridge Station. Here the young lady was put in with the guard, who asked one of the passengers to accompany him, and he did so; but nothing particular occurred until she got to the Southmolton Station, when she accused the gentleman who prevented her from jumping out of the train with having insulted her. It was evident, however, to the officials that there was something wrong with her mind, and she was put in an omnibus and accompanied by a friend, who happened to be at the station, to her father's house at Sunnyside, just as her father was preparing to go to Barnstaple in search of his daughter, in consequence of the telegram he had received. The father immediately telegraphed to Exeter for another daughter, a sister of the deceased, who came home at once. About nine o'clock on Wednesday evening deceased retired to her room with her sister. She knelt by her bedside, said her prayers as usual, and went into bed. Thinking everything would be all right, the sister went downstairs to supper, leaving a lamp burning in the room. She had not left the room more than four or five minutes before a strong smell of something burning was apparent in the house. MR BICKELL and his daughter rushed upstairs. On getting to the room it was found to be full of flames and smoke. MISS BICKELL immediately ran into the street with the cry of "Fire." This alarmed the neighbours. Mr W. Chapple, parish clerk, living next door, hastened in and upstairs to the room, where he found MR BICKELL and his daughter enveloped in flames and smoke. After some difficulty he got hold of MISS BICKELL and brought her out with nothing on but the burning shreds of her nightdress, and evidently quite roasted alive, pieces of her flesh adhering to her clothes and placed her in an adjoining room. He went back and succeeded in rescuing MR BICKELL, but not until he had been severely burnt. MISS BICKELL, who had gone into the street, having raised the cry of fire, soon alarmed the neighbourhood, and some members of the fire brigade with one of the engines were hastening to the house, but, before arriving there, were stopped and told their services were not required. Medical assistance for MR and MISS BICKELL was obtained, and both Messrs. Furse and Sanders, surgeons, did all they could, but MISS BICKELL died about one o'clock yesterday morning. How the fire originated can be only conjectured; but it is thought that MISS BICKELL, during the absence of her sister, and owing to her temporary aberration, set fire to her nightdress and bed clothes, and thus brought about her shocking death. An Inquest was held yesterday before the Borough Coroner, (Mr James Flexman) and a Jury, of whom the Mayor (Mr Alderman White) was Foreman. The evidence was similar to the account given above, and Mr Sanders, surgeon, stated that deceased was suffering from acute mania. MR BICKELL mentioned that his daughter had been ill for a week and at her request he took her to see Dr Forrester, who told him that there were symptoms that she would go out of her mind owing to pressure of blood in the head. The Jury returned a verdict "That death resulted from the shock caused by the burns."

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 September 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Fall On Board The Achilles. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of JAMES WHITE, second-class petty officer of the Achilles, who died on Wednesday last from injuries received by falling from the yardarm of his ship. Mr James Taylor was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr Selmon officiated as Admiralty law agent. The Coroner stated that the Inquiry was originally fixed to be held on Saturday, but whilst at Tavistock on Thursday at another Inquest he received a telegram stating that the fleet would sail on Saturday, and he had, therefore, convened the Jury that day. - James Stone, able seaman of the Achilles, now lying in Plymouth Sound, stated that on Wednesday afternoon, about three p.m., the men were at drill, and an order was given to "shift maintopsail." Deceased was on the yard of the maintopsail. He knew his work well, and had been there several times. It was a calm day, and there was no wind. Deceased was "heel lashing," and he called to the men on the top to take the weight of the boom. Witness looked at him, and saw him standing on the yard, and trying to seize the boom. Witness saw him fall from the yard on to the deck, a distance of about 98 feet. He could not account for his falling, unless he slipped his foot and fell. - By the Foreman: When he last saw deceased he was on the yard. There was no one assisting him; generally a sailor assisted. The boom was against the rigging, and could not have knocked deceased off the yard. He thought no blame was attached to anyone. - William Shaw, captain of the maintop of the Achilles, who was in charge during the drill on Wednesday afternoon, corroborated the statement of the last witness. When ordered to his work deceased did not complain of illness and went to his duties willingly. - William Giles, boatswain's mate of the Achilles, deposed to seeing the deceased fall into the rigging on the starboard side, and then on the deck. He was about five yards from the place where he fell. He went to his assistance and found him to be insensible. A surgeon was sent for. - By a Juror: The sail had not been unfurled, and therefore could not have knocked him from the yard. - Mr A. W. May, surgeon of the Achilles, stated that he saw deceased soon after he fell. He was quite insensible. Deceased's injuries were compound fracture of the skull, which was sufficient to cause death, and the right leg was torn off above the ankle. Deceased died in the Hospital on Wednesday night. - A verdict that deceased met with his death Accidentally whilst on duty was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 September 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Plymouth Guildhall relative to the death of EDITH LAURA CARKEET, aged 3 years, who fell over the stairs on Friday last and died on the following day. AMELIA CARKEET, residing at 56 High-street, mother of the child, said she fell through where the banisters were broken. It was a well staircase, and the child fell from the top to the ground floor, which was of stone, a distance of about twenty-five feet. - Mr Bampton, house-surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the child received fracture of the right thigh and of the forearm. On the left side of the forehead there was a large bruise. The child never regained consciousness and died at midnight from shock occasioned by the injuries of the fall. - Elizabeth Coombes, a tenant at 56 High-street, deposed to finding deceased on the floor. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the mother, who is very poor, was at the close of the Inquest assisted by the Coroner and Jury.

PLYMOUTH - A strange case of sudden death was investigated by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) on Saturday, at the Seymour Arms, North-street. EMMA TOLL, a single woman, aged fifty, died on Friday last. It appears that she had lately been suffering from neuralgia and on Monday last consulted Mr Stephens, dentist. He extracted all that remained of two teeth in order, if possible, to relieve the pain, and on the following day revisited him and allowed him to extract two sound teeth. She then received a bottle of neuralgic mixture, manufactured by Mr Stephens and returned to her lodgings at Radnor-place. Nothing more occurred until Friday morning when deceased seemed in high spirits, and contemplated taking a walk. She was conversing with Mrs Pascoe, landlady of the house, in the passage, when she uttered an exclamation of pain and fell against the wall and but for Mrs Pascoe, she would have fallen to the ground. Dr Greenway, who attributed death to fatal syncope, was immediately called, but life was extinct. He was of opinion that death was accelerated by the extraction of the four teeth. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 September 1881
PLYMOUTH - Messrs. Devitt and Moor's Australian line of packets ship Sobraon, Captain Elmshi, arrived in Plymouth Sound yesterday at 4 p.m. She is on an outward passage, and on her way down from London had a fatal accident on board. When about twelve miles off the land, midway between the Start and Plymouth, at noon yesterday, WILLIAM M. HARTNEL, an able seaman, 23 years of age, was employed aloft. He was in the maintop, about to parcel one of the backstays, and on reaching from the top to the stay, he slipped and fell to the deck and died shortly after. He was promptly attended to by the surgeon of the ship but was beyond medical relief. The surgeon has since certified that the death occurred from fracture of the skull. The body was brought on shore in a shell last evening and taken to the Sailors' Home where an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner on the body, at 8.30 p.m. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - A case of sudden death at Devonport was investigated yesterday before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at the Waterman's Arms, Mutton Cove. The deceased, JAMES METHERELL, residing at 18 Wellington-street, Stoke, was a delivery porter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway and on Saturday was requested by a passenger arriving at the Stoke Railway Station to carry a portmanteau to Mutton Cove. On delivering the portmanteau the deceased fell forward on to his handcart and expired immediately. Mr P. Delarue, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, found the heart large and fatty and there were other influences which would materially affect the action of the heart. Death resulted from a cessation of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 September 1881
MEAVY - An Inquest was held at Durance Farm, Meavy, on Monday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of a little boy, named WILLIAM HENRY STAPLIN, aged 4 years, who was on a visit to his grandfather, MR BLATCHFORD, the occupier of Durance Farm. It appears that the deceased child, about noon on Saturday last, went out into the linhay, which adjoins the farmhouse, for the purpose of fetching some eggs. To get at the eggs the boy got on top of a gate lying against the wall, which slipped away from its position and fell on him, killing him instantly. Dr Norman stated at the Inquest that the deceased died from concussion of the brain and injuries to the spinal cord, which had been brought on by the accident. The Jury, of whom Mr Andrews was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Only a fortnight previously the poor mother of the child had lost her husband, a wheelwright of Buckland, also by means of an accident.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident In Plymouth Sound. - The schooner Summer Cloud, Captain Thomas Lewis, arrived in Plymouth Sound early yesterday morning with a cargo of coals for the port. She anchored near the Coblber Buoy to await orders for her discharging berth and while swinging head to the easterly wind that prevailed, THOMAS OWEN, of Aberystwyth, an A.E. on board, aged about 19 years, was ordered to stow the jib. He went out on the jibboom for that purpose, and while so employed he missed his footing and fell overboard. The captain threw over a small ladder to him; a spar and some ropes were also thrown, and a boat was promptly launched. OWEN grasped the ladder but was unable to hold on, and before the boat could reach him he sank. He had on heavy sea boots and cumbersome clothing, and could not swim. Captain Lewis, who was his uncle, called out to him to hold on, and he did all that lay in his power to rescue his relative. During the morning the body was dragged for and was recovered shortly after midday. It was conveyed on shore to the dead-house and last evening Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. It was ascertained in the course of the Inquiry that the vessel carried no life-buoys. - The Jury desired to express their opinion, through the medium of the Press that it was desirable these small vessels, as well as the larger, should carry life buoys.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 October 1881
BIDEFORD - Sad Fatality At Bideford. - An accident, causing the death of MR GEORGE TURNER, a horsebreaker, of Bideford, happened on Wednesday night, on the road between Westward Ho! and Bideford. MR TURNER had attended the horse races at Westward Ho! on Wednesday afternoon, and left the Royal Hotel at about ten p.m. in company with another gentleman who was going to Bideford, both being mounted. MR TURNER'S pony, in addition to being a fiery little animal, was much given to "shieing," and had thrown a man the same afternoon. It had only been in MR TURNER'S possession for a few weeks, and had run in the races that day. On reaching the crest of the hill above Westward Ho!, MR TURNER bid his companion "Good night," and rode on, remarking that he wanted to "get home," his friend who had been keeping the course at the races and whose animal was consequently tired, electing to travel more slowly. On reaching Silford Farmhouse, about half way towards Bideford, MR TURNER'S pony must have "shied", throwing its rider heavily to the ground. A young man named bird, on reaching the sot, found him lying in the road, bleeding profusely and unconscious. The horse was subsequently found some distance further on the road. Assistance was at once procured, and the injured man was conveyed to Dr Rouse's residence, Bideford. He was found, however, to be quite dead, and blood was still flowing copiously from his mouth, nose, and ears. There were no marks or lacerations about the face or body, and nothing to indicate foul play. Deceased was taken to his own residence, and yesterday Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest. - Dr Rouse stated that death was caused by fracture of the base of the skull. Deceased was a heavy man, and death must have been almost instantaneous. That the horse had "shied" was evident from the fact that deceased was found stretched along the road in the direction in which he was travelling, having been pitched forward as his horse swerved round. Deceased was a young man, and was married only about three months since. He is much regretted, and deep commiseration is felt for his widow in her bereavement.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 October 1881
BARNSTAPLE - The case of the man SYMONS who cut his throat at Barnstaple on Friday morning, terminated fatally about five o'clock on Saturday morning. At an Inquest held by the Borough Coroner, Dr Fernie stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased's head, and found there was extensive disease of the blood-vessels of the brain, and this had produced softening on its left side, and he thought that his mind was seriously impaired in consequence. A verdict to the effect "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was accordingly returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 October 1881
EGG BUCKLAND - Fatal Accident At The Laira Junction. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Laira Inn, near Marsh Mills, respecting the death of JAMES HANCOCK, a watchman on the Great Western Railway, who was found dead on the line, near the Laira Junction, at four o'clock on Sunday morning last. Inspector J. Foster watched the case on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company, and Inspector W. TG. Milhunn represented the Great Western Company. - Inspector John Wotton, of the Great Western Railway, said the deceased was a packer on the Great Western Railway, and had been so for thirty-eight years. At times when wanted packers were chosen as watchmen, and as the bridge near the spot where deceased met with his accident was being repaired, he was placed there, and had been doing duty there for the past twelve weeks. The deceased knew his duty well. - John Dart, engine driver on the London and South Western Railway, said he was working the 3 a.m. goods train from Devonport to Exeter on Sunday morning last. The train did not leave Devonport until 3.32 a.m., being late. At the Laira Junction they passed a Great Western Railway goods train which he did not expect to meet. He did not see the deceased at his post, but when near the Marsh Mills station he heard a noise under the engine. At the Marsh Mills station he pulled up and went around the engine and found that the glass of the head lamp was smashed in, and on further examination of the engine he found a sprinkling of blood and some grey hairs on the eccentric strap rod, which is under the engine. He noticed nothing particular in passing the Great Western train on the Laira Bridge, nor did his mate. They saw no signal light at the bridge for which they looked out. He had passed over the bridge several times previously, and the deceased was then in a little hut which was erected for his use. He thought it quite probable that the deceased was signalling the down train, and was standing on the up rails and did not hear his train coming. - The Coroner said it was necessary now to have the driver of the Great Western train, who had not been warned to attend because he had understood that the driver of the London and South Western Railway, whose evidence they had heard, had seen the deceased at his post. It was quite certain that one of the drivers of the train must have seen the light of the deceased, and he, therefore, thought it best to adjourn the Inquest. This was rather an important matter, and needed to be thoroughly inquired into. He should adjourn the Court until Monday next.

NEWTON ABBOT - At the Newton Townhall, an Inquest was held yesterday by Dr Gaye, on the body of a little boy named MILLER, son of a drover, who was drowned on the previous day. The deceased was picking nuts in Bradley Woods when he fell into the river Lemon, and was drowned before assistance was available. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Vine Hotel, Cremyll-street, Stonehouse, respecting the death of MARY ANN WAKEHAM, a married woman, aged 50, residing at 43 Cremyll-street, Stonehouse. - Edwin Cross, a resident in the same house as the deceased, said n Saturday fortnight last, he heard the deceased fall over the stairs. It was about 11.15 p.m. He went out and saw the deceased lying on her back; he picked her up and found she had a wound on the side of her head. The deceased was at the time the worse for drink. - Mr C. Bulteel, M.R.C.S., said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased. He found considerable bruising of the right eye, and a large bruise at the vertex of the skull. On opening the head there was a large quantity of blood effused from a ruptured blood vessel on the surface of the brain on the left side, underneath the membrane. He believed that the cause of death was due to the effusion of blood, which might have been of twenty-four hours' duration. He could not say the cause of death was due to the fall, but was of opinion that death was due to apoplexy, which caused compression of the brain.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 12 October 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Stopford Arms, Stoke, on Monday, on the body of MARY ANN KELLARD, wife of MR JAMES THOMAS KELLARD, retired chief carpenter, living at 18 Trafalgar-place, Stoke, who committed suicide by strangling herself in bed that morning. Deceased, who was sixty-eight years of age, appeared in her usual health on Sunday. The servant being engaged, deceased's husband took a jug of hot water to her bedroom about ten minutes to nine that (Monday) morning. On opening the door and entering the bedroom, he found deceased laying on her back. She had a woollen comforter round her neck. He immediately loosened it, and afterwards took it off. His son, who was a medical man, subsequently came, but other assistance was procured. he had known deceased attempt suicide on more than one occasion. The last time she tried to take her life was in January, when she cut her throat. Deceased had expressed herself as being tired of life. - Mr J. May, F.R.C.S., had known deceased for thirty years. he had known her to have attempted suicide. On going to the residence of deceased that day (Monday), he found the face livid and the veins distended, more especially those about the face. From what was mentioned to him, he examined the neck, but could find no evidence of strangulation there. He then examined the scarf found round the neck of the deceased, but as it was of a soft woollen texture he was not surprised that there was no mark of violence on the neck. He had no doubt death had resulted from strangulation. Deceased attempted suicide twenty years ago, and on another occasion in January last, when she divided the windpipe. he had looked upon her as insane for many years. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased had Strangled Herself in her bedroom with a scarf while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 October 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport yesterday Mr James Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ALFRED EARNEST BYRNE, aged 4 months, who died on Tuesday morning. It was shewn that the child had been weakly from birth, and Dr Wilson, who made an external examination of the body, said the deceased had died from the effect of the convulsions and general debility. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

KINGSTEIGNTON - An Inquest was held at Kingsteignton, near Newton Abbot, yesterday by Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, on the body of RICHARD MARTIN, 49 years of age, who was found in a tributary of the river Teign on the previous day. Deceased was missed on Monday night, and nothing was heard of him until his body was found in the water. He was a very steady man, and had been employed on the turnpike roads for sixteen years, and the fact that the gates are to be closed on the 1st November seems to have preyed on his mind. Deceased leaves a widow and family. The Jury returned an Open Verdict "Found Drowned."

PANCRASWEEK - Death From Playing With Poisonous Matches. - At Pancrassweek, near Holsworthy, on Tuesday, Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the death of a child named GILBERT, about 2 years old, who died on the previous Saturday. On the Friday before the child was playing with a box of Tandsticker matches, and on the following day it was taken ill, was sick, and complained of a pain in the head. It continued ill until the morning of the following Wednesday, when there were symptoms of jaundice, and as the child grew weaker it was taken to Dr Pearce, of Holsworthy, who found it suffering from jaundice, which might have been occasioned by sucking phosphorus matches. The next day the child was worse, and on the Friday it died in convulsions. Evidence was given that the phosphoric poison on two of the matches of the same sort produced was sufficient to kill a child, and a verdict was returned in accordance with the evidence. The Coroner quite agreed with the verdict, and thought the public should know of the dangerous properties of these matches, so that they might keep them out of the way of their children.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - Drowning Of A Plymouth Fisherman. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Sutton Harbour Inn, North Quay, respecting the death of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, a fisherman, who was lost in the Channel some time ago, and whose body was picked up in the Channel on Wednesday last. - Robert Knox, captain of the fishing sloop Firefly, and residing at 6 Castle-street, said on Wednesday night last at seven o'clock he was in his vessel, four miles to the south-west of the Breakwater light. In hauling in the trawl he found a body in it. He then came into the Sound, and at the North Quay steps he handed over the body to P.C. Jones. He identified the body as that of WM. WILLIAMS, of the sloop Baron, who was drowned near the Eddystone on the night of the 19th of August last. Deceased was 19 years of age, and used to reside at 39 New-street, Plymouth. - JOHN WILLIAMS, brother of the deceased, stated that on the 20th of August he had a conversation with Joseph Germaine, the captain of the vessel on board which his brother was employed, respecting the occurrence. The captain said he was four miles off the Eddystone, all the hands were below asleep excepting deceased, when he heard a cry of "man overboard." They rushed on deck and saw deceased in the water catching hold of the stern of the vessel. He spoke to him and said "Catch a hold and I'll save you in a minute." He then stooped over the bow and caught hold of the deceased's fingers when a sea came and swept him away, and they saw nothing more of the deceased. At the time deceased was on deck on watch by himself looking after the trawl. The Coroner said the captain of the Baron was at sea and therefore could not be called; if he had been present he could not tell them how the deceased got in the water, nor give them any further particulars of the sad affair. He recommended the Jury to return a verdict of "Found Drowned," which was done, with the addition that there was no evidence to shew how deceased got into the water.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 October 1881
BIDEFORD - An elderly woman, named MARY GRACE HUXTABLE, Meddon-street, Bideford, died suddenly in the street on Saturday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by disease of the heart," was returned at the Inquest in the evening.

EXETER - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest on Saturday as to the death of RICHARD HARRIS, a boy who was drowned in the Exe. Deceased was crossing the river in a flat-bottomed boat, when the high wind caused it to drift across the ferry-boat line, and deceased and a man, who were standing with their backs to the ferry-rope, were caught by it and thrown into the water. The man was rescued, but the boy did not rise. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 October 1881
EGG BUCKLAND - An adjourned Inquest was held at the Laira Inn, Marsh Mills yesterday, as to the death of JAMES HANCOCK, a packer on the Great Western Railway, who was killed at the Laira Junction by a passing train on Sunday week. The further evidence given was to the effect that as a Great Western train passed the deceased on duty, a London and South-Western train also came up, and the noise of the former probably prevented deceased from hearing the latter. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 October 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at Stoke last evening on the body of SAMUEL HALLETT, foreman of masons, aged 58, who died suddenly on Monday night at his lodgings, 49 Tavistock-road, Stoke, Devonport. The wife of the deceased stated that her husband and herself came from Exeter only a week ago. On Monday evening the deceased returned from work in his usual good health, and after eating his supper went upstairs to his bedroom. A few minutes afterwards he was seized with illness, fell back in a chair, and died. - Mr J. Rolston, jun., who was called in, informed the Jury that there was no external indication of the cause of death, and he consequently had made a post-mortem examination. He found the heart extensively diseased, the valves having thickened so much that they could not perform their proper functions, and were in such a condition as to fully account for the suddenness of death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening held an Inquest at the Tandem Inn, Octagon-street, on the body of MABEL FANNY RENDLE, aged 4 months, who was found dead in her cradle on Tuesday morning. ELIZABETH RENDLE, the mother of deceased, said on Monday night, when the child was put to sleep in the cradle, it appeared quite well. In the morning, however, at about a quarter to eight, on looking at the child, she discovered that it was dead. She immediately called her mother and sent for a doctor, but the deceased was past all aid. Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, said he had examined the body, but found no marks of violence, and it appeared to have died quietly. The Jury, of whom Mr Richard Parkhouse was Foreman, expressed themselves satisfied with the evidence, and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 21 October 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Fall At Devonport. - The Devonport Borough Coroner, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquiry last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, into the cause of the death of FRANCIS BAYLEY, a mason's labourer, residing at 9 Boot-lane, who fell from a ladder at the Old Granby Barracks, on Tuesday afternoon, sustaining injuries from which he expired on Wednesday. John Yeo, a mason, said that on Tuesday afternoon he was engaged in painting the ventilating belonging to a house at the Old Granby Barracks. witness was on the roof and deceased was one the ladder. Witness gave deceased a paint pot to carry down. Immediately after, he heard the sound of a fall. Witness at once descended the ladder, and took up deceased, who was lying at the foot of it, on his right side. Witness was sure that deceased had firm hold of the pot before he let go. The weight of the pot, which was half-full of paint, was about 3lbs. Deceased was taken to one of the barrack rooms and afterwards conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, on a stretcher. He was about 48 years old. Wm. Hy. Bryan deposed that he was a Sergeant-Major of the royal Artillery, stationed at Old Granby Barracks. At the time stated by the previous witness he was about four or five yards from the ladder, when he heard a noise as of something falling. He rushed up and saw deceased on the ground. he had evidently fallen from the ladder. Deceased was taken into one of the barrack-rooms, and it was afterwards decided to take him to the Hospital. Deceased was perfectly sober at the time. - Wm. Edmund Cant, resident surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, stated that deceased was brought to the Hospital in the afternoon of the 18th instant. He appeared to be suffering from a shock. He was quite bright as far as his mind went, and the only thing he complained of was his arm, which was found to be broken a little above the wrist. The arm was also injured at the elbow. Deceased made light of the case, and expressed a wish to return home after his arm had been dressed, but was persuaded to remain. His condition was about the same until next morning between twelve and one, when he was suddenly taken ill and died almost immediately. Witness had made a post-mortem examination. There were no external injuries that could offer any explanation as to the cause of death. There was no injury to the head or brain. In the left side of the chest, at the back, under the shoulder-blade he found three ribs broken. The muscular partition, which separates the breast from the abdomen, was torn. The contents of the stomach and some of the intestines had passed through the hole in the chest. They very much distended, and the left lung had collapsed. The heart also was pushed over to the right side. In the abdomen there were a great many bruises. Witness thought it wonderful that deceased, having so many injuries, should have lived as he did. In answer to the Coroner, witness said that he had made two examinations, one about twenty minutes after deceased was admitted into the Hospital, and another the next day. There were no external symptoms to lead him to suppose that deceased was suffering from the injuries described. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 October 1881
PLYMSTOCK - Inquiry was made by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Saturday at Staddiscombe, near Plymstock, as to the death of a little girl named EMMA ELIZA DODRIDGE, aged 5 years, who met with an accident on the 19th inst., from the effects of which she died on Saturday last. - The child, who is the daughter of SAMUEL DODRIDGE, a labourer, residing at Staddiscombe, was left home in charge of a younger child on the day in question. She went to the fireside to remove a kettle from the fire to the hob, when by some means her clothes caught fire. Unfortunately no one was in the house at the time, and the poor child, not knowing any better, rushed out from the house into the road, which she traversed for some distance. A neighbour named Mrs Jackson saw the child, and immediately ran out and caught her and rolled her in a sack, which extinguished the flames. The child was found to be dreadfully burnt about the body, and Mr Jacobs, surgeon, was sent for, but he declared the case was hopeless from the first. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 26 October 1881
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday upon the body of JOHN ROBERTS, an old man, who committed suicide on the previous day by placing gunpowder in his mouth and exploding it, under circumstances already reported. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMPTON ST MARY - Suicide Of A Farmer At Plympton. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Borringdon Farm House, Plympton St. Mary, on the body of JAMES ADAMS, farmer, in the occupation of the above-mentioned farm. Mr James Horton, of Colebrook Farm, was chosen foreman of the Jury. - The first witness called was AARON ADAMS, son of the deceased, who said his father was 55 years of age. The last time witness saw him alive was about ten o'clock on Monday morning. The pistol produced belonged to his father, and was occasionally used to scare rooks. It had not, however, been adapted for that purpose this season. Witness went into a field on Monday afternoon, and found his father lying quite dead under an old tree. He had noticed that deceased had been very low-spirited of late. - Ellen Northmore said she was a servant at Borringdon Farm House. About eleven o'clock on Monday morning she saw MR ADAMS standing near the tree under which he was found, and shortly after heard a report of fire-arms in the same direction. Her master had been in low spirits for some time past. - James Truscott, employed on the farm, said he went in company with MR AARON ADAMS to the field in question and found MR ADAMS lying dead. - Mr B. Butland, Leigham Farm, said he had known MR ADAMS for many years. he was at witness's place on Thursday, and they had a conversation on business matters. MR ADAMS then left, but, after going about twenty yards, returned and repeated the same conversation; and, on leaving, again shook hands with witness, who thought his conduct very strange. MR ADAMS did not appear to be in his usual spirits and complained of being unwell. - Mr Ellery, surgeon, said he was called to Borringdon Farm shortly after two o'clock on Monday. He found MR ADAMS lying under a large tree, quite dead with a discharged pistol by his side. The right side of his skull was completely gone, and was lying in fragments around and against the tree. The tongue and lips were blackened by gunpowder, which led witness to suppose that he had shot himself. From the circumstances connected with the case he believed that MR ADAMS had committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) yesterday held an Inquest at the Clarendon Inn, Summerland-place, as to the death of a child named LOUISA PHOEBE STOATE, aged 11 weeks. Deceased, who had always been a delicate child, was put to bed at about 11.30 on Tuesday night, but on the father rising in the morning at 7.30 he found her dead. Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, said he had examined the body but found no marks of violence on it, and it had apparently died a natural death. The Jury, of whom Mr James Harley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 October 1881
WHITCHURCH - Inquiry was made at the Pennycomequick Inn, Pennycomequick, yesterday, by the Devonport Coroner, Mr Vaughan, as to the death of JOHN HOLMAN, aged 79, who died on Tuesday night. During the day deceased, who resided at Norfolk-villa, Pennycomequick, walked to Torpoint, and in the evening walked to the public reading-rooms in Cornwall-street and went to a lecture at the Mechanics' Institute. He returned home about 10 p.m. and retired to his room. His son, knowing that his eyesight was bad and fearing that he might set something on fire, followed him upstairs, but finding his presence objectionable, left the room. Remaining on the landing outside he heard a noise as of a body falling, and the door was violently closed. He thereupon entered the room and found his father seated on the floor and leaning against a safe. He called the housekeeper and endeavoured to force some whisky down deceased's throat, but he died immediately the spirit touched his lips. Dr Jackson was sent for, but on arrival pronounced life extinct, death being probably caused by the rupture of an artery in the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr Philip Willis was Foreman, returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, Plymouth, as to the death of JAMES MURCH, a market porter, aged 58. Sarah Dawe, a married woman, stated that the deceased resided in the same house, at 34 Looe-street. On Thursday afternoon he complained that he was suffering from indigestion. At 9 p.m. the same day the deceased called her into his room. On going in she found that he was in bed, and he then said he was very ill. She immediately called the landlady, Mrs Allen, who on being informed of what was the matter at once went for some brandy, but, before she returned the deceased died. - Maria Allen, the landlady, deposed that the deceased was one of her lodgers. For the past three weeks the deceased had been suffering from what he termed indigestion, and also a bad cough for which he had been taking medicine, and obtained from the dispensary. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 31 October 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest at the Penrose Inn, Penrose-street, on Saturday evening, on the body of a child named JOHN HENRY WILLIAMS, aged 13 months, who died suddenly that morning. It was taken with a fit of coughing about nine o'clock, and soon afterwards expired in convulsions. Medical testimony showed that the child had been always weakly, and had frequently suffered from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd (Coroner) opened an Inquest on Saturday at Mr Westaway's Market-house Inn, Market-street, Stonehouse, on the body of MRS BAILEY, an old lady, residing in High-street, who is alleged to have died under somewhat mysterious circumstances between Thursday night and Friday morning. The Enquiry was adjourned until today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 November 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Pride of Devon Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of the male illegitimate child, aged three days, of SARAH JONES, residing at 51 King-street. Mr P. B. Clemens was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The deceased had been a strong child since birth, but about midnight on Sunday it was discovered dead. Dr Miller was sent for, and he attributed death to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 November 1881
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) held an Inquest yesterday at the Guildhall as to the death of WILLIAM HICKS, aged 61, who was found drowned under the Hoe on Monday. - Mary Dyer, step-daughter of the deceased, deposed that he was an army pensioner, and had been out of regular employ for about six months, which had depressed him a good deal. His health had also been failing of late. - William Wright, a labourer, said he was walking under the Hoe on Monday afternoon last, about two o'clock and was standing at the wicket gate leading down to tinside when he saw the body of a man floating in the water. He went down on the rocks, but could not get at the body, and he therefore called the Hoe constable. There was a hat on the rocks near where the body was floating. - James Coulton, the Hoe constable, said he was sent for by the last witness to go to the rocks under the Citadel, near the Aquarium, and he saw the body of a man floating in the water. With assistance he got the body out of the water and had it conveyed to the Guildhall mortuary. He searched the body, but found nothing on it but a handkerchief. - The Coroner said he could bring no further evidence before the Jury and the only person who last saw the deceased alive was his son, aged 6, whom he did not think it advisable to call, because he could only tell them that his father gave him his breakfast and then left the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence to shew how the deceased came into the water."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 7 November 1881
EXETER - Sudden Death. - MR J. BEER, tailor, of Exeter, died suddenly early on Saturday morning. Deceased, who was sixty years of age, was one of the oldest and most respected tradesmen of the city. An Inquest was held during the day, when it transpired that at six o'clock that morning, after speaking to his wife about the celebration of the Fifth, he suddenly expired. Deceased had been subject to gout and death was attributed to an affection of the heart. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 November 1881
SAMPFORD SPINEY - Fatal Accident Near Horrabridge. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd), held an adjourned Inquest on Saturday at Sampford Spiney, near Horrabridge, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES TUCKETT, aged about 14 years. - George Blatchford, miller, residing at Huckworthy Mill, said the deceased, at the time of his death, was in his employ, and had been so for 18 months. Deceased thoroughly understood his work, was strong, and competent to carry out the duties which he put him to perform. On the 27th ult. they were engaged in cracking oats, the deceased being employed on the first landing in scooping the oats from the sack to the bin. How the accident happened he could not say. He did not order the deceased to carry the sack. Whilst engaged on the ground floor witness heard an alteration in the mill, and he then called out to the deceased; but, not receiving any answer, he ran up the stairs and found the deceased around the drum shaft connected with the machinery. He was revolving with the mill; the sack was around the shaft. The bin, which would hold about one sack of oats, was capsized by the deceased in some way, and that caused an alteration in the mill. The bin must have been capsized by the sack or the deceased. Witness stopped the machinery as quickly as possible, and with the assistance of a Mr Nicholas took the deceased from the shaft. He sent instantly for a medical man. - Mr I. G. Butters, surgeon, said he saw the deceased shortly after the accident, and found him suffering from severe injuries, his left arm was broken and almost torn from the body, and he also had a very severe scalp wound which caused haemorrhage. Deceased died shortly afterwards from shock to the system caused by the injuries, and haemorrhage combined. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 November 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Yesterday morning a man named JOHN HARRIS, a pensioner from the Dockyard police, committed suicide by hanging himself in his workshop on the premises of 21 Cross-street, Devonport. In consequence of family troubles he has been for some time in a very depressed state of mind. On Monday evening he appeared very moody and spoke of his past troubles, but at 10.30 he went to bed apparently undisturbed. At about 5 o'clock yesterday morning his wife awoke, and missing the deceased from the bed, and from his previous state of mind fearing that might do himself harm went in search of him. She visited all the rooms except the workshop, the door of which she could not open. Feeling alarmed she immediately went to No. 31 St. John's-street, and fetched her nephew, John Quirk, who resides there. On going to Cross-street, Quirk managed to force the door of the workroom, which was found to be fastened inside by a bolt. On entering the room he saw the deceased hanging to a hook in the ceiling by means of a cord which was fastened around his neck. On the floor directly under the deceased was lying a chair, and it was evident that the deceased had stood on it whilst fastening the cord around his neck, and had then kicked it from under him. Quirk immediately cut deceased down and sent for Dr Paul, who, on his arrival, pronounced life extinct, and said that deceased had probably been dead for over an hour. At an Inquest held on the body at the Tavistock Inn in the afternoon, the Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 November 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday at the New London Inn, Fore-street, on the body of ANNE PERKINS, aged 54, of 4 Queen-street, who died suddenly on Wednesday morning. She had been in bad health for some years, but had not been attended by a doctor. On Tuesday night she went to bed feeling unwell. She rose soon after her husband on Wednesday morning, and whilst seated on a chair in her bedroom called for a drink of water. This her daughter (ANNIE BOWDEN) brought her, and as she suddenly became too weak to support herself, her daughter and her husband (Mr Bowden) helped her into bed again. MR PERKINS was then called, and the deceased died in a few minutes in his arms. The evidence of the doctor, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, shewed that deceased had been internally affected by disease of long standing. In his opinion she had died from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 12 November 1881
MIDDLESEX, LONDON. - Strange Death Of An Exeter Young Lady In London. Coroner's Inquest. London, Friday. - This morning Dr George Danford Thomas, the Coroner for Central Middlesex, opened an Inquiry at the Buffalo Tavern, Marylebone-road, London, into the circumstances attending the death of MISS CAROLINE ELIZA PERRY, aged eighteen, daughter of MR JOHN VOUSEY PERRY, a farmer, of Christow, near Exeter, who died most mysteriously while on a visit to her relatives in London. The circumstances of the case were so extraordinary that an analysis of the contents of the stomach was ordered - in addition to the post-mortem examination made by Dr Rayner, the analysis being carried out by Mr Blyth, the medical officer of health to the parish of Marylebone. The Jury having been duly sworn, proceeded to view the body, which presented a somewhat abnormal appearance, the lips being parted and drawn away from the teeth; the face was very dark, and shewing indications of twitchings and convulsions as from strychnia, the presence of which poison was suspected by Dr Rayner, when he made the post-mortem examination. All witnesses were ordered out of Court. - JULIA PERRY, of Christow, Exeter, wife of a farmer, said: The deceased was my daughter, and I last saw her alive on the 22nd of September last. After she left school she went out as governess for sixteen months, and then returned home, where she stayed until the 22nd of September, when she went on a visit to her aunt at 46 Edgware-road, London. The name of her aunt was CAROLINE HUDSON, and her business that of a dress and mantle maker. Deceased was a very healthy and active girl, and she wrote to me three times a week. She went away for a month, but at the end of that time she wrote to me asking me to send her some warm clothing, as she was very happy, and wished to stay longer in London. I received the last letter from her on the 23rd October, and she said then she was very happy, and would send a longer letter. I never heard of or from her until Monday last, when I received a telegram stating that she was in a very serious state. The telegram was sent to my husband either by Mr Neale or my sister, MRS HUDSON, and I was asked to come to London forthwith. I at once came to London and found my daughter dead. I have not since then received any satisfactory explanation of her death. - By the Coroner: Deceased was always sober and temperate and of a very happy disposition. She was exceedingly well behaved and beloved by everyone. - CAROLINE HUDSON, widow of John Charles Hudson, a draper of Lancaster, said: I am living at 46 Edgware-road, and have carried on the business of a dressmaker. I keep one servant and an assistant named Eleanor Bartlett. The name of the servant is Emily Loder. I let two upper rooms, one of them being to a Captain Payne and the other to a Mr and Mrs Hudson. Mrs Deane and a Mrs Clifford also have lived there. The deceased came to me as a visitor about two months ago, and she had remained with me up to the time of her death. She was, to all appearance, in good health. I noticed on Monday morning that she was very ill, but up to that day she was well. - By the Coroner: On Monday morning we got up as usual, and I left home at 8.45 to see a lady in Connaught-square, accompanied by Miss Bartlett. I returned home about a quarter to eleven and asked the servant where the deceased was, and received the following answer:- "Oh, she is very ill, upstairs on the couch." I went upstairs and found deceased in the front sitting-room lying on the couch. I do not know what to call her condition, for it was not a faint. She was stretched out, her legs being perfectly straight, and a little apart. She did not appear to me to be very much in pain. The eyes were open. I cannot say how her arms were, but I think she had a good deal of colour. I asked her what was the matter, and she said, "I am very ill." I said "Shall I sent for your mamma?" and she replied "Oh, no; pray don't send for mamma." I don't know why she refused to allow me to send for her mamma, and she gave no reason. I sent a Mr Miles, a friend of mine, a dealer in jewellery, to fetch a doctor. I have known Mr Miles ten months. I don't think he is a married man; he is a constant visitor at the house and comes in the morning. He had just come in at that moment, and so I sent him. He knew the deceased a little, but not much. Dr Rayner came shortly afterwards, and someone else also. I was asked to leave the room, my servant remaining with the doctor and the deceased. No instructions were given to me by the doctor, but I believe Emily Loder received directions what to do. I was not informed what was the matter, but I believe one of the doctors said that it might be "hysteria." I saw the deceased after the doctors left, but I cannot say what time she died. I believe it was about half-past twelve. When I saw her after the doctor left she seemed to clasp the hands of the nurse tightly, and her movements were spasmodic. She kept on saying, "Oh! I am so ill; catch hold of my hands." It might have been four o'clock, and not 2.30 when she died. I know a Mr Lynch, a jeweller, who called for orders that morning. He knew the deceased, and had seen her three times. He was a very nice young gentleman; and he, on one occasion, took the deceased to Madame Tussaud's. I have only known him in business, and he was no friend of mine. I am constantly having persons call upon me. I cannot in any way account for the death of the deceased. She had not to my knowledge changed in her demeanour since she has been with me. Beyond a cough she had nothing whatever the matter with her, so far as I knew. She had bread and butter and tea for her breakfast on the morning of her death. During the past fortnight she shared my bed, but before that she had a room to herself. I know of no one who can throw any light on the matter. On the morning of the death I was not upset by any other unpleasant circumstance that I am aware of. I had had a little too much to drink that day, and it got into my head, and it may have affected my memory slightly. - By the Jury: So far as I know, the deceased had no male acquaintance. She used to take walks in the Park mornings, and of course, I cannot say whom she met there. - Emily Loder said: I have been living at 46 Edgware-road for the last month, and acted as servant to the last witness. The deceased acted as housekeeper to her aunt. She was in good health when she first came to Edgware-road, and I understood that she came on a visit and not as an assistant. I saw her every day, and she went to bed generally at ten o'clock. She was in perfect health on Sunday, and went out for a walk with her aunt. I saw her on Monday morning. She gave me a cup of tea that morning as she was up first, about seven o'clock. Later on, after breakfast, about 8.45, Mrs Hudson and Miss Bartlett went out, and the deceased came down and said to me "What can I do with my clothes? Captain Day is coming in at 11 o'clock and my clothes are in the room." Captain Day was coming to lodge in the house that day. I told her to take them up to my room and she did so. She afterwards made me a cup of tea and then went upstairs to get some soap. I called out to her shortly afterwards, and, getting no answer, searched the house, and found her lying on her back stretched out on the couch. I thought she was hysterical, but she was quite conscious, and could neither laugh nor cry. I asked her to do so, but she could not do either. She kept on saying, "Oh, Emily, don't leave me." both her arms and legs were stretched out as though she had the cramp, and her face twitched convulsively as she seized me by the arm. - By the Coroner: She also said, "Oh, Emily, I have done something wrong, I have done something wrong." I asked her what it was. She said "I shall not tell you, go away and leave me with a doctor." - Mrs Hudson returned at 10.30 and said where is CARRIE" And I answered she is very ill, lying on the couch. The doctor was sent for, and came at once. I know a Mr Miles, and he comes often. He was represented to me as the nephew of Mrs Hudson. When Doctor Rayner came he told me not to leave the room, and requested Mrs Hudson to leave. I did not hear any conversation between them. The deceased, however, said to me "Leave the room, I want to speak to the doctor privately. I have done something wrong. I want something to send me to heaven; send me something, doctor. I want to die and go to glory." She did not say that she had taken anything. - By the Court: Deceased was sensible until the time of her death, which occurred at 4 o'clock. She had asked previously to have her legs rubbed. She was continually twitching and being drawn backwards and forwards, and after the doctor left she vomited. The vomit was saved. She asked continually for water. - James Miles, of 17 Sale-street, Paddington, a general valuer and jeweller, said: My business was a private one. Mrs Hudson was a particular friend of mine. I am her adopted nephew, I call her "aunt." I have known her about eighteen months. I made her acquaintance in business and I transact business for her. I am a frequent visitor at the house and knew the deceased; she came up on a visit and in a hurry, too. A letter was sent, and she came at once. I have seen deceased about five times, and always thought there was something strange and excited in her manner. Had not seen her for a fortnight before death. I said then that I would not call again whilst she was there. She was jealous of her aunt. I went for Dr Rayner. I have heard that she was of a hot temper and excitable. I have never had any quarrel with her. I was not paying my addresses to her; I never liked her. With regard to the jealousy, I used to go out with my aunt, and deceased sometimes wanted to go instead of me. I do not know that my aunt drank, and I don't know why I should say anything about it, for I always like to smother a fault, and not to show it up. - The Inquiry was then adjourned for further evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 15 November 1881
LONDON, MIDDLESEX - The Strange Death Of An Exeter Young Lady. Resumed Inquiry And Verdict. {Special Telegram.) - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MISS CAROLINE ELIZA PERRY, aged eighteen, daughter of MR JOHN VAUSEY PERRY, a farmer of Christow, near Exeter, who died, mysteriously, at 46 Edgware-road, W., whilst on a visit to her relatives in London, was resumed yesterday afternoon, before Dr Danford Thomas, the Coroner for Central Middlesex, at the Buffalo Tavern, Marylebone-road. It will be remembered that at the opening of the Inquiry last Friday evidence was given showing that the deceased came to London on the 22nd of September, being then in excellent health, in which condition she remained until last Monday week, when her aunt, Mrs Hudson, and a young lady named Bartlett went out to visit a person in Connaught-square, and upon their returning the servant, Emily Loder, stated that she was very ill. Upon the arrival of Dr Rayner the deceased made such an extraordinary statement to him and the servant, and dying immediately afterwards, that the Coroner determined, not only that a post-mortem examination of the body should be made, but also ordered an analysis of the contents of the stomach to be made by Mr Blyth, the Medical officer of Health for the parish of Marylebone. The Inquiry was accordingly adjourned for such medical and other evidence. Considerable interest was manifested in the proceedings, the spacious room in which the Inquiry was held being crowded with Jurymen, witnesses, relatives of the deceased, and other persons anxious as to the result. The adjourned Inquiry was fixed for three o'clock in the afternoon, but considerable delay was caused by the Coroner's detention in Holborn by an extra case having cropped up unforeseen. At the commencement of the proceedings, the Coroner said:- Gentlemen, on the last occasion you will remember that we deemed it advisable to adjourn the Inquiry until today, when we should be prepared to place before you the further evidence of the medical witnesses, and also that of the public analyst, Mr Blyth, who has since examined the contents of the deceased's stomach. The following evidence was then called:- Miss Helena Bartlett having been sworn was examined by the Coroner as follows:- You are an assistant, I believe, to Mrs Hudson? I am. - For how long? About five months. - And I suppose you go in the morning to the house, and leave each evening? Yes. - And you drive there? I do. - Do you remember deceased coming there? Yes, about two months ago. - And as far as you can judge was she quite well? Yes, until Monday morning, the 7th inst., the day of her death. - Did you see her on that morning? Yes, at a quarter to nine. - And you had opportunities of seeing her constantly, of course? Yes. - Every day? Almost every day. - What was her disposition? Very good tempered. - did you ever see her give way to bad temper? No, I do not ever remember seeing her out of temper. - Did you ever see her ill? No. - Did you get very friendly with her? Yes, very friendly. - Did you ever go out with her? Yes, once or twice. - In the mornings or evenings? Sometimes in the mornings and sometimes in the evenings. - To some places of amusement? No, I only took walks. - Did you ever go in the parks with her in the mornings? Yes. - She was a stranger in London, was she not? Yes. - Did you ever have very particular conversation with her? No, sir. - I mean on matters which might throw some light upon her death? No. - Try and tell us all about your last walk? Last Saturday week she asked me the way to the Serpentine. She then appeared very dull. - Did you ask her what was the matter? I did not. - She told you then? No, she simply asked me the way to the Serpentine River. I was doing some dusting in the drawing=room at the time. - Do you call the drawing-room your store room? Yes. - How did the conversation commence? She simply asked me the way to the Serpentine. - Did she say "Will you take a walk with me?" Tell me her exact words. She said "Miss Bartlett, if you can spare time, will you show me the way to the Serpentine?" - Did she give any reason? No; I asked her what for, and she said she should like to take a walk there. - Was it then that you noticed she was very dull? Yes. - What else did you say to her? I do not recollect anything else. - Did you go with her as requested? No, sir. - What did you say to her? I( said I could not go. - What happened after that? Did she go or not? She did not go out that day. - I suppose you never slept in the house? No; on no occasion during the last month. - Within the last two months have you? Yes. - Who did you sleep with? Madam Hudson. - Have you ever slept with the deceased? Once or twice I have. - You say you were very friendly with deceased; did she ever make any other observations to you? No. - Think carefully. Cannot you remember anything further? She never on any occasion made reference to a young man. - Never expressed any feelings that way to you at all? No, never. - With regard to her position, what position did she occupy? She was housekeeper. - Did she ever tell you anything about herself? So far as I could judge she was happy. - do you remember any occasion when she said anything about her desire to return home? She expressed that desire once or twice. - Did she tell you why? She said she did not care for London. I think she wished for a quieter place. - Did she ever speak to you any way unpleasantly about Mr Miles or anyone? No, sir; she never mentioned his name to me. She, however, once said she did not like him. - Ah! that was a mutual dislike as far as the evidence goes. Did she speak more than once on the subject? I think so. She always said she did not like him. - Did she give you any special reason why? I think there was a little jealousy. - Explain to us what you mean? She did not like him to go out with her aunt. - But, if she did not like him, I do not see why she should have been jealous of him. I think she thought her aunt took too much notice of him. - But where can be the jealousy? I think she thought he took too much money from her aunt. - Were there any disputes about money matters? Tell us the truth. Yes. - You were quite out of these jealousies? Yes. - did they get to high words at times? Was there a good deal of storming? Yes. I have seen her crying once or twice, but I cannot tell what it was about. - What time did you arrive on the morning of her death? Half-past eight. Were you there the day before? No. - Do you know what happened on the Saturday? We were preparing for Captain Day. He was coming there as a lodger. - Was Mr Miles there on Saturday? No. - Did Mr Miles and MISS PERRY quarrel? I think they had some words together. - You do not know what it was about, do you? No. - When you saw deceased the first thing on Monday how was she? She appeared quite well. - Did she say anything to you? Nothing at all. - You did not know anything was the matter until you came in afterwards? Not until my return at half-past ten with Mrs Hudson. - What was the matter then? She was lying on the couch groaning, and told Mrs Hudson she was very ill. - Did you speak to her? No, I was out of the room most of the time. - What did she say to you? She said "I have done something wrong." But she did not say what it was. She said she knew very well what she had done, but she could not tell me. - A Juror: Did she not explain the nature of the wrong to you? - No. - The Coroner: Did she say whether she would tell anyone else? Yes, four or five times. - At the conclusion of this witness's evidence a gentleman named Bartholomew Lynch asked to be allowed to make a statement. He said "I should like to state that I came here voluntarily. I used to call on business matters to see Mrs Hudson about her beer. I made the acquaintance of the deceased about six weeks or two months ago. Mrs Hudson spoke about her being a nice girl, but that she was inclined to be very dull. Two or three evenings from this occasion we went together to Madame Tussaud's. After an absence of about an hour she went straight home. On the last occasion she seemed rather a pleasant young person. - Dr Rayner, of 79 Edgware-road, said: I was called to see deceased on the 7th instant, shortly after ten in the morning. Mr Miles fetched me. On my arrival I found the deceased in the drawing-room of the first floor. She was partly lying on the carpet, and was supported by the servant Mary Loder. I learnt that she had taken poison. The Coroner: Who informed you of that? It was talked of in the room by the servant and Mr Miles. I had her raised from the floor and placed on the couch. I then looked round the room for any traces of poison, in cups for papers, or anything which could be found to give me a clue, but discovered nothing. - The Coroner: In what condition was the patient? She was conscious. She said she would tell me what was the matter with her if the others would leave the room. She said she wanted to speak to me alone. I directed everyone to leave the room, and took a seat beside her couch. She then said, "Doctor, I want you to give me something to send me to heaven." I said, What for? What do you want to die for?" She replied, "Because I have done something wrong. I have been wicked." I asked, "What have you done?" And she replied, "Will you promise to give me something to send me to heaven?" I rejoined, "I hope to send you something to do you good." She declined to tell me anything more. - Presuming that she had taken poison, did you notice anything? Well, she was excited. There was great nervous excitability and sensibility. She even started at a sound while she was on the couch. When I put my finger on her shoulder she started as if she had received a violent shock. I gave some directions to the servants what to do with her; and my own impression was that it was simply a fit of hysteria. - Did you inquire further as to the rat poison? I did. I was told she had been seen with some in her possession, and had been noticed spreading it on bread and butter. This was on the occasion of my second visit. I sent some medicine for her to take, and arranged to see her again. I was again called in about half-an-hour's time. On the occasion of my first visit I disbelieved the idea of poisoning. It was simply put to me as a surmise. When I arrived I found her strongly convulsed. I had recourse to the usual means - water and sponge. Presently she revived and came round. Mr Edkins, the chemist, had also been sent for. It was then we made enquiries about this poison. I asked him what was sold for rats' poison, and he told me. - The Coroner: Who informed you that deceased had been spreading it on bread and butter? The servant Loder told me so. Very shortly after she partook of a sip of lemonade she was violently sick. I directed the servant to get a basin. I collected a considerable portion of the first vomit, and I told the servant to put it aside to take care of it, and that if any change took place they were to immediately send for me. At this time I began to think there might be some truth in the statement as to her having taken some poison. I then left. I was sent for about four, and when I arrived she was already dead. There was considerable rigidity about the upper extremities - the features being quite distorted. I made the post-mortem examination twenty-two hours after death. There were no external marks upon the body. Upon opening the chest I found the lungs generally engorged. It was evident that she had had some time or other an attack of pleurisy. I found blood in the wind pipe and in the mouth. The heart was structurally healthy; both chambers, however, contained dark clots of blood. The liver and kidneys were in a healthy condition. The brain was in perfectly healthy condition. The stomach was quite empty, the contents having been vomited. I did not remove the stomach because it was quite empty, and there was no appearance on the coats of the stomach to necessitate its removal. In reply to further questions, the doctor stated there was nothing to show that the deceased had not lived a strictly moral life. - Mr Alex. Winter Blyth, public analyst for the parish of Marylebone, was the next witness called. He said: On Thursday morning I received a jar containing forty-three ounces of liquid said to be vomit, and I have made a careful analysis of it. I have separated 17 grains of strychnine from 13 grains of brucine, that being three grains of poisonous alkaloids in all; and on examining a deposit that settled from the vomit through a microscope, I found a vegetable powder which strikingly resembles that obtained from nux vomica. I found no other poison. I am of opinion, from the evidence of the symptoms just detailed, and from my own analysis, that the deceased died from strychnine and brucine poisoning, and the probable source of the poison was powdered nux-vomica. I believe she must have taken at least one hundred grains, assuming it was powder. - What quantity would have been sufficient to have killed the deceased? I should say half-a-grain of strychnine and what was taken from the vomit was nearly two grains - 1.7. - Emily Loder, the servant, was recalled. She said on Saturday morning deceased gave me 3d. to get some poison to kill the mice in the storeroom. I gave a penny for it. We broke off the neck of the bottle, and she spread the contents on some bread and butter which she laid about the storeroom. I went up with her and showed her how to lay it. Mrs Hudson knew I had bought the poison. How much bread and butter was there? Only one slice, but it was cut up into several pieces. I bought two bottles and the second was put on the dresser, but it is not to be found anywhere. I never saw it after it was placed on the dresser. - When did you suspect the deceased lady had taken poison? I did not suspect it. I have not talked about it. I did not say anything to the doctor. - On the last occasion we had great difficulty with you. Why did you not tell us at first about the two bottles? I did. - The Coroner here spoke sharply to the witness as to her manner of giving evidence. - Are you sure you did not buy three bottles? I did not. I looked for the second bottle on Monday evening. - Why did you not tell us about the poison on Friday? I did not know. - did you not tell us about the bottles? I knew nothing more. I did not think to say anything about it, as I did not think deceased would do anything of the sort. - Did you tell anybody that if you were asked fifty questions they would get nothing out of you? - I did not. - Are you sure you did not give her a dose? - Yes, I will [Portion of the newspaper here missing.] idea about the illness? - No, I thought, perhaps, it might have been a fit. - The Inquiry room having been cleared for about a quarter of an hour, the following verdict was announced by the Coroner as that returned by the Jury:- "That the deceased was found dying, and did die, from the mortal effects of strychnine poisoning contained in a bottle of rat poison, and that the said poison was self-administered by the deceased for the purpose of self-destruction; and the Jurors further say that the deceased was at the time in a state of mental excitement, produced by the unhappy conditions with which she was surrounded whilst living with her aunt at 46 Edgware-road." The Inquire then terminated.

EXETER - Sudden Death. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday at the Clarence Hotel, on the body of FANNY JERRED, a domestic servant, who expired somewhat suddenly whilst in the employ of Mr J. E. Lake, silversmith, of High-street, Exeter. The medical evidence showed that death resulted from Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 November 1881
PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Last evening an Inquest was held at the Hyde Park Hotel, Mutley, on the body of ALFRED EDWARD WALLING, aged 17 months, who died at Maisonette Cottage, Compton, on Friday last. On the 31st of October, at about 5.30 p.m., CLARA WALLING, the sister of the deceased, filled the teapot with boiling water and stood it on the tea-table. The child was seated on a sofa close to the table. He then went to the kitchen, but hearing a noise returned, and found that the child had pulled the tablecloth, and thus brought the teapot and contents over him. His mother immediately applied oil to the scalded parts and sent for a doctor, but notwithstanding all efforts the deceased died on Friday. - The Jury, of whom Mr F. Gloyne was Foreman, returned a verdict that Death resulted from injuries caused by the Accident.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Deaths At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held two Inquests yesterday, the first of which was at the Queen's Head Hotel, and was as to the death of an infant aged 19 months, named WILLIAM TROTT. The mother of the deceased stated that she resided at 23 Duke-street. The child was healthy, but on Sunday last about eight p.m. whilst nursing him he was seized with convulsions, and died in two or three minutes. Two or three months ago the deceased had been seized with a convulsive fit, but it was very slight. - Dr Laity deposed to being sent for, but on arriving at the house found the child dead. He had made a post-mortem examination and on opening the head he found that the membranes and surface of the brain were very much congested. The internal organs were all healthy with the exception of the stomach, which was very much distended with undigested and partly digested food, which appeared to consist principally of meat and potatoes. The deceased had only two teeth on the under jaw, and two very prominent on the upper jaw, but they were not through the gum, which ought to have been lanced, being sufficient in the state he found them to cause the fits. He thought, however, that death was due to the state of the stomach, the food in which had not been properly masticated. As a rule, a child of the age of the deceased had more teeth, but it was improper to give a child of such tender age food the like of which he found in the stomach. From inquiries he had made of the mother of the deceased he had ascertained that the baby made a hearty dinner of mutton and potatoes, and shortly before it died it again partook of the same kind of food. The Coroner remarked that a life which might one day have proved valuable had been sacrificed through excessive kindness, and he hoped that it would be a warning to other parents to refrain from giving young children food such as the unfortunate child in the present case had had. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The death of another infant, aged 1 year and 10 months, named SYDNEY LEOPOLD LAUNDER, and residing with its parents in Cornwall-street, was the subject of the next Inquest. LOUISA LAUNDER, mother of the deceased, stated that on Monday the child was taken with measles. She procured medicine for the deceased from a chemist. The child on Saturday last appeared to be much brighter and at midnight, whilst in bed, she gave the child its medicine. An hour and a half after she woke up and found the child dead by her side. - Mr C. Wilson said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased. On opening the heart and examining the left cavities he found a clot of fibrine which blocked up the entrance from one cavity to the other, and thus caused death. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 21 November 1881
CORNWOOD - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Cornwood Inn, Cornwood, on Saturday, on the body of ELIZA ELLIOTT, aged 69, who was found drowned on Thursday morning in the River Yealm, a little below Vicarage Bridge. Mrs Bastard, a neighbour, said that on Thursday morning, about seven o'clock, she went in search of the deceased, who had not returned home on the previous night. Witness found the poor woman in the river, about 150 yards from the bridge. She was quite dead. By the Coroner: The river was very high on Wednesday night and also the next morning. Harriet Wilcocks deposed that she was a servant, and lived at Wisdom Farm. She knew deceased very well. On Wednesday she came to the farm, and left again between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. She did not appear to be low spirited. Witness offered to light her down the road, but she refused. When she left deceased was quite sober. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Mumford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 22 November 1881
BARNSTAPLE - Found Drowned. - A man named GEORGE ALFORD, a labourer, a few days ago met with his death through drowning. He was employed as a labourer on the estate of Mr R. Chichester, of Hall, and it was his usual custom to go to his home by the way of some path-fields which run along close to the river Taw. It is supposed that the deceased accidentally walked into the river. It was a dark and stormy night, and deceased was blind in one eye. He was missed on Wednesday night, and although a diligent search was made for the body it was not found until Saturday. An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr J. H. Toller, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Sad Fatality At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Enquiry at the Guildhall, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of ANDREW BURNET, examining officer of H.M. Customs. Mr T. Wolferstan, secretary to the Sutton Harbour Improvement Company, watched the case on behalf of that body. ANDREW GRENFIELD BURNET, residing at 19 Longfield-terrace, said he last saw his father alive on Saturday, 19th inst., at seven o'clock. John Knight Trewin, customs' officer, said he was stationed at Plymouth and knew MR BURNET very well. On Saturday night witness was on duty at Harbour Avenue with another officer when he saw someone, who was going along between the metals on the quay, fall. Witness at once rendered assistance to the person, who thanked him and walked on. He then saw it was MR BURNET. The spot where he fell would be about twelve feet from the edge of the quay. There was a piece of timber parallel with the rails, and it appeared to him that MR BURNET fell over that. As deceased walked away witness saw him put his hand to his forehead. Witness saw nothing more of MR BURNET until he was brought from the water to the quay a few minutes afterwards. The distance from the place where deceased fell to the spot where he was brought up was about fifty yards. When the body reached the quay there was life still in it. Every possible means were used to improve the respiration. The deceased was afterwards taken to the Harbour Avenue Station, where Mr Harper saw him and pronounced life to be extinct. - Malcolm Macgregor deposed that he was steward and cook of the barque Adias, of Newquay, which was lying alongside the north-east quay. About half-past eight, or a quarter to nine, on Saturday night, he was standing at the galley door, talking to the mate. The night was very dark, and by the glimmer of a lamp he saw a man coming along the quay as if he was feeling his way. After watching him for two or three minutes witness turned and went into the galley. Soon after he heard his companion, who was a foreigner, ejaculate, "De man over," and just then he heard a splash. Witness immediately jumped ashore, and his mate getting into the boat he pulled it along by the painter. They managed to get the man into the boat, and then, with some assistance, he was taken ashore. He seemed stunned and senseless, and witness thought there was little life in him. There were no lights near the spot where deceased fell, but there was a light near the stern of the ship. - By the coroner: He did not see any irregularity in MR BURNET'S walk. - P.C. Setters deposed that having heard that a person had been drowned he went to the North Quay with a stretcher. He saw deceased there, and he was carried to the station. He sent for Mr Harper, who came soon after. There was no list of measures prescribed by the Royal Humane Society at his station, but he knew them, having formerly had them at the Barbican. - Mr Brian would strongly recommend witness to apply for a list. Being questioned as to the lighting of the quay, the constable replied that there was a gaslight at the bottom of Harbour Avenue, but no other lamp to Sutton-road, a distance of from 120 to 150 yards. He did not think, from the direction deceased was said to be going, he could get out that way. That deceased was going out of his way there was not a doubt. There was no chain round the quay. - The witness Trewin, being recalled, said there was nothing in the manner of deceased to lead him to suppose he was not sober. - A verdict was returned to the effect that the deceased died from a shock to the system caused by his immersion in the water, the Jury expressing, through their Foreman, Mr Bickell, their opinion that lights ought to be placed at the spot pointed out, as well as a barrier f some sort or other round the edge of the quay. - Mr Wolferstan replied that the quay was the property of the Sutton Harbour Improvement Company, and they had thought it unnecessary to place a barrier around it.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 November 1881
BARNSTAPLE - Two cases of sudden death occurred at Barnstaple on Wednesday night last, and at the Inquests held yesterday a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned in each case. In one instance JOHN WESTACOTT, aged 67, was at work making a coffin in a shop by himself. On someone going to the shop a few hours after the old man went to work he was discovered dead and cold, lying on his face and hands. The other case was that of a man named HENRY RICHARDSON, a lace twister, who had a wife and eight children. He was found in bed in convulsions, and died about ten minutes afterwards.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 28 November 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday at the Seymour Arms, North-street, respecting the death of PETER REILLY, a naval pensioner, aged 46. Richard Rolestone, a butler, said deceased was his son-in-law, and resided with him at 57 Regent-street. REILLY, who had been pensioned from the Royal Navy, entered the mercantile service, and returned about three weeks ago from a voyage round the South African coast. His health had not been particularly robust since, and he complained of giddiness in the head. He had not been under medical care since he had been home. Witness had had the misfortune to lose his wife lately, and REILLY had intended going to her funeral, which took place on the previous day. The cortege was to have left the house at a quarter after two, and about a quarter to one the party sat down to dinner. REILLY was sitting by witness and had just finished his meal, when suddenly he fell back over his chair without saying a word. Witness rose and placed him on the floor with his back against a chest. Medical help was then sent for, and Dr Harper, who came, pronounced deceased to be dead. He had told witness that when his vessel called at Hamburg on the homeward voyage, he had been taken so ill that it took two men to hold him, and he was taken to the hospital there, where he remained for five weeks. He had been attached to his mother, and seemed much depressed during Friday morning. The Jury, of whom Mr Smith was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 1 December 1881
EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death In Hamoaze. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon, touching the death of WM. FLINN, a private in the Royal Marines, serving on board H.M.S. Impregnable. - Sergeant Wm. Curry, R.M.L.I., stated that FLINN was one of the detachment of Marines serving on board he Impregnable, and was thirty-eight years of age. On Saturday evening, the 26th inst., deceased was on duty from eight to twelve p.m. At the latter hour he went to his hammock, but did not complain of being unwell. Next morning at 6.30 he did not turn out as usual, and witness, on going to rouse him, found him dead and quite cold. Deceased was lying on his right side. - Frederick Finch was a private on board the Impregnable, and knew deceased very well. About two o'clock on Sunday morning deceased awoke witness by his snoring. He shouted to him, and the snoring ceased. - Mr Henry Hadlow said he was fleet surgeon on board the Impregnable, and about twenty minutes after seven on Sunday morning he was called to see FLINN, who was quite dead. He considered syncope and failure of the heart's action were the cause of death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 December 1881
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. Sad Results Of Drink. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest yesterday at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, concerning the death of GEORGE OSBORNE, a drayman in the employ of Mr Liscombe, proprietor of the Tamar Brewery, Newpassage, who committed suicide under the circumstances which have already been stated. A double Jury was empanelled, of whom Mr Dean was elected Foreman. - Charles Sambell, 6 Tamar-wharf, employed as a cooper at the brewery, said about seven o'clock on Monday morning he had occasion to go down into the long cellar where the vats were situated. He lit a candle and he then saw at his feet a clean jacket. After breakfast he was told the deceased man OSBORN was missing. He immediately went down to the cellar and found the watch and hat of the deceased on the top of the vat, and on looking further he found the deceased in the vat. He thought the deceased was there from the fact of his watch and hat being on the top of the vat, and also because the door of the manhole was off. Previous to taking the deceased out of the vat he let all the beer run out, and he should think the amount was about a barrel full. The deceased, to get to the entrance of the vat had to use a ladder, and before he could get in he would have to remove a quantity of sand and lift the trap-hatch, which a stranger would not know how to do. The vat had not been opened for three months, and in it there was a quantity of hops as well as beer, but the deceased was not near the beer. His head was buried in the hops. He should think that the hops and beer in the vat would be about eight inches deep. There was a great deal of bad gas in the vat. If directly a vat were opened a man got in it his life would be soon gone by his inhaling the noxious gases there. Before he could take the body out he had to knock off five hoops and take the head of the vat off. - By Jurors: He was of opinion that the foul air killed the deceased. The beer in the vat was absorbed pretty well by the hops. Previous to being taken out the deceased was lying on his face and hands. - By the Coroner: He last saw the deceased alive on Saturday night, and he then appeared to be quite rational, but the deceased had been very low-spirited for the past two or three months. The vat in which the deceased was found was to be taken down and destroyed by order of Mr Liscombe. - John Pearse, a labourer employed at the brewery, spoke concerning the low state of mind the deceased had been in lately, especially the last two or three weeks, which was due to the fact that no one would take him in as a tenant because of having heard of his attempt to take his life. The deceased had spoken to him about the quarrels he had had with his wife. - P.C. Matthew Crabb, of the Plymouth Borough Police, deposed that on the 26th of October last he was called to No. 24 Neswick-street, Plymouth, to see the deceased, who had attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. The wound was about four inches long and the windpipe was exposed but not cut. On the 31st of October deceased was taken before the magistrates when he was remanded for a week at the expiration of that time he was again brought before the Bench, and on expressing contrition for what he had done and promising not to attempt the like again he was discharged. He had heard that the deceased drank heavily and consequently did not live comfortably with his wife. - FANNY SCOTT OSBORNE, wife of the deceased, said she had been married thirteen years. The deceased was 45 years of age, and for more than twelve months he had drank very heavily, and at times when in drink he was very violent. The night before the day on which he cut his throat she left him because of his having threatened to "do" for her and her children. The deceased came to her on Friday last, and asked her to come back and live with him, which she refused to do. - P.C. Johns, of the Devonport Borough Police, deposed that he was called to the Tamar Brewery and was informed, on proceeding to the long cellar, that OSBORNE had committed suicide. Candles were procured so that the body might be seen, but the gases were so strong that the lights went out. The head of the vat was afterwards taken out and several buckets of hot water were thrown in the vat to drive out the gas, which proved effectual. They were then able to keep a candle lighted in the vat and the body was immediately taken out. He searched it and on it was a purse containing £1 2s. 6 ½d. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide while in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Colebrooke, Plympton, as to the death of THOMAS PEDRIC who died from mortification through poisoning his finger. As the necessary witnesses were not in attendance the Coroner simply took sufficient evidence to grant an order for burial, and adjourned the Inquiry until Friday afternoon next. The same course was taken in the case of JANE RICE, who died suddenly whilst gathering sticks.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner, (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening at Sleaman's beerhouse, Harrell-street, as to the death of CHARLES HENRY HILL, aged 11 weeks. The father of deceased stated that his child had been strong and healthy since birth. During the last two days it had been unwell, and Mr Filmer gave it some medicine on Saturday evening, which apparently relieved it. On Monday night they retired to bed as usual. On awaking the following morning the child was dead. Witness immediately went for a doctor. - Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, stated that deceased was a fine child for its age. He had examined it, and found no external marks. The right hand was clenched, with the thumb pressed into the fist. - John Filmer, chemist, Union-street, said that he prescribed for deceased. he gave it a mixture which he had recommended in a hundred similar cases. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 10 December 1881
PLYMPTON - Inquests At Plympton. - The Inquests adjourned by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner from Monday, were resumed last evening at the Colebrook Inn, Plympton. The first was on the body of an elderly woman named ELIZABETH RICE, who was found dead in a wood at Newnham Farm, on Saturday last. - Mrs Stephens deposed to seeing the deceased in the wood near where she was afterwards found dead about one o'clock. She seemed in good health then. - T. Maddon said he saw the deceased lying in the wood about a quarter to two. She was dead, and he sent for a medical man, and Dr Ellery said that from external examinations which he had made he came to the conclusion that the woman died from heart disease, and a verdict was returned to that effect. An Inquiry was then made relative to the death of THOMAS PEDRICK, a workman at the Plymouth Manure Works, Cattedown. Evidence was given to show that on the 4th November he was employed, in company with a man named Parsons. They both took hold of a piece of timber, and deceased shouting "all right", Parsons relinquished his hold, and the wood came down on three of his fingers, crushing them a little and making them bleed. he was at work for a week afterwards, but during that time felt a great deal of pain. He went to Dr Sharpe, but blood poisoning set in and he died on the 28th. The doctor said the accident was the primary cause of death, but the blood poisoning rose from the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 15 December 1881
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening into the circumstances connected with the death of MISS MARY ANN THOMAS, stationer, of Cornwall-street, Plymouth. Bessie Kate Full said she was a servant in the employ of deceased, who on Tuesday appeared to be in good health. At seven o'clock on that (Wednesday) morning deceased woke her and asked her to answer a ring at the door. She did so, and on her return to the room, about three-quarters of an hour afterwards, found MISS THOMAS lying with her head under the clothes; on making an examination she saw that she was dead. She immediately went to Mr Luke, who manages the business for MISS THOMAS, and he returned with her to the room. Ultimately Dr Stephens was sent for, and on his arrival he pronounced life extinct. Thomas Leonard Luke, business manager to MISS THOMAS, stated that deceased had been subject to spasms for some time past. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 19 December 1881
PLYMOUTH - Inquests At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquest at the Tandem Inn, Octagon-street, on Saturday, on the body of JOHN DANIELLS, the illegitimate three months old son of ELIZABETH DANIELLS, residing at 28 Rendle-street. The child had been strong from its birth, but on Saturday morning, when in bed with its mother, it drew up its legs, and clenched its hands with the thumb inside, and expired. The little pit the Jury saw in the deceased's head had been there since birth. Mr Henry Miller, M.R.C.S., said in his opinion the child died from convulsions. The indentation in the crown of the head was natural, owing to the bones not having closed. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at the Lord Clarendon Inn, Summerland-place, on Saturday evening, respecting the death of EMILY CHUBB, the infant daughter, aged four months, of ELIZABETH CHUBB, wife of a plumber, living at 3 Summerland-terrace. The mother said she went to bed with the child about one o'clock on Friday morning. Witness sat up until that hour for the purpose of warming the child. When she went asleep it was lying on her arm, away from her husband. About a quarter to seven she woke up; she then found the little thing dead. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 December 1881
DORCHESTER, DORSET - Sad End Of A Plymouth Actress. - The unfortunate young woman, CONSTANCE GERALDINE PENNINGTON, whose case was reported in this paper on Saturday, died at the Infirmary, at the Dorchester Prison, on Saturday night. As soon as it was known that the young woman was suffering from a cancer in the throat, her case was considered hopeless, but her death was rather more sudden than was anticipated. Deceased was visited by her relatives, who were present, when she died. An Inquest was held yesterday, when Mr Goad, surgeon, said he ordered deceased the best of prison diet, and a pint of milk daily. She had that diet and also her own dinner. He saw her twice a day in the hospital, and prescribed for her. She was in very good condition of body when she entered the prison, but became very much emaciated before death. She was about 21 years of age and was ordinarily robust when she came in, but he did not think she had taken much care of herself. As she was awaiting her trial, she had no work to do. - The matron deposed that deceased told her she had been very kindly treated. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 21 December 1881
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday morning into the circumstances connected with the death of JOHN JONES, a carpenter employed on board the steamship James Grice, at present lying in the Great Western Docks. It appeared from the evidence of the captain and other witnesses that, on Friday last, when the steamer was about thirty miles north-north-east of Portland, JONES was helping to take in the mainsail. The ship at the time was lurching heavily, and a rope which deceased was holding happening to break, he fell forward. At the same time the main boom fell, striking him on the chest and back of his neck and crushing him to the deck. The captain immediately had him removed to the cabin, where he expired in a few minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 December 1881
TAVISTOCK - Inquiry was made at Tavistock yesterday by the Deputy Coroner as to the death of the illegitimate female child of JANE JEFFERY, which was found dead in bed by the side of its mother on Sunday morning. It appeared that the child, which was a month old, had suffered from diarrhoea and died of convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Jurors gave their fees to the mother.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 December 1881
PLYMOUTH - Two cases of sudden death were investigated by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday. At the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, an Inquest was held as to the death of JOSEPH HOCKER, aged 29, a seaman of the Harpy, tender to H.M.S. Royal Adelaide. A boy named Ellis slept with deceased on Tuesday night, but was disturbed about 3.30 a.m. yesterday by a candle being lighted, and deceased was restless. Ellis found blood oozing from deceased's mouth. He called assistance, but before it arrived deceased had expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." At the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, an Inquiry was held on the body of SAMUEL RADFORD PAYNE, a labourer, aged 43. For the past twelve months deceased had been unwell, and complained of pain in his right side. On Tuesday he went to bed about ten o'clock, but at six the following morning he was found dead by his wife. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 December 1881
BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held at Brixham on Wednesday evening by Dr Hocker, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of RUTH SHERRIFF, a child three months old and after hearing the evidence of the father and midwife, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BERE FERRERS - Inquiry was made at Bere Ferris last evening by Mr Douglas Johnstone, the Deputy Coroner, into the cause of the death of a farm labourer named WILLIAM WILLS, aged 76. He was at work in a turnip field belonging to Mr Trevethan, last Tuesday, when he was taken ill, and shortly after being carried home he died. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday on a woman named STEER. The husband said the deceased was all right at Tuesday dinner-time but when he went home from work in the evening he found her leaning over the fire with her handkerchief to her mouth, spitting blood and she shortly after died. Medical evidence shewed that death resulted from suffocation produced by rupture of a blood vessel and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 December 1881
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Plymouth on Saturday respecting the death of ANN ASHTON, a widow, of 37 St. Andrew-street, who was found dead in her bed, but had died from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 December 1881
TOPSHAM - Inquiry was made at Topsham yesterday as to the death of JULIA BROOKS, aged 22, one of two girls who mysteriously disappeared from Exeter on November 30th. The body of BROOKS was found a few days ago in the Exe, near Topsham. The medical evidence went to show that there had been no violence, and it was conjectured that, the night being dark and stormy, the girls were either blown or stumbled into the water. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The body of the other girl has not been recovered.

STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Fatality At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Coroner at Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday upon the body of SARAH ANN DAVEY, aged 5 years. The deceased lived at 33 James-street. Early on Saturday morning the mother of the child went downstairs into the yard, leaving her three children in bed. Within a very few minutes she heard screams of "fire," and on rushing upstairs the deceased ran out upon the landing with her nightdress on fire. As quickly as possible the flames were extinguished and oil and flour were applied to the burns, but the poor child was dreadfully injured about the body, and was accordingly removed to the Royal Albert Hospital. She lingered until late that night, when death ensued. None of those in the house could say how the accident occurred, but it was suggested that the child left her bed as soon as her mother went out of the room, and sat, as she was in the habit of doing, on the hearthrug before the recently-lighted fire, a spark from which fell upon her nightdress. One of the other children in the room at the time was older than the deceased, but stated that not until she heard her sister scream did she know that anything had happened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 December 1881
MIDDLESEX, LONDON - Sad Death Of A Devonshire Woman In London. - Dr Danford Thomas, the Coroner for Central Middlesex, held an Inquest at the Coroner's Court as to the death of ELIZABETH MARCHANT STOWE, aged 35, a single woman, of Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire, found killed at the Highbury Station of the North London Railway on the morning of Christmas-day. - MR JOHN STOWE, a chemist's assistant, of 420 Holloway-road, London, identified the body as that of his sister and deposed that she came to London a few days ago with her mother to spend the Christmas with some relatives. She had been suffering from indigestion and depression, and she was subject to a feeling that she would go out of her mind. She had also been much worried lately. On Sunday she left Bow by the railway, as he believed to pay him a visit. On Monday morning, hearing that a body of a woman had been found on the line at Highbury Station of the North London Railway, and that his sister was missing, he went there and found it was she. - John Crew, porter at the Highbury Station, said on Sunday morning at five minutes to eight, he observed through the mist something lying on the line at the end of No. 1 platform, and on going to it he found it was the body of a woman, and that one of her boots had been caught in the points. She was quite dead, and apparently much injured. The previous train from the direction of Bow had gone by a long while before the discovery. - The station-master proved that the station was well lighted at the time, and that it continued so for half an hour after the train by which the woman had travelled had passed. His opinion was that she must have walked off the end of the platform in front of the train without being seen. - Verdict, "That deceased, whilst of Unsound Mind, wandered on to the line and thus met her death by Misadventure."

Western Morning News, Friday 30 December 1881
MARWOOD - Inquiry was made at Marwood, near Barnstaple, on Wednesday, as to the death of an unmarried labourer, named JAMES BROWN, 30 years of age, who was sent by his master to work in a meadow on Monday morning, and whose body was found with the face sunk in mud and water on Tuesday morning. Evidence was given that the deceased was subject to fits, and the medical testimony was that death was caused by suffocation by water whilst he lay in an unconscious state from the effects of an epileptic fit. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 December 1881
TIVERTON - Suicide At Tiverton. - An Inquest was held last evening at Tiverton on the body of JAMES HOLMES, a factory operative who committed suicide by cutting his throat on the previous day. Deceased had for two months suffered from weakness, and complained of a pressure on the head, and on Thursday morning he did not appear in his usual spirits. He had been an out-patient at the Infirmary suffering from a pain in the back of the head, but did not appear to be of unsound mind. When the medical man arrived deceased was tearing at his throat, which was cut, the jugular vein and windpipe being severed in more than one place. The Jury, after nearly an hour's consultation, returned a verdict of Felo De Se, and added a rider that they were of opinion that deceased committed the act whilst under great mental depression.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 January 1882
EXETER - Mr Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter on Saturday on the body of HENRY ISAACS, a Royal Artillery pensioner, aged 40, who died suddenly two days before. Deceased was employed as sweeper at Topsham Barracks. Before going to his work on Thursday morning he called at the lodgings of Edward Barrett, Sun-street, to see the time, and while looking at Barrett's watch he was taken ill. He went to the barracks, however, and while there had another attack. The ambulance men carried him to the Exeter Hospital, where he was received in an unconscious state, and he died at eleven o'clock the same night. Deceased had been discharged from the army in consequence of sunstroke while in India, and the medical evidence shewed that the immediate cause of death was apoplexy, the result of Bright's disease. Verdict "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 January 1882
EXETER - Inquiry was made at the Country House Inn, between Topsham and Exeter, yesterday, as to the death of the young girl, MARY ROUSALL, whose body was found on Saturday in a mill leat at Countess Weir Paper Mills. ROUSALL and a friend of hers, named Brooks, disappeared from Exeter on November 30th and Brooke's body was discovered near Turf a few days before the remains of her companion were found. Brooks lived on the St. Thomas side of the river Exe, and it is supposed that at night the girls went to the quay for the purpose of crossing the river by the ferry, when, in the darkness, they walked or were blown into the river. The evidence given at the Inquest yesterday shewed that the deceased had been subject to no personal violence - the state of her clothing, the contents of her pockets, &c., being exactly in the state in which they would have been found on the supposition of death by accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Of A Retired Officer At Plymouth. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of MR CHARLES HENRY ELPHINSTONE-HOLLOWAY, who was found drowned under Plymouth Hoe on Wednesday. Mr G. E. Searle was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr W. Phillips represented the friends of deceased. - Montague Sparrow, 6 Lipson-terrace, said he knew deceased. It was his body that the Jury had viewed. Deceased was 53 years of age. Witness knew him intimately as he was connected with the family. Deceased was a retired lieutenant in the army. Witness had not seen him for a week. The last time he saw him was when deceased called on him, when he was in good health and in very good spirits as he always was. He was a very temperate man. Witness's father was a medical man, and on deceased's last visit he observed that he had the appearance of a man who was liable to apoplectic fits. Witness noticed that his eyes were red. - Henry Caulls, fisherman of the Swan, of Penzance, stated that on Tuesday morning he was walking in company with another fisherman under the Citadel. About ten yards east of the aquarium he saw something floating. It was between two and three yards from the rocks. Witness went down the rocks alone, and saw that it was a man. He called to his companion and five other fishermen who were near. They went down to the water's edge, and by means of a long pole the body was brought to land. Witness then went in search of a policeman, and, the Hoe Constable (Mr Colton) returned with him. The men in the meantime were trying to get the water out of deceased. Deceased was full dressed with the exception of his hat, which was found floating near. No one knew who deceased was, and the body was carried to the mortuary. There were no seats on the rocks where deceased might have sat in order to smoke, and no pipe was seen near. - By Mr Phillips: He had never seen deceased before. The body was floating face downwards. He did not notice that deceased wore a gold chain, but he was wearing gloves. He saw deceased's pockets emptied at the station. - Mr Phillips: You know nothing of any watch, because a gold watch and chain, valued £5, are missing? - No. - The Foreman: Were the men near when you passed? - There were two there. - By Mr Bruford: He did not know if deceased was quite dead when taken out of the water. The other men tried to pump the water out of the body. - By Mr Pearce: Ten yards east of the aquarium there is a precipice with a path above, but there are wooden pailings there. - William Gilbert, fisherman, of Porthleven, said that about 2.30 on Tuesday afternoon he was just below the Citadel in company with two other fishermen. There were several fishermen in the neighbourhood. He heard the last witness's alarm, and ran to his assistance, and saw the body floating. Witness noticed the amber mouthpiece of a pipe protruding from the coat pocket of deceased, who was wearing an overcoat, which was buttoned over. Witness saw no gold chain. He appeared dead, but restoratives were applied. The body was not searched before the constable came. Two or three gentlemen were there, but they did not touch the body. From the time the body was taken from the water until it was placed on a stretcher, witness saw no signs of life. He did not know what became of the pipe. He did not observe deceased in the vicinity before the alarm of the last witness was given. If deceased had fallen into the water witness would have heard a cry. - By a Juror: The overcoat was taken off by the advice of a gentleman standing by, but witness saw nothing of any watch or chain. - William Nicholas stated that about 2.15 on Tuesday afternoon he was on the Hoe. He went towards Tinside, and as he was coming back he met deceased, whom he knew perfectly well. Deceased had a pipe in his mouth and an umbrella in his hand. Witness stood looking out to sea, just over the aquarium. Deceased was looking over the palings above the precipice east of the aquarium, and witness saw him descend to the archway leading to the aquarium. Here deceased stood near the iron railings looking out to sea. These railings separated deceased from the sea. Shortly afterwards witness saw him on the rocks east of the aquarium. The rocks were rugged, and it was very difficult to climb them. Deceased assisted himself with his umbrella. Witness, thinking that deceased went to the rocks for a natural purpose, did not take further notice of his movements. - By Mr Phillips: The water outside the aquarium was very deep. Deceased was of a cheerful disposition. - Henry Hutsam, coachman in the service of deceased, said that deceased left his home between ten and eleven o'clock. They arrived at the Globe Hotel between eleven and twelve and deceased left as usual. Deceased wore a long gold chain around his neck, but witness did not see it on Tuesday morning. Witness expected him to return about two o'clock. He was in his usual spirits. - By Mr Phillips: He was as much surprised as anyone to hear of the fate of deceased. He waited for him until five o'clock. - The Foreman suggested that the watch and chain had been detained at some place for repair, but Mr Phillips stated that every inquiry had been made and Mr Goulding had furnished the number of the watch. - James Colton, Hoe constable, stated that when he saw the body it did not have the appearance of being searched or "ransacked." He searched it at the Guildhall and found a leather bag in the pocket of the overcoat, a purse containing 12s. 4d., three blank cheques, and a tobacco pouch. He could find nothing which would give a clue as to how the deceased came into the water. Deceased was wearing a scarf with a gold pin and a gold ring on his finger. Witness found no watch or chain. - Detective Thomas stated that about ten yesterday morning he went to the Aquarium, and found the umbrella of deceased wedged between a rock and a loose stone. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that there was no evidence to lead to the conclusion that deceased committed suicide, nor was there any clue as to how he came into the water, whether thrown in wilfully or by accident. The latter was the more probable, as Mr Sparrow observed that he had the appearance of a person likely to be seized with an apoplectic fit. If the Jury did not think they could safely return a verdict to this effect, there was only one alternative for them, and that was to find that deceased was found dead, but as to how he came into the water there was no evidence to shew. - The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict that "Deceased fell into the water Accidentally and was Drowned." - Lieutenant ELPHINSTONE-HOLLOWAY, was the eldest son of the late Colonel ELPHINSTONE-HOLLOWAY, C.B., of the Royal Engineers, who died at Plymouth Citadel in September 1830, when in command of the Engineers in the Western District. He served in the 89th Regiment and 1.60th Rifles, from which corps he retired as lieutenant in 1853. It was his brother, mentioned yesterday, who was in the Ordnance Store Department. - The watch and chain referred to at the Inquest had not been taken from the body, as seemed to be indicated, but were found yesterday afternoon at Tamerton Foliott.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 January 1882
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, as to the death of FREDERICK JAMES TEPPETT, late a leading seaman of H.M.S. Agincourt. - Richard Cole, captain of the forecastle, stated that on Tuesday, at about 2.15 p.m., he was standing at the forepart of the upper deck watching the men who had been sent aloft. Deceased was sending aloft the topmast studding-sail boom, assisted by one of the younger seamen, who at the time of the accident was standing on the bunt of the yardarm. Witness saw the boom slip and come down with the run, the end striking the deceased, who was leaning over the boom iron, in the left side, and throwing him a depth of 50 feet into the water. He was rescued by a boat which was near the vessel (which is alongside the Dockyard, and after being seen by the ship doctor he was taken to the Hospital. - The seaman who was assisting the deceased gave corroborative evidence. - Mr William Edley, the fleet surgeon, said he saw the deceased on Tuesday evening, but from the first thought it a hopeless case, as ribs were broken on the left side and his brain was fractured. The brain fracture was the primary cause of death, which ensued at about 10 p.m. the same evening. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that "Deceased died from injuries Accidentally received whilst on duty."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) on Saturday evening as to the death of the child of ELIZABETH JAMES, wife of a merchant seaman, residing in Woolster-street. The child only lived seven hours, and it appeared that the mother was not attended by a medical man but by a midwife, named Elizabeth Bond. Dr Bampton stated that the child's life could probably have been saved if medical assistance had been called. Bond stated that the mother objected on the ground of expense, but the Coroner reminded the witness that she could have had the assistance of the district parochial surgeon. In returning a verdict of Death from Natural Causes, the Jury censured Bond for not having called in a medical man.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sudden deaths in Plymouth formed the subject of Inquests held by Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, last evening. - The first was that of ANN PROUT, aged 79. The deceased was an inmate of the "Charity Twelves," in the Almshouses, Green-street. She was admitted nearly three years ago. She appeared all right on Saturday dinner time, but on her son, SERGEANT PROUT, of the borough police, visiting her room about three hours later he found her lying on the floor dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr R. G. Edmonds, solicitor, appeared to watch the Inquiry on behalf of the trustees of the charity. The second Inquiry was held on the body of ELIZABETH IRISH, aged 70, who had for many years been a patient of Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon. The deceased was last seen on Friday night about 9.30 when she said she was very much better, but she was found dead in bed the following morning, and Mr Eccles gave it as his opinion that deceased died from a fit of apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

ST GILES IN THE HEATH - An Inquest was held at Chapman's-Well, between Launceston and Holsworthy, yesterday, as to the death of an infant child, the body of which was found on a hedge on Hele Farm, St. Giles-in-the-Heath. Evidence was given that MRS FULFORD, daughter of the occupier of the farm, had admitted that she was the mother of the child, and had placed the body where it was found. Messrs. Pearce and Ash, surgeons, stated that wound in the throat had caused death, but it might have been inflicted before the child had a separate existence. The Coroner held that this precluded a verdict of murder and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 January 1882
EXMOUTH - Inquiry was made at Exmouth yesterday by Mr Coroner Cox as to the death of MARY SMITH, aged 60, whose body was found in the water on Sunday. - Ann Chamberlain, a lodging-house keeper, of Preston-street, Exeter, deposed that she remembered deceased who made application to her in November last for lodgings, and told her that she had just been released from Exeter gaol, where she had been confined on a charge of drunkenness. Deceased stopped with her a week, during which time she followed her business of hawking, and was on no occasion seen by her the worse for liquor. Deceased then went to Dawlish, and returned on Christmas-day. The following afternoon she went away with her hawking basket in her usual cheerful spirits, and was not seen afterwards. Witness had heard that she had a son in Plymouth. - P.C. Evans of the Exeter force, said that he was on duty on the night of the 26th ult., and about half an hour past midnight saw deceased sitting on door-steps in Horse-lane near the Quay. He ordered her to move away, which she did, and he went some distance with her towards the quay. The lamps were all lit and he thought it very unlikely that she could have fallen in by accident. The Coroner pointed out that there was no direct evidence as to how the deceased met with her death, and an Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Plymouth Deputy Coroner (Mr W. Harrison) at the Clifton Hotel, on the body of JOHN SHAMBROCK, a foreman of labourers in the Great Western Docks, who died the day previously. Mr Smallridge, on behalf of Mr Rooney, represented the Great Western Docks Company. - William Setters, a labourer in the employ of the Dock Company, stated that on Monday, the 19th ult., he was working under the direction of the deceased on board the S.S. Thorn Holme, which was then in the docks. The vessel was taking on board barrels, which were hoisted from a lighter alongside by means of the ship's derrick and then lowered into the hold. Two barrels had been hoisted, and as they cleared the bulwarks the derrick naturally swung them inboard. At this moment the deceased had approached the amidship hatchway to look down into the hold and see that the men were working, and one of the barrels, as they cleared the space between the side of the vessel and the hatchway, struck the deceased in the back before he could be warned, and precipitated him into the hold. A trolley was obtained, and he was taken to his home, where he was attended by Dr C. Bulteel. - Deceased's daughter, MARY MARTIN, stated that her father had apparently been progressing favourably until Tuesday morning. At about 9.30 a.m. she went into the bedroom, when deceased was quite cheerful. At about a quarter to twelve her sister went into the room, and deceased asked her to bring him a book for him to read. At a quarter after twelve witness went into the room, only in time to see her father die. - Dr Bulteel said that he saw the deceased on December 19th, when he was suffering from severe bruises and contusions, but no bones were broken. For a week he progressed favourably, when pleurisy in the left side transpired and afterwards pleurisy in the right lung. Notwithstanding this the deceased appeared to be progressing favourably, and his death was totally unexpected. He attributed it to either a rupture of a blood vessel, occasioned by the injuries he had received, or a stoppage in the blood vessels, caused by inflammation; but in either case the primary cause of death was his fall. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 January 1882
EXETER - Suicide At Exeter. - An Inquest was held by the Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) yesterday on the body of LOUISA BARRETT, aged 18, the daughter of a painter living in Paris-street, whose death resulted from the effects of phosphoric paste, sold by chemists for the purpose of killing rats and other vermin. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased girl was of weak intellect, which was aggravated at times by epileptic fits, to which she was subject. On Thursday week some unpleasantness arose between the deceased and her mother, the former, who was at times irritable, having refused to help in the house work. She left the house and purchased a small bottle of the vermin killer, which, according to her statement, she ate on some bread. She was seized with vomiting; but it was not until the following Tuesday that she confessed what she had done. Then medical aid was of no avail; and she died on Thursday last. It was stated at the Inquest that patent medicines were not included in the provisions of the Poisons' Act, and the Coroner expressed an opinion that this was a great defect in the law. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Hill-park Hotel, Plymouth, by the Deputy Coroner (Mr W. Harrison) into the death of GEORGE EVELY 42, a carrier, in the employ of Mr Moses, who received injuries on the 13th inst. as to cause death. MARY ANN EVELY, widow of deceased, residing at Froodum Cottage, said that on Friday last about 6.30 a.m. he left home with the horse and cart to take mundic from a barge in Cattewater to Messrs. Gibbs's works. About four p.m. he returned, and informed her that he had met with a serious accident, having fallen over the quay into the barge, from which the mundic was being removed. He had broken his arm, and had been to Mr Jackson, who had set the injured limb. He immediately went to bed and the doctor visited him on the following afternoon. Deceased became weaker every day, and died on Wednesday evening at seven o'clock. - John Deacon, a labourer, gave evidence as to the accident, and George Jackson, M.R.C.S., said that on the Tuesday afternoon following the accident the deceased shewed symptoms of blood poisoning, and on the following morning he was dying. He attributed death to blood poisoning as a result of the accident. There was a wound on the arm 2 inches in length. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 January 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner (Mr Vaughan) yesterday held an Inquest at the Townhall on the body of JOHN WILLIAMS, 42, a bootmaker, residing at No. 4 Ker-street. EVELINA WILLIAMS, daughter of the deceased, stated that her father had been in the habit of going to Millbrook to sell his work every Saturday, and last Saturday went as usual. He had previously complained of pains in his stomach, but witness had apprehended nothing serious. Deceased was a very sober man. Mr William Pyle stated that on Saturday he was walking with a friend from Millbrook to Cremyll, when near Maker Church they met a woman, who said that there was a man a short distance down the road apparently very ill. They immediately hastened to the spot and found deceased lying on the ground apparently in great agony. They assisted him to rise and walk a short distance, when he asked to be allowed to sit down. They allowed him to do so, but with the assistance of a third man he eventually walked to Cremyll and crossed the water. He was then taken to the police-station, and given into the care of the constable on duty, P.C. Irish, who identified the deceased, and sent for the police surgeon, Dr De la Rue. The latter stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found a portion of the right lung congested, this in itself being sufficient to cause death, and he thought that a temporary stoppage in the bowels would account for the apparent agony the deceased suffered. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 January 1882
WEMBURY - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest yesterday at the Jubilee Inn, Wembury, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD HENRY FOWELL, dockyard pensioner, who was employed at Spriddlestone Lodge. From the evidence it appeared that on Saturday evening last deceased was found in a sitting posture against the back door of his house quite dead. Mr Liddle, surgeon, Plymstock, who made a post-mortem examination of the deceased, said he died from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 January 1882
NEWTON ABBOT - Inquiry was made at the Newton Townhall, on Saturday, by Dr Gaye, Coroner, as to the death of an infant son of HENRY BESS, a mason, living in a court in Wolborough-street. The mother put the infant to bed on the previous day, apparently well, and on going up to it about two hours after it was dead, but lying in just the same position as she left it. Dr Ley was called in, and he was of opinion that the child died of suffocation; and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

PLYMPTON ST MAURICE - An Inquest was held at the Castle Hotel, Plympton, on Saturday, by Mr Rodd, as to the death of MAURICE REGINALD TURPIN, aged two years, son of a gardener named WILLIAM TURPIN, residing at Handover-square, Plympton St. Maurice. - EMMA TURPIN, mother of the deceased, said about two p.m. on Wednesday last the deceased child was sitting in front of the fire on a low chair, and there was also a teapot full of boiling tea in front of the fire. By some means the child fell off the chair, and, in thinking to save himself, caught hold of the teapot and upset its contents over him. She immediately rushed forward and picked him up and found that he was badly scalded on the neck just under the chin, and on the arms. Mr Miles, surgeon, was sent for, and treated the child, who, however, despite careful attendance, died the next day. Mr George Miles, M.R.C.S., said death was due to convulsions brought on by the injuries sustained in the scalding. The Jury, of whom Mr Stanbury was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and as the parents of the deceased child were in very poor circumstances, they handed their fees to the mother.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 January 1882
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquiry at the Sutton Harbour Inn, Plymouth, last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ANN MARTIN, wife of a porter on the quay, residing at 12 Vauxhall-street. From the evidence of Eliza Tregido, midwife, wife of a naval pensioner residing at 7 Higher Batter-street, it appeared that deceased died during labour. A medical man was not in attendance, and witness was not aware that the deceased was suffering from heart disease. As soon as she noticed a change a medical man was sent for, but death had taken place before his arrival. Mr J. F. Eyeley, L.R.C.P., London, and M.R.C.S., Eng., stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and found extensive and long-standing disease of the heart, and he attributed death to that cause. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect and exonerated the midwife from blame.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 February 1882
EXMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday respecting the death of a fisherman named LACEY, who was drowned on the 20th December. - George Gray, master of the boat in which LACEY sailed, deposed that on the morning of the 20th December they were returning from off Teignmouth, where they had been fishing. There was a heavy sea on the Exmouth Bar, and a strong wind from south-south-west. He was steering, and LACEY was on his knees with the sheet in his hand. In crossing the bar between the Wreck and Fairway Buoys, a heavy sea broke over them, half filling the boat with water. At the same time the sheet flew out of LACEY'S hand, and he disappeared. He immediately threw out an oar and shouted that there was a man overboard, but he could do nothing more. It was quite dark, and they were going at the rate of six or seven miles an hour. If he had attempted to stop the boat they must all have been drowned. - Corroborative evidence having been given a verdict to the effect that deceased had been Accidentally Drowned was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Singular Death In Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of JANE SLEEP, single woman, aged about 42 years. Deceased, who resided at 26 Stillman-street, had until recently enjoyed good health, but for the last week or two she had complained of pains in the stomach. On Wednesday afternoon she was walking past Messrs. Underwood's shop in Bedford-street when she stumbled and fell in the doorway, the back of her head coming in violent contact with the granite slab on the threshold of the shop. Brandy was administered to her, and she was conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. She was examined by Mr Godfrey Carter, house surgeon, who found her to be in an unconscious and dying state, and death occurred within half-an-hour of her admission. Mr Carter, who made a post mortem examination, stated that there were no external marks of violence whatever. He found signs of old inflammation of the lungs, and, whilst the heart was sound, the other organs were not healthy, although not marked with disease. The stomach had certainly been overloaded, it being quite full of food, which was not half digested. The appearances led him to believe that the deceased first fainted, and that her generally bad condition prevented her recovery and led to syncope, which proved fatal. There was no evidence of any blow or wound in the skull. He considered that had deceased been able to absorb any stimulant she might have rallied, but her stomach was so overloaded that absorption in time could not take place. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 February 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Death At Devonport. - The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest last evening, at the Royal Albert Hospital as to the death of MARTHA HAWKING, aged 53, who died on Saturday from the effects of burning. John Bragg, a labourer, said that he was lodging at the Bank of England public-house, 7 John-street. He heard an alarm that deceased was on fire, and he saw her running through the passage enveloped in flames. He followed her into the backyard and extinguished the fire. They placed her on a bed. Witness saw her about half an hour previous to the accident and she then appeared as usual. Thomas Sloman, shipwright, 7 John-street, corroborated. He saw a lamp in the room of the deceased on the floor, and in flames. There was no one in the room. An oil bottle was lying in front of the fire, and a mat before the fire was saturated with the oil. His opinion was that deceased was filling the lamp from the bottle by the light of the fire and that the oil suddenly ignited. - P.C. Marks said that on Saturday night he was informed that the Bank of England beer-house was on fire. He went there and saw smoke coming out of the house. He was informed that deceased was burnt, and saw her in the passage. She was black and almost in a naked state. Deceased made no attempt to speak when questioned as to how the accident occurred, but when witness further asked her if it were through trimming a lamp, she faintly replied in the affirmative. She was immediately brought to the Hospital. Witness thought she would be dead before they reached the Hospital. Witness gave corroborative evidence as to the condition of deceased's room. There was a very bright fire burning there. She died at 11.5 p.m. the same evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner hoped this would be a warning against the use of benzoline and of trimming lamps by night.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 February 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquiry at Mr H. Atwill's First and Last Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, on Saturday evening, as to the death of ALFRED GEORGE FREDERICK HAWKINGS, aged 9 months. Mr Peter White was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MARY JANE MARTIN HAWKINGS, married woman, stated that the deceased was her child. It had been suffering from measles, but it had not had any medical attendant. About four o'clock on Friday afternoon witness took the child from its cradle to feed it and it then had a fit. Witness called assistance and used friction to the child's feet. The child died about five o'clock, and Mr Prynne, who had been sent for, came about half an hour afterwards. Mr Prynne, M.R.C.S., deposed to seeing the child and said he had no doubt but that the child died from Natural Causes. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 February 1882
ERMINGTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Inn, Ermington, yesterday on the body of WILLIAM ARTHUR, a baker, who met with a serious accident on the previous Thursday. His horse having come home alone deceased's brother went in search of him and found him lying unconscious in the road at Yeo, near Ivybridge. He had evidently been thrown from his horse which resulted in concussion of the brain, from which he subsequently died. The Jury found that he died from a fall from his horse, but under what circumstances there was not sufficient evidence to shew.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, on the body of ALICE FOURTE, a child 2 years of age, who died from the effects of scalding. The mother of the deceased, living at 6 Parade, said she had poured some boiling water into a cup for the purpose of washing the tea things, and during her temporary absence from the room, the child, who was running around the table, must have overturned the cup and received the boiling water on her neck and chest. The accident occurred on the 22nd ult., but deceased did not die until Friday last. Mr Pryn, surgeon, said the child suffered from extensive scalds on the throat and abdomen. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 February 1882
EXETER - Sudden Death In Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at Exeter on the body of CORDELIA KEEBLE, wife of a gasfitter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, living at 25 East John-street. - WILLIAM KEEBLE, husband of deceased, said she was 52 years of age and had been ailing for some time, having been suffering from heart disease. Witness left deceased in the house alone about a quarter past six on Monday morning and yesterday whilst at work at Templecombe he received a telegram calling him home, and on returning by the first train he found her dead. She was subject to fits, having had one about two months ago. there was no one in the house with her when she died, as they lived by themselves. - Mrs Mary Ann Haine, residing at 41 East John-street, stated that on Monday last between one and two o'clock deceased came to her house and asked for an orange, saying she felt very poorly and had no appetite for her dinner. She had the orange (which she said she had bought because she had a dryness in the throat) and then left. - Thomas Haine, husband of the last witness, stated that between ten and half-past ten yesterday morning he was in his shop, when he saw an unusual number of persons in the street, many being gathered in front of deceased's door. On making enquiries he was told that MRS KEEBLE had not been seen, and that the dog in the house had been howling all night. The front door was locked, but the back one being opened, he entered through that in company with a police officer. Witness went upstairs and tried to pacify the dog, which was howling at the top; whilst the policeman remained below. Having quieted the dog he entered a room, but on looking around saw nothing. As, however, he was about to leave the dog began to whine and walked anxiously about the off side of the bed. This induced witness to look the other side of the bed, and on doing so he found deceased lying, dressed, on the floor, with her head resting against the wall. - P.C. Yeo, the constable mentioned by the last witness, confirmed what had been said by Mr Haine. - Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, who was called in to see deceased, deposed that when he saw deceased she had evidently been dead several hours. The left side of the mouth was drawn down, but there were no marks of violence. In witness's opinion the death was a natural one, most probably caused by an apoplectic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Death of the Rev. H. WHEELER. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest yesterday at Charles' Schoolroom, Tavistock-place, as to the death of the REV. H. WHEELER, minister of the Norley Congregational Chapel, which was reported yesterday. The first witness was MRS MARY WHEELER, wife of the deceased, who stated that she resided at 41 Tavistock-place, and that her husband was the pastor of Norley-street Chapel. The deceased on Tuesday morning was in his usual health. About 2.20 p.m. he came home and into the kitchen where she was, and was about to speak to her when he fell forward on the floor and never moved afterwards. Mrs Jenkins, her cousin, came to her assistance and Mr W. Square was sent for, and within a very short time arrived. The deceased was 52 years of age, and was not under any medical care. - Mr W. Square, F.R.C.S., stated that he was called to the house about 2.30 p.m., and went at once. He found the deceased stretched on his back on the floor of the kitchen. He was pulseless, motionless and quite dead. The rev. gentleman was naturally a pale man, but it struck him that he was then much paler than usual. He had known the deceased for many years, and, taking into consideration the very sudden nature of his death, he had not the slightest hesitation in saying that death was due to the arrest of the heart's action. He was given to understand that the deceased ran home, and that in itself would be sufficient to cause cessation of the heart's action if the heart were in a diseased state. The heart's action might have been stopped by the rupture of a large blood-vessel, or through fatty degeneration. He was not able to say positively which it was of these causes, but he did not think it necessary to make a post-mortem examination. - The Coroner said if the Jury were not satisfied he would at once order a post-mortem examination to be made. - The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes". - Before MRS WHEELER left the room, and immediately after giving her evidence, the Coroner, on behalf of the Jury, expressed to her their deep sympathy in her great loss. Mr Brian also, before dismissing the Jury, asked them to allow him to tender their thanks to the Rev. G. F. Head, the vicar of Charles, for having so kindly placed that room at their disposal. In a case of that sort he did not care about holding the Inquest at an inn, and therefore, the room had been most suitable in that respect, and also convenient for the widow. - The funeral will take place at the Plymouth Cemetery on Saturday afternoon. Members of the I.O.G.T. wishing to join in the procession will provide cabs and meet at Tavistock-place; all other members to meet at the cemetery; members to appear in regalia.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 February 1882
PLYMOUTH - Yesterday at Plymouth the death of a woman named ANN FISHER, aged 60, was the subject of an Inquiry before the Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), at the Cambridge Arms, Cambridge-street, Plymouth. Mr Nicholson, relieving officer, watched the case on behalf of the Plymouth Board of Guardians. - It appeared that the deceased had been in the Plymouth Workhouse suffering from heart disease. About a fortnight since she came out of the House on a day's leave, and went to 67 Cambridge-street, where her husband, who is also in receipt of parish pay, resides. On the following day she would not go back to the Workhouse, although requested to do so by her husband. On Tuesday evening last she went to bed, and about five o'clock on the morning of the following day, was found dead in bed by her husband. - Mr F. Aubrey Thomas, M.R.C.S., the medical officer at the Workhouse, stated that the deceased, when in the Workhouse, was of weak intellect, and therefore was an inmate of the female lunatic ward. At Christmas last the deceased was more particularly under his care, being then suffering from heart disease and bronchitis. It was a great pity that she did not go back to the Workhouse, as she was not fit to be out so long. He was of opinion that death was due to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 February 1882
LYDFORD - Fatality In A Devonshire Mine. Strange Conduct Of A Medical Man. - Mr Fulford, Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at the New Inn, Post Bridge, Dartmoor, into the cause of death of a miner, named RICHARD HENRY STEPHENS. Just after noon he, with another, was at work underground in the Golden Dagger Mine, about a mile from Post Bridge, and whilst charging a hole the powder exploded in the face of the deceased, and he sustained frightful injuries. He was at once conveyed to the surface, and after lying many hours in great agony he expired. Much interest was taken in the result of the Inquiry, not only, as will be seen, because the deceased literally "threw away his life," but there was a report that although a doctor at Moretonhampstead was sent for, he refused to attend because the messenger had no money. Mr W. Rowe was elected Foreman of the Jury. - In opening the Inquiry, the Coroner explained that it was compulsory for the managers of mines to have certain regulations for the prevention of accidents posted in a conspicuous place, and he called attention to one in order that it might be brought before miners, and be the means of making them take greater precautions, for it would appear that the deceased neglected to follow the instructions laid down in the regulations, for he used an iron pricker to ram in the powder, instead of one of copper or wood. The clause read:- "In charging holes for blasting, except in mines excepted from the operation of this section, by the Secretary of State, an iron or steel pricker shall not be used, and a person shall not have in his possession in the mine underground any iron or steel pricker and an iron or steel tamping rod or stemmer shall not be used for ramming either the wadding or the first part of the tamping or stemming on the powder." He was pleased to find that the result of an inspection of the mine by the Inspector of Mines was that the regulations were posted in a proper manner, and that as far as those who had the control and management of the mine were concerned everything was done to give intimation to miners as to the duties devolving on them, and to see that they were carried out in such a way as to prevent accidents. The Coroner proceeded to inform the Jury that they would not have on that occasion the assistance of medical evidence to tell them the cause of death, and the circumstances of the injuries it would appear the deceased received. It had been reported to him as a fact, but he could scarcely credit it until it was said in evidence, that a medical man was sent for from Moretonhampstead, but although he did not appear to have any other urgent engagement, before he would come to attend on the poor man he insisted on the payment of the fee, and would not leave his residence to do what was the duty of every medical man to render to everyone, and one which, in the interests of common humanity, should have been rendered to the poor man suffering from the effects of such an accident. (Hear, hear.) - John Webb said on the day in question he and the deceased were working in the adit end of the mine, driving west. They had blasted one hole, and deceased had bored a second 13 in. deep. Deceased had in a portion of the powder, and was about to ram it with an iron tamping bar when witness cautioned him, and he replied, "That won't matter, Jack." Deceased had by him a wooden swab stick, which had been used in swabbing out the hole before, and he should have used that for the purpose of ramming. Witness then returned to where deceased was and handed him the tamping. He had the hole fully charged. Deceased took a handful of tamping, which had been prepared of soft stone, from the witness and poured it into the hole. witness then saw him use the iron tamping bar, before swabbing out the hole, and immediately after observing what good tamping it was, he struck the bar with a mallet and there was an explosion. Deceased received the whole force of the blow and was thrown back some distance. Witness ran to his assistance, and afterwards procured help to get him to the surface, deceased being himself able to use his feet on the ladder of the shaft. They could see the brain through a hole in his forehead, and his eyes were fearfully injured. - Mr Moses Bawden, the proprietor of the mine, explained the means necessary to be taken in charging a hole to prevent the possibility of an accident. The men were working on tribute, and the use of an iron tamping-bar would enable the deceased to get through his work more expeditiously. - A discussion then ensued as to what was "wadding" within the meaning of the section, the Coroner arguing that gritty decomposed granite was not suitable, while Mr Bawden contended that such "tamping" was the only sort used in the Cornish mining district. - Evidence was next called with respect to the refusal of the doctor to visit the deceased. But it was found that other doctors had previously been sent for, but they were unable through other engagements to attend. William White, however, gave evidence that as no doctor came at eight o'clock he went for one. He reached Moretonhampstead at a quarter to nine. he saw Mr Collings who said he had two causes of confinement he was compelled to attend; he had sent a former messenger to Mr Hunt at Chagford, but as he did not appear to have come, Mr Collings referred him to Mr May. Witness explained to that gentleman the nature of the accident, and Mr May replied that he had made up his mind not to go beyond the turnpike-gate unless he received his fee beforehand. Witness told him he had no money, but that it would be all right. Mr May added that he was expecting a confinement case every hour. Witness then left Mr May and returned to Mr Collings, that gentleman having promised to go the first thing next morning if Mr May could not go. Mr Collings was out, but witness received instructions to bathe the wound. - The Coroner in summing up at some length, expressed his sorrow that such an accident should have occurred through the neglect of a miner to follow instructions laid down by the Government for his own safety. It was a miracle that accidents did not more frequently occur, for the tamping used ought not to contain a particle of gritty matter; if it were the work of blasting must be fraught with considerable danger. There was no doubt such a substitute for "wadding" was more frequently used than they were aware of, and, therefore, it was a mystery accidents did not more frequently occur. He hoped this man's death would be the means of inducing miners to act with greater caution, and that the loss of that poor man's life would be the means of preventing others from using such an iron bar with that gritty material. He again expressed sorrow that no medical man would attend; for although the man was so injured that no medical aid could save him, his agony might have been alleviated. He praised Mr Collings's action, believing he did all he could, for he would have been blameworthy had ne neglected the cases for which he had been previously retained. But it was a matter of great regret to hear of any gentleman practising the honourable profession of medicine acting as they were told one had, for his great experience of the members of that profession was that they attended people wholly regardless of their being paid, and from a sense of moral duty, and a feeling of right doing. He did not feel, therefore, that a gentleman who objected to come west of Moreton to attend an injured man unless he received a fee was an exception to the grand rule of the medical profession, whose members were always ready to tender their assistance in cases of need regardless of fee. - The Jury found that the deceased met with his death Accidentally; they exonerated the managers of the mine from all blame, but they thought that the conduct of Mr May, of Moretonhampstead, in refusing to come without being paid, unprofessional and much to be regretted.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made at the Regent Inn, Treville-street, Plymouth, yesterday, by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, as to the death of ALFRED G. MARTIN, aged 6 weeks. It was testified that the child had been suffering from the thrush, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 March 1882
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening at the New Town Inn, York-street, as to the death of WM. WALKER PETHERICK, aged 5 months. The mother stated that the child, which had been healthy since birth, suddenly became ill yesterday morning, and Mr Lewis, surgeon, was sent for, but before he arrived the child was dead. Mr Lewis gave the results of an examination of the body, and said he believed the child had died from Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 March 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Morice Town on Saturday as to the death of FREDERICK JAMES JOHNS, aged six days, son of a shipwright of that name, working in the dockyard. The child was in bed with its mother early on Friday morning, and MRS JOHNS, having gone to sleep, woke up about an hour afterwards and found the baby dead. Mr Gard, surgeon, was sent for, but his services were of no avail. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 March 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Wm. Gilbert, the Mayor and Coroner of the Borough of Saltash, held an Inquest yesterday at the Mount Edgcumbe Inn, Mutton Cove, Devonport, as to the death of CHARLES BROWN, a superannuated smith from H.M.'s Dockyard, aged 55. - William Couch, waterman, stated that about 9.15 p.m. on Monday he, in company with Private Truan, of the Royal Engineers, was fishing off Bullock's Pier, Mutton Cove, when they saw something floating in the water. He at once procured his boat and on getting near the object he found it to be the dead body of a man. With Truan's assistance he took the body out of the water and landed it at Mount Wise steps. Dr W. C. Wilson said that he had attended the deceased for the past fifteen years. About four years since the deceased was seized with an apoplectic fit, which left him paralysed the whole of the left side, and up to the time of his death he was still an invalid. He knew that it was the custom of the deceased to go for a walk on the pier at Mutton Cove very frequently, and he thought that the deceased must have had a fit on Monday whilst walking on the pier and have fallen into the water. He was of opinion that in the fall the deceased struck himself, because there was an abrasion on the face. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, and that there was no evidence to shew how the deceased came in the water."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Morice Town. - Inquiry was made by the Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) last evening, at the Crystal Palace Inn, Charlotte-street, Morice Town, as to the death of ELIZA JANE MAYNARD, 41, wife of a hammerman in her Majesty's yard at Keyham, residing at 36 Charlotte-street. The deceased had been in apparently good health up to the present week, since when she had complained of shortness of breath. On Tuesday afternoon the deceased went to bed, and about nine o'clock the same evening her stepson, who was in the same room, heard her breathe heavily, and a noise, and on looking around he saw that the deceased had fallen out of bed. With assistance the deceased was put into bed, and a doctor was sent for, but before it was possible for him to arrive the deceased died. Mr R. Rolston, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and found slight dropsy in the legs. The lungs and kidneys were very much congested and the heart was very flabby and fatty. He attributed death to the failure of the heart's action, which latter was brought about by the extra strain put on it by the congestion of the kidneys and lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 10 March 1882
PLYMOUTH - Death From Drink At Plymouth. - The sudden death of RICHARD EMMERY, pensioner, 64, was the subject of an Inquiry at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, by the Plymouth Borough Coroner last evening. From what could be gathered from the evidence of the wife, who was very deaf, deceased had been suffering during the past few months from a cough and a tightness in the chest, and in order to alleviate his sufferings he had taken intoxicating liquors to such an extent that he had been fearfully tipsy, according to his wife's story, for two or three weeks together. he had not been able to eat anything, and during the past week had suffered from pains in his stomach. His wife appears to have done everything she possibly could for him in the way of poultices, medicines, &c. On Wednesday morning about three a.m. deceased, who lived at 18 Neswick-street, got up and asked for a cup of tea. Ten minutes later his wife noticed a change come over his countenance, and she called for assistance, but before a medical man arrived the deceased expired. - Mrs Aungher, residing at 18 Neswick-street, said that for eight years deceased had suffered from a cough. He had drunk occasionally, but was not what one might call a drunkard. She thought that lately deceased had suffered from asthma. He was a very quiet man, and she did not see him much. - Mr W. H. Miller, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased at half-past six on Wednesday morning and found him dead. Deceased was a man of very robust physique. The wife of the deceased told him that the deceased had been drinking hard for some time, and eating but little. After hearing all the circumstances witness's opinion was that the cause of death was due to over stimulation, and this, combined with bronchitis, would lead to cessation of the heart's action. Death was due to natural causes, aggravated and accelerated by intemperate habits. If deceased had been under proper medical care and subject to restraint, his life would have undoubtedly been saved. - The Jury, of whom Mr Higman was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 March 1882
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening at the Lord Borington Inn, Ebrington-street, as to the death of a man named W. THOMAS REDHOUSE, a lodger in that house, who was found dead in bed that morning. The medical evidence shewed that death had resulted from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 March 1882
ILFRACOMBE - Inquiry was made at Ilfracombe yesterday by Mr G. H. Bromham, Deputy Coroner, as to the death of the sailor found by the lifeboat on Sunday, and supposed to be HENRY SMITH, a seaman of the schooner Uzztah, washed overboard while trying to rescue the crew of the steamer Pelton. Mr Huxtable was appointed Foreman of the Jury. - P.C. Shepherd stated that he examined the body and found a number of tattoo marks on it, which he described. He had sent a description of the body to Cardiff and Newcastle, and had received a reply to the effect that the body was probably that of HENRY SMITH, a seaman of the Uzztah, who was a native of Exeter, where his sister lived. His wife, however, resided at Bridgwater and he had reason to believe that if the Inquiry were adjourned the wife would attend and identify the body. The Jury having expressed the opinion that one of the sailors of the schooner should be called, the Coroner said he had done his best to get one to be present. He had telegraphed three times to Cardiff, but if the Inquiry were adjourned he would send again. This was agreed to and the Inquest stood adjourned until the next evening.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 April 1882
TAVISTOCK - Deaths Of Children By Drowning. - Mr R. R. Rodd on Saturday afternoon held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of a little boy, aged 2 years, the son of MR CHARLES DOIDGE, farmer, of Crebor, who was found dead in a well on the farm on the previous Thursday. Mr George Prout was foreman of the Jury. - Elizabeth Venton said on the morning in question she was engaged in washing at a shute when the deceased came to her. While the child was there its mother came to her, and asked her to take care of it as she was afraid he might fall in the well. Shortly after the boy said he wanted to go to his father; she asked him to remain until she went, but shortly afterwards she missed him. Ten minutes later she went to the house of a neighbour and soon after the mother said she had found the body in the well. MRS DOIDGE, who was so affected with grief that she could only with difficulty give evidence, detailed the circumstances attending the finding of the body, and the Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned in a Well."

CHARLETON - A boy named J. CHUDDER, aged 11, was accidentally drowned in a pond at Charleton, near Kingsbridge, on Friday. He was on a hedge by the side of the pond, when he fell in. A younger boy who was with him ran to the village and gave an alarm. When taken out he was quite dead. The pond was five feet deep.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, Plymouth, as to the sudden death of SARAH JANE COLLIER, aged 40, which was reported in our special edition Saturday afternoon. - Elizabeth Roberts, a married woman and sister of the deceased, said on Wednesday last the deceased procured a casual order for admittance to the Workhouse from Mr Mayell, the relieving officer. She, however, did not go to the Workhouse that day, neither on the following day, because she did not feel well enough. On Friday morning between seven and eight o'clock, however, the deceased went and witness accompanied her. They were both admitted into the house, and she left the deceased in what she thought was one of the sick wards. She returned to her residence in Stoke-road, but about noon the same morning, and only three or four hours after she had left her in the workhouse, the deceased came back to her in an exhausted condition. - Witness asked her why she had not remained in the Workhouse, and the deceased replied that they had sent her away because the order was only made out for one night, and that the 29th of March. The deceased had been ill for some time, and more especially during the past week. In answer to a Juror, witness stated that she could not say whether the deceased asked Mayell for a casual order, or an order for admittance to the House. - The Coroner said he believed it was only in the power of the relieving officer to give a casual order. If the woman wanted to remain in the House for a longer period she, or the relieving officer, must apply to the Guardians. - Several Jurors remarked that they thought it a great shame that the woman should have been sent away from the Workhouse in the state she must have been in. - The Coroner thought it would be best for the Jury to keep their opinions until he had finished with the witnesses. - Dr Thomas Pearse, of Union-street, deposed that shortly before 10 a.m. that day he was called into the back parlour of his house, where he found the deceased woman lying on the floor, her head and shoulders being supported. She was unconscious and almost pulseless, and he left the room to get a stimulating draught, but on returning found that he could not administer it to the deceased, and within a minute or so she died. He had no doubt death was due to natural causes. Probably the deceased had had inflammation of the lungs during the past week, and he thought the immediate cause of death was faintness in a person probably exhausted by want and weakened by disease. The deceased, instead of being at his house, ought to have been in bed, and under proper medical care. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr Smith) said after hearing the latter portions of Dr Pearce's evidence, he thought the Inquest should be adjourned and after a consultation in private the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until today for the attendance of Workhouse officials.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 April 1882
EXETER - An Octogenarian Burnt To Death At Exeter. - The Exeter Coroner, Mr Hooper, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of SUSAN RADFORD, aged 81, who had come to her death by being burnt. Deceased, who was a laundress, was trimming a benzoline lamp close to the fire, when the oil ignited, and in her fright she fell forward upon the grate. A witness named Mrs Pearse went to the poor woman's assistance, and smothered the fire with a piece of carpet, but she was so badly hurt that death ensued in a few days. The Jury, after hearing the medical evidence of Mr J. D. Harris, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death At Plymouth. Workhouse Officials Censured. - The Enquiry into the sudden death of SARAH JANE COLLIER, aged 40, who died on Saturday at the house of Dr Pearse, Union-street, whither she had gone for advice after having been sent away from the Workhouse in consequence of having an informal order, was resumed last evening before the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Plymouth Guildhall. Mr W. Adams, clerk to the Plymouth Court of Guardians, again appeared on behalf of that body, and Mr Loye represented friends of the deceased. The following Guardians were present:- Dr Gale, Messrs. G. R. Barrett, J. B. Cousins, Gray, Penson, Woolland, and Uglow. Several ratepayers also were present. Further evidence was given by Hannah Squires, ward nurse at the Workhouse, Dr Pearse, William Bentley, porter at the Workhouse, Mr Mayell, relieving officer, John Harris, assistant and messenger to Mr Mayell. - After a long hearing and a consultation of twenty minutes the Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from Natural Causes, and that the nurse (Badcock) and the porter be severely reprimanded by the Coroner for allowing deceased to leave the House before being reported to the master, and hope that Mr Mayell will use more discretion in giving orders in the future." The Coroner having carried out the wish of the Jury, thanked them for their services and great attention to the case.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 April 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth Prison. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Prison on Saturday evening as to the death of JAMES BRAMWELL, aged 73. Mr William Brewer, chief officer, said the deceased was a prisoner. Witness received the deceased on the 1st inst., under a warrant signed by Mr James King, magistrate, being committed to prison for seven days in default of the payment of a fine of 5s. imposed for drunkenness. He would have left the prison on Friday morning had he not died in the meantime. On his admission deceased appeared in good health; he continued to remain so until Thursday evening about 6 p.m., when witness was informed by one of the officers that deceased was ill. He at once went to No. 10 cell, where the deceased was confined, and found him lying on his bed, which was on the floor. Deceased was unconscious and apparently in a fit. He at once sent for a medical man, and deceased was subsequently removed by the doctor's orders to the Infirmary. He never became conscious and died at 3.30 on Friday morning. Deceased complained to the warder who took him his supper at 6 p.m. of being ill and almost immediately went off, as they presumed, in a fit. - Reuben Porter, night watchman, said on Thursday he came on duty at ten p.m., and saw the deceased at once, as he was instructed to take charge of him. Deceased was very ill, in fact on the point of dying. He remained with him until about half-past three on Friday morning, when he died without recovering consciousness. - Mr Sedley Wolferstan, surgeon to the prison, said he saw the deceased in the ordinary course of his duty on his admittance on the 1st inst. At that time he was in good health. He saw deceased again at four p.m. on Thursday, when he examined him previous to his discharge. Deceased still appeared to be in good health, and made no complaint. Witness then left the prison, but received a message at 6.30 p.m. to come there. He went at once, and found the deceased on his bed in his cell. He was unconscious and paralysed on his left side. He examined deceased, and tried to administer stimulants, but he was unable to swallow. Witness then formed an opinion that the attack would be fatal. He saw deceased again at 8 p.m., when he superintended his removal to the Infirmary, and left instructions as to what was to be done for him during the night. He attributed death to cerebral haemorrhage and sanguineous apoplexy. - Mr Brewer, recalled, said deceased was not sentenced to hard labour; he was put to picking oakum. He was with the deceased from six p.m. until 10 p.m., during which time he did not recover consciousness. He saw the deceased at 5 p.m. on Thursday, he then appeared to be all right, and quite cheerful. Deceased had been in the prisons four or five times previously. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that every care and attention had been paid the deceased by the prison officials. The Jury, of whom Mr John Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 April 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Laira Hotel as to the death of MISS ANNA WHIPPLE, aged 62, who was found dead in bed at her residence, 4 Laira-terrace. The deceased lady, who was the sole surviving sister of MR H. H. WHIPPLE, enjoyed good health, and on Friday evening appeared perfectly well. On Saturday evening, on returning from a visit, deceased complained f being unwell, feeling a heavy weight in her chest. She retired to rest, and on being visited during the night she expressed herself as being better. On the servant taking a cup of tea to her the following morning she was found dead. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from "Natural Causes." The Jury also expressed their sympathy with MR WHIPPLE, the brother of deceased, who was present at the Enquiry.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was also held by Mr Brian yesterday as to the death of the infant daughter of MRS LETHBRIDGE, residing at 1 St. John-street, Plymouth. Deceased was one of twin children, the deceased being the weaker of his twin. The mother only recently came to Plymouth, her husband having left her in America, leaving her and the children totally unprovided for. The child suffered from chicken-pox, and on Sunday was taken worse and died suddenly yesterday morning. The Jury found that the child died from "Natural Causes," and reflected on the conduct of the father in leaving his wife and children as he had done, and exonerated the mother from all blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Dangers Of Patent Medicines. Death Of A Child At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Falcon Hotel, Ford, into the cause of death of FRED. HOOPER HOWARD, aged 2 years and 7 months, who died suddenly on Good Friday. - Mary Belinda Mortimore, a nurse girl, said she had been in the employ of MRS HOWARD for three months. Deceased had been in good health during that time. On Friday evening last about six o'clock she washed deceased and put him to bed, and two hours afterwards it had a slight cough. Just before nine o'clock she observed red marks on the child's face, and immediately called Mrs Cook, who said she thought deceased was in a fit. A spoonful of brandy was given to it, and a hot bath was prepared. Deceased died a few minutes after having the bath. Witness added that on Friday morning MRS HOWARD gave the child a dose of "Kay's Linseed Compound" in warm water, this being for a cough. Deceased did not sleep that day. In the afternoon he went into the Park and appeared in good health. Witness had never seen deceased convulsed. It was not usual for the child to go to sleep during the afternoon, but once it had been taking the medicine it frequently went to sleep in its mother's arms, and had slept more than usual during the past week. - Emily Cook, a married woman, residing at 31 Alexandra-road, said she was called by last witness on Friday. She did not see the child move after it had the bath. Its eyes were closed and the whole body was rigid. - Mary Mortimore, recalled, said the medicine was first administered on the Saturday previous, a neighbour recommending it. - Dr Roe stated that on Friday evening about nine o'clock he received a message to attend a child at Ford. He was then attending a patient in Clowance-street, and said it would be impossible for him to leave that patient. The messenger said the child was dying, and he offered to go to Ford if a cab were procured and returned him to his patient again. He heard nothing more about the matter until the following morning, when he received a message that the child was dead. He immediately went to Ford, and from inquiries he found that deceased had been suffering from a cough, and the mother produced a bottle of medicine which she said she had been administering. He took charge of the bottle, which was labelled "Kay's Linseed Compound," and at the bottom was a notice "Registered under the Sale of Poisons Act." Above the notice was a scale of doses, by which for children over 1 year five drops must be given up to 4 years, when the quantity was increased to ten drops. He had examined the bottle, and concluded that from twelve to fifteen or twenty doses had been given. There was a further notice on the label - "To be repeated in half-doses three or four times a day, if required." If the mother had acted strictly in accordance with these directions she had not unduly administered the medicine. Linseed contained no poison, and was one of the most harmless medicines known. No quantity would injure a person. Witness had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased. Being led to believe that deceased had a cough he first examined the lungs, and found them perfectly healthy, the cough being apparently due to a cold and not from any disease of the lungs. Finding no indications of the cause of death in the body, he was compelled to open the head. He found the surface of the brain very greatly congested with blood. There was no disease in the substance of the brain, and no water in the ventricles. He concluded that death was due to narcotic poisoning, the symptoms being such as were invariably produced by such poisoning. The purple colour of deceased's face indicated a failing circulation and stagnation of the blood. There was some difficulty in reconciling the evidence with the presumption of narcotic poisoning. They had evidence to show that when the medicine had been taken the child had gone to sleep in its mother's arms; but on Friday morning it did not sleep after a dose was administered. The medicine was a dangerous narcotic. Anybody might be misled by the prominent description on the label. The effects produced were similar to those of laudanum. Young children could not endure narcotic s, a 90th part of a grain of opium being known to kill a child. He believed a number of children had been killed by its use unknown to the parents. - HARRIETT HOWARD, mother of deceased, stated that she believed that it was on Monday last when a neighbour gave her a bottle of Kay's Linseed Compound, and she gave deceased a dose. On Monday afternoon she herself purchased a bottle and gave her child a dose then. She always gave him the full dose of five drops, because he had a cold. On Tuesday evening one dose, on Wednesday two, and on Friday one, were administered. The only effect she noticed was that deceased slept after the dinner hour. The medicine did not make him dull and he always awoke fresh. On Friday last she gave the child a dose about 9.30 and left home at 2.30 p.m., up to which time the deceased had not slept. She did not notice anything about the half-doses, or that the medicine was a registered poison. - The Coroner then said he considered it would be useless to take an analysis of the contents of the stomach, or postpone their decision. The medicine in question was one commonly sold. [Dr Row: Yes, any grocer can sell it] - and was thought to be harmless. Those who had used it had recommended it to the mother, and had said that it would do the child good. Therefore the Jury could return no verdict against those who had used it. But the medical evidence led them to conclude that the medicine was not merely a compound of linseed, but was mixed with something else which made it a registered poison. The blame fell on those who prepared the mixture, and the Government for allowing a compound to be sold in such a manner as to mislead people. He suggested that the Jury should return a verdict that the child died from the effects of a narcotic contained in a patent medicine administered by its mother for a cough, and that the mother being unaware of the character of the medicine administered it for her child's good. He would write to the Home Secretary giving him an abstract of the medical evidence and explaining that it was at the recommendation of the Jury that the matter was brought under his notice, to consider how he could remedy what they considered a defect in the law. The Jury acted on the suggestion of the Coroner and returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 April 1882
EXETER - Inquiry was made at Exeter yesterday as to the death of WM. NATHANIEL SNOW, driver of the Starcross mail cart. The deceased, who was a pensioner from the Royal Marines, had driven the mail cart between Exeter and Starcross for several years, and it appeared that when driving up the High-street on Sunday evening, the horse took a "short" turn, and SNOW, probably sitting a little loosely, was thrown out on his head. He was treated at the Hospital and sent home in a cab, and died on Monday night. A question was raised as to whether the Hospital authorities ought not to have detained the man for treatment, but the Jury in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerated the authorities from blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict of a Coroner's Jury at Devonport yesterday, after an Inquiry into the death of WILLIAM HENRY JEWELL, aged 7 months, the son of a plumber, residing at 17 Fore-street. Deceased was seized with a fit on Sunday and died suddenly. Medical evidence shewed that death had indirectly resulted from the effects of teething and water on the brain.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At A Plymouth Railway Station. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest last evening at the North-road Railway Station, Plymouth, as to the death of a man unknown, who died suddenly near the station on Easter Monday. Mr Reynolds was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - James Shapman, a naval pensioner residing at 12 Wyndham-street, said he was going to the station in order to travel by the 7 a.m. train on Monday, when he observed deceased standing against the station buildings. When quite close to him deceased fell, and made motions to be lifted up. Assistance was called, and the station-master and two porters came and took charge of him. - Mr Robert Davis, station-master at North-road, stated that he was called to a man in a fit, and he went to deceased with a couple of railway officials. He raised deceased and had him placed in a chair, and afterwards conveyed to the station. He tired to restore animation, but found that he was dead. Dr Lewis came, and pronounced life extinct. Witness thought deceased was a man of about 50 years of age. P.S. Rodd said deceased was five feet seven inches in height, aged between 45 and 50, and had the appearance of a travelling mechanic; he had dark hair, sandy moustache, and dark whiskers. He was dirty and very poorly clad. Witness searched the bundle which contained three articles of linen. In his breast pocket was a sovereign, and in another 5 ½d. in bronze. He also had a short pipe and a little tobacco, and a knife. He had examined deceased's linen, but could find no clue as to who he was. - Mr Nicholson, relieving officer, mentioned that the arms of deceased were tattooed. Witness immediately went to re-examine him. On his right arm were tattoo marks of two men boxing, a sailor holding an ensign, and a crucifix extending over the arm. On the left arm there were a sailor and a woman standing on a pedestal. On the back of the left hand there was an anchor, and bracelet on both wrists. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and accorded the station-master their thanks for his conduct in the case. - After the Inquest the body was identified by three men as that of a shipmate named FREDERICK HOPKINS, of the fishing-boat Good Hope, lying in Sutton Pool. He was a single man, and had friends at Bangor, and his mates had given him a sovereign to enable him to visit them. They further stated that he went to a doctor a short time ago, and had since been taking medicine, and had been so unwell that he had not taken any food, save a little milk, for a week.

ST. MARYCHURCH - Strange Death At Babbacombe. - Dr Gaye, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH FIRTH, 49, widow of a Rotherhithe surgeon, whose death occurred on Sunday under peculiar circumstances. MRS FIRTH, who had recently suffered from facial paralysis and general weakness, had been residing at 10 York-terrace, Babbacombe, for about four weeks, having been advised to try change of air. On Sunday morning deceased went to church, but left immediately after the first prayer and walked upon Babbacombe Downs, which rise to a distance of 150 ft. to 250 ft. above the beach below. Just before one o'clock deceased was missed, and search was at once begun for her. On Monday the body of the deceased was discovered by P.S. Ellicott and P.C. Stone on the beach, 150 feet from the top of the cliff. The evidence of Dr T. Finch was to the effect that the skull was fractured and blood was issuing from wounds on the head and face. In his judgment death had been instantaneous. The Jury, of which Mr Samuel Raby was the Foreman, after consulting for a short time, returned a verdict to the effect that the body of the deceased was found at the bottom of the cliff, but how it came there, there was no evidence to shew.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 April 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner last evening at 5 Pentyre-terrace, as to the death of ANN DINGLE, aged 65. MR THOMAS DINGLE, artist, residing at 5 Pentyre-terrace, said the deceased was his wife. She had suffered from her childhood from an excruciating sick headache, and fullness over the head, but of late years had been better. That was the only ailment she suffered from. On Thursday deceased complained very much of nausea in the nostrils, and on Good Friday she also suffered from a sick headache and sickness. This continued all day. She was not attended by a medical man, as she suffered so habitually from this complaint that no notice was taken of it. On Tuesday deceased was in her usual health, and on Wednesday morning she had her breakfast with witness, after which deceased read the newspaper to him, and, strange to say, read about some sudden deaths, upon which she commented. After breakfast she went about her usual domestic duties, which would take her into the kitchen. Witness went up into his studio, which was over the kitchen, and remained there until about half-past eleven, when he heard a groan proceeding from the kitchen. Thinking that there was something wrong he flew over the stairs into the kitchen where he found his wife lying on her back. He called for assistance and some brandy. They got three spoonfuls of brandy into her mouth, but could not get her to swallow any. Deceased was unconscious and they carried her upstairs, but she died in about two minutes. - The Jury, of whom Mr Smith was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and the Coroner and Jury tendered their sympathy to MR DINGLE in his bereavement.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 April 1882
EXETER - The Exeter Coroner, Mr W. H. Hooper, held an Inquiry yesterday as to the death of VIOLET LILLIAN COLLINS, infant daughter of MR PAUL COLLINS, proprietor of the Black Horse Hotel. On Thursday morning the child, who had previously been suffering from a cough and diarrhoea, was taken unwell and Mr Cummings, a surgeon, of Exeter, was sent for, but on his arrival the child was dead. The mother of the deceased, in her evidence, said that Dr Cummings was sent for at 5.30, and did not arrive until an hour and twenty minutes afterwards. Mr Cummings, however, states that he was not sent for until 6.30, and not more than twenty minutes elapsed before he visited the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated the medical man from blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening at the Herbert Inn, Herbert-street, Morice Town, before the Devonport Coroner (Mr Vaughan) as to the death of EDITH MAY COOPER, aged 9 months. From the evidence of the father it appeared that at 4.30 yesterday morning his wife woke him and asked him to look at the child, and he at once thought it was dead, but called a doctor and used means to restore life. The evidence of the doctor pointed to the fact that death had occurred from Accidental Overlying, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 April 1882
BOULOGNE, FRANCE - The Murder On A French Railway. Official Inquiry. - Some of the uncertainty which attached to the mysterious death on a French railway has been removed. On Monday the body which had been found was authoritatively identified by MR F. W. WILLOUGHBY as that of his cousin, MR W. J. WILLOUGHBY, assistant-paymaster of the Tamar, whose absence from his ship had left little doubt but that he was the unfortunate young man who had been murdered. On Monday afternoon a court of Inquiry was opened before the Public Prosecutor and the Juge d'Instruction, at the Palace of Justice, Boulogne. The evidence of the father of the deceased, MR J. WILLOUGHBY, of Plymouth, was taken, which was merely as to identification. MR F. W. WILLOUGHBY was also examined, and gave similar evidence. He stated that he knew deceased by a scar on the left hand. The Court was then adjourned until Thursday, when the matter will be more fully investigated and other evidence, including that of the guard of the train, the man who found the body, and the result of the post-mortem examination will be given. - A correspondent of the Standard states that inquiries in the immediate neighbourhood where the body was discovered concur in shewing that the deceased was forcibly ejected from the railway carriage while in a state of partial or complete insensibility, and met with his death while on the permanent way either by the fall or by being run over by the express train. It was noticed when the body was found that the face had been injured, apparently by the fall. The nose was flattened, either from a heavy blow delivered upon it or from the mere fall; and an eye was discoloured from some similar cause. There were no cuts, stabs, bullet, or other wounds such as might have been inflicted upon him in a struggle. No wounds, save the crushed head, were apparent. It is therefore assumed that the young Englishman, while asleep or drugged, was set upon by his two fellow travellers, struck full on the face, partly stunned by the blow, robbed of most of his valuables while insensible, and then thrown out of the door. The fact that when the train stopped at St. Pierre Station the guard is positive that no door was open or unlocked, disposes of the idea of suicide. With regard to the disposal of the deceased's luggage, there was no difficulty in alighting nearly at midnight with other passengers on the Calais platform, and then proceeding in the usual way direct to the steamer, which lay a few yards off ready to start for Dover after the arrival of the Paris mail train.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 April 1882
OKEHAMPTON - Inquiry has been made at Thorne Moor, near Okehampton, by Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, as to the death of a child named MARY ANN WOOLDRIDGE, the daughter of a labourer, who while playing near a quarry pit filled with water fell over and was drowned. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 April 1882
TAVISTOCK - Inquiry has been held by the County Coroner, (Mr R. R. Rodd) at the Ship Inn, Morwellham, into the death of THOMAS ADAMS, aged 67, master of the barge Mary Ann. On the 17th inst., the barge, which belongs to Calstock, had been discharging cargo in the Great Western Docks, and had moved out to the eastern pier in order to ship another cargo. Deceased was crossing from the pier to the ship, when the plank slipped and he fell between the vessel and the quay. Deceased's son jumped overboard and rescued his father, who was taken on board, but was unconscious. Restoratives were applied, but deceased died on the 19th. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Great surprise was expressed that deceased was not taken to the Plymouth Hospital.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 May 1882
BRADSTONE - An Inquest was held at Bradstone on Saturday, by Mr R. Fulford, as to the death of RICHARD VOADEN MARTIN, formerly a farmer at Lawhitton, near Launceston, whose body was found by the side of a hedge at Dunterton. A verdict of Death from Heart Disease was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 May 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - At Plymouth Guildhall last evening Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest as to the death of JOHN DENNIS O'NEIL, aged 2 years, who died under singular circumstances yesterday morning. On Sunday afternoon deceased was staying with his aunt, who resides at 14 Martin-lane. About six p.m. she poured some hot water into a teapot, and when replacing the kettle on the stove deceased, who was seated on his grandmother's lap, seized the pot and drank a small portion of the tea. He immediately afterwards screamed, and threw out what remained in his mouth. The aunt then took deceased to a chemist, who stated that he was not injured much. On Monday morning he became worse and was taken to Dr Pearse, who advised that deceased should be removed to the Hospital. This suggestion was immediately carried out, and the house surgeon (Dr Carter) of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on seeing deceased informed the aunt that he was in a dying state, and, if they tried to save his life, he must be operated on. Deceased was immediately put in a special ward with a warm atmosphere. Dr Carter had prepared the instruments, but refrained from using them unless he was compelled to. He watched deceased for two hours, and at noon deceased was dying. The windpipe was opened and a silver tube inserted. Deceased rallied, and lived until 6 a.m. yesterday morning when he died from congestion of the lungs, the result of the scalding. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the aunt from all blame. They also passed a vote of thanks to the Hospital surgeon.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 May 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the King-street Wesleyan Schools, as to the death of CHARLES JORDAN BALHATCHET, aged 16, son of MR BALHATCHET, timber merchant, residing 12 King's-gardens, and carrying on business in Tracey-street. Mr J. Perriton was chosen Foreman of the jury. - MR THOMAS BALHATCHET, father of deceased, stated that his son assisted him in his business. Witness saw him in the office about 11 o'clock that morning. He was quite cheerful and there was nothing, to witness's knowledge, weighing upon his mind. He had not been depressed of late, and had been a Christian youth from the age of 7, when he came home one Sunday evening and told his friends he had been converted. he had been connected with the Wesleyan Chapel for a long time, and attended the Young Men's Bible Class every Sunday. About 12.30 yesterday afternoon witness left his office, having missed deceased. He went to his residence, but not finding him there returned to the timber yard. He then went to the loft, where he saw deceased hanging by a rope from a beam, and immediately cut him down. No [?] in the loft at the time. There was no noose or knot in the rope; the head was caught just as though he had put the rope under his chin accidentally. The rope was pressing against the neck, and deceased was resting on one leg and one knee. An alarm was raised and a sawyer named Skinner came. He believed deceased was quite dead. Deceased was very fond of gymnastics, and he had seen him swinging from the beams. - The Foreman said the Jury did not desire MR BALHATCHET to remain, because it was very painful to them, and must be more so to the father. On behalf of the Jury, he expressed their sympathy with him in his sad and sudden bereavement. - Then Symons, foreman in the employ of MR BALHATCHET, stated that he had known deceased for seven years. He would very often practice gymnastics, and witness had seen him hang by his (?) and chin to a rope or trapeze. Sometimes he would use a rope. He saw deceased with the rope produced on Saturday. He was of a cheerful disposition and appeared in high spirits yesterday morning. he was an excellent lad, but was weak at times, and very tall for his age, his height being 5ft. 9in. - A Juror: I should like to ask a question to allay some rumours about the neighbourhood, as to whether his father had words of difference with deceased. - The Coroner: You must keep out rumours, please. We have nothing to do with them. Witness: Deceased never had any difference with his father. He was his "father's boy," and was dearly loved. - P.C. Gidley said he was called to MR BALHATCHET'S yard. He saw deceased then, and considered he was quite dead, and had been hanging for an hour. Two doctors were sent for, and they tried for a quarter of an hour to obtain artificial animation, but without success. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that it was quite clear that deceased came to his death by strangulation, produced by hanging. They had evidence which gave deceased one of the best characters that could be given a lad. He was not found in a manner which would indicate that he had hanged himself, and everything pointed to the conclusion that he had come to his death accidentally. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 15 May 1882
CORNWOOD - Fatal Accident At Cornwood. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Rock Farm, near Cornwood, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the decease of a servant on the farm named ISAAC JENKINS, aged 11 years, who died on Wednesday from injuries received by a kick from a colt the day previously. Mr Glover, of Cornwood, was elected Foreman of the Jury. - Mr William Hillson, the master of the deceased, was called as a witness, and stated that the deceased had worked for him about twelve months. On Tuesday last about 2 p.m. he was in the stable busy with the horses when the deceased went to give the colt (which was alone in the stall) some mangolds. Deceased must have gone into the stall, for a moment afterwards he heard a kick, and on going to see what was the matter he met JENKINS coming out, and was told by him that the colt had kicked him in the stomach. He was immediately put to bed and some hot grog given, which he, however, did not drink. During that night deceased slept well, and on Wednesday at noon got up and came downstairs with the intention of returning home to his parents, but he went to bed again and almost immediately expired. The colt was not in the habit of kicking, but witness had frequently warned deceased against entering the stall where the colt was. The colt was not yet shod. After JENKINS was dead Dr Randle, of Ivybridge, was sent for. Witness did not think the injuries were sufficiently serious to send for the doctor the day before. - Mrs Hilson, wife of Mr Hilson, said the deceased was brought home on Tuesday by her husband, and she at once put him to bed. He complained of severe pains in his bowels. He slept well that night and the next day ate very well. She did not think it necessary to send for a doctor on Tuesday. Deceased died at about half-past two on Wednesday afternoon. Dr Randle said had he been called before he could have done no good. The deceased was the son of a labourer in the clay works. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed an opinion through their Foreman that great negligence was shewn by Mr Hillson in not sending for medical assistance before he did, as the child must evidently have been dangerously ill. Mr Hillson showed an indifference to the proceedings of the Inquest, which drew comment from the Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) and he caused some inconvenience by not being at hand when required as a witness, and he left the house immediately he had given his evidence, without waiting for the decision of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 May 1882
PLYMOUTH - Death From Lock-Jaw At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Prince Arthur Inn, Cecil-street, relative to the death of JANE [KERSLICK] KERSLAKE, 51, who died from tetanus, or lock-jaw, on the previous morning. The Coroner informed the Jury that deceased had died from the results of an accident, and Dr Prynne, who attended her, had given a "certificate of death." The certificate was sent to him (the Coroner) by the Registrar, who had declined to accept it. He felt it his duty to point out to Dr Prynne that in case of accident no medical man had any right to give a certificate of death. - Dr Prynne said it was an oversight on his part, and the Jury then went to view the body of deceased. On reassembling JOHN KERSLICK, newsagent, 142 King-street, said the deceased was his wife. On Tuesday, the 9th inst., she went out about [?] p.m. with the intention of going to her sister's residence at Lambhay-hill. On returning she said that she had met with an accident. Coming down [?]-lane from Lambhay-hill towards the Barbican she fell over some large stones there and in falling broke her thumb. She had been to the South Devon and East Cornwall hospital and had the wound dressed. On the following Friday morning witness accompanied her to the Hospital. She gradually [?] until last Monday when other symptoms set in. Deceased complained of soreness in the neck. He again took her to the Hospital and saw the junior surgeon, who said that the soreness in the throat had a connection with the injuries to the thumb. He said she could either remain under his care or receive medical attendance. Dr Prynne was immediately called. [?] Marker, a boatman and brother-in-law of deceased, stated that on Tuesday, the 9th instant, he saw deceased at his house. She left at 9.30 p.m., but returned about ten minutes afterwards, stating that she had had a fall and injured her thumb. He took her to a neighbouring chemist, who advised her removal to the Hospital, where the wound was dressed. The surgeon told her that if she felt much pain to come the next day, but [?] to come after a few days had elapsed. Witness then returned home. - Edward Michael Prynne, M.R.C.S., stated that on Wednesday morning deceased and her husband came to him. He examined her face and mouth, and as much of her tongue as possible. he could not examine it freely, as there was a contraction of the muscles of the jawbone. He saw immediately that she was suffering from lock-jaw, and treated her accordingly. On Thursday the symptoms were more marked, not only in the jaw, but the body generally. There was a tight rigidity in all her limbs, and he saw that the case must terminate fatally. It was very unlikely that anyone suffering from lockjaw recovered. He connected death with the injury to the thumb. Dr Prynne was about to re-open the question of his giving the certificate of death, when the Coroner and the Jury [?] him. A verdict was returned that deceased died of tetanus or lockjaw, the result of an Accident. MR KERSLICK said he thought the town authorities should be acquainted with the state of Quay-lane. There were several large stones there used for the convenience of carriages, but no lamp. Had there been a lamp in the lane and it was properly attended to, his wife would have been living at this instant. The Coroner said he was glad MR KERSLICK had mentioned the matter and thanked him for it. The Jury were then discharged.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) on Saturday at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, as to the death of JAMES BONNEY, 67, of 6 Cambridge-lane East, who died suddenly that afternoon. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was also held at the Army and Navy Inn, Castle-street, as to the death of the infant daughter of WM. TARR, waterman, of 11 Castle-street, which took place from convulsions. A verdict of death from Natural Causes was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport coroner (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest on Saturday as to the death of MICHAEL BUTLER, aged 11 months, who expired on Friday from the effects of a scald received a fortnight before by pulling a cup of boiling tea off the table and over his chest. The child was seen by a chemist, and the doctor who was called in on Friday said it had not been properly treated and might have been saved had a medical man been consulted in the first instance. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence, and censured the mother for her neglect.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 May 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide On The Cornwall Railway. The Inquest. - The Devonport coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Falcon Inn, Albert-road, Morice Town, yesterday afternoon, as to the death of WILLIAM PURVES, 43, who committed suicide on Saturday. A double Jury was summoned, and Mr J. Beer was elected Foreman. Mr Stanbury, inspector on the Great Western and Cornwall Railway, represented that company. - Mark James, 21 Frederick-street, Plymouth, engine-driver, stated that at 3.23 on Saturday afternoon he was driving a special goods train on the Cornwall Railway. Just after leaving the Saltash Bridge and approaching Camel's Head, he saw a man standing in the path by the line. When an engine's length from him, he sat down on the rails. The engine was reversed as soon as possible, and witness jumped off before the train stopped and returned to the man. The whole train of 16 trucks had passed over him before the engine could pull up. The train was going at the rate of fifteen miles per hour, and witness blew the whistle to warn deceased that he was too near the line to be safe. Deceased was brought by the train to Devonport Station, where it was found he was living. He was injured in the legs, feet and head. A doctor was sent for immediately, and witness drove the train into Plymouth. - James Parsons, station-master at the Devonport Station of the Cornwall Railway, stated that the special goods train arrived at Devonport at 3.35 p.m. on Saturday. The guards told him that a man had been knocked down by the train, but was still living. The station officials carried deceased from the train to the general waiting-room, and witness sent four men for different doctors. Dr May, jun., arrived at about five minutes to four, and on examination he pronounced life extinct. The other three doctors arrived within five minutes afterwards. - William Bennett, Compton-street, Plymouth, an employee at the Ordnance Survey-office, Princess-Square, said he knew deceased, who was a pensioner of the Royal Engineers, and had been employed as a land-plotter in the Ordnance Survey Department. He was of a reserved and uncommunicative disposition, and sometimes when spoken to would seldom answer. It was thought that he had something on his mind. When at work witness noticed that he had been desponding. Deceased never complained. His eyes had lately become "glaring" and witness remarked that he thought he was going out of his mind. - Alfred Law, of Princetown, employed on the Ordnance Survey, also gave evidence as to deceased's state of mind. When witness first knew him he appeared cheerful, but during the past week he had been very strange. Sometimes he would leave his seat, and unaccountably dance and sing in the centre of the room. He drank, but not heavily. Deceased said that his travelling chest had been retained at Ashwater in default of paying his bill for lodgings. he seemed to get worse as the week advanced, and said he should never be comfortable unless he had his wife with him. He did not say that he had quarrelled with her. The "glaring" in his eyes was more apparent when he would dance. Witness was not afraid of him, nor had he any suspicion that he would do anything to himself. He scarcely ate anything. On Wednesday evening witness saw him, but on Thursday morning he was missing. On Saturday week witness was sleeping in an adjoining room to him, and about the middle of the night he heard a noise as if deceased were knocking himself against the wall and the bedstead. This lasted for about two hours. - P.C. Blackler said about 3.30 on Saturday afternoon he was called to the Devonport Station. He searched the body of deceased, and found a letter, which he produced. He also found 5d. in coppers, some writing papers, a knife, razor and scarf pin. - The Coroner here read the letter, which was as follows:- My dear Fanny, - One more line before I bid you an eternal farewell. Kiss Bill for me and may you never want, and there is one thing I want you to do for me, is to tell - that it is mostly his fault that I am in this state, and that he will never thrive after having sent me and the ---. If there is another world I shall live in bliss. If there is none I have made the most of this. Tell my boy James that I ---- him with my dying breath and you might have been better to me than you have been to me. Your temper has of late proved my ruin, but I hope you will be able to get my pension for this quarter, and I am making tracks for London, if I live long enough. Say nothing to anyone yet until you hear further from me again, but it is not likely that you may hear again. Good-bye, may the God of nature protect you. - OLD BILL. - This letter was directed to deceased's wife, who had received another by post. The other letter was worded thus:- My dear Fanny, - I may be no more probably before you receive this. I will be in the "land of the dead;" there is no sorrow there in the "land of the dead." May God protect you, if there is one, which I very much doubt, but I will very soon know this grand secret. Get the papers filled up and have them sent away, and you will be more likely to get the money this quarter. I have been bad I know but never vicious. James will assist you for a while, and tell young Bill to confound drink; drink [?] (future), farewell dear Fanny. do not shew this until you do see whether you can procure my pension or not. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Insanity." They accorded their thanks to the station-master and other witnesses.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 May 1882
PLYMOUTH - Alleged Unfilial Conduct At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Regent Inn, North-street, Plymouth, on Monday evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), as to the death of JOHN HOPPER MASTERS, aged 78. Mr Simon Phelp was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Maria Allen, married woman, 28 Lower-street, said deceased lodged with her. In December deceased suffered from bowel complaint, but was attended to by Mr Harper, and recovered for a short time, but since that he was subjected to attacks of constipation almost weekly. On Saturday morning about half-past five JOHN MASTERS, son of the deceased, who slept with his father, called witness and told her that his father was complaining of an attack, and asked her to get some castor oil, which usually relieved him. She told him she could not get any castor oil then, but she made a cup of tea which she gave to the deceased. JOHN MASTERS left the house to go to work at seven o'clock. Deceased was then very ill, and his son JOHN told her to go to the No Place Inn and see his brother, JAMES, and ask him to get a doctor. She went to the No Place Inn between eight and nine o'clock, and saw JAMES MASTERS. She told him his father was very ill; she feared dying, and would not last the day out. He said that he was going to a funeral, but when he came back he would come down and see his father. She told him his father must have a doctor, and he replied, "I know nothing about that; you go to my brother ISAAC". She went to Messrs. Ind Coope and Company's Romford Brewery, where ISAAC MASTERS was employed, but he was not there. She left a message that his father was dying, and wanted a doctor. She left a similar message at the residence of another son named CHARLES, living in King-street. She got home about nine a.m., and found deceased a little easier. he was in very great pain until about one o'clock, when the pain ceased. He died at 5.30 p.m., up to which time not one of the four sons of the deceased had been to see him. ISAAC and JOHN came about two hours later. At 2.30 p.m. she asked deceased if she should send for Mr Harper, but he replied in the negative saying medicine would not do him any good. In the morning, however, deceased wanted a doctor. - Elizabeth Baker, married woman, said she was called by Mrs Allen to attend the deceased whilst she went to the sons. - Mr Harper, surgeon, said after the death he was asked for a certificate. At the express wish of ISAAC MASTERS he examined deceased. Death resulted from natural causes. had he been called some hours before death he might have been able to have alleviated the pain. - JAMES MASTERS informed the Jury that he told his brother JOHN, who lived with the deceased, to send for Mr Harper at any time when necessary. - JOHN MASTERS denied this. - ISAAC MASTERS informed the Jury that he received the message of his father's illness at 10 a.m. on Saturday, but he could not get away from his business, because he was in charge, and if he had let it would have had to be closed. Moreover, he had received so many intimations that his father was dying, and had been there so many times, that he did not place much reliance on the message. He went to his father's house as soon as he was able. Not being able to go in the day he went to his brother JAMES'S, who promised to go to the house at three p.m. - JAMES MASTERS said he was unable to go according to promise. - In summing up, the Coroner said it was a question whether it was wise for the son JOHN to go away from his father whilst lying very ill, and not to return until after his death. JAMES MASTERS had to attend a funeral, which was over by one p.m., but he did not go near his father. He did not see how they could expect the woman ALLEN to take all the responsibility upon herself. - After a long consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and added as a rider, "We exonerate MR ISAAC MASTERS, one of the sons of the deceased, from all blame; but in respect of the other sons of the deceased the Jury do not consider that they attended as they should have done to the deceased in his dying hours, and that a medical man should have been sent for by them, and they consider that the woman Allen did all that could be expected from her under the circumstances."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 May 1882
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday as to the death of MARY KEEN, 65, wife of JOHN KEEN, ropemaker, 13 Princess-street, who died suddenly on Saturday night. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 June 1882
BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held yesterday at Brixham as to the death of a lad named BRINHAM, who fell over a cliff at Oxen Cove on Monday. In consequence of a rumour that the boy had stated he was pushed over by his companions, these boys were subjected to a strict examination, but nothing was elicited, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 June 1882
CHARLETON - The Inquest on MRS REEVES, at Goveton, near Kingsbridge, who died from the effects of an accident with a benzoline lamp, was held on Saturday. The Jury, of whom Mr Walters, of Longclose, was foreman, expressed a desire that public notice would be taken of the fatality, in order that greater care might be exercised in using inflammable oils and that benzoline lamps should be trimmed by daylight.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS GOMER, a mason, aged 71 years. - James Burnes, mason's labourer, 82 High-street, Stonehouse, said about five minutes past one that day he was standing outside the new Board-schools being erected in Summerland-place, and noticed a ladder placed against a private house opposite the works. It was about a 20ft. ladder. he saw the deceased go about three parts of the way up when it snapped in two and deceased fell to the ground. The ladder broke about five feet below the parapet, just above where the deceased was standing. There was no one near the ladder at the time, either at the top or below, and it was not secured at the top. The top fell to the ground, whilst the bottom rested against a window. He went to the assistance of the deceased, who was insensible, having struck against a tile on the ground, and bled very much. Witness obtained a cab and took the deceased to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital where it was found that he was dead. - JOHN GOMER, son of the deceased, identified the body. He was a mason, and, notwithstanding his age, he was fit to carry on his trade. Deceased had met with many accidents before; he had broken his thigh three times, one ankle twice and his ribs once. These were from falling from scaffolds and ladders; and deceased had never fallen and injured his head, which was as good that morning as it was when he was 20 years of age. The last accident was some years ago. - Richard Smith, mason, after being duly cautioned by the Coroner, said he resided at 122 King-street. He was engaged to repair Nos. 9 and 10, Summerland-place. He went to work there last week and recommenced that morning at six. The ladder, which the Jury had seen, was put against No. 10, to put up some shutes and repair the roof. he went up and down the ladder himself that morning several times. Deceased came to work about eight a.m., and was on the ladder at work for hours. He thought that one side of the ladder was a few inches longer than the other. All the rungs were perfect. The rung that was broken, now he believed deceased must have broken in falling. He had no idea that the ladder was at all defective, but he had sen since the accident that there was a flaw in it. He was borrowed that morning from the foreman of the works at the new Board school in Summerland-place. Witness removed the ladder from the scaffolding, where it was in use. Deceased carried some wood and mortar up the ladder. Had witness known there was a flaw in the ladder he certainly should not have allowed the deceased to go up the ladder nor would he have gone up himself. - By a Juror: The ladder was placed against the facia board of the house, and it was safe to do so, although one side was longer than the other, because two rungs were above the facia board. - Matthew Truscott, carpenter, also gave evidence. Smith and himself went up and down the ladder several times. He had no idea there was a flaw in it. The Coroner having briefly summed up the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated Smith from blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 June 1882
OKEHAMPTON - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Okehampton yesterday touching the death of GILES LILLICRAPP, a carpenter, aged 63, who committed suicide during the previous night by hanging himself in his workshop. The deceased had been in a desponding state for some time past, and had given way to habits of intemperance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." Two of deceased's brothers destroyed themselves in a similar manner.

LYDFORD - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at Lidford village into the cause of death of a little boy named ALFRED STANBURY, son of an agricultural labourer, who died on Sunday night. Dr W. C. Northey, said the child was taken ill on Sunday morning with vomiting and diarrhoea, which continued until the moment when he died. It was the general impression of the inhabitants of Lidford that the boy had been poisoned by eating water hemlock on the previous day, but on investigation the report proved erroneous, death arising from the effects of suppressed scarlet fever poison. A verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence having been returned, Mr Mason, the sanitary inspector, applied for and was granted an order for immediate burial, as the residence was only one bedroom.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 June 1882
TORQUAY - The Fatality In Torbay. The Inquest. The Coastguard Censured For Gross Negligence. - Yesterday morning two Torquay boatmen named Brown, went out at an early hour in a steam launch, taking with them a conger line, nearly a mile in length (known as a pull-taw) fitted with many hooks, and with this they proceeded to drag near the spot where the boat was supposed to have gone down on Sunday with the two young men, EDWARDS and PARK on board. The launch of Messrs. Brown was after a time joined by two of Mr Dendy's launches from Paignton. After some fruitless work the boat was caught and investigation shewed that it had evidently capsized and then righted in sinking. Just before eight a.m. Messrs. Brown dragged up, about 50 or 60 yards from the sunken boat, the body of MR PARKER, which was landed at Torquay and taken to the mortuary. No marks indicative of violence were visible, but the hands were clenched. Amongst other things in the pocket of the deceased was a watch, which had stopped at half-past twelve. At half-past ten the second body, that of MR EDWARDS, was dragged up some yards further out from the spot on which that of MR PARKER was found; it was pulled up by one of the shirt sleeves, the coat, which was off, being dragged up first, from which it would seem that as the boat was sinking the deceased took off a portion of his clothing in order to swim. The watch found on the person was stopped at seven minutes past twelve. - Last evening Mr Hacker (Messrs, Michelmore and Hacker, solicitors,) Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the bodies at the Townhall, Torquay. Captain Medley, R.N., superintendent of the coastguard for the district, watched the case; and Captain Graham, of the merchant service, was Foreman of the Jury. MR EDWARDS, father of one of the deceased, appeared in court for a short time; he was greatly agitated. Evidence was given as follows:- Charles Tomlinson, butler, Paignton, said he was sitting with a friend on a seat near Paignton Pier on Sunday last at about twenty minutes past twelve. He noticed the yacht, and immediately after said to his companion, "That boat seems as if it is going to capsize." The next moment the yacht went over and sank. He and his friend ran immediately to the coastguard station and told the chief officer what had occurred. The statement, however, was disbelieved, and although he stayed there some ten minutes trying to the best of his power to impress upon the coastguard the fact that a boat had gone down, no effort was made, and no boat sent out. He might have said, "My God, won't you go and save these people?" The officer sent a man to look round the cliff and looked round himself, and then said he (witness) must be mistaken. Finding he could do nothing, witness went home. - William Earle, hairdresser, of Paignton, said he knew both the deceased, and on Sunday last he was sitting on a seat near the new pier when the last witness joined him. The seat faced the bay. There were two or three boats in the bay. Tomlinson called witness's attention to one of the boats, saying "Look at that boat, she is going over." Witness saw the boat go over quickly, but did not see anything else. At once Tomlinson and witness ran off to the coastguard station. Two men who were sitting near said "Here is the boat which you thought you saw go down." The boat referred to was not the one which had disappeared. Witness and Tomlinson told the man on duty that they had seen a boat go down, but the men about the station said it could not be so as they thought the boat must have gone on. It was quite possible that the men at the station could not see the boat go over. Witness went again to the pier to see if he had been mistaken, and as he could see nothing of the boat and as the men were so positive that the boat was all right he felt that he had made a mistake. The accident took place very suddenly. The men at the station did not make any attempt to get out a boat whilst witness was present. - Examined by Captain Medley: Did not know one rig of a boat from another, but felt sure that he saw the boat go down. Reported the occurrence at once to the officer on duty who was accompanied by another man. - George Greet said he was the officer in charge of the coastguard station at Paignton, and was on duty on Sunday last in the watchroom. The station was so situated that from it a view could be had from Roundham Head to Daddyhole. Was watching a yacht coming across the bay. There were two boats in the bay at noon, and one of them was a yacht coming across from Torquay. Thought, as it was blowing hard, that it was strange to see a boat out cruising. Saw the boat in question shoot round the head and pass out of sight. Witness then sat down to write a letter. Tomlinson came in about twenty minutes later and said a boat had disappeared from him, with tan sails. Witness said this was not possible, as there had been no such boat in the way; he then went out to the watchman, and looked through his glass, but could see nothing. Sent the watchman away over Roundham Head, and he came back saying he could see nothing. A boat could not have been got out to the spot where the boat was seen under an hour. Considered that Tomlinson had been deceived in the boats. - The Deputy Coroner: did you understand that Tomlinson intended to inform you of an accident? - I understood that Tomlinson had lost sight of the boat altogether. Did not think that Tomlinson thought the boat had gone down. - By a Juror: Sent a man round the head to see if he could see anything of the boat which had gone round there. The man came back and said he could see nothing, but witness did not send out a boat. He thought the boat which had disappeared round the head had gone to Brixham. Tomlinson came to the station about twenty-five minutes after the boat disappeared round the head. - Examination continued: Heard of the accident definitely on Monday morning. - A Juror: If I had been on duty and a man had come there and said that he had seen a boat go down, I should naturally have manned a boat and gone out to see if there had been any accident. (Hear, hear, and applause in court.) - The Deputy Coroner: What are your instructions in such a case? - Witness: To render every assistance possible. - A Juror: And you rendered none. (Applause.) - By Captain Medley: Only one person came to witness, and witness felt sure, from the spot that was pointed out to him, that no accident had taken place. Everyone else near the watch-house was of the same opinion. - Albert Pitman, coastguard, stationed at Paignton, gave evidence similar to that of the last witness. Did not understand that there had been an accident. The boat would go from Roundham Head to Brixham in about a quarter of an hour. Thought if Tomlinson meant that a boat had gone down he must have been mistaken. - Tomlinson, recalled, said he was at the coastguard station for quite ten minutes endeavouring to impress upon the minds of the coastguardsmen that he had seen a boat go down. He distinctly used the word "capsized." - Tom Brown and William Brown, boatmen, of Torquay, proved finding the bodies in the bay, the latter stating that in his opinion the deceased men were not proficient in sailing. The boat was found about three-quarters of a mile E.S.E. of Paignton harbour and a little over half-a-mile from the nearest land; it might have been reached from Paignton harbour on Sunday, in a rowing boat, in a quarter of an hour. - The Deputy Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said it appeared to him that the fact the coastguard was informed by two men that an accident had happened should have been sufficient to induce him to give orders to the men to go out at once and give all the help they could. (Applause.) - The Jury retired for fifteen minutes and on returning into court the Foreman said they were of opinion that the deceased were Accidentally Drowned; and they were also unanimous in censuring the coastguard for gross negligence of duty.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 June 1882
STOKENHAM - Sad Death Near Kingsbridge. - Dr Gaye, County coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Ellicombe House, Stokenham, near Kingsbridge, the residence of MR A. F. HOLDSWORTH, into the circumstances regarding the death of that gentleman's son, EDWARD DENMAN HOLDSWORTH, aged 5 years. From the evidence of [?] French, the nurse in charge of the child during the absence of MR and MRS HOLDSWORTH at Salcombe, it appeared that on Tuesday evening, finding he was suffering from a cold, she determined to bathe his feet in hot water and mustard before putting him to bed. While the boy was sitting on the bed French poured some water into a foot-bath, but finding it too hot she crossed the room to get some cold water, first cautioning the child not to put his feet into the bath. Suddenly, however, she heard a loud scream and seeing that the deceased had got his feet in the bath she immediately poured in the cold water. The boy's feet and legs were, however, very severely scalded, and having applied some simple remedies she put him to bed. He slept comfortably for some hours, but towards morning he became so uneasy that a medical man was sent for. At six o'clock the child died, before medical aid had arrived. Mr J. Elliott, surgeon, now stated that the severe scalding and the shock to the system were the cause of death, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Great sympathy is expressed in the neighbourhood for MR and MRS HOLDSWORTH in their sad bereavement.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 June 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, last evening held an Inquest at the Friendship Inn, Albert-road, Stoke, on the body of SARAH ELIZABETH COLE, domestic servant, who died there on Sunday morning. Deceased had lived in the house for some time as a domestic servant, and on Saturday complained of pain in her chest and side. Her illness continued throughout the night and Mrs Cook, her mistress, stayed up with her. Early on Sunday morning medical aid was sent for, but deceased died about nine o'clock. A post-mortem examination by Messrs Gard and Balstock, jun., revealed the fact that the young woman was with child, and that her death arose from Natural Causes. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 June 1882
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Lord Ebrington Inn, Ebrington-street, Plymouth, last evening, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) into the circumstances attending the death of ALICE BLANCHE ROBERTS, aged one year and ten months, daughter of MR WM. ROBERTS, decorative painter. On the 13th instant, as the mother of the deceased was preparing the dinner, a servant named Rosina Heavers, took up a cabbage out of a boiler in which it had been boiled. The girl strained the cabbage into a large basin, which she put down on the floor near the window. Deceased was standing near the window at the time, and when her father came in the deceased, in running towards him, stumbled and fell into the boiling water. She was very badly scalded from the waist downwards, and although the usual remedies were applied and Dr Jones was most assiduous in his exertions, the child died on Wednesday afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with MR ROBERTS in his sad bereavement.

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, opened an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of GEORGE PARSONS, aged 49 years, who resided in Vauxhall-street. - John Williams, foreman of quarrymen in the employ of Messrs. Sparrow and sons, stone merchants, Cattedown, said deceased was a quarryman, but his special duty was to "fire" or "blast" the holes after they had been bored by others. On Thursday deceased was employed in the quarry at Deadman's Bay and about eleven o'clock he saw him in the middle of the quarry on the face of the cliff, about sixty feet from the bottom. A hole had been bored in this spot by some other men during the morning. Deceased charged the hole and fitted the fuse. The alarm whistle was sounded as usual; the men all cleared off to a safe distance, and deceased remained behind to ignite the fuse. Directly he stooped, however, to fire the charge it exploded and blew the deceased in the air and then right out over to the bottom of the quarry. On going to where the deceased was lying he found him quite dead. The charge was poured into the hole by means of a tin-cup which had no lip, and tamping or dust was laid upon it which was rammed down by means of a bar. There ought not to be any powder left at the top of the hole: his belief was that there were a few grains accidentally left on this occasion at the top of the hole which ignited on the fuse being lit, and thus the fire was communicated to the charge. Deceased had had a great deal of experience in this work. - By a Juror: The same hole had been charged once before this with 1lb. of powder. Deceased fired that about ten minutes before, but witness did not believe that had anything to do with the subsequent explosion. It was usual for quarrymen high up to have ropes let down from above to go around them. There was a rope near the deceased at the time, which he could have used if he had desired. It was the deceased's own fault that he had not got it round him. At this stage of the Inquiry the Coroner said he was bound by law to adjourn the Inquest. In the case of a man killed by an explosion of any explosive he was compelled, if there were no Government Inspector present, to give four clear days' notice to the Secretary of State before the holding of the second or adjourned Inquest, in order that, if he thought fit, a Government Inspector might attend. It was simply necessary for him now to give an order for the burial [portion missing]. The Coroner then adjourned the Inquiry until [?].

Western Morning News, Monday 19 June 1882
EGG BUCKLAND - On Saturday afternoon the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest at the New Inn, Knackersknowle, on the body of THOMAS PENGELLY, labourer, who died on Wednesday last. The evidence shewed that on Wednesday morning deceased was working in his garden when he fell down and had to be carried into the house. A doctor was called, but deceased very soon expired of apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 June 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry in Plymouth Workhouse last evening into the cause of death of AMELIA WILLCOCKS, an inmate of the Workhouse. Deceased was an inmate of the imbecile ward, and 41 years of age. Mary Parnell, nurse, employed in the Asylum, said deceased was seized with a fit early on Sunday morning, which, however, did not last long. About three hours after she was seized with another fit, which was more severe than the former one. The deceased appeared to her to be sleeping shortly after seven o'clock, but on looking at her an hour later she found that she was dead. WILLCOCKS had been subject to fits for a great number of years. Mr F. Aubrey Thomas, the medical officer of the Workhouse, said he had known deceased for over eleven years, and during the whole of that time she had been subjected to fits of epilepsy, and he attributed her death to that cause. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 June 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the White Lion Inn, King-street, last evening into the cause of death of JOHN GUYETT, a labourer, 49 years of age, who died almost suddenly on Monday. Mr Delarne, surgeon, proved that heart disease was the cause of death and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 June 1882
EGG BUCKLAND - Terrible Tragedy At Widey. A Military Officer Shot Dead. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Widey Cottage, Knackersknowle, the residence of Major Letts, 3rd battalion Devonshire Regiment, into the cause of death of MR ROBERT JENKINSON, a lieutenant of the royal North Gloucester Militia, who was boarding with Major Letts. Mr W. H. Alger, of Widey Court, was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Mr William Henry Vernon, lieutenant of the 3rd West York Militia, said he had lived at Widey Cottage about three weeks. Deceased had been there about the same time. Witness accompanied him to Plymouth on Tuesday and returned shortly after eleven o'clock. Deceased immediately went to his room and took no refreshment. he was in very good spirits, because he had had a telegram in the morning offering him a cavalry commission. He was always very cheerful, but he was particularly so on that afternoon. Witness and deceased slept in adjoining rooms, and on Tuesday night the communicating door was open. About ten minutes after they had retired to their respective rooms witness heard a "crash," and immediately went to deceased's room. He saw deceased with his feet against the washstand, and his head against the wall. Witness thought that he might have fallen against the chinaware, but nothing was broken. He saw a mark in the forehead, and deceased was dead. Witness immediately informed Major Letts of what had occurred. Deceased always kept a pistol loaded in his room, but he consented to unload it at witness's request. - By the Foreman: They went to the theatre in the evening, and drove back. There was nothing unusual in his manner, and they were very friendly on the way home. He had been drinking, but he was not in the least affected by it. He did not hear the report of the pistol, which he accounted for by the fact of the deceased falling against the washstand, and the noise of the chinaware might have drowned the report. He did not receive anything when he got home of a disappointing character. - Major A. Letts, of the 3rd battalion Devonshire Regiment, stated that he resided at Widey Cottage. Deceased and last witness were boarding with him. They returned from Plymouth on Tuesday about 11.30, and were both quite sober. They went to their rooms, and he shortly heard a noise, and thought that a chair had been knocked down in the room. About five minutes to twelve Mr Vernon came to his room and said deceased had met with an accident. Witness immediately ran into the room, and found him lying on the floor with his head partially under the bed. He was dressed as he had come home, but his vest was undone. He believed deceased was about 21 years of age. There was a candle in the room, and there was a strong smell of gunpowder. A doctor and the police were sent for. Witness searched for the pistol, but could not find it. There were some cartridges on his dressing table, and there was also a box of percussion caps there. Within the past week he had been excited with pleasure. When he received the officer of a commission he was excessively pleased and proud and was in high spirits all day. - By the Foreman: He was in very good spirits when he went to bed, and intended going home the following day to take up his commission. He was quite sober, and if he had been an officer in uniform he should have passed him for duty. - Edwin Charles Langford, surgeon, stated that at 12.30 yesterday morning he was called to Widey Cottage. He found deceased lying on the bed dead. On examination he found a small wound on the left side of the forehead. A pistol was on the floor, under the toilet table. None of the barrels were loaded, but one appeared to have been recently discharged, and smelt strongly of powder. The wound would be such as would be caused by a bullet fired at a very short range. He saw a little discolouring around the wound, which would have been caused by the powder. The wound caused instantaneous death, and the bullet must have gone completely into the brain. In witness's opinion the probable reaction from the excitement and pleasure would be followed by depression, which at times came on very suddenly, and would cause temporary insanity. He believed the wound was self-inflicted. - MR JENKINSON, brother of deceased, said deceased had always been very fond of firearms from a boy. He kept a revolver when at home and was in the habit of shooting. His death was quite inexplicable to him. Witness had letters from him, in which he appeared in high spirits. - The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict that deceased shot himself Accidentally.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Wife Murder At Devonport. Magisterial Examination. - At the Devonport Petty Sessions yesterday, before the ex-Mayor (Mr J. C. Graves), Mr J. W. W. Ryder, Mr R. C. Smith, Mr J. Weary, and Captain Edye, R.N., ALFRED GEORGE CORIN, 29, coach painter, was charged with the wilful murder of his wife, ANN MARIA CORIN, at 5 Market-lane, on the previous day. The prisoner, a short, miserable looking man, walked with much difficulty to the dock, and from the tremors apparently on him had evidently been drinking very heavily of late. Steps had been taken to exclude the general public from the Court, and the proceedings occupied by a few minutes. - The Chief Constable, Mr Lynn, on being sworn, said yesterday afternoon the prisoner was brought to the Guildhall charged with maliciously wounding his wife. I saw him then. This morning, at 10 o'clock, I had him brought from his cell, and told him the charge would be rather different to what it was on Tuesday, when he first came in. I then charged him with the wilful murder of his wife at Market-lane. He said, "Is she dead?" I said, "Yes." He said, "Well, it was her own fault. What I did was in self-defence." - Mr Alan Bone (magistrates' clerk): The woman died at the Hospital at ten o'clock last night, dis she not? - Mr Lynn: Yes. I must apply for a remand for a week, and until after the coroner's Inquest is completed. - Mr Bone (to prisoner): Have you anything to say why you should not be remanded until this day week? - Prisoner: I shall plead not guilty to the charge. - Mr Bone: Very well. You had better not say anything more now. - The prisoner was then remanded until Wednesday next, and, in charge of Inspector Evans, was rapidly driven off to the gaol, unperceived by the large crowd which was still in waiting outside the police court door. The Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest on the body of the deceased woman was opened at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday afternoon before Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, and a Jury of seventeen gentlemen, Mr J. May being chosen Foreman. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, expressed regret at the circumstances which had brought them together, but at the same time congratulated the town on the immunity from crimes of violence which it enjoyed as a rule. His intentions were to take enough evidence that day to enable him to issue an order for the burial of the body, and then to adjourn the Inquiry to a day when they would be able to conclude it. - The Jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was given:- P.S. David Shubart deposed: About ten minutes past five yesterday afternoon, from information I received I, in company with P.C. Westlake, went to a room in a house 5 Market-lane, Devonport. When we got to the door of a room on the first landing we found it locked; we forced it open, and inside the door saw a woman lying on her face and hands in a pool of blood. Her face and head were so covered in blood that I could not identify her. I sent for a doctor, and meanwhile, observing that deceased was then alive, procured a bucket of water and cleansed her face. I then saw two large open cuts on the right side of the neck, one about four inches long; and the other from two to three inches in length. There were also one or two small marks on the back of the neck which appeared to be stabs. Mr Paul, surgeon, then arrived, and by his orders, deceased was removed to the Hospital in a cab. I went to the police-station, and there saw the husband of the woman, ALFRED GEORGE CORIN. He was charged then with wounding his wife with intent to murder her. He said, "She struck me with the hatchet first, and I struck her afterwards. She is a bad one." This morning at 10 o'clock, after hearing of the woman's death, Superintendent Lynn charged the prisoner with the wilful murder of his wife. He said, "She is a bad one. I am sorry, but I had to do it in self-defence." Prisoner seemed to be greatly affected. - The Coroner: Was any caution given to the prisoner before he said anything? - Witness: My Lynn said "I have to alter the charge against you. I have now to charge you with wilful murder. The Coroner: But did he caution him not to say anything? - Witness: No; there was no occasion to do so. - The Coroner: I do not say there was. I was only asking for the information of the Jury. - Witness: And I say there was no need to caution him. - The Coroner: I do not say there was legally, but sometimes we do things which are not absolutely legally required, but we do it out of kindness. - Witness: I found a hatchet concealed under the fire grate of the copper in the washhouse. I took charge of it, and also of two knives, which I found in a small box where the body was lying. I also found a small poker, which had been recently broken in two, one part being on the floor and the other on the table. There were, it appeared to me, stains of blood on the hatchet. There were blood stains on prisoner's hands when I first saw him at the Guildhall, but he had no marks as if he had been struck with the hatchet. Deceased was unconscious when I saw her. - John Millard, of 19 Cross-street, Devonport, said: I am a publican. I knew both prisoner and deceased for nearly two years. Yesterday afternoon, about 4.30, I was standing at the corner of my house when prisoner walked into my bar. I told him it was no use for him to come there as I would not serve him as long as I lived. He came out of the bar, caught me by the hand, and said, "Good bye; I have done for the -----". I made no reply, and he walked away. Prisoner has often said to me that he had done for her, and would do it again, so I took no notice of his remark. I did not consider prisoner was drunk when he spoke to me. I have often known prisoner and deceased to quarrel. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Monday next at the Guildhall at 3 p.m., the Jury being bound over to attend there that day.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 June 1882
PLYMSTOCK - The Death By Drowning In Jennycliffe Bay. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of MR RICHARD JAMES VINSON, retired grocer and one of the deacons of the Catholic Apostolic Church, Princess-street, Plymouth, was held on Saturday evening at Hine's Castle Hotel, Mount Batten, before Mr Rodd, County Coroner. It will be remembered that the deceased gentleman was found dead under the cliffs at Jennycliffe on Tuesday last. An Inquest was held on the following day, but it was adjourned until Saturday in order that a post-mortem examination of the body might be made. - Maurice Rees, private R.M.L.I., stationed at Fort Stamford, deposed that on Tuesday, about 1.15 p.m., he was standing on the cliffs above Jennycliffe Beach when he observed something floating in the water. On going down to the beach he saw that it was the body of a man, who was quite dead, and was floating in about eight or ten inches of water, the tide being on the ebb. He immediately fetched the police constable, and they proceeded back to the spot and removed the body to the Castle Inn. - A Juror asked witness why he did not take the body out of the water. - Rees, in reply, said that, finding the man was dead, he thought the best thing for him to do would be to fetch the constable. - Several Jurors expressed the opinion that Rees should have taken the body out of the water. - P.C. Fleming said he found several letters on the deceased, all of which were of a private nature and were from his son, and it was from these that he ascertained who the deceased was. When he arrived at Jennycliffe the tide had left the body. - Mr J. Jacob, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination and found that death had resulted from drowning. There were no external marks which would cause death, and the heart was in a sound and healthy condition. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." - The funeral of MR VINSON took place on Saturday afternoon at the Plymouth Cemetery. Shortly after two o'clock the funeral cortege left the residence of the deceased and proceeded direct to the cemetery and on arrival there the corpse was borne into the church by members of the church in Princess-street. The funeral service was read in the church and at the graveside by the cemetery chaplain (the Rev. J. Phillips). The chief mourners were the two sons of the deceased, MESSRS. R. J. VINSON and J. VINSON, and his brother MR J. VINSON, of Falmouth.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 June 1882
DARTMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Dartmouth [By Telegraph.] - Yesterday morning, about ten o'clock, as some men at Dartmouth were discharging the collier William, Captain Windows, laden with coals from Cardiff, into the Powel Daffryn hulk, the chain belonging to an iron bucket containing coals gave way, and the bucket with its content fell on the head of a man named JOHN FINCH, who was in the hold of the steamer killing him almost instantaneously; his skull having been entirely split open. Medical aid was soon forthcoming, but too late to be of any service, the injured man having died with a minute or so of being struck. Deceased was a workman at the Torbay and Dart Point Company's works, but the steamer requiring a quick despatch he was with a fellow-workman asked to assist. FINCH was a married man, and leaves a wife and six children totally unprovided for. An Inquest was held last evening at the Guildhall before Mr Luxmoore Hockin, Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Killed" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Wife Murder At Devonport. The Inquest. Verdict of Manslaughter. - The Inquest concerning the death of the woman ANN MARIA CORIN, who was killed on Tuesday last by her husband, was resumed yesterday afternoon before the Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan), at the Guildhall. Mr G. H. E. Rundle, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the accused, and Superintendent Lynn on behalf of the police. - The first witness called was Jane White, wife of a shoemaker, residing at 11 Doidge's-wells, who said:- On Tuesday I was in Chapel-street, when the accused came to me and said, "I have done it. Will you go and see? I've either cut her throat or chopped her head off with a chopper." - The Coroner: He did not say who he was speaking of? - Witness: No; but I thought he did not mean it. The accused said he would stop there (in Chapel-street) while I went to his house. I went down to the house and found that all the doors were locked. As I was going over the stairs I was met by two policemen, one of whom broke open one of the doors, and found deceased lying on the floor of the room covered with blood. The doctor was sent for, and when he came the woman was placed by his orders on the bed in the adjoining room. The policemen and I washed the face of the deceased before she was taken to the Hospital. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said it was a little after 5 p.m. when CORIN came to her in Chapel-street. She had known CORIN and his wife for many years. When the accused first addressed her in Chapel-street he said "She has pledged all my clothes, and cut my hand with a knife." He shewed her his hand, but the cut was of a very slight nature. He was not sober at the time, and was looking very wild. - By Mr Rundle: The accused when he stopped me did not say that he wanted to see me for any particular purpose. I am very friendly with CORIN and his family. I could not say whether there had been any previous quarrel between them. - David Hawke, a bootmaker, residing at 13 Market-street, said:- About 1 p.m. on Tuesday I noticed a water policeman at the door of No. 3. MRS CORIN answered the door, and after the departure of the policeman I heard her go to Mr Balkwill's room, saw her look out of the window, and say to Mr Miller, the landlord of the public-house at the corner, "You have put the water police on the house," and then commence to abuse him and his wife. Mr Millers said, "You must not blame me for it, or any of your neighbours; it was your own husband." MRS CORIN looked at Miller and asked, "He did?" Miller answered, "He did, in my bar this morning." Deceased then again commenced to abuse Miller and his wife. - Mr Rundle: Did she make any remark about her husband? - Witness: No, but she appeared to be astonished. A few minutes after I saw her leave the house with Emma Kendall, who lives in the same house, and who is a prostitute, in fact the house has been a resort of prostitutes of late. MRS CORIN said when leaving the house with Kendall "I'll get him seven years, if I don't I'm d.......". I saw her return to the house in company with three prostitutes, and they all went inside. I did not see CORIN go in the house after the deceased went in, but about a quarter to four I saw MRS CORIN at the window and heard her say "You did." I then heard CORIN'S voice for the first time, but could not make out what he said in reply. She then said, "You have done for this house; you told Bob Miller you sent the Water Police here." The prisoner again replied, but I failed to make out what he said. Deceased used violent and threatening language towards him; and at this juncture I heard something fall, followed by cries of "murder," and my wife called my attention then, and I then saw CORIN leave the house. - The Coroner: Why did you not go over when you heard cries of murder? - Witness: The cries have been so frequent of late that I did not take any notice of them. Deceased was a most violent woman, and has on several occasions threatened to knock my wife's brains out. I saw the two policemen go into the house, and I did not see anyone go in from the time CORIN left until the police entered. I heard them quarrelling on the previous Saturday. - By a Juror: For the past two months their quarrels have been very frequent. I know of one occasion on which the accused was thrown over the stairs. - By Mr Rendle: I have never heard the man commence a quarrel. - By the Coroner: From the time I first recognised the man CORIN'S voice until he left the house was not more than five or eight minutes. The quarrel on the present occasion was less severe than it had been on other occasions. The fatal quarrel took place in a room occupied by a Mr Vogwell. - Mary Ann Hopkins, a single woman, residing at 7 Doidge's-wells, said: About ten minutes past five on Tuesday evening ALFRED CORIN came to me in Chapel-street. he said to me, "Poll, I have been and done it." I said, "Done what?" and he replied, "I don't know whether I have killed her or not; I have been and hit 'Ri' with a hatchet." I went down to his room and found the policemen there. - Emma Kendall, residing in the same house as the deceased, said: I was one of the three who went into the house with MRS CORIN. I stayed there until half-past four, when I went out on an errand, leaving MRS CORIN lying on the floor asleep. She was under the influence of drink. On returning about half an hour afterwards I heard a little girl say that CORIN had cut his wife's throat. - By a Juror: I have resided in the house eight days, and have never heard a quarrel between them. When they separated in the morning they were good friends. - Mr E. W. Paul, surgeon, said: About quarter-past five on Tuesday, a police-constable came to me, and said that a woman had been murdered in Market-lane. I went there, and found the woman lying on the floor in one of the rooms in a pool of blood. Her injuries were so severe that I recommended her removal to the Hospital. Mr Cant, the resident house surgeon, was called in, and restoratives were applied, and the woman rallied slightly, and was placed in bed. I then proceeded to examine the extent of her injuries. There was a scalp wound at the back of the head about 1 ½ inches long, but there was no fracture of the bone. This wound was very probably inflicted with a blunt instrument. There were four wounds on the right side of the neck, and the principal one was three inches long and was clean cut, it having been inflicted with some sharp instrument. The principal vessels were not cut through, but most of the smaller vessels were severed and the large muscle at the back of the neck was cut completely through. The principal wound was two inches deep for the greater part of its length. The two smaller wounds, one an inch long and the other about a quarter of an inch, were below and behind the others. All these four wounds in the throat were done by some sharp instrument. The loss of blood from the principal wound in the throat was so excessive that we had little hope of the woman surviving, and she died at 9 p.m. - Sergeant Schubert, of the Devonport Borough Police, said: I produce the jacket that the prisoner was wearing at the time of his arrest. I also produce a small pocket knife which I found in the jacket, and a hatchet which I found under the fire place of the washhouse, as well as a pair of scissors, which were hanging up by the window in the same room in which the murder was committed, and a shoemaker's knife and a glazier's knife, which I found in a small box in the room, and the poker, which is broken in two. I wish to state that in addition to what I said at the first Inquiry, that the prisoner said, "I was not going to let a b..... like her knock me about. I wasn't going to be knocked about by a b..... like that." - Mr Paul was here recalled, and said there were stains of blood inside the pocket of the jacket, and also on the handle and the blade of the hatchet, and there were two smaller stains of blood on the shoemaker's knife. The immediate cause of death was exhaustion, following on the loss of blood. If the blood could have been staunched in time, it was probable that the woman would have recovered. - By a Juror: At the time I was called in the woman had stopped bleeding; in fact, she had lost all the blood that she could really spare. If there had been any blood running I should not have had the woman removed to the Hospital until I had stopped it. I should say that the woman had been bleeding about half an hour. - P.C. Henry Westlake said: In company with Sergeant Schubert, I went to the house of the deceased and found her lying in a large pool of blood. At the direction of the sergeant I went for a doctor, and, after having seen Mr Paul, I was coming down St. Aubyn-street, when I saw the prisoner with two or three civilians. I immediately ran down and apprehended him and brought him to the station. I left the prisoner with the inspector, who asked me what it was. I said it might be a case of murder. The prisoner then said, "The b.... is not dead yet. She struck me first with a hatchet; she is a bad one." The prisoner shewed me his hand, which was stained with blood, but I could not see any wound. I searched him, and found six keys on him, a florin, and 2 ½d. in coppers, and a pawn-ticket for a counterpane which was pledged on the same day as the occurrence. I then went back to the house, and found that the door of the room had been burst open. One of the six keys found on the prisoner fitted the lock on this door. Mr Lynn, superintendent of police said: On Tuesday last I visited the prisoner, ALFRED CORIN, in his cell. I looked through the aperture in the door, and when he saw me he said, "Oh, Mr Lynn, I think you are the only friend I have." He added, "Maria attacked me; she has been going on a bad game. Last night I had to pull her out of Balkwill's bedroom, as she said she would sleep with him. I had 33s. 3d wages on Saturday, and gave her the whole of it with the exception of 3d., and today there is not a farthing of it left." I said, "That does not justify your knocking her about." He replied, "Well, she struck me; and he shewed me one of his hands, on which there was an abrasion. I remarked, "That is a small matter," and he said, "It is quite enough for me." I was about to leave when he asked, "Do you know how she is?" I told him I believed she was very ill, and he replied, "I am very sorry for it; but it was her own fault." I knew about an hour and a half afterwards that she was dead, and I gave instructions that prisoner should not be informed of it. Next morning about ten o'clock I had him brought into the charge-room, and I said, "The charge against you will be a much more serious one than you were charged with last evening. You are now charged with the wilful murder of your wife in Market-lane." He said, "is she dead?" and appeared surprised. He asked, "When did she die?" and I replied, "Last night, and I gave orders that you should not be informed." He said, "Well; what I did was in self defence. She had only herself to blame." The prisoner then sat down, and hid his face in his hands, and appeared deeply affected. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said: We have got together all the evidence we can in this matter, and without going strictly into all the facts, there is one fact that the man admits that he had "done for" someone, and that someone was his wife. To other witnesses also he either said he had cut her throat or chopped off her head. There were also a number of weapons found about the premises with which the man could have done the deed. We cannot tell which he did first, whether it was with the hatchet or with the knife, but all the evidence shews an amount of deliberation on the part of the prisoner. Having committed the act he goes out of the room and locks the door, and tells a number of people what he has done, but he never shews one sign of repentance by fetching a doctor or going back to see how the woman was. The accused tries to justify himself by saying that he was struck by her first, and that he was wounded in the hand, but when he was told by the superintendent of police that it was not much, he replies "That is quite enough for me;" and that, I think, shews malice on the part of the accused. If the deceased had been found by her husband committing adultery with a man, and then struck her a hasty blow it would have been in some sense justifiable; but the accused goes in the house, and although the deceased might have used some strong words, which I have no doubt she did, that does not offer the slightest justification for what he did after. I think it will be your duty, however painful it may be, to return a verdict of wilful murder against the prisoner, ALFRED CORIN. There is nothing that I can see to reduce it to manslaughter, and I think you have no alternative but to bring in a verdict of wilful murder. - The charge to the Jury concluded about ten minutes to six, and they then retired. After a short interval they sent for the Coroner, who remained with them some time. Shortly after Mr Vaughan's return the Coroner's Officer notified to him that the Jury could not agree. A message was then sent to the Jury by the Coroner, saying that they would have to be locked up until they did agree. Subsequently the presence of tobacco smoke was perceived by the persons in court, and on opening the door of the room in which the Jury were closeted, it was found that some of their number were smoking. A message was sent to the Jury that they were not justified in smoking, and unless it were discontinued the police would be called in, and their pipes and matches be taken from them. This warning put a stop to the smoking, and after having been in consultation for over an hour and forty minutes, the Jury returned into Court, when the Foreman said the majority found a verdict of "Manslaughter." Thirteen were in favour of a verdict of "manslaughter," and four of a verdict of "wilful murder." It was subsequently found that the Foreman had made a mistake, and that twelve were in favour of "manslaughter" and five for "wilful murder." - The Coroner, on hearing the verdict of the Jury said: "I beg to state that I entirely disagree with your verdict, although bound to accept it." This concluded the Inquiry, which had lasted nearly five hours.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 June 1882
PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of PATRICK BARRY, 61, a pensioner, was the subject of an Inquiry before the Plymouth Borough Coroner yesterday afternoon at Thomas's Three Crowns Inn, Parade, Plymouth. Deceased, who lodged at 3 Parade-ope, felt unwell on Monday evening and went to bed, saying if he were not better in the morning he would see a doctor. The next morning at six o'clock he was found dead in bed by Mr Jansen, with whom he lodged. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 June 1882
TORQUAY - A verdict of Suicide by Hanging whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity was recorded yesterday at an Inquiry held before Dr Gaye, Coroner, at Normount, Torquay, touching the death of AUGUSTA WOOD, wife of JOHN WOOD, gardener, in the employ of Mrs Gamble, Normount.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 July 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr Harrison, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Sutton Harbour Inn, Plymouth, last evening, concerning the death of JAMES CLARK, aged about 52 years. Deceased was a merchant sailor, and had been living for several days at a boarding-house in Vauxhall-street, kept by a widow named Reed. He was paid off at Belfast, and came to Plymouth with several pounds in his possession. For a week he drank heavily, but latterly he abandoned those habits. On Friday he complained of pains in the back, and was not better on Saturday. Later on in the day the man was discovered lying on the floor in his bedroom. Mr Harper was called, and pronounced him beyond recovery. In fact, he was then dead. - P.C. Sloman and others having given evidence, the Jury, of whom of Mr W. Perraton was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 July 1882
ASHWATER - Sad Depravity At Ashwater. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Ashwater, a village about ten miles from Launceston on the body of the illegitimate child of ELIZA ANN HATCH, daughter of a farm labourer. The mother of the child admitted in evidence that this was the third illegitimate child to which she had given birth within the past three years, that she gave no intimation of her condition to any of her neighbours before the child was born, and that she made no provision for its birth. No one was with her but her father at the time she was taken ill, and he at once went for a neighbour, who came to the house and assisted her. The witness added, in reply to questions from the Coroner, that there were seven persons in the family, and that they all slept in one small bedroom. When the child was taken ill she did not send for a doctor, "because while some said 'do', others said 'don't.'" Eventually she took it to Mr Pearse, of Holsworthy, but it died within a few days. The next witness was HATCH'S father, and he swore that until the child was born he knew nothing of his daughter's condition, although living and sleeping in the same room with her. He did not question her as to who was the father of the child or trouble himself at all about it, because he was afraid she might do something to herself. Mr Pearse, surgeon, deposed that when he saw the child it was suffering from erysipelas in one of its arms, and this was sufficient to account for death. He had no doubt, however, that if it had been born in the Workhouse and properly cared for it would have lived. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that although there was nothing to shew that death resulted from other than natural causes, the surrounding circumstances were of the most revolting character. Nothing could be more disgraceful or contemptible than the conduct of the young woman's father, and he strongly advised her to leave her father's roof, and to seek a home elsewhere, even if it be in the Workhouse, where she would be taught to live a decent life. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Boat Accident Off Plymouth. Inquest On One Of The Drowned Men. - Mr William Harrison, Deputy Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Millbay Pier waiting-rooms, Plymouth, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of ARNOLD EZECHIEL, a corporal in the 9th Brigade Royal Artillery, who was one of three men drowned through a boat capsizing in the Sound on Saturday evening. The circumstances were given fully in yesterday's Western Morning News. Mr P.T. Brockington was Foreman of the Jury. - MARIA JANE EZECHIEL, residing at 59 Wolsden-street, Plymouth, identified the body of the deceased as her brother. He was 38 years of age and was a corporal in the Artillery, having been in India for several years. He returned to England in February last, and to Plymouth on the 24th ult. on furlough from Woolwich. They took breakfast together on Saturday morning, and he left home between nine and ten o'clock. He said he would return to dinner about one o'clock. He did not return. - Thomas James Alcott said: I am a gunner in the 3rd battery 1st brigade Royal Artillery. I was not a friend of the deceased. I never met the deceased before Saturday about one o'clock, when he came into Mount Wise Barracks to see Richard Burns. Deceased asked Burns to go out for a sail, and went purposely for this. Burns did not seem inclined, and deceased then asked Gunner Hall and myself to go. We did so. A sergeant of marines, who came to the barracks in company with EZECHIEL, went with us. I never saw the sergeant before. I don't know who he is, but he is one of the missing men. We went to Webber's boating house at Richmond Walk, and all got into a boat. A boatman named Harris accompanied us. We agreed to go to Cawsand, and as we thought we could get there quicker by pulling than sailing, we did so. We left Richmond Walk at half-past two and reached Cawsand about half-past five. We got out and went to the London Inn, where we had refreshments. After staying about half an hour we returned to the boat and pulled out into the Sound. We then hoisted all the sails again. We were making fair headway, when, about 1,400 yards from Cawsand beach, a puff of wind blew the sergeant's hat off. He was sitting in the stern of the boat. Afterwards we saw it about ten yards off. The boat was put about in order to get the cap, the boatman managing the sails. I don't know whether the sergeant or corporal was at the tiller. We got the boat round safely but failed to secure the cap, which must have sank. Just at this time the boatman's cap blew off. The wind was blowing in puffs. We were not "larking." I think his cap must have been knocked off when he was moving about to manage the sails. I was sitting in the bow of the boat. We were trying to get the boatman's hat when somehow or other the boat got broadside on in the middle of the swell which was running, and the boat half filled with water. None of us jumped up then; and the boatman was attending to the sails all this time. Two or three seconds afterwards another sea struck us and the boat capsized. - The three - the sergeant, corporal and boatman - were all pitched into the water. I caught hold of the boat as she turned on her side, and as soon as I felt I had hold of her I got on the gunwale. I clutched the nearest man, who happened to be Gunner Hall. I succeeded in pulling him on. The boat kept on her side. The sails, I think, kept the boat from properly overturning. The others were in the water, about ten yards away, making efforts, as far as I could see, to swim. I don't think they tried to swim to the boat; they did not appear to get nearer it. I don't know what became of the men. They had said they could swim just before the accident. I had as much I could do to keep myself and Hall afloat by clinging to the boat, which was under water except a small part of the bow. I saw several men at Picklecombe Fort and shouted to them. They saw us, but could not do anything as they had no boat. We were clinging to the boat for about half an hour when we were rescued. We saw the steamer - Sir Francis Drake - going past us. I shouted, but we were not observed until the steamer was past the Breakwater. When they saw us they immediately bore down and threw us a lifebuoy. A pleasure boat, however, which was attracted by the men at the fort shouting came up and rescued us. They took us to Picklecombe. I did not see the sergeant, corporal, or boatman more than once after the accident, and then I only caught a glimpse of them. - By the Foreman: I was sitting in the bow of the boat all the time. I could see everyone in the boat, but could not say who had charge of the helm. The hats were lost through the strong breeze and not through "skylarking." I did not see the waterman take charge of the tiller. He was attending most diligently to the sails, and I think he was perfectly capable of managing the boat. I heard him give directions to those in charge of the tiller. The accident occurred near Picklecombe, and was noticed almost immediately from the fort. They were looking at us for fully half an hour, and could render us no assistance. I fully believe that if they had had a boat at Picklecombe they would have been able to save the lives of the whole of them. - The Foreman: Many accidents happen near Picklecombe, and I think they would be able to render valuable assistance if they had a boat there. I think this ought to be represented to the proper authorities. - The Deputy Coroner: I will take care the Coroner represents the matter to the authorities with a view of your suggestion being carried out. - Harry Mitchell, seaman, of the steamer Sir Francis Drake, said on Saturday night he picked up the body of the deceased half-way between Picklecombe Fort and the Breakwater. The body was floating, and he took it on board the steamer which immediately brought it into the Docks. Witness stayed in the steamer's boat searching for the other men, but could not find any trace of them. They towed the sunken boat into the Docks. - P.C. Southern, of the Borough Police, said when the body was landed on the pier it was conveyed to the store. Dr Greenway, Dr Batho, of the Army and Dr White tried to restore animation but failed. On searching the body he found a purse containing £2 16s. 5 ½d., and several articles. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that a boat be kept at Picklecombe Fort to render assistance whenever necessary.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 July 1882
TORQUAY - At Torquay yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded at an Inquiry held before Mr Rodd, Coroner, relative to the death of ANN EALES a domestic servant, residing at Kinlet Villa, Torquay. From the evidence it appears the deceased on the 20th ult., went too near the fire and her clothes ignited. She was so severely burnt that after lingering for a few weeks death ensued on Monday.

EXETER - Suicide By A Married Woman At Exeter. - The County Coroner, Mr Burrows, held an Inquest yesterday on MARY BURNETT, wife of a gardener, of Coombe-street, whose body was found on Saturday in the canal near Exeter. - A smith named Abrahams deposed to having seen the deceased, between three and four o'clock on the afternoon of the day named, walking on the canal bank. He noticed that she stooped as though to pick up something, but on turning and seeing witness and his companions she walked on. A quarter of an hour later witness passed that way again and found some men dragging the canal. - Walter Moxey stated that on passing the Welcombe Inn in a boat he saw what appeared to be a dark dress floating in the water. On touching it with his paddle it immediately sank. As it went down he thought he noticed a tress of hair, and he remembered what he had previously seen. He immediately raised an alarm, some men came and dragged the canal, and the body of the deceased was found in about nine or ten feet of water. Deceased's husband stated that his wife had been under medical treatment for despondency. - John Hill, brother of the woman, said that, as far as he knew, his sister lived comfortably with her husband, but he had noticed her despondency. - After evidence from Mr Brush, surgeon, and P.C. Blackmore, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 July 1882
NORTHAM - At Appledore yesterday the Coroner held an Inquiry into the death of MR CHARLES PLATT, M.D., which took place suddenly on Sunday evening. The evidence shewed the deceased gentleman had suffered from heart disease for some time past, and his brother, a surgeon, deposed that death had resulted from Natural Causes. Verdict accordingly.

TOTNES - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Totnes on the body of the boy GEORGE WELLINGTON, son of a labourer, who on Monday accidentally fell into a mill leat and was drowned, the body not being recovered until the following morning. It appeared from the evidence adduced that several children witnessed the accident and were afraid of giving information about it. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 July 1882
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was yesterday returning at an Inquiry respecting the death of WILLIAM NETTING, aged 58, a shipwright, who on Saturday fell from a stage whilst caulking a trawler in Mr Banks's shipbuilding yard, Coxside. Deceased sustained considerable scalp wounds by the fall and died soon after being admitted to the Hospital.

EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquiry was held at the Foresters' Arms, Union-street, Stonehouse, yesterday, by the County Coroner (Mr Rodd) into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES JOHN FURZE WILLIS, aged six years. - It appeared that on Friday, about half-past four in the afternoon, the deceased, who was the son of a nurse in the Royal Naval Hospital, residing in Union-place, was playing near his home, when a horse and cart belonging to Mr J. H. Ferguson, ginger beer manufacturer, driven by John Snawdon, passed along. The deceased ran behind the cart and hung behind it. In endeavouring to get a better hold of the cart the lad missed his hold and fell under the cart. One of the wheels passed over his back. He was picked up by a lamplighter, named Richard Henry Stidston, and carried to his home. Mr Marens Henry Bulteel, surgeon, was immediately called in, but the poor little fellow had by that time expired. The horse and cart were proceeding at an ordinary pace at the time, and the driver who did not know of the occurrence until after it had occurred, was exonerated from all blame. The Jury, of which Mr Wm. Joyce was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 July 1882
STOWFORD - At Castle Farm, Stowford, near Lifton, an Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Fulford, on the body of MR EDWARD HARVEY NORTHEY, 45 years of age, who was thrown from his horse on Saturday evening when returning from Launceston Market. From the evidence it appeared that MR NORTHEY left Launceston about half-past eight on Saturday evening. When near Polson Bridge he was thrown from his horse (a very spirited animal), and fell heavily on his head. he was met on Saturday evening by James Eade, who was driving a baker's cart, near Bamham Mills, when he was observed to be riding fast. Eade watched him for about 150 yards and saw deceased fall. He returned and took deceased to his home in the bread cart. MR NORTHEY was visited on Sunday morning by Mr Thompson of Launceston, who pronounced the case to be hopeless. Death ensued the same morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 July 1882
PLYMOUTH - At an adjourned Inquest held at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, on the body of BESSIE GARN, who died suddenly in Martin-street on Tuesday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Dr Pearse, who made the post-mortem examination, deposed that the immediate cause of death was syncope.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 July 1882
The body of another of the three men who were drowned off Picklecombe Fort a fortnight ago when out on a pleasure sailing trip was found on Wednesday. It was that of the waterman, GEORGE HARRIS, and was seen by a boy named Coot, who reported the matter to the police at Cawsand. A waterman secured the body and took it to the fort. An Inquest was yesterday held by Mr Glubb, County Coroner, at Picklecombe Fort, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 July 1882
Mr Coad held an Inquest at Millbrook on Saturday on the body of JOSEPH HAMBLY, a pensioner sawyer at Devonport Dockyard, who was found hanging in the stairs of his house early on the previous morning. It appeared from the evidence that deceased had for some time previous complained frequently of distracting pains in the head. A verdict of "Death whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 July 1882
PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - The Sudden Death At Mutley Station. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Fortescue Hotel, Mutley-plain, respecting the death of ELLEN REYNOLDS, aged 36, wife of a Hull merchant, and daughter of MAJOR RAMSAY, of Lipson Vale, Plymouth. - MARGARET RAMSAY, mother of the deceased, deposed that for some time past her daughter had been ailing. Deceased's home was in Hull and since May last witness had been staying with her there. She had been under the care of a medical man for some time past, and on Thursday he sanctioned the journey from Hull to Plymouth. On Saturday at 6.50 a.m. witness left Hull with deceased for Plymouth. They travelled all day, and at Exeter deceased left the train for refreshments. Arrangements had been made for staying at Bristol should her strength fail, but this was not thought necessary. Shortly after leaving Exeter deceased shewed signs of fatigue, and passed the greater part of the journey between Exeter and Mutley in sleep. On arriving at Mutley they found Major Ramsay and his son awaiting their arrival. Deceased heard her father's voice, turned her head, and fainted. She was lifted out of the carriage and taken to the waiting room, and Mr E. H. Edlin, surgeon, was sent for. Deceased, however, died before his arrival. - Dr Edlin said the immediate cause of death was syncope acting on the heart, which was much weakened by consumption. - Henry Richards, station-master at Mutley, having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 July 1882
BERE FERRERS - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest on Monday, at Beeralston, relative to the death of JAMES IVEY, a miner, aged 17. On the 15th inst., the deceased was at work in Gawton Copper Mine, near Tavistock, when he fell from the 70 to the 95-fathom level, and was killed. An Inquiry was opened on the 17th inst. by the Coroner, but it was adjourned in order that the Inspector of Mines for the district (Mr Frecheville) might attend. The inspector now attended; and the Jury, of whom Mr Bell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 July 1882
LYDFORD - Mysterious Death At Post Bridge. The Inquest. - At the New Inn, Post Bridge, yesterday, Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry respecting the death of JAMES MARSDEN, an employee at Messrs. Hamlyn's factory, at Buckfastleigh, whose dead body was found on Monday morning near Post Bridge under circumstances already published. Mr W. Rowe was elected Foreman of the Jury. Mr T. W. Windeatt, of Totnes, watched the case on behalf of Richard Gilpin, an overlooker in the same factory, who was last seen in company with the deceased. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, alluded to the condition in which it had been alleged the parties were when last seen, and said he could not but feel grieved that the result of the outing of the two men was that one was dead, and that that sad ending was the result of their being incapacitated by drink. - Thomas Trist, factory operative, of Buckfastleigh, identified the body. He believed deceased was a native of Yorkshire, and thought he was about thirty-two years old. - Thomas Webb, a labourer, of Post Bridge, said that on Monday morning, at 4.30, he was going to his work on the Princetown railway, and when about three-quarters of a mile on the road saw the body of a man lying in the water-table. The head was towards Princetown. near the body was a four-wheeled trap; the horse had turned to the grass on the side of the road and was grazing. One of the wheels was close to the head of the deceased. He examined the body and found it cold and limp. The reins were hanging by the horse's head. He saw no signs of any scuffle on the road. From appearances the horse had not moved after it had been free from control. The off wheel was on the bank and the near one in the water-table. A tilt being thus given was sufficient to throw a man out. Appearances led him to think the accident occurred in that way. He carefully laid the body on the grass and then gave information to the engineers encamped near. - By Mr Windeatt: The body was in a very damp state, and dirty. He saw no wounds. There were no footmarks on the road. - John Webb, landlord of the New Inn, who assisted in carrying the body to his inn, described the state of the deceased's clothes to be as though he had been in the water. In his pocket he found 6s. 7 ½d., a silver watch (stopped at 5), a silver chain, and a tobacco cutter. - By Mr Windeatt: On Sunday evening, at a few minutes past eight, I saw the deceased and his companion at my door. I did not supply them with liquor. both men were wet, but neither appeared the worse for liquor. They left for Ashburton, Gilpin driving. - By the Coroner: They both appeared as though they had been drinking, but were not as bad as has been represented. My sister told me that while at my inn they and another man had between them six glasses of whisky and a glass of ale. The direction in which they left was quite the opposite one to that where I found the body on the following morning. I did not refuse to draw any drink; in fact, they didn't ask me. The men appeared to be on good terms. - Mrs Selina Warne, the sister of the last witness, said on Sunday evening at 7.25 three men drove up, a man named Slee, of the powder mills, driving. They came to the bar, and one of the two men called for three glasses of ale, and after drinking it they got into the carriage. After a time, however, they returned, and saying they wanted "something to keep the wet out" had each some whisky and cold water. Altogether they had six threepennyworths, and Slee had two. They did not behave like drunken men. She observed to the deceased that he was wet, and he replied, "Yes, missus, I am, and that you would say if you had been on the moor where I've been." Both Gilpin and MARSDEN paid her. - Captain Williams said that at six o'clock on Sunday the two men went to him at the Powder Works. The deceased appeared to be tipsy, but he could not see that Gilpin was the worse for drink. They said they wanted help to get their carriage out of the mire. He went and found it in a pond by the side of the road. Just as he got up to the pond he saw the deceased fall in the pond and get covered with water. Could not tell how he got into the pond, but, from the marks of the wheels, must have driven straight in. The deceased said Gilpin was driving. After the trap was got out a man employed at the works took the reins to put them in their way, Gilpin sitting behind. The direction they took - to Post Bridge - was not the direct way to Ashburton. - Thomas Rouse, a labourer, said that, when on returning from Chapel on Sunday, eh saw the two men driving up the road, and thought they were both incapable. They were going at a walk. After they had gone about a hundred yards he saw one of them "sprawling" on the road. the man wore dark clothes. He watched him go to the side of the carriage, but did not see him get up. - It was here remarked by a Juryman that the two men were seen later in the evening, and the Coroner thereupon suggested that an adjournment should take place in order that the police, who had worked hard to obtain the evidence at present adduced, might be able still further to trace the men. He was anxious to call before the Jury all possible evidence that could be brought to bear, besides that of the companion. The Inquiry had assumed a very serious aspect, and he thought the witness mentioned,, as well as two strangers who found the hat of the deceased, should be heard. - The Jury agreed that it was advisable to adjourn; but it was decided first to hear the medical evidence. - Dr Northey said he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He found no external marks except a contusion of the shin of the left leg. On opening the head he found the membranes of the brain greatly congested. The pupils of both eyes were very much dilated. The heart was healthy, the lungs somewhat congested, though not sufficient to account for death. One cause of death would be alcohol, and the immediate cause congestion of the brain - in fact the congestion was caused by excessive drinking, not of old duration, but shortly previous to death. He should think deceased was not a habitual drinker. He should say the fact of his having fallen would not in any way have accelerated death. The congestion produced rather caused him to fall. - The Coroner: Supposing he had been driven quietly home, would death, in your opinion, have resulted in the carriage? - Dr Northey: I should say if he had been driven quietly home, or kept in this house, death would not have occurred. The immediate cause of death was exposure to the night air and damp. That would have aggravated the congestion. It was a combination of circumstances which led to the death. - The Coroner: Then the exposure was an important ingredient in the cause of death? A.: I have no doubt of it. - The Coroner: In your opinion anyone in a condition to help him would be guilty of culpable neglect to leave him in that state? - A.: I should say so. - The Coroner said in so grave and serious a case as the present one had assumed, he thought, in order that the Inquiry might be as thorough as possible, further inquiry should be made of the whereabouts of the men from the time they were seen by Rouse, and it was therefore in the ends of justice and the discharge of a public duty that an adjournment must take place. The Inquiry was then adjourned until next Tuesday.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 July 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death In Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Saturday evening into the cause of death of MARY ANN ROBERTS, a widow, whose body was found floating in the water off Winter Villa, Stonehouse, early on Saturday morning. It was proved that the deceased had been for some little time past much depressed in spirits in consequence of a small allowance which she had been receiving from her brother at the Cape having been discontinued. She was owed several bills, but was absolutely penniless, and unable to pay her debts. At times she seemed lost in her mind, and would cry bitterly for hours. On Friday evening she left her home, saying she was going to see her brother, who lived in Flora-street. She failed to see her brother, and during the evening was in a public-house in Granby-street, where she had a glass of ale with a man named Groves, who afterwards saw her part way towards her home. She then appeared in very good spirits; but it is surmised that on leaving Groves she walked straight to Winter Villa and in a momentary fit of insanity threw herself into the water. The Jury, at the suggestion of the Coroner, returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 August 1882
BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held at Brixham on Monday evening on the body of GEORGE FARLEY, who was drowned on Friday from the fishing smack Ariel. In the evidence of the master of the boat it transpired that at the time of the accident the life-buoy was down the hold instead of being on deck, and the Jury suggested that all masters of trawlers should see that the life-buoys were on deck in a suitable place. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 August 1882
LYDFORD - The Mysterious Death At Post Bridge. The Inquest And Verdict. - At the Saracen's Head, Two Bridges, near Princetown, Mr R. Fulford, the County Coroner, yesterday re-opened the Inquiry into the cause of the death of JAMES MARSDEN, an operative at Messrs. Hamlyn's Factory at Buckfastleigh, whose dead body was found more than a week ago on the high road between Post Bridge and Two Bridges. Mr T. W. Windeatt, of Totnes, again watched the case on behalf of James Gilpin, an over-looker of the factory at Buckfastleigh, who was last seen in the company of the deceased. - The Coroner read over the evidence given when the Inquiry was opened last Wednesday. - Selina Warne repeated her evidence as to the condition of the men and the amount of drink she supplied to them on the evening they were last seen together at the inn at Post Bridge. In reply to Mr Windeatt, she said both men appeared to be on very good terms. - Robert Williams, manager of the Powder Mills, near Post Bridge, gave evidence as to an accident the two men met with by driving into a deep pond before they were seen at the Post Bridge Inn, while Thomas Rowse, a labourer, of Post Bridge, said he saw the deceased and his companion shortly after they left Mr Webb's inn, and soon after passing him the deceased fell out of the trap. - Dr Northey's evidence was also read, his opinion being that deceased died from congestion of the brain, brought on by drinking and exposure. If the man had been taken care of when at the Post Bridge Inn death might not have resulted. - By permission of the Coroner Mr Windeatt put the following questions to Dr Northey:- I take it that it is really what Dr Taylor would call alcoholic poisoning? A.: Yes. - Q.: And that would produce insensibility and stupor, and thus he would hardly die suddenly. A.: Yes. - Now, taking the fact that this man had been drinking considerably and had fallen into this pond, where he got thoroughly soaked with wet, and then having had this further drink at Post Bridge, even had Gilpin remained with the deceased and driven him to Totnes, whence the trap was hired, considering the tired condition of the horse, might not the man have died before reaching home? - It is just possible. - The Coroner: Supposing his companion to have been in his senses, might not he, by taking care of deceased, have saved his life? - Dr Northey: That is my opinion. - By Mr Windeatt: Alcohol is a poison, and the more that is taken the greater the harm. The whiskey taken at Post Bridge would have aggravated the complaint, and perhaps if none had been taken there his life might not have been lost. Considering the state of deceased he should not have been supplied with drink. - The Coroner: Do you think the drink alone, but for the surrounding circumstances, would have caused death? - I think if he had not fallen into the pond, and had not been exposed to damp, it is possible he may have lived if he had been taken care of at the Inn. - By Mr Windeatt: Of course I think it possible that Gilpin was in such a state as not to know what he was about, and perhaps would have been of little use even if he had remained. - The Coroner then said that at the last Inquiry all the evidence tended to shew that the deceased was with Gilpin just beyond the Post Bridge Inn, and he therefore considered it right to adjourn the Inquiry so as to enable the police to prove, if possible, when the two men were last together, and where they were seen after leaving Post Bridge. He now found that they were seen by two or three people after that time, and appeared to be wandering about the Moor. No one, however, appeared to have seen the deceased since ten o'clock, and at that time Gilpin was with him, and seemed to have charge of the carriage. He (the Coroner) intended calling that evidence, and then Gilpin should explain to them the state the deceased was in when he left him, and what made him do so. - Richard Croaker, of Runnage Farm, near Post Bridge, said at a quarter to nine on the Sunday night deceased's companion went to his farm and inquired the way to Exworthy. he told him he must go back to Post Bridge, and Gilpin then turned the carriage and left. A few minutes after witness went to the road and saw another man getting up from a lying position on the road. He assisted him into the carriage. He was apparently drunk, and did not speak to witness. Gilpin appeared to have been drinking, but to be capable of thinking, and spoke intelligibly. After he gave the direction the men turned towards Post Bridge. - George French said when deceased and his companion quitted the inn the horse appeared to be tired, and Gilpin was beating it - first with the lash and then with the stump end of the whip-handle. Witness remarked that a good feed would do the animal much more good, but no answer was returned. - Anne Widdicombe said she was going on the Sunday night from Post Bridge to Runnage, and when she reached Downmeade Gate she saw a horse's head over the gate, and inside observed a carriage and two men in it. it was dark and raining. The men were huddled together and appeared asleep. At first they returned no answer to her inquiries, but afterwards asked if they were on the Ashburton-road, and how far away the town was. She told them, and they said they were going to Totnes. They then turned round the carriage in an exactly opposite direction, and in such a way as to make her believe that they must have been drunk. - William Slee, employed at the Powder Mills, said on the evening of Sunday week the two men went to the mills and asked for help to get the trap out of the pond. With Captain Williams he went into the high-road and there saw a four-wheel vehicle in the pond. The deceased had ridden the horse to the mills. They tied ropes round the carriage, and while they were getting it out the deceased jumped into the water. The deceased appeared to have been drinking, but was not so drunk as to be unable to drive. After harnessing the horse he (witness) offered to drive them into the proper road. The deceased said he wanted to go to Ashburton. He replied that he was going in the wrong road. He then turned the horse towards Two Bridges, when the deceased said, "No, no; this is not the way I want to go. I want to go on this way (pointing towards the Post Bridge road). I know what I want to go there for." On the way Gilpin said to the deceased "How came you to drive into that place?" and he replied "I don't know. It is like a dream to me." On the way the men got out to have a run in order to circulate the blood. Afterwards on the challenge of the deceased the two men raced fifty yards; Gilpin won by about a foot, and he never saw men run smarter. MARSDEN then rode, Gilpin still walking. He advised MARSDEN to walk, but he refused, saying it was easier to ride than walk. When they reached Post Bridge both appeared as though they had been drinking, but Gilpin was most in his senses. At the Inn they drank a glass of ale each, and then three threepennys worth of whiskey. Gilpin drove off from the inn very steadily. - By Mr Windeatt: They appeared to be friendly. The deceased seemed the worse for liquor, but not too bad to drive. They wished him good-night and thanked him for driving. - Richard Gilpin, who gave his evidence with much hesitation, was then examined. He said he worked for Hamlyn Brothers. He was a foreman of combers, and had to look after the machines. He had been seventeen years in their employ, and had known the deceased about four months. They started from Buckfastleigh on the Saturday by the 2.58 train, went to Totnes, and hired a trap with the intention of driving about Newton. Did not intend to return same night. Deceased said he should like to drive around Princetown. They went on the Ashburton-road, and got to Princetown about half-past eleven. Stopped at Two Bridges to put up for the night, but could not do so, and therefore stopped at the Duchy Hotel. They left there about eight o'clock in the morning for Tavistock. They had some ale at Merrivale Bridge, and then drove on to Tavistock, where they stopped about an hour and half and had several glasses of ale. Returned to Merrivale Bridge, and had more ale there also. He did not know who was driving when they left Two Bridges, nor did he know how the carriage was driven into the pond. They both got into the pond and lifted the carriage, but the wheels appeared to be stuck in the mud. They got the horse out and went to the Powder Mills for assistance. They helped the carriage out. - The Coroner: If you remember this, do you not now remember who was driving when the horse got in the pool? - No. - Was this the right way for you to go to Totnes? - It was not the way we came. - Who suggested going that way? - I don't know. I think the deceased. - But was he not a stranger on the Moor? - Yes; but he wanted to return some other way. We thought it was nearer. I do not remember having ale at Post Bridge, but I do remember running with deceased. - The Coroner: Can you give any reason why you do not remember? - It must be owing to the drink I had. Slee drove to Post Bridge and I drove away from there. I do not remember going into Runnage to inquire the way. We drove on for five miles, and deceased kept leaning on me. I told him if he did not sit up I should get out and walk, which I did. I told him to take the trap to Totnes, and he said "All right." - The Coroner : Was he dead or alive when you left him? - He was alive. - Where do you mean to tell the Jury you left the deceased? - I don't know. I wanted to get home early for work, and I went on the road four or five miles and went to sleep. I afterwards walked on a short distance further and went to sleep again. I* woke up I should think about four, and I arrived home about nine in the morning. - Did you inform the deceased's wife where you had left her husband? - No. - Mr Windeatt then expressed a wish to address the Jury, and remarked that it was a lamentable affair, and would be a shadow on the path of his client as long as he lived. The explanation was that it was a drunken spree. All the witnesses had stated that the two men appeared to be under the influence of drink; and it stood to reason that no man who at all realised the consequences would have left his companion as he had done. The doctor had expressed an opinion on which no Jury would convict; the evidence must be positive to find a man guilty of manslaughter. - The Coroner agreed with Mr Windeatt that the case did not come within the scope of the law. Gilpin seemed to be blinded by the effects of drink, but this was no excuse for crime. The fact of his having left the man on the Moor to perish would rankle within his breast as long as he lived, for he seemed to be more anxious to set his machines to work than to take care of a fellow-creature. - The Jury found that the deceased died from Congestion of the Brain, accelerated by Exposure; that the conduct of Richard Gilpin leaving his friend on the Moor was very much to blame, and although he was not legally responsible for the man's death, they wished the Coroner to severely censure him for his unmanly conduct in leaving his friend, who was a stranger, on the Moor to die. - The Coroner censured Gilpin in strong terms, stating that he believed he knew far more about the death of his companion than he chose to tell.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 August 1882
HOLNE - An Inquest concerning the death of EDWARD CARTER, who was killed at Holne on Saturday by falling from his horse, was held at his late residence on Monday evening, before Mr Hacker, the Coroner for the district. Mrs Meathrel, daughter of deceased, proved seeing her father trying to get on the horse, and sending a lad out to hold the animal. The lad explained how on going out he found MR CARTER lying on the ground dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 August 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Devonport last evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANN HURRELL, aged about 26 years. - Samuel Coombe, warrant officers' cook, residing at King-street, Devonport, said he had lived with the deceased for about twenty months. She complained of pains in the head and neck; but she drank more than was good for her in the way of alcoholic liquors. He last saw her on Tuesday morning at half-past six, when he left her in bed, apparently in her usual health. - Mary Graham, landlady of the Maltster's Arms, King-street, said deceased came to her house on Tuesday afternoon and had two glasses of porter. Whilst sitting down she dropped her head on the counter and witness thought she had fallen asleep. About 4 o'clock witness went to the deceased to awaken her, but could not do so. Witness having lifted her head found she was foaming at the mouth and then sent for the police, and on Sergeant Blackler arriving a doctor was sent for. On the arrival of the doctor deceased was found to be dead. She could not say whether HURRELL drank the second glass of porter. - Mary Ann Snell, wife of a pensioner, residing in Ordnance-lane, said she had known the deceased for about six or seven months. Her health had been very bad during that time. Deceased did not drink much; she was in the habit of drinking porter now and then. She went with the deceased on Tuesday afternoon to the Maltster's Arms, where HURRELL had a glass of porter. Witness left her in the house, intending to return again. Deceased was in the habit of vomiting very much, especially in the morning. - Sergeant Blackler, of the Borough Police, having given evidence, Mr James Harrison, surgeon, said he went to the Maltster's Arms, where he saw the deceased, who was sitting down near the counter as if asleep. On examination he found that she had evidently been dead for at least half an hour. That morning he made a post-mortem examination of the body, which he found well nourished. All the organs were perfectly healthy, but congested. The tracheal and bronchial tubes were full of froth, which he found to be that of porter. The lungs were congested. This was all he found, and he considered death was caused by suffocation, a consequence of the porter being inspired into the lungs, and filling them up in the place of air. The right side of the heart was overladen with blood in the way it would be in the case of death by suffocation, and the left side empty, as was also usual in such a case. - In answer to the coroner, witness suggested that the deceased, in the act of recovering her breath, as it were, after vomiting or coughing whilst in the act of drinking the liquor, drew the porter right back into her lungs. It was not the quantity of porter that she drank that caused the suffocation - a mouthful would have caused it. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 August 1882
PORT ISAAC, CORNWALL - The Bathing Fatality At Port Isaac. - Mr G. Hamley, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Port Isaac into the cause of death of MISS MARY NORMAN, of Plymouth, and Miss Annie Phillips, of Bodmin, who were drowned while bathing on the previous day. It transpired that the young ladies arrived at Port Isaac only two days previously on a visit to their friends. They went down to bathe unaccompanied by anyone acquainted with the place, and went into the water at one of the most dangerous and unfrequented parts of the coast, deceived, no doubt, by the clearness of the water. There are several coves in the immediate neighbourhood where bathing can be indulged in without fear of danger, and where, in case of accident, assistance would be readily available. But, unfortunately, they went a few yards to the west of Lobber Point, where the rocks under the water are very steep and lead rapidly to a depth of ten or twelve feet. At the Inquest yesterday no particulars whatever as to the cause of the accident were forthcoming, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The bodies, which were recovered within two hours of the accident, had drifted some distance from each other. That of Miss Phillips was removed yesterday to Bodmin; MISS NORMAN will be buried today at St. Endellion.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 August 1882
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Fatal Accident At Horrabridge. - At the Rock Hotel, near Horrabridge, last night, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the cause of death of two navvies, named THOMAS TAYLOR, a native of Liverpool, and JOHN TICKLE, of Tamerton, employees on the Princetown Railway works, who met with their deaths last Saturday morning through a fall of earth from an embankment, under circumstances already reported in the Western Morning News. Mr Barons was elected Foreman of the Jury. In opening the proceedings, the Coroner explained the cause of the accident, and regretted that considering the very mutilated state of the bodies he had not been able to hold the Inquiry earlier, but he was unfortunately away at the time. He would ask the Jury to view the bodies and receive evidence of identification that he might give an order for burial. He was unable to call the medical evidence before the Jury because Dr Butters had been called on important business to London. So it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquiry for his attendance. - SIMON TICKLE, of Tamerton Foliott, identified the body of TICKLE as his brother, who was a navvy and had worked on the line for eleven months. He was 33 years old, and was unmarried. He understood his work well. - John Davies, the ganger in charge of the work on the cutting where the accident happened, said the other deceased gave him the name of THOMAS TAYLOR, of Liverpool, and appeared about 25 years old. He could not account for the earth giving away, for the cutting was considered safe. There was no giving away at the base, and there must, he should think, have been a flaw in the back. Only about a ton of earth fell altogether. There was scarcely any undermining of the ground that slipped; the men were about to drive under it when the accident happened. The earth did overhang a little on the top, but there was no reason to think it would fall when it did. TICKLE was a thoroughly good man and understood his work well. Previously the cutting had been thought unsafe, and then he examined it every morning before work commenced. - William Veale, a navvy, who was working with the two deceased, said just before the accident TAYLOR was filling his barrow and TICKLE working in the bottom of the cutting, and as he (witness) was stooping over his barrow some earth from the side gave way and buried his companions. He should not think more than a ton of earth fell. He gave an alarm, and in about three minutes the men were taken out. He could not account for the accident, and saw no defect afterwards. If the earth had not fallen they would soon after have "barred" it down. - The Inquest was then adjourned until the return of Dr Butters.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 August 1882
SHEEPSTOR - The Death By Lightning On Dartmoor. - At Narrator Farmhouse, near Sheepstor, Dartmoor, Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of WILLIAM HILL JACKMAN, the son of the occupant of Narrator Farm, who was killed by lightning on Saturday. Mr T. Pearce, of Leathertor, was elected Foreman of the Jury. - In addressing the Jury, the Coroner said it was always painful to have to Inquire into cases of sudden death, but it was particularly so where a young man was struck down suddenly by the act of God. All would agree with him that it was an awful affair, sand he himself was very sorry to have to meet them that day as lightning was one of the worst causes of death, and the first case he had had since his appointment as Coroner. - Thomas Pethick, labourer, said on the day in question he was working on the Narrator farm with the deceased, and at about 5.30 a severe thunderstorm came on. They saw the weather was looking unpromising and commenced "pooking," but before they had finished there were several severe claps of thunder. The deceased had a steel prong in his hands and had stuck some hay on it. He advised witness and Parsons to do the same and place it over their heads to keep off large drops of rain which had commenced falling. He did not do so, but at the same instant was knocked down by a flash of lightning. He remained partially insensible and on recovering observed the deceased lying on his face with the prong by his side. There was no hay near him. He was dead. - William Parsons, who was also employed in the field, said he was the first to recover and he found the shirt and trousers of the deceased on fire. He picked up the body and put out the fire. - He (witness) had his prong struck out of his hand. Deceased was in the act of lifting his prong of hay over his head when the flash came; it was followed by a terrific clap of thunder. - Dr de Woolfson said he reached the scene of the accident immediately after he was called. MR JACKMAN was quite dead, and life appeared to have been extinct for about an hour and a half. From the fact of a thunderstorm raging, and the deceased holding a steel prong in his hand, he had no doubt a blow from lightning was the cause of death. This was confirmed by the appearance of the body. There were marks on the breast and the nose was bleeding. - In summing up, the Coroner expressed his surprise that the companions of the deceased did not share a similar fate, and added that he was glad to learn that, under the care of Dr de Woolfson, they had now completely recovered. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased was Killed by Lightning.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 August 1882
BELSTONE - An Inquest was held at Sticklepath yesterday by Mr Coroner Fulford, touching the death of MR GEORGE HEALE, baker, of Okehampton, who was found drowned in a stream of water near Rockside, Belstone, on Monday. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 August 1882
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the No Place Inn, Eldad, concerning the sudden death of REBECCA MASTERS, wife of the landlord of the house. It was stated that deceased had always been delicate, and within the past few months had been in failing health. On Wednesday evening she went to bed apparently as well as usual, but yesterday morning she was missed by her husband, who, on going downstairs, found her sitting in a chair in the back parlour, dead. Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said he found the heart very much pressed and the liver about half as large as it ought to have been. The actual cause of death was syncope brought on by pressure on the heart by the distended liver, induced by the position in which the deceased was found by her husband. If she had been found before and her position altered, her life would in all probability have been saved. From the appearance of the liver he should say that the deceased had partaken largely of alcohol of late. In fact, the state of the liver - which was generally known as a "nutmeg" liver - was due to the taking of alcohol. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 August 1882
DAWLISH - Sudden Death At Dawlish. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening at the London Hotel, Dawlish, into the cause of death of MR STOPFORD EDWARD RAM, of Worcester Park, Surrey, who was on a visit to the town. MR NIXON CHETWODE RAM, brother of deceased, stated that they both went into the water about half-past eleven that morning and remained bathing about a quarter of an hour. After dressing deceased complained of feeling giddiness and cold. They then walked to meet their mother, who was sitting on the beach opposite Cliff House, and deceased again complained of giddiness when sitting on the shingle beside her. He then fell down on his side. Witness fetched some water, which was sprinkled over deceased's face, as he could not swallow. A doctor was sent for, and means were taken to restore animation, but without avail. Deceased was then taken to his lodgings in the Strand, where other restoratives were applied, but without avail. - Dr A. D. Parsons stated that he found deceased lying on the beach, cold and pulseless, and there was no sign of the heart's action. On the beach artificial respiration was tried, and at MR RAM'S lodgings other restoratives were applied, but without success. Witness considered death was caused from disease of the heart. - The Jury found a verdict accordingly. Deceased was a son of the late REV. MR RAM, vicar of a parish in Kennington, and well-known for his advocacy of the temperance cause.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 August 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Three Crowns Inn, Parade, on ELIZABETH RUSSELL, wife of a fisherman, who died suddenly on Saturday at her home, 24 Parade. On a woman entering the room of the deceased about noon, she found her lying dead on the bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" the medical evidence pointing to heart disease as the probable cause.

BRAUNTON - The Fatality At Appledore. - An Inquest was held at Braunton, near Barnstaple, yesterday, on a lad named WILLIAM TYLER, aged 10, who, with his stepfather, MR BRANNAM, a retired builder, of West Appledore, was drowned on Monday last at Appledore. A lad named Alfred Bennett stated that he accompanied Mr Brannam and TYLER in a boat, when they purposed going fishing. The tide was running out very strongly, and they went to the old walls, near the Braunton Lighthouse, to anchor, but it would not hold. Mr Brannam went forward to the bow to pull up the anchor, and in doing so it caught in a rock. The bow was dragged down and the boat filled with water. Mr Brannam seeing this jumped into the water, and called on his stepson to get upon his back, and then told witness to jump on the other lad. He was unable to swim with both, however, and witness caught hold of the sail and swam in by himself. Witness had to bite the finger of the other lad to get him away from him; and on his reaching the shore he looked out and saw Mr Brannam and TYLER being carried out over the bar by the tide. - The body was found on Sunday on Saunton Sands and it having been identified as that of the lad TYLER, a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning" was returned. The body of Mr Brannam has not yet been recovered.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 August 1882
NEWTON ABBOT - The Tragedy At Newton. Magisterial Proceedings. Coroner's Inquest. - At Newton Police Court yesterday, before Mr J. Vicary, GEORGE MILLMAN, lighterman, of Newton, aged about 40, was charged for that, on Tuesday, he "feloniously, wilfully and of his malice aforethought, did kill and murder one MARY MILLMAN, his wife." - The Court was crowded, much excitement being caused by the affair. Prisoner maintained a quiet demeanour throughout the hearing. It appears that the accused has for some time lived most unhappily with the deceased, who was much addicted to drink and led an immoral life. Quarrels between the two were frequent and their neighbours in St. John's-place, Queen-street, have been more or less accustomed to witnessing scenes of considerable violence between them. MILLMAN is naturally a man of quiet temperament and of inoffensive manner, but the habitual negligence of his wife, who was constantly away from home drinking, and leaving her children to take care of themselves, greatly irritated him, and at times he would treat her with considerable violence. There are five children as the result of the marriage, all being under 8 years of age. The prisoner is a native of Chudleigh, and the deceased was an Irish woman. Some of the statements of two of the witnesses when under examination varied considerably as compared with those made by them just after the occurrence on Tuesday evening. - Harry Matthews, carpenter, living in St. Paul's-road, Newton, was the first witness, and deposed that he knew prisoner by sight, and also prisoner's late wife. On Tuesday evening, at about 9.30, he was by Mr Magor's Hotel, in Queen-street, when he saw a man and woman near the Hotel. Witness went over to the woman and the man, the latter of whom walked away. Could not say that he saw the man do anything to the woman. did not hear any conversation. Could not positively swear that prisoner was the man, as he did not see his face, but the man whom witness saw had on a white slop similar to that now worn by the prisoner. Tried to lift the woman out of the gutter, and was subsequently helped by a man named Harvey. The woman was living, and groaned with witness took hold of her. No one else was near, and witness could not say who the man was. The woman did not speak, and witness did not see any marks upon her except that when she was carried into the back of the hotel he noticed that her eyes were somewhat bruised. did not see the man again. - Prisoner declined to ask the witness any questions. - Police-sergeant Nicholls, stationed at Newton, stated that from information given him by the last witness on Tuesday evening he sent a constable to Magor's Hotel, and subsequently followed himself. This was at about 10 p.m. Found the deceased, MARY MILLMAN, sitting on a chair, apparently dead. There were about 100 persons present, and a chemist's assistant was applying restoratives. Dr Ley came in shortly afterwards, and the body was laid upon a table and examined by Dr Ley, who pronounced the woman to be dead. Deceased was about 34 years of age. Returning to the street, witness met prisoner coming towards the Hotel. Witness told him that his wife was dead, and that he must consider himself in custody for having caused her death. Took prisoner to the police-station and locked him up. MILLMAN went very willingly. That (Wednesday) morning witness formally charged prisoner with murdering his wife, and cautioned him in the usual way. Prisoner said, "I came home yesterday afternoon at twenty minutes past three from Teignmouth and found my wife out and no dinner ready for me. I then went to the Temple Bar public-house, and shortly after my wife came in, and I said 'MARY, this is very unkind of you to provide no dinner for me, and the children are out in the wet; you had better go home.' She said, "I shall not; you mind your own business.' She had pint after pint of beer while she was there on this occasion. I said, 'you can go home and attend to the children and come up again if you like.' She then left with another woman who was carrying her (MRS MILLMAN'S) baby; she was very drunk." Prisoner then added that he went home and afterwards came out when he found his wife near the old Post-office with another woman; he said to her "This is pretty goings on" and pushed her when (as prisoner asserted) she fell to the ground and struck her head against the kerbstone. - Richard Harvey, mail messenger, of Newton, said he knew prisoner by sight and his wife also. At about 9.40 on Tuesday evening he was crossing the street near Magor's Hotel when he saw a woman fall down outside the Bodega window. The woman, when he went to her, was lying partly on the kerb with her head in the gutter. Saw a man walking away with a white slop on. There was a man close to the woman when she fell. Did not see the man push or strike the woman. did not call out to the man. Assisted the witness Matthews to take the woman up. Deceased did not speak, but groaned as she was lifted out of the gutter. Witness saw no blood. Prisoner was then formally remanded until 11.15 today. An Inquest was held at the Newton Townhall last evening by Mr Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of the deceased woman. Mr Williams was Foreman of the Jury. - Eliza Jane Nicholls, sister of the prisoner, identified the body as that of MARY MILLMAN. She last saw her alive on Saturday. As far as she knew the deceased was married to GEORGE MILLMAN, a lighterman, and lived at No. 8, St John's-place. She was about 30 years of age, had five children, and lived a very bad life. By bad she meant that deceased was given to drink and was very often drunk. - Harry Matthews repeated the evidence given before the magistrates in the morning. He denied having told the sergeant of police on fetching him, that he had seen a man kicking a woman and that she was then lying in the street. - Mr J. W. Ley, surgeon of Newton, stated that he was called at a quarter past ten on the previous night to Magor's Hotel to see a person said to be dying. He went and found her sitting under the archway, and on being taken into the kitchen he examined her there and discovered that she was dead. He had again examined her that afternoon to see if there were any marks of violence; externally about the body there were none. At the back of the head was a bruise. He opened the body and found all the organs of the abdomen and chest healthy and uninjured. On cutting back the scalp he found no fracture of the bone. On opening the skull he saw a large mass of blood at the base of the brain, and laceration of the substance of the base of the brain. His opinion was that death was due to shock, caused by haemorrhage of blood through the eruption of a large blood vessel, caused by injury. The brain was very much injured, and the most likely cause of the injury was a fall. He could find no signs of any blow, and he thought it impossible that the injury could have been done by a kick. Apparently she had fallen from a height or had been pushed very hard. Supposing she had been intoxicated she might have fallen a dead weight and caused the injury. He was of opinion from the membranes of the brain sticking closely to the skull that she was in the habit of drinking, but he could not trace anything to shew that she had been drinking that day. - Mr Ley, having finished his evidence called the attention of the Coroner to the place where he had to make the post-mortem. It was a filthy stable at the back of Magor's Hotel. There was no light, and he was obliged to stay two and half hours in that place - quite an hour longer than he would have been in a proper room. It was so disgusting a place that it made him feel quite ill. He was of opinion that a mortuary should be provided in the town. - The Coroner said he was sorry Dr Ley should have had such a disagreeable place in which to do his unpleasant work, and hoped the Press would take notice of the fact that a mortuary was wanted in the town. - Richard Harvey and Sergeant Nicholls repeated the evidence given before the Magistrates. - In summing up the Coroner told the Jury that the points for their consideration were - first, whether the deceased was killed by a blow on the head in the way described by Dr Ley; secondly, how the injury was produced, and also whether the deceased was knocked down by any person or fell herself. If they came to the conclusion that she was knocked down by some person, they must say who that person was, and whether that person knocked her down with the deliberate intention of killing her, with malice aforethought; or whether the blow was struck in the heat of the moment without any malice. In the latter case it would amount to manslaughter, whilst, of course, in the former it constituted wilful murder. - The Jury, after being absent for about half-an-hour, returned the following verdict:- We find the deceased MARY MILLMAN came to her death from the effects of a blow at the back of the head, but how occasioned there was not sufficient evidence to shew.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 August 1882
KELLY - At Meadwell, near Kelly, yesterday, Mr Fulford held an Inquiry into the cause of death of an aged labourer named WILLIAM BALL, who fell four feet from a rick of hay on which he was working on Windbrook Farm, on the 1st inst. A verdict of Accident Death was returned.

BISHOPS TAWTON - An Inquest was held at Bishopstawton, yesterday, touching the death of ARTHUR ALFRED BARR, a gentleman of independent means, who on Wednesday evening was found drowned in eight feet of water. The deceased had recently suffered from fits of despondency and was, in consequence, ordered to be watched. On Wednesday he managed to elude his attendants and made his way to the river Taw, which runs at the back of his house. It was here that his body was afterwards found. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 September 1882
EXMOUTH - At an Inquest held at Exmouth yesterday with respect to the death of JOHN EAST, who was found drowned in a pond, the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

GEORGEHAM - The drowning of two lads at Croyde was investigated yesterday at an Inquest held at Georgeham, near Barnstaple. The bodies were picked up on the beach at Croyde on Sunday and have been identified as those of HAVELOCK MCGEORGE and HERBERT MACONAGHEY, pupils at a London school, which has recently visited Croyde. The parents of the deceased are in India, and both were aged 12. It appeared that seven went out bathing together, and three were carried away by a ground swell. The body of a third boy who was also drowned has not yet been recovered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and recommended that a notice be fixed on the sands cautioning bathers against a dangerous pool at the spot called Glover's Pool.

KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held at Kingsbridge yesterday, before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of MR T. H. EDWARDS. - Mr H. R. EDWARDS, son of the deceased, 16 years of age, stated that on Monday morning he carried up a cup of tea to his father about seven o'clock, when he found him quite dead, his father had been ailing for some time and under the doctor's care, and was in a very weak state. - Mrs Phillips, a nurse who had been attending the deceased, stated that deceased had been ill for a considerable time. The doctor saw him on Wednesday, but not since. The deceased was much worse on Sunday. She presented him to have the doctor called, but he would not. - Dr Legge, assistant to Mr J. Elliot, surgeon, stated that he last saw the deceased professionally three weeks ago, when he was suffering from a tumour in his head. From what he could see by the appearance of the body, his opinion was that he died from a rupture of a blood vessel in the head. - Mr J. Elliot, surgeon, who had been attending the deceased, sent a letter to the Coroner, stating that on account of illness, he was himself unable to attend the Inquest. - The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - It was proposed by one Juryman, and seconded by another, that there should be added to the verdict, "That the Jury think this Inquiry quite unnecessary." The Coroner said he would not add that to the verdict but as the reporters were present no doubt it would be made public.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 September 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at No. 11 Claremont-street, on the body of HENRY KITT, aged 72, who died suddenly the previous night. - ELIZABETH KITT, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was a basketmaker by trade. he had been subject to asthma, but had been able to superintend at his workshop without doing any actual labour. He had been under no medical care and no immediate danger had been anticipated. On Wednesday night deceased took his supper and at about half-past eleven, rose from his chair to go to bed, but just as he reached the door he fell on a chair and would have gone to the ground had not witness caught him. Witness called for help and P.C. Mending, who was on duty near the house, entered and helped to lay the deceased on the couch. Dr Lewis was soon in attendance but pronounced life extinct. P.C. Mending corroborated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 September 1882
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at Sherman's Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, respecting the death of PHILIP LUSCOMBE, aged 67, who met with an accident at the Plymouth Cemetery some time since. - Margaret Shields, a married daughter of the deceased, stated that her father was an ostler employed by Mr Watts, of the Globe Hotel. On the morning of the 19th instant deceased attended a funeral, and he returned home to his residence in York-lane about one p.m. There was a cut over one of his eyes, and he explained to his wife that one of the horses he was driving had a stone in its foot, and after he had removed the stone he was in the act of mounting to the box, when the horses started and he fell to the ground. The deceased as the evening came on got very ill, and Mr Lewis, surgeon, was sent for; but he, after examining the deceased, said he did not think any bones were broken, and that it was merely a straining of the muscles of the chest. On the day following Mr Eyeley, surgeon, was sent for, and he attended the deceased up to the time of his death, which took place on Sunday evening. Mr Eyeley now deposed to having examined the deceased on Wednesday last, when he found that he had fractured his fifth rib, and sustained a very severe contusion of the left side. The fractured bone in his opinion entered the lung, which brought on inflammation, which caused death. From the first he entertained a very poor opinion of the case. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 September 1882
BIDEFORD - The Tragedy Near Bideford. The Inquest And Verdict. - The Inquest on ELLEN LEE, who was shot dead on Tuesday while her master and mistress were absent at Bideford market, was held at Winscott Barton, the scene of the tragedy, by Mr J. Bromham, Deputy Coroner for the district. The body having been identified. - The evidence of Mr Andrew, occupying the farm, was taken. He deposed to seeing deceased alive on Tuesday morning, when he left for Bideford, in company with his wife, at 10.30. She had been in his employ about two months, and was a little over 11 years of age. He returned from Bideford in consequence of the occurrence at about 2.30, and found deceased lying in the back kitchen. Witness kept two guns on rests in the back kitchen, near the stairs, but he did not know that either of them was loaded. He did not notice whether the guns were in their correct places when he returned. The boy Mayne had been in his employ about six weeks. He saw him shortly after reaching home, but did not ask him any question, nor did the lad volunteer any statement. The boy and deceased were on good terms, so far as witness knew. He knew nothing personally against him. - Reuben Ayre, teamsman, in the employ of Mr Andrew, and who resided in his master's house, said he last used the gun about six weeks ago, putting it in its usual place afterwards, and having it loaded with ordinary rabbit charge. It was also capped. At 12.30 on Tuesday, on coming in from the field, he heard the discharge of a gun, being then about fifty yards distant. The boy Mayne ran towards him from the door saying, "ELLEN'S dead," and then returned to the house before witness did. He seemed to be "hurried up" a good deal. Going into the back kitchen he saw deceased lying on the ground with the pail under her, her head hanging over the edge of the pail, her left hand also clutching the further edge, her right hand being underneath her. He found Mayne in the back kitchen, and two of Mrs Andrew's little children, both of whom are under 3 years of age, standing close behind deceased, looking at her. The gun was then in the rack, but was not precisely in the position in which he last left it. Before anyone came on the spot witness asked Mayne how it happened, to which he replied, "She fell over the stairs and knocked her head against the wall." Witness said, "You've been at the gun, haven't you?" to which the boy replied, "No, I haven't." Witness rejoined, "You have; the powder smells." Mayne said, "ELLEN was going upstairs to place some things on the mantel-piece and touched it, and it fell down and went off." Leaving the body in charge of a gamekeeper who was at the time passing the house, witness rode to Bideford for his master and for medical aid. To the best of his belief the boy and girl were on the best of terms. - By the Jury: Mayne was not in the habit of taking down the gun. I do not think he could conveniently reach the gun from the stairs. - The question as to the boy's reaching the gun from the stairs was repeated, but witness adhered to his opinion. - It was mentioned incidentally by a constable present that the boy had, just prior to the Inquest, reached to the rack, shewing it to be possible for him to remove the gun. - A Juryman again referred to the point as to the boy being able to reach the gun rack from the stairs. He said someone had remarked that the boy could, and he (the Juryman) thought this a very important point. - Dr S. C. Thompson (Bideford) deposed to having been called to see deceased, and finding her in the position already described, her left hip resting against the corner of the wall, and deceased resting on her knees, being kept in position by the pail and wall jointly. On examining her he found a large wound on the right of the forehead, which had carried away the roof of the socket of the right eye. The whole of the bridge of the nose, and the whole of the forehead as far as the centre of the left orbit were removed. The left side of the head as far as the left ear was fractured, the skin over the left brow being lacerated, and the skin of the right cheek blackened as if by gunpowder. The wall near by had a large spot bespattered with blood and brains, at about 4 feet 3 inches from ground. He could find no shot, nor trace of any, from an external examination of the body, nor in any part of the room though he had no doubt a post-mortem examination would have revealed shot. The wounds described were such as would result from a gun-shot at very close quarters. - By the Jury: My idea, based on the character of the wounds and the mark being on the wall instead of on the ceiling, is that the gun was horizontal, and on a level with deceased's head, and very close to it when it exploded. Dr Thompson added that he was also of opinion that the gun was pointed at deceased not quite at right angles but a little from the rear. Witness related a conversation he had with the boy Mayne, who said deceased had told him that she had meddled with the hasp (i.e. the hammer) of the gun, to which he replied if she did it again he would give her something and tell master of it, but he could not say if she really did touch the gun. Subsequently he (Mayne) from the doorway between front and back kitchen saw the girl going out at the backdoor with the pail in her hand, when the gun fell and exploded, the girl dropping to the ground. Subsequent statements of the boy were somewhat conflicting. He was confused, and is very deaf, which witness thought might account for the inconsistencies. Mayne gave as his reason for replacing the gun that he was afraid the children might meddle with it. The boy shewed witness the position of the gun when he alleged it exploded. - By the Jury: The position of the gun as indicated by the boy would not account for the results. - Superintendent Rousham, County Police, corroborated the evidence of the medical man as to the statements of the boy. Witness added that he saw the lad put the gun on the crooks, standing on the top stairs. He examined the gun, but perceived no evidence of its having fallen on the ground. The medical evidence as to the position of the body was corroborated by witness. In the window-sill witness found a portion of the skull, which he now produced, and which contained a shot-hole. - By the Jury: I do not think the falling of the gun from the crooks would produce the results. Witness added that on examining the gun he found it had been recently fired, and that there was an exploded cap on the nipple. - P.C. Froude deposed to the statements made to him by Mayne, which were to the same effect as the evidence of the two preceding witnesses. Witness added that Mayne got up on the stairs and reached the gun, to show how deceased, according to his allegation, had meddled with it. By the Jury: The boy could not only reach the gun, but could take it from its place. - Henry Mayne, whose mother was present, and to whom the Coroner gave the option of either giving evidence or not, repeated the statements made to previous witnesses. In returning from the dairy, he had one child in his arms, the other following after him, in addition to which he was carrying something prepared for dinner. On the girl being shot, he placed the baby in the cradle, and put the gun into the rack, giving as his reason that he was afraid the children would handle it, and "let it fall, or anything." Witness somewhat reluctantly admitted that what he said on Tuesday to the teamsman as to deceased falling over the stairs was not true. He could not say why he had made this statement. He was quite sure he had not touched the gun before the girl was shot, and he would swear the gun was not in his hand at the time this happened. The gun did not go off in falling, but when it touched the ground. Witness was questioned as to his evidence as to the gun falling, but adhered to his statement. The Coroner pressed him for a reason for not at first stating to the teamsman that the girl had been killed by the gun, but he would not give any. - The Coroner then addressed the Jury, remarking that in a case of this kind there could only be two questions, viz., whether it was an accident pure and simple, or whether the occurrence was due to the action of someone else. He pointed out that there was no evidence whatever that at the time of the occurrence the boy had the gun in his hands. Alluding to the discrepancies in the boy's statements, he remarked on the fact of the boy not offering any explanation as to the false statement first made to the teamsman. But the Jury should not attach too much importance to these conflicting statements. - The Jury deliberated about fifteen minutes and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with the recommendation that firearms should not be kept loaded in a house.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 September 1882
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, relative to the death of FREDERICK BOSWARVA, 40, who was found on the previous day hanging in his father's bedroom. - HENRY BOSWARVA, father of the deceased, residing at 25 Looe-street, gave evidence to the effect that deceased had been in a desponding state of mind for about eight years, during which time his wife had been in a lunatic asylum. On account of his condition he was superannuated from the dockyard. Deceased had been living with witness recently, and on Thursday afternoon was left in his room alone. Witness afterwards found him hanging from a nail in the wall by a piece of his mother's shawl. He cut him down, but life was extinct. The Jury found a verdict "That deceased hanged himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 September 1882
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at Westaway's Market House Hotel, Market-street, Stonehouse, relative to the death of BENJAMIN HEARD, a bargeman of Devonport. Deceased was at work on Wednesday, on board the barge Margaret, as she was sailing down the Stonehouse Pool, and whilst in the act of unwinding the winch to lower the mast, he fell down on the deck dead. The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said inquiries had been made of the relatives of the deceased, and it had been found that he had not been attended to by any doctor. It was, therefore, necessary that a post-mortem examination of the body should be made, and as Mr Leah had not yet been able to perform this duty, he proposed to adjourn the Inquiry. The Inquest was accordingly adjourned until today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 October 1882
STAVERTON - The Suicide Near Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Fursdon, Staverton, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, respecting the death of WALTER STRANGE LONG, 31 years of age, who committed suicide on Saturday, as reported in the Western Morning News of yesterday. - Miss Matthews, with whom deceased had been lodging for some months, stated that on Saturday afternoon MR LONG went to the post with some letters. On his return he appeared much depressed. he told witness he was very unhappy, and that he would as soon die as live, and added that he would shoot himself. She told him not to talk of such things and he replied, "Do you think I would not?" He then went up to his bedroom and shot himself with a revolver. He was quite dead when discovered almost immediately afterwards. Deceased had been of a very excitable temperament lately, and had threatened to destroy himself before. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

EXETER - Fatal Railway Accident Near Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Topsham Inn, Exeter, on Saturday evening on the body of WILLIAM BILLING, who had died in the County Hospital as the result of injuries received while engaged on works on the London and South-Western Railway. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Brailey, contractor, was on Friday afternoon excavating in the cutting between Lion's Holt Tunnel and the Exmouth Railway when a quantity of earth fell away. Seeing his danger the poor fellow endeavoured to get out of the way of the falling mass, but tripped and fell, knocking his head against one of the buffers of the tipcart which he was loading, and receiving other injuries, from the effects of which he died soon after his removal to the Hospital. The house surgeon stated that the injuries were chiefly to the spine in the region of the neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and cautioned the contractor to exercise greater care, as it appeared that another accident of a similar kind, though not a fatal one, had occurred at the same spot during the week.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 October 1882
LYDFORD - Sudden Death Of An Officer. - At the Saracen's Head Inn, Two Bridge's, Dartmoor, yesterday afternoon, Mr Fulford, the County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of CAPTAIN EDWARD CHARLTON DIXON, of the 3rd Buffs, who was found dead in his bedroom at the Saracen's Head (where he had been lodging for the past five months) last Sunday evening. - The Rev. J. Henery having been elected Foreman of the Jury, Mr R. Mallock, J.P., of Torquay, identified the body of the deceased as that of his brother-in-law. He was 40 years old and had been subject to epileptic fits ever since he had known him; and he was staying on Dartmoor, on that account. - John Smith, the son of the proprietor of the inn, said the deceased had stayed there during the summer. As he did not come down as usual on the Sunday his (witness's) mother went up, and, getting no answer, she asked witness to open the door. He did so and found the deceased lying behind it dead. Dr Watts was called and said deceased died from a fit. He had possibly found one coming on and got so far as the door to get help. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

LYDFORD - Death Through Suffocation At The Dartmoor Prisons. - At the Dartmoor Prisons last evening, Mr R. Fulford, the Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CUMMINGS, a convict confined in the prisons at Princetown. Mr Rowe was foreman of the Jury. Evidence was given that the deceased was serving out his second term of imprisonment, having been sentenced the last time at Manchester in 1868. He was regarded as a very quite inmate and was employed as a sweep. On the previous day he was instructed to clean out the flues of the baking oven, and as after entering one he did not return within a reasonable time an alarm was given, and all the higher prison officials quickly arrived on the scene. Search was made in the flue he had entered and the body was found in another one parallel with it, which was still heated. Deceased was much burnt. The medical evidence shewed that death was caused through suffocation from carbolic acid, and it was supposed that in returning from the cold flue which the deceased was instructed to clean he must have by mistake backed into another one which was still being used. The Coroner, in summing up, urged the necessity of having the flues so constructed that an accident of that kind would be impossible, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 October 1882
BIDEFORD - The Death By Drowning At Bideford. - The body of the little boy, RICHARD GOULD, aged about four and half years, the only child of one of the postboys of Tanton's Hotel, and who was drowned on Friday evening while endeavouring to recover his hat from the tide which was flowing in the river, was found on Tuesday. The Inquest was held the same evening by Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner. The little girl - Minnie Bowden - who was with the boy when the casualty occurred, deposed that the deceased fell into the river by missing his footing and she ran at once to the child's mother. - Frederick Friendship stated that he saw deceased in the water, only a portion of the head being visible, but he was unable to reach him. Witness procured a boat, and, in company with another man, pulled to the spot, but the child had disappeared before he could save him. On reaching the spot he found deceased's cap floating. Witness remained for some time near the spot trying to find the boy, but did not succeed. - Thomas Holland, belonging to a travelling theatre, stated that while fishing on Tuesday in the river some distance above the bridge he found the body in about two feet of water and at once hailed a searching party, who were on the other side, informing them of the fact. - A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 October 1882
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To MR JAMES MATCHAM, of Plymouth. - Residents in the Western Counties will hear with regret of the death of MR JAMES MATCHAM, the well-known builder, of Plymouth. MR MATCHAM, who was 67 years of age, about twelve months ago secured the account for the erection of the Naval Barracks at Keyham, on which over 200 men have been, and are being, employed. Yesterday morning, as was his custom, MR MATCHAM drove from his residence, St James's House, Plymouth and arrived at the works about ten a.m. Here he was met by Mr Bigwood, clerk and timekeeper and he at once proceeded to the A block of the building. He met Mr Hallett, the Foreman, and with him proceeded to look round the works on the second floor. While standing on a scaffold looking at some masons at work, one of the labourers, carrying a hod of bricks, desired to pass. MR MATCHAM stepped on to a side plank, which turned over, and the unfortunate gentleman was precipitated to the basement - a distance of 25 feet - striking one of the massive iron girders in his fall. He was immediately picked up and taken to his office. He was quite conscious. Mr Bigwood seized the deceased's horse and trap and proceeded with all haste to Devonport for medical advice. He called at the Royal Albert Hospital, but on being informed at the lodge that no doctor was there, went on to St Aubyn-street and secured the services of Mr Harrison, bringing that gentleman to the works. Deceased was alive when Mr Harrison saw him, but died soon afterwards, all attempts to administer restoratives proving ineffectual. - MR MATCHAM has executed some of the largest [?] in the West of England. He built the Devonport Public Hall, the Rougemont Hotel, Exeter, Mr [?] mansion at Paignton, the Imperial Hotel and St John's Church, Torquay and the Militia Barracks, Mutley. The contract for the present work on the Naval Barracks amounts to £60,000 and what is being done now is only the erection of a section of the complete buildings. MR MATCHAM leaves a widow and two children, a son and daughter, the latter being married. Within a few minutes of his melancholy death a deputation of Conservatives of St. Andrew's Ward, Plymouth, consisting of Messrs. C. H. Walter, Coppin and W. H. Luke, arrived at the works to ask MR MATCHAM, in case of the Liberals forcing a contest in St Andrew's Ward, to allow himself to be nominated in the Conservative interest. The unfortunate deceased, however, had previously alluded to the likelihood of being so waited on, and although an ardent supporter of the Conservative party, had declared that he would in no way interfere in municipal contests. - At six o'clock last night the Devonport coroner (Mr James Vaughan) held an Inquest on the body of the deceased at the works. Mr William Sampson was Foreman of the Jury. - Charles Michael Shaw deposd: I live at 11 James-street, Devonport, and am a mason. At twenty minutes past ten yesterday morning I was working in A block of the Seamen's Barracks, in course of erection at Keyham. I was right behind MR MATCHAM on a scaffold and I saw him step aside to allow a labourer to pass with a "hod" of stone. In so doing he stepped sideways; he put his foot out too far, and fell off the plank to the ground below. The plank, which was across the angle of two scaffolds, was firmly fixed. I was 12 feet from him when he fell off. I noticed before he reached the ground the body turned over and I therefore believe his head struck one of the iron girders 15 feet below the spot from which he fell. The plank on which deceased stood when he fell went down with him and my belief is that this was caused by his endeavouring to catch hold of the plank as he fell. I went to the ground and helped to carry the body to the office. - The Coroner: You are sure he fell, and that he was not touched and thus caused to fall? - Witness: I am sure his fall was quite accidental. - By a Juror: The man who was carrying the hod of stones cleared deceased and in no way touched him. - Mr A. R. Debnam deposed: I am the Government clerk of the works at the Naval Barracks, and was on the works yesterday morning. I was some hundreds of yards from the A block when deceased fell. On coming towards the office I met the men who had carried the deceased from the scene of the accident. They said a bad job had happened, that MR MATCHAM had fallen from the top scaffold to the ground. I proceeded hastily to the building and saw the scaffold board which had fallen with deceased lying on the ground. There was a large pool of blood where deceased had fallen. I afterwards saw MR MATCHAM'S body. He was a man of temperate habits. When I first saw him in the office he was unconscious. A doctor had been and gone. I went to Keyham Dockyard to obtain the ambulance, the doctor who had seen him recommending that he should be taken to the Hospital. I fetched the surgeon of Keyham Yard and he was brought to the works on the locomotive. The doctor said there were no bones broken. Deceased came round a little and exclaimed once or twice "My God!" "My Lord!" but I believe it was only semi-conscious. The Keyham doctor said there certainly might be internal injuries. - The Coroner said Mr Harrison, who first saw deceased after the accident, expressed his opinion that death resulted from internal haemorrhage. - The Coroner: How do you think he fell? - Witness: I believe he overstepped his mark. All through the works MR MATCHAM had been very careful and all the woodwork for scaffolding is entirely new. - John Meech, carpenter, of John-street, Marine Drive, deposed: I was passing through a block of buildings at the time the deceased fell. I heard someone shout out and looking round, about ten yards from me, I saw MR MATCHAM on the ground. I quickly got assistance and removed the body to the office. Deceased was bleeding from the [?], head and nose. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The body, which was enclosed in a shell, was removed from the office last night to the residence of deceased, James's House. MR MATCHAM was insured in the Accidental Insurance Company for £1,000. At the Inquest Mr S. Roach, of Plymouth and Mr D. Sale, of Devonport, who were sub-contractors for the barracks under deceased, were present.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 October 1882
BRIXHAM - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday evening at the Commercial Inn, Brixham, as to the death of JOHN H. HAWKING, who was killed on Saturday last on board the fishing smack Rose by a block falling on him from the masthead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 October 1882
EAST STONEHOUSE - Yesterday afternoon the County Deputy Coroner (Mr J. D. Johnstone) held an Inquest at the Market House Inn, Stonehouse, respecting the death of ELIZABETH REDWOOD, aged 75, who lived in Water-lane. On Tuesday night the deceased went to bed n apparently good health, but on the following morning was found dead in her bed. Dr Leah, who had made a post mortem examination, was of opinion that syncope was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Inquest In Plymouth. Censure Of Relatives. - An Inquest was held at the Clarendon Inn, Plymouth, last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of ALBERT WEST. According to the evidence of the deceased's brother, a butcher, the deceased, who was a butcher's assistant, came home on Saturday very sick, and complained of great pain in the abdomen. He continued to get worse and yesterday morning was found dead in bed. The brother, who slept in the same room, awoke at 2.30 a.m. by hearing the deceased retching. The deceased got into bed again and nothing more seems to have been heard of him up to the time of his being found dead at 8.30. No medical man was called in during WEST'S illness. A sister called twice at the office of Mr Mayell, relieving officer, but he was out, and medicine was procured from a druggist. Mr Jackson, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that the deceased had died from acute inflammation of the whole of the peritoneum. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had died from "Natural Causes," but they added that they were of opinion that great blame was due to the relatives of the deceased in the house - except the father, who is so invalid - for not procuring medical assistance, and the relatives were censured accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 October 1882
KINGSWEAR - Yesterday Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Kingswear as to the death of ARTHUR TOWNSHEND, a sailor on board the brigantine Wilhelmina, of Newhaven, who fell overboard when returning to his vessel on Saturday evening, and was drowned. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday respecting the death of ELIZABETH LARDEAN, an aged woman, who resided in a tenement at the back of 104 Queen-street. Deceased went to bed on Sunday night in apparently good health, but on the Monday died very suddenly. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At The Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Enquiry last evening at the Plymouth Workhouse, into the death of CHARLES BEER, 57, a labourer, who died there yesterday morning. Mr Dyke, the Master, stated that deceased had been in receipt of out-door relief. Yesterday morning he was brought to the Workhouse in an unconscious condition. Witness ordered him to be placed in the receiving ward, and Mr Eyely, medical officer, was sent for, but deceased expired before that gentleman arrived. John Burrows, 2 Camden-street, foreman of the stone-yard at the Workhouse, said that deceased had been employed under him. He frequently complained of pains in his left side, and when he came to work yesterday he looked ill. He became unconscious, and was taken into the Workhouse. Mr Eyely stated that deceased suffered from heart disease. Mr J. B. Cousins, chairman of the Stoneyard Committee, stated that deceased's work was very light. He was paid his full wages if he did little or no work. He had made no complaint. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 October 1882
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Plymouth Coroner at the Wellington Inn, Wellington-street, on the body of a child, aged 3 months, who lived with its parents at 4 Wellington-street. - ELIZABETH BROWN, mother of the deceased, said that on Tuesday night, at about 11.30, she took the child to bed with her. She slept until about 7.30 the next morning, as she was not disturbed by the child, which lay on her left arm. When she woke she saw that the child was dead. Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, stated that the child was well developed and appeared to have died in a fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News Saturday 28 October 1882
PLYMOUTH - Death From Lock-Jaw At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Plymouth Guildhall, into the death of RICHARD PERHAM, 53, labourer. It appeared that on the 13th inst. deceased was engaged in excavating a sewer at Millbridge. About two p.m. he suddenly ceased working and told another labourer that he had thrown the pick upon his foot. On taking off the boot and stocking of his right foot there was a small wound over the first joint of the second toe. With the assistance of a walking-stick deceased walked to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was attended by Dr Carter, the house surgeon. It was not considered a serious case until the 22nd instant, when deceased shewed symptoms of tetanus, or lockjaw. He was then removed to a special ward and attended by nurses night and day. he was sustained for a couple of days by injecting food with the stomach pump, but deceased died yesterday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 October 1882
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Borough coroner at Bloye's Eagle Tavern, Plymouth, respecting the death of CHARLES EDWARD LONG, a child 6 months old. From the evidence given by MRS LONG and Mr Manning, it was apparent that the child had died from convulsions, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 November 1882
DAWLISH - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday by Mr S. Hacker at the White Hart Inn, Dawlish, respecting the death of the infant male child of HENRY and MARY ANN GIBBINGS. It appeared that death was caused by the weight of the bedclothes and the position in which the child was lying. The Coroner said he did not see that there was any blame attached to the mother. Verdict, "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Friday 3 November 1882
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Lambhay Point, Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquest last evening at the Fisherman's Arms, Lambhay-street, into the circumstances attending the death of FREDERICK JAMES PHIPPS, aged 10 years, who was drowned off Lambhay Point during the gale on Wednesday last. William Giddy, a lad employed at Messrs. Serpell's Biscuit Works, stated that about half-past twelve on Wednesday afternoon he was at Lambhay Point in company with other boys. It was blowing a strong gale and the sea was running very high. Deceased was there, standing alone. On account of the force of the wind, he was clinging to the wall to maintain his balance. He was walking up the quay when a gust of wind seized him. He tried to regain his hold on the wall and fell backwards into the water. Witness laid on the quay and looked over. He saw deceased rise and then float on his back, after he had been under water for a minute. An elderly man named PHIPPS (grandfather of deceased) jumped after him. He reached deceased, but was compelled to relinquish his hold in order to save his own life. The boy then sank. A rope was thrown to PHIPPS, but it was not long enough. - JOHN ELLIS LUCOCK, grandfather of deceased, stated that he found the body about five o'clock. - The Jury thought there should be some railings around the quay to prevent accidents. - The Foreman (Mr Durant) suggested that there should be a lifebuoy and line kept at the place. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that there should be proper appliances at the Point for rescuing life. The Coroner said he would write to the Mayor on the matter. A Juror recommended that there should also be similar appliances at the Barbican.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 November 1882
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr Coroner Rodd, at Westaway's Market House Hotel, Market-street, Stonehouse, as to the circumstances attending the death of CHARITY CRISPIN, who lived at No. 1 Newport-street, Stonehouse. The deceased, who was aged 81, was in receipt of parish relief and was also under medical care. On Friday week she fell in getting out of bed, and received a severe shock to the system, from the effects of which she died on Wednesday morning. Mr T. Leah, M.R.C.S., having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sad Death Of A Naval Officer. - At the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Saturday, an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of MR THOMAS MCFARLANE, chief engineer R.N., and late of H.M.S. Druid. The Coroner in opening the proceedings said he had been informed that the Druid was at Kingston, Jamaica, about four months ago, and the deceased was then one of her complement. In attending a picnic he sustained a serious injury, which he (the Coroner) should call evidence to shew was the cause of death. There were no persons whom he could call who saw the accident, but Mr Edney, the doctor who had attended the deceased in the Royal Naval Hospital, would be able to give them the statement made by the deceased to himself as to how the accident happened, also the papers sent home with the deceased by the medical officer in charge of the Public Hospital at Kingston, and the results of a post-mortem examination, and if that evidence did not suffice he (the Coroner) must adjourn the Inquiry, and try to get more exhaustive testimony. - Mr W. Edney, Fleet Surgeon, R.N., stated that on the 10th of September the deceased was admitted into the Royal Naval Hospital, having been landed from one of the West Indian Mail steamers. He was suffering from an obscure injury to the skull, accompanied by arterial haemorrhage. The deceased met with these injuries through an accident at Kingston, an account of which was sent home with the deceased by Dr Ross, the medical officer in charge of the Public Hospital there. This story was corroborated in every respect by the deceased himself, who blamed nobody. Witness had known the deceased for a number of years, and the account he gave of the accident was this:- On June 17th last the deceased, in company with a number of gentlemen and ladies, was about to proceed on a picnic party and was in a boat close to one of the wharves at Kingston. There was a heavy sea on at the time and MR MCFARLANE happened to be standing up in the boat, when a heavy wave gave it a lurch and brought the unfortunate gentleman's head with tremendous force against one of the projections of the wharf. Blood was seen shortly after to issue from his nose and mouth and he was taken to the Public Hospital, where he was left by the Druid, which had since come home and paid off. The deceased lingered until the evening of October 31st, when he died, having literally bled to death; but he was conscious during the whole of the four months. Witness had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that the cause of death was due to a fracture of the anterior part of the base of the skull, an injury that might have been caused in the way the deceased described. - In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that he did not think any more evidence could possibly be obtained, because the accident did not occur on board ship. No statement of the accident had been received from any naval medical officer. - The Coroner, in summing up, said after hearing the evidence of Mr Edney, he must say he did not think any more testimony could possibly be got. Even if the accident had occurred on board the Druid there would have been difficulty in obtaining evidence, seeing that the ship was paid off; but the accident had taken place at a private picnic party, which made the matter more difficult. The Jury were of the opinion that there was no need for any further evidence, and they returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The body of the unfortunate officer will today be conveyed to London, where his friends reside.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 November 1882
PLYMOUTH - Last evening the Plymouth Coroner held an Inquest at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, respecting the death of the illegitimate child, aged nine months, of SARAH PIKE, a domestic servant. The deceased had been "farmed out," first with a Mrs Shuter, of Saltash-street, and afterwards with a Mrs Jenkins, of 52 High-street. Whilst in the care of the latter woman sometime ago Dr Prynne saw it; it then appeared to be under the influence of a narcotic, but the woman denied having given it anything but ordinary food. He expressed the opinion that the child had not received proper care. He again saw the deceased on Thursday at the house of a Mrs Locke; it was then dying. It ought previously to have been under medical care. All the women concerned denied that the child had been improperly treated and a verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 November 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at the Castle and Keys, Prospect-row, Devonport, on Wednesday night by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of WILLIAM HELLEN, a pensioner, aged 45. Deceased had been ailing for ten days past, but on Tuesday morning he expressed a belief that he was better - an opinion with which Dr Row, jun., who had attended him concurred. The same afternoon, at four o'clock, HELLEN died, and a post-mortem examination, made by Dr Rolston, revealed the fact that death was the result of diseased heart and kidneys. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 November 1882
LYDFORD - The Encounter Between A Warder And A Convict. Inquest At Dartmoor Prisons. - Mr R. R. Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dartmoor Convict Prisons yesterday, as to the death of WILLIAM MURRAY, a convict, who was shot during an encounter with a warder, named Kelly, on Wednesday. Mr W. Duke was elected Foreman, and the Jury having viewed the body - that of a stalwart, muscular young man. - The Coroner remarked that though they were Inquiring into the death of a convict who was shot by a warder whose charge he was under, he would remind them that that convict was a fellow being who had met his death at the hands of a fellow-man. As regarded the previous history of the prisoner he thought it was not out of place, but part of his duty to bring before them some facts connected with his fate. The deceased was 23 years of age; he had been convicted of stealing on six several occasions, and had been within the walls of a prison several times for assaults. Therefore he thought he was a man certainly not of a quiet demeanour, and they would find that since his incarceration within those walls the convict's conduct had led to his being constantly punished for breaches of the regulations. Prisoner was one of a gang of men working in the sand pits. He (the Coroner) had been personally to examine those pits, and had seen the spot where the encounter took place. It seemed that the deceased attacked the warder under whose charge he was, and the officer sacrificed the life of the prisoner rather than risk his own. If it was shewn that the convict was guilty of such conduct towards the warder as to endanger his life, that warder, for his own protection and the safety of others, would be justified in firing at the convict, and it would be their duty to say so. - Mr Oswald William Every, governor of the Dartmoor Convict Prisons, stated that the prisoner was convicted at the Clerkenwell Sessions on the 9th of May, 1881, and sentenced to five years' penal servitude for theft and an assault on a police-constable. Prisoner underwent the usual terms of detention at Pentonville and Millbank, and was received at Dartmoor as a man of good conduct,. Since his admission there, however, his conduct had been bad. Among his offences were:- On March 13th he was reported for tampering with his cell lock, and attempting to steal gruel; on the 18th of the same month tampering with his cell door, coming out of his cell and stealing cocoa; on the 3rd of May disobedience of orders when a patient in the infirmary, and refusing to go to bed when ordered; on May 11th he struck another prisoner, and made use of improper language to an officer, on the 19th of May he was reported for fighting with another prisoner; on the 1st of June stealing gruel from other prisoners' pints; on the 22nd talking; on the 23rd insolence and improper language to an officer; on the 30th wilfully throwing dirt at an officer; July 25th assisting in wrangling with another prisoner and fighting on the landing; on August 10th, talking after being cautioned; on the 8th September reported for insubordinate conduct, using threatening and abusive language towards officers; on the 4th of October talking in the Catholic Chapel; on October 10th, entering another prisoner's cell; on October 25th talking in the ranks. On the 7th of November (Wednesday) prisoner was employed in the sand pits at the back of the church with a gang under the charge of Warder Kelly. There was another small party in close proximity under Warder Cole. One party was supposed to be guard for the other. About 2.45 it was reported to witness that the deceased had been shot by one of the warders. The prisoner was removed to the Infirmary, and when witness saw him he was dead. Prisoner's sister (MRS HAZELL, of Fulham) was informed of his death the same evening. No reply had been received from her. Prisoner's number was H150 and his age was 23 years. He was described on conviction as a bricklayer and a single man. The newspaper report of prisoner's conviction stated that there were two indictments against him for stealing wearing apparel, and that he was the terror of Hammersmith, and had committed a brutal assault upon a young constable. - John Kelly, warder, a stout, muscular looking man, stated that on November 8th he was on duty at the sand pits at the back of the parish church. He had ten prisoners under his charge, who were employed in excavating sand. The deceased was one of the gang, and just before dinner witness spoke to him, telling him to continue his work. After dinner witness had charge of the same gang. Having conferred with the officer in charge of the other gang, he told the men under his charge to dig sand. Seeing that the prisoner did not commence work as the other convicts did, he called to him, "MURRAY, are you going to work?" To this he replied, "No, I want to see the ---- who will make me work this afternoon. Warder Cole was at some distance from the scene of this conversation, and was the only warder in the vicinity. - The Coroner here said it was his duty to caution the witness as to the evidence he was about to give. He might be justified in what he had done, or he might not be justified; the Inquiry might end there, or it might go elsewhere. It was his duty, therefore, to caution the witness and ask him if he wished to continue his statement and tell all he knew to the Jury? - Witness: Yes, I do, sir. - The Coroner: And you do so knowing that what you say may be used in evidence against you on any charge which may arise out of this Inquiry? You are aware of that? - Witness: Yes, sir, I am quite aware of that. - Witness, continuing, said that after the reply he gave, the prisoner walked up and down for about two minutes, and then continued using disgusting language towards witness. He then took up the pick which he had been given to dig sand with, and advanced towards witness, who was standing about five yards from him on the side of a slope. Prisoner swung the pick round his head two or three times and while doing so said, "You ----, I will do for you this afternoon." He next held the pick in an attitude for striking and remarked, "I will be the ----- 'screw' over you this afternoon." "Screw" was a slang word used among convicts. Witness ordered him not to come too close, and he then put the pick down from where he had taken it, and took up a spade. He stood for a minute still making use of bad language and threats, and then made a rush to get on the bank above the warder. The other nine men were working in the pit below. Witness anticipated MURRAY'S movement, and reached the surface of the ground before he did, at the same time putting a cartridge in his rifle. When he arrived at the top of the pit witness came to the charge, and told MURRAY to "stand." The latter held the spade up and said "Shoot, you ---- , if you have got any heart; if you don't I will do for you." He then threw the spade down and went to the entrance of the sand pit, some half a dozen yards from where the other men were working. Witness said nothing more to the prisoner, but ordered the remainder of the men to "fall in," preparatory to marching into the prisons. The other men then came out of the pit close to where the prisoner was standing and during the time they were "falling in" MURRAY was throwing large stones at the witness. One of them struck him in the left side, and another just under the left knee and a third on the right thigh. Witness was standing about six yards from the deceased at this time and ordered him to fall in and march off with the other prisoners. To this he replied several times, "No, you -----; I will do for you before I leave here." The remainder of the convicts had "fallen in" ready to march, and the prisoner stood about ten yards from them. He said to the other convicts, "Stand out like ---- men; don't you move from here. I am going to do for the ---- before he leaves here." MURRAY still kept throwing stones at witness, and meanwhile Warder Cole came down and tried to persuade him to come away into his gang. To this the prisoner replied, "Stand back you ---; don't you come near me, or I will serve you the same as I am going to do that ----," meaning witness. Warder Cole, in consequence of what he saw going on in witness's gang, had previously ordered his men to "fall in." Kelly then ordered his own gang to march off, and told the deceased to join them, advancing towards him at the same time with his rifle at the charge. He replied, "I won't," and frequently told witness he would "do" for him before he left there. As Kelly advanced the prisoner walked backwards, still throwing stones. They moved about thirty yards in this way, there being about five yards between the deceased and witness. Warder Cole was behind witness with his own gang. MURRAY continued retreating until he came to a spot where the road had been recently repaired, and where there were plenty of stones. Here he made a stand and said "I will go no further until I have 'done you' you ----." He came up within three yards of witness, still throwing stones. One of the stones struck witness just behind the ear, and he fell back against the bank in consequence of the blow. Had it not been for the bank he should have fallen to the ground. As witness fell the prisoner jumped on the top of him and caught hold of the rifle by the barrel saying "I will be the ---- 'screw' over you now." He made a desperate pull at the rifle but did not succeed in wresting it from the witness. Warder Cole was some distance up the road by the side of the pits with his gang, but was still in sight of witness. Prisoner stood in front of the witness, having hold of the rifle by the barrel and pulling it towards him. In the struggle for the weapon it was discharged. Witness was then on his back leaning on the bank. Almost simultaneously with the explosion of witness's rife Warder Cole fired. Witness was not conscious how his rifle went off. He had his left hand on the barrel and his right hand on the stock. His left hand, therefore, was above the lock. At the time of the explosion of the rifle, as far as he knew, it was "half-cocked," as it was customary for warders to carry their weapons. If the rifle had become cocked it must have been by "hitching in his clothes." He did not "cock" it knowingly. He could not tell whether Cole's or his own rifle exploded first; they went off together. After witness's gun exploded prisoner fell back and immediately called out, "Mr Kelly, Mr Kelly, forgive me for what I have done." Warder Cole then came up and told four prisoners to carry the deceased off to the Infirmary, whither he was accompanied by witness. The latter handed the prisoner over to the charge of nurse Walters. Witness then visited the surgeon himself, and was under medical treatment now in consequence of the injuries he received from the prisoner. - By the Jury: Have you any special instructions in case of man refusing to fall in? - I have instructions that in case of a prisoner attacking me, and there are no other means of dealing with him, to use firearms. - The Coroner read the instructions to warders which ran as follows:- "If a convict, either by himself or banded with others, should forcibly attack or resist officers of the prison or the military when in discharge of their duty, the officer or soldier so attacked would be justified in using firearms to repel the attack or overcome the resistance if these objects could not be accomplished by other means." - Mr Fulford pointed out that the witness did not use his rifle but that it exploded in the struggle. The warder used his rifle designedly and according to the orders he was perfectly justified in so doing. - A Juror: Would he be justified in using his rifle if a prisoner refused to fall in? - The Coroner: He would be justified in using it, if necessary. The rifle is used with great caution and only in case of great emergency. - A Juror: I think the warder exercised great forbearance in not using his rifle. - The Coroner: I will say I have never heard a witness give a more lucid or apparently accurate account of an occurrence of which only he knew the particulars. - A Juror: How could the rifle explode without being full cocked? - The Coroner: It might have caught in his clothes or become full cocked in a hundred ways. - A Juror: By trying to wrest the warder's rifle from him the prisoner was really an accessory to his own death. - The Coroner: According to my mind there is nothing which shews that the Warder Cole's rifle had anything to do with the death of the prisoner. He discharged it to prevent what he considered a murderous assault on a fellow officer. - By the Jury: Witness and Cole were the only two officers in charge of the two gangs of eighteen prisoners. There was no civil guard. - Were there no persons near beside yourselves and the convicts? - There were some men working near at hand on the railway. - Did you see no one during the scuffle? - No, sir. - Can you call upon a convict to assist you in case of insubordination? - It is not usual to do so. A convict can please himself whether he assists or not. - Are you at liberty to call upon a convict to assist you? - The other men of the gang did not attempt to assist me. Although the deceased killed himself if there were any means to prevent his coming to a violent death they should have been used. I suppose you would hardly have 18 disorderly convicts altogether and some might be disposed to assist? - None did offer to help me. - The Coroner: You did not feel justified in appealing to the prisoners? - I should not care to trust myself to a gang of prisoners. - The Deputy Governor: We should not punish any of those prisoners for not assisting a warder. - The Coroner: Did you hear the other prisoners say anything? - Not at the time. - The Coroner remarked that if it would be any satisfaction to the Jury, or if they thought it would further the ends of justice, he would desire that one of the prisoners should be called to give evidence. - In reply to further questions witness said that if one prisoner had any inclination to assist a warder he would not do so on account of fear of the remainder. There was not one convict out of a hundred would do it. The deceased had been under witness's charge about ten days. During that time he had never reported him so as to occasion his being brought before the Governor. Witness reported deceased for his insolence in the morning, but as he was not brought before the Governor he knew nothing of it. He had never threatened witness before Wednesday, nor had he had any altercation with him, but the prisoner was a "nasty" tempered man. - Edward Cole, warder, stated that on Monday he was in charge of a party of eight men digging sand, about thirty yards below Warder Kelly's gang. He was setting his men to work, and on looking up he saw the deceased prisoner going towards Kelly, holding up a shovel in a threatening attitude. Witness went up to the prisoner and tried to persuade him to come and work in his gang. He then dropped the shovel and picked up some stones, telling witness to get out of the way or he would "do" for him the same as he was going to do for Kelly. MURRAY then threw the stones he had in his hands at Warder Kelly. Witness saw he could not pacify the deceased, and he gave orders for the other men to fall in. He gave that order in consequence of MURRAY'S conduct. As soon as he got both gangs of convicts together he moved the whole party down the road, the deceased meanwhile throwing stones at Kelly. One of witness's men dropped to the rear, and he turned round to tell him to come up with the others of the gang when he heard the report of Kelly's rifle. He turned round immediately and saw that both the deceased and Kelly had hold of the rifle. Kelly was leaning against the bank, and as witness saw he was getting the worst of it he stepped on one side so as to clear his fellow warder and fired at the convict, striking him on the knee as he thought. The prisoner fell immediately. He fired for the protection of his brother officer, whom he thought to be in imminent danger of his life at the hands of the prisoner. There were no signs of insubordination among the other men. Witness was about eight or ten yards from the prisoner when he fired. Cole afterwards ordered four of the convicts to carry the deceased to the Infirmary and reloaded his rifle. As he came up he heard MURRAY say something to the other warder - he could not tell what - and as the prisoner was being carried to the prisons he said several times, "Let me die; let me die." When witness fired at the prisoner, the latter's left side was towards him. He fired low. - By the Jury: When the deceased was throwing the stones, prisoner was about three feet from witness. - Could not you have arrested him? - What could I have done with him, and what would have become of the other prisoners? I could only fire upon him and I did not want to do that. If I had attempted to put the handcuffs on that man, the other prisoners might have seized my rifle and blown my brains out. - The Coroner: A warder is not supposed to close with a convict single-handed. - A Juror: Was the prisoner struck with the butt end of the rifle? - No. - Something was in the morning papers to that effect. - The Coroner said he wished them to discard from their minds all the stories and versions they had seen in the morning papers. He thought it was a great pity morning papers should write up stories and versions without ascertaining facts. The morning papers were useful, but they were also dangerous, and he should make some observations upon them later on. The Coroner again asked the Jury if they required any evidence from any of the convicts, and was answered in the negative. - Mr Thomas Watts, medical officer, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the prisoner. Externally, on the left side of the abdomen, just above the groin, were three bruises and two penetrating buckshot wounds. On the outer side of the left thigh, and occupying a small area, were twelve other penetrating wounds. Above the centre of the inner part of the thigh there was an abrasion of the skin. In the right groin were two elongated wounds, which communicated directly with the abdominal cavity. Lying immediately beneath the skin in the upper part of the thigh, just below the groin, were three buckshot embedded. On opening the abdomen he found a good deal of effused blood. On dissection he ascertained the source of the blood to be one of the left pelvic arteries, the several coats of which were penetrated by a lacerated wound. The large and small intestines were penetrated in several places and the left haunch bone was also penetrated. Three buckshot were lying loose in the small intestine and two others were found imbedded in the abdominal faschia. There were no marks of blows, and all the bruises and wounds were, in his opinion, caused by the discharge of the rifle. Witness was with the prisoner from the time he first saw him until he died, about 2.17 p.m. on the 8th. He was not conscious during that time. The immediate cause of death was the laceration of one of the arteries in the left pelvic. He thought the whole of the wounds he had described were due to the discharge of one rifle. The shots took an upward direction. - Mr Frederick William Harris, assistant surgeon, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness. - Joseph Walters, nurse in the Infirmary, stated that about ten o'clock, on the 8th he received prisoner, who was suffering from a gunshot wound. He remained with him until he died. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that, although they were Inquiring into the death of a prisoner, the lives of those men were sacred, and therefore it was their duty to give the matter their most serious and weighty consideration. In the struggle with Warder Kelly for the possession of the rifle and in consequence of that struggle it was clear the rifle exploded. He was under the impression that the explosion of that rifle was the cause of the prisoner's death; but from the account given by Warder Cole it did now appear a question of some doubt whether or not the rifle which Cole discharged killed the prisoner. If that were so, that rifle was discharged lawfully and for a lawful purpose, and its discharge was in the strictest sense within the duty of the warder. If, as he stated in his evidence, Warder Cole discharged his rifle for the protection of his fellow warder who was struggling in the jaws of death at the hands of a prisoner, then the act was one of justifiable homicide. Supposing it were Kelly's rifle which fired the fatal shot the prisoner brought about his death by trying to wrest the weapon placed in the hands of the warder for his own protection and to keep in custody the prisoners under his charge. Had the life of Warder Kelly been taken at the hands of the prisoner, and Cole had omitted to resort to that means of protection which the law allowed him, then in his (the Coroner's) opinion Cole would have been guilty of dereliction of duty. - The Jury, after half an hour's deliberation, found "That the convict MURRAY came to his death by the discharge of a gun whilst he was struggling with Warder Kelly; they considered that both officers (Kelly and Cole) did their duty in a most exemplary manner, and were both entirely free from blame." - The Coroner said he entirely endorsed their verdict and the remark they had thought fit to make as to the conduct of the warders. He thought their conduct in the trying position in which they were placed was admirable. He took that opportunity of remarking that in the most important cases that had come under his notice he was never assisted by juries of greater experience and ability than those who met him in the discharge of his public duty on the wilds of Dartmoor. He thought it was a grave reflection on a paper such as the Western Morning News, which was so widely circulated throughout the West of England, to have so inconsiderately published, as it did that morning, a paragraph reflecting upon the honesty of Princetown juries appointed to inquire into the death of a prisoner. He considered it a great want of proper consideration on the part of that paper and he hoped the editor would make proper amends to the gentlemen he (Mr Fulford) saw around him, and whom he had to thank for their assistance on that Inquiry. - The Jury were then discharged.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 November 1882
PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Bovisand Coastguard Station on Saturday relative to the death of EDWARD POUND, aged 6, son of a coast guard. Deceased was missed on October 25th last, and on Thursday was found floating near the fort. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 November 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Jas. Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest at the Albion Inn, Pembroke=street, last evening, on the body of MATILDA PETERS, aged 67. Deceased had twelve months since had two fits, and for some time afterwards she was ill. Latterly, however, she had enjoyed good health, and apparently was well on Monday afternoon. While her daughter, MRS CLIFT, went into the shop which she kept to serve a customer, deceased was taken ill. Mr P. F. DeLarne, surgeon, was sent for, and attended immediately, but he found life extinct. As the result of a post-mortem examination, made yesterday, Mr De Larne was of opinion that the deceased had died from disease of the blood vessels of the brain, causing apoplexy. The Jury, of whom Mr C. Palmer was the Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 November 1882
LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday before the Coroner, Mr R. Fulford, relative to the death of THOMAS GREEN, who was undergoing a term of seven years' penal servitude for house breaking. Evidence was given by Dr Watt showing that deceased died from inflammation of the kidneys and a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

IVYBRIDGE - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Ivybridge as to the death of the infant child of WILLIAM BURTON, Keaton-road. The mother found the child dead by her side on Sunday last. As it had been in ill-health for some time past and no doctor had attended it the Jury asked that a medical examination be made and the Inquiry was adjourned for the purpose.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 November 1882
OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held at Ottery St. Mary Hospital yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM THOMAS MILLS, a child who had died from burns. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death caused by the child's falling into the fire, and recommended the parents to place a guard before the fire to prevent similar accidents.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 November 1882
CREDITON - An Inquest was held at the Ring of Bells Inn, Crediton, on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of EBENEZER WILSON, a single man, whose body was taken out of the river Yeo, near Fordton Bridge. The deceased, a cook and confectioner, had been lodging with Mr William Dodridge of Crediton, to whom he had often said, "My mind is a nuisance to me." Since the failure of the West of England Bank, in which he had lost about £300 he had been in a desponding state. He disappeared yesterday week and was not afterwards seen alive. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 November 1882
TOTNES - At an Inquest held at Totnes Workhouse yesterday the Jury found that the illegitimate child of RACHEL ADAMS, found dead in bed on Tuesday morning, came to its death through Accidental Suffocation. The child was only 2 days old.

IVYBRIDGE - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest yesterday at Ivybridge into the cause of death of the child of WM. BURTON. The medical evidence shewed that the child had been consumptive, and that death was caused by Suffocation. A verdict to that effect was returned.

SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton yesterday before the Borough Coroner, Mr Flexman, into the cause of death of the infant child of JAMES and ELIZABETH SNELL. The deceased was born at Barnstaple on the first inst., and the parents with four other children had been tramping the country begging. On Monday night while at Southmolton they obtained shelter in a loft over some stables at the Red Lion Inn, and on the following morning the infant was found dead. It was now proved that death resulted from convulsions produced by congestion of the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 November 1882
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough coroner held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall relative to the death of GEORGE BEVAN, aged 63, a plasterer, who fell from a scaffolding in Wolsdon-street on the 23rd inst. Mr J. Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. The deceased who was a very steady man, was employed by Mr. Wm. Phillips, Builder, 12 Wyndham-street West, in plastering a house, No. 49 Wolsdon-street. He was mounted on a scaffolding 10 feet high. A little girl named Bennett of 3 Wyndham-street West, was passing the scaffolding when she saw the deceased fall. He did not stagger first. - Mr Candish, baker, the occupant of the house, stated that he heard the noise of the fall, but thought that it was the shutters that had given away. His little boy, whom he sent out to ascertain what was the matter, returned saying that a man was lying on the kerb. Mr Candish went to him, and found deceased bleeding from both ears and nose. He raised him, and with assistance conveyed him to his bakehouse. Mr Phillips was sent for, and he gave the deceased some brandy. A cab was procured and the man was removed to the Hospital. Witness afterwards inspected the scaffolding and found that it was very strongly built. The night previous to the accident the deceased complained of a slight headache. Mr G. Carter, house surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that the deceased was received at that institution at 8.35 a.m. last Thursday. He was semi-conscious and bleeding from the left ear and nose. He was placed in a bed and remained in much the same state during the whole of the day, exclaiming at intervals, "O, my God." He never answered any question or made any statement. On the following day he became completely insensible and paralysed and died at 6.30 p.m. on Sunday. From a post-mortem examination witness found that there was an extensive fracture of the skull and the brain was very much damaged. There were no symptoms of the deceased having had an apoplectic fit. With regard to the giddiness spoken of, a man of his age would be very liable to such an attack if he were in the least ill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Two Trees Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, respecting the death of ANDREW ECKHART, a German, who died suddenly that morning at his home in Marlborough-street. - Edward Sercombe, a Royal Marine pensioner, said that deceased had lodged at his house since last Tuesday. Yesterday (Monday) morning, shortly before eight o'clock, witness knocked at deceased's door, but, getting no reply, went in and found him lying dead in bed. The evening before when he was taking his tea, deceased complained of being giddy; and he went to bed about eight o'clock. He had worked for a jeweller. - Mrs Sercombe corroborated her husband's statement. On Friday evening last the deceased came home somewhat "the worse for drink." On Saturday night he stumbled over the stairs when going to tea; he was not then at all intoxicated. he fainted when at tea on Sunday, but soon recovered and said that he had once before experienced a similar faintness. - Dr De La Rue, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that one entering the deceased's room he found him lying in bed partly on his left side, his face being buried in the pillow. The nose and lips seemed compressed, the face was livid, and there was a little mucus on the lips. In his opinion, the deceased expired during a fainting fit caused by heart disease, the immediate cause being gradual suffocation from his position as he lay in bed. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this testimony.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Sudden Death On board The Foudroyant. - Mr J. D. Johnstone (Deputy County Coroner) held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, respecting the death of WILLIAM WEBBER, first class boy on board the Foudroyant. Mr A. E. Lean was the Foreman of the Jury. The Coroner stated that he had received a note from the captain of the ship, in which he stated that last Friday evening, at about eight o'clock, deceased complained to two of his messmates of being unwell. At about 3 a.m. the next morning the quartermaster of the middle watch heard moaning in the ship's head, and at 4.30 he reported the case to Mr Percy, chief gunner, who at once sent a boat to the Cambridge for medical aid. - Evidence was then given bearing out this statement by James Beattie and James Kent, two of the deceased "mates," who said that though the deceased complained of pains in his head he did not want a doctor. Mr Ed Swan, surgeon of the Cambridge, spoke to being called to attend the deceased, who, however, had died about ten minutes before his (Mr Swan's) arrival. A post mortem examination revealed the fact that both lungs were greatly congested; this disease was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict to this effect, but recommended that a medical officer and a sick boy be "attached" to the Foudroyant.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 November 1882
EGG BUCKLAND - Suicide Near Plymouth. - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest last evening at Goose Hill Farm, near Knackersknowle, relative to the death of SUSANNAH DAMERELL, the wife of a retired farmer. It appears that for some time past the deceased has shewn signs of mental derangement, but on Saturday when she retired to rest she appeared to be much better than usual. Early on Sunday morning she got up and called the servant girl. She then went upstairs again, but instead of going into her bedroom, she entered one of the adjoining rooms and there, by means of a rope attached to a beam, hanged herself. - Alma Jago, the servant, stated that some time after she had been awakened by her mistress, she (witness) noticing that she absented herself longer than usual, told Mrs Humphreys, a woman staying in the house, of the matter. Mrs Humphreys directed witness to go and search for deceased; and it was then that the latter was found hanging. Life was then extinct. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death through Suicide whilst in a state of Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 November 1882
DARTMOUTH - Yesterday the body of the seaman BURT, of the Britannia, who fell from the side of the ship whilst engaged at work and was drowned, was found on the Kingswear side of the river. The body was landed at Dartmouth and an Inquest was held by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 December 1882
BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Brixham by Mr Sidney Hacker, Solicitor, County Coroner, respecting the death of THOMAS FLETCHER, one of the crew of the fishing boat Minnie, of Looe, whose body was brought in by the fishing smack Ellen, on Friday afternoon. From the evidence it appeared that the Minnie sank near the Berry Head on Thursday morning during a heavy squall. A verdict to the effect that the deceased was Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 December 1882
TOTNES - An Inquest was held yesterday at Totnes Workhouse by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, respecting the death of THOMAS SMITH, aged 76 years, who was choked on Sunday while eating his dinner. An Inmate named Lakeman, who was also in the Infirmary ward, said that he cut up the deceased's dinner, and fed him with a spoon, he being unable to feed himself. He had just finished eating when he was seized with what seemed to witness to be a fit. Witness immediately sent for the nurse. Miss Garbett said that when she arrived she found the deceased black in the face and foaming from the mouth. His teeth were firmly clenched and on her trying to open the mouth she was unable to do so. The doctor was fetched, but when he arrived the man was dead. Mr Hains, surgeon, deposed that the deceased's throat was full of cabbage and meat. He attributed death to suffocation. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 December 1882
TORQUAY - Alleged Manslaughter At Torquay. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Torquay on Thursday night respecting the death of MR WM. DEAR, late landlord of the Golden Lion Inn, Union-street, Torquay, who died at Exminster Asylum on Monday last, as the evidence shewed, from the effects of a blow in the eye administered by a man named Ernest Stephen, who had been employed as an artist at the Watcombe Terr Cotta Works. Stephen went into the Golden Lion Inn after hours on the night of the 2nd of Sept. last, and asked for drink. On being refused, he became abusive, refused to leave the premises, and struck the deceased with a cane in the face, injuring the ball of the eye so much as to destroy the sight. MR DEAR'S mind subsequently became so unbalanced that he had to be removed to the Asylum. After hearing the evidence the Jury (of which Mr Graham was Foreman) retired, and, having been absent for an hour and a quarter, returned into Court with the following written verdict:- "Died from Insanity produced by worry, chiefly accelerated by anxiety as to his probable loss of sight from the effects of a blow." - To this verdict the Coroner objected, on the ground that it did not state whether deceased died from natural causes or whether death was attributable to a blow. It was now 10 p.m., and the Jury again retired; when they had been absent half an hour the Coroner sent to ask if they were agreed, and was answered in the negative. Mr Hacker then said he must adjourn the Inquest but twelve of the thirteen were able to agree, after another period of five minutes, to the verdict - "The death of the deceased was due to Insanity, and that his death was accelerated by the blow given by Stephen." - A Coroner's warrant for the arrest of Stephen who decamped immediately after the assault, will be issued.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 December 1882
STOKE DAMEREL - Yesterday at the Falcon Hotel, Ford, Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of THOMAS MONAGHAN, an army pensioner, aged 67. Deceased had for a long time suffered from asthma. On Tuesday he had a fit, but apparently was afterwards none the worse for it. On Friday night he went to bed as usual, but at a quarter past five on Saturday morning he was taken ill, and before medical assistance could be called he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Wm. Hawke, Coroner for Saltash, held an Inquest at the Waterman's Arms, Mutton Cove, yesterday, respecting the death of JOHN GRIFFIN, aged 7 years, who was found in the water on Sunday evening. The body of the deceased was noticed by Thomas Ellis, a waterman, of Millbrook, who immediately, with the help of P.C. Sampson, took it from the water. As life was not extinct, Drs. De Larne, F. E. Row and White (of H.M.S. Adelaide) were called, but their efforts were of no practical avail. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." At the close of the Inquest contributions were gathered, to the amount of 19s. for the bereaved parents, the father being ill in the Hospital and the mother in a weak condition. The Jury said they were very much pleased with the kindness of Mr Austin, who had taken in the deceased and done all in his power to recover the child.

CLOVELLY - An Inquest was held at New Inn, Clovelly, by Mr J. H. Toller, County Coroner, on Saturday afternoon, as to the death of RICHARD HARRIS and JAMES JEWELL, mariners, who were drowned in the Bideford Bay on Wednesday during a strong gale. Mr John Whitefield was Foreman of the Jury. - David Headon gave evidence as to seeing both men leave the pier for fishing on Wednesday afternoon, and as to the finding of the bodies on Thursday morning about one and a half miles south-east of Clovelly Pier. - John Jewell gave similar evidence, and John Cruse said that he spoke to RICHARD HARRIS about 11.30 p.m. on the night of the gale, when their respective boats were anchored off the pier and awaiting the tide. On entering the quay witness found on inquiry that the boat of RICHARD HARRIS was missing. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The Jurymen unanimously gave their fees to the orphans.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 December 1882
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Exeter Coroner respecting the death of JAS. STONEMAN, aged 70, a thatcher of Cheriton Fitzpaine, who was run over by a trap of which he was in charge on the 17th ult. The cause of death was shewn to have been Heart Disease accelerated by the accident.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 December 1882
SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held yesterday at Southmolton before the Borough Coroner, respecting the death of AMOS ADAMS KEMPE, a butcher of that town, who died yesterday morning from the effects of a wound in the leg, the result of an accident in the market on the previous Saturday. The deceased was cutting up a pig when his knife slipped, cutting his thigh. He dressed the wound and did not go home until an hour afterwards, when he was removed in a cart. He was attended by Mr Edwin Furse, surgeon, who was called in on Wednesday. The doctor found him in bed suffering from a punctured wound over the soephena vein. the injury had produced blood poisoning, from which he died. A verdict to this effect was returned. The deceased has left a wife and eight young children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 December 1882
BARNSTAPLE - Two Inquests were yesterday held at the North Devon Infirmary before the Barnstaple Borough Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft). In the first the deceased was NOAH NICHOLLS, a labourer of Bideford, who was far back as August last met with an accident in Wales. He was in charge of a cart at Llandoor when it upset, and passed over him. He was taken to the Bideford Dispensary at first, and subsequently to the North Devon Infirmary where he died on Tuesday. The Inquiry was adjourned for the attendance of a witness from Wales. The second Inquest was held in respect of JOHN MOCK. Deceased was at work at Landkey a fortnight since digging down an old cob wall, and having removed the supports the wall fell on him when he was in a kneeling position. He died on Thursday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 December 1882
EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday afternoon touching the death of ALBERT ISAACS, aged 31, a farmer, of Whitstone. Deceased and his wife were thrown out of a trap on the evening of Friday, December 8th, when returning from market, the vehicle having come into collision with a wheelbarrow which had been left on the road by some children. MR ISAACS received serious injuries and died on Sunday from pleurisy and inflammation of the lungs at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. A Juryman raised the question whether the parents of the children were not to blame for sending them out after dark with a barrow, but the Coroner thought not. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 December 1882
PLYMOUTH - Last evening the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Fisherman's Arms, Lambhay-street, on the body of AMY RENDLE, aged 71 years, who died suddenly yesterday morning at her residence, 16 Lambhay-street. It appeared from the evidence of RICHARD RENDLE, son of the deceased, that for some time past the old woman had been ailing. Early yesterday morning RENDLE noticed that his mother appeared to be very ill. He sat by her bedside until half-past seven o'clock, when he went to his work, bidding his wife to send for a doctor if the old lady became worse. About nine o'clock AMY RENDLE, the deceased's grandchild, went to MRS RENDLE'S bedside to see if she would take a cup of tea, and noticing that she "looked" very strange the little girl called her mother, who found that the deceased had then expired. The Jury, of whom Mr Walters was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes", and censured RENDLE and his wife for not sending for a doctor, when they must have seen that the deceased was seriously ill.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 December 1882
PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death Of A Swedish Sailor. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday held an Inquest at the Guildhall touching the death of PETTER JOHNSSON, a Swedish sailor, who was accidentally killed by a fall. - Andrew Jansson, captain of the barque Johan Frederick, stated that the vessel arrived at Plymouth on the 15th inst., and was placed in Mr Hill's building slip at Cattedown. The deceased was a seaman on board the vessel. On Christmas-eve the men were in the cabin and each had two glasses of grog served out to them. At about 10 minutes to 10 JOHNSSON went on deck, and as he did not return a search was made for him, and soon afterwards the mate reported that he had found him lying at the bottom of the slip by the side of the vessel apparently dead. Witness and some of the crew immediately went down and found the deceased lying under a staging which was slung outside the vessel. The bulwarks near where he fell were only two feet high. He was immediately taken on board and witness went for a doctor, but not being able to find one he returned to the ship and had the deceased conveyed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where the doctor pronounced him dead. - Emil Anderson, mate of the vessel, gave corroborative evidence. - Dr Godfrey Carter, M.R.C.S., resident surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital said that the deceased was received at about 12.40 on Christmas morning. He was quite dead, and the death was attributable to a severe fracture of the skull. He would be killed instantaneously. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said that deceased had probably stepped on to the staging, and, as the planks were wet, fallen overboard on to the rough stones at the bottom of the slip. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed an opinion that no blame whatever was attached to anyone on board the vessel.

BIDEFORD - Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner for Bideford, held an Inquest on Tuesday evening relative to the death of a MRS DAVIS, the wife of a sweep resident in New-street, Bideford. Deceased, whilst visiting some friends in Cornwall, cut her fingers. Medical aid was sought and the wounds appeared to be healing, when slight symptoms of lockjaw manifested themselves. The deceased at once returned to her home, where the symptoms increased, and in a few days death ensued. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was given.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 December 1882
PLYMOUTH - Suspicious Death Of A Child At Plymouth. Alleged Baby Farming. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Brunswick Hotel, Barbican, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of EDITH MARY TRUAN, aged 4 months, the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH TRUAN, who lives at 17 Lambhay-hill. TRUAN, having been cautioned by the Coroner, stated that deceased was born in the Truro Union. It was a very healthy baby. She attended to it for a month, when she delivered it to her mother, and went into service. About a month after she brought deceased to Devonport, and placed her under the care of her sister. She kept the baby for a month, and it was healthy and strong. A Mrs Phillips, of Dockwall-street, Devonport, then took deceased and maintained it for 2s. per week. That would be in the latter part of last month. About three weeks afterwards when witness saw the child, it was looking emaciated and ill. Phillips said she did what she could for it. Some time afterwards witness complained of its condition, and left her situation in order that she might take the child to her sister's at Lambhay-hill, and nurse it. On Sunday morning last she saw that deceased was worse, and on the following day took her to Dr Pearse, who said that she was in a "bad state of health," and if she was not better on the following morning witness could take it to Mr Prynne. On Tuesday that medical man saw deceased and said that she was dying through neglect. She died during the same night. Witness either took or sent food to Devonport for deceased every week. She had only paid Phillips 1s. 6d., because she was not satisfied with the treatment of deceased. - By a Juror: Dr Pearse said that medicine was no good for the child. He gave her a piece of paper and as she said her brother-in-law was a soldier in the Citadel, he told her to take it there. She did not have the prescription dispensed, as she had no money. - Harriett Roweth, wife of David Roweth, private, Royal Artillery, said that the last witness was her sister. Deceased was placed with Mrs Phillips on November 16th. Witness had it under her care for five weeks previously. It was a healthy child, and well able to take its food. After the child had been with Mrs Phillips a week it did not look well. Witness saw it two days before it was removed, and it was in a very bad state. There were other infants there. She spoke to her sister (the mother) and the child was removed to witness's residence. - Rebecca Phillips, widow, residing at 22 Dockwall-street, Devonport, having been cautioned, said that deceased was brought to her on November 7th, and was taken away again on the 25th of the same month. She had therefore given it up more than a month ago. She was to be paid 3s. per week on account of deceased, but only received 1s. 6d. She fed it by means of a bottle with milk, bread and sugar. Witness would swear that the child was fed properly and drank three-pennyworth of milk every twenty-four hours, besides taking milk and bread. The mother never refused to pay the maintenance because the child was not looking well. - By a Juror: She was certain of the date of giving up the child. Deceased was the first child she took, and she received another a week before deceased left. She was not a registered "farmer." - David Roweth, private Royal Artillery, and husband of the second witness, having given evidence, Mrs Roweth was recalled and adhered to her previous statement as to the date of the removal of the child. - Mr Edward Michael Prynn, M.R.C.S., said that when deceased was brought to him on Tuesday morning it appeared to be in a dying condition, and he could do little or nothing for it. He made up some medicine and gave it to the mother. Witness had made a post mortem examination. The deceased was a small child for its age, weighing only 7 ½ lbs. It did not appear to have been well nourished and was emaciated. Internally the organs were in an unhealthy condition, and there were symptoms of great exhaustion from some cause. The stomach and intestines were perfectly empty. By the condition of the child he considered that whatever food it had taken it had not assimilated for some time. In his opinion the cause of death was atrophy through want of nourishment. He could not say that the atrophy arose from the want of power of the child to assimilate its food consequent on its weak condition, because he had not seen it for any length of time previously. - The Coroner having summed up, remarking that the mother doubtless was to blame, and that she had made several mis-statements, the Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from Atrophy, but whether that was caused by the want of proper nourishment, or from the inherent weakness of deceased's constitution, whereby it was unable to assimilate its food, the Jury are unable from the medical or other evidence to determine."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Clarendon Inn last evening respecting the death of FRANCIS GLUYAS, 44, a tailor, who resided at 159 King Street. Deceased had been suffering from rheumatism for the past three years, but otherwise he had been in average health. Since February last he had not had medical attention, but he had several times complained of pains. On the night previous to his death he spoke of pains in his left arm and side, but no special notice was taken of what he said. About seven o'clock on Wednesday morning his wife got up, lit the fire, and then asked him if he was ready for his tea. Receiving no answer she raised an alarm: a doctor was sent for and he pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Deceased leaves a widow and seven children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 December 1882
BRISTOL - The Singular Death Of A Plymouth Tannery Manager. - Yesterday an adjourned Inquest was held at Bristol into the circumstances attending the death of MR GEORGE DREWETT, 38 years of age, manager of a Plymouth tannery, who died suddenly in Bristol on Christmas Day. The deceased shot himself in March last, but he seemingly recovered. Dr Keal, who had made a post-mortem examination, said that he found the pistol bullet embedded in the bone forming the internal part of the ear. It was close to one of the largest blood vessels of the brain, and it was a wonder that the wound had not caused immediate death. Death was due to inflammation produced by the bullet. The Foreman of the Jury remarked that the deceased was at Sunday school the very day he made the attempt upon his life. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Inflammation of the Brain caused by a pistol shot wound self-inflicted in March last while he was suffering from Temporary Insanity.