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Help and advice for Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury 1883-1884

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

[Printed in Plymouth, Devon]

1883-1884

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Abbott; Adams; Allen; Alleyne; Allsop; Andrews(2); Archer; Arnold; Atkins; Avery(2); Axworthy; Baker(4); Ball; Balsom; Bannerman; Barnicott; Barons; Barratt; Bartlett; Baskerville; Basley; Bearman; Bearne; Beavil; Beer(3); Belts; Besley; Bishop; Blackbeard; Blackell; Blackmore(2); Boggia; Bolt; Bone; Borland; Boulot; Bovey; Bowden; Bowhay; Box; Boyes; Brackenbury; Braund; Bray; Brealey; Bridgeman; Brimblecombe; Brock; Brodie; Brooking; Brown(2); Browne; Buckley; Budge; Bulford; Bulteel; Bunker; Bunny; Burlace; Burt; Buttler; Buzza; Canning; Carrington; Caston; Champerri; Cheek; Chennoeur; Chorley; Cleave(2); Coad; Coaker; Cobbledick; Coke; Cole(2); Coles; Colicket; Colwill; Compton; Connolly; Cook; Coombes(3); Corder; Cotton; Cousins; Cove; Cowen; Cox; Crawley; Creech; Crimp; Croker; Crosse; Cuddeford; Curtis; Cutler; Darlington; Davies; Davis; Davy; Dawe; Delves; Dennis(2); Dewdney; Digman; Doddridge(2); Dolan; Dovett; Down(2); Drake(2); Dyer; Dyment; Edney; Edwards(2); Elford; Elliot; Ellis; Elston; Evans; Evey; Fey; Finch; Fisher; Fishley(2); Floud; Flower; Fogwell; Foot; Ford(2); Foster(2); Fredericheen; Freeman; Frost(3); Frude; Fry; Galliver; Geen; Gifford; Gillard; Gilley; Gillies; Gooding; Gray; Greenslade; Gregory; Floyn; Haggett; Hall(2); Ham; Hammet; Hammond; Hancock; Hannaford(2); Harding(3); Harnack; Harper; Harris(5); Harrod; Hatcher; Hatherley; Hawken; Hawking; Hawkins; Haydon; Hayes; Hayman; Heath; Heathershire; Hemmings; Henderson; Higman; Hil(2); Hobley; Hodge; Hoit; Hole; Hollow; Holmes; Holten; Hooper; Horn; Horswill; Horwell; Hoskings; Huddy; Hugo; Hutchinson; Huxham; Jackman; James(2); Jarvis; Jenkins; Jewell(3); Jinks; Johns; Jordan; Jukes; Kinder; Kingcombe; Kingsland; Knowles; Lane; Lang; Langdon; Langman; Langridge; Launder; Lavis; Lawry; Lee; Ley(2); Light; Lock; Longworthy; Loveridge; Luke; Luscombe(2); Luxon; Luxton; Lyle; Maddock; Maitland(2); Mandin; Mann; Manner; Marsh(2); Marshall(3); Martin(2); Matthews; Maunder(2); May; Maynard; McAndrews; McKay; McMullen; McNisbey; Melhuish; Milford; Miller; Mitchell; Moore; Morcombe; Morse; Mortimer; Mortimore; Mountjoy; Mudge; Mugridge; Mullins; Mumford; Napper; Newcombe; Newman; Newton; Northcott; Nott(2); Oades; O'Brien; Olding; Olver; Openshaw; Opie; Ozanne; Palmer(2); Parker; Parkin; Parson; Pascoe; Pearne; Pearse; Peatheyjohn; Pedlar; Peek; Penwell; Perkins(2); Perry; Perryman; Peters; Pinhey; Pinsent; Pitman; Pitt; Pollard; Portman; Powlesland; Pretty; Price(2); Priter; Prout; Pym; Queenborough; Rathbone; Rawe; Rawling; Rawlings; Reddaway; Reed; Reeve; Renolds; Rice; Richard; Richardson; Riddolls; Rippin; Ritson; Roberts; Robinson; Rollings; Rolph; Routleffe; Rowe; Rowlings; Royce; Sampson; Saunders(2); Searle; Seaward; Selley; Sercombe; Serle; Seward; Shaw; Shearman; Shears; Shipway; Short; Shortland; Single; Skedgell; Skinner; Slack; Smale(2); Smallridge; Smeath; Snell; Southcott; Southwood; Sparks; Sprague; Squires; Stamp(2); Stanner; Stevens; Stoneman; Street; Stringer; Sullivan(2); Summers; Susman; Swigg; Symons; Tavenor; Taylor; Thomas(2); Tolhurst; Tolly; Tomlinson; Tonkin; Tope; Towl; Trewyn; Trump; Truscott; Tucker; Tuckett; Turner; Turpin; Underhill(2); Vass; Vaughan; Velland; Velvin; Vickery; Vidal; Viggers; Vinnicombe; Vosper; Vye; Wade; Wakeham; Walcott; Walter(2); Walters(2); Wardley; Ware; Warren; Waterfield; Watts(3); Webber; Wedlock; Welsford; West; Westacott; Westcott; Westlake; Wheeler; Whiteford; Whitfield; Whyte; Williams(11); Wilmot; Wilson(3); Winstone; Winter; Wise; Wonnell; Woodfin; Woollcombe; Yeo; Young.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 1 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Chimney Accident At Plymouth. Coroner's Inquest And Verdict. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday, at the Plymouth Gas Works, relative to the death of JOHN WOODFIN, stoker, who was killed on Friday morning by the fall of a portion of one of the stacks on the premises. Mr James King (vice-chairman), Messrs. J. Wills, T. N. Lansdown, W. Symons, and R. H. Snow, directors, and Mr J. Thomas, secretary of the Company, were present on behalf of that authority. - The Coroner, previous to the Jury being sworn, observed that he did not think it would strike them that the fall of masonry from the chimney was a surprise when they came to consider how the chimney had been subject to the influence of an extraordinary amount of damp, wet weather, combined with the gusts and squalls and gales with which they had been visited for months and months past. - Mr Jonathan Marshall was chosen Foreman, and the Jury having visited the scene of the accident and viewed the body of the deceased, - Thomas Pitts, stoker, gave evidence as to the nature of the accident. he said that about half-past six o'clock on Friday morning he was in the retort-house with the deceased and two others. Deceased was about three yards from witness. He heard a loud crash above, and part of the roof, with a large quantity of bricks and other materials fell in, extinguishing the lights. He was thrown to the ground, but did not notice, owing to the darkness, the others. Witness found his way out, and almost immediately returned, hearing Kerswill crying out. Every effort was at that time being made to rescue the injured men. He was himself but slightly injured in the leg. - Charles Elliott, stoker, who was in the retort-house at 6.30, said he had at that period just finished his "charge." There was a sudden, loud crash, and upon witness going to the door he heard Stevens exclaim that he could not see anything. He returned and dragged Stevens out. Witness then asked, "Where is WOODFIN?" He received no answer, and went back to the archway, where he had just before observed WOODFIN at work. He found WOODFIN stretched on his face, and motionless. Witness procured assistance, and the deceased was carried out. Deceased was quite unconscious and was much injured. he was taken into the engine-house and witness left deceased there in the care of others. Deceased died, he was told, twenty minutes after. - John Thomas Browning, engineer and manager of the Gas Works - a post which he has occupied for twenty-seven years - said that whilst dressing on Friday morning, at twenty minutes past six, he was called and informed that the chimney had fallen. He first went into the retort-house to see about the men and the extent of the fall there. Directly the light enabled him to observe the chimney, he noticed that the whole of the "cap" on the east side had been carried away, and had consequently fallen through the roof of the retort-house. There was only one side of the cornice gone, the whole of the inside lining remaining intact. The chimney in question was built seven years ago by Mr Willcocks, from designs by witness. It was 91 feet in height. its area at the base was 10 ft. 6in. square. The top of the chimney was 7ft. 6in., the top being crowned by a cornice of terra cotta. In his opinion a "cap" at the top of a chimney conduced to give steadiness to the structure. Under any ordinary circumstances he undoubtedly considered the chimney safe. The great heat from the works and the prolonged wet weather had certainly tended to the accident. The wet weather would have a tendency to wash the mortar from the joints of the brickwork, rendering the latter liable to break away. On the 27th inst. he detected a crack at the south-east side of the cornice. It was not, however, of such a character as to cause any apprehension of danger. he took a circuit round the chimney on the 28th and could not perceive that the fracture had increased. He observed slight cracks in other places, but these were old cracks. He thought the matter would have to be watched and made up his mind to report it to the committee of Works, as he felt it to be necessary. He was aware that it blew very heavily during the early morning of the 29th; that there was an unusually heavy squall at half-past two o'clock; and that there was rain. The wind, no doubt, hastened the accident. - The Coroner asked if Mr Browning felt there was any danger in another crack, which was to be observed in the cornice. - Witness said that the crack had been there for two years. But he did not anticipate any danger from it, as the bricks underneath did not show any signs of settlement. he might state, however, that men had been employed to put up scaffolding and remove the whole of the cornice and to work on Sunday so as to hasten the repairs. - The Jury expressed their satisfaction at this decision. Witness added that after visiting the retort-house to ascertain if any men had been injured, he proceeded to the engine-house, where the deceased was. Witness got a little brandy down the throat of the deceased, who, however, did not recover consciousness, but died soon after. Mr Greenway, surgeon, was sent for, and was promptly on the scene; but the deceased died before his arrival. - The Coroner addressed the Jury and characterised the accident as a remarkably simple one. So far as they could judge, the chimney, in its construction, was singularly appropriate, and not too lofty for the work which it had to do. There was a peculiarity in its construction and that was that the stack was very ornamental in the cornice of terra cotta. But Mr Browning had given it as his deliberate opinion that the stack was not simply ornamental, but that the cornice was appreciably used, in that it gave stability to the remainder of the structure. He presumed that that was Mr Browning's idea in designing the chimney. He did not think they had anything to complain of in the materials that went to form the stack. As sensible men they should not fail to take into consideration the unprecedented wet and stormy season and that on the morning of the accident there was a sever gale. There was no doubt that these causes led to the accident. They ought to feel thankful that there were no more persons killed. Viewing the matter gravely and impartially, he could form no other opinion than that, if there had ever been an accident pure and simple, that was one. Adverting to the stack in its present condition, the Coroner remarked that they had seen that a crack yet existed at the corner of the cornice and they could but feel that a large portion of masonry might come away at any moment. Should it fall upon the roof the same result would probably follow. He would take the liberty of asking the Jury to join with him in a strong, respectful request to the Gas Company to have immediate steps taken to prevent a recurrence of such a fearful calamity. - A Juror (to Mr Browning): Were there any copper or metal ties of any kind connecting the angles of the cornice? - Witness: There were no metal ties immediately at the angles of the cornice, but there were wrought iron angle bands built in the chimney within two feet of the cornice. - The Coroner: How close to the cornice? - Witness: About two feet. If there had been copper bands I do not think they would have withstood the gas emanating from the chimney. - A Juror: What size terra-cotta stones form the cornice? - Witness: About eighteen inches in base. Two inches would project outside, and there would be a bearing of sixteen inches on the chimney. - The Juror asked if Mr Browning could say if the work was thoroughly carried out and Mr Browning answered that he had no reason to believe that it was not. - After a brief consultation, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that whilst deceased was engaged at work at portion of the cornice of the chimney, owing to the stress and action of long-continued wet and storm, broke away accidentally and killed the deceased. The Jury added a rider, which stated that they hoped the directors would very early see to the reconstruction of the chimney and direct improvement to be made in the nature of the cornice, if there were any possible means of so acting; and, moreover, the Jury would be glad if the workmen were kept as far as possible from the chimney during the work of reconstruction. - Mr King said that immediately after the accident Mr Thomas and himself sent for Mr Finch, who was requested to provide a staff of men to make everything as secure as possible. So urgent did they deem the matter to be, and so careful were they in endeavouring to avoid the possibility of accident, that Mr Finch would keep his men at work on the following day (Sunday) so as to get down what remained of the cornice. No stone would be left unturned in order to secure the safety of everybody in the building and to remove every cause of danger. - The Coroner said he thought the Jury would agree with him when he said he was apprehensive of the chimney in that portion where the second larger crack was. - Mr Browning mentioned that the men had been removed from working underneath the chimney. - Mr Finch observed that he did not think there was immediate danger from the crack, but the work would be conducted with every despatch.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 3 January 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr T. Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest at the Stoke Spirit Vaults yesterday, touching the death of AUGUSTUS M. BULFORD, examining officer, who met his death from an accident he received whilst on duty on board H.M.S. Royalist. - P.C. Taylor, constable in the Devonport Yard, stated that he was in company with the deceased on the 12th ult., searching the Royalist, and they were going into the screw-alley, when he heard deceased shout for a light, at the same time saying that he had slipped his foot. Witness asked him if he was hurt, and he replied "No; I don't feel like hurt." Witness further stated that they proceeded with their duty, and left the ship about five minutes after the accident, deceased, as he supposed, going home. - George Littleton, carpenter, of the Royal Adelaide, stated that he was also on duty, searching the Royalist, about 4.30 p.m. on the 12th ult., when he heard deceased call for a light. He did not see deceased again until he was leaving the yard, when he asked him whether he was hurt. Deceased replied that he did not feel hurt, but that he had received a tremendous shaking. They then parted. Witness further stated that the deceased fell a distance of about four feet, and that it was almost impossible to fall where he did without seriously injuring himself. - HARRIET BULFORD, sister of the deceased, stated that after the accident she did not see him until Christmas Day, as she had been away for some time. She further stated that the deceased attained his 52nd year on the 15th of December last, and that when she saw him he complained of pains in his thigh and shoulder, and also of being very much shaken. He had been attended by Dr Fletcher, and had also been seen by Dr Wilson. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 January 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - At the Market House, Stonehouse, yesterday, an Inquest was held by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) respecting the death of NICHOLAS HODGE, a pensioner, aged 88, or Oreston. The deceased came to Plymouth on Monday in order to pay a fee towards his club, and whilst passing Devil's Point he fainted and fell. He died shortly afterwards from syncope. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 January 1883 PLYMPTON - At the London inn, Plympton, an Inquest was yesterday held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of ISABELLA WARREN, aged 67 years. The deceased had been living for the past four months with a niece, Annie Joyce, at Plympton. About 8.30 on Sunday morning passing the bedroom door, Joyce saw there was a light still burning, and found her aunt hanging from one of the bed-posts. She was dead. She had been in a depressed state of mind for some time and had once been an inmate of Axminster Asylum. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind." The deceased prior to going to Plympton resided at Plymouth and Laira.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 10 January 1883 BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident At Barnstaple. - JOSEPH DENNIS, 50, of Barnstaple, was last week kicked by a horse while he was bedding up the animal in the stable. He was obliged to go home and to send for medical assistance, but after suffering great pain, he died on Sunday night last. At an Inquest held on the following day, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - Drowned In The Tavy. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquiry was held at Higher Gawton farm, near Tavistock, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY BALL, whose body was found in the river Tavy on Sunday morning last. Captain George Rowe was Foreman of the Jury. William Wilmot and William Hicks gave evidence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 January 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Mount Edgcumbe Inn, Mutton-cove, relative to the death of MRS MARY ANN HILL, aged 67. Deceased, who lived with her husband at Mutton-cove, left her home on Thursday morning upon an errand, and while walking up James-street she was observed to stagger and fall to the ground. When raised she opened her eyes, but could not speak. She was taken to her home and Mr De Larne, surgeon, was called. He pronounced her dead. He attributed death to syncope, or failure of the heart's action; and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 13 January 1883 BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Sortridge Mine Disaster. Inquest And Verdict. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Account-house at Sortridge Mine, near Horrabridge, as to the circumstances attending the death of CAPTAIN NICHOLAS WILLIAMS, fifty-six, resident agent, whose body was found in the river Walkend on Thursday morning. Mr R. J. Frecheville, Inspector of Mines, was present on behalf of the Home Department. Captain W. Skewis, the manager, was also in attendance. Mr R. Willis, surgeon, was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Captain Skewis having identified the body, John Axford, miner, proved finding the body. He said he discovered it in the river on Thursday between ten and eleven o'clock, life being quite extinct. Deceased was under from a foot to a foot and a half of debris; he was lying on his side. Witness came across his shoulder in the first place. He imagined the debris came from the "burrow" of the old mine. The body was below the adit's mouth. - The Foreman: Have you been working in the level? - From the beginning. - By a Juror: The body was in the centre of the river. - Mr Frecheville explained the plan of the mine. He had examined the mine that morning, and was satisfied that the plan was correct as far as he had been enabled to inspect it. He knew the adventurers were clearing out the old adit. The adventurers came into a certain point where the adit was discovered choked. This was in a shallow part of the adit, between thirty and forty fathoms in. A shaft was sunk at the back of the adit, and a slope was made, allowing the water to flow away from underneath the feet to the depth of the old level. No further difficulty was met with until reaching an additional thirty or forty fathoms. Another choke was here found in the old adit. This was passed into by a process of "spilling" and "breasting" for a distance of from five to six fathoms. The water then became rather strong. A firm dam was placed in the level in that particular spot. Returning five fathoms, a cross-cut was driven in a south-easterly direction a distance of six fathoms away from the original adit. next a "side-tie" was driven for a distance of about forty fathoms, so that there was a block of ground about six fathoms between that and the original adit. Holes were then put into the block from the "side-tie" to the original adit, and then let down the water. The original adit next took a turn to the east. The "side-tie" was continued, and an entry was again made in the original adit. The original adit was pursued in an easterly direction about an additional forty fathoms. This original adit then followed a cross-course into the old mine for a distance of some hundred fathoms. In the last few fathoms of the hundred fathoms recourse was again had to "spilling," owing to a choke in the adit. When the pressure became too great a second strong dam was constructed. Retiring fifteen fathoms, a cross-course was put out west to the extent of two fathoms, and, started another "side-tie" in order to communicate with a lode which crossed the adit at right angles. When it was shown by the plan that the lode had been nearly approached, bore-holes were kept, which were eight or ten feet ahead of their "drivage." These bore-holes let the water down, so as to communicate with the south lode. Getting on to the south lode a turning took place for the east in consequence of the finding of a choke. It being known that the lode was in proximity, another dam was made, and yet another "side-tie" was made in firm ground to the west of the original adit. He that day could go no further because of the water. He did not think anything would be gained by an adjournment of the Inquiry, and nothing would be needed to be done in the adit save repairs. He showed that the level of the original adit and the "side-ties" were not exactly the same, and the holes were made in a sloping direction. The accident was due to an overflow of pent-up water from the old workings. up to the point at which he had proceeded he thought the workings had been conducted with great ability. He could not reach the scene of the rush without going under water, and he would not then have been able to examine it. Not until the water had been drained from the old workings by an engine could the place be inspected properly. Personally, he did not think a fathom of ground sufficient where the rush occurred between the adit and the "side-tie." The plans, however, were made when the old mine was in existence, and when the rules were not so rigid as they now were. He should have liked as much ground as in the "side-ties". A commencement was made with two fathoms, and he should have favoured that distance all through. But that was part of the management. Very much would depend on the nature of the ground, whether firm or porous; and, again, there was implicit faith in the plans. He should not have cared himself to have been in the "side-tie" with only a distance of six feet separating him from the adit. They must recollect that CAPTAIN WILLIAMS was himself an agent and was present. If the holes had been left alone the mine would probably have been as dry as at that moment. The accident was due to the deceased meddling with the holes, through, undoubtedly, over-anxiety, and a desire to have the mine drained. - Captain Skewis deposed that the report of Mr Frecheville, from the plan, was correct. - Alfred Dawe, 20, said he had been working at Sortridge Mine ten months. About noon on Saturday he was at work in the adit; there were also there Edward Crocombe and Edward Newcombe. Deceased was there superintending the working. They were poking a hole, endeavouring to let the water down; holes had been made, and they were trying to enlarge one of them. There were two holes, about a foot apart. From one no water had run since it had been made, and from the other a stream of water, as large as his arm, issued. They were in the act of clearing the choked hole. A rush of water was not anticipated. The piece of iron which was used was ten feet in length. Newcombe had gone back into the western part of the level with a barrow. CAPTAIN WILLIAMS ordered witness to poke the hole. He had only put the iron into the hole a foot previously, when a stone was found to be in it. He had forced the iron but six inches further in when he saw the stone coming, and heard a great roar. Each ran, and witness and Crocombe reached the adit's mouth - three hundred yards away - a minute before the rush of water came. Witness passed CAPTAIN WILLIAMS and Crocombe, who started ahead of him; where he could not say. Crocombe only had a candle. The adit was half full of water in the rush. - By a Juror: The new ground came away. - By Mr Frecheville: He knew there were only two feet of ground between the adit and the "side-tie" dividing the water from them. CAPTAIN WILLIAMS was aware of this fact. - Mr Frecheville: How do you know CAPTAIN WILLIAMS was aware there were only two feet of ground between you and the water? - He had tried it. - He had tried it? It was full of rubble inside. - I understand that. What did he try it with - a bar? A scraper. - When was this? I can hardly tell. - That day? No; in the week some time. - By the Foreman: The hole was enlarged three days before. No dynamite or powder was used; only the bar. - Captain Skewis: You stated just now that CAPTAIN NICHOLAS WILLIAMS and Crocombe were at the end at the time of your probing the hole? Yes, sir. - Whilst standing there each had a candle, had he not? Yes. - You were probing the hole, with your candle fixed in the end? Yes. - Then you heard a great roar of water? Of something. - You saw water? No. - What led you to run away? The roar. The moment you heard the roar you turned? The Captains aid: "Go on." - You turned, and ran away at once, did you not? Yes. - You say you passed these men? I passed them; I was behind them in the end. - Have you any idea at what distance? No. - Do you know if the Captain had a light? Yes. - You stated to the Jury that you saw the level half full of water? Yes. - Did you see any water from the time you left the end until you passed the mouth of the adit? No. - You have no knowledge of the quantity of water in the adit when you were going through, or where the body of water came from? No. - The first hole was bored through a fortnight ago, you should think? About three weeks ago now. - When bored, the water came regularly away, did it not? Yes. - What was your employment during that time? Keeping it clear. - How long were you before boring the other hole? It was bored the next night. - By Mr Frecheville: Two feet was the depth of the hole from the side of the "side-tie;" the hole was almost flat. The hole was made about eighteen inches from the bottom. - Edward Crocombe gave corroborative evidence. CAPTAIN WILLIAMS ran first. he saw the water issue forth; the stream might have been the size of his leg. He thought there were three feet between them and the water. CAPTAIN NICHOLAS WILLIAMS had frequently cautioned them as to keeping at a safe distance from the water. The deceased gave no limit. He thought, in that ground, three feet a sufficient barrier. - Captain Skewis was next examined, and a letter to him, from the deceased, dated Friday last, was first read. In the communication, the deceased said the water had decreased, and that the holes were choking. He expressed an intention of going down and boring another hole to the westward on the following day. Witness, proceeding, said he generally examined the mine underground weekly. Matters of detail were left to the deceased. When dams and "side-ties" became necessary, witness requested Mr Walters, the surveyor, to set out lines for the deceased to work upon. No danger whatever was anticipated by witness. They used long bore-holes, and let down every pool of water. - By the Foreman: The deceased had informed him that the wall was three feet six inches thick. He desired the deceased several days before the fatal occurrence not to make further holes. In pushing through the hole where the accident took place deceased did so on his own responsibility. He never imagined there was any danger in the work, and had never heard of anything from anyone to that effect. He desired his son to request the deceased not to bore the hole, deceased having so intimated his intention in the letter to him on the Friday. He knew the deceased was desirous of his seeing the 40, where a good lode had been found, that day. - The Coroner said that the deceased, having been left in charge of the mine by the manager, was responsible for what occurred. - After a lengthy deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was Accidentally Killed whilst at work, in consequence of the breaking out of water from the old workings. - The Coroner and Jury expressed their sympathy with the widow.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - Death Through Typhoid At Plymouth. A Father's Neglect. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday held an Inquest at the Crown Inn, Cambridge-street, touching the death of ALBERT EDWARD WILLIAMS, aged 11 years, who died at No. 7 Claremont-court, Claremont-street, on Monday, from Typhoid fever. The Coroner addressed the Jury and assured them that as the child had died of an infectious disease the Coroner's Officer had used all sorts of disinfectants in the room where the body lay, and that therefore, the Jury, in viewing the body, need not fear for their own safety. He had received a note from Mr Jackson, surgeon, who stated that he could not give a certificate, as the child had died without medical attendance, and although the cause was undoubtedly typhoid, he thought there were circumstances which ought to be inquired into. - The Jury having viewed the body, ELIZABETH MARY ALLEN, the wife of a sailor and sister of the deceased, stated that on Sunday afternoon week the deceased became very unwell and had to go to bed. The next morning he appeared better, but did not get up as he complained very much of a pain in his head. She gave him senna tea and castor oil. He did not appear to get any better during the next few days. On Thursday afternoon witness saw Dr Jackson visit an old woman who lived opposite, and she then asked him to come in and see her brother. He did so, and said that he would probably have the fever, as there were the incipient signs apparent. He also told witness to communicate with him in a few days if the deceased did not get any better. From Thursday to Monday morning deceased got gradually worse, and then a great change took place. Witness on the latter day went to see Dr Jackson at his house, but could not see him until ten o'clock. She told him that her brother was very ill, and he said that he would call and see him. Deceased died about 20 minutes to 5 o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, shortly before Dr Jackson - who had not had the case represented to him as urgent - called. - Witness's father was a labourer, and was home mornings and evenings, as well at dinner time. Witness frequently represented to him the urgency of her brother's case, and endeavoured to impress upon him the necessity of calling in a doctor, but he would not consent, and witness was afraid to call in a medical man without sanction. Witness now had a sister in the Infectious Diseases Hospital, where her mother, who never came home, was employed as nurse - suffering from typhoid fever. She did not understand from Dr Jackson that it was typhoid fever that she had to fear. Her father slept in the same room as the deceased, but could not, or would not, believe that he was very ill. - Mrs Mary A. E. Chapman, who lives at No. 14 Claremont-street, said that she knew of the deceased's illness, and visited the house daily to see him. She told the father he ought to have a doctor, but he would never say anything. Witness could see that the deceased was getting worse, but could not get the father to believe that it was so. - George Jackson, F.R.C.S., gave evidence corroborative of what the deceased's sister had stated. On Monday morning he saw the sister and told her that as her brother was worse he would call and see him during the day. He did not thin k the case urgent. He concluded that fever had simply developed itself somewhat, and apprehended no immediate danger. When he arrived in the afternoon the boy was dead. The sanitary arrangement of Claremont-court were extremely bad. There was an insufficient water supply, insufficient closet accommodation, and witness suspected that the drains were extremely defective. He had spoken to Mr Greenway, the Plymouth medical officer of health, about the state of affairs there but was given to understand that nothing could be done. Witness had frequently attended cases of typhoid fever in that court; and when he said to deceased's sister that "he would probably have the fever," he thought she would understand what fever he meant, especially as another member of the family was there suffering from typhoid. The deceased should certainly have been under medical care. JOHN WILLIAMS, ,father of the deceased, was next called. He was cautioned by the Coroner, and asked if he desired to be sworn. He replied that "he was not feeling very well," but on being pressed for an answer said he had no objection to being sworn. Under oath he told his story in a very hesitating and unsatisfactory manner. He said that he knew that the deceased was taken ill on Sunday week. He saw him frequently during the following week, but "did not think he was very bad." He admitted that he had been frequently asked by his daughter and Mrs Chapman to send for a doctor, but did not reply to them. After some prevarication he also acknowledged that a child of his, aged 2 years, died without medical care some time ago, and that the Jury who held an Inquest on the body censured him for his neglect in not providing for the child's safety. His daughter told him about Dr Jackson's visit on Thursday and what he had said, but witness "said nothing." - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought there had been great neglect on the part of the father. From apathy or unconcern, he appeared to have made no effort to save the child from death, although he must have known that nothing was more probable than death under the circumstances. If the Jury thought that the father was criminally at fault, he would at once make out the papers for committing him to take his trial on a charge of manslaughter, but if they considered that the negligence arose from ignorance they could not do less than censure him. - The Court was then cleared. - On reassembling the Coroner, addressing himself to JOHN WILLIAMS, said that the Jury had returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but wished him to express their severest censure of his negligence, which had probably caused his child's death. If he had had the commonest feelings of a father, he would have found out what was the matter with his son and have procured medical assistance, but he seemed to have neglected the deceased's comfort and safety in every way, and no ordinary vote of censure would sufficiently express the Jury's disapprobation of his conduct. The Jury (of whom Mr William Ley was the Foreman) expressed a hope that the unsatisfactory sanitary condition of Claremont-court would be speedily remedied by the authorities, as at present it seemed a hotbed of fever

WINKLEIGH - At Winkleigh on Monday the sudden death of FANNY REEVE, single woman, 59 years of age, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry held by Mr R. Fulford. The deceased lived alone and on Mrs Bennett, a friend, visiting her on Friday morning, she found the door fastened and could get no answer from her. The door was burst open when MISS REEVE was found seated in her chair quite dead. She was seen alive by her niece, Ann Down, on the previous evening. According to her medical attendant the deceased had suffered from a weak heart and general debility; and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - Last night the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Harvest Home Hotel, touching the death of ALICE MAUD BEAVIL, aged 3 months. ELIZABETH BEAVIL, the mother having given evidence, Mr G. Jackson, M.R.C.S., said that, having made a post-mortem examination, he attributed death to convulsions caused probably by dentition. The Jury considered that death was in no way connected with vaccination, which had been performed a few days previously, and returned a verdict Died from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 January 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Devonport. The Driving Of Milk Carts. - Mr Vaughan held an Inquest at the Two Trees Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, last night, touching the death of JOHN MORCOMBE, coachbuilder, of 28 Marlborough-street, Devonport, who died from the effects of being knocked down by a milk cart on Saturday afternoon. - Elizabeth Welch, wife of a labourer, deposed to seeing a milk cart being driven up Fore-street very rapidly, and soon after she heard someone scream. She then saw deceased taken from under the wheels of the cart. - CHARLES E. MORCOMBE, son of the deceased, said his father was 77 years of age. After the accident he was taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, from which institution witness took him home, as he was not asked to allow him to remain. Deceased was uneasy on Saturday evening and Sunday, and continually removed the bandages from his head. On Monday Mr Harrison, surgeon, was called to see him and he attended on him up to the time of his death. Deceased was in good health and possessed of good bearing up to the time of his death. - Mr R. E. Couch, ironmonger, of Fore-street, said he was standing at his door on Saturday afternoon, when he saw a milk cart being driven up the street at a dangerous rate. He thought the horse was going ten miles an hour. He saw the deceased struck by the horse and thrown under the wheel of the cart. Witness had complained to Superintendent Lyna, after the accident, of the furious way in which milk carts were driven through the town. - In answer to the Coroner witness said the driver of this particular cart was not going at a greater rate than milk carts were generally driven. The driver had the horse well under control. - William Smith, 16 years of age, driver of the cart, having been cautioned by the Coroner, said he lived at 29 St. Paul-street, Stonehouse, and was an errand boy in the employ of the Plymouth Dairy Company. Before entering their employment he had had little experience as a driver. Just prior to the accident he was driving at the rate of six miles an hour. He first saw deceased going across Fore-street in the direction of Marlborough-street. When about five yards off the deceased he tried to pull up but was unable to do so. He called out to deceased and he looked round but did not move out of the way and was consequently knocked down. He did his best to pull up his horse but was unable to do so before the accident happened. He had, however, slackened speed. - Charles Ravett, builder's apprentice deposed to hearing Smith shouting to deceased to get out of the way and also to seeing him trying to pull up his horse. - Mr Cant, house-surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, said deceased was brought to that Institution on Saturday. He had a bruise in the left shin, and a graze on the forehead, but no other wounds. He seemed to have had a severe nervous shock, and was so feeble and old that witness said to his son he ought not to be about the streets alone. Mr James Harrison, surgeon, stated that he was called to deceased on Monday. he had a severe contusion over the left eye, and was very feeble. On Wednesday deceased became unconscious and on Thursday he died. The wound was not sufficient of itself to cause death. Shock to the system was the primary cause of death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and wished to severely condemn the employers of the boy for sending so young and inexperienced a lad to drive a cart of this kind. They also asked the Coroner to caution the boy - which Mr Vaughan did.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 22 January 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Found Drowned At Devonport. - The Saltash Coroner, Mr W. Hawke, held an Inquest at the Richmond Walk Inn, Richmond Walk, Devonport, on Saturday, on the body of ELIZABETH WATERFIELD, single woman, aged 57. Deceased had been engaged as head nursemaid to Mrs Crosier, at Mannamead for the past eight years. She had recently been depressed in spirits through the loss of her mother, but she had never wanted food nor money. The family with whom she was engaged had gone away to stay, and deceased had been granted a fortnight's holiday. She had a niece living at Richmond Walk, with whom she had arranged to stay. She drove up to her niece's house on Friday morning in a cab, left a box or two with her, and promised to return on the following day. She was strongly urged to remain, but pleaded that she wanted to spend the remainder of that day and night with another friend in Plymouth. She did not complain of illness at that time, nor did she appear to be more than usually low-spirited. Later on in the day deceased visited her sister, who lived at Morice Town, when she appeared perfectly rational, and made no complaints whatever. She left her sister's at half-past eight, and it is surmised that she must have then proceeded to Richmond Walk, as her body was found about half-past seven on Saturday morning by a man named John Burns, in the employ of Messrs. Fox and Elliott, timber merchants. The police were immediately communicated with and P.C. Irish had the body removed on a stretcher to the inn where the Inquest was held. The constable examined the body closely, but was unable to trace any marks of violence on it. An Open Verdict was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - A shockingly sudden death occurred on Saturday at Barnstaple. Mr Dalling, aged 58, a hairdresser of the town, was walking up through Boutport-street about ten o'clock in the morning and wished Mr Lake, who was at his shop door, good morning. The latter replied, and was about to go into his shop, when he heard something fall on the pavement. On looking round he saw MR PARKIN lying on his face and hands. He went over and raised deceased, who was heard to exclaim "Oh my!" twice. He was conveyed to his house near by, but was then found to be dead. Dr Fernie stated at the Inquest on Saturday afternoon that from conversation he had had with the widow he believed deceased had died from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Wellington Hotel, Plymouth, by the Borough Coroner, as to the death of ERNEST JOHN TAVENOR, 14 months old, who died suddenly on Sunday evening. EMILY TAVENOR, the mother was preparing to put deceased into his cradle, when he was seized with convulsions and died in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest yesterday at the First and Last Inn respecting the death of FRANCIS HOLE CARRINGTON, aged 60, of 4 Charles-place, Plymouth. - Octavias Seevan, a widow, residing in the same house and brother of the deceased, deposed that he had complained of late of pains in his chest. Yesterday morning he took his breakfast as usual and about nine o'clock went into the yard. On his returning he said, "Rub my chest - pain." With assistance he managed to reach the sofa, where he immediately expired. Deceased had been at times very intemperate, but not for the last few months. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 23 January 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquests were yesterday held at Devonport by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner, on the bodies of BEATRICE RIDDOLLS, infant daughter of WILLIAM RIDDOLLS, labourer, 11 Ker-street, and of WILLIAM COWEN, aged three weeks. In both cases the mothers retired to bed on Sunday night, and on waking the following morning found the children dead. Medical evidence showed that death resulted from Suffocation; and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect in each case.

EXETER - Death From Swallowing A Marble. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter, yesterday, on the body of a little girl, named AMELIA SLACK, daughter of a hawker, living in Preston-street, whose death occurred on Saturday afternoon. It appeared that the unfortunate child had been playing with a marble, and she was sent on an errand by her parents, to whom she returned in a choking condition. She died on her way to the Hospital, where the marble was extracted from her throat. The cause of death was Suffocation, and the Jury gave a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH - The Inquest on the body of MARTIN WEST, who expired suddenly at Dartmouth on Sunday, was held yesterday, when a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Western Morning News Wednesday 24 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Tandem Inn, Octagon-street, Plymouth, relative to the death of WILLIAM COOMBES, aged 9 months, whose parents live at 11 Flora-street. Mr Scoffern was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Deceased had been a healthy child from birth and was not under any medical care. On Sunday night his mother took him to bed as usual. About 10 o'clock the following morning deceased cried, and on her proceeding to attend to him she noticed his face turn a purple colour. She called a neighbour and Mr Pearse, surgeon, was sent for. The child was dead before he arrived. Dr Bampton made a post-mortem examination and gave it as his opinion that deceased died from convulsions. Verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 24 January 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Brunel Hotel, Plymouth, last evening, on the body of JAMES HARRIS, who was found dead in bed at the hotel, on Monday morning. The deceased it seems, left England about twenty-nine years ago for California and had spent 20 years in New Zealand. He was a native of Netherex, near Exeter, and left his home in the hope of making money. About three months ago he came back in search of a favourite sister, who, however, had died three months before his arrival. On learning this he left Exeter for Newton, and nothing was heard of him up to the time of his death. In his portmanteau was found a little canvas bag, containing £276 in gold. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Later on the Coroner held an Inquest at the Penrose Inn, touching the death of FLORENCE MARY LUSCOMBE, aged two years, who died from burns, at her home, 3 Tracey-street, on Saturday last. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 January 1883 EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquiry at Exeter yesterday afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of NORBOLT HATCHER, an engine driver on the Great Western Railway, whose shocking end was reported yesterday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 26 January 1883 BIDEFORD - Death From Privation At Bideford. - An Inquest was held at the Bideford Union Workhouse on Wednesday evening, on the body of the infant child of MARGARET WILLIAMS, a vagrant. The child was only three and a half months old, was delicate, had not been carefully nurtured, and had been exposed to all weather. By the neglect of the mother, who was addicted to drink, it had died from privation. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

PLYMOUTH - Alleged Unnecessary Inquest At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Brunswick Hotel, last evening, on the body of SIDNEY JAMES, aged one year and seven months. - AMELIA JAMES, 12 Lambhay-hill, the mother, said the child had been suffering from whooping cough for ten months. On Tuesday afternoon it commenced crying, and gave a sudden cough. Witness took it up in her arms, where it lay in a rigid position, looking very white. She called a neighbour, who immediately came to her assistance. she then sent her son for a doctor, and when he arrived the child was dead. The medical man, seeing that death had resulted from convulsion, wrote to the district Registrar, saying that he thought an Inquest quite unnecessary under the circumstances. The doctor's action was strongly condemned by both the Coroner and the Jury. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 January 1883 MARHAMCHURCH - Mr G. G. White, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Marhamchurch yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of SIMON WEBBER LANE, of Pyworthy, who died suddenly at Marhamchurch on Saturday. Deceased, who enjoyed good health until the past week, was 91 years of age. At 2 a.m. on the day of his decease he insisted upon being dressed to go out. He was induced to lie down again in his clothes, and when next seen he was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Octagon Spirit Vaults last evening touching the death of WILLIAM BUCKLEY, aged 9 months, who died yesterday morning. - JANE BUCKLEY, the mother, who resides at 62 King-street, said that yesterday morning she noticed that the child was unusually quiet, and on taking it up she saw that it had convulsions. Medical assistance was at once sent for, but Mr Miller arrived too late to be of any service to the child. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 2 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), last evening held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, on the body of a married woman named LOUISA BUNKER, aged about 30, wife of a ropemaker, named JOSEPH BUNKER, 1 Queen Anne's-place. MRS BUNKER suffered from nerve disease, and on Monday 22nd inst., Elizabeth Townsend, a neighbour, hearing shrieks, rushed into deceased's room, and found her stretched on the floor near the fire-place, the room being filled with smoke. MRS BUNKER said that the sleeve of her pompadour dress caught fire, whilst she was engaged in pouring out a cup of tea, and she could not extinguish the flames. Later on the poor woman was taken to the South Devon Hospital, where she died yesterday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 3 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - At the Olive Branch Inn, Plymouth, yesterday, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest on the body of GEORGE HENRY MILFORD, aged seven months, who died suddenly that morning at 1 Archer-place. The mother gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 5 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Fatality On Board A Norwegian Barque. - On Saturday evening Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Sailors' Home, Plymouth, touching the death of ANDERS FREDERICHEEN, seaman of the Norwegian barque Eleida, now lying in Plymouth harbour. Evidence was given by the captain, George Osborne, who said that the barque was bound from Baltimore to Plymouth for orders, and whilst coming up the Channel between the Lizard and the Eddystone Lighthouse on the evening of Thursday last, the deceased being at the time aloft on the yard port arm, there was a cry of "Man overboard." The captain and crew looked around the vessel, but could discover no one and shortly the deceased was found, in an apparently lifeless condition, lying on the top of the forecastle. He was taken into the forecastle, and it was seen that he still breathed. Efforts were made to save his life, but he died the same night about 11 o'clock. The captain supposed that the deceased had been struck by a flying block. He said the deceased bore an excellent character. His mother was a widow and he was her only son. She kept a small farm at San Fjord, in Norway. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned after the Coroner's usual summing up.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 February 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Sportsman's Arms, Keyham-road, Morice Town, touching the death of ELLEN BURLACE, aged 30, wife of WILLIAM BURLACE, a fitter in Keyham Yard. On Saturday morning the husband left her in her usual health, but was shortly afterwards fetched from his work, as deceased had been taken ill. Before he arrived at home she was dead. Several years ago deceased suffered from a severe attack of rheumatic fever. Dr G. Rolston, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated he found that a clot of blood had grown on her heart and during her confinement on Saturday morning, the clot shifting to a fatal position, stopped the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMPTON ST MARY - Death Through Exposure At Plympton. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest at the Plympton Workhouse on Saturday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of a man who was admitted into the house on Wednesday night. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was JOHN STAMP, aged 45, recently an inmate of the Exeter Workhouse. He had served twelve years in the Royal Artillery, from which he was discharged in 1871. For the last eight years he had bee now and then an inmate of the Exeter Workhouse, but he had been in the habit of leaving it about three times a year and walking to Plymouth to visit his brothers, one of whom is a publican. Deceased had one brother in Exeter, and three in Plymouth, all of whom seem to have treated him kindly. They could not, however, prevent him walking to Plymouth from Exeter, although they invariably sent him back by train when he had concluded his visit, which usually covered a month. On Monday last he left Exeter and nothing more was known of him until he was seen at Lee Mill Bridge at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday by a man named Nathaniel Yabsley, lying in the hedge. Yabsley, thinking he might be ill, offered to help him to a farm which was close by, but deceased thanked him and refused. He afterwards asked Yabsley to help him a few yards along the road to a green spot and this was done. As the deceased refused further offers of assistance Yabsley left him. At about 6.30 Mr William Phillips, builder and mason of Lee Mill Bridge, was passing along the road, when he saw deceased lying in the hedge a little further along the road. He went to him and found him quite insensible. A horse and cart was procured and deceased was conveyed to Lee Mill. As the landlord at the inn there seemed unwilling to admit him, Phillips took deceased, who all the time lay insensible in the bottom of the vehicle, to the constable at Ivybridge. The latter said that he could not take the man in, and went to Mr Sherwill, a guardian of the parish, who advised that the deceased should be taken to the Plympton Workhouse. At that institution everything possible was done to resuscitate him, but, notwithstanding all efforts, he expired at about five minutes past twelve. - Dr Richard Ellery, parish doctor of Plympton St Mary Union, said that he was called and saw deceased at about eleven p.m. on Wednesday. He was "stone cold," and his clothes were saturated with mud and water. Witness had no doubt that deceased had died from the effects of a fit and exposure. The Jury, of whom Mr Williams was Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that "Deceased died from a Fit accelerated by Exposure" and appended a rider expressing disapproval of the conduct of P.C. Wheaton and a hope that such a duty to humanity would not again be neglected by him. The Jury also expressed satisfaction at the manner in which Mr Phillips, the master of the workhouse and others had acted.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 7 February 1883 BRIXHAM - The Inquest on the body of the little girl, EDNA PITMAN, who was drowned in the leat at First-lane, near New-road, Brixham, was held at the Bolton Hotel yesterday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury were of opinion that iron gratings should be placed at First-lane, at Second-lane and at Pollard's-hill leat.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 February 1883 NORTH TAWTON - A Coroner's Jury at Northtawton on Tuesday, Inquiring into the sudden death of WALTER H. PERKINS, aged one year and nine months, desired, as no medical man had seen the child, that a post-mortem examination should be made. This was conducted, and having heard further evidence yesterday, a verdict of "Death from Convulsions" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 February 1883 TOTNES - An Inquest was held at the Totnes Workhouse by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of ROGER WILLIAMS, an inmate aged 88 years, formerly of Halwell, who died on the previous day from injuries received through falling down a flight of stairs in the eastern ward. It appeared that he had been subject to giddiness, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 February 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at the Newton Cottage Hospital last evening, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, touching the death of JOSIAH MURRIN MOORE, a carpenter, aged 40 years, who died the same morning from the effects of a fall whilst repairing some shutes, through the breaking of a ladder. The Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," gave their fees to the Hospital.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 13 February 1883 HIGHWEEK - An Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at the Seven Stars Inn, Newton Bushel, on Saturday evening on the body of an infant belonging to a labourer, named HENRY SKINNER. The evidence went to show that the child was suffocated through overlaying and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - Singular Suicide At Plymouth. - Yesterday morning, a suicide of a sad nature, occurred at Plymouth. ROBERT SHEPHERD JEWELL, aged 49, a wheelwright by trade, had been disabled by paralysis from following his occupation for the last six or eight years. During the greater part of that time he was bedridden, and lived with his mother at No. 6 Frankfort-square, Russell-street. In his helpless condition he was unable to do anything for himself, and had even to be lifted in and out of bed; indeed, the only movement of which he was capable was slight action with the arms. For sometime past he had been very depressed, and had often said that he knew he should never recover. On Monday afternoon he was visited by his nephew, a boy named Francis Wilcocks, whom he asked to hand him a drawer from a table in order that he might give him a few things. This the boy did, and the deceased gave him several trifling articles. Whilst rummaging the drawer the deceased must have taken out a razor - although the boy did not notice him do this - and secreted it. Yesterday morning his mother on rising at about 8.45, asked him what sort of a night he had passed, and, although he did not speak, she understood from him that he had had a bad night. A few minutes afterwards she went downstairs to fill the kettle, but, hearing an unusual noise, ran back to her son's room, fearing that he was sick. On entering she saw the deceased lying in the bed with a razor in his hand, and his neck severely gashed, whilst the bedclothes and night things were saturated with blood. Even as she entered the room deceased made an effort and again drew the razor across his throat, and then his hand fell. His mother seized the razor and called for assistance. Her daughter (Mrs Willcocks) came, and Mr Eyeley, surgeon, who was sent for, arrived promptly; and although the latter sewed up the deceased's throat, and did all in his power to restore him, the invalid died in about half an hour afterwards. The mother had not for a moment suspected that the deceased had any intention of committing suicide. He had been in receipt of 3s. per week from the parish for about five years. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall in the afternoon by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian). Mr F. J. Eyeley stated that he was the medical officer for the north of the Plymouth Union district, and had been in attendance at intervals upon the deceased for the past three years. The deceased was completely paralysed and the paralysis had affected his nerves, so as to render him at times unaccountable for his actions. He had no doubt that the rash act was committed whilst the deceased was suffering from insanity. The Jury of whom Mr Lewis J. Sydenham, was the Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that the "Deceased committed Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 February 1883 EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST JACKMAN, aged 24, a shunter employed by the South Western Railway Company, who lost his life while coupling some trucks in the Queen-street Station goods yard on the previous evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was arrived at.

EXETER - The Singular Death On The Railway Near Exeter. - Yesterday afternoon Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Acland Arms, Exeter, on the body of JOHN FRY, aged 34, a native of Brancote, but late of Umberleigh, whose mangled remains were found on Wednesday evening on the London and South Western Railway, some distance from Queen-street Station. Deceased was a licensed Scripture-read, and was sometimes strange in his behaviour, through a spinal complaint and an excess of study. It is conjectured from the evidence that he wandered on the railway and was knocked down by a passing train. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 20 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Plymouth Solicitor. - A very painful sensation was created yesterday morning in Plymouth by the report that MR HAMILTON WHITEFORD, solicitor, of the firm of Messrs. Whiteford and Bennett, of Courtenay-street, Plymouth, had met with his death by accident, and the feeling became intensified when the correctness of the report was established. For the past two years MR WHITEFORD, who is son of MR CL WHITEFORD, late Town Clerk of Plymouth, whom he has predeceased, and who resided at Tothill House, Laira, had been in indifferent health, but this indisposition only assumed a serious phase some six or nine months ago, and since that time he has been attended by two or three medical gentlemen. From some cause or other, which is known to but few, MR WHITEFORD grew depressed in mind, and of late this mental trouble had been very noticeable. It may be remarked that he had purchased of late a good many medical works from a local book-seller. Still, the deceased gentleman continued to attend to his professional duties, and even on Saturday was at work at the offices in Courtenay-street. On Sunday he attended his church as usual - the Church of St. John, Sutton-on-Plym, the vicar of which is the Rev. Charles Coombe - and there he received communion. During the day he was cheerful for the most part, and he retired to bed in his usual state. Yesterday morning MR WHITEFORD rose about the ordinary time, and, according to wont, he conducted family prayers. Very frequently he strolled in the garden after this observance, and yesterday morning he followed the common custom. When he had been absent some time, it was observed that he had not yet partaken of breakfast, and a member of the household went into the garden for the purpose of calling him in. This was about eight o'clock. The body of the deceased gentleman was then for the first time discovered lying motionless, and it was found on examination that MR WHITEFORD had come to his death by the discharge of a pistol which lay near him. On the news of the shocking occurrence reaching the town, the deepest regret was expressed on all hands, and numerous calls were made at the offices by friends anxious to receive denial of the report, or, if true, to learn the melancholy circumstances. - MR WHITEFORD had passed middle age. Both his respected father - MR C. WHITEFORD - and the father of his partner - Mr Bennett - had for many years carried on the profession of solicitors. They indeed established the connection which the late gentleman and Mr E. G. Bennett have since 1881 continued by themselves, for in that year both the elder principals retired from the firm. MR HAMILTON WHITEFORD and the remaining partner entered their fathers' firm about twenty-five years ago, being received at the same time. The deceased gentleman married Miss Florence Aylwing, daughter of Mr Aylwing, of Plympton, and the six bereaved members of their family are all of tender years. MR WHITEFORD possessed all those qualities which ensure for a man respect and affection from those amongst whom he moves. He was of genial disposition, warm-hearted, benevolent, ready at all times to do a good turn for anyone. No charitable movement in whose behalf his influence and practical aid were asked failed to count him among its supporters. he dispensed with a liberal hand both publicly and privately - privately more than in a public manner - from the substance he had acquired. MR WHITEFORD frequently held honorary positions in connection with philanthropic and social movements, and in this way he rendered good service which will long be remembered. In his professional capacity he was clerk to the Compton Gifford Local Board and clerk to the Commissioners of Taxes at Plymouth, the former of which positions he received on the establishment of the Board, and the latter on the retirement of his father many years ago. He was the promoter and the mainstay of the Plymouth Mendacity Society - for which he acted as hon. secretary - an institution which has done great good in directing charity into proper channels and in detecting and preventing fraud. He was one of the promoters of the fund for the purchase of a borough organ for Plymouth, and of that fund was one of the two treasurers. In politics MR WHITEFORD was a warm Conservative, but he worked behind the scenes as a mover and a prompter rather than took a prominent place as an actor and a leader. He was not a speaker, for his utterance was to some extent defective. But what he lacked in this respect was made up by the gift of an unusually active mind. during the last twenty years he frequently contributed to the Plymouth papers political letters of ability, vigorous in style and trenchant in expression. The initials "H.W." are very familiar to readers of the Western Daily Mercury. By the removal of MR WHITEFORD a regrettable breach has been caused in the professional circle of which he formed a part, while the community at large has lost a useful and honourable member. At five o'clock Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending MR WHITEFORD'S death at Tothill House, Tothill-lane. Mr John Smith was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MRS FLORENCE WHITEFORD said: My husband was forty-eight last birthday. He had been unwell for the last eighteen months and had been under medical care until within the past few weeks. He had not been depressed in mind lately, though he was some time ago. It has been the practice of my husband to stroll round the garden before breakfast during the last few days. One of the servants told me he was strolling around the garden this morning about eight o'clock, and something the children told me induced me to go to "the drive." I there saw something lying on the pathway, and my first impression was that my husband had fainted. I hastened to him, and spoke to him, but got no reply. I noticed a wound in his forehead and saw a pistol lying by his left side. I went to the gardener, and obtained other assistance, feeling sure that there had been some accident. Medical aid was sent for, and I returned, being present when Mr. Greenway, surgeon, came. We did everything we could to the deceased, but without avail. My husband was not very conversant with firearms, and was not left-handed. I heard him say he purchased a pistol some short time ago, and that it made a loud report. He said nothing more, except that he should like to practice shooting in an outhouse. He did not say anything further on the subject. I think my answer was, when he referred to practice firing, that my son would like to practice with him. My husband assented and put the pistol away. He had suffered very much of late, but during the last few days he had been considerably better, so much so that the whole household had observed the change. Before he went out this morning my husband had been reading one of the Psalms - a very cheerful Psalm it seemed to me. He inquired after one of the children, and seemed pleased to know the child was so much better. My husband took a bath, which he never did except when he was sufficiently strong. He came into the bedroom for a little hot water I used for dressing purposes. He remarked that it was a very cold morning, and that the thermometer was about 40 degrees. We agreed that it was cold and bright - weather he particularly liked. This was the last remark he made. I have not found any letter taking leave of me, or anything of the kind. MR WHITEFORD went to church yesterday and made an appointment on his way home to see a lady here at five o'clock today. In case the day was wet the lady was to have come tomorrow. - By the Jury: My husband always used to have two pistols. I think he had two besides the one produced. One is a revolver and the other a saloon pistol. I do not know whether it was his practice to keep these pistols loaded. He was in the habit of looking on while his sons practiced firing during the holidays. They fired at bottles on the wall. MR WHITEFORD used to practise with them, as he never considered it safe for them to be alone. It was his custom to read a portion of the Scriptures every morning. - John Pengelly: I am a gardener at Tothill, and was asked to go "the drive" shortly after eight o'clock this morning. I found MR HAMILTON WHITEFORD lying there. He appeared to be dead. I saw the pistol (produced) lying by his side, but cannot say which side it was. I took it up in a hurry and put it into my pocket. I never saw the pistol before. MR WHITEFORD'S cap was about two feet off. He was lying upon his back. MRS WHITEFORD shortly afterwards came, and I assisted to take the body into the house. I had not seen MR WHITEFORD before this morning. My residence is about forty yards from the spot, but I heard no report of firearms. I used to see MR WHITEFORD and his sons last summer practise firing at a target, in a different part of the grounds. I cannot say I have seen them practise within the past three months, and never in "the drive." I have examined "the drive" about thirty yards higher up, and found an empty cartridge (produced). It fits the pistol. There is a bullet marked on a stone close by. It is a recent mark. I passed the same spot on Saturday, but did not notice anything of the kind then. If the cartridge had been there then I should have noticed it. - The Coroner: I think it is my duty to ask you whether MR WHITEFORD has said anything strange to you lately? No sir. - The Coroner: Not that he was depressed or anything? No. - By the Jury: The stone I referred to is about two feet above the ground. - Wilmot Joyce, nurse at Tothill House, said: I did not see MR WHITEFORD before going out of doors this morning. I saw him yesterday afternoon, when he seemed very cheerful. He said, "It is a beautiful afternoon, Wilmot." He has been very cheerful these last few days. I was called up "the drive" this morning, and saw the deceased lying on the pathway. I recollect the children practising firing in the flower-garden, but I cannot remember whether their father ever fired. - Mr Henry Greenway, M.R.C.S., said: I was sent for somewhere about half-past eight this morning by MR WHITEFORD'S son. I was conducted to the spot where the body lay, near a large tree, and about 140 paces from the house. I found several persons round the deceased. They had a basin of water, and were washing his face and hands. I examined the body, but could feel no pulse, no movement of the heart, and the pupils of the eyes were insensible to light. I concluded he was dead. I had the body removed. Before it was removed I noticed a wound in the forehead, having the appearance of a gunshot wound. I have more carefully examined the body since. The wound itself is lacerated and star-shaped. In the very centre of the forehead I perceived an orifice in the bone, almost as if it had been punched out, below the level of the flesh. It had the appearance of having been caused by a bullet. The nature of the wound and the sharply defined orifice in the bone led me to conclude that the explosion must have taken place either immediately on the forehead, or only a few inches from it. I placed my hand at the back of the head, and found a projection underneath the scalp; I was not quite certain whether it was the bone itself or the missile. I then proceeded to ascertain what the projection was. On making a short incision, I was enabled, by the aid of the forceps, to extract the bullet produced. It corresponded to the opening in the bone in the centre of the forehead. The line of traverse was almost as straight as could be imagined, but the exit at the back was rather below the level of the entrance. It is possible, but I should not have expected the bullet to have taken the line it did, if it had been intentionally fired. I should have expected the ball to have taken a slightly divergent line. If the wound was purposely self-inflicted, I should imagine the ball would have gone out slightly on the left centre to a point behind. I should not have expected the all to have taken the line it did, in the case of a man shooting himself. - The Coroner: Suppose the pistol went off by accident, must the bullet of necessity have gone in a straight line? - If the wound were inflicted by accident, the pistol might have been in a position to have caused the bullet to proceed in a straight line. - The Coroner: Do you believe that, because the wound was in a straight line, it must have been by accident? - I will not say "must". It is what I should expect under certain conditions. I should judge it either to be an accident, or murder. I myself saw MR WHITEFORD a fortnight ago, and noticed him to be walking rather lame, and in answer to my enquiries he said his leg was a little stiff. - A Juror: Supposing the deceased gentleman was out for the purpose of practising with the pistol, it is not possible that in raising his arm to fire at an object with the swing of the body peculiar to him, that the action of the body might have exploded it accidentally? - I should not expect it, certainly. But the mode in which I can imagine an accident occurring would be by the deceased stumbling and falling head-foremost on the muzzle of the revolver in his hand, and resting against the ground. - The Coroner: Was his dress dirty? - Yes. - The Coroner: In what parts? - Well, about the chest, knees and arms. - The Foreman: I should like to ask whether it is not a more probable hypothesis to consider that the deceased stooping over the pistol to examine it, it then exploded. I would like to know whether, this being so, the ball would have taken the track it did? - To support that view, I think the deceased ought to have been in a sitting and stooping posture. - Mr William John Edwards sated: I am a gunsmith in partnership with my father, and carry on business in George-street. I knew the deceased very well indeed. He came to our shop on 7th February and purchased a Belgian revolver. It is known as the "Bull Dog" revolver. He said to me, "I want to try this pistol at a mark," adding that he would take with him two or three cartridges. I suggested that he should take five, as that number would fill each chamber. He replied, "Yes, that will do capitally." - The Coroner: Was the explosive material gunpowder or something else? - Gunpowder. I have looked carefully at the cartridge produced. It has been recently fired. The metal base is similar to those sold MR WHITEFORD. The metal of a cartridge would turn quite green in a day or two, if exposed. - MR CHARLES C. WHITEFORD: The deceased was my son. For the last twelve or fifteen months he has suffered considerably - his health has been considerably impaired. That has produced great fluctuation in his spirits. At times he has been depressed, while at others he has been remarkably lively and cheerful, taking a remarkable interest in a variety of pursuits. I think debility induced a languor and his walk was sensibly affected, so that a fall would not be an unexpected thing with him. I remarked it particularly on Saturday last, when he dragged one leg after the other. He was exceedingly cheerful on that day. That was the last time I saw him alive. He was making business arrangements with me for the current week. - The Coroner then summed up, remarking that he did not think the Jury need entertain for a moment the theory of murder. Then , if it were not murder, deceased's life must have been intentionally or accidentally taken away. No letters or papers had been found to support the theory of suicide, nor did a word escape deceased that would lead one to believe for a moment that he intended to commit such an act. Then comes the question, if it were not intentional, it must have been accidental, and the Jury could say that the deceased gentleman came by his death by a pistol wound, but how that wound was inflicted there was not sufficient evidence to show. - After a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that while deceased was practising with a pistol, the latter, by accident, suddenly exploded, inflicting such injuries as to cause his death. - Prior to the Jury considering their verdict, the Foreman said, at the expressed desire of the Jury, he offered their deep condolence to the bereaved wife and father of the deceased gentleman, as representatives of a much respected family, in an hour of such terrible calamity. - The Coroner desired most cordially to express his concurrence and to add how much it had pained him that circumstances should have rendered it necessary for the presence of MR and MRS WHITEFORD at that Inquest. - MR WHITEFORD remarked that he was very thankful for so sincere an expression of sympathy from the Coroner and Jury towards himself and his daughter. He need not say how deeply anxious he was that his son should stand right in the estimation of his fellow townsmen. He did not believe deceased had ever made an enemy during the whole course of his life. He again thanked them all very cordially and kindly for their expression.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 February 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest last night at the Sportsman's Arms, Keyham, respecting the death of OCTAVIUS CURTIS, 9 months old, the infant child of a fitter in Keyham Dockyard, who died suddenly on Monday. The evidence of Dr John Rolston shewed that death resulted from convulsions brought on by teething, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 22 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - Sad Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, on the body of MARY THOMAS, widow, residing at 10 Nicholl's Court. MRS THOMAS, who was in receipt of 3s. a week from the parish, was found lying dead on the floor of her room. The table, a lamp, and a couple of books were overturned. P.C. Warne stated that he found the old lady lying lifeless on the floor with her left arm stretched out under the grate. She was fully dressed and had on her spectacles. Her jacket was burnt right across from the left side to the right, and the left side of her face was also burnt to the bone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 24 February 1883 PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall on the body of SARAH ANN SKEDGELL, 27, who succumbed to injuries sustained by being burned whilst in the service of the Rev. W. Fraser, at St. Stephens-by-Saltash. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 February 1883 ILFRACOMBE - The Singular Death Near Ilfracombe. - At Slade, near Ilfracombe, yesterday, Mr J. H. Toller, Coroner, held an Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS SYMONS, as briefly reported yesterday. Mr George Heddon was Foreman of the Jury. - John Bale, a neighbour of the deceased, gave evidence as to the finding of the body lying on the face and hands in a mud pit. As he could not alone remove the deceased he ran for assistance and with John Lovering pulled out the deceased, who was quite dead. There were seven or eight inches of mud, and the deceased must have been very quickly suffocated. It was stated by P.C. Shepherd that he had made inquiries at two or three public-houses at which deceased called on the day on which he met with his sad end, and it was denied that the man was under the influence of drink. - Mr F. Gardner, surgeon, Ilfracombe, said deceased had an attack of typhoid fever about five years ago, since which time he had been thrown from a horse, causing him to lose the sight of an eye, besides injuring his head. From the evidence of the witnesses he (Mr Gardner) should say deceased was seized with a fit of apoplexy, and fell into the mud pit. The fact of the man having been drinking might have been a predisposing cause of the accident. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died through falling into a mud pit, producing suffocation, he having been probably struck down in a fit of Apoplexy. The fees were handed over to the family.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held two Inquests at Plymouth last evening, both respecting sudden deaths. The first was held at Sleeman's Inn, Harwell-street, and was relative to the death of BESSIE LOUISA COBBLEDICK, aged 10 months, the daughter of SARAH JANE COBBLEDICK, of 19 Well-street. The mother stated that except for dentition the child had generally enjoyed good health. About six weeks ago the infant fell from its bed and as it seemed to be ailing it was taken to Mr Lewis, surgeon, who attended it, but since the occurrence the child had until Sunday been apparently well. For about three hours on that afternoon the deceased slept soundly, but when it awoke it refused food, and about nine o'clock it had a fit. A bath was given it, but almost directly afterwards it expired. Mr Lewis attributed death to convulsions brought on by dentition, and not at all to the fall that the child had some time ago. Verdict accordingly. The second Inquiry was held at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, and was into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES WINSTONE, aged 62, late porter at the Plymouth Free Library. SUSAN WINSTONE, daughter of the deceased, said that on Saturday afternoon about 4.30, her father was brought home in a cab, when he complained of pains in the chest. Some remedies were applied, but as he did not seem to benefit by them she went for Mr Lewis, surgeon, who promised to come in half an hour. She immediately returned and found her father had expired. Deceased had been ailing for some twelve months, and he had a similar attack about a fortnight since, but appeared to recover. Dr Eyeley said that deceased was one of his parochial patients, and he saw him last about ten days ago. He had been suffering from palpitation of the heart, which greatly affected his breathing, and he (Dr Eyeley) was not at all surprised at the suddenness of his death. This he attributed to Syncope, or failure of the heart's action. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 27 February 1883 EXETER - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday on the body of ROBERT SAMUEL GEORGE BROCK, a little boy, who was burnt to death on Friday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Gloster Arms, Gloster-street, last evening, on the body of ARCHIBALD WISE, the infant son of THOMAS WISE, shipwright in the Dockyard. The child was seized with convulsions and expired almost immediately. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 3 March 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - The Devonport Coroner, Mr J. H. Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Carlton Inn, last evening, on the body of JESSIE ELIZA JEWELL, aged seven weeks, who died suddenly that morning. MARY ANN JEWELL, the mother and Dr Row, junr., gave evidence, and the Jury, of whom Mr G. Willis, was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Singular Sudden Death Of A Domestic Servant At Plymouth. - A Coroner's Jury last evening assembled at the Plymouth Guildhall, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ELIZABETH RIPPIN, aged 18, a domestic servant, in the employ of Sergeant Welch, of the Ordnance Survey-office, in Princess-square, who died suddenly on Thursday afternoon. - From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased had been in Sergeant Welch's employ for upwards of four years. She had always been delicate, but had not appeared more unwell lately than at any other time. She was subject to a cough in the winter, but this did not affect her much. For a few days past her ankles had been rather swollen, but she was quite able to do her work. On Thursday morning she commenced her duties about ten o'clock, when she complained of a pain in her side, and after some persuasion from Mrs Welch went and laid down. Although on lying down she appeared much easier, particularly in her breathing, a change for the worse took place at one o'clock in the afternoon. The girl in the morning had a little brandy and milk, which appeared to do her good. She died about half-past four in the afternoon. On Wednesday she took her meals with her usual appetite, and had her breakfast on Thursday morning, but she did not eat any dinner. - Mr J. H. S. May, M.R.C.S., stated that about one o'clock on Thursday afternoon, on returning home, he found that he had been sent for by Mrs Welch, but could not go then. He was not aware of there being any urgency in the case, as he thought he was required to see Welch, who was one of his patients. He went to the house at about five o'clock, and found that the young woman was dead. He had made a post-mortem examination, and found the whole of the surface of the heart rough and inflamed; some portion of the inflammation was of several days' standing, and there must have been a rapid extension of the inflammation a few hours before death. There were symptoms of old-standing pleurisy, together with an indication of dropsy. He attributed death immediately to the inflamed condition of the heart. The Jury of whom Mr Henry Squires was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 5 March 1883 EXETER - Suicide By An Innkeeper At Exeter. - On Saturday morning MR FREDERICK BRODIE, of the Spirit Vaults, Fore-street, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. The deceased's affairs were in liquidation, and it is supposed that his failure in business had so affected his mind as to induce temporary insanity. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon. Evidence of identification was given by the brother of the deceased, MR WM. BRODIE, journalist, who stated that he had been very much depressed of late in consequence of the turn taken by his business affairs, but added that the estate shewed at least 15s. in the £. Deceased, the witness stated, was a temperate man. MISS MARIAN BRODIE, daughter of the deceased, spoke to the deceased as having been in a very low state for some weeks, and he had taken nothing that morning but a cup of coffee. - Thomas Rudd, the man who had been put in possession by Mr Southcott, the trustee, said the deceased would frequently sit down and cry, saying that he did not know what he should do for his wife and family. Witness saw him in the kitchen and told him he believed the trustee would be down in the course of the day: MR BRODIE'S reply was that he "did not care how it went now." Half an hour afterwards he heard screams and on going to a room upstairs found that the deceased had cut his throat with a razor. Dr Farrant was sent for, but before he arrived life was extinct. MR W. BRODIE said he believed deceased had received a letter from Mr Southcott, telling him to hold himself in readiness to give up the house and probably that was the "last straw". - After hearing further evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane." Much sympathy was expressed for the deceased's friends.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the New Town Inn, York-street, respecting the death of HARRIET GLIDDON BLACKELL, aged 42, who had died suddenly on the previous day at her residence, 5 York-place. - Elizabeth Greep said the deceased was in very good health until last Saturday, when she was ailing, but on Sunday she seemed better, though she still complained of pains about her limbs. At 9.30 yesterday she was taken worse, and became so alarmingly ill that some neighbours were called in. She, however, expired in a few minutes. Mrs Tonkin gave corroborative evidence and Mr George Jackson, surgeon, said that on making a post-mortem examination he found that deceased had been suffering from congestion of the lungs and disease of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER - The Fatal Fall From A Scaffold At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of JOHN RICHARD, a mason, who sustained fatal injuries on Saturday last by falling from some scaffolding on which he was at work. It was proved by the witnesses that deceased assisted in erecting the scaffolding in question, which was at a height of twenty-five feet from the ground, and that the workmen themselves selected the materials used from amongst a quantity which was at their disposal. The pudlock forming one of the supports was inserted in a hole in the wall, and it was believed that the swaying of the ladder communicating with the ground had had the effect of dislodging this. One of the Jurymen said it appeared to him that the pudlocks were composed of rotten, worn-out door-jambs, which might have been a hundred years old for all they could tell. In a very lengthened experience in the building trade he had never seen such used before. - It was elicited from one of the witnesses that the master of the men (Mr Yardley) did not at any time inspect the scaffolding. - The Coroner informed Mr Yardley, who was present, that he might make any statement he felt inclined to give, but, as it might be used against him on another occasion, he would advise him not to do so, and Mr Yardley accepted the advice. The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that it was open to them to return a verdict of manslaughter or one of accidental death, leaving the deceased's representatives to secure compensation under the provisions of the Employers' Liability Act. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they believed there was blame attributable, but it was not sufficient to amount to culpable negligence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 March 1883 PAIGNTON - Serious Charge Against A Woman At Paignton. - Yesterday Mr Sidney Hacker, District coroner held an Inquest at the Victoria Inn, Paignton, touching the death of an illegitimate female child of SARAH TOLLY, a single woman, aged about 30, daughter of RICHARD TOLLY, labourer, of Holloway-street, Barnes-hill, Paignton. Mr John Parnell was appointed Foreman of the Jury. The case was one of more than ordinary interest, inasmuch as the mother of the child not only denied for some time after her confinement that she had been delivered of a child, but also concealed the body of the infant in a box which she locked. Messrs. Eastley and Jarman, solicitors, Paignton, watched the proceedings on behalf of the woman TOLLY. - Ann Ellis, wife of Matthew Ellis, labourer, living at Paignton, stated that on Saturday last she was called to the assistance of SARAH TOLLY, who was very ill, but whose relatives did not know what was the matter with her. Witness went to the cottage of RICHARD TOLLY, labourer, and was shewn into a bedroom, where she saw SARAH TOLLY in bed. There were various stains and marks in the room, and witness said to TOLLY, "What's the matter here? What have you been doing?" On further examination witness discovered that TOLLY had been confined, and asked her, "Where is the baby?" to which she replied, "I have had no baby." There was an afterbirth in the bed, and everything indicated that a child had been born "all right." This was about noon. Witness attended to TOLLY and then went home, without seeing anything of the child. Afterwards witness went back to TOLLY, and said to her, "Now, I am come with the full intention of knowing what has become of the baby. I'll known in five minutes, or else I'll go further." Witness looked round the room, and after a time TOLLY said, "It is in a box, pointing out a box in the room. The box was not far from the bed, and might have been reached from it. The floor had been washed by the people in the house, evidently for the purpose of removing stains. Witness opened the box indicated by TOLLY, and took from it the body of a child. The body was entirely wrapped up in a petticoat, and witness unwrapped it and laid it on the bed. The child was quite dead. Witness remarked to TOLLY, "You've done a fine thing for yourself," and afterwards sent for Mr Goodridge, surgeon. Had seen TOLLY at her sister-in-law's at nine on Saturday morning and sent her home and told her to take something hot and go to bed, as she appeared to be ill. Had no suspicion as to the cause of TOLLY'S appearance, as though the woman had several times told witness that she had an internal tumour - she had never said anything to create suspicion as to her real condition. TOLLY was partially crippled in her legs. - By Mr Jarman: Had known for many years that TOLLY was in a bad state of health, but had never heard that she had met with an accident, which had affected her head. - By a Juror: Could not say whether TOLLY was right in her head or not. In some things she was right enough, and in others she was quite different, but she was always very peculiar. - Examination continued: There was no sign of baby linen that witness could see in the room. - Mr Goodridge, practising at PAIGNTON, said he attended TOLLY on Saturday evening. The last witness met him at the house, and said, "Oh, Mr Goodridge, here's an awful case." He examined the child, which did not look as though it had been stillborn, but it appeared to have been born some hours. Saw that the child had not been properly attended to and declined to certify. The umbilical cord had been broken, and TOLLY admitted having torn it. He had made a post-mortem examination of the child, which was a full grown female child. There were no external marks of violence on the body, but there was a mole or birthmark on the left cheek, and a large clot of blood on the right heel. About nine inches of the umbilical cord had been left attached to the child. If the cord had been cut it was with a very blunt instrument. The lungs floated when placed in distilled water, but there were indications that the circulation had not been properly set up, and that it had in some way been interfered with. In his opinion the child was alive at birth, and if a medical man or experienced nurse had been present its life might have been spared. He attributed the child's death to haemorrhage, which was caused by the cord not being tied. - By Mr Jarman: It was possible for a child to breathe without having an independent existence, but it was his opinion that in this instance this had not been the case. - HARRIET TOLLY, sister of SARAH TOLLY, and a single woman, said she was in SARAH'S room on Saturday afternoon. The key of the box in which the body was found was in the pocket of SARAH'S dress. Witness opened the box and found the body of the child there. - By Mr Jarman: Thought SARAH was "out" sometimes she would do curious things and behave very strangely. SARAH had hurt her head when a child, and had been subject to fits of depression ever since. Had had no suspicion that her sister was enceinte. - Catherine Langdon gave similar evidence, and said that when TOLLY was ill she told witness that she need not go for a doctor. Did not suspect her condition. - P.C. Smith, Paignton, stated that in consequence of what he was told by Mr Goodridge on Saturday he went to see TOLLY, whom he found in bed. After cautioning TOLLY, witness asked her, "Have you been prepared for this in any shape or form?" to which she answered, "I did not think it was coming so quick." Witness then said, "Have you got any linen prepared for the child?" TOLLY replied, "Yes." HARRIET TOLLY, who was present, then asked, "Where?" and TOLLY said, "At my sister's, at the cemetery." HARRIET then said to TOLLY, "Don't you go bringing any trouble on us. This is trouble enough already. What is at Kate's is hers, and where have you any else?" SARAH then pointed to a box in which two shirts were found, but no baby linen. Up to the present TOLLY had been charged with no offence. She was very weak. - This concluded the evidence, and the Coroner, having granted a brief adjournment, proceeded to sum up, pointing out that in some points the evidence was very contradictory, and especially that of Mrs Ellis and Mrs Langdon. If the Jury thought that the child was killed intentionally and by malice aforethought, that would be wilful murder; if they thought it had died through the omission of due care in providing for its birth, that would be manslaughter. They must consider, if they brought in a verdict of wilful murder, whether there was an accessory before the fact. - The Jury, after a lengthy consultation, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against SARAH TOLLY for having failed to provide for the child at its birth." The Inquest lasted over six hours.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of EMMA HAGGETT, widow, was found dead at her residence, 4 Jessamine-lane, on the previous evening. Deceased was found at the top of the stairs with her arms and head bent partly under her. Dr Paull was sent for, and on arriving pronounced life to be extinct. He made a post-mortem examination, which shewed that her heart was very fatty, and her liver twice the ordinary size. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 March 1883 BARNSTAPLE - Killed At A Level Crossing. - The Inquest on the old man CHARLES LEY, an inmate of the Barnstaple Union Workhouse, who was killed near Fremington Station on Tuesday, was held at the above named Institution yesterday morning. The poor fellow, who was very nearsighted, had been to the Fremington limekiln for a load of lime. He had passed over the level crossing on his return to Fremington and the donkey, which was drawing the load, was following him. The animal was nearly on the line, when the signalman at the station seeing the train approaching shouted across "Stop that donkey." The unfortunate fellow made a rush to reach the donkey, and at the moment the train came up and he was caught by the centre of the engine. After the train had passed it was found he had several wounds about the head, his right leg was cut off, and his left leg below the knee smashed to a pulp. He expired a few minutes afterwards. No blame was attachable to any of the officials, and "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned. The donkey was knocked down and so injured that it had to be shot.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 13 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Navy and Army Inn, Plymouth, last evening, on the body of ALBERT MOUNTJOY, aged 59. James Waye, landlord of the Navy and Army Inn, said MOUNTJOY lived in a tenement adjoining witness's house. On the evening of Saturday, the 3rd inst., deceased fell over a flight of stairs, but did not appear to be much injured at the time. There was an iron rail on the right hand side of the steps, but the stanchion at the bottom was missing. - Mr E. M. Prynne, M.R.C.S., attributed death to compression of the brain, brought on by the fall. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Veale, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that a new stanchion should be fixed to the iron railings on the stairs.

TOTNES - The Supposed Suicide At Totnes. - Last evening, Mr S. Hacker, District coroner, held an Inquiry at the residence of Mr Skinner, Castle View, Totnes, touching the death of JANE WARDLEY, whose body was picked up in the Mill Leat on the previous morning. Evidence was given by a girl named Allery, a servant in the house, as to deceased's leaving there on Saturday evening about half-past seven. Witness offered to go with her on account of her eyesight being bad, but deceased did not wish it and said she should not be long. Miss Skinner deposed to the deceased having lived with her for thirty-two years, and as she had not returned at nine o'clock, witness went in search of her, but could not find her. She had never before been out by herself since living at Totnes (about six months) owing to ill-health and failing eyesight. She was very depressed at times on account of the pain she suffered, and on Friday and Saturday last looked very ill, but would not admit it. She was a very careful person, and had saved about £200. Mr A. Pike proved searching the Mill Leat on Sunday morning, and finding the body of the deceased in the water near the Town Mills, and this evidence was corroborated by John Crocker, ostler at the Seven Stars Hotel. Dr Currie was of opinion that the deceased met her death by drowning, and there were no marks of violence on the body. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Drowned herself whilst of Unsound Mind.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Galatea Inn, King-street, on the body of AMELIA HOOPER, aged thirteen months. - Mary Ann Bridgman, widow, residing at 8 Stoke-road, said she had had charge of the child almost from its birth, receiving £1 a month for it from the father, who was employed in the dockyard. The father appeared to take an interest in the child and frequently visited it, although she had not seen him for three months. As the mother was a woman of gay character, witness forbade her to come to the house. The mother appeared to be quite indifferent about the child. The little thing died in a convulsive fit. Mr S. Manning said the child was well developed and appeared to have been nourished and cared for. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Accident At Sortridge Consols Mine. Inquest On NEWCOMBE'S Body. - Yesterday an Inquest was opened at the Schoolroom, Horrabridge, by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on the body of EDWARD NEWCOMBE, aged twenty, a miner, recently employed at Sortridge Consols. Dr Willis was Foreman of the Jury. It will be remembered that on the 6th January last Captain Nicholas Williams, the resident agent, with Edward Crocombe and Alfred Dawe, were engaged in the adit at Sortridge Consols mine, near Horrabridge, when the water broke in upon them from the old workings. Crocombe and Dawe succeeded in reaching the adit's mouth and were saved from an untimely death. Captain Williams was overtaken by the water and debris and his dead body was found in the river Walkham near the adit a few days after. At the time of the water breaking in NEWCOMBE was working back in the western level, about twenty fathoms from the adit, and some distance from where the accident occurred. On Crocombe and Dawe hastening out one of them saw NEWCOMBE in the level, and called to him to come on, as the water was upon them. This was the last seen of the poor fellow, and notwithstanding the diligent search made by the men employed on the mine for sometime afterwards, the body could not be found, and a general feeling was expressed that it had been washed down the river Walkham. This view was not, however, held by P.C. Jones and a few others, and he discovered the remains floating in the level as described in the Western Daily Mercury of yesterday. After the Jury had viewed the corpse, the evidence of GEORGE NEWCOMBE, the father, was taken, and he identified the body as that of his son. The Coroner said he did not propose to take more than sufficient evidence that day to warrant him giving an order for the interment. Much praise was due to Dr Willis for allowing the corpse to be placed in his coach-house, but there ought to be a mortuary built at Horrabridge for such bodies. He was much obliged to Dr Williams, the Medical Officer of Health and to Mr Mason, the Sanitary Inspector, for disinfecting the body as without it the Jury could not have viewed the body without much discomfort. He then adjourned the Inquest until Tuesday next, to enable Mr Frecheville, the Government Inspector of Mines to be present. The funeral of young NEWCOMBE took place immediately after the adjournment of the Inquest. The finding of NEWCOMBE'S body has occurred at a somewhat opportune moment, as Mr J. J. Daw, the Portreeve of Tavistock, has been trying during the past week to get in the amounts promised and collected on behalf of Captain Williams's widow, with a view of closing the subscription list. The directors of the Sortridge Consols Company promised a handsome sum, and a substantial amount was collected on the Stock Exchange by some friends in London. The committee may, perhaps, think it well to appropriate a small portion, at least, of the subscriptions to NEWCOMBE'S father, who is only a labourer and very poor. He must necessarily be a loser by the death of his son.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 15 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - At the Passage House Inn, Cattedown, last evening, Mr Coroner Brian held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM THOMAS POLLARD, aged two years, who died suddenly at the residence of his parents on the previous evening. Emma Hamley, grandmother and Mary Ann King, neighbour, gave evidence and the Jury, of whom Mr R. Woods was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 16 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, relative to the death of ELIZABETH SINGLE, 84, who was found dead in her room on Wednesday afternoon, at the almshouses known as Fox's Cottages, Windsor-street. Deceased was a widow of MR SINGLE, builder, of Plymouth, who many years ago was a member of the Town Council. From the evidence it would appear that on Wednesday morning deceased was heard moving about her room, and about 12.30 a loud noise proceeded from there. A neighbour knocked at the door, but receiving no answer entered. Deceased was dressed and lying dead on the floor in the middle of the room. She was quite warm. There was a chair near deceased, and she appeared to have fallen from it. Dr Morris was called to deceased, and in his evidence said there were extensive bruises on the right cheek and temple, such as would be caused by falling from a chair. The shock to so old a person would cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was stated that the old persons at these almshouses were not allowed to have anyone to live with them, and the Jury considered that such should not be the case.

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Plymouth Publican. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, into the death of MR ONISEPHEROUS LUXON, aged 53, landlord of the Prince Albert Inn, Notte-street, who was found dead at his house yesterday morning. - LUCY ANNA LUXON, wife of deceased, stated that deceased's tenancy of the Albert Inn terminated yesterday. He had been in bad health of late, and greatly harassed in mind. He had complained of pains in the chest and throat, a slight cough, and difficulty in breathing, and on Tuesday evening he got a bottle of medicine from Mr Jones, chemist. Between five and six o'clock yesterday morning he took witness some tea, and she did not see him alive afterwards. In going downstairs about seven, she found him lying in the passage. She spoke to him and he sighed. The servant girl and a man from the street were called and they helped to get deceased upstairs. Dr Morris was sent for and quickly arrived; he pronounced MR LUXON to be dead. - Dr Morris said that he was called to deceased about 7.5 a.m. yesterday, and found him dead. He had made a post-mortem examination. The right lung was congested and the lower lobe of the left lung was solid from acute inflammation. The heart was large and there was a loose clot of blood in each ventricle. The liver was much enlarged and evidently going into a fatty condition. The brain was most healthy. He attributed death to natural causes, there being quite sufficient to account for death in the state of the heart and lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes, and expressed their condolence with the widow.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 17 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Occurrence At Plymouth. - Mr Brian held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, on the body of PRISCILLA TOMLINSON, aged 81. Amy Adams, residing at 9 Looe-street, said the deceased, who was her sister, told her that she was knocked down by the mail van in Whimple-street on Friday last. John Sullivan, the driver, said he was in the employ of Mr Cook. On the day in question he was returning from the station, when he heard a cry, and subsequently found that TOMLINSON had been knocked down by the van. He was driving at a steady pace. Samuel Joseph Bray, postman, corroborated. Dr Prynne attributed death, which occurred on the day following the accident, partly to natural causes, and partly to the injuries TOMLINSON received. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly and censured Sullivan for not driving more carefully.

PLYMOUTH - A Negligent Mother. - At the Navy and Army Inn, Plymouth, last evening, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest on the body of SAMUEL GEORGE FRUDE, aged twelve months, the illegitimate child of LOUISA FRUDE, residing at New-street Cottages. The evidence showed that the infant had been put out to nurse with different persons, and that it had recently been in the charge of Elizabeth Lewis, of 21 Castle-street. A few days ago the little thing was taken ill, and on Tuesday it died in convulsions. Samuel George Mildren, the putative father, said he had seen FRUDE drunk with the child in her arms and other evidence went to prove that the mother had kept it out with her as late as twelve o'clock at night. Dr Cash Reed attributed death to natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect and censured the mother for not sending for a medical man when the child was taken ill.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 March 1883 BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Disaster At Sortridge Mine. Adjourned Inquiry. - The adjourned Inquest into the death of the young man ALBERT EDWARD NEWCOMBE, who was drowned on January 6th last by the flooding of Sortridge Mine, Horrabridge, was held yesterday at the Horrabridge schoolroom before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. Mr E. Nicholls (Callington) represented the company who own the mine. - The Coroner stated that the Inquiry had been adjourned for the purpose of communicating with Mr R. J. Frecheville, the inspector of Mines, at Truro. He had received a letter from him, stating that he did not deem it necessary to appear before the Jury again, as he had already given technical evidence at the Inquest on the body of Captain Williams, who was also drowned by the accident. Mr Frecheville gave his opinion on the matter as follows:- "1. That up to a certain point the operations at the mine had been conducted with great care and sill. 2. That Captain Williams in driving the last 'side tie' had approached it too close to the adit. Dawe deposed that there was only 2ft. of ground between them. According to Crocombe the distance was 3ft. and according to Captain Skewis 3ft. 6in. In my opinion a distance of at least two fathoms should have been maintained between them, as the formation is killas, and as fifteen fathoms of water standing in the old workings would give a pressure of at least 45lbs. to the square inch against the ground which separated the 'side tie' from the water in the adit. Now, this 'side tie' having been driven and holes bored through from it to the adit about ten days before the accident occurred, during this time the ground was becoming daily weaker owing to the percolation of water through it under the above-mentioned great pressure. The immediate cause of the rupture, however, was the enlarging of the holes by Captain Williams himself with a drill of about ten feet in length. It surprises me that he should have been so reckless, but I cannot for a moment imagine that he apprehended any danger any more than miners always fear when approaching a body of water. He seems to have been over-anxious to effect the drainage of the mine, and for this sacrificed his own and NEWCOMBE'S life. He, however, in the first instance, had shewn great error in judgment in approaching this 'side tie' so close to the adit. 3. I further stated that I was of the opinion that a certain amount of responsibility rested with Captain Skewis, the managing agent, as at least he should have supervised the work more closely, and in allowing the 'side tie' to be approached so near the adit. In his evidence Captain Skewis deposed that he went over the ground on December 9th, and found that the bore holes shewed that there was a distance of about 1 ½ fathoms of ground between the 'side tie' and adit, and that he left instructions for Capt. Williams to continue the 'side tie' but cut some distance between it and the adit; that on his next visit to the mine about ten days before the accident he did not go underground, but was informed by Captain Williams that more holes had been bored, which shewed the distance between the 'side tie' and adit to be three feet six inches; that the water was being lowered in the mine not so fast as he wished, and spoke of enlarging the holes. Capt. Skewis stated on his oath that he cautioned him against doing so, so that he, at least, must have thought 3 feet 6 inches of round between the 'side tie' and adit insufficient for safety. I again reiterate my opinion that two fathoms of ground should have been kept between them, and if the mine were sufficiently drained for me to examine the place where the water burst through, and I were to find a foot or two more or less than 3 feet 67 inches of ground, it would not in the least change my view of the subject. The mere inspection of the place where NEWCOMBE'S body was found can throw no further light on the matter. If you absolutely require, however, that I should be present at the Inquest, please telegraph me to that effect." - P.C. George Jones stationed at Horrabridge, stated that on Saturday, the 10th inst., having felt confident that deceased was lying in the western level, where his hat was found, and the mine authorities had given up the search, he determined to search himself. He obtained the assistance of a miner named Lauri, and they went into the adit where the water burst. They looked into the hole, which was about 300 fathoms from the entrance, and, having retraced their steps about six fathoms and entered the western level, they had to creep on their hands and knees for about thirty fathoms. Here a "deadly" smell convinced him that the body was there. They then got to the rise, and about thirty fathoms further on found the body of deceased floating in about four feet of water. - Samuel Lauri corroborated. He once worked in Sortridge Mine, and left because the air was foul and unhealthy. - In answer to the Foreman, Mr Nicolls stated that there were thirty or forty men employed for several days making a search for the body of deceased, and not until Captain Williams's body was found in the river did they relinquish their efforts in the mine. - At the request of the Coroner, Mr Nicolls addressed the Jury. He said that the company very much deplored the accident. This was an old mine restarted, and there was always a large amount of danger attending it's working. Captain Skewis was ostensibly the manager appointed by the company, his duty being to visit the mine once a week. Captain Williams was selected by the company on the recommendation of Captain Skewis, as a competent person to look after the mine. There was no doubt that NEWCOMBE owed his death to the too strong desire on the part of Williams to get the water out of the mine too quickly. Captain Skewis had given him all the caution that was necessary for a mine agent, and Williams knew all about the mine and had perfect control over it. When the water began to flow with such force into the workings NEWCOMBE, no doubt, lost his presence of mind, and ran the wrong way into the danger. There was no blame attached to the company, because they had done what was required of them and spared no expense. - The Foreman asked whether the company had any plans of the mine. The Act of Parliament required they should have plans taken every six months. - Mr Nicholls said they only had the plans of the old workings. - In reply to the Foreman, Mr Nicholls said that so far as he knew no undue pressure had been put upon Captain Skewis to hasten on the work. - After an hour's deliberation the Jury returned the following verdict:- "That deceased was Accidentally Drowned in Sortridge Mine in consequence of the flooding of the level on the 6th of January, and the Jury further say that they consider that more frequent and careful supervision should be exercised by the manager and agent in the future." - The conduct of P.C. Jones was highly praised, he having, unknown to any of the mine authorities, made a difficult but successful search for the body, and destroyed a suit of clothes in so doing. The Jury shewed their appreciation of what he had done by awarding him their fees. Mr Nicholls intimated that he would bring the matter before the directors of the mine. It is understood that a reward of £5 was offered for the recovery of the body and P.C. Jones is entitled to this.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 March 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - A Foolish Notion. - Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest at the Queen's Head, Duke-street, on Thursday evening, touching the death of OWEN SPENCER HUGO, 18 months old, the child of a leading stoker on board the torpedo ship Heela, who died on Wednesday. The mother deposed that the child had been delicate for the past twelve months. He had, however, taken his food pretty well, and recently he had had raw milk and beef tea. On Wednesday he was seized with a fit, and died in a quarter of an hour. - Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, said he had no doubt death resulted from a fit. The child had fits very frequently last year, and he believed this was owing to defective dentition, for there was not even now the sign of a tooth in the gums. - The Coroner: Do you think the child was weakened owing to being vaccinated, and that this brought on the fits? - Mr Laity: I do not believe vaccination had anything to do with it. - The Coroner: The grandmother told me that if she could write she should write to the papers and say it was all through the child being vaccinated. - Mr Laity: That is all nonsense. The fits were entirely owing to defective dentition. They told me about the vaccination long ago, and could not make them believe anything else. - The Coroner: The grandmother came to me making complaints against persons concerning the vaccination and I, therefore, thought it best to have the matter cleared up. If the child had been buried without an Inquest, and these assertions continued to be made, a great deal of harm might have been done. - Mr Laity: The fact stands that the child, 18 months old, has no teeth, and no sign of any. The vaccination could not have prevented the teeth from coming. I must add that the child had every care bestowed on it by the mother and grandmother. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and agreed with the Coroner that in view of the grandmother's assertions the Inquest was necessary.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 March 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Newton Town Hall on Saturday touching the death of ERNEST OLDING, aged 1 year and 7 months, whose parents reside in Lemon-road. It appeared that on Thursday the mother left the little fellow in the kitchen whilst she fetched some water from the back of the house, and when she returned in the course of a minute or two the clothes of the child were in flames, having by some means become ignited from the fire of the stove, and before they could be extinguished the body was so burnt that death shortly after ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death Of A Prisoner At Plymouth. - On Saturday evening the Plymouth Borough Coroner held an Inquest at the Guildhall on the body of JOHN MAY, dockyard labourer, who died in the cells at the police station on Friday morning. - Chas. Bunker, soda water manufacturer, of 32 Richmond-street, identified the body as that of his brother-in-law. He had not seen him for some time past, but was sent for on Friday morning to bail him out of custody, as he had been locked up for drunkenness. He did not go immediately, as he had some business to attend to, and before he arrived he was told that MAY had died. - Isaac Burge, a youth, said that about 5.30 on Friday morning he was put into the cell with the deceased man, having been brought to the station charged with sleeping in a lime kiln. Deceased was quite sober at that time, and complained of a pain at his stomach. Soon afterwards he vomited slightly, but this passed off, and the sickness appeared quite well. A policeman came to the cell every hour to see if they were "all right", and about 9.30 they had their breakfast (bread and hot milk) given them, and they also had "a wash". About 11.30 deceased, who had been standing near the stove, said that as no one appeared to be coming to bail him out he might as well lay down, and went to the bedplace, where he laid down. Witness, about a minute afterwards, noticed him draw a deep breath, and then remain quite still, and fearing he was dead, witness took up a tin cup and knocked at the door. When the constable came, he told him he believed the man was dead, and this was found to be the case. - Inspector H. Hill, who was on duty at the station at the time of the occurrence, said that it was at his suggestion that deceased tried to get bail. He knew deceased through his having at one time kept a public-house in Plymouth. When a constable reported to him that MAY was dead, he himself went to inform the deceased's friends, and went for Dr Morris. - Mr S. Wolferstan, police surgeon, said that he had made a post-mortem examination. There were no external marks of violence. He found the whole of the right lung and a part of the left lung deeply congested, and shewing evidence of long standing pleurisy. The heart was large, and exhibited symptoms of commencing disease. The liver shewed fatty degeneration, and both kidneys were much congested, whilst the vessels on the surface of the brain were full, and the substance of the brain itself was somewhat hard. He attributed the immediate cause of death to the congested state of the lungs, which congestion was of recent date, and probably accelerated by deceased's drinking habits and exposure to the cold whilst intoxicated on Thursday night. Had he not been exposed to the cold in such a way he might probably have lived some time longer. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, and, having visited the cell in which MAY died, expressed an opinion that there should be some means provided of the prisoners' communicating with the police in case of illness. - Chief Constable Wreford, who was present, promised that the matter should be taken into consideration. It would, however, be a question how such an arrangement could be affected without making it the means, in the hands of prisoners, of annoying the police.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 27 March 1883 TORQUAY - Mr Sydney Hacker held an Inquest at the Town Hall, Torquay, yesterday, on the body of MRS MELHUISH, of Upton, who succumbed to injuries sustained through being thrown from a carriage. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 March 1883 TIVERTON - Murder At Tiverton. - Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Washfield, Tiverton, yesterday afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of LUCY CLEAVE, about 4 years of age, who was murdered by her father RICHARD CLEAVE, a dairy farmer, of Spilleford Farm, Washfield. It appeared that on Tuesday morning CLEAVE'S wife got up, leaving him in bed and the deceased was at that time asleep in a crib in the same room. MRS CLEAVE went into the yard to feed the poultry and in the meantime CLEAVE'S father came in and inquired for his son. Almost immediately after CLEAVE was heard coming downstairs. Knowing that he had made a previous attempt to destroy himself by drowning, CLEAVE'S father held his stick up and ordered him to go to bed. He was very excited and turned and went upstairs again. On entering the bedroom he fell, and the wife and father, hearing the fall, went up to him. They then discovered that the little girl had been murdered. The throat was cut and all the main arteries were severed; whilst the floor was covered with blood. The murder had been committed with a table knife, which was found in the room. CLEAVE was put to bed and watch was kept over him by the police. In the afternoon he talked about the murder, and said that something "took" him, and he did not know what he was about. The Jury returned a verdict of "Homicide during a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 March 1883 PLYMOUTH - Last evening an Inquest was held at Plymouth Guildhall, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) as to the circumstances attending the death of a child named WILLIAM HERBERT LAWRY, aged 12 months and 1 week, who died early on Thursday morning. According to the evidence of JESSIE LAWRY, mother of the deceased, residing at No. 2 Hoe-gardens, the child had not been a healthy one, and was teething at the time of his death. It appeared unwell on Wednesday, but seemed better at night. The next morning, however, the mother found it dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 April 1883 DOVER, KENT - The Fatality From a Plymouth Vessel. [From Our Dover Correspondent.]. - An Inquest was held by the Dover Borough Coroner on a man named HOLLOW, of 38 James-street, Devonport, and one of the crew of the schooner Margaret West, of Plymouth. - James Pittaway, captain of the schooner, said he had seen the body at the mortuary and identified it as that of MALACHI WEST NICHOLAS DANIEL HOLLOW. He was one of his crew and was cook. His age was 24, and he shipped at Par. Witness last saw the deceased alive on Wednesday evening when he was on board. Witness directed that none of the crew were to go on shore. The vessel was about twenty feet from the nearest craft in the Wellington Dock, and could only be reached by means of a boat. When witness returned he heard there was a man overboard, and subsequently learnt that the deceased was missing. - George Cole, landlord of the Old Commercial Quay Inn, said on Wednesday the deceased came into his house with two friends between seven and eight o'clock. There were several of them together, and witness drew them five pints of porter. Deceased left the house at 10.25. He was certainly not intoxicated when he left. - William Mills, aster of the harbour dredger, said he lived on board his boat. About half-past ten on the evening of Wednesday he heard someone walk down the deck. Witness's wife said, "I think that man has gone overboard." Witness went up on deck at once, and heard two groans and a splash, as though someone was beating the water. Witness got into a boat at once, but could not find anybody. the boat belonging to the Margaret West was made fast to another boat alongside the dredger, and witness supposed that the deceased pitched into the water in stepping from one boat to the other. The drop from the dredger to the small boat was about six feet. Witness called the police, and they commenced grappling at once. - James Horn, a mariner, said at half-past three on Thursday morning, he commenced dragging in the harbour, and about an hour afterwards recovered the body. With the assistance of the police, they took the body to the mortuary. Mr Clement C. Walter, police surgeon, deposed to examining the body of the deceased at the mortuary. There were no external marks of violence and from deceased's general appearance he had no doubt that death resulted from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 April 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Suicide Of General Pakenham's Butler. - MR GEORGE UPCOTT BAKER, who for five years has been butler to Lieut.-General Pakenham, committed suicide early yesterday morning by shooting himself. ~deceased, who was said by his wife to be 29 years old, although he looked much older, had had orders when the General left last Saturday to pay several bills, and then to go to London, where he was to remain with General Pakenham for a month before entering upon another situation. In fact it was stated that deceased had agreed to enter the service of the Home Secretary in the same position as that he filled at General Pakenham's and that in a month he would have commenced his duties at 7 Grafton-street, Piccadilly. Everything had been packed up on Tuesday in readiness for BAKER and his wife, and two children to start for London yesterday morning; at 5.30 a.m. yesterday, however, his dead body was found in a field at Richmond Walk by a lamplighter who was on is rounds extinguishing the lamps. - At six o'clock last evening Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest on the body at the King's Arms, George-street. The Jury of twenty-three gentlemen chose as their Foreman, Mr John Martin. - The Coroner remarked that the Jury had been called together to investigate a painful circumstance - the cause of the death of one who had, up to the day of his death, held a trusted office in the employ of Lieut.-General Pakenham, lately commander-in-chief of the Western District. The Jury would have two questions to determine - first, did deceased take his own life; and second, what was the condition of his mind at the time he committed the rash act. - Major Slade, C.B., deputy assistant adjutant-general, said he had received a telegram from Lieut.-General Pakenham asking him to watch the Inquest on his behalf. - The Coroner said he was glad of Major Slade's presence. - Edward Gee, residing at 16 Duke-street, Devonport, said he was a lamplighter in the employ of the Devonport Gas Company. About 5.20 that morning he was coming along Richmond-walk when he saw something lying in a field near the quarry. He found it to be the body of a man. He communicated the fact to two policemen and he went back to the spot with them. There one of the constables picked up a pistol lying close to the left foot of deceased. There was some congealed blood on the right cheek. The body was removed to the Richmond-walk Inn and placed in an outhouse there. Witness found the deceased was dead when he first saw the body. - P.C. Hodge deposed to being spoke to by the last witness at 5.30 yesterday morning. Gee said, "Policeman, there is someone lying either dead or very drunk in the gardens at Richmond-walk." Witness, with another constable named Bucknell, went with the lamplighter to the gardens and found deceased. He saw a pistol near the left foot, the muzzle pointing towards the head. The deceased was lying on his back, with his right leg stretched out and the left one bent up; his right arm lying down by the side, while the left was stretched out from the body. Witness called Mr F Everard Row, surgeon, and that gentleman pronounced life to be extinct. Mr Row said the only way to account for death was that deceased had held the pistol to his mouth, as two of his front teeth were hanging by a piece of "string." From what he saw witness had no doubt that suicide had been committed. Mr Row said deceased had been dead sometime. There was no wound on the back of the head. The pistol was a six-chambered one; one chamber appeared to have been recently discharged, and the other five were empty. - P.C. Dymond proved finding a box near the left foot of the deceased. It contained nineteen cartridges which would fit the pistol picked up by Hodge. The leather case of the revolver lay by deceased's right side. He searched the body and found in money the sum of £2 3s. 4d.; this was in various pockets. He also found a tobacco pouch and a few other things, among them a pocket-book and letter, but neither threw any light on the commission of the act. - Sergeant Charles Riggs, Royal marines, said he was the General's coxswain at Mount Wise. He had known deceased for sixteen months, and had been very friendly with him. - The Coroner: Was he a sober man? - Witness: I never saw him intoxicated. - Did he enjoy a glass? - Yes. - Could he stand a good deal with getting drunk? - I do not know. I was never long enough in his company to see. - Was he a man to speak of any troubles if he had any? - No, he was not. He had been in General Pakenham's employ for five years - two years at Aldershot and three at Devonport. - Have you noticed if he has appeared in trouble of late? - Only since the General left. That was on Saturday last. Since then I have noticed a difference in him. He did not express himself freely. In the midst of packing up things to take away to London he would go out of the room, leaving his drawers unlocked - a thing I have never known him do before. He always locked the drawers before he left a room. I was not struck with this change at the time, but I attach importance to it now. - Did you think his spirits were low? - I cannot say that I did, but I have noticed him start off suddenly when talking to anyone. On Tuesday night, at 10.45 he called at my house, 49 Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse. I was in bed, and I got up. Deceased asked me to see him and his furniture to the railway station in the morning, and I promised to do so arranging the details with him. Deceased said he was going by the 10.20 London and South-Western train from Devonport Station. - Was he as hearty as usual? - No, he was not so free and hearty as before. I joked with him, and he did laugh in reply, but his laugh was forced. I noticed this at the time, but I thought it might be due to his going to leave friends and to live amongst strangers. He was evidently in low spirits. I have seen the pistol which the policeman has produced. It belonged to MR BAKER It was kept in the case which the policeman found. I never knew deceased use the revolver; I have seen him take it out of his cupboard at times, but never saw him clean it or heard him make any remark about it. He had nothing to drink at my house on Tuesday night, and was perfectly sober when he left, shortly before eleven. - Had he said anything about being out of work when he left General Pakenham? - He said he need not trouble, as he had a nice place to go into when he got to London, but that it was not quite decided on. - Did you ever know him bet or gamble? - No. I have never known him play cards for more than sixpence a game. - And you never knew him to have trouble? - He never mentioned any, and I did not believe he had any. I believe his wife and he lived happily together. - Were you not very much surprised to hear of his death? - I was. I knew nothing to lead me to believe he would take his life; but when I heard of his death it struck me that on Tuesday night he appeared strange and quiet - he was not so "jolly" as usual. - Do you think he was a man likely to become entangled with any young woman? - No; and I do not think he was. - Can you form any reason for his taking his life? - No. I have been to several tradesmen whom he had to pay for the General, and I find that they have been paid. There is only one bill outstanding that I can find, and that is one for £5 15s., which only came to the house on Tuesday morning. Deceased was very much respected, and had he wanted money I am sure he could have obtained it. - When you saw him on Tuesday night did he look wild at all? - His eyes had a wilder appearance than usual, and this struck me immediately. His wife told me that he left home about half-past ten o'clock on Tuesday night, and never came home afterwards. He took out his watch and chain and placed them on the mantel-piece, saying he would be back again as soon as he had seen me. He also gave her some money. - The Coroner asked Major Slade if he could throw any light on the case. - Major Slade replied in the negative. he had had a telegram from General Pakenham, in which the gallant officer said he was shocked to hear the news, asking him to attend the Inquest and watch it on his (General Pakenham's) behalf, and to take care of the widow and family. (Several of the Jury: Hear, hear.) - The Coroner: As far as you know he was very kindly and well treated. - Major Slade: Most kindly, and he was very much respected by both General and Mrs Pakenham. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there could be no doubt that deceased took his own life, but the question for the Jury was what condition his mind was in at the time. The very fact that there was nothing to account for the commission of the act seemed to point in the direction of a temporary derangement of the mind. His financial condition was all right, and even had he been in want of temporary assistance there was no doubt he could have obtained it. - Major Slade: I respected him so much that if he had come to me and asked for money I should have lent it to him. - The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 April 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On board H.M.S. Lion. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) yesterday held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of DANIEL WILLIAM HEATH, a first class sailor boy of H.M. training ship Lion, who was killed by a fall from the foretop on Wednesday last. The Coroner explained why the Inquest had not been held the day previously. He had summoned the Jury for that day, but in the morning he saw in both the local papers a statement to the effect that on Wednesday the Deputy Coroner had held an Inquest on board H.M.S. Lion and that the Jury then had returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." He therefore had discharged the Jury, as a second Inquest was out of the question. Since then he had found that the statements which appeared in the papers were incorrect, as no Inquest had been held. He had, therefore, been compelled to summon the Jury a second time. - John Bale, a first class boy of H.M.S. Lion said he was at drill on Wednesday morning, and worked next to the deceased. They were sending up the yards and he, as well as the deceased, was bearing the yard off the mast as it came up. Witness was bearing it off with one hand and catching hold of a rope with the other, but the deceased leant both hands on the yard to keep it off, and in doing so slipped and fell. Captain Alexander M. Kechnie, commander of the Lion, said that he was on deck at the time of the accident. The boys were being exercised, and the yards were being slowly sent up. The deceased and the boy Bale were stationed in the foretop to keep the yard clear of the mast as it came up. There was a "t[?]ing rope from below to the foretop for that purpose, but as the yard was drawn up into the foretop the angle at that point was not sufficient and therefore the boys were stationed there to bear the yard off at that point before it rested. The masts had been fitted and stanchioned and the order to "sway clear" had been given, immediately after which he (witness) heard a thud, as of a body falling and a petty officer reported to him that the deceased had fallen from the foretop. The deceased at once received surgical attendance but he died soon afterwards. Witness on inquiry found that deceased was "swaying clear" the yard when he fell. Deceased had been in training over 14 months. Samuel Light leading seaman on board H. M. S. Lion, spoke to identifying the body. Joseph Dew, second captain of the foretop, deposed to witnessing the accident. The fall was about 45 feet. The yard was being sent up in the usual way. - John Lambert, the ship's surgeon, said that he was called to see the deceased at about eight o'clock on Wednesday morning. He found that he had sustained a compound fracture of the skull the right side of his head being quite flattened with the force of the blow, and from an abrasion in the right temple blood and pieces of brain were oozing. Nothing whatever could be done for him and he died at about nine o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 11 April 1883 PLYMSTOCK - The Fatality At Oreston. - At the King's Arms Hotel, Oreston, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest concerning the death of a lad, named GEORGE HENRY CORDER, who was drowned at Oreston on the 6th April and whose body was recovered on the dock outside the Government offices, Oreston, on Sunday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 12 April 1883 LUSTLEIGH - Gored To Death By A Bull. - A few days ago WILLIAM PARSON, a servant to Mr Carlyon, of Lustleigh, was gored to death by a bull. It appears he was engaged attending to some cattle when the bull attacked him. The poor fellow was knocked down, and then frightfully mangled by the infuriated animal. In this state his lifeless body was found by some fellow servants. Mr Hacker, Coroner, has since held an Inquest on the body, a verdict of "Accidental Death" being returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 13 April 1883 EXETER - Death From Scalding. - The Exeter Coroner yesterday held an Inquest upon a child named BAKER, aged twelve months, whose father is a carpenter, living in Holloway-street. On Tuesday the mother left the infant sitting on a chair, but when she returned she found him on the floor considerably scalded, having, in falling, overturned a kettle of boiling water. The child died on Wednesday from convulsions brought on by the injuries which it had sustained. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 April 1883 UGBOROUGH - An Inquest was held at Bittaford, Ivybridge, yesterday, as to the death of JOSEPH BROWN, whose body was found in a cart linhay at Bittaford, Mr Nepean, solicitor, was Foreman of the Jury. The evidence of Mr Randle who had made a post-mortem examination, shewed that death had resulted from the effect of a corrosive poison on the stomach A bottle of some chloride of zinc in it was found near the deceased, and it appeared that the bottle with a larger quantity of the poison was in his possession on the previous day. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de Se, but the foreman expressed the Jury's belief "That the deceased was probably suffering from Temporary Insanity at the time of his committing the act." The deceased is said to be a travelling tinker from Stonehouse.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 April 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening into the cause of the sudden death of JOHN HOLTEN, 53, seaman. Deceased was employed by William Hopper, master of the ketch Selina Mary, and for the past twelve months had apparently enjoyed capital health. On Friday morning the ketch left Plymouth for Chepstowe, and arrived off Fowey about 7 p.m. The master then wanted to go to the cabin, and asked deceased to take the tiller. He did so, and as Hopper turned away deceased fell through the glass of the skylight of the cabin. On being raised he was dead. Hopper immediately returned to Plymouth, arriving early on Saturday morning. Mr S. Wolferstan, surgeon, stated that deceased had died from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr H. Squires was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their approval of the conduct of the master in at once returning to Plymouth with the deceased's body.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Sea Sickness. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon, at the waiting-room, Millbay Pier, into the death of a young girl, named MARY HANNAFORD, a native of Co. Kerry, Ireland. From the evidence adduced, it seemed that a few weeks ago deceased and two relatives of about her own age decided to emigrate to New Zealand as servant girls. Their parents did not oppose their wishes and on Thursday last the emigrants left Cork in the steamship Upupa. Deceased was in good health and high spirits, and her friends were at the quay when the vessel left. When she had been at sea about an hour, she was severely attacked with sea sickness and became very ill. Her companions were near her and when in the act of vomiting she fell backwards on the deck prostrate. The ship's surgeon was called and tried to administer brandy, but could not get deceased to swallow it. On closer examination he found she was dead. Although in high spirits at her prospects when leaving Cork, yet she exhibited much grief at leaving her parents. Mr G. Carter, house surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and could find no sign of poison. The deceased's heart was weak, and the excessive vomiting caused by the sea sickness was quite sufficient to have brought on an attack of fatal syncope. Her death, too, was considerably accelerated by the grief and excitement of leaving her friends. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 24 April 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Boating Fatality At Devonport. Inquest On The Bodies. - The Coroner of Saltash (Mr W. Hawke) assisted by Mr F. W. Cleverton, held an Inquest last evening, on the bodies of CHARLES EDWARDS, a soldier pensioner and JOHN BUTTLER a pipe layer in the employ of the Devonport Water Company, who were drowned through the capsizing of a boat off Mount Edgcumbe on Sunday afternoon. Benjamin Ley, quarryman, living at 85 Pembroke-street, stated that he, with others, was in a public-house on Sunday afternoon. Prior to the closing of the house a party of them, consisting of EDWARDS, BUTTLER, himself and five other men, agreed to go for a cruise on the Hamoaze. A young man named Warren, whose brother was a waterman, offered to get possession of his brother's boat in order that they might not be put to any expense. Accordingly Warren obtained his mother's consent, whereupon, witness and BUTTLER agreed to fetch their wives in order that they might participate in the excursion. MRS BUTTLER brought a little child about three years of age with her. Before embarking, however, EDWARDS got the party to consent t go to Millbrook, where he said his wife was on a visit to a friend of his, in order to bring her back with them. But before starting EDWARDS learnt that his wife had returned to Devonport by another route and accordingly went in search of her On their return all embarked together and proceeded from the landing steps towards Anderton, with the intention of still going to Millbrook. The weather was rather squally at the time. The mainsail was almost immediately hoisted and all went well until the boat had reached about 500 yards beyond the Impregnable, when a squall suddenly came on them, carrying away Walters' hat. Walters, who was steering the boat, then said, "I must bout ship and pick up my hat," but as soon as he starboarded the tiller for the purpose of doing so, the boat hove over to the leeward, which caused the sail to suddenly jibe. The rope by which the sheet was held was in the possession of BUTTLER, and was hitched to a crook in the stern of the boat. Instead of instantly freeing the sail from the windward side, BUTTLER still held fast to the rope and MRS BUTTLER becoming frightened, stood up in the boat with the child in her arms and began to scream. The boat then gave another lurch, which caused MRS BUTTLER to fall on to the leeward side, and all were precipitated into the water. At first, all the women clung to witness, who managed to keep himself above the water by clinging on to the side of the boat. Witness was not a good swimmer, but some of the other men were. In the struggle that ensued two of the women lost their hold on witness, who managed, however, to save his own wife by pushing her on to the keel of the boat. MRS EDWARDS grabbed her own husband and witness heard the deceased tell her to put her legs around his body and hold tight to his neck. All assisted in getting the woman on the keel of the boat, and afterwards made for the shore together. Witness, however, stuck to the boat with the women. By this time boats from H.M.S. Impregnable, training ship, the Circe, tender to the Royal Adelaide, and others were coming to their rescue, and on their arrival witness helped in getting the women on board. The four other men had nearly reached the shore by the time they were rescued by the boats. Both the deceased men were able to swim. Was astonished when he heard they were drowned. He believed that they must have been nearer to the shore than either of their comrades, and so got their feet caught in the mud. At the time of drowning the men were in comparatively shallow water, but were unable to stand on account of the soft nature of the mud. Witness was a staunch teetotaller, and neither of the other men was, to his knowledge, the worse for liquor. It was true, however, that they had been drinking. On being rescued they were all taken on board the Impregnable, where they received every kindness and attention. With the exception of MR BUTTLER, who was suffering from a severe shock to the system, none of the other occupants were at that time much the worse for the ducking they had received. - The Coroner: Was any waterman with you? No. - How many was the boat licensed to carry? Nine. - And how many of you were there altogether on board? Eleven. - The Coroner: Then you have nobody but your own selves to thank for what has occurred. I am very glad indeed to learn that no waterman was on board at the time of the occurrence. Had he been, in my opinion, it would have proved a serious matter for him. - Francis Wills, armourer on board H. M.S. Cambridge, said he was one of the number who embarked with the deceased men on board the boat known as the Sarah Jane on the previous afternoon. Witness then corroborated Ley's statement. Witness assisted Ley in saving the women and afterwards took the child in one of his arms and swam towards the shore. Was able to swim well. Saw both EDWARDS and BUTTLER swimming with the rest of them for some distance. Heard EDWARDS call for help and tried to assist him, but failed. He believed, as the former witness had said, that the poor fellows must have got their feet caught in the mud, and so lost all power. - Henry Wylie, a licensed waterman, deposed to finding the bodies on the beach at Houndiscombe, near Mount Edgcumbe. The body of the shorter man was about 250 yards from the shore, and that of the other man about fifty yards from his comrade. Witness placed a rope around their waists and towed them up towards the Impregnable, when assistance was sent him from that ship and the bodies were conveyed to Mutton Cove. P.C. Osborne, of Devonport, proved finding on BUTTLER 4s. 7d. in silver and bronze, a knife, a bunch of keys and a watch and chain. The watch was stopped at five minutes past four o'clock. A penny, two halfpennies, and a pocket-knife were taken from EDWARDS'S pockets. The Jury at once returned a verdict to the effect that the men were Accidentally Drowned, and exonerated all concerned from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 26 April 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Sad Accident At Plymouth. - An inquest was held last evening at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), touching the death of MARY ELLEN DARLINGTON, aged five years. - Deceased's brother, a child about the same age, stated that on Tuesday afternoon he was playing with his sister and other children on the glacis near the citadel. The deceased, in endeavouring to pluck some flowers, fell into the water. He called to a quarryman, who immediately came over, and put off in a boat, and succeeded in bringing the child's body ashore. Frederick Foxworthy deposed to being called by the last witness and to bringing the body ashore, and Mr Coulton, the Hoe Constable, to ordering its removal to the home of the parents, at 4 Higher Batter-street. When the child was taken out of the water she was quite dead. Previous to the holding of the Inquest, the Jury, at the invitation of the Coroner, walked up to the spot where the child fell over, and found that the protection afforded by the railings around the top of the cliff had in many places been destroyed. We drew attention to this fact in our yesterday's issue. A presentment to the Hoe Committee, respecting the condition of the spot, and asking their immediate attention thereto, was unanimously agreed to.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 May 1883 TAVISTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Union Inn, Tavistock, yesterday afternoon, relative to the death of HENRY JOHN JUKES, aged 20. The deceased, who was a labourer, had been subject to fits, and on Friday morning last was found dead in a water closet at the back of his residence in Bannawell-street. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 May 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held two Inquests last evening respecting persons who died suddenly on Monday. A Jury first assembled at the Barley Sheaf, Catherine-street, to Inquire into the cause of the death of ELIZA WILMOT, a widow, living in a tenement at the back of James-street. Deceased complained to her daughter, Mrs McKeer, on Friday of a pain in her side, but on Monday she was better, and went out with her daughter to walk to her home in Cross-street. At the end of James-street, however, she was taken ill and had to be assisted to her home, dying on the doorstep. Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, said both lungs were inflamed - one very much so. Deceased had also suffered from chronic bronchitis. Death resulted from inflammation of the lungs accelerated by chronic bronchitis. Had a medical man been called to see the woman on Friday he might have done her good. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The second Inquest was held at the King's Arms, George-street, on the body of EDWARD WEDLOCK, a naval pensioner, 54 years of age, who died in a water closet at the back of his residence, 67 Pembroke-street. Mr E. J. Hinvest, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination said death had resulted from syncope. He found from examination that deceased had formerly drunk heavily, and this had injured his constitution greatly. A verdict of "Death from Syncope" was recorded.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 3 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held last evening at 38 Torrington-place, North-road, Plymouth, relative to the death of MR FREDERICK GEORGE BONE, retired secretary of the Indian Navy, who, whilst walking in the road near his residence, the same afternoon, was observed to suddenly fall on the pathway, by a young woman named Jane Harper, domestic servant at No. 34. Capt. Gehan deposed that deceased was his brother-in-law and resided with him at No. 38 Torrington-place. The same afternoon information was brought to him that deceased had fallen in the pathway just outside the house. He went out and assistance being procured, deceased was brought into the house. Dr W. Square said that he considered that death had resulted from failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at Sherman's Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, yesterday relative to the death of FLORENCE ELLEN MARSH, a child aged 4 ½ years. - MRS LILY MARSH stated that on Monday night when she put the child to bed she was apparently in good health. However during the night the deceased was seized with illness, which the next day developed into malignant scarlet fever. Mr Carter was called in, but the child died about midday. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was recorded. Scarlet fever being prevalent in the neighbourhood, the Jury desired the Press to call attention to the fact, with the view of steps being taken for its suppression.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 May 1883 PLYMSTOCK - The Suicide At Turnchapel. - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, yesterday held an Inquest at Stamford Fort, Turnchapel, touching the death of RICHARD HUTCHINSON, gunner in the Royal Artillery, who committed suicide on Wednesday morning by hanging himself. Samuel Collins, private R.M.L.I., stated that on Wednesday, about ten a.m., he went to one of the rooms in the fort, which is yet in an unfinished state, and there he found the deceased suspended by a rope. It was tight round his neck and a hook at the end served the purpose of a slip-knot; the other end was fastened to a ring bolt in a beam overhead. Deceased's feet were about two feet from the ground. Witness lowered him to the ground, but he was dead. The room is in an unfinished condition, and witness supposed deceased had got on to the beams, which are still uncovered, fastened the rope, and then squeezed himself through the beams and dropped. The drop would be fully four feet, and death must have been instantaneous. Witness had known deceased for some time, and had always found him a quiet, steady, and respectable man. - W. Stockman, a labourer employed in the fort, spoke to having seen the deceased about 8.30 on Wednesday morning. He observed nothing unusual in the man's appearance. Deceased then had his coat off as he had when Collins found him. The master gunner of the fort spoke to deceased's character. he had always known him as a steady man, anxious to do his work well. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 May 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hotel, Morice Town, on Saturday afternoon relative to the death of FREDERICK CHARLES HIGMAN, who had hanged himself in his father's stable, Tamar-road, the same morning. JAMES HIGMAN, brother of the deceased, deposed that he noticed the deceased was rather "queer" in his manners on Thursday and Friday. On Saturday morning he (deceased) came to the stables about half-past seven, but after some instructions as to the work to be done he left, and witness did not again see him alive. Witness knew of nothing that would be likely to prey upon deceased's mind. - JAMES CHARLES HIGMAN, nephew of the deceased, gave similar evidence, adding that for the last two days deceased had tried to shirk his work. But witness did not know of anything to cause him any trouble. If, however, he had any troubles deceased was not one likely to tell anyone about it. - JAMES HIGMAN, father of the deceased, said that on Friday evening his son came home to tea shortly after seven o'clock, and soon after eight he began to make out a long account, over which he seemed very much confused. Witness told him to leave the account for a time, but received no answer. He was very "queer" on Saturday morning; he looked for his cap in the most unlikely places, and after all did not find it, the cap being in a conspicuous position all the time. Witness saw no more of him until he was found at about 9.30 the same morning hanging in the stable, when he was quite dead. In answer to the Coroner, MR HIGMAN said he had no doubt that deceased had been overworked, as he would start work early in the morning and not leave off until night. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 8 May 1883 BIDEFORD - Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Swan Inn, Bideford, before Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN DENNIS, son of Albert Dennis, East-the-Water, who was found drowned yesterday in the mire near the Iron Church. Deceased who was subject to fits was seen to go towards the river, and it is believed that he fell in. An Open Verdict was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 10 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - Inquest Revelations At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse last evening, on the body of JANE YOUNG, aged about 80. William Lacey, an old man, said he was a Corporation labourer, and had resided with the deceased at 41 Morley-place, for the last ten years. During that time he had slept in the same room with YOUNG. She had been suffering from illness, but he never procured medical assistance. He had always maintained YOUNG, who had been a bed-lier for some time. He, however, thought her state very satisfactory considering her old age. On Saturday he told YOUNG he should cease living with her, which he did. He took no steps for her maintenance, nor did he apply to the relieving officer for an order to admit her to the Workhouse until the following Monday, when he was persuaded to do so for his own benefit. Mr G. G. Dyke, master of the Workhouse, said YOUNG was admitted into the House on Tuesday forenoon. She was in such a deplorable condition that she was placed in the foul ward. About three o'clock and shortly after her admittance, she expired. As soon as she was observed to be in a sinking condition the matron administered a little brandy and water. Other restoratives were applied and everything possible was done for the woman. She was in a most filthy, loathsome, and emaciated condition. - Bessie Badcock, a nurse, employed at the Workhouse, said she attended to YOUNG when placed in the foul ward, and found her to be unconscious. She was covered from head to foot with vermin. She was attired in a man's shirt, a skirt and a pair of stockings. She had evidently been unable to take care of herself for some time. - Mr R. J. Nicholson, relieving officer, said that on Monday evening Lacey applied to him for a doctor's order for the deceased. Witness gave him an order and marked it urgent. Owing to the receipt of a letter from Dr Eyeley, on the following morning witness gave Lacey an order for her admittance to the Workhouse. Dr Eyeley, medical officer, said that when he saw YOUNG on Monday night, she was in a very emaciated condition and covered with vermin. She seemed then in a precarious condition, and he thought it advisable that she should be removed to the Workhouse immediately. He attributed death to natural causes, accelerated by the dirty and deplorable conditions by which she was surrounded. The Jury, of whom Mr John Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. They also expressed themselves in very strong terms with regard to the lack of humanity displayed by Lacey.

LYDFORD - Inquest At Princetown. - Mr Fulford, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at Dartmoor prisons on the body of prisoner JAMES HAYES, who was tried at Newcastle in 1869 for manslaughter and sentenced to penal servitude for life. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Heart Disease. The prisoner's conduct whilst at Dartmoor has been exemplary.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 May 1883 HOLCOMBE BURNELL - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Lamb Inn, Longdown, in the parish of Holcombe Burnell, near Exeter, touching the death of ELIZABETH BEER, who was killed on Tuesday by the overturning of a carrier's van. The facts, as already reported, were deposed to by several witnesses; and Mr Robert Ridell, surgeon, of Dunsford, stated that he examined the body of the deceased, and found the entire scalp dragged off from the head from the eyes, while the bones of the back of the head were crushed into the brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 14 May 1883 The Dynamite Disaster Near Tavistock. - Inquest On The Victims. - On Saturday morning an Inquiry was held at the Maltster's Arms, Stokeclimsland, before Mr G. G. White, County Coroner for Cornwall, into the circumstances attending the death of William Bawden, aged 21, of Luckett, who was one of the miners killed by the dynamite explosion in the Devon Great United Mine on Wednesday night. Mr W. Peak was elected Foreman of the Jury. Mr R. J. Frecheville, of Truro, Government Inspector of Mines for the district, was present at the Inquiry and Captain W. H. Clemo, the resident agent of the mine, represented the mine authorities. - The first witness called was Anthony Jewell, a miner of Luckett, who stated that he was employed at the Devon Great United Mine. Bawden and HORWELL were fellow-miners of his, both of them being employed that week on the night "core." All three of them met at the mine at nine o'clock on Wednesday night, and left the changing house together for the shaft. They made for the 60-fathom level, where all of them were going to work, but on the way down, the deceased got ahead of him - a distance, he thought, of about 20 fathoms. He heard an explosion whilst he was still behind, and immediately hurried on to the mouth of the level, but the smoke prevented his entering. He then went to the bottom of the mine, where the father and uncle of Bawden were at work, and procured their assistance. All three proceeded back to the mouth of the level, and after waiting a few minutes they were able to enter. The level was of solid rock being about seven feet high and five feet wide. After looking about he noticed the man Bawden lying at the bottom of the level quite dead. HORWELL was also close by on his back and quite dead. The clothes of both were much torn, whilst their heads, hands and legs were blackened and very much cut and bruised. On looking about for the dynamite box kept in the level they found that it had been blown to pieces. They were engaged in working a boring machine in the sixty fathom level, and all three went down to start boring holes, and in the ordinary course of things the deceased would not have wanted to use dynamite for some hours afterwards. He was not able to say what quantity of dynamite was stored in the box, which was never locked, but the cover was always kept down. - A Juror pointed out that the whole of Bawden's fingers were blown off, which led him to believe that he, at any rate, must have had his hands in the box. - The witness, in concluding his evidence, stated that HORWELL'S fingers were not damaged to the extent that Bawden's were. - Captain Clemo here mentioned that he served out on the Monday previous to the accident, 25lbs. of dynamite to Nankivell, but ordered that only 10lb. should be taken to the dynamite box. - Philip Bawden, the father of the deceased, deposed that he was at work 60 fathoms below the level in which the accident occurred. He noticed the explosion, which was not a very loud one. Shortly afterwards Jewell came to him, and in company with his (witness's) brother, all three went back to the 60 fathom level, and on going in found the bodies in the condition that had been described by the previous witness. The bodies were removed to their respective homes. - Captain Clemo was called, and, in the course of his statement, repeated what he had previously mentioned as to the quantity of dynamite served out on Monday, adding that he could not exactly say what amount there was in the box, but he should think there was a little over 10lbs., having ordered Nankivell and Rich to take a portion to the temporary stores and a portion underground. - The Inspector explained that each man was allowed 5lbs. so that with three men working in the level, there should have been 15lbs. and no more in the box. - One of the Jurymen, named Rapson, here said that he had left the box a short time previous to the men going down, and there was certainly not more than 10lbs. in it then. - The Coroner having ascertained that Rapson was connected the mine, rebuked the police officer present and told him he ought not to have summoned anyone on the Jury who was in any way connected with the mine. - Captain Clemo, in concluding his evidence, stated that he went into the level the morning after the accident, and found a portion of one of the men's brains, a number of fingers and parts of a skull. The candles which the men had taken down with them were also blown to pieces. The cause of the accident was a mystery to him, and he might say that in his search the box of caps which was kept in the level, in a cleft of the rock, away from the dynamite box, was also missing. - In answer to the Inspector, Captain Clemo said he had at times noticed the miners, on going to the dynamite box, carelessly place a lighted candle up over it in the side of the level, and it might by accident fall in. - The Inspector said accidents had occurred at West Frances and Carn Brea mines entirely through this one thing. He would suggest that at this mine the box in which dynamite was stored should be placed above the floor of the level on cramps. It should be so constructed as to open like a cupboard and an iron socket should be placed on the wall immediately opposite the dynamite box, in which the man going to the box might fix his lighted candle. He should like to know if the detonators were ever kept in the same box as the dynamite. - Captain Clemo replied that he could speak positively that no detonators were kept with the dynamite. - The Coroner hoped that attention would be paid to the very valuable suggestion of the Mine Inspector, and Captain Clemo promised to bring it under the notice of the mine authorities. - In summing up, the Coroner said that any opinions that the Jury might have formed could only be treated as mere conjectures, the two persons who could have told them anything about the cause of the accident being unfortunately dead. He must say that it seemed to him that there had been some unnecessary meddling on the part of one or the other, or perhaps both, of the deceased, because it was clearly shown that before they could have had time to commence work they went to the dynamite box. He thought also that they had clearly seen the value of having Mine Inspector present at such Inquiries. According to the evidence they could only bring in a formal verdict that the deceased (William Bawden) was accidentally killed by an explosion of dynamite. - A verdict was returned by the Jury as directed by the Coroner. SYDENHAM DAMERELL - Later in the day Mr R. R. Rodd, one of the Coroners for Devon, opened an Inquest at the Royal Hotel, Horsebridge, relative to the death of WILLIAM JOHN HORWELL, aged 15, of Townlake, South Sydenham, who was also killed by the explosion. Mr W. Collier was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr Rodd, at the outset, explained that the Inquest would have to be adjourned. he had been under the impression that the Government Inspector would attend his Inquiry. Mr Frecheville had, however, attended the Inquiry held by Mr White that morning, and had sent to say that he need not attend the second Inquest, the occurrence being purely accidental. Mr Rodd also explained that the usual course in cases of this kind was for him to open an Inquiry for the purpose of giving an order for the interment of the body, and then adjourn it for the attendance of the Inspector. Under these circumstances, the had instructed the police not to summon any witnesses for that day. He should, therefore, have to ask the Jury to adjourn for the attendance of the witnesses. He regretted that the people on the mine at the time should have moved either of the bodies, especially that of Bawden, as they moved that into the County of Cornwall, which had the effect of putting him and others to some inconvenience. - WILLIAM JOHN HORWELL, a licensed hawker, and father of the deceased, said that the lad had been employed at the mine for the past four months. During that time the deceased had, he believed, used dynamite the same as the other miners, and he had never heard the lad complain of anything respecting the mine. The Inquiry was thereupon adjourned until the afternoon of the 19th inst.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, last evening, respecting the death of FLORENCE PASCOE, aged 4 months, who lived with her parents at the Salutation Inn. From the evidence of the mother it appeared that the child was apparently well at 3.30 yesterday morning, but when the mother awoke at about ten minutes to seven she found it dead. A verdict to the effect "That death was the result of convulsions through teething" was returned.

NORTH TAWTON - Fatal Fight At Northtawton. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - A brutal struggle occurred at Northtawton on Monday last between two labourers, named NORTHCOTT and Arscott, resulting in the death of the former. It seems that late in the afternoon a party of men, one of whom was Arscott, were playing skittles at the Globe Inn, when NORTHCOTT entered somewhat the worse for liquor, and shouted out that he was willing to fight, to play skittles, or wrestle with any man in the alley. No notice was taken of this challenge, but a game was arranged in which the deceased and Arscott were to take part. Just as play was about to commence, however, the two men began wrangling about the possession of the ball. The dispute soon grew to high words, and ultimately the men "stripped" and fought. The encounter appears to have been a very savage though a very brief one. Kicking was resorted to freely on both sides and eventually NORTHCOTT was thrown to the ground, severely bruised about the face and bleeding profusely. He was taken into the house and as he complained of internal pains medical aid was procured. It was then surmised that deceased had received an injury to his intestines and he gradually sank. On Tuesday afternoon his deposition - put in, in evidence, at the Inquest - was taken before Dr Budd, J.P. The poor fellow in the document expressed his belief that he would not recover, and he died about an hour afterwards. NORTHCOTT was a man 37 years of age, and of average height; he had been twice married, and resided with his second wife and seven young children at Northtawton. Though he possessed some skill as a wrestler, he was always known as a quiet respectable man, not given to drink or disorderly behaviour. Arscott is 24 years of age and of somewhat spare build. He, too, is married and lived with his wife and their three little children at Woodly Farm, Southtawton, where he was employed as a labourer. Like the unfortunate man who met his death on Monday, he appears to have generally behaved with propriety and to have never been in trouble before. Though he fought with at least equal ferocity to his antagonist, the evidence certainly points to NORTHCOTT having been the aggressor, and to his having greatly provoked Arscott. A former Inquiry was opened before Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, on Wednesday, and adjourned. Arscott was arrested shortly afterwards when returning from his work to dinner. An adjourned Inquest as to the death of ROBERT NORTHCOTT, labourer, aged 37 years, was held at Northtawton yesterday before Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner. There was a large attendance of the public. - ELIZA NORTHCOTT, sister-in-law of deceased, stated that NORTHCOTT died on Tuesday evening. He was 37 years of age and a married man with six or seven children. - Mr John Deans, surgeon, practising at Northtawton deposed to having made a post-mortem examination of deceased in conjunction with Mr Bennett, of Okehampton. He found the whole cavity of the abdomen and the intestines in a state of intense inflammation. On examining the small bowel, he found that it was torn at about 3 ft. from its junction with the large bowel. Through the opening thus created wind and the fluid contents of the intestines had escaped, producing the state of inflammation before mentioned. The actual cause of death was intense peritonitis resulting from laceration of the bowel. There were no external marks on the trunk. There was a blackness surrounding both eyes, which was plainly visible when he first saw deceased on the morning of the day on which he died. The whole back was so discoloured by the rapid decomposition which set in, that he could not say whether it was bruised or not. When he first saw the man he complained of pain in the lower right side of his bowels, which he said resulted from a kick he had received the previous day. Deceased added that he thought some of his ribs were broken, but such was not the case. It had been proved over and over again that a man might receive a blow in the abdomen sufficient to rupture his bowels, his kidneys, or his liver, without there being any external mark of violence. From his experience he should say an external blow was the cause of the injuries received by deceased. The only other cause which could produce a laceration of the bowel such as he had described was a disease, and that disease was not present. He had no doubt that the injury was caused by a blow, such as might be given by a kick. - A Juror: Might not such an accident be caused by one man struggling with another if the bowels were full at the time? - No. - Wold there not, generally speaking, be an external mark after a severe kick? - I should say that as a rule a blow in the abdomen would not produce an external mark. - If two men were struggling might not the knee of one come in contact with the bowels of the other? - I cannot say anything about that; but it must be a short, sudden, sharp, and decisive blow to rupture the bowels. The blow of a stone thrown has been known to produce such an injury. - Might not a fall against a table or a stool cause it? - Well, the blow must be very sharp and a suddenly received blow. - Would not a fall across a form or a wall cause the injury? - I should say not unless there was some projecting portion. - The Coroner: If a stool were upside down and a man fell on the leg, that might cause the injury? - Yes. - The Coroner remarked that Dr Taylor, in his "Principles and Practice of Medical Jurisprudence," said, "When these ruptures are produced by blows they are rarely accompanied by the slightest mark of ecchymosis or of injury to the skin. Thus, then, there may be no means of distinguishing by external examination, whether a rupture was really due to violence or to spontaneous causes. Those who are unacquainted with this fact might be disposed to refer the rupture to disease, on the supposition that violence should be indicated by the usual characters externally, but there are numerous cases on record which shew that this view is erroneous." - Mr F. J. Bennett stated that he assisted the previous witness in the post-mortem examination, and he concurred in what he had stated. Although there was no mark of an external blow, he believed the injuries resulted from such a blow. - By the Jury: He should say a blow from the knee would not rupture the bowels, unless the person inflicting the blow had fallen from some height upon the injured person. - Loammi Vanstone, residing at Broadwood Kelly, stated that he was at the Globe Inn, Northtawton, on Monday, from 5 to 6 p.m. The inn was kept by Mr Northcott. He knew deceased very well, and met him outside the Globe. They went into the skittle-alley together. As soon as they got inside ROBERT NORTHCOTT said "I will fight, play skittles, or wrestle with anyone in the alley." The accused was there, and deceased said to him "What the ---- ---- do you want with me, Bobby?" Prisoner replied "Well, what do you want with me?" That was how the quarrel began, and the two then "stripped" to fight. They both began to "strip" together, but before any blows were struck witness tried to quiet the men and advised them to drink a pint of beer together instead of fighting. The two men then put on their waistcoats and seemed quiet, but they did not have any beer. Witness tried to get away from the place, but as he reached the gate he heard something said, and on looking round saw the deceased strike the accused. Prisoner returned the blow and they then fought. Only two or three blows were struck, however, before the deceased fell. They were both kicking before the fall, and he believed that NORTHCOTT was the first to use his feet. Arscott, however, seemed to give his opponent a very dangerous kick. The accused then struck deceased several heavy blows in the ribs; the deceased tried to throw the prisoner, but got thrown himself. Immediately afterwards Mrs Northcott, wife of the landlord of the Globe, took deceased away. There were five or six men in the skittle-alley at the time. - By the Jury: He did not see any kicking after deceased was on the ground. NORTHCOTT did not fall upon his stomach. - Do you consider Arscott acted in any way other than in self-defence? - No; I think the deceased was in fault. - The Coroner: Those are proper subject for Inquiry, but the law of the land does not allow any man to do that which leads to the death of a fellow man without being answerable before a proper tribunal. Though the fact of his acting in self-defence does not justify the act, it lessens the seriousness of it. - A Juror: A man has the right to defend himself. - The Coroner: But to ask a witness what he "thinks" is not quite a proper observation. - The Coroner (to the witness): You saw the affair from beginning to end - who was most at fault? - ROBERT NORTHCOTT: he was very wicked and very insulting. - James Ellis, labourer, Northtawton was present in the skittle alley on Monday, which was a general holiday. He had been playing skittles with Arscott and had just finished the game when NORTHCOTT came in. The latter, on entering, said he would play skittles, fight or wrestle with any man in the alley. NORTHCOTT was a little the worse for liquor, and wanted to play skittles with Vanstone. Arscott suggested they should play double handed, and they were just about to commence when the two began to wrangle about the ball, and NORTHCOTT eventually said, "Do you want anything else?" Arscott said, "Do you want anything else?" and at the same time they both commenced to take off their clothes. All present tried to restore peace and witness himself spoke to NORTHCOTT, who replied, "Let me go." They partially dressed, when NORTHCOTT a second time said, "Do you want anything else?" They then began to fight, but witness could not say who struck the first blow. They both began together, so far as he could see. He saw Arscott kick NORTHCOTT once below the knee, and he also saw NORTHCOTT kick Arscott two or three times. NORTHCOTT fell on his right side, and witness saw no blows struck afterwards. He did not see a skittle upon which deceased could have fallen. - Robert Cole, residing at Northtawton stated that Arscott was his brother-in-law. He corroborated the evidence in chief of the previous witness, but stated that he only saw NORTHCOTT kick Arscott, and did not see Arscott kick his opponent. - John Arscott, residing at Newlyn, uncle of the accused, gave evidence to the same effect. NORTHCOTT kicked Arscott first, and then there were kicks on both sides. - James Arscott, son of the last witness, corroborated, but stated that NORTHCOTT was the worse for liquor. He was the only man in that condition. - Vanstone, recalled, said that NORTHCOTT might have been a little the worse for liquor; but he was very quiet until he got to the skittle-alley. - Mary Ann Northcott, wife of the landlord of the Globe Inn, stated that her husband was first cousin to deceased. She heard the noise in the alley, and went into the yard and helped deceased up from the ground. He was covered in blood. When he got into the house he made a statement. Witness was proceeding to say that deceased said he had been kicked, but the Coroner stopped her on the ground that the accused was not present at the time. Witness added that deceased must have been drinking somewhere, because he was the worse for liquor. He had not been to the Globe Inn for some hours previous to the quarrel. - The Coroner, addressing the accused, said: You have head what has been said in this room - that you were engaged in a scuffle and a fight with NORTHCOTT, who has since died. This Inquiry may not end here. You can make a statement if you like, but what you say will be taken down and may be used against you if you are sent to take your trial elsewhere. I think you will do well to keep your own counsel and say nothing, but if you desire to say anything it is quite open for you to do so. You will have full opportunity of calling any witnesses you may please elsewhere. - After a conference with his friends, the accused replied that he had nothing to say. - The Coroner said that he had before him a statement made by the deceased shortly before his death before Dr Budd. He had upon this occasion adhered somewhat rigidly to what he considered the rules of evidence in justice to the accused, but the deceased's statement, properly made, he could place before them. It was as follows:- "ROBERT NORTHCOTT this day, before Christian Budd, M.D., justice of the peace for the county of Devon, on oath, states as follows:- I feel myself in great danger, and I state that yesterday, the 14th May, I was at the Globe Inn, Northtawton, kept by John Northcott, with Robert Arscott, of Southtawton, living at Wood Farm in that parish, about half-past four o'clock. He struck and knocked me down, and while down kicked me in the belly four or five times, from which injuries I am now suffering and fear I shall never survive." - The Coroner remarked that it was a serious and sad Inquiry. That the death of ROBERT NORTHCOTT was caused by the blow which he received on Monday in the skittle-alley at the Globe Inn, where he was engaged in fighting in a wretched, barbarous struggle with his fellow-man, Robert Arscott; and that that blow was received from Arscott there could be no doubt. If they were of that opinion, then Robert Arscott was guilty of slaying his fellow-man; but, still, slaying him under such extenuating circumstances, the crime was reduced to one of manslaughter. If a man inflicted an injury on another man, even in self-defence, which led to that man's death, then the person inflicting the injury was in the eye of the law guilty of manslaughter. He thought he should not be exceeding his duty if he said that in his opinion the man who had passed away was the aggressor; that he commenced the fight and brought on the struggle which ended in his death. With that, however, they had nothing to do; those were circumstances which would be taken into consideration elsewhere. But if they thought that Arscott inflicted the injuries from which NORTHCOTT died it would be their duty to return a verdict of manslaughter against him. The Jury after a brief conference found the prisoner guilty of Manslaughter, but added that he committed the crime under aggravating circumstances. - The Coroner said that the prisoner stood committed for trial at the next Assizes, but there were such circumstances of extenuation surround the offence that he would admit him to bail. Arscott was brought before the Magistrates later in the day and committed to the Assizes for Manslaughter. He was admitted to bail - himself in a bond of £40 and two sureties of £20 each.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 May 1883 IVYBRIDGE - An Inquest was held by Mr Hacker, County Coroner, at Yollandbrook, near Ivybridge, on Thursday touching the death of MR THOMAS ADAMS, farmer, whose suicide has already been reported. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been for some time in a very unsettled frame of mind, and that on Monday, with a pistol he had secreted, he went into a field on is farm, when, putting the muzzle of the weapon in his mouth, he shot himself, death being instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased had Committed Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 May 1883 SYDENHAM DAMEREL - The Recent Dynamite Explosion Near Tavistock. - The adjourned Inquest as to the death of WILLIAM JOHN HORWELL, one of the two miners killed in the dynamite explosion at the Devon Great United Mine, situate near Tavistock on the night of the 9th inst., was held on Saturday afternoon at the Royal Hotel, Horsebridge, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. Mr W. Collier was the Foreman of the Jury. Among the witnesses was James Rapson, who said he worked in the afternoon "core" on the day of the accident. He did not think the deceased would require to use any dynamite. The caps for the dynamite were from two to three feet from the box containing the latter. - Captain W. H. Clemo, the resident agent of the mine, repeated the evidence he gave at the previous Inquest. In answer to the Coroner, he stated that he had no rules or regulations as to the manner in which the dynamite should be served out. It would be possible for those working on the mine to take away some of the dynamite. - The Coroner said that there was no evidence to shew that carelessness could be attributed to anyone. The Foreman said there were instances in which boys in the village had got hold of dynamite and exploded it, and this he thought ought not to be allowed. There were many present who agreed with him that the dynamite at the mine should be better taken care of. The senior of each core should be supplied with a key, the box being kept locked, and he held entirely responsible for the dynamite. The Jury then returned a verdict of Accidental Death. - The Coroner, addressing Capt. Clemo, suggested the necessity of care that dynamite was not taken away from the mine, and that the recommendations made by the Foreman be brought under the notice of the mine authorities.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Guildhall, touching the death of MRS ELIZABETH ALLSOP, aged 66, of 34 Vauxhall-street. It appeared that deceased entered Mrs Roach's shop in Whimple-street and was seized with faintness. She was given some water and afterwards taken home in a cab. Dr Cash Reed was sent for, but she expired soon after his arrival. He stated that she died from syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 23 May 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening at the Pennycomequick Inn, by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, on the body of HENRY COLE, a cartman, 46 years of age, of 11 Wake-street, Pennycomequick, who died on Monday night about 11 o'clock. A post-mortem examination was made by Mr George Jackson, which showed that death resulted from an effusion of blood on the brain, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Exeter, on the body of JAMES STILES VELLAND, aged six years. It appeared that the little fellow as at play on Tuesday with some companions, when he jumped on one of their backs, and fell over into the road, cutting the back of his head. On the day following he complained of illness and Mr Henderson was sent for and attended him up till Saturday, when he died. In the doctor's opinion, death resulted from concussion of the spine. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - Distressing Suicide Of A Youth At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall touching the death of HERBERT FRANCIS MONTAGUE EVANS, who was a junior reporter on the staff of the Mercury, and who committed suicide on Tuesday by taking prussic acid. Mr J. Lewis was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MR HENRY M. EVANS, father of deceased, identified the body of his son. Deceased was within ten days of his seventeenth birthday. He was a very steady and a very resolute lad. Witness knew there was a "love affair" with him and a young lady living in the same neighbourhood. Her father, on account of her extreme youth, gave witness to understand that he disapproved of any engagement. Deceased felt that very deeply, but did not shew any depression to the family. Witness saw him at the breakfast table on Tuesday morning. He was then apparently "all right." Witness was not aware that he made an attempt on his life some days ago, nor was he aware deceased had prussic acid in his possession. Just before 7 p.m. on Tuesday evening witness arrived at home and his wife told him that deceased had not been home to tea, and she believed he had gone out of the house. Between 7.30 and 8 o'clock he accidentally noticed both deceased's hats in the passage. He then went to his bedroom and found it locked on the inside; trying to force the door he failed. He lifted a small window in an adjoining room and one of his sons got on to a ledge common to both windows. He entered deceased's room and opened the door. Witness then went in, and saw deceased lying on the bed, his feet hanging over the side. He was quite dead and cold, and fully dressed. A bottle was found on the window sill with a label marked "Prussic Acid" and "Poison", the latter word in two places. Witness locked the door and went for Dr Eccles. He had noticed a loss of memory and absence of mind lately in deceased. About four weeks since some papers were found which led witness to believe deceased was in trouble. During the past week he complained of giddiness, heaviness and sickness. Deceased had lately been very irritable at times, and this witness could not account for. - ERNEST EVANS, deceased's brother, stated that he and deceased occupied the same room. He saw him alive last at dinner time on Tuesday, and he was holding his hand to his head. He then went upstairs to his room. - The Coroner stated that deceased had pre-arranged the act, for he had spoken to his clerk (the Coroner's Officer) as to the best means of getting prussic acid, and the latter told him to go to the police, which he did. - P.C. George Ryder stated that he was on duty at the Central Station. Deceased was in the habit of frequently calling there. On Thursday morning he said to witness "I want to get rid of a large Newfoundland dog, which is the best way?" Witness told him to poison it, and volunteered to administer poison. On Saturday morning he again came to the Station and said the dog was not getting any better and would witness assist him in getting some poison. He said, "You know me well enough," and witness told him he had better get a sixpennyworth. They then went to Mr Wilmot's (late Lewin's) shop and asked for sixpennyworth of prussic acid to destroy a dog. The chemist gave witness the poison without any hesitation, as he was known there officially. Deceased took the bottle and he paid for the poison. He appeared quite collected and in his right senses. He said it was his father's dog and there was no chance of its recovery. Witness suggested he should bring the dog to the Guildhall and he would destroy it, but EVANS said it could not walk and that he lived at Laira Bridge-terrace. - Mr George Henry Eccles, M.R.C.S., practising in Plymouth, stated that about 8.35 on Tuesday evening he was called to deceased. He found him lying on his bed quite dead, cold and rigid. He could not tell externally what was the cause of death, but the symptoms were consistent with poisoning. Witness had made a post mortem examination and carefully examined all the organs. There was no disease in any of them. About the stomach and, indeed, all the organs, more or less, there was an odour of prussic acid. This shewed that the poison had thoroughly pervaded the system. There was no doubt deceased died from the acid. - By the Foreman: The brain was in a healthy condition, except being slightly congested. It might be possible for deceased to suffer temporary aberration without a medical man being able to detect signs of it in the brain. - The Coroner then read a letter to the Jury, which had been found on the deceased. He had addressed it to his parents, and stated that he was about to commit suicide. Some days ago he made a similar attempt by taking nine-penny worth of prussic acid, but that only made him vomit. His thoughts were evidently engaged with his "love affair", as he requested that when in his coffin his sweetheart should tie a small cross which he had in his possession around his neck; that the lock of her hair, which he held, should be placed on is breast; and that the box containing his love letters should also be placed in his coffin. He expressed his desire to be buried in the Plympton St. Mary churchyard and with a service of strict Roman ritual. He also named several friends whom he wished to be present. In his book she had written the names of the persons to whom he wished them to be given. - In summing up, the Coroner pointed out how unusual it was that a young lad, who had seen little life, should commit such an extraordinary act. Deceased formed a love engagement and was evidently very much attached to his sweetheart, but on account of her youth the engagement was broken off. This preyed upon his mind, as was shewn by the letter that had been read: in fact, the matter appeared to have eclipsed every other object. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that "Deceased died by taking prussic acid, self administered when in a state of Temporary Insanity." Much sympathy was expressed towards his parents.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 May 1883 LYDFORD - Mr Coroner Fulford held an Inquest at the Convict Prisons, Princetown, yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS OPENSHAW, a convict, aged 35, who died on Tuesday night, he having been ailing for some time previously, his complaint being congestion of the lungs. Deceased was received at the establishment in April 1878, on a sentence, received at Manchester, of ten years' penal servitude for felony. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY - At Torquay yesterday an Inquest was held concerning the death of MR CHRISTOPHER H. BULTEEL, who was found dead on Tuesdays evening in Cockington Wood under circumstances already fully reported in these columns. The evidence given by James West, the deceased's attendant, Dr Gordon Cumming, and other witnesses, shewed that MR BULTEEL had for some time suffered from profound melancholia, and that in consequence he was closely watched and never allowed to go out by himself. He conversed rationally with his wife and sister on Tuesday morning, was missed shortly afterwards and nothing more was seen of him until his body was discovered in the evening. The Jury returned as their verdict "That deceased Committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

CLOVELLY - An Inquest was held at Mouth Mill, near Clovelly, by the County Coroner, Mr J. H. Toller, respecting the deaths of the two boys TREWYN and CLEAVE, who were drowned on Saturday. The Foreman of the Jury was Mr John Howard. Mr William Babb said he was at Mouth Mill on Saturday afternoon when he saw the youth TREWYN on a rock surrounded by the tide. He did not call to him, as his back being towards the shore he was afraid of alarming him. He watched him for about five minutes, when he was washed off by a wave into a depth of from eight to nine feet of water. There were no boats at hand, and as he could not swim no assistance could be rendered. Babb also deposed to the finding of the body about five p.m., three hours after the occurrence. Mr William Beer spoke to finding the body of the lad CHARLES CLEAVE about eight p.m. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 26 May 1883 IVYBRIDGE - The Inquest At Ivybridge. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN AXWORTHY was held yesterday at the London Hotel, Ivybridge before Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner. Dr Randle stated that he had that morning examined the body and found that the cavity of the heart and the heart itself was much swollen quite sufficient to cause sudden death especially if AXWORTHY had been under any violent exercise or strain. In answer to a Juryman, the doctor stated that it was quite possible that the heart was swollen through decomposition, and added that it was at least twice the size of that of the average man. The Jury, without much discussion, then returned a verdict of Death from Heart Disease. Mr Mallett, the Foreman of the Jury, suggested that under the circumstances they should hand their fees to the widow, a suggestion which was carried unanimously. - Mr Rodd then addressed the Jury and complained of the report which had appeared in the Western Daily Mercury. He stated that the constable in making his report to him did not mention that the body was in a state of decomposition, and that the widow and children were sleeping in the same room. He was at home on the Tuesday morning, and waited for the morning's post and his son receiving the Officer's report next day treated it as an ordinary case, and did not communicate with him. Had the constable come down the same morning he would have been at home and held the Inquest in the evening. Mr Mallett was very glad of the explanations, and thought that the constable had fully done his duty (a sentiment which the Jurymen endorsed), and suggested that even if he had himself gone he might not have got his expenses. Mr Rodd, however, assured them that he should have himself paid all expense, and reminded the gentlemen present that the law allowed him four days in which to hold the Inquest. Mr S. Head stated that if such were the case it was a great shame, as illustrated in this case, the doctor having stated that decomposition this warm weather, would rapidly set in. After a great deal of discussion the Jury and those present separated.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 May 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Brian at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, on Saturday, touching the death of MARY ANN PRITER, aged 78 years, of 10 Morley-street. It appeared that the deceased, who had suffered from apoplectic fits and a mental disease, went to bed in much the same state of health as usual on Friday night and that the next morning she was found dead in bed. The Coroner said that there being nothing suspicious in the case, he had not thought it necessary to have a post-mortem examination. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 2 June 1883 PLYMOUTH - Tragedy At Plymouth. Alleged Murder Of A Husband By His Wife. Coroner's Inquest. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - Claremont Street, Plymouth, and neighbourhood were thrown into a state of excitement yesterday morning on a rumour spreading to the effect, that a woman had murdered her husband. As soon as the report gained currency, the scene of the crime was besieged by people. Various stories were circulated as to the circumstances, but, so far as can be gathered, the real facts of the case are these:- Three years ago an old man, named WILLIAM GILLARD, married an odd, repulsive looking woman, about twenty-five years his junior. The alliance did not prove a happy one; in fact, the parties appear to have lived together on very bad terms, especially during the last few weeks. MRS GILLARD is a woman of intemperate habits, and she appears to have spent every farthing she could get in liquor. She has, it is alleged, even stolen money from her husband for this purpose, and the latter naturally rebuked her for what she did. This MRS GILLARD resented in forcible language, hence the unpleasantness and unhappiness between them. During the past month, they have frequently quarrelled, and only last week it is said that the woman knocked her husband down, and let him lay on the ground for hours. MRS GILLARD complained very strongly of her husband keeping her short of money, and this, if true, was not to be wondered at considering her drunken habits. When MRS GILLARD mentioned this fact when gossiping with some neighbours, one of them said, "I have never been kept short of money, and I wouldn't be if I were you." MRS GILLARD replied, "No, I won't." With that she made use of a disgraceful expression accompanied by a threat that she would "do" for her husband, and the woman appears to have suited her action to the word, for she at once rushed to her rooms, and commenced to abuse her poor old husband, who is nearly seventy years of age, in a shameful manner. GILLARD resented this as well as he was able, but MRS GILLARD, who is, comparatively speaking, a strong woman as compared with her husband, not content with abusing him, struck him a blow in the forehead, causing blood to blow. The old man said he would stand it no longer, and with that packed up his box, carrying it out on the landing previous to going to Exeter. The woman again bullied him, and would have pushed him over the stairs with his box, but for the interference of a neighbour named Chapman. GILLARD, however, left the house, followed by his wife, who returned shortly after, saying her husband had gone to Exeter. GILLARD, it seems, did not go to Exeter, and must have returned to the house shortly before half-past eleven, but was not seen by anyone except his wife, who it was thought retired to rest about nine o'clock. Shortly before midnight the couple were heard quarrelling in their room, the husband accusing his wife of stealing 6s. 6d. from him. This she stoutly denied, with a strong oath. All became quiet again until shortly before one o'clock yesterday morning, when a sawyer named Kingcombe, who resides in the house, heard a great noise in the passage as if somebody had fallen over the stairs. Kingcombe gave his evidence in a singular manner at the Inquest. Until after the murder was committed, he said he did not know that GILLARD and his wife were tenants in his house, although he let GILLARD in on Wednesday night. Kingcombe does not believe in anyone interfering with man and wife, when they are quarrelling, even if they are killing each other. When he heard this tremendous noise of someone falling over the stairs he lay in his bed and took no notice at all of what had occurred. He should not have done so, he said, had he known murder was being committed. About half-past five yesterday morning, as an unfortunate was passing through Claremont-court, she noticed blood trickling out under the door in which GILLARD resided. She at once raised an alarm, and it was then found that there was a man lying against the door on the inside. The neighbours in the house were called and the dead body of GILLARD was discovered lying at the bottom of the stairs covered with blood. Dr Jackson was sent for, and on his arrival he pronounced life extinct, the man having been dead some hours. On examination a clean cut incised wound, about an inch in length, was found on the back of the head of the deceased. The matter was placed in the hands of the police, who, on investigation, came to the conclusion that the man had been murdered by his wife. Spots of blood were found on the wall at the top of the staircase, whilst a blood-stained hatchet and knife, and a heavy instrument - a soldering iron - covered with grey hairs - similar to that on the head of the deceased - wee found in MRS GILLARD'S room. It is thought that GILLARD and his wife were quarrelling, when the former went to leave the room, and his wife becoming enraged took up the soldering iron, and dealt her husband a terrific blow on the right hand side of the head, stunning him and causing him to fall over the stairs. The man fell in a heap on his face and hands at the bottom of the staircase, where he lay and died. The wife, instead of going to her husband's assistance, locked herself in her room. MRS GILLARD on being questioned, however, denied having seen her husband from the time he left the house to go to Exeter, until she saw him dead. GILLARD, it may be stated, came by his death on the third anniversary of his wedding day. At the Inquest last evening, a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned against MRS GILLARD. The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of WM. GILLARD, aged sixty-nine years. A double Jury was empanelled and Mr Edwards was chosen Foreman. Mr F. Wreford, chief constable, appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of that body. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, said the case was of a very suspicious nature. The man was found lying at the bottom of the stairs dead with injuries to his head. A blood-stained hatchet, and soldering iron, with hair about were discovered in the room afterwards. Blood stains were also found about the staircase. They would have to consider how the deceased came by his death. They would have to say whether he fell over the stairs, or was pushed over. If they came to the conclusion that deceased was pushed over, then they would have to say who pushed him over. He was glad to say that MRS GILLARD would be there at the Inquiry, although she was a person who was prima facie implicated. The woman was not there in custody, but a watch had been kept on her. He thought it right to mention these circumstances to the Jury, so that they might take due cognizance of them. - The Jury then walked to the house in Claremont-street to view the body. There was a large and excited crowd outside the premises. After the body and staircase had been viewed by the Jury, they returned to the Guildhall, where the Coroner said he was quite sure that the Jury, who were well versed in these cases, would kindly discredit any stories that they might have heard made by irresponsible persons outside. - The prisoner, MARY GILLARD, is forty-six years of age, and a boot-closer by trade, but has not worked to her trade for many years. Her husband was a labourer and a diver, and had saved a little money. - The first witness called, Mary Ann Elizabeth Chapman, married woman, residing at 14 Claremont-street, said she knew the deceased. Had known him for about five weeks. He was about sixty-nine years of age, and lived in the same house as witness with his wife. She had heard deceased and his wife quarrelling a little. That was about a week or two ago. She had only heard them quarrel once. She saw the deceased about eight o'clock on Thursday morning. He then appeared quite well. She saw the deceased again about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. Deceased was quite sober. He had a box on his back and said he was going to Exeter. He then left the house. The wife went away with her husband, but returned again in less than half-an-hour, saying "He has taken a cab, and gone away to the station." MRS GILLARD then went into her room. About twenty minutes to nine MRS GILLARD locked herself in her room, saying she was going to bed. Asked whether the wife was sober or drunk, she replied that she could not say she was sober. She had not said that MRS GILLARD was drunk, but she had been drinking. After MRS GILLARD went to bed witness, who slept on the same landing, did not hear anything more of her for the night, nor did she hear anyone go into the room. Witness retired to rest about 10.30 p.m., and was asleep by midnight. MRS GILLARD had been in the house all that day, and witness frequently conversed with her. She would swear that she heard no noise or disturbance or a person falling over the stairs from the time she retired to rest until she was called, at about a quarter to six that morning, by Mrs Michelmore, who said that someone had cut their throat downstairs, for blood was running underneath the door on to the stones. Witness went to the head of the stairs and looked down. Although it was dark she saw a dark object lying at the bottom. She then went half-way down the stairs, and, seeing that it was a man at the bottom of the stairs, screamed. With that MRS GILLARD opened the door, and said, "What is it?" and she told her that her husband was lying at the bottom of the stairs. MRS GILLARD said "No he is not, he is gone to Exeter." On looking at the man she recognised deceased, who was lying on his face with his forehead against the door. She did not see any blood at that time. Several persons came to the spot, and the front door was opened and the deceased was pulled back when she saw blood on the stairs. She saw some specks of blood on the wall at the top of the stairs. She never saw the soldering iron (produced) before. She knew the knife (produced); saw MRS GILLARD cutting a bullock's melt with it on Thursday. - By the Coroner: Her hearing was very good, but it was possible for deceased to have fallen from the top of the stairs to the bottom in the night without her hearing it. There was a room between her bedroom and the stairhead. She did not hear any altercation on Thursday night between deceased and his wife. Had never said that she did. - By the Foreman: When she met the deceased on the staircase on his way to Exeter, he said to his wife "I will get away out of it." When MRS GILLARD came out yesterday morning on the staircase, she lit a lamp and went down to see who it was at the bottom of the stairs. She did not hear what MRS GILLARD said when she discovered it was her husband. - In answer to the Jury, witness said she could not tell when the door was fastened on Thursday night; it was closed when witness went to bed. A Mr Kingcombe usually locked up the door. She did not see anyone come out of MRS GILLARD'S room that morning. MRS GILLARD was very excited that morning. - John Kingcombe, sawyer, residing at 14 Claremont-street, said the last time he saw the deceased was on Wednesday night about quarter-past twelve. He was then quite sober. He did not see the deceased on Thursday at all, but fancied he heard him. He had frequently heard the deceased and his wife quarrelling. Last week he heard a terrible row at night in their room, and something fell heavily to the ground. He did not ask what had occurred. If they had murdered each other he should not have went to them. If a man and his wife fell out, it was no business of anyone. On Thursday night witness came home with his wife at 11.30 p.m., and heard a man and woman quarrelling in the room occupied by deceased and his wife. He heard the man accuse his wife of taking 6s. 6d. out of his trouser's pocket. The woman called him a lying old ----. Then he heard a fall in the room; he could not say who it was that fell. He went to bed about midnight, and just before one o'clock he heard a tremendous noise in the stairs. He could not say at what portion of the stairs the row was. It seemed like a dead fall. Whatever it was that fell it lay still. The person might have been thrown down; he could not say. Did not hear any groans or screams. When he heard that noise he did not hear anyone close MRS GILLARD'S door, or anyone go back into the room. It was possible for anyone to have closed the door without his hearing it. About six o'clock that morning women roused him up, saying there was a man murdered at the bottom of the stairs. Shortly after the body of the deceased was brought into witness's room. He could not say GILLARD was dead, although someone said he was cold and stiff. MRS GILLARD came downstairs almost immediately, and said the deceased was her husband. Witness told her that she and her husband had fallen out in the night, and MRS GILLARD said, "My husband was not home for the night." He did not bolt the front door on Thursday night, because he was roused out of his bed the night before. He did not hear anyone come in the house after he locked the door; he did not believe anyone did so. He did not hear anyone go out of the door during the night. MRS GILLARD told him that her husband took his box away on Thursday afternoon with the intention of going away. - By the Foreman: The front door was unlocked that morning, but the deceased was lying against it on the inside. - By the Coroner: When he first saw the deceased, he was lying sideways with his head against the door; he was not lying on his face and hands. - By the Chief Constable: He had not said that he did not get out of bed until the body was brought into his room. He would swear that he got out of his bed before the body was brought into his room. - By a Juror: When he heard the noise in the stairs he heard a dog bark loudly in the house for about five minutes. It was quite possible for anyone living in the house to have heard it. - Elizabeth Chilcott, widow, residing in Claremont-street, said that about half-past three on Thursday afternoon she heard the deceased and his wife quarrelling in Claremont-court. She could not say whether MRS GILLARD was the worse for liquor or not. She had been drinking. She saw the deceased at the top of the stairs just before with a box on his back. His wife was also on the top of the stairs. She believed that MRS GILLARD would have thrown the deceased with the box over the stairs if it had not been for Mrs Chapman. When the deceased came downstairs he was trembling very much and had some blood on his left collar. Just after half-past two witness saw MRS GILLARD in the court. MRS GILLARD said it was her wedding day - she had been married three years that day. She said that her husband had kept her short, and that she would do for him. She appeared very angry at the time. She knew that deceased was considerably older than his wife. When deceased left the court with his box, his wife followed him out and returned shortly after. Did not know when the deceased returned. - By the chief Constable: MRS GILLARD did not use any threat beyond that she would do for him. She, however, made use of the expression, "I will do for the old ..... before long." MRS GILLARD did not say, "I will be the death of him ere long." - By a Juror: Just before the deceased came down over the stairs with the box on his back, MRS GILLARD had hold of her husband at the top of the stairs. They were quarrelling. MRS GILLARD was abusing her husband, who was trying to get away from her. She heard a dog howling about half-past twelve on Thursday night. - Detective Inspector G. Stone, of the Plymouth Borough Police, said in consequence of information he received he visited No. 14 Claremont-street, at about half-past eleven that morning. He found GILLARD'S body in bed in an inside room at the top of the stairs. On examining it, he saw a wound about half an inch in length on the forehead. On the back of the head he saw a deep wound, about an inch in length. He saw MRS GILLARD, who appeared agitated and excited. He asked her for the coat that the deceased was wearing at the time he was brought up from the stairs. She gave him the two coats (produced). There were stains of blood on the collar of the overcoat, and spots on the right sleeve. The under coat was also stained with blood on the back part. On searching the room, witness found the soldering iron (produced) standing against the wall by the side of a chest of drawers. He examined it, and noticed some grey hairs about it. He did not notice any blood. He found the hatchet (produced) on the floor under the sofa. There was blood about the handle. He found a knife with blood on it, which she said she used for cutting up cat's meat. He said to her "Can you give any explanation about this occurrence?" She said, "No; I have not seen him since half-past three yesterday afternoon." He went on the landing, and with the aid of a lamp he noticed on the right-hand side of the wall from the landing to the second wall splashes resembling blood, and on the door on the opposite side - Mrs Chapman's apartment - he saw splashes of blood. It was not a smudge, but a sprinkling of blood. From the top to the bottom of the stairs he saw spots of blood on the steps. He would not be positive about it, but it seemed as if a wet cloth had been put over the whitewashed wall on the sprinkled spots of blood. During the time he was examining Mrs Chapman's door, Mrs Chapman, who was present, said this could not have been done by bringing him upstairs. It was not here last night. He should certainly say that the spots on the wall were not caused by bringing the body up the stairs. Mrs Chapman also said that it was a matter of impossibility for these spots of blood on the door to have been caused by bringing the body up the stairs because her door was open. - Mr C. Jackson, F.R.C.S., said that about six o'clock that morning he was called to 14 Claremont-street. He found the body of the deceased inside the witness Kingcombe's room. There was a bruise on the forehead. He considered that deceased had been dead three or four hours. At the Coroner's request, he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. Externally, there was a small bruise slightly indented over the right temple. It did not look very recent; it might have been done twenty four hours before. On the right side of the head there was a clean cut incised wound about an inch in length, produced probably by a moderately sharp instrument. The wound was about a quarter of an inch in depth; it was down to the bone. On examining the soldering iron, he was inclined to think that the wound might have been produced by a blow from the edge of the iron. It was a blow that must have been struck with considerable violence. It was such as would knock a man over the stairs. There was an effusion of blood between the covering membrane on the outside of the bone on the head and the bone itself. He did not think that it was likely that the wound would have been caused by a fall over the stairs. Looking at the position in which the deceased was found, he did not think the wound was caused by a fall over the stairs. There was no discolouration of the vertebrae. The heart was diseased, especially one of the barrels. His opinion of the cause of death was shock to the system, caused by the fall over the stairs, caused probably by the blow on the head, together with the loss of blood on a diseased heart. It was quite possible to inflict a blow with the soldering iron on the head, without leaving any stain or mark of blood upon it. He saw the spots on Mrs Chapman's door and after examination with a microscope, he had come to the conclusion that they were human blood. - By the Foreman: It was very likely that the blow the deceased received rendered him unconscious immediately. - P.C. Collings, of the Borough Police, said that about six o'clock that morning he went to 14 Claremont-street, and saw GILLARD'S body in the witness Kingcombe's room. Deceased was wearing the two coats produced at the time. He searched the body and found a florin, sixpence, seven penny pieces, watch and spectacles. - By the Foreman: The room which the deceased occupied was not disordered or was there any blood in the room. - The Coroner to MRS GILLARD: You have heard what has been said by the various witnesses, would you like to ask them any questions? - MRS GILLARD: No. - The Coroner did not know whether the Jury would require to re-examine Mrs Chapman. It was rather unusual to re-examine a witness on her own statement, but it was very evident that she had done and seen a great deal more than she had stated. Addressing MRS GILLARD, Mr Brian said: It is quite open to you to be sworn if you wish it to give evidence. You have heard what has been said, and how far you are implicated. Of course. I must caution you that if you are sworn you must answer any question that may be put to you. We should ask the most exhaustive and penetrating question, and you would probably be placed in an awkward position. You have no legal adviser, and I think that under the circumstances I would recommend you not to say anything. You can use your own discretion. - MRS GILLARD: I have nothing to say here. - The Coroner: I think that perhaps that is best. - The Foreman: I quite agree with you sir. - The Coroner, in summing up, reprimanded Mrs Chapman for keeping back information from the Jury, she had not evidently told the truth, or all that she knew about the occurrence as shown by the evidence of Mrs Chilcott. He pointed out that Chapman did not say anything about MRS GILLARD attempting to throw her husband over the stairs in the afternoon until Mrs Chilcott spoke of it. There were some things that could not be gainsaid. The man was found dead at the bottom of the stairs with a wound in his head, and the couple lived a very unhappy life. MRS GILLARD had said that she did not see her husband after three o'clock in the afternoon until she saw him dead, but there could be no doubt from the evidence that deceased and his wife were quarrelling about midnight, just before GILLARD met with his death. After they had had a quarrel on Thursday afternoon GILLARD said he would go out of it, and with that left the house with the intention of going to Exeter. MRS GILLARD probably stole some money from him because GILLARD found he had not enough to take him to Exeter and then came back and accused his wife of robbing him. It was then that this fatal row took place. Taking the circumstances of the case and the woman's language into consideration, he thought they would have no difficulty in finding a verdict. It was for them to say how GILLARD came by his death. Was it by accident? If not, was it through violence? If so, by whom was that violence inflicted? Was it inflicted by the wife of the deceased? If the wife used the weapon (produced) after making use of the threat that she would do for her husband, then that pointed to murder, because the character of the weapon showed the murderous intention. Were there any circumstances, or was there any provocation shown on the part of the husband, which tempted this woman to strike the blow? He thought not. He reminded them that they were not sitting there to try anyone; they were simply trying to find a prima facie case. If the woman, with malicious intentions, struck her husband that blow then she was guilty of murder. - The Jury then consulted and the Foreman said that several of the gentlemen of the Jury were not satisfied with the evidence of Mrs Chapman and they would like to have her in the witness box again. - Mrs Chapman, recalled, said that about half-past three on Thursday afternoon the deceased was on the top of the stairs with a box. MRS GILLARD was standing close to him just inside the door. She heard them talking, but could not say what they were talking about. She did not go between them and take MRS GILLARD into her room. She fancied MRS GILLARD was going to push her husband and the box over the stair: witness put her hand between them. She did not hear a tremendous noise in the house on Thursday night, nor did she hear a dog barking during the night. - By the Jury: The dog referred to belonged to her son, and was in one of her rooms when it barked. She did not hear it. She would not explain why Mrs Chilcott, who lived in another house, heard the dog barking and witness who lived in the same room did not hear it. She did not tell Inspector Stone that she heard the dog barking during the night. - Inspector Stone said he did not know that there was a dog in the house until Mrs Chapman told him. - The Coroner cautioned the witness, who persisted in her statement that she did not hear a noise in the night. - The Jury then consulted in private and after a quarter of an hour's deliberation returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against MARY GILLARD. GILLARD, on hearing the verdict became distressed and exclaimed "Oh! I did not do it. I am as innocent as a baby. I know nothing about it." - The Coroner: It is now my painful duty to say you stand committed to take your trial at the ensuing Assizes for the County of Devon, and I now hand you over to the custody of the Chief Constable of the Borough. - The prisoner, who was then removed to the cells, will be brought before the Borough Magistrates at the police-court this morning.

TORQUAY - The Fatality At Torquay. - At the Town Hall, Torquay, last evening, an Inquest was held on the body of ERNEST HOBLEY, who was killed by falling over some balustrades at Mr Collard's, confectioner, on Wednesday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

KINGSTEIGNTON - Found Drowned At Kingsteignton. - A few days since JOHN LUSCOMBE, about 37 years of age, married, and foreman of claycutters in the employ of Messrs. Watts and Co., clay merchants, of Newton, was found drowned in an old clay pit at Kingsteignton. The deceased was subject to fits of giddiness and it is supposed that whilst he was at work alone, near the edge of the pit, he was seized with one of these fits and fell into the water and was drowned. At the Inquest held by Mr Hacker, Coroner, on the body, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 4 June 1883 NORTHAM - Sad Drowning Case At Appledore. - On Friday night, SAMUEL FISHLEY, son of MR SAMUEL FISHLEY, the well-known ferryman of Instow and Appledore, was drowned. The deceased, who is about twenty-seven years of age, left Appledore between ten and eleven o'clock alone, to cross the ferry to Instow. He was seen to enter the boat and start from the quay, but was not seen alive again. His dead body was picked u by the deceased's uncle near Cleavehouses on Saturday morning, and the boat, which was a safe one, was discovered near Instow, with the oars gone. It is thought deceased must have let the oar slip and in attempting to reach it, fell over the side and was drowned. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, when an Open Verdict was returned.

BRIXHAM - The Suicide Of A Clergyman At Brixham. - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Upton Manor, Higher Brixham, on Saturday, on the body of the REV. H. G. G. CUTLER. Several witnesses - including MR F. E. CUTLER (deceased's son), Mr O. C. Ward, of Farnham, Surrey (deceased's solicitor), Charles Perriman (carpenter), Charles Woodley (ropemaker), Thomas Adams and Abraham Eales - were examined. From their evidence it appeared that for some time past MR CUTLER had been suffering from depressed spirits on account of supposed monetary difficulties which, in reality, did not exist. On the 30th ult. he wrote to his solicitor wishing him "Good-bye," and saying that he would not see him again in this world; he also mentioned that his financial position was desperate, and that hope was beyond him. Under the same date a note appeared in his diary, "My dear mother died on this day, 1847. Lord now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace." On the evening of the following day, between eight and nine o'clock, the rev. gentleman was seen to throw himself from the cliffs of Berry Head into the sea, a distance of 60ft., as already reported. Before a rope could be obtained to throw to him he had sunk. The body was recovered on Friday morning by two fishermen. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 June 1883 NORTH TAWTON - Mr Coroner Fulford held an Inquest at the Gostwyck Arms, Northtawton, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN HAWKINS BOLT, who died suddenly at Yeo Farm on the previous morning. It was the custom of the deceased to stay at the farm on Sundays during the absence of Mr Strong, the occupier. BOLT had not been in the house long on Sunday last when he was observed to be very ill and he died before medical aid could be procured. The evidence of Mr Deans, the medical man, shewed that the deceased had been suffering from heart disease for some time, and that this was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 5 June 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Boating Fatality At Devonport. Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquest on the body of MARY LOUISA RAWLING, aged 15, who was drowned in Hamoaze on Sunday afternoon, was held yesterday afternoon at MR C. RAWLING'S public-house, Benbow-street, Stoke, by the Mayor of Saltash (Mr W. Hawke), the Coroner. Mr Ovenden was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner hoped the Jury would disabuse their minds of anything they had heard or read in the papers that morning, and return a verdict on the evidence laid before them. - The Jury having viewed the body, the first witness called was John Hill, a tailor, of Cambridge-street, Plymouth, who stated that yesterday afternoon about three his cousin, EDWARD RAWLING, and himself hired a boat of a man named Francis, living at Joll's Cottages, Morice Town. Three of RAWLING'S sisters, including the deceased, accompanied them. At the time they started a gentle breeze was blowing, the wind being south-east. There was a tidy sea on, but they did not feel the wind very much until they reached the other side of the water. They only had a mainsail. Witness, who acted under RAWLING'S instructions, held the rope in his hand the whole time, steering the boat as well. RAWLING was sitting on the thwart by the side of the mast. Two of the girls were sitting to windward and the other to leeward. While passing one of the men-of-war lying off Wilcove they did not feel the wind, but when past the ship they felt the breeze freshen. LILY RAWLING, the middle sister, got very nervous, and she wishing to go ashore, they put the boat about for this purpose, when a squall caused the sail to flap, which still more frightened her, and she stood up in the boat, causing it to heel over still more. At the same time the sail jibed and the boat capsized, all five being thrown into the water. Both young men could swim, and each tried to get on the bottom of the boat and save the girls. The whole of the party were close together, and on each of them trying to get to the boat it seemed to continually roll over. RAWLING held on to his eldest sister. Witness supported LILY for some time until he was washed away from the boat. At the time he was holding LILY he caught hold of the deceased by the foot. The latter seemed to have become entangled in some part of the boat, as he could not get her head above water. He was of opinion that deceased was caught under the boat the last time she rolled over, and was suffocated. Witness was picked up by a shore boat. He was conscious the whole time but was nearly exhausted. He attributed the cause of the accident to the sudden squall. - By the Coroner: He did not hear the boat-owner give RAWLING any warning, although he knew there was a conversation between him and Francis. He told the two boys who picked him up that there were five in the water, and asked the boys if they had all been saved. They said they thought so, with which answer he was satisfied. Witness was in the water ten minutes after the boat capsized. He was perfectly sober at the time and had been a teetotaler for over fourteen years. - By the Coroner: The girls did not have the permission of their parents to go on the water. - EDWARD CHARLES RAWLING, age twenty-two, brother of the deceased and cousin to the last witness, corroborated the opening statement. He stated that the aim they had in view when they started on Sunday was to get to Wilcove, and, as the wind was blowing from the south-east, he thought they would have no difficulty in making straight sail for there. Witness told Francis their intentions, who advised him not to attempt it, as he thought it was too stormy. Notwithstanding this, he let them have a mainsail, which was of a fair size for the boat, a light sailing one, which did not draw more than five or six inches of water. They passed a man-of-war soon afterwards, when a sudden gust made the sisters afraid. Witness then said they would make for the shore. In doing this the boat lurched a little, and in consequence one or two of them moved to leeward, which caused the boat to turn over. he had constantly cautioned his sisters to sit still. - By the Coroner: It was not true that he had made fast the sheet. - Witness, continuing, stated that his cousin held the sheet rope in his hand. On being thrown into the water he clung to the boat. He was able to swim. His eldest sister happening to be the nearest to him, he held her up until they were rescued. He noticed his cousin holding the deceased by the leg. His sister and he were picked up by some boys in a pleasure boat, and landed at Wilcove in order that his sister might get her clothing changed. - William Joachin, petty officer of the 2nd class, H.M.S. Lion, deposed that he was in command of a boat which was ordered to put off from that ship to the scene of the accident. He found some boys towing a boat, who told them they had seen three females' hats, but that only two girls had been picked up. He immediately concluded that the missing girl must be under the boat, which was being towed, bottom upwards. On canting it over sufficiently he found the deceased lying with her legs under the stern seat board. Witness at once extricated her, and carried out the Humane Society's regulations for the treatment of the apparently drowned, but he did not see any signs of life. The deceased was at once taken on board the Lion, and attended by the doctor. It was blowing very hard and gusty at the time of the accident: in fact, it was the most dangerous wind that blew in that harbour for small sailing craft. - The Coroner thought the evidence that had been given was very satisfactory. He did not think it necessary to hear the statement of Francis as from the evidence they had heard he thought he was entitled to be exonerated from all blame. The Coroner, however, wished that the boat-owner might be called in. On this being done, he expressed the hope that in future Francis would be careful in not allowing youngsters to hire boats in stormy weather, and that he would endeavour to see that all to whom the boats were lent knew how to handle them. - Francis explained that when the young men asked for a mizzen, he persuaded them not to have it. He promised to act on the Coroner's suggestion. In the present case, however, he felt perfect confidence from the remarks the young men made as to the wind in letting them have the boat. - The Coroner, in summing up, thought this was a clear case of "Accidental Death," and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. Great sympathy was expressed for the father of the unfortunate girl, who hoped the remarks of the coroner would be the means of preventing boys from being allowed to hire boats in stormy weather. - The Boatswain of the Defiance wishes us to correct a statement in our report of the boating fatality in Hamoaze on Sunday. It was the men of the Defiance who rescued MISS RAWLING, the elder sister, who was taken on board the Lion, and is slowly recovering from the shock. The Lion's boat arrived later on, and turning the boat over found the deceased.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 6 June 1883 TORQUAY - The Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Barton, Torquay, before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, yesterday afternoon, relative to the death of MRS ANN FOGWELL, who committed suicide by hanging herself in the wash-house of her residence on Sunday evening. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 9 June 1883 PLYMPTON - The Suicide At Plympton. - Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest yesterday on the body of GEORGE MADDOCK, 58, labourer, who was found hanging, on Wednesday last, at Colebrook. The deceased was last seen the previous evening by Mr F. Cornish. Mr E. Stephens, farmer, Shaugh, said that he was called on Wednesday, and he went in and cut MADDOCK down, but life was extinct. Maria Blake, a sister of deceased, said that for about a year her brother had been getting low spirited, his mother's death and his own failing health being, she believed, the reason. Dr Ellery said he saw the body shortly after it was cut down, and he thought MADDOCK had been dead about an hour. He thought deceased must have committed suicide in an unsound state of mind. The Jury, of which Mr H. S. Pearse was Foreman, brought in a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 June 1883 LYNTON - The Mysterious Disappearance Near Ilfracombe. - The singular disappearance of a young woman from the Lynton Cottage Hospital, has now been explained. On Thursday morning Captain Jones Irwin, of Combmartin, near Ilfracombe, left his home in a boat, with several other men, to proceed to Heddonsmouth, where they are engaged in receiving wreckage, and whilst so doing they perceived in the distance something white floating on the water. On approaching nearer they found it to be a human body, whereupon they tied a rope around it and having fastened a large stone to the rope, left the corpse to float on the water, intending to convey it to Combmartin on their return home. However, on their looking for the body later in the day they were unable to find it, and concluded that it had sunk, the tide having risen. On the matter being reported to the police, the latter endeavoured to induce Captain Irwin to again go in search of the body, but this he was unwilling to do. On Friday morning, a coastguardsman named George Ashby, stationed at Combmartin, accompanied by two young men proceeded to Heddonsmouth, and there saw the body in a standing position underneath the water. They lowered grappling irons and after securing the body conveyed it to Combmartin, where it was subsequently identified as that of EMMA DOVETT, of Brendon, and about 30 years of age (the young woman in question). An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr J. H. Toller. Hannah Pape, nurse at the Lynton Cottage Hospital, gave evidence as to the deceased being missed last Thursday morning. Witness had never noticed any symptoms of insanity about the deceased, who was a domestic servant. Had greatly improved in health since she had been at the Institution. Dr Berry said he had been attending deceased, who had been suffering from general debility, accompanied by extreme mental depression, but he did not consider her to have been insane. Witness gave particulars regarding the close search made for the deceased on her being missed. He believed that her malady had ended in a severe attack of suicidal mania. Captain Irwin deposed to finding the body. It was lying face downwards, and was in a night-dress. He went to the stern of the boat he was in, and turned the body over, and as he had a little distance further to go he put a rope round the body, underneath the arms, and attached a stone to the rope. He then went to the wreck, and a short time afterwards returned to where he had left the body, but it had then disappeared. He tried for two hours to recover the body with a rope, but was unable to do so. Other evidence having been given, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 15 June 1883 IVYBRIDGE - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at Ivybridge last evening, touching the suicide of MR WILLIAM ROWE, which was reported in our columns yesterday. The Jury, of whom Mr Sherwell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Suicide At Stoke. - A widow named KATE PARKYN ANDREWS, aged 52, who lived at 62 Hotham-place, Stoke, committed suicide early on Wednesday morning by drowning herself in the Dead Lake. Deceased's husband died about twelve years ago, and she has recently lived at Hotham-place with her son HENRY and her other children. She was in very comfortable circumstances, as her four sons, who held very good positions, assisted her. She had, however, unfortunately given way to drink during the past few weeks, and had at times left the house at night (on one occasion staying out all night, besides doing other unusual acts in order to frighten her children. There was, undoubtedly, an inherent tendency to insanity in her disposition. Her sister is at present confined in a lunatic Asylum, and her brother disappeared mysteriously some years ago. For sometime past her family had considered the advisability of confining her also, but yielding to her entreaties had, somewhat foolishly, allowed her to remain at home. On Tuesday night deceased, who was not quite sober, went to bed about eleven o'clock. She slept with her daughter KATE, to whom she remarked that she wished to go out, but she was persuaded to go to bed. About four o'clock the daughter awoke and found that her mother was not in bed. The window, which was 12 or 14 feet from the ground, was open, and the curtain was flying out. After a little time she called her brother, HENRY, but they concluded that this was only one of the deceased's freaks, and made no stir about the matter, although the other windows, as well as the doors of the house, were all secured. Before going away in the morning, about 6 o'clock, HENRY made an unsuccessful search for his mother. nothing was heard of her until the afternoon, when, on the tide receding in Mill Lake, her body was found about twenty yards from the shore by a mason's labourer named James Smith. She was only partially dressed. Smith and a fellow labourer at once took the body to Hotham-place, and handed it over to her friends. - A Coroner's Jury assembled last evening at the No Place Inn, and returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Monday 18 June 1883 BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary, Barnstaple, on Saturday, respecting the death of a farm labourer, of Frithelstock, near Torrington, named MARSHALL. A fortnight since, just as he had mounted his employer's horse, the animal plunged and threw him over its head. He sustained a fracture of the skull, and died on Friday from inflammation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 June 1883 EXETER - Supposed Suicide By An Exeter Chemist. - Mr H. W. Hooper, the Exeter Coroner, held an Inquest last evening respecting the death of MR GEORGE DELVES, aged 46, who had carried on business as chemist and druggist for some years at the shop, corner of High-street and North-street, known by the curious figures of St. Peter and the devil, which occupy a niche in the wall. Mr J. W. Friend, solicitor, watched the proceedings on behalf of the friends of the deceased. Miss Ellen Clark, sister of the deceased's wife, stated that about noon on Saturday MR DELVES, who was in bed, rang for some bread and butter and tea, but his wife told him that he was well enough to get up, and refused to allow the servants to go to his room. Deceased said he would get up: and witness went downstairs and left the house. Shortly before six o'clock in the evening she was fetched home. MRS DELVES was then in a highly hysterical condition and utterly unable to give any account of what had occurred: but the messenger stated that the door of MR DELVES'S room had been burst open, as they were unable to get an answer from him when called, and that on going to the bed he was found dead and cold. Witness said she was aware that deceased frequently kept his bed for a week at a time. In answer to Mr Friend, she stated that the deceased was a very intemperate man. He was not sober on the morning in question. He would have drink the whole of the time he was in bed, his usual drink being wine (sherry or champagne) or brandy. He appeared to be in tolerably good health when sober, but he has lately complained that he could not sleep. In witness's opinion he was not at times responsible for his acts. MR DELVES was not medically attended, but he was in the habit of taking sedatives. More than twelve months ago, when attacked by a fit of epilepsy, Mr Roper visited him; and often, when suffering from the effects of drink, he would make up a dose of medicine from a prescription given by that gentleman and Dr Drake. The mixture in question contained bromide of potassium. In addition to this he also took something in drops, but whether this was prescribed or not she was unable to say. - Ellen Elizabeth Levy, cook in the service of the deceased, deposed that on Saturday morning about 7 o'clock she saw the deceased in the stairs, and he was then intoxicated. He was put to bed, and she afterwards she him in bed asleep. About six o'clock in the evening, the door of deceased's bedroom was locked, and as MR DELVES did not answer their calls, she forced the door. The nurse and the assistant then entered, and witness heard them say he was dead. Deceased was in the habit of drinking heavily. - Sidney John Baker, apprentice to the deceased, proved entering the bedroom on Saturday evening and finding the dead body of deceased upon the bed. It was covered with the clothes, with the exception of the left arm. Witness found on the washstand a bottle containing the bromide mixture, and another labelled in Latin, "Prussic Acid." Witness knew he was in the habit of keeping this in his room. When in these drinking fits witness did not believe he was master of his actions. In answer to the Foreman, witness said the deceased's hand shook to such an extent that he should not think it possible for him to pour drops out of a bottle steadily; he would in all probability pour more than he wished. Traces of prussic acid were seen in the drawer in which the bottle had been kept. Deceased was in the habit of taking a saline draught, and one of the ingredients was prussic acid. Witness often made up the mixture for him, and it was always prepared in the shop: he had never known the deceased add prussic acid after the mixture was made up. - The medical man, Dr Henderson, was of opinion that the deceased had died from the effect of an over dose of prussic acid. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Homicide through Misadventure."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 22 June 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Found Dead At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at the Board-room of the Ford Workhouse yesterday on the body of a man named SAMUEL MITCHELL, a pensioner, formerly residing at Ford, but latterly at Plymouth. The deceased was in the habit of taking country walks, and on Tuesday last, about a quarter to seven in the evening, he was found by an artist, named Francis J. H. Edgcumbe, in Bladderly-lane. Edgcumbe felt his pulse, but could find no signs of life. A cart passing by at the time, the body was conveyed to the Ford Workhouse, and handed over to the Governor. Mr F. E. Row, the Workhouse surgeon, on examining the body, gave it as his opinion that the deceased, who appeared to be about eighty years of age, had been dead about three hours. The surgeon obtained an order to make a post-mortem examination, but did not think it necessary to take this course. Mr Albert Gard, acting for Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 June 1883 LYDFORD - An Inquest was held at the Prisons, Princetown, yesterday afternoon by Mr Coroner Fulford, relative to the death of JAMES WILSON, a convict aged 55, who died somewhat suddenly on the 19th inst. The deceased was sentenced at Liverpool Sessions in May 1876 to seven years' penal servitude for larceny, and he was received at the Dartmoor establishment in December 1878. He had since remained there. On Sunday he was seized with a fit in the Roman Catholic Chapel, and he had another fit on Tuesday. He died on the following day. Dr Watts, senior medical officer of the prison, stated that on making a post-mortem examination, he found an effusion of serum on the brain, which had caused death. - Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Wellington Hotel, Wellington-street, relative to the death of CAROLINE TRUMP, aged 58. - ROSINA JANE TRUMP stated that she lived with her mother (the deceased) who was a widow. She had been an invalid for some years and had often complained of difficult breathing and pains at the heart, though latterly she had appeared to be much better. On Thursday deceased went to bed at about eleven o'clock, witness, who slept in the same room, retiring about the same time. On the following morning, about 6.30, witness was disturbed by a heavy fall, and on at once getting up to see what was the matter she found her mother dead on the floor. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Subsequently another Inquest was held at the Brunel Hotel, respecting the death of MARY VALLACK ELLIOT, of No. 18 Clarendon-place. The deceased was a retired governess. Her health had been good up to the past week, when one day she went to Cawsand and returned very unwell. On Thursday morning she had breakfast as usual and returned to her room. At about eleven o'clock Mary Hicks, who lived with the deceased, heard her vomiting. MISS ELLIOT, who complained of pains at her chest, was put to bed, but declined to have a doctor. She seemed somewhat better during the evening, but on Elizabeth Haddy knocking at her door several times she failed to obtain an answer, and at half-past nine o'clock determined to go inside. She then found that the old lady was dead. A doctor who was called in was of opinion that life had been extinct for two hours. The Jury's feeling was one of "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 25 June 1883 ASHBURTON - The Fatality Near Ashburton. - On Saturday afternoon Mr Sydney Hacker, the District Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr George Gidley was Foreman, held an Inquest at Gulwell on the body of MR RICHARD PERRY, who died the day previous. From the evidence of William Satterley it appeared the deceased left his residence on Wednesday morning on a pony which he was accustomed to ride. When descending a hill near Pridhamsleigh the animal, from some unknown cause, started off at a furious rate, and almost immediately after it fell on its haunches, throwing MR PERRY with great force out of the saddle on to the road, with which the left side of the back part of his head came in contact. Dr Adams stated there was no external fracture, but that death resulted from an effusion of blood on the brain, the result of some internal fracture of the skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury and Coroner at the same time expressing their deep sympathy with the relatives of the deceased. MR PERRY was in his sixty-eighth year. The funeral will take place at Ashburton tomorrow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 June 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday relative to the death of JOSEPH HOLMES, who died there on Saturday. The deceased, who was an assistant boilermaker in the Devonport Dockyard, fell from a boiler on Saturday morning, thereby receiving such injury that soon afterwards he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow, who is left with her children.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter last evening, respecting the death of MR NOTT, butcher, South-street, who had died in the Hospital in consequence of injuries received in falling from horseback. The circumstances were reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. One of the witnesses stated that when the deceased left the Sawyer's Arms to return home he was sober, although he had taken two or three "drops" of gin and water; how much the witness could not say. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 26 June 1883 EXETER - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest last evening on the body of JOHN ATKINS, plasterer, who died on Sunday from the effects of self-inflicted wound. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 27 June 1883 PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Drowning Fatality At Marsh Mills. A Dangerous Spot. - An Inquest was yesterday held at Lee Moor Cottage, Marsh Mills, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of a little boy, named ALBERT WILLIAM MANN, son of RICHARD MANN, a platelayer on the Great Western Railway. The child was playing with his two sisters in the truck-way near the house, when he was suddenly missed and could not be found. Eventually a ganger, named James Brewer, after searching the mill-leat as far as Sherwood Bottom, perceived the child's body lying at the bottom of the water, a depth of about four feet. Brewer waded in, recovered the body and brought it home. In reply to a Juror, Brewer said he used means to restore animation, but, of course, the child was dead. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict. A Juror called attention to the fencing of the place. - The Coroner remarked that a fence was placed round the place about twenty years ago, when another case of drowning occurred. It was explained that the only way out, except by crossing the line, was by traversing the leat, which was unprotected. A Juror suggested that the owner of the property should be written to. - The Foreman called attention to the fact that it was not a public right, but that the property was private. - A Juror: But it is the only way out. They do not allow children along the line. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that they should deal with the case as they found it. The spot mentioned was not proved to be where the child fell in. - A Juror remarked that if they could not convey their opinions in a rider, they could put it in the form of a suggestion. - The Coroner said he would take the suggestion of the Jury, and would write to Mr Newberry, Lord Morley's agent, on the subject. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 28 June 1883 TORQUAY - The Fatal Fall At Torquay. - On Tuesday night, at the Castle Inn, Torquay, Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of ELIZA JANE BOWDEN, who was discovered dead at the bottom of the stairs in the White Lion public-house, on Saturday evening, by her husband. The first witness called was Annie Dist, fourteen years of age, who said that on Saturday afternoon she went into the White Lion. MRS BOWDEN was at the top of the stairs. She believed MR BOWDEN was upstairs as well, as she heard him tell his wife to come back. She saw that MRS BOWDEN had been crying, and when she came in heard MR BOWDEN scolding her. When acting as a nurse in the house she had seen quarrelling and fighting between MR and MRS BOWDEN. She left a month ago, but had not noticed any quarrelling since. - Mr Stephen Gay, bootmaker, gave evidence to the effect that at ten o'clock on Saturday evening the deceased served him with a glass of ale, but that he had not observed anything particular about her, nor did not notice that she had been crying. He had, however, seen MR BOWDEN sometimes attempt to strike his wife, and sometimes he was quarrelsome, and that she often had to leave the house for fear of him. - Mary Cummings, deceased's servant, gave evidence to the effect that when she left at 10.30 the deceased was all right, and that she never heard any quarrelling, nor did she notice that MRS BOWDEN had been crying. - Ellen Shears, dressmaker, wife of John Shears, deposed that she last saw deceased alive on Saturday at noon. She was awoke at one o'clock in the morning of Sunday by cries of "Help". She got up and went down and saw MRS BOWDEN with her head lying on the stairs with MR BOWDEN standing beside he crying aloud "It can't be true! Oh! it can't be true!" She noticed that something appeared to be wrong with deceased's teeth. Nothing had led her to suppose that BOWDEN had been drinking. he was much agitated. Mr H. Gordon Cumming, surgeon, made a post mortem examination. He opened the wind-pipe, and found the teeth had not passed into the wind-pipe, and were not the cause of death. His opinion was that the condition of the head and liver was the cause of death. - JAMES BOWDEN, the husband of the deceased, was then called, and in answer to the Coroner expressed his willingness to give evidence. The Coroner then summed up, and said there were two questions for the Jury to decide - whether deceased died from the disease mentioned in the medical evidence, or from violence. After a brief consultation, the Jury returned their verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 30 June 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Two Trees Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) on the body of JOHN HOLE, who died suddenly on the preceding evening at Mr Allen's beershop, 10 Granby-street, Devonport, as reported in our yesterday's issue. William Allen stated that he had known the deceased for seventeen years, and during that time he had not heard him complain of illness. Ata bout five o'clock on the previous evening, deceased, according to custom, came to witness's house and asked for a pennyworth of beer, but was not supplied through his being taken suddenly ill, when he complained of violent pains in the head. After he had vomited a great deal he leaned his head on the table and seemed to sleep. Two hours afterwards witness tried to rouse him, but finding he could not do so, he sent for the police. On Sergeant Schubert's arrival he felt deceased's pulse and sent for Dr Rolstone, who immediately arrived and ordered his removal to the Hospital. Before a stretcher arrived the man had died. Deceased was a gardener, and resided at 104 Pembroke-street. Witness never saw him the worse for liquor, but he bore the character of a man who "liked his beer." - Sergeant Schubert corroborated the statement of the previous witness, and stated that he had that morning visited deceased's late residence, and found it in a wretched condition. The room - an attic - was in a very dirty state, and not an article of furniture nor a particle of food did he see. An old book in the room bore the following entry:- "JOHN HOLE, born 25th September 1825," from which deceased's age was computed to be 58. - Dr Rolston examined deceased, and found him to be unconscious. His extremities were cold, and from the first he entertained no hopes of his recovery. He had that morning made a post-mortem examination, and found the body fairly well nourished, but in an unhealthy condition, caused by bad living and by drinking large quantities of beer. His opinion was that deceased died from apoplexy. The Jury, of whom Mr Prior was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and commended Sergeant Schubert's promptitude.

PLYMOUTH - A Child Scalded To Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest yesterday at the Guildhall to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ALICE THEODOSIA TURNER, aged eighteen months, who died from injuries received by scalding on Tuesday last. ELIZA TURNER, residing at 3 Parade-ope, Plymouth, and grandmother of the deceased, stated, that on Tuesday last about 2 p.m. she was in the kitchen washing, and had placed a bucket of boiling water in the corner, with the intention of throwing it into the boiler, shortly after this she heard the deceased screaming, and on looking around, observed the child lying on the floor and the water pouring over her. She immediately shouted and the mother of the deceased, who was directly over her, ran down to the assistance of witness, and after divesting the child of its clothing, conveyed it to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Mr John Hanson, assistant house-surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said the child, when admitted, was suffering from very severe scalds. It did not seem to rally and on Thursday expired. He attributed death to the shock to the system occasioned by the scalds, and the Jury, of whom Mr R. Jolliff was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, at the same time exonerating the grandmother from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 3 July 1883 KINGSWEAR - The Suicide In Dartmouth Harbour. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday, at the Royal Yacht Hotel, Kingswear, into the cause of the death of CAROL HEINRICH BENJAMIN HARNACK, the German sailor who committed suicide by hanging himself on board the German corvette Niobe. Mr James Paddon was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and the proceedings were watched by Lieut. Von Heiringen on behalf of Capt. Koester, and Mr J. H. Cumming acted as interpreter. Several witnesses were examined and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of suicide, but in what state of mind the deceased was in there was no evidence to show.

EXETER - The Suicide Of MRS FLOUD, of Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest last evening at Exeter touching the death of MRS FLOUD, the widow of the late MR FLOUD, solicitor of Exeter. - It appeared from the evidence of Bessie Pengelly, whose home is at Exmouth, and who was an attendant on the deceased, that on Saturday she went to bed sometime after the deceased (who was then awake) and went to sleep. Some time during the next morning she was awakened by the deceased walking up and down the room holding her head. Witness subsequently went to sleep again and did not then wake till five minutes past eight on Sunday morning, when she discovered the deceased had left the room. She went and searched for her and found her in the drawing-room with her throat cut. She had been rather strange in her habits lately. A knife was produced covered with blood, it being found near deceased's body. - This was the principal evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 July 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident To MR J. B. WALTER. - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Stoke Spirit Vaults, Waterloo-street, touching the death of MR JOHN BRIMMACOMBE WALTER, forage dealer, of Plymouth, who died on Saturday from the effects of an accident on May 1st last. - Mr George Thom, surgeon, of Stoke, said that on the 1st of May he was on the road to Plympton, and near the Laira Bridge turning. He was driving, and he wrote down particulars of an accident which occurred, and which he witnessed. These particulars were as follows:- "I was driving on the road to Plympton on the afternoon of this day, accompanied by my wife. The weather looked very threatening, and I turned to go home just before the road turning to Laira Bridge. While in the act of turning I saw a man on horseback galloping in what seemed to me a reckless manner. He was about 100 yards from my pony cart when I just saw him keeping close to the wall on his right hand side, and he was going in the direction of Plympton. I saw there was danger, and stopped as close to my right hand as I could go with my pony's head towards Plymouth as to give him plenty of room to pass. To my horror when about twenty or thirty yards distant he left the wall on his right hand side and bore right down on my trap. Then suddenly seeing the danger he pulled his right rein sharply and threw the horse down on his right side, and he himself went clean over the horse's shoulder and pitched on some part of his head. The horse's hind feet were in front of my left wheel, but as he drew them up to rise I drove on to get clear of him in case he should stagger and fall on my wife. I then went to deceased's assistance and found him almost pulseless and suffering from the concussion. He was lying in the middle of the road on his face. I turned him over on his back and undid his collar and waistcoat, and had him lifted to the side of the wall. I asked a bystander to send for a shutter, as he was now beginning to revive, and, after seeing him laid on it, and directing him to be taken to the South Devon Hospital, I drove on there and asked the assistant house-surgeon to prepare a bed for his reception. The time of the accident must have been about a quarter-past four o'clock." - The Coroner: What you have read you swear, on your oath, to be the truth? - I do. - And you have nothing to add to the contents of the paper produced? - I have not. Perhaps I could answer any question founded on the paper. I wrote it directly I got home. - The Coroner: What rate was he riding at? - I cannot say. I think it was as hard as the horse could go. - Did he give you the impression of a man whose horse had run away with him? - I was a considerable distance off, and the accident occurred in a very short space of time. He was riding down towards me, and I saw that the horse was galloping as fast as it could. - Was he riding in a reckless manner? - Yes, unless the horse had run away. He had the rein in his hand. - Did he appear to you to have control over the animal? - I cannot say. His seat was very unsteady. - He had the whole width of the road? - Yes, he crossed right over the road, and fell in front of my pony. His horse's legs became mixed with my pony's legs. - Could you tell whether he was sober at the time or not? - I could not. - I thought when you assisted him to get up you might have noticed whether he smelt of liquor? - I did that as a matter of fact, but it is not a trustworthy test, and, in fact, he was hardly breathing when I got there. From the time I saw him until the accident a very short space of time elapsed; seconds could count the time. I saw it was a serious case, and I wrote my account, when I got home, in consequence. He nearly pitched over my trap. - But you were on the wrong side of the road? - I could not help being so. I could not drive my trap on the right side in front of a man coming down at the pace I have mentioned. - The Coroner: Was there anyone else in the road that you had to clear but him? - No. Mine was the only vehicle. You must understand I was not in motion. I had just turned round when I saw him coming. - MR ELIJAH WALTER said he lived at 13 Paradise-place, and was an Admiralty writer. Deceased was his brother, and resided, when at home, at the Dock Hotel, Millbay. He was brought to witness's house from the South Devon Hospital, Plymouth, on or about May 20th. He was still confined to bed, and was under the care of Mr Swain and Mr R. H. Hughes. He was sometimes conscious and when in that condition he said that the horse ran away with him and desired witness to have it shot. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said he had not had the animal shot. Witness was hoping that his brother would get better and then he could have done as he liked about the horse. Deceased had not ridden the horse before that day. The horse, witness believed, was four years old. - Was deceased a good rider? - As good as any in the county. - Mr Sampson (Foreman of the Jury): He could ride anything. - The Coroner: Did you know anything that he had been doing on the day of the accident? - No, but I know he went to his bankers to deposit money, and he had a receipt for his money on him. Deceased was 43 years old last November. He was insured in the Lancashire and Yorkshire Accidental Insurance Office. - Witness said he wished to add that Mr Paul Swain stated that he believed deceased was sober at the time of the accident. He was habitually a sober man. - Mr Sampson: So I can testify, after seeing him many times. - Mr Bryant, the Coroner's Officer: So I say, and I have known him for years. - Mr R. H. Hughes, M.A., M.B., surgeon, of Plymouth, said he first saw deceased on May 20th. He attended him constantly until his death, which took place on Saturday. Deceased had been suffering from partial paralysis of the right side, from which he temporarily recovered. He was then kept in bed more to prevent any ulterior consequences than from the actual condition in which he was. The first paralysis was caused by haemorrhage, the result of an injury to the skull, and from this injury he never fully recovered. Death was caused by abscess on the brain, which resulted from the original injury. Witness feared the formation of this abscess from the first, and therefore kept deceased in bed. Witness had no doubt that deceased died from the result of the accident he sustained on May 1st. Everything was done towards his recovery; he would not have lived so long but for his excellent nursing, both in the Hospital and at his brother's house. Witness had known deceased for some years, and he knew him to be a healthy and temperate man. Had he been otherwise he could not have lived so long. His skull was fractured in two places. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, caused by the running away of deceased's horse."

STOKE DAMEREL - Last evening Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest at the Lord Hood Inn, King-street, relative to the death of JOHN MUMFORD, age 50, who was a cooper on board H.M.S. Cambridge. Deceased resided at 10 Ordnance-street, and besides being a cooper in the navy he was a pensioner from the Royal William Victualling Yard. He complained of illness on Friday, and was attended by Mr Malcolm V. Stace, surgeon of the ship. On Saturday he came on shore and went to see Mr Breeze, chemist, of Catherine-street, who prescribed for him. Later in the evening deceased complained of pains in the side. On Sunday morning he came down from his room, and in endeavouring to return he was unable to get up the stairs. He called assistance, and when Mr James Harrison, surgeon, was fetched, he found life to be extinct. Mr Harrison attributed death to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - A little girl, aged 6 years, and only daughter of MR P. KINGCOMBE, shipwright in her Majesty's Dockyard, who resides at 10 Whimple-street, Plymouth, met with death on Monday afternoon under painful circumstances. The house is a very high one, and deceased's parents resided in the upper apartments. The various flights of stairs from the bottom of the house to the top form what is known as a well-staircase. Deceased was accustomed to play on the landing leading to her parents' rooms, and was so doing when she was heard by her mother to fall. When picked up by MRS KINGCOMBE the child was dead. It appeared that she had mounted the banisters and fallen over, a distance of nearly fifty feet. She alighted upon her head, and death was almost instantaneous. Mr Brian, Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their sympathy and condolence with the bereaved parents.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 4 July 1883 EXETER - The Bathing Fatality At Exeter. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday on the body of WILLIAM LANGDON, aged 11, son of a labourer, who was drowned whilst bathing in the Exe on Saturday afternoon last. The evidence of a boy named Breading, who was bathing with the deceased, showed that the unfortunate boy was swimming towards the middle of the river, where he had seen a log floating. Before he could reach it, he suddenly sank, having, it is believed, been seized with cramp. The witness swam to his assistance, and succeeded in taking hold of him, but he was too heavy, and he was obliged to relinquish his hold in order to save his own life. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and complimented the boy Breading on his plucky attempt to save his companion.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 7 July 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Found Drowned At Devonport. - About five o'clock yesterday morning, the body of a man was seen floating in Hamoaze, abreast of the Lion, by the officer on watch, who secured it and subsequently handed it over to the care of P.C. Lethbridge, of the Devonport police force. The constable had it conveyed to the dead-house at Newpassage, to await an Inquest. The body was identified as that of MR WILLIAM WATTS, Master of the War Department vessel Sebastopol. of the Gunwharf, Devonport, and who has been missing since the night of the 27th ult. The authorities at Saltash having been communicated with, Mr W. Hawke, (the Coroner) assisted by Mr F. M. Cleverton, held an Inquest last evening at Shepherd's Ferry Hotel, Newpassage. The Jury having viewed the body, which was much decomposed, evidence was taken as to the means by which deceased met his death. Elizabeth Burns, living at 10 St John-street, Devonport, stated that she saw the deceased about eleven o'clock on the night in question, when he was walking very unsteadily down Boot-lane, leading towards Northcorner. Witness believed him to be very tipsy at the time from the manner in which he rambled from one side of the road to the other. She had also seen him once before the worse for liquor. Her attention had been drawn to the matter by one of the crew of the Sebastopol, who resided in the same house as herself. On hearing this she at once remembered having seen him on the night in question. - JOHN LITTLETON WATTS, a fisherman living at Cawsand, the father of the deceased, said he saw his son alive on the morning of Monday, the 25th ult., when the deceased left his home. His son would have been 38 years of age in August next had he lived. Witness could not say how deceased got into the water, but he knew that he could swim. - Thomas Dunstone, master of a War Department lighter, William Turner, quartermaster of the Lion, and Charles Henry Mock, second class petty officer of the Lion, also gave evidence, the latter as to finding the body. - P.C. Lethbridge said he searched the body and found a silver watch with a locket attached, a bunch of keys, a knife, a whistle, a pencil, and a purse containing 7s. 2 ½d., two studs, a watch key, and a bronze coin. The watch had stopped at ten minutes past eleven. In the opinion of witness deceased met his death by drowning. - Inspector James, who watched the proceedings on behalf of the Gunwharf authorities, was not sworn, but stated that a detective sergeant had been making inquiries about the way in which deceased came by his death, but the first witness called seemed to be the person who last saw him alive. He was rather surprised at what he had heard at the Inquest, as he was in the habit of seeing the deceased nearly every day, and believed him to be a very steady and respectable man. - The Coroner thought that the Jury could find no other verdict than that the deceased was found drowned, but how he came into the water there was no evidence to show. - The Jury, after a short consultation, concurred, and returned an Open Verdict according to the Coroner's suggestion.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 July 1883 EXETER - Death From An Overdose Of Laudanum. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday, touching the death of MARY ANN HARRIETT SOUTHCOTT, widow, who had died from the effects of poison on Friday. On Thursday last the deceased went home the worse for liquor, and was put to bed by Mrs Elston, her landlady, who had never seen her in that state before. Next morning the deceased left the house as usual and nothing was seen of her until the evening when she was found by her sister, Mrs Leage (who had come to seek her), on the bed apparently asleep. She attempted to arouse her, but was unsuccessful. On looking around the room she saw two small bottles both empty and labelled laudanum, and Mr Harris, surgeon, was sent for and promptly administered two emetics which were both effective. The surgeon left, giving instructions that deceased was to be walked about the room, and in this her sister and Mrs Elston assisted her until about ten o'clock, when she became tired and sat on the edge of the bed, and while in that position she suddenly expired. She had purchased the poison at Mr Tighe's, chemist, High-street, stating that she knew its nature, and was in the habit of taking it. The deceased's husband had also been in the habit of taking laudanum. The medical evidence went to shew that death was caused by cardiac syncope, resulting from the use of laudanum acting on a circulation enfeebled by age, and a verdict of "Death from Misadventure" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 10 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - Scene At An Inquest At Plymouth. The Coroner And The Juror. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Lord Ebrington Inn, Ebrington-street, Plymouth, on the body of JAMES MCMULLAN, aged sixty-one years, who died almost suddenly on Sunday evening last. CATHERINE MCMULLAN, residing at 9 Ebrington-street, said her husband, who was blind, had served as a non-commissioned officer during the Indian Mutiny. He had enjoyed pretty good health, but recently had suffered from frequent attacks of severe coughing. He had one of these attacks on Sunday evening and died before the arrival of a medical man. At the conclusion of the evidence a Juror, named Bishop, said he wished to question the witness. - The Coroner, evidently labouring under a misapprehension that Bishop was not a Juror, told him not to interfere. - Bishop: I shall interfere. - The Coroner: What is that you say - you shall interfere? (To Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer: Remove this man who dares to interfere. - Bishop: I will not leave the room. - The Coroner: Remove him. - Bishop: I refuse to go. - The Coroner's Officer then went over to Mr Bishop, and he was eventually persuaded to leave the room quietly. He, however, shortly afterwards requested to be allowed to apologise if he had done any wrong, and upon re-entering the room remarked that, as a Juror, he had a right to speak. - The Coroner: You are not allowed to make speeches. - Bishop: I will speak. - The Coroner: Now, mind what you are doing. - Bishop: We are summoned here to .... - The Coroner (interrupting him): I have my own opinion as to your conduct on this occasion. There are other times when you would conduct yourself in a different manner. - Bishop: Explain yourself; what do you mean? - The Coroner: If I had had any conversation with you previously I should not have had you sworn as one of the Jurors here. I have never been subjected to such insulting conduct by a Juror before. - Bishop: I want truth and justice. I am summoned here to...... - The Coroner (interrupting): Now, Mr Bishop, be careful. It is in my power, and I will heavily fine you. - Bishop, after defying the Coroner to do so, rose, but was ordered by Mr Brian to sit down. - The Coroner: I will not be served in this manner whilst in my office. - Bishop: This is not your office. - The Coroner: It is whilst I am performing my duty as Coroner. - Bishop: Yes, pro tem. - The Coroner: Do you wish Mr Forward (living in the same house) to be sworn? - Bishop: I do. - After some of the Jurymen had expressed the opinion that this further evidence was not necessary, Mr Forward was called and examined by the Coroner. Bishop then proceeded to put several questions to the witness, and the Foreman interrupting, said he thought these questions had already been answered. - The Foreman: Are you not satisfied with the evidence? Do you believe that death resulted from natural causes? - Bishop: No. - The Foreman: Then what is your opinion? - Bishop: There are plenty here to tell without me. - The Coroner to the Foreman: We must have the decision of the whole Jury. - The Foreman to Bishop: What is your opinion? - Bishop: I was told just now to sit down, and I shall not tell. Bishop subsequently said that he was in favour of a post mortem. The other Jurors, considering that the evidence was satisfactory, expressed themselves in favour of a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and Bishop then said: I will give in, there are so many against me. The Jury then returned their verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 11 July 1883 IVYBRIDGE - Found Dead At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was yesterday held at Stretchleigh Farm, Ivybridge, by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr B. Sherwill was Foreman, on the body of JOSEPH PENWELL, aged 22, farm labourer. From the evidence of his master, Mr Charles Ryder, it appears that deceased, who was subject to fits, left work on Saturday evening, and not returning, the family retired to rest. Mr Ryder found him about half-past eight on Sunday morning in an outhouse, lying on his face, he having probably fallen there in a fit. His face was embedded in the mud, which must have caused suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, the result of a fit."

BASINGSTOKE, HAMPSHIRE - Sudden Death At A Railway Station. - The Hampshire Coroner has held an Inquest at Basingstoke, on the body of WILLIAM COOMBE OADES, a draper's assistant, of Shoreditch, who died suddenly at the railway station at Basingstoke while travelling from London to South Tawton, Devon. From the evidence of Henry Moore, the deceased's cousin, living at Kilburn, it appeared that he travelled from Waterloo with the deceased, whose breath was short, and who seemed ill from the time he got into the train. He was taken out at Basingstoke and died directly. He had told witness that he had been an out-patient of a hospital for chest diseases and that the doctor had informed him that his heart was weak. GEORGE OADE, a farmer, at South Zeal, South Tawton, said the deceased was his son. He had written home informing them that he was out of health, and wanted to come home. Dr Webb was of opinion that the deceased died from syncope, super-induced probably from the heat. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 July 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Queen's Hotel, Newton, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, relative to the death of THIRZA BRIMBLECOMBE, aged 6 years, daughter of a labourer named GEORGE BRIMBLECOMBE. Evidence shewed that the deceased, whilst playing on the marsh ground, fell into a large pit of water, and was drowned before assistance arrived. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and recommended that the owners be requested to put a fence around, or fill up the pit.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 16 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Melbourne Inn on Saturday by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE THOMAS FLOWER, aged forty-two, residing at 22 Wyndham-street West, who died somewhat suddenly that morning. The Coroner's opinion was that death resulted from the bursting of a blood vessel on the lungs, and the Jury, of whom Mr Henry Hocking was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that they considered MRS FLOWER did all that was possible, and they sympathised with her in her trouble.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 18 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Occurrence At Plymouth. The Inquest: Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Last evening the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall upon the body of FRANCIS DRAKE, labourer, aged twenty-three, who died in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on the previous evening from the effects of burns, which he received through the upsetting of a paraffin oil lamp on Friday night, during a fight with another labourer, named Robert Matthews, aged twenty-five, at 17 Middle-lane, Plymouth. Mr William Stanbury was chosen Foreman of the Jury, which numbered twenty-three. Mr R. P. Jackson, solicitor, attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the man Matthews, who was not present. The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr Bridgman) and the Chief Constable (Mr F. Wreford) were also in attendance. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, remarked that the Jury were summoned to give attention to a case of a very unusual and painful character. he could not conceal from them that they probably knew something of the circumstances, and that the unfortunate man was found running up the street in a sheet of flame. There were other persons in the house at the time of the occurrence, and from them the Jury would hear as to what led to the deceased receiving the injuries which led to his death. It would, perhaps, be a very delicate duty, but he did not think, if the witnesses were clear in their statements, that they would experience much difficulty in coming to a conclusion. Although the Jurymen had doubtless read the accounts of the affair in the papers, he was quite sure they would not allow their minds to be warped or prejudiced against any person implicated. That there was a person implicated was clear, from the fact that the man Matthews was at present moment detained in custody under a charge of violent assault in connection with this very painful occurrence. It might be asked why this man was not before them, but this was because he was in custody under the order of the magistrates: and it would have been a waste of time, knowing all he did, to have made any efforts to procure Matthew's attendance, inasmuch as, if he (the Coroner) made an application with this view, he would most probably have been met with the argument that the bringing of the man from one place to another would afford him a possible means of escape. Of course, if there was an absolute necessity for Matthews's presence, there were ways and means by which it could be obtained, but he did not think it was requisite in this case, as the man was represented by a solicitor, who was entitled to put questions to the witnesses on his behalf. At the same time, he knew that, amongst Englishmen, there was always a feeling against evidence being taken against a man in his absence. In reply to a Juror, the Coroner explained that Matthews had been twice brought before the Magistrates, and was remanded until Thursday. - The Jury, having viewed the body, and also inspected the room in the house where the dreadful occurrence took place, the Coroner proceeded to take evidence. - Caroline Ellen Effer, single woman, living at 17 Middle-lane, stated that she knew the deceased, FRANCIS DRAKE, and that she had been living with him about seven months. On Friday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, she was in her room, up one flight of stairs, on the first floor. With deceased and herself there was also in the room Robert Matthews and a merchant sailor, the latter being so very drunk that he did not know what he was about. The room, which was small, was lighted with a lamp, lit with paraffin oil. Matthews had brought in half-a-gallon of ale, and at this time they were all quiet and on good terms, and were not quarrelling. They drank some of the beer, after which there were some words between Matthews and the deceased. It first began about a locket, and a dispute took place as to how much it came to. During the dispute the sailor was sitting on the side of the bed, and said the locket was for witness if she behaved herself. After some further conversation Matthews looked up and said, "I'll go for DRAKE." He then rose up and jumped over the round table at which witness was sitting and with his clenched fist he struck the deceased, but she could not say whether the blow was in the face. Deceased did not return the blow. Matthews struck the deceased two or three times, and it ended in a scuffle, in which both Matthews and deceased fell on the floor, the deceased being undermost. Matthews's leg touched the table and overturned it, throwing down the lighted lamp which fell on both deceased and Matthews. As it fell the paraffin was all in a flame, and it caught both men afire, the deceased most. The two men jumped up, and deceased made for the door, which he opened and rushed out. Matthews ran out after him immediately afterwards. Sergeant Gill produced the remains of a medium-sized lamp, and witness identified it as the same as that which fell off the table and was smashed. In reply to the Coroner, she said she was quite sure that the first blow was struck by Matthews. - The witness gave her evidence in a very hesitating, reluctant manner, causing the Coroner much trouble in eliciting her evidence, and leading him several times to complain of the way in which he had to drag her statement from her and to ask her her motive for endeavouring to keep back what she knew of the occurrence. - In reply to questions put by Mr Jackson on behalf of Matthews, witness said the words about the locket were between Matthews and deceased, and not between Matthews and the sailor. On the question being repeated, however, witness altered this answer, saying that there were a few words between Matthews and the sailor, and these were the first words of difference. Deceased did not interfere in the squabble between Matthews and the sailor. She was quite sure that from first t last there were no other persons in the room except herself, the sailor, the deceased, and Matthews. When the quarrel commenced between Matthews and deceased, the former said, "I'll go for DRAKE," calling the deceased by name. - The Chief Constable: Did you not say, before the Magistrates, that Matthews followed DRAKE out of the room and struck him on the top of the stairs? - Witness: Yes. - A Juror: Why didn't she say so before? - The Coroner: You see the difficulty I have. What did Matthews strike the deceased with - his fist? - Witness: Yes, sir. - The Coroner: You don't mean to say he struck him with the lamp? - Witness: - Oh no, sir. - Replying to further questions, witness said the sailor was "too tight" to know what was going on. She was sat beside him on the side of the bed, and could see all that went on. They had been in the room half-an-hour before the quarrel arose. She was talking to the sailor, and could understand what he said. - A Juror: Then he could not have been insensibly drunk. - The Coroner mentioned that the sailor was present, and he would call him if the Jury wished it. He might say, however, that he had spoken to the sailor himself, and he had told him that he remembered nothing whatever of what took place. - Mr C. V. Bridgman, solicitor, and clerk to the borough justices, stated that Robert Matthews was first brought before the Magistrates at the Guildhall on Saturday, charged with an assault on the deceased, who was not able to be present. After certain evidence had been taken, and it having been made to appear to the Magistrates that the deceased was then dangerously ill, they adjourned to the Hospital, the prisoner Matthews being also taken there. In Matthew's presence, also in the presence of Mr Godfrey Carter, the house surgeon, Joseph Richard Hoyten, assistant clerk to the justices, John Hill, inspector of police, Richard Hill, police sergeant, Edwin Hutchings, police constable, and the two justices (Mr Isaac Latimer and Mr Samuel Jackson), and witness, the deceased, FRANCIS DRAKE, made on oath the following statement:- "I am a labourer, and have been living at 17 Middle-lane with Caroline Effer. Last night I was in her company. A merchant sailor was with her. We were at the Mechanics' Inn. Just before eleven o'clock I and Effer and the sailor and the prisoner, who I know as 'Bob', went home to 17 Middle-lane. The sailor and Caroline had some words, and she smashed his albert, and he called her a few names, and started smashing up the things. I and Matthews were there. I pulled off my coat, and said to the sailor, 'If you go smashing the things, I shall smash you.' The prisoner then took off his coat, and said 'I'll have a go at you,' (meaning me). He knocked me down and I got up and ran over the stairs and he after me. I saw him with a burning lamp in his hand, and he hove the lamp after me and it struck me in my head, striking me in the back of the head. I then fell on the stairs. I was all afire. I saw no more of Matthews. I know Birdman. I first saw him last night in the lane, not on the landing. The prisoner hit me in the room and I fell and he fell as well, and we got up again. I was on fire just as I got on top of the stairs. Prisoner gave me a hit in the face in the room. The lamp was on the side table. It was not knocked off while I was in the room. I did not hear Matthews say anything when he ran after me. I did not know he was behind me until I received the bow with the lamp, and I fell all aflame. The knock was nearly on the top of my head. I had no hat on. I fell over the stairs. When I came out I did not see Birdman, not until I was in the lane and he helped make out the flame. The door was open when I made towards it. I went towards it because I did not want to get marked up. I fell in the room near the bed. I did not see where Bob fell. I saw the shadow of the lamp. The light was behind me, and when I looked around I was all afire. Cross-examined by prisoner: I did not see the lamp in Matthews's hands, but I saw the light behind me and then received the crack in the head. When I felt the crack I heard the lamp fall, but did not see it. The lamp did not fall from the table when we both fell. I have a wound in my head. When I turned round in the stairs after receiving the crack I saw Matthews behind me. " - Witness added that Matthews had a full opportunity of cross-examining the deceased and did cross-examine him. When they went into the room the deceased said voluntarily, "I'm very, very ill," but witness did not then think DRAKE thought he was going to die. He did not put the question as to deceased being dying in a direct way, because the prisoner was present. Deceased's statement was not taken as a dying declaration, but as an ordinary deposition in the presence of the accused. - William Birdman, labourer, living at 17 Middle-lane, stated that between eleven and twelve o'clock he was on the landing, when Caroline Effer and deceased came in and went up to their own room. Deceased was sober, but the woman Effer had had "a nice drop of drink." About ten minutes afterwards witness saw a sailor, who was drunk, and Robert Matthews, who was with him, come up the stairs and go into the room with Effer and deceased. Matthews was carrying a jar. After the parties had been in the room about half-an-hour, and whilst witness was still on the landing, witness heard the sailor asking Matthews who DRAKE was. Matthews replied that he knew DRAKE and then the sailor asked Matthews if he thought he (the sailor) was safe to stop there with Caroline Effer for the night. He heard Matthews say yes, and just afterwards witness thought he heard the sailor say he didn't care for DRAKE. The latter replied, "If you mean that, steward, I'll have a go with you." DRAKE then came out on the landing, pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and returned to the room. Matthews then jumped up and heard him say, "I'll have a go with you," meaning DRAKE. Witness heard a scuffle, and going to the open door he saw Matthews and DRAKE fighting. They fell to the floor close to the table on which the paraffin lamp was burning. They were scuffling on the floor, and in the scuffle the table was knocked - by which of the two men witness didn't know - and then the lamp was overturned and fell on the floor and smashed close to where the men were lying. A great flame burst out and both men caught fire, DRAKE being the worst, he seeming at the moment to be one sheet of flame. Matthews jumped up from the floor and knocked the little fire off the sleeve of his arm. DRAKE ran to the door, all aflame as he was. Witness followed and caught hold of him, and Matthews did not follow him. Witness took hold of deceased and tried to put the flames out, but DRAKE got away from him, made a false-step, and rolled over the stairs. Matthews was in the room at this time, and did not leave it. The young woman Effer and the sailor also remained in the room. Witness went down stairs and followed DRAKE to the end of the lane, still on fire. Witness overtook him and wrapped DRAKE around with his shirt which he had taken off just before. At this moment P.C. Hutchings arrived and threw DRAKE to the ground. The fire was then soon put out on DRAKE and he was removed to the Hospital. Witness returned to the room in about ten minutes and found Effer, Matthews and the sailor sitting down drinking the beer that was left. Witness told them that DRAKE was pretty well burnt to death and had been taken to the Hospital, but they would not believe him. The broken lamp was lying untouched and there was broken glass all about the floor. - At this stage the Jury retired for ten minutes, and on their re-assembling, Birdman, in reply to the Jury, stated that he only knew Matthews casually, and had not spoken to him since the occurrence. - Police-Sergeant Richard Gill stated from a report he received on Friday night of a fire at 17 Middle-lane, he went there about ten minutes to twelve. He went into the front room on the first landing, and found there Effer, Birdman, Birdman's mother, and the sailor, but not Matthews. The room was in great disorder, as if recent scuffling had been going on, and there was a strong smell of burnt oil. The broken lamp was on the floor, near the table, and there were pieces of a broken bottle. Witness then left and returned about one o'clock, when he found spots of blood on the stairs, on the landing, and on the wall. He picked up the fragments of the broken lamp and found oil spilt all over the canvas and the canvas burnt. He found a quantity of blood on the floor, and on the mattress large spots of blood as big as the palm of his hand. There was also a great quantity of blood on the valance of the bed and elsewhere. Just before one o'clock, from information which he had received at the Hospital from the deceased, witness went to No. 11, Woolster-street, and apprehended Robert Matthews, whom he found in bed. Inspector Hill, who was with witness, charged Matthews with heaving a paraffin lamp at FRANCIS DRAKE and cutting his head, to which prisoner replied, "I did not do it." Prisoner was then removed to the police-station and again charged, when he answered, "I never struck him." Matthews was brought before the Magistrates and remanded. - Cross-examined by Mr Jackson: Matthews's finger was cut and the blood upon the bed might have been caused by cuts from the broken glass. - Mr Godfrey Carter, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was brought to that Institution exactly at midnight on Friday. He was placed in the casualty room at once. Witness examined him immediately on his admission, and found the deceased stripped down to the waist. He was severely burned over the whole of the back, the chest, both arms and hands, and the neck. He was quite conscious. His eyelashes were singed off and his hair was also singed. Seeing he was very seriously injured witness had him wrapped up and put to bed at once. Deceased was suffering severely from shock to the system when he was admitted. He rallied a little on Monday morning, and he died quite suddenly about six o'clock on Monday evening. He was perfectly conscious up to the moment of his death. At the time his depositions were taken, on Saturday morning deceased was aware that he was very seriously ill. Witness had made a post mortem examination of the body that day (Tuesday). In addition to the burns he found a scalp wound near the crown of the head. The wound was an inch in length, not down to the bone, and he should call it a contused, jagged wound. It did not appear to have bled much, the skin had been broken. In his judgment all he could say was that the wound was caused by a blunt agent. He did not think it could have been caused by broken glass. Possibly the wound might have been caused by the metal base of the broken lamp produced, but probably not. It might also have been caused by the deceased falling and striking his head violently against the iron portion of the bedstead. He attributed the deceased's death to shock, occasioned by the burns. He did not consider the wound in the head sufficient to cause the man's death, nor to contribute to his death in any way. - Cross-examined by Mr Jackson: The body was that of a fine healthy man, and there was no disease of the heart. - The Coroner again offered to call the sailor, but the Foreman of the Jury said he thought it would be purely unnecessary. - Mr Jackson on being asked if he wished to address the Jury on behalf of Matthews, briefly ob served that the evidence so plainly showed that the occurrence was such a pure accident, that he would not detain them. - The Coroner, in commencing his summing up, characterised the case as a most lamentable one and all its surroundings such as to evoke a dreadful feeling of regret. He also remarked on the fearful death by which the poor fellow DRAKE had perished. Proceeding to review the evidence, he pointed out some discrepancies in the statement of the woman Effer, as compared with that of other witnesses, and then alluded to the deposition made by the deceased. He said he did not urge upon them the force of that statement, which was to the effect, most deliberately and distinctly, that Matthews followed deceased out on the stairs and there flung the lamp at him. Of course, if they believed that statement it would at once settle the question, but they must remember that there were some circumstances which mitigated against, and in fact very much opposed, that view of the matter and quite negatived it. The Jury must believe that both Effer and Birdman were right when they said that the lamp was knocked off the table. It would be impossible in such a small room, for two men to be engaged in a violent scuffle without knocking the lamp off the table, and what confirmed this view was the testimony of Sergeant Gill, who distinctly said he saw the remains of the lamp, not on the landing nor on the stairs, but inside the room and near the table. It was not at all likely that any persons would have gathered up these fragments of broken glass from the stairs and placed them in the room, and the Jury might, therefore, depend upon it that where the police-sergeant picked up the pieces, there the lamp fell. When the poor fellow DRAKE was once set on fire, where were his opportunities for coolly observing what happened? In his dreadful state he would imagine all sorts of things, and he (the Coroner) had no doubt that he did imagine that Matthews followed him over the stairs. But he also thought that, in thus imagining, the poor fellow mistook Birdman for Matthews. In considering the deceased's statement on this particular point, the Jury must make great allowance for the fearful pain and suffering he endured and the disordered state of mind he must have been in from the first moment he was set on fire. The very flame from the lamp which he thought was behind him might really have been the flame arising in all directions, and this might have led him to suppose that a man was running after him with the lamp. Therefore he did not think the deceased's statement was very material, but that the Jury would have to decide the case on another point. There could be no doubt that deceased was burnt by the upsetting of the lamp, and how did it get upset? Through the scuffle between the two men - the deceased and Matthews. It was not necessary to be shown that Matthews deliberately flung the lamp at the deceased. Even admitting that it was an accident, that the lamp fell, and that Matthews did not intentionally throw it down, the question was how came it upon the floor? The answer was, owing to the fight between Matthews and the deceased, a fight which Matthews commenced, and an unlawful act in which they were both engaged. The law held that, if death ensued to a man through the unlawful act of someone else, that other person was responsible for the man's death. It might appear at first as if what led to the deceased's death was a pure accident, but it could not be forgotten that it was owing to an illegal act in which they were concerned when the lamp was upset. That was the point for the consideration of the Jury. It did not seem to him that the case would be answered by saying it was a mere accident. They had to look at what had gone before, and also at the fact that Matthews commenced the fight. The evidence of Sergeant Gill also showed that the struggle must have been a very severe one, the blood about the bed and in all directions not being to his (the Coroner's) mind sufficiently explained by the statement about Matthews having a cut finger. The question for the Jury was not to say whether Matthews was guilty, but whether they did not think the case was one of such a serious nature as to justify its being sent for investigation before a higher tribunal. - After twenty minutes' deliberation, twenty-one out of the twenty-three Jurymen returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Matthews. The two dissentients were the Foreman and Mr Rogers, they being of opinion that the occurrence was accidental. - The Inquest lasted four hours and a half, from six o'clock until half-past ten.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 July 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death Of A Devonport Dockyard Foreman. - Last evening Mr James Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Davis was chosen Foreman, held an Inquest at the Ford Hotel, Ford, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR WILLIAM JAMES BARRATT, one of the foremen of the dockyard, who died suddenly at 2 a.m. on Tuesday, at his house in Alexandra-road, Ford. Mr T. Heath, solicitor, and Mr A. R. Debnam, contractor for the Naval Barracks at Keyham, attended to watch the interests of the widow. After the Jury had been sworn, the Coroner said MR BARRATT'S decease was a very painful one. MR BARRATT was a highly respected townsman, and one of the most useful employees in the dockyard. His courtesy was proverbial, and those who had more particularly experienced it bore testimony to the excellent qualities of the deceased. The Jury would first have to determine by what means MR BARRATT came by his death, and then - supposing they were told that death resulted from brain disease - they would have to say whether that was produced by overwork and over anxiety in the discharge of official duties. - The Jury then proceeded to view the body in deceased's house in Alexandra-road. The corpse was in a coffin of polished oak, and on the lid lay several wreaths, the gifts of friends. The widow being an important witness the Coroner determined to take her evidence in the house, so as to save her the inconvenience of attending at the Ford Hotel. - MRS MARY ELIZABETH BARRATT said: I am the widow of the deceased. He was 37 years of age last October. As a rule he has enjoyed very good health, with the exception of complaining of very severe headaches. These headaches were so very severe that they would almost take away his eyesight at times. he was a very temperate man: I never saw him the worse for liquor in his life. He was foreman of the dockyard from 1878; he acted as foreman twelve months previously. His duties at times kept him very late at his work, and I have known him often-time to bring his books home to work on them. He has worked at them after tea until ten o'clock. - Did he sometimes complain of the worry of his work? - Oh, yes; he said the estimates were something dreadful to get up. He seemed to have so much to do. He used to say the estimates were very heavy, and sometimes he said, "Don't talk to me about the yard; I want a little peace, now I am home." He usually, and when not specially detained, was at home about 6.45 p.m. On Monday last he did not come home to dinner until 3 p.m., having taken three foreigners round the yard. He left home about 4 p.m., and returned again between 6.30 and 7 p.m. When he came home from the Freemasons' lodge at Stonehouse, about 11.30 p.m., he seemed the same as usual; indeed, he appeared quite well. In the afternoon of that day he appeared very dozy and tired. He seemed better after having a cup of tea and going out in the garden. He went to bed directly he got home, and was soon asleep. Later on he was making a noise. I thought he was dreaming. I called him, but he did not answer. I shook him and turned him on his side to see if that would stop him making a noise. He just made a moan or two and then he was quiet. I got some water and bathed his face, thinking that perhaps he was faint. After I did that I noticed a blue shade come over his face which frightened me. I screamed and called his name, but he could not answer me, and I ran across the street in my nightdress to Mr Skelton, and he ran for the doctor. Deceased never spoke to me. Mr Rae, the doctor, came in after a few minutes, and on examining him said he was dead. - Did he ever apply for medical treatment? - I don't know. He generally doctored himself. - The Jury having returned to the Ford Hotel, the following other evidence was adduced:- John Gedye, of 37 Kent-road, Ford, said he was a draughtsman in Keyham Yard. he had known deceased about 18 years. MR BARRATT was always an industrious steady man. At times he would stop in the dockyard late attending to his papers. This was particularly the case when ironclad Audacious was fitting out. Deceased did an immense amount of work in his office. Witness left deceased about 1.40 on Monday night near his house; they had been in company most of the evening at the Metham Masonic Lodge. Deceased had been in good health and spirits; he had not had much to drink, and he was quite sober when witness left him. Witness was quite surprised to hear of his death; in fact he would not believe it at first. - Mr Chas. Fredk. Phillips, of 100 Alexandra-road, Ford, said he was a leading man of shipwrights in Devonport Dockyard. He had known the deceased since he became an apprentice - 23 years ago. He was always steady and industrious; indeed, he was a most persevering man, and witness thought his energy in the execution of his duty was the cause of his death. He was very accurate in his calculations and estimates, and very clear-sighted. He was most anxious about his work. Deceased frequently stayed late in the yard, witness knew from the fact that he had often taken messages from him to his wife, saying he "would not be home to dinner," or that "he would be late at night." Witness took a message on Monday to deceased's wife that he was detained showing the Japanese officers round the yard by order of the Admiral-superintendent. - The Coroner: I suppose, in that case, they would provide him with a luncheon as he could not get home to dinner. Of course they are thoughtful in that respect. (Laughter). Witness: Nothing of the kind, sir. He never had anything to eat from 6.30 on Monday morning until 4 o'clock on Monday afternoon. He has told me he has had to bring his books home and had to work from 7 a.m. until 4.30 p.m. on Sundays in order to get his work up. - The Coroner: Then sometimes he worked Sundays and week days? - Witness: Yes, he had to, being a salaried officer. - The Coroner: I thought there were writers of the yard to do the copying work when the mental labour was worked out. - Witness: They are merely copyists. The foreman has to make calculations and the writers copy them. - Was there more thrown on MR BARRATT than on any other foreman of the yard? - I am not prepared to answer that. MR BARRATT has always been ready to undertake any service to relieve anyone else. - that is not the point. Has he been engaged in work which might injure him? - He has been engaged in framing estimates for the Iron Duke which has lately returned from China; he has been carrying out the work of fitting out the Raleigh, frigate, which is to be the future flagship in the East Indies, and he has been looking at the Thalia, lately returned from China; he has had smaller jobs as well. - The Coroner: I never knew deceased in life, but from his appearance in the coffin I should say he was a thoroughly sober, steady man. - Mr Phillips: So he was. Mr Hand, the constructor, said to me yesterday, that since he had known MR BARRATT he had learned to love him. - A Juror: Had you heard him complain of the headache? - yes, he had oftentimes said to me that he had the headache distractingly, and he would add, "It is heavy work to put me on this job." He frequently when he came to work, said he had been up late with his books, and that it had affected his head. He has been obliged to bathe his head with vinegar. During the past fortnight deceased has frequently come out of his office, where he has been at work, and gone under the bottom of the Raleigh as she lies in dock. He was most anxious about the correctness of her refit. - Mr George Alfred Rae, of 77 Albert-road, Morice Town, surgeon, spoke to being called in on Tuesday morning just after two a.m. to see the deceased. He was then dead. He was warm, and had apparently only recently died. Witness on Tuesday, by the Coroner's order, made a post-mortem examination. On opening the chest he found all the organs perfectly healthy. The left ventricle of the heart was firmly contracted as if from chronic spasm. The membranes of the head were distended with fluid; the vessels of the membranes were also dilated. On making an incision into these membranes a large quantity of blood escaped. The vessels of the brain were turgid, and the brain generally was in a state of congestion. The effusion of blood was the result of congestion of the brain. Excitement, extending over a few days and inordinate exercise of the brain would produce this result. The work deceased had to do, as detailed by the witness Phillips, would end to increase blood to the head, and might, and probably did, cause congestion of the brain. This would result in the effusion, which caused such a pressure on the brain as to lead to deceased's sudden death. Witness thought that overwork caused the death of the deceased. - The Coroner, in summing up, observed that from zeal and energy in her Majesty's service MR BARRATT had undoubtedly sacrificed his life - a sacrifice which was the more to be lamented seeing his extraordinary ability in the position in which he was employed. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by over anxiety and fatigue in the discharge of his official duties."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 19 July 1883 PLYMSTOCK- Fatal Accident Near Hooe. - An Inquest has been held at Hooe by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr J. Bennett was foreman, on the body of EDWARD AVERY, carter, of Hooe, who fell from a cart which he was driving from Thurget to Hooe, on the 29th ult., and was seriously injured. He lingered till Sunday, when he succumbed. Dr Jackson having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 20 July 1883 EXETER - The Fatality Near Exeter. - Mr Hooper, the Exeter Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the remains of DANIEL SEARLE, aged 22, who was the victim of an accident at the Countess Weir paper mills on Tuesday last. The evidence showed that deceased, who was a married man, was endeavouring to fix a belt to some machinery, when he slipped his foot, and his clothing coming in contact with the belting was torn completely from him and the unfortunate fellow himself sustained such injuries that he succumbed to them on the following day. It was stated that the spot at which deceased was engaged was not considered dangerous, all portions of the machinery included in that category being carefully fenced. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 23 July 1883 BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Saturday on the body of the lad THOMAS HARDING, who succumbed to injuries received under the peculiar circumstances already reported. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 24 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on the body of a little boy, named JOHN THOMAS VICKERY, aged four years, who died from injuries received through a fall on Saturday afternoon last. - ELLEN VICKERY, deceased's mother, residing at 16, Lambhay-street, said she last saw her child alive about two o'clock on Saturday afternoon last. Two hours later she hard that he had cut his head through a fall, and had been taken to the Hospital. - Willie Foster, aged five, residing at 17 Lambhay-street, gave evidence as to being in company with the deceased on Saturday afternoon on the Hoe. - William Chambers, labourer, deposed to picking the deceased up. The lad was subsequently taken to the Hospital on a stretcher. - William Godfrey Carter stated that the child was received at the Hospital on Saturday in an insensible condition, suffering from concussion of the brain. On the following morning he expired, from a clot of blood on the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr H. C. Merrey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with the parents. PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Hill Park Hotel, on the body of AMELIA ELIZABETH LANGRIDGE, aged sixty-two, who died suddenly on the previous afternoon. ALICE LANGRIDGE, deceased's daughter-in-law, residing at 39 Hill Park Crescent, having given evidence, the Jury of whom Mr Martin was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Inquest on the body of the woman ROWLINGS was opened at the Stonehouse Workhouse yesterday, and adjourned in order that a post mortem examination may be made.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 July 1883 OKEHAMPTON - The Sad Death Of A Devonshire Magistrate. The Inquest. - Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at Ashbury House, near Okehampton, into the cause of death of MR HENRY WOOLLCOMBE, son of the Ven. Archdeacon WOOLLCOMBE, and a county magistrate for Devon, who was found dead on the previous morning under circumstances detailed in yesterday's Western Morning News. Mr W. Burd, solicitor, watched the proceedings on behalf of the family. - The Coroner remarked that the Inquiry was one of the most sad and painful that he had ever been called upon to make. He had known the deceased for many years, and probably some of the Jury had known him from childhood, and all had without doubt learned to respect him. But they had a public duty to perform, and however painful it might be they must discharge it properly and thoroughly. - The first witness called was Mr W. Burd, the family solicitor, who said the deceased was 34 years of age. The deceased was a married man, and had a family of four children - two sons and two daughters. he last saw MR WOOLLCOMBE alive on Sunday morning, when he visited him in company with his brother, Mr G. V. Burd, who was the medical adviser of the deceased. he had some talk with him and deceased told him that he was feeling very unwell and witness saw that he was in a low desponding state. The deceased further complained of a pain in the head, and also said he had not had any sleep for more than a week. This state of health the deceased gentleman attributed to an exposure to the sun. He had noticed nothing strange in the deceased, whom he had known for many years, until Sunday last, when anyone knowing him must have noticed a great alteration. The words used by the deceased when describing the pain in his head were, "I have a fearful burning and throbbing sensation in my head." - Mr George V Burd, surgeon, in practice at Okehampton, stated that the deceased had been a patient of his for a short time. Tuesday last was the first time the deceased consulted him, and he then complained of a great pain in his head, of sleeplessness, and a general lowness and depression of spirits. Witness treated him for the complaint and saw him again on Sunday morning, when MR WOOLLCOMBE told him that he had seen a doctor on the previous Friday, when in Exeter, who had given him a draught, and as a consequence he had since been able to sleep better. The deceased told him of his belief that the sun had affected his head when at work one day, and witness believed him to be in a very depressed state. In answer to a question put by him deceased said he had no business to worry him, and he then advised him to take a change of air. He had made an examination of the body, and found the cause of death to be a gunshot wound in the mouth. There was a slight external wound, but the whole of the roof of the mouth was split from the front to the back. The upper portions and the base of the skull were also fractured. There were no marks of powder whatever on the face, and he did not think from the nature and situation of the wound that it could possibly have been caused by an accident. - John Blatchford, one of the keepers of the estate, said that as MR WOOLLCOMBE, who had previously left the house, did not return at the time he was expected, he, about ten o'clock on Monday morning, was sent to look for him. He saw his master in the yard about eight o'clock that morning with his gun, but there was then nothing in his conduct or demeanour to attract his attention, it being a frequent habit of the deceased t take his gun with him. After looking about for some time he proceeded to a gate close to the house, which led to the garden. The gate was unhung, and deceased was lying in the gateway quite dead, with his gun between his legs. The body was warm at the time. The right hand barrel of the gun had been discharged, but no shot had been placed in the other barrel. He saw the deceased before he went out putting the gun together himself. - The Coroner said this was all the evidence he proposed to call, but there was one other person - the wife of the deceased - who could give further evidence as to the state of mind the deceased had been in lately, and it would be for the Jury to decide whether they would require any evidence MRS WOOLLCOMBE might be able to give. - The Jury decided not to trouble MRS WOOLLCOMBE, they being of the opinion that they had quite sufficient evidence to enable them to arrive at a verdict. - The Coroner then proceeded to sum up, and in the course of his address said he thought that from the evidence they could come to no other conclusion than that the deceased with his own hand deprived himself of life. He could not conceive it to be possible that it could have been caused by accident. Then came the question, would it be likely for a man in the position of the deceased, if he were in a right state of mind, to commit such a deed? He thought not. He had always felt very strongly on this point, and he went so far as to say that no man when he committed suicide, at the actual moment, could be considered responsible to man or to his Maker for his actions. Reason had altogether left a man who did such a thing. The laws of the country said that a man, if proved to be in his right mind at the time of committing suicide, by inflicting self-murder committed a felony, and having so offended the laws of his country a punishment must be inflicted. That the deceased took his own life there was not the slightest doubt, but the Jury would have to decide the important question as to his state of mind at the time. - Mr Burd here read portions of a letter which the deceased had sent to his mother a day or two before the accident. In that letter he spoke of having pains in the head, and mentioned that he had seen Dr Bankart, of Exeter, and that Mr Burd was treating him. The deceased went on to say that he wanted to forget all about himself, and, in order to do this, thought of taking change of air. - The Jury then retired, and after a short absence returned, when the Foreman said, "We believe that the deceased committed the act by his own hand, whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity, brought on by a sunstroke."

LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict At Dartmoor. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning at the Convict Prisons, Princetown, before Mr Coroner Fulford, into the circumstances attending the death of a convict named JOHN FOSTER, aged 38. The deceased was sentenced on the 1st of April 1876, at the Central Criminal Court, London, to ten years' penal servitude with five years police supervision, for larceny, after seven summary convictions and two previous sentences of penal servitude for felony. The deceased was first sent to Newgate, and was afterwards confined at Pentonville, Brixton, Woking and Dartmoor respectively, being received at the last-named place in April 1878, where he has remained ever since. When FOSTER was at Pentonville he threw himself over a balustrade and fell a distance of 30 feet. As the result of this he received severe injuries to the head, which had rendered him infirm ever since. Dr Watts, the medical officer of the establishment, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Infirmary on the 11th of June suffering from acute phthisis, and although every attention was paid him he died on the 20th inst. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

ILFRACOMBE - Sad Death Through Drink. - At the Railway Hotel, Ilfracombe, on Monday evening, the District Coroner, (Mr J. H. Toller) held an Inquest concerning the death of a young gentleman named EDGAR HARRY ACKLAND WALCOTT, aged 24. Mr John Coats was the Foreman of the Jury, and the evidence went to shew that deceased had for a considerable time been addicted to heavy drinking. Some time since he took the blue ribbon, but fell back and again indulged continually in strong drink. He was rarely sober and died on Saturday evening from the effects of his unhappy indulgence. - Louisa Gorman, with whom deceased had been lodging for the past year, said that on Saturday morning, MR WALCOTT appeared to be very weak and drowsy, and that she gave him beef tea. Questioned by the Coroner, witness admitted that she had scarcely ever seen deceased sober. - James Ackland, cabinet-maker, said he had seen deceased "screwed" a good many times. - The Coroner said it was plain the deceased had been a very unsteady person, and the long Inquiry terminated with the verdict that deceased died from the continuous use of alcohol.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 26 July 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - At the Inquest yesterday on the body of WILLIAM BOVEY, who was killed through falling into a clay pit at Newton, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 27 July 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - Suspicious Death At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was yesterday opened by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, on the body of ALEXANDER MAITLAND, aged 15, belonging to a schooner lying at Whitehall Wharf, and whose body was found in the water near the vessel. Mr Westaway was elected Foreman. The Jury, at the suggestion of the coroner, who stated that there were several nasty marks on the body, adjourned the Inquiry until Monday, in order that a post-mortem examination may be made.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner yesterday held an Inquest on the body of MARY WELSFORD, wife of JOHN WELSFORD, cutter in an oil cloth manufactory. The husband was pouring paraffin into a lamp, when it suddenly ignited and the oil running over MRS WELSFORD burned her so terribly that she expired after great suffering. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 28 July 1883 PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning At Plymouth. - CHARLES E. WELSFORD, 3 Zion-cottages, Zion-street, Plymouth, writes that the following are the correct facts in regard to the melancholy occurrence into which the Borough Coroner held an Inquiry:- MRS WELSFORD was pouring some benzoline oil into a lamp, when the oil became ignited, and spread in a sheet of flame around her. She was sitting with her feet in hot water at the time of the accident, and before her husband could reach her, the flames had enveloped her. He, however, succeeded in getting her out, and extinguishing the fire on her. MR WELSFORD, jun., then came and put out the fire, which was in the room, and afterwards fetched a doctor, and together with him, attended to his mother.

NEWTON ABBOT - Suicide Of A Young Lady At Newton. - An Inquest was held by Mr Christopher Hacker, at Sandford Orleigh House, Newton Abbot, last evening, the residence of SIR SAMUEL BAKER, touching the death of a daughter of SIR SAMUEL, named ELLEN CONSTANCE. Evidence showed that the deceased tried to cut the veins of her arm with a penknife on the 11th of July, but failed, and got a Japanese dagger and thrust it into her side. From the effects of the wound she died yesterday morning. She had suffered from epileptic fits and was also under the influence of religious mania. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased died from Self-Inflicted Injuries whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 July 1883 IDDESLEIGH - An Inquest was held at Iddesleigh on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Fulford, on the body of MR GEORGE C. CASTON, aged 37 years, residing with his brother-in-law, Col. Arnold, at Nethercott, who was found drowned in the river Torridge that morning. The deceased, who was fond of fishing, left Nethercott on Tuesday morning for a day's fishing, arranging to return to dinner at the usual hour. Not having returned at eleven p.m. Colonel Arnold and his servant searched the banks of the river, but were unable to find any traces of the deceased. On Wednesday morning the police were communicated with, the search was renewed, and the deceased was found in the river near Bridgetown Farm. It is supposed that he waded into the river and was caught in one of the numerous deep pits for which the Torridge is noted, and sunk immediately, as when last seen alive he was "playing" a salmon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while fishing in the River Torridge."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 July 1883 The Late MISS BAKER. - Sir, As foreman of the Jury in the Inquest held on MISS CONSTANCE BAKER, at Sandford Orleigh last evening, I beg to ask you kindly to correct some misstatements that appear in your impression of today respecting the verdict &c. - 1. The deceased had not suffered from epileptic fits, though with the light of recent events it is possible that a fainting fit she had at her aunt's four years ago, as well as one which occurred recently in church in London, might have been of that character. - SIR SAMUEL BAKER had not been informed of these fits. - 2. There was no evidence whatever that the deceased had suffered from religious mania. - 3. The verdict expressly stated that the deceased committed the rash act in a state of "Temporary Insanity induced by the severe physical and mental strain in her work as a Sister of Mercy in London." The latter clause your informant has left out but as they were our unanimous verdict I shall be obliged by your giving them due publicity. - P.S. - The deceased had undergone severe manual labour in attending to the most painful cases in a hospital for incurables. - Yours truly. W. Cornish-Bowden, Vice-Admiral, Foreman of the Jury. Oak Lawn, Newton Abbot, Devon, July 28th, 1883. [The Inquest was held at a private house at Highweek on the same day that the unfortunate young lady died. The wonder is that we had any report at all the following day. ED., W. M. News.].

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the North Country Pink Inn, Barbican, touching the death of THOMAS WESTCOTT, the landlord. From the evidence of deceased's wife it appeared that WESTCOTT'S habits were somewhat intemperate. He was a very corpulent man and experienced some difficulty generally in breathing. On Friday evening he retired to bed about midnight and shortly after six o'clock the next morning MRS WESTCOTT noticed his face was discoloured. She called for assistance, but it was found that deceased was dead. The Jury, of whom Mr Noble was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 31 July 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - Sad Case Of Destitution At Stonehouse. Inquest And Verdict. - Yesterday afternoon Mr R. R. Rodd, District Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at the Stonehouse Police-court, upon the body of SELINA ROLLINGS, aged 59, who died in the Workhouse on Friday week. The Coroner explained that the Inquiry had been adjourned in order that the doctor might make a post-mortem examination. It appeared that on Thursday week, when P.C. Egan visited the small room in which the deceased had lived for some months, he found the woman ill, and that the only furniture there was a broken table and four posts, but no bed. The room was in a very dirty state and the deceased had a quantity of vermin about her. She was taken in a cab to the Workhouse, and placed in the Hospital, where she died the following day. Mr T. Taylor, jun., chairman of the Board of Guardians, was present to watch the proceedings on their behalf; and the two sons of the deceased were also in attendance, as rumours had been afloat that the condition of the deceased was attributable to their negligence. Of these two sons one is seventeen, and a dock labourer; and the other, who is in ill-health, works for a bill poster, and receives 9s. a week wages. The other child of the deceased is a married daughter, named Hayes. The room in which the deceased lived was at 11 George-street, Stonehouse, and, according to the evidence of Mary Smith, living in the same house, she had been there since February last, her two sons living with her. There were four tenants in the same house, the landlady of which (Mrs Baker) did not live there herself. Deceased was confined to her room six weeks; she had no bed, and was not attended by any doctor. She had a very bad eye, of which she complained a great deal. She did not drink that witness knew of. Her sons came every day and brought her food. Witness had never heard of deceased's sons forcing drink down her throat, nor did she think she had been neglected. On Thursday week hearing groans proceeding from deceased's room witness went and found the woman very ill. Mrs Baker, the landlady, came and deceased was removed to the Workhouse. Mrs Isabella Baker said deceased first took the room for herself. Witness corroborated the last evidence as to seeing deceased on Thursday week, when the latter told her that her son was gone to get her clean clothes before removing her to the Hospital. Witness sent for the sons and a doctor, and had a cab to take her away. She did not think deceased wanted food. SELINA HAYES, married daughter of the deceased, of 39 King-street, said that owing to her recent confinement, it was five weeks since she last saw her removal. The deceased's furniture was all taken - for rent she supposed - several months ago, before she took this room. Her husband died three years ago, and deceased had been dependent upon her children for her maintenance, chiefly her eldest son. Witness's father was a great drunkard and her mother maintained him for years. Witness advised her mother to go into the Workhouse several weeks ago, but she declared she would not go so long as she could live outside it. Her sons had also advised her to go, but she gave them the same answer. Witness, in reply to the Coroner, said she had no complaint to make against her brothers; on the contrary, she believed they both did their best for her mother. There were only a table and chair in deceased's room. Witness sent a dinner to her mother every day for the fortnight previous to her removal, but she would not eat it: all she craved for was brandy. When witness saw her in the state she was, on Thursday week, she had a cab, and took her at once to the Union Workhouse. - Mr Thomas Leah, surgeon, stated that he saw the body of the deceased on her arrival at the Workhouse about noon on the 19th instant. there was a quantity of vermin about her. She died from exhaustion. She had lost the sight of one eye, from a recent ulceration of the cornea. He had made a post-mortem examination, which revealed that the deceased had had recent inflammation of the left lung, which had ceased before her death. She had had congestion of both lungs. He believed that she might have lived had she been attended to. Her digestion was bad, and the kind of food given to her was, in her condition, unfit for her. - Eliza Mitchell, nurse at the Workhouse, said deceased made no complaint against any person. When witness asked her why she let herself get in such a wretched state, deceased replied because she did not wish to become chargeable to the parish. - The Relieving Officer stated that deceased never applied for parochial relief. - The two sons of deceased made statements, shewing that they gave their mother money and food, and that one of them washed her face and neck so long as she would allow him. On being told that there was no bed in the room, the eldest son said he used to sit up beside his mother by night. - P.C. Egan expressed his opinion that, but for the promptness of Mrs Baker in getting the cab for the removal of the deceased, she would have died in the room. - The Foreman (Mr Sparrow) thought great blame attached to the sons for not reporting the case. If they could not afford together a bed, they could have got her relief and medical aid. - One of the sons retorted, saying that his mother would not take his advice and go into the Workhouse, and it would have seemed hard on his part to drive her there. - Mr M. Westaway, landlord of the Market House Hotel, said he had supplied the sons with brandy for their mother, whether they had the money to pay for it or not. Though very poor, he considered they had done their best for their mother, and were not deserving of the blame imputed to them. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from Exhaustion, in accordance with the medical evidence.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mysterious Death Of A Boy At Stonehouse. Discrepancy In The Evidence. - Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner for the district, yesterday held an adjourned Inquest at the Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ALEXANDER MAITLAND, aged 15, an apprentice boy on board the schooner Paragon of Peterhead. The Inquiry was opened on Thursday, and adjourned until yesterday to allow of a post mortem examination of the body being made, as it presented certain marks of violence. Mr Mark Westaway was the Foreman of the Jury. - Mr Thomas Leah, surgeon, stated that he saw the body on Thursday morning, having been called by the captain at half-past three. He then saw the body on the wharf at Whitehall. It had evidently just been removed from the water, and its appearance indicated death from drowning. There was frothy mucus attended with blood, issuing from the mouth and nose, and blood was oozing from the eyelids. He made a post-mortem examination of the body on Saturday, and the result was that, in addition to the marks before described, he observed a slight abrasion on the left cheek and on the right wrist. The thin skin on the edges of the ears was gone. The condition of the eye-lids and of the ears he considered to have been post-mortem. The abrasion on the cheek and wrist might have been caused immediately after death, but he rather supposed it was during life and shortly before death. These were the only marks of violence. In turning the body over to examine the back about half-pint of water ran from the mouth. From the lungs being collapsed and the heart containing blood he concluded that the boy met his death by suffocation from drowning. The abrasion was more from a scrape than a blow, and it apparently was caused after the deceased got into the water. - The Foreman: How deep was the cut by the side of the face? - Witness: It did not penetrate the skin. - The Foreman: Were there any marks of a blow to show that the boy had received a pair of black eyes? - Witness: There was no mark whatever to show this. The abrasion did not penetrate the skin. - A Juryman: Do you consider that these marks could have been produced by accident, by the deceased merely falling overboard? - Witness: I consider that the marks on the wrist and cheek were produced by the boy's falling overboard, and that the loss of the skin on the eyelids was probably due to some marine animal having eaten it off. - A Juryman: There was a mark on the eye? - Witness: Yes, but it was not due to the fall. - A Juryman: In your opinion, were there any marks to indicate violence before death? - Witness: None, except the slight ones on the cheek and wrist. - At this point the captain of the schooner produced the deceased's shirt and guernsey, which was stained in front with what seemed to be blood marks. The surgeon stated that this was not pure blood, and that the stains doubtless caused by the frothy mucus - the blood mixed with fluid - which issued from his mouth. - Peter Leydan, captain of the Paragon, stated that the deceased was his nephew, and was 15 years of age. He was a good, quiet, intelligent boy, and, as far as witness new, all the crew were very fond of him. On Tuesday night witness left the vessel about eight o'clock, leaving all hands on board, consisting of the mate, cook, one man, and the deceased. Witness returned about half-past twelve to the vessel, which was lying at the Whitehall Quay, Stonehouse. He found a light burning in the forecastle. He went to the hatchway and asked who was on board and who ashore. The cook replied, "I'm here sir," and when witness asked, "Where's the boy?" the answer he received was "The boy's drowned, sir." Witness, who said, "He was struck and knocked stupid" on hearing this, exclaimed to the cook, "Don't tell me that. It can't be. Where? When?" The cook told him that he went to bed shortly after ten o'clock, and left the boy reading in the forecastle, the mate and the other man having gone ashore. The cook asked the boy if he was not going to bed, and he replied that he would wait until the captain came. The cook said he then fell asleep, and the next he heard was a cry from the deceased calling, "Cook, cook! come to me, cook." The cook went on the deck and thence on to a raft of timber alongside. He got a boat off, and shouted out to the boy to keep himself up. The cook sculled about, but did not hear the boy cry out any more. He afterwards saw something in the water, and it proved to be a boy's cap, which he picked up. - In reply to the Coroner, the captain added that it was possible that the boy might have gone on the raft to shift the boat, so as to keep her longer afloat. The tide was flowing when he found the body, in company with two policemen, at three o'clock. It was supposed that the body had then been in the water three hours. He found the boy about twelve yards from the stern of the ship, fully dressed, and about the same place as where the boy's cap was found. - By the Jury: At ten o'clock there would be four feet of water, and at twelve o'clock it would be low water. When he returned to the vessel he walked on board, the ship being high and dry. It was a very dark night. The deceased was found lying on his back, and witness picked several crabs off his face. - A Juryman remarked that he had spent all his life at sea, and he never saw the body of a drowned person bearing the same appearance as this. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that the doctor had stated that deceased came to his death by drowning, and they must be guided by the evidence. - The Captain added that, although at twelve o'clock it was low water, outside the vessel was the raft and then the boat. Therefore, he could not say what was the depth of water there. He knew that the boy used to bathe, but he did not know whether he could swim. - The Mate, in reply to the Coroner, stated that the boy went out with him about eight o'clock the same evening, soon after the captain. The cook also went with him, and they went to a public-house and had beer and lemonade. Witness left the cook and boy at quarter to ten to go on board. - John Barclay, an elderly man, cook on board the Paragon, stated that he had acted in that capacity for a little over four months. On Tuesday evening he met the mate and deceased, and the other man belonging to the ship, and they all went to a public-house near Whitehall and remained there a quarter-of-an-hour. They then went to the shooting galleries in Phoenix-street, stayed there half-an-hour, and returned to the public-house. They had a glass of ale each, and the boy a small bottle of lemonade. The boy was quite sober. About quarter to ten witness and boy went on board. Witness went down the forecastle, took off his clothes, and went to bed. He left the boy reading a book. Witness asked him if he was not going to bed early, and he replied no, adding that he should wait to see if the captain came. Witness fell asleep, and heard nothing more until the cries of the boy awoke him. The boy was crying loudly, "Cook, come to me, come to me!" That was about twelve o'clock or a little after. Witness immediately got out of bed, and without waiting to dress he jumped down on the raft alongside the vessel. He called to the boy to keep up till he arrived., but he did not hear his voice after. The boy's voice died away as he cast the boat off from the raft; this boat had been moved from the bows. It was a very cloudy and dark night. Witness did not alter the position of the boat, nor did he order the boy to do it. After he had got thirty or forty yards from the stern of the ship, he saw something black, and found the boy's cap floating on top of the water. - By the Jury: He had not time to report the circumstances to anyone, and he did not know who was at the gate. The captain came aboard a quarter of an hour after he had returned from looking for the body. When he found the cap he felt about with the oar, but could not feel anything of the body. There was ten feet depth of water at the time. - A Juryman: Why it was low water at twelve o'clock. there could not have been a foot. - The captain repeated that when he returned he walked aboard high and dry. - The Foreman pointed out this discrepancy in the evidence of the two witnesses, adding that there could not have been a difference of ten feet in the depth of the water in about a quarter of an hour. - The Captain said it might have been half-past twelve or quarter to one when he came on board. - The Coroner: Where were you when the captain came on board? - Witness: In the forecastle, putting on my clothes. - A Juryman: Can't you give any explanation how the boy came by his death? - Witness: I can't give you any more. I was re-dressing myself in order to give an alarm when the captain came. - The Foreman said it was a mystery to him how the cook could bring the boat to the quay and moor it when the captain said he walked on board high and dry. One said there was ten feet of water and the other that it was low water. - The Cook: Well, I'm right enough in my statement. - The Coroner pointed out to him that the matter was a serious one, and he ought to give all the explanation he could concerning it. - At this stage the Inquest was adjourned for three parts of an hour to allow of further evidence being called. On the Jury re-assembling. - Mary Beer, living at 13 Baker's-place, stated that about ten minutes past twelve on Tuesday night she heard cries of distress proceeding from the water. She heard a boy saying "Cook," or "boat," and also a man calling out "Where are you?" Not hearing the boy's voice again, she concluded he was drowned. - The Coroner remarked that when he first examined the body there were suspicious circumstances which warranted the post-mortem examination, but they had heard, from the straightforward evidence of the doctor, that there were no marks of violence on the body, and that in his opinion the boy was drowned. He (the Coroner) was glad that, as the deceased was a stranger amongst them, the Jury had given such patience and diligence in Inquiring into the case. There was no evidence to show whether the deceased fell into the water accidentally. In his opinion there was no blame attached to any person, and the only conclusion they could arrive at was the open one of "Found Drowned." - A Juryman: The body was found in the water, but whether the boy was drowned is another thing. - The Coroner: You are sworn to give a verdict upon the evidence, and the medical evidence is that the boy was drowned. - The Foreman: I don't think it is prudent to have any altercation before the public. I therefore think it better to have the Court cleared while we consider our verdict. - The Coroner: Certainly, and if I can assist you I shall be glad to do so. At the same time you must decide on the medical evidence, and not on individual opinion. There were no marks of violence on the body. - The room was then cleared, and after a quarter-of-an-hour's consultation, the Jury returned a verdict that the Deceased was Found Dead, but that there was no evidence to show how he got into the water. - The Coroner said he was sorry he could not agree with the verdict. He was of opinion that it should have been "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 July 1883 GEORGEHAM - The Murder Of A Policeman In North Devon. - Mr J. H. Toller, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of the constable, WALTER CREECH, who was stabbed to death at Georgeham on Saturday night, by an old man named GEORGE GEEN. The accused was present at the Inquest. It was proved that Geen had been drinking at a public-house during the evening, and that because the deceased refused his offer of a glass of ale he became very abusive, and continued his abuse in the streets. He was heard to say that "he had a knife at home and would kill the b....", and at a later period of the evening he was seen to again accost the policeman in the street, and to plunge a knife into his side. CREECH died about six o'clock on the following morning. During the Inquiry Geen continually made remarks and persisted in the statement that CREECH stabbed himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against the accused.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 2 August 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Suicide At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening upon the body of a gentleman named TOLHURST, cashier in the bank of Glyn, Mills, and Co., London, who was found in a room in Farley Hotel yesterday morning with his throat cut, under very mysterious circumstances. The deceased was recognised by a Plymouth gentleman, who was formerly a clerk with MR TOLHURST in the same bank and it appeared from his statement that yesterday morning, the deceased and Mr Jones, a fellow-clerk, called upon this gentleman and told him they had come down upon their holidays and that they had become unwell in the steamer and intended to break the journey at Plymouth. MR TOLHURST was spoken to as to his despondent appearance, and he gave the sea-sickness as an explanation. On Tuesday morning MR TOLHURST obtained rooms at Farley Hotel, and from that moment his friend Jones, with whom he had intended to travel, disappeared. Whether Jones altered his mind and proceeded by an earlier boat to Dublin there was no evidence to show. MR TOLHURST took supper and proceeded to bed, and yesterday morning he was found lying on the floor with his throat cut, his head being almost severed from his body. In his possession was found an I.O.U. for £200, signed by himself, which he appeared to have recently redeemed. there was no evidence to show that he had become financially embarrassed. - James Edward Westlake, head waiter at Farley Hotel, said he saw the deceased for the first time at half-past six on Tuesday morning, when he asked for a bedroom. He went into the bar, sat down and had some milk and brandy. He then went up into the bedroom and slept in it the same morning, remaining there until about half-past eleven. He then had his breakfast and afterwards went up the River Tamar as far as Calstock. Witness did not see him after the morning. The chambermaid called witness at half-past eleven that morning and said she had been knocking at the door of the room in which the deceased was, but could get no answer. Witness then knocked for five minutes and the door was then forced open. Witness saw the deceased lying on his face (undressed), with his hands out-stretched. He was quite dead, but witness did not touch him. He was lying in a pool of blood. Witness rushed down to call Mr Walter. A medical man had been sent for, and within a minute or two Dr White arrived. That gentleman turned the deceased on his back, and then witness saw a large gash across his throat, his right hand being extended. There were two beds in the room and witness noticed that both had been laid on. Had had no conversation with the deceased. - By a Juror: I noticed the key in the lock on the inside, and the window was closed. The room was on the third storey, and there was no one else sleeping on the same floor that night. - John Hill, Inspector of the Borough Police, said he was called to the Hotel about twenty minutes past eleven. On proceeding to the bedroom witness saw deceased lying on his back. There was a razor on the floor covered with blood, about eighteen inches from the bed and three feet from the dressing-table. The knife now produced was on a chair near one of the beds, with the large blade open. Deceased's portmanteau, filled with clothing, was open. Witness found a bag containing eleven sovereigns and eight shillings; also one £5 Bank of England note, £1 3s. in silver, and 7 ½d. in coppers. There was also a letter addressed to his sister, MISS TOLHURST, in which no reference was made to the tragedy, deceased only complaining of his passage in the steamer. An IOU, signed by deceased, and a season railway ticket were discovered. - Lucy Pomroy, waitress at Farley's Hotel, said she first saw the deceased on Tuesday morning about ten o'clock, in the coffee-room. His manner was cool and collected. He gave witness an order for breakfast, which she supplied. While she was getting it he was writing a letter, and made no remarks whatever. After breakfast he went out and witness did not see him again until the evening, when he ordered supper and a bottle of ale. He remained in the coffee-room reading until ten o'clock. About twelve o'clock witness went upstairs to procure something for another gentleman, and by mistake went into deceased's room. The door was slightly open. She pushed it farther open, and saw the deceased rise in the bed. She said, "I beg pardon," and he replied, "All right." Witness left the room, and closed the door after her. There was no light in the room, but witness had a candle. - The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said there were two questions for them to decide - first, how the deceased came by his death. On that point there could be no doubt, it was only too evident that death was occasioned by throat-cutting, inflicted by deceased's own hand. The second question was, what was the state of his mind when he committed the rash act? - The Jury, after some deliberation, decided that the deceased died by his own hand, but there was no evidence to show the sate of his mind at the time. - Mr Walter, acting with his customary thoughtfulness, had very kindly ordered a coffin to be made, in which, immediately after the Inquest, the body of the deceased gentleman was placed, and then removed to the mortuary, to await its removal to London by his friends. - MISS TOLHURST arrived in Plymouth by the midnight train, and in answer to inquiries, stated that she left London at five o'clock on being telegraphed for. Her distress was most acute, because she could assign not the slightest cause for her lamented brother's suicide. He had been third cashier at Glynn's Bank, and had held the situation for twenty years. He was not married, but lived with her at Farley Villa, near Lombard-street. He left London with a fellow-clerk by the Dublin steamboat, intending to spend his holidays in Ireland. They both, however, landed at Plymouth on Wednesday, and went up the Tamar as far as Calstock by excursion boat. At night the deceased's companion went on to Dublin, but his sister is unable to explain why he remained behind. Without being aware of the IOU in deceased's possession, MISS TOLHURST believed his accounts to be exact. They lived on the happiest terms and the circumstances of his leaving London were the opposite to such as would prompt suicide.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 August 1883 BARNSTAPLE - At Barnstaple yesterday Mr Coroner I Bencraft held an Inquest respecting the death of a child, aged about twelve months, daughter of MR SHAW, surveyor of taxes. On Sunday morning the servant left the child in its chair by the side of the bath in which she had put some boiling water. Directly afterwards she heard the child fall, and running to it found it in the bath. The medical man said the child had died from the effects of the scalding and the fall. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DAWLISH - Suicide Of A Young Woman At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held at the Cottage Hospital, Dawlish, yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, touching the death of MARY MARGARET LOUISA COMPTON, who was drowned at Dawlish on Monday night. From the evidence of William Johns and Anne Evers, who were sitting on a seat under the railway station platform, it appeared that about 9.20 on Monday night they observed some person walk towards the sands, and then into the water. The young man suggested that it might be someone shrimping. The figure soon disappeared, and they saw something moving and floating, but the water there was not deep. A man named Pike, then accompanied Johns to the water's edge, and the waves gradually brought the object therein closer, when Johns, holding Pike, walked out and brought in the body. They both tried to restore animation. The young woman was without a bonnet. - Charles Henry Please, of 115 Strand, London, public analyst and medical practitioner, staying at Blenheim House, stated that the deceased, who had been in his service for seven weeks, was just recovering from malarial fever, she had seemed at times absent-minded, and brooding and suffering from hallucinations. She was missed from their lodgings soon after 9 p.m. on the night in question, and on inquiry he found that the body at the Cottage Hospital was that of his servant. Deceased was a conscientious and pious young woman. - Mr Parsons, surgeon, said that on arriving at the beach he found that the deceased was dead. Knowing that artificial respiration had been tried, he ordered the body to be taken first to the Albert and then to the Royal Hotels, but the proprietors declined to take it in. From the evidence of Dr. Please he considered the deceased was not in her right mind. - MARGARET COMPTON, mother of deceased, and residing at Hornchurch, Essex, said the deceased was 26 years of age. Witness produced a letter from deceased, speaking of her arrival at Dawlish and of the great kindness of her master and mistress. - P.C. Stapleton stated that on his arrival at the beach he also tried artificial respiration. Deceased had on her spectacles. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, remarked on the unwillingness of the two hotel keepers to take in the body. Although it was not a settled point of law that they were bound to do so, he thought, looking at the matter from a moral point of view, they might have received the deceased. In a place like Dawlish there ought to be a public mortuary. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 11 August 1883 EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Drowned In The Exe. - An Inquest was held at the Lamb Inn, Exwick, yesterday, on the body of a man named GEORGE BLACKMORE, late of St. Sidwell's, Exeter. The medical evidence testified that the deceased met his death by drowning. A Porter named Steele deposed to finding the body in the river, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 14 August 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Devonport coroner yesterday held an Inquest at the Boot Inn, Devonport, on the body of an elderly woman, named MARY ANN ROUTLEFFE, who expired suddenly at her residence in King-street, on the previous morning. The husband sent a neighbour for Dr Harrison, and he gave evidence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 August 1883 ILFRACOMBE - The Fatal Running Down Case At Ilfracombe. Committal For Manslaughter. - Mr J. H. Toller, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Albert Boarding-house, Ilfracombe, yesterday, respecting the death of ELIZABETH GALLIVER, who was killed on Saturday night by being run over by a handcart which, as alleged, was being furiously "driven" by a grocer's porter named William John Harding. The latter was brought u in custody. Mr E. G. Withycombe was Foreman of the Jury. The Inquest was fixed to commence at twelve o'clock, but the Coroner did not reach his court until after the arrival of the twelve o'clock train, fully half an hour later, and great dissatisfaction was expressed by the Jury, who were principally tradesmen, at being called upon to waste so much time at the busiest part of the season. - Evidence of identification having been given, Samuel Hill, builder, Portland-street, said that on Saturday evening he was going up the street when he met the prisoner, who was pulling a handcart, with a person riding on the "tail." Harding was going at the rate of from eight to ten miles an hour, and witness narrowly escaped being run over. The shaft of the cart knocked down the deceased. Did not hear the prisoner call out. - George Dadds, butcher, said the handcart was literally "driving" the prisoner, who was in front, as it was going so fast. In cross-examination witness said Harding could not have stopped had sudden death been before him, he was going at such a speed. - John Challacombe, baker, said that after the accident Harding did not stop the cart until requested to do so by a gentleman. Witness heard Harding say, "I cannot help the ---- cart." - Samuel Davey, who was on the cart at the time, having been examined, P.C. Shepherd deposed that on arresting the prisoner, he said he had lost control of the vehicle, and he could not help the accident, for which he was very sorry. - Medical and other testimony was adduced; and at the close the Jury, after two hours;' consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Harding, who was committed for trial at the Assizes, on the Coroner's warrant. The Jury handed their fees to the relatives of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 August 1883 TAWSTOCK - Suspicious Death Of A Child Near Barnstaple. - The Inquiry into the alleged suspicious death of an illegitimate child at Tawstock, six miles from Barnstaple, was concluded on Saturday, after having been twice adjourned. The deceased, named JOHN AVERY, 16 months old, was the child of JAMES HARRIS and a girl named LOUISA AVERY. An order of 2s. per week was made on HARRIS, who is a married man, and after paying the contributions for about six months he wrote saying that rather than pay any more he and his wife would keep the child. The constable at Tawstock received an anonymous letter some months after the child had been with HARRIS and his wife, saying it was cruelly treated and badly fed. Howard examined the child, and, finding it was very ill and weak, told HARRIS'S wife she had better be careful or he should report the matter. In evidence, too, the constable stated that he saw the child when it first came to the neighbourhood, and it then looked healthy, strong and happy. It had a miserable appearance later on. - Mr Henry Jackson, surgeon, said when he saw the child first, in May, it was suffering from severe diarrhoea, owing to a chronic state of catarrh of the bowels and he was informed it had been delicate from its birth. The state of the bowels would naturally predispose it to inflammation, and he thought its death was therefore due to natural causes. He could detect no signs of neglect. - Mr Paul Jackson, in his post-mortem report, also was of opinion death was due to disease of the lungs occurring in a weak and sickly child. - the mother of the child, LOUISA AVERY, in domestic service at Exeter, was present on Saturday, and said she received a letter from HARRIS in December last, saying he would not pay anything more, but would take the child, and, as she was not getting enough to maintain it, she came to the Barnstaple Station with it, and HARRIS and his wife fetched it. It was perfectly healthy when she gave it up. She expressed a wish to come and see the child from time to time, or to write; but HARRIS'S wife objected to her ever seeing it, or writing. - Mary Ann Loring, St Thomas, Exeter, said she accompanied the mother to Barnstaple when she brought the child, and it was then very healthy and fat. Mr Paul Jackson said he did not think any bad treatment the child might have received while at HARRIS'S led to the disease from which it died. - HARRIS'S wife was sent for, and stated that the child when at her house was properly fed and cared for. When she received it, it was thin and weakly. Witness became very excited when cross-examined by the Jury. She told them she could face them, and, more than that, could face God about the child. Turning to the mother she exclaimed that before she would give up a child to a man and woman she knew nothing of she would rather swing on the gallows. No mother could ever have any feeling to spare her child to anyone she knew so little of. The Coroner, in summing up, said the deceased might not have received the attention it would have had had it been the legitimate child of his and MRS HARRIS, and he had no hesitation in saying that HARRIS had an interest in its death. However, after the medical evidence he thought they could return no other verdict but natural causes. - The Jury were locked up, and at the end of two hours had arrived at no conclusion. The Coroner then sent inquiring whether they had agreed, and they replied that they should not agree for six hours. - The Coroner said if they did not agree he should adjourn the case to the Assizes, but they shortly after found a verdict of Death from Natural Causes, but that there were suspicions of neglect on the part of JOHN HARRIS and his wife.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 20 August 1883 BRENT - The Fatal Accident At Brent. - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at Deptford, on Friday, touching the death of a quarryman named HAWKINS, who expired on Wednesday from the effects of an accident sustained that day while at work at Lincombe Quarry, in the parish of Brent, owned by Mr Middleton. It appeared from the evidence adduced that on Wednesday about noon, a waggon was loaded with rubble at the pit of the quarry, and drawn up as usual by means of a chain. When, however, this vehicle was within 30 feet of the top, the chain parted and the waggon was pitched with its contents to the bottom, about 100 feet below. Five men were here at work, and they were shouted to from the top to look out. The danger was perceived and the men crowded to a corner in the rocks of the pit. The waggon pitched on one corner against the rock and then struck the deceased, who was stood with his face against the rock for shelter. He was knocked upon his back, and when picked up could only mutter a few words. Blood was oozing from his mouth, and there were several bruises about the body. He was conveyed speedily to his home, but died soon after his arrival there. The link which parted was produced at the Inquest and in it was a flaw. The chain had parted about nine days previously, but according to the evidence of the owner of the quarry, the breakage on that occasion was due to a jerk. Several witnesses stated that on the present occasion they observed no jerk. A verdict that the deceased died from injuries sustained by the accident was returned, and a rider was added that the chains employed at the quarry should be tested by an independent practical person twice a year.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 23 August 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Death From Burning At Devonport. Commendable Behaviour. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, touching the death of MRS SOPHIA WHITFIELD, who died on Tuesday morning from the effects of the burns she sustained at the fire on Monday night, which occurred at her residence, 16 Market-lane. Mr Hodge was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The body having been viewed, the first witness called was James Hooper, who had his left hand bound with lint. He stated that he was a skilled labourer in her Majesty's Dockyard, and resided at 16 Market-lane, Devonport. About half-past eight on Monday evening his wife, who was in the street, heard screams proceeding from upstairs, and ran in. From what she said he proceeded to the room occupied by MRS WHITFIELD, whom he met on the landing, three stairs down from her room. She was in flames. He told her to lay down, but she could not do so as the place was so narrow. He pulled her downstairs, and covered her with coats and mats to make out the flames. Two men, who came to his assistance, called for blankets, one of which was wrapped around the woman and materially aided in putting out the flames. Witness said his attention was drawn by his son to the fire in MRS WHITFIELD'S room. Leaving the deceased in the care of a man named Miles, he rushed upstairs and entered the room, which was full of smoke and flame. He heard a child crying "Mamma," and he rushed through the fire and rescued the child, who was lying in a cradle. After handing it over to someone downstairs, he called for water, and with assistance made out the flames. In smothering the flames on MRS WHITFIELD, and in rescuing the child he was much burnt himself. When he got downstairs again he found MRS WHITFIELD sitting on a man's knee. He at once suggested that she should be taken to the Hospital in a cab. The fire was extinguished before the arrival of the police. - Joseph Gritton, living at No. 3 St. Stephen's-street, Devonport, a naval pensioner, stated that he was passing up Cross-street, on Monday evening, shortly before nine o'clock and just as he got near Market-lane he heard screams. He went to Mr Hooper's house, where, near the door, he saw the woman on her face and hands. She was burning. Witness called for a blanket, and one being passed to him, he wrapped it round her as well as he could. With the assistance of others he got her into the street. About a quarter of an hour must have elapsed between the time he first saw the woman and when the cab was brought to take her to the Hospital. - P.C. Henry Lethbride said that about ten minutes to nine he was on duty in Catherine-street. Hearing that there was a fire in Market-lane, he ran there, and found a large crowd outside MRS WHITFIELD'S house. He found the deceased, who was wrapped in a blanket, supported by several men. He noticed that she as burnt, and he wrapped them round with a blanket. About two minutes afterwards the cab which had been sent for arrived, and he with two other men accompanied the deceased to the Hospital. On the way thither witness asked her how the accident occurred, and she replied that she took up the paraffin lamp to look for something, and in putting it back she placed it too near the edge of the table, when it fell over. She was quite sensible, and in his opinion deceased was then quite sober. She was very badly burnt about the body, and complained principally of the burns on her back. - Hooper, recalled, said that after the Inspector had spoken to him downstairs, at witness's request they went up and examined the room together. Just inside the door and near the bed was a table which was signed. Close to it lay a broken paraffin lamp, which had been extinguished. From the position of the fragments it seemed as if the lamp had been placed too near the edge of the table and fallen over. - N. Crago, nurse at the Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted at five minutes past nine on the night in question. The deceased was suffering from numerous burns all over her body. She died at ten minutes to eleven the following morning. Deceased was conscious up to the last, but was in too great pain to make any statement. The doctor saw her immediately after her admission. When she was brought to the Hospital she was wrapped in a blanket. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that there was great credit due to Hooper for his bravery in rushing through the flames and saving the child's life. The evidence seemed perfectly clear that death was the result of an accident. - In this opinion the Jury, after a short consultation, were unanimous, and considered that no blame was attached to anyone. Great praise was due to Hooper for his courage in saving the child's life.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 August 1883 ILFRACOMBE - The Suicide By A Magistrate At Ilfracombe. - Mr H. Bromham, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Rosemount, Ilfracombe, yesterday, into the cause of death of MR NATHANIEL VYE, J.P., who was found dead on Sunday morning, under circumstances already detailed in our columns. The evidence of several witnesses shewed that the deceased gentleman had been considerably depressed in spirits ever since the sudden death of a favourite sister some little time since, and became at times so strange in his manner that, under medical advice, he was placed in charge of attendants. He so improved, however, that the attendants were eventually dismissed, but on Sunday morning he possessed himself of a pistol, and going into the grounds adjoining the house, he discharged the weapon into his mouth and died shortly afterwards. Mr Foquett, surgeon, stated in evidence that there was not the slightest doubt that the deceased gentleman was of unsound mind at the time he committed the act; and he had been informed by a relation of MR VYE'S that he on one occasion found him in the hall with only his shirt and trousers on, and with a loaded pistol in his hand. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased shot himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 September 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - Terrible Death From Starvation At Newton. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, at the Board-room of the Newton Workhouse, on the body of ELIZABETH HALL, about 50 years of age, a woman who died that morning soon after admission into the Workhouse. It appeared from the evidence that the woman formerly lived with a Mr Eggbeer, clay carrier, of Highweek-street, but left several years ago, and was married to a quack-doctor of St. Thomas's, Exeter, named HUMPHREY HALL. HALL soon afterwards died, and the woman had been a widow for some years, and latterly travelled about the country, but how she got her living was not clear. On Friday night last she called at Eggbeer's house in a wretched state, and asked for something to eat, which was given her, and also sixpence to pay for a night's lodging. She left the house just before ten o'clock and next morning a dairyman named Dicker, on going to his field in Exeter-road, found the woman lying in the hedge trough. He roused her up, and she said she would leave. Dicker went on and told a man named Avery of the state the woman was in, and Avery, with his wife, went and saw the woman, who asked very pitifully for something to drink. Mrs Avery went home and got a cup of tea, which the woman drank, and Avery then went and fetched Constable Honey, who found the woman could not stand and he therefore got the assistance of P.C. Salter and removed her on a handcart to the Workhouse, where she died about fifteen minutes after being admitted. She was too ill to partake of anything, and the surgeon was sent for, but arrived a few minutes after she died. A post-mortem examination of the body was made by Dr Haydon, who found that death was caused by starvation, aggravated by exposure. The stomach, which only contained a little fluid, shewed that the poor woman had wanted for food for some time past, and there was no symptom of her having been given to drink. The body was covered with a few rags and was full of vermin and the surface of the body was also eaten by the vermin in a horrible manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Starvation, accelerated by Exposure."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 September 1883 PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the George Hotel, Plympton, on the body of WILLIAM SHORT, aged 63, horse keeper, who met his death on Friday night through falling in the river Tory. - Mrs Ball, who lives at Hemerdon, said that on Friday night she was passing Lofter Mills, when she saw a man lying in the hedge, whom she now identified as the deceased. She asked him if she could be of any assistance, but he said she could not, and asked her to go away. Returning from Colebrook in about half an hour, she saw nothing of the deceased, and supposed that he had got safely away. It was quite dark at the time and the night was very foggy. - Charles Lane, employed at the Lofter Mills, said that on Saturday morning a little girl told him that there was a hat in the water just below the bridge. He took the hat out and after he had returned to the mills he was informed that a man had been drowned near the bridge. Witness at once went there and found the deceased lying on his back with his face out of the water. He was resting partly on two pieces of timber, which the stream had brought down, and these lodging against the bank had prevented his being carried further down. - Verdict: "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 6 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, on the body of ROBERT RICHARDSON, chief engineer of the steamer Cordova, now lying in Plymouth Sound. - John Frostick, captain of the Cordova, gave evidence to the effect that RICHARDSON died in his arms, whilst the vessel was at sea. Deceased hailed from Sunderland, where he leaves a widow and four children. Witness believed he suffered from chronic bronchitis. The Jury, of whom Mr Alfred Hooper was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 7 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - Neglect Of A Child At Plymouth. A Sad Case. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Workhouse, respecting the death of PHILLIP THOMAS PEEK, aged thirteen months, the illegitimate child of CORDELIA PEEK, now an inmate of the Union. Mr Edwin George Dyke, master, Sarah Bailey, an inmate and nurse in the receiving ward, and Henrietta West, nurse in the children's hospital, gave evidence, from which it appeared that when the child was admitted with its mother on the 13th August, it was in a terribly emaciated condition. Owing to the indifference of PEEK, the little thing was removed to the children's hospital, where it succumbed on Tuesday last. The mother told the nurse West that she had begged in the streets to get the child food and that she had been to different places, including London. - Mr F. Aubrey Thomas, Medical Officer of the Union, deposed that he saw the child on the 14th. It was in a shocking state, and he asked the nurse if it had been starved. She said it had, and the mother cried and said it was not her fault. She could not get it food. He had the child stripped, and then saw fully the fearfully emaciated condition it was in. He had been medical officer there for 14 years and had never come across a worse case. He ordered it to be taken to the children's hospital out of the mother's care and ordered it to be given raw milk and other things. He attended the child until its death, on the 4th inst. The matron and the attendant West, he might say, were unremitting in their attentions to it. The child was too far gone to be saved. He had made a post-mortem examination, assisted by Mr Hanson, one of the house surgeons of the South Devon Hospital. Externally the child had all the appearance of having died from starvation, but there were no external marks of violence. He considered that the child died from neglect and want of sufficient nourishment. The weight of the child was ten pounds. It should have weighed from twenty-five to thirty pounds. After consideration, it was decided not to call the mother, and the Jury then returned the following verdict:- "That the child died from Natural Causes accelerated by neglect; but the Jury do not consider the mother, from the circumstances of the case, to be criminally responsible." - The Coroner then remarked that the manner in which Mr Dyke and the other Workhouse officials had behaved during the whole of the time was very creditable, and must commend itself to the Jury. The child had received the most devoted attention especially at the hands of Mr Thomas, and they therefore tendered them their thanks and commendation.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 September 1883 EXETER - Fatal Accident At Dawlish. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday on the body of WILLIAM BALSOM, miller-s wagoner, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous day, in consequence of injuries sustained at Dawlish. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Woodbridge, of Exeter, on Monday took a wagon-load of flour to the premises of a baker named Hosgood, of Dawlish. Whilst carrying a sack into the loft the steps on which he stood slipped from under him, and he fell to the ground. The sack first pitched on a table, and then rebounded against the deceased, striking him in the back. Finding that the deceased was injured, Mr Hosgood removed him to his sitting-room, and sent for a medical man. BALSOM was afterwards, at his own request, removed to the County Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from paralysis, the result of severe injury to the spinal cord. The symptoms grew worse rapidly, and death ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 8 September 1883 TOTNES - The Fatality At Totnes Races. - At the Totnes Guildhall last evening, Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquiry touching the death of a man named WILLIAM BAKER, whose body was found in the mill leat on Thursday morning. The body was identified by a brother, from Moretonhampstead, who stated that deceased was a mason, unmarried, about thirty years of age, and had been working at Totnes for about ten days. - Mr L. Hains, surgeon, gave evidence of having examined the body. The deceased had no coat or waistcoat on, his face was much congested, and his hands clenched. There was blood in the left ear and a fracture of the base of the skull, on the right breast an incised wound about an inch long and a smaller wound below the left shoulder, left arm much swollen. He had no doubt the wounds and fracture of the skull were caused after death. A waiter of Newton, called Blatchford, deposed to the deceased being employed in a refreshment booth on the race course. He left the ground on the Wednesday night quite sober to go into the town and bring back some straw. He had a coat on when he left, but he could not say whether he wore a waistcoat. Evidence having been given as to the finding of the body, the Coroner summed up the evidence, stating that there was no doubt the deceased died from drowning, but there was nothing to show how he got into the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", and added a rider to the effect that some protection to the public should be provided by the Race Committee in the way of fencing the mill leat. The Coroner remarked that perhaps the press would give publicity to the recommendation.

PLYMPTON - The Fatality At Bovisand. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Bovisand Fort, on Thursday, into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES HILL, gunner in the 1st Brigade South Irish Division Royal Artillery, who was drowned on Saturday evening at Bovisand, having been washed overboard from the pier with two other men during the heavy gale of that night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed their admiration of the services of the coastguard officer, Mr Hosking, and his men, who, at the peril of their lives, launched their lifeboat, and within eight minutes from the report was received, picked up and saved Gunner Smith, one of the three men washed away. The Coroner has once forwarded the following communication to Mr Hosking, the chief officer of the Coastguard at Bovisand:- "Sir, at an Inquest, held yesterday at Bovisand, on the body of CHARLES HILL, who was drowned on the 1st of September, having been washed overboard from Bovisand pier during a heavy gale, with two others, it was proved that yourself and your crew, respectively named Albert Pain, Edward Pound, John Davie, John Davie, John Warden and William Bristow launched your boat, and at great risk and peril of your lives rescued one of the men named John Smith from a watery grave. It was also proved that the man was saved in less than eight minutes from the time that the report was received at the Coastguard buildings. The Jury added a rider to their verdict conveying their admiration of your conduct and their thanks to you and your men, not only for the promptitude in launching your boat, but also for your gallant services in saving Smith under such dangerous circumstances. I have much pleasure in forwarding this to you, and in saying that I cordially concur in the above rider, and trust that this heroic conduct on the part of yourself and your crew will not be unnoticed by the proper authorities. - I am &c., Robinson Rodd, Coroner."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 10 September 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest on Saturday afternoon, at the Longroom Inn, Stonehouse, respecting the death of MR JOHN STONEMAN, butcher, aged about 60. Deceased carried on business in Admiralty-street, and on Friday evening he was backing the horse and trap against his shop window, for the purpose of unloading its contents, when he suddenly fell to the ground. He was conveyed inside, but medical assistance proved unavailing and he died the next morning. No evidence was taken, and the Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday next.

DAWLISH - Fatal Accident At Dawlish. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dawlish Cottage Hospital, on Saturday night, touching the death of a little boy named SERCOMBE, son of MRS ELIZABETH SERCOMBE, residing in Queen-lane. The mother stated that at nine o'clock on Tuesday morning the lad left home, saying he was going to the Strand. Witness next saw him at the Hospital about eleven o'clock the same day. He spoke once and said "Mother." Witness remained with him until his death at twenty minutes past seven on Tuesday night. James Gill, a lad in the employ of Mr Richard Williams, coal merchant, said he took out some small bags of coal in a donkey cart on Tuesday. Deceased walked with him down Brunswick-place, and on witness taking out a bag, he got up into the cart. On returning witness could not see SERCOMBE in the cart, but Mrs Coombstock ran out from a house near and took him up in her arms. he was lying in the road the other side of the cart. After Dr A. de Winter saw him he was conveyed to the Cottage Hospital. Although there was no evidence to that effect, the Jury considered that the little fellow fell out of the cart, and sustained fatal injuries and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They gave half their fees to the mother and half to the Hospital.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 11 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Deaths At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at Sherman's beer-house, Harwell-street, Plymouth, on the body of WILLIAM MARTIN, aged sixty-eight years. James Collins, carpenter, 53 Well-street, Plymouth, said deceased was his father-in-law, and resided with him. He retired to rest about half-past eleven o'clock on Saturday night, apparently in good health. The next morning witness found him dead in his room. Deceased was formerly a lime-burner, but had not followed his occupation for the last eighteen months. He had complained of pains in his head and suffered from giddiness, but was not under any medical care. When he found deceased he called in Dr Miller who pronounced life to be extinct, and afterwards communicated with the police. The Jury, of whom Mr Sleeman was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was afterwards held at the Clifton Hotel, Clifton-street, on the body of ANN SIMS COX, aged sixty years. Mary G. Chilston and R. Durant Chilston said they were on a visit to their grandmother, Mrs Garland, at 49 Hendlands Park. Deceased was a servant there and had been in the employ of Mrs Garland for thirty-five years. She went to bed on Saturday night last, as usual, and when they woke up in the morning they found her dead in bed. Dr Square was called and said she was dead. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 12 September 1883 HONITON - Mysterious Shooting Case Near Sidmouth. - A labourer, named JOHN PERRYMAN, living at Honiton, was shot in a mysterious manner on Saturday night last. Deceased had been engaged on some works at Branscombe, near Sidmouth, and on Saturday, about nine o'clock, after leaving work for the day he walked a certain distance with several of his comrades. He afterwards parted with them in order to take a near road which led across the cliffs. PERRYMAN had not proceeded along more than a few hundred yards when his fellow workmen heard a shot fired, and simultaneously someone was observed to cry out. On following the direction deceased had taken, his friends quickly came upon PERRYMAN, whom they found to have been shot in the face and head. He lingered a short time and expired. The person by whom the shot was fired was not discovered, and the cause of the outrage is unexplained. One theory is that the deceased was shot by poachers in mistake for another person against whom they had a grudge. At the Inquest yesterday before Deputy Coroner Cox no additional information was forthcoming. It was proved that on Saturday night a labourer named Loveridge heard cries and went to the spot. he saw deceased lying bleeding. He said he was shot, and had heard a gun go off. - The Coroner said the case was a serious one, and adjourned the Inquiry for a fortnight. The excitement in the neighbourhood continues. It does not appear that anyone had a grudge against the deceased.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 September 1883 KINGSTEIGNTON - An Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at Kingsteignton, yesterday, relative to the death of MR THOMAS PHILLIP KNOWLES, butcher, 27 years of age, who died on Tuesday night very suddenly. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased was apparently in his usual health up to the time of his death, but Mr Ley stated that MR KNOWLES had suffered for some years from severe affection of the heart, and in his opinion, death resulted from syncope. The Jury, of which the Rev. P. Jackson was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 14 September 1883 WALKHAMPTON - The Fatality At Princetown. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest yesterday at the Red Cottages, Walkhampton, on the body of WILLIAM JAMES, foreman of labourers, who met with his death in the station-yard, under circumstances already reported. After Mr Clement Stedman Lloyd had formally identified the body, the Inquiry was adjourned to the Duchy Hotel till tomorrow, when witnesses will be fully examined.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 September 1883 HARBERTON - The Fatal Accident Near Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Harbertonford by Mr s. Hacker, Coroner, and a Jury, of which the Rev. A. Gill was Foreman, on the body of SAMUEL ARNOLD, a shoemaker, of Harbertonford, about 66 years of age, who was killed on Wednesday night by being thrown from a cart when returning from the harvest field. The youth Nancarrow, who was in the cart with the deceased, and the man Rowe, who was also seriously injured, were examined, but could not throw much light on the matter. He stated that it was dark; that the horse shied at something and got one wheel of the cart up on the bank; that ARNOLD was thrown out, but that Rowe, who was driving, and witness were carried about thirty or forty yards further before the cart upset, and Rowe and himself were thrown out. Mr J. T. Cape, surgeon, Totnes, said ARNOLD'S death must have been instantaneous, and was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The other occupant of the cart Mr Rowe was still alive yesterday, but Mr L. Hains and Mr Cape entertain the opinion that his injuries are of so serious a character that his recovery is almost hopeless.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 15 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquest was yesterday held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Octagon Inn, Plymouth, on the body of FREDERICK JOHN SAMPSON, aged 12, who expired suddenly on the previous night. ANN KINGCUMBE said her son was apparently very well on Thursday, and was playing in the streets till half-past nine. She heard that his companions gave him some apples, but he never told witness so. He complained of a pain in his legs. He ate a potato and went to bed about 9.45 and woke up about 11 o'clock screaming. Witness went over to him, but he was unable to speak and continued screaming. Witness took him out of bed and put him on a chair, and went for a neighbour while the stepfather minded him. The father, when the neighbour came, went for a doctor, and Mr Jago came. The lad, however, died before he arrived. Deceased was ill about one hour, and about 10.30 fell into a stupor from which he never recovered. P.C. Crabb came in the morning and searched the room and found a bottle, now produced. Witness stated it was in the cupboard where the coals were kept and about three years ago she had some spirits of salts in it. Witness then emptied the bottle, and had not used it since. Witness stated deceased had not had a blow or a fall to her knowledge. - P.C. Crabb stated he went to the house in Granby-lane and examined the room and found a bottle marked spirits of salts, poison. He asked MRS KINGCUMBE what she used it for, and she said about three years ago she fetched some from Mr Tatam and mixed it with some oil and napha for the purpose of cleaning furniture and the bottle had not been used since that time. Witness thought the bottle had not been used for some time, but felt it his duty to report finding it. - The Coroner remarked that Crabb did quite right. - Mr William Pearce Jago, surgeon, stated he was called about quarter to twelve. On arriving at the house he found the lad was dead. He could then form no reason of death. At the Coroner's request he made a post-mortem examination. He found no external marks of blows on the head. He opened the head, and in the left lateral ventricle he found a large clot of blood weighing at least 4 ounces, and this was quite sufficient to account for death. He had been informed that the child was subjected to fits about 7 years ago. He attributed death to natural causes, and did not think it necessary to examine the body. The Jury, of whom Mr Philip B. Clemens was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and the Jury, as well as the coroner, thanked Mr Jago for the great and kind attention he had given the case.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 September 1883 SAMPFORD COURTENAY - Mr Coroner Fulford held an Inquest at Sampford Courtenay on Saturday into the cause of death of GEORGE BREALEY, a labourer, who sustained fatal injuries while attending to a steam sawing machine on Thursday. It was proved that the occurrence was Accidental and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 17 September 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Carlton Inn, St Aubyn-street, Devonport, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of MR THOMAS BROOKING. - Mrs Pawley, the wife of Mr George Pawley, a leading man of shipwrights in her Majesty's Dockyard, living at 36 St. Aubyn-street, Devonport, stated that the deceased lived at Commercial-road, Portsmouth, and came to Devonport on Saturday last to see his stepson and own brothers. He was a superannuated sergeant of the Metropolitan Police Force. On Thursday evening he made a good supper, and showed no signs of being ill, but, on the following morning, complained of feeling a little sick. Whilst sitting at the tea-table on Friday afternoon, he suddenly fainted and was in the act of falling from his chair, when witness caught him in her arms. She heard a gurgling noise in his throat. She immediately sent for a doctor, who, directly he came, pronounced him to be dead. The deceased was 66 years of age. - Mr G. H. Hinvest, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, said that he found the heart enlarged and flabby. In the left ventricle there was a large organic clot of blood, which had been forming for some months past. The immediate cause of death was syncope, due to the formation of this clot of blood. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatality To MR F. G. BARONS. Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday afternoon Mr James Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Falcon Hotel, Ford, into the circumstances attending the death of MR FREDERICK GEORGE BARONS, cashier of the Devon and Cornwall Bank, Devonport, who died on Thursday morning last, as reported in the Western Daily Mercury. Great interest was attached to the proceedings from the fact that so many rumours were in circulation as to the way in which the deceased met with the accident resulting in his death and the circumstances attending his removal from the George Hotel to Mr Sibley's, Tavistock Hotel, and thence to his residence, 2 Melville-road, Ford. The Inquiry on Saturday commenced at four o'clock, and was not concluded till half-past eight and the evidence taken was of a conflicting nature. Mr Loye, solicitor, was present on behalf of Mr Sibley. Mr J. Head was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and they having viewed the body, - The first witness called was Henry Hamand, landlord of the George Hotel, Tamerton Foliott. He said he had known the deceased for several years, but until about three weeks ago he had not seen him for over ten years. Between four and five o'clock on Wednesday the deceased came to his house on horseback. He had his horse led up and down by a boy for about ten minutes and had nothing to drink. He again mounted and with two friends rode round the field opposite for about half-an-hour. He came in and ordered tea, of which he partook heartily. After tea witness joined him in a game of quoits behind the house. They played a couple of games together, and then deceased and a Mr Pile played on nearly another hour. they came in and deceased had four or five glasses of port wine. About half-past eight two friends from Devonport dropped in and deceased ordered two or three cigars, which he afterwards returned to the landlady, giving no reason for returning them. He did not complain of any illness. Four young gentlemen from the Rock then came in. About half-past nine deceased jumped on his horse to leave, being then quite sober. Witness saw him on his way for about 100 yards, during which he galloped his horse. When mounted and on the point of starting he offered to race either one to the town for a sovereign. After deceased had left the house about a quarter of an hour two of the four young men returned and stated that the gentleman was "off the road." Witness at once put his horse in a dog-cart and about three-quarters of a mile from the house he found the deceased lying by the side of the hedge on his back, resting against a man's knees. Witness put him in the trap and at once drove into Devonport to Mr Sibley's,. as witness knew he hired the horse from there. Witness there saw two or three of Mr Sibley's men. One of the men who accompanied witness held the horse. Witness left the deceased in the trap and went into the house to see Mr Sibley, saying "MR BARONS is outside - had a tumble, and a man is riding your mare home." Mr Sibley at once sent away two men to inquire where MR BARONS lived, telling them to go to the Royal Hotel and anywhere where they thought they could obtain any information. Witness and Sibley then went to the dogcart and both men having come back and reported that they were unable to find out his address, deceased was at once taken into the house and placed in a sitting posture on the floor. His back rested against a box. Witness noticed that his eyes were partly shut. He considered he was breathing evenly. Witness did not, nor did, he believe, anyone, suggest sending for a doctor. Witness passed the post-office on the way to Sibley's at half-past ten o'clock. - The Coroner said, speaking for himself, he could not understand witness's action in not sending for medical assistance. - Witness admitted that he ought to have done this. He remained with the deceased quite an hour and a half. Mr Sibley's son, witness and others washed his face and then he seemed to revive. He moved his hands, and he seemed to be recovering. A seidlitz powder was given him with the object, and seemed to have the effect, of reviving him. Witness left for home about twelve o'clock, expressing the opinion that the deceased would be better shortly. - The Coroner: I am going to ask you a rather important question. Did you ask Mr Sibley anything with respect to the deceased being sober when he left Mr Sibley's house? - Witness: I told Mr Sibley he had scarcely anything to drink when he left my house and asked him if the deceased had had anything to drink before he left his (Mr Sibley's) house. Mr Sibley replied, "No, he walked straight from the front door to the yard." - The Coroner: Why did you not take the deceased to your house? - Witness: Because I should have had to send to Plymouth for a medical man. - In answer to one or two questions put to him by MR BARONS, the brother of the deceased, witness said the deceased was driven home as fast as possible. He was not conscious during the drive, nor any of the time witness stayed with him. - Mr Loye intimated that, although the tendency of the questions he might put to this witness might give pain to the friends of the deceased, the questions were absolutely necessary in the interests of his client. - To Witness: Why did you ask Mr Sibley if the deceased had anything to drink before he left his house? Because he was so lively and joking with everyone who came in. - Did you consider from his condition that he had been drinking? - I thought he had the day before, or in the morning. - did you hear any opinion expressed to the effect that he ought not to be allowed to ride home? - No, sir. - When the gentlemen came back and said the deceased was in the road, were not the words used: "The deceased is either dead or dying?" I understood them to say, "He has had a tumble and is lying in the road; you must get a conveyance to take him away." I ran at once into the stable to tell the man to put on the harness and the two gentlemen turned and rode back again. When you got to Mr Sibley's house, did you not say that you had MR BARONS in your dogcart, and that he was awfully drunk, or words to that effect? - I did not. I will swear I did not say so. No-one in my presence said anything at Mr Sibley's house as to the deceased being very drunk. - The Coroner: If he went from your house perfectly sober, I cannot understand your asking Mr Sibley if he was drunk when he left his stables? I did this because he was so lively at the time he was in my house. The natural disposition of the deceased was a lively one. - By Mr Loye: He would swear that he did not hear anyone while at Sibley's make the remark that deceased was drunk. He did say to Mr Sibley that he had tumbled off the horse. Witness, however, would not be certain whether the word he used was "tumbled" or "slipped." Witness did not think he told Mr Sibley that when deceased left the George he was perfectly sober. There were two or three spots of blood on his shirt when witness arrived at Mr Sibley's. He would not, however, swear that they were not the stains of port wine. They were dark stains. He tried to vomit in Mr Sibley's yard whilst remaining in the cart. he would swear that he did not hear it suggested by anyone present that the deceased would be put in the harness-room so that the people coming in might not see him. Deceased was lying on a pile of rugs. Witness did not see any straw. Witness was perfectly sober. When he arrived where BARONS lay someone said "Some gentleman has taken his watch and chain and intends leaving it at Knackersknowle with a policeman". Witness met the policeman on the road, who asked if he (witness) had the man who was thrown off. Witness answered yes. The policeman said he had his watch and chain and asked where deceased lived. Witness replied that he did not know, but should like to find out. The policeman then handed him the watch and chain. He said the gentleman who left it had told him that there was a man lying on the road, handing him his watch and chain. - The next witness called was David Lowry, retired Admiralty clerk. He started that he lived at 2 Prospect-villas, close to where the accident occurred. hearing that man had been thrown from a horse and had been placed in the roadside by some men, witness immediately went to try and render assistance, and found the deceased, who was not personally known to him, lying, or partially supported by the persons around him, perfectly helpless and insensible, not even able to hold up his head, which fell on either shoulder. he made a few moaning sounds, and was perfectly helpless. Witness at first thought he was unable to make any such sound, and considered whether it would be advisable to have him taken into his house. Witness really felt at a loss what to do for fear of the responsibility of moving him, as he considered his death might be hastened by this means. Others around seemed to be equally at a loss and someone undid his collar, tie and waistcoat. Several men were there on horseback, some having dismounted and witness said to one of them, "I met four horsemen on the Down this evening, one on a grey horse. Is this man one of them?" His answer was that he did not belong to their party. He stated that they had been drinking at the George and he saw him afterwards backing his horse at a white gate and he supposed that he was trying to dismount. Soon afterwards he was told by someone who had driven past that a man was lying on the road dead. In consequence of which he returned. When Mr Hamand came up he called the man "CHARLEY" and tried [?] him. The man tried to vomit and witness smelt a strong smell of liquor. witness thought from Mr Hamand's general conduct that Hamand was treating a drunken man. Witness took note of the time after Mr Hamand started and found it was then a quarter past ten o'clock. Witness was of opinion that the man had not been hurt by the accident, but was stupefied by drink. Witness did not think it necessary to interfere, as Mr Hamand appeared to know the man. - Frederick Frost, 4 Old Town-street, Plymouth, a draper's assistant, stated that he, in company with three others on horseback, saw MR BARONS at the George Hotel at half-past ten on the night in question, when witness formed the opinion that deceased was intoxicated. The remark was passed to his three companions that deceased was not fit to ride home. The last time witness saw the deceased he was against a gate calling out. - A Juryman: Was it not a white gate? - I have heard of horses shying at this gate. - Witness replied that it was. About five minutes afterwards the horse came galloping after them without a rider. Witness and one of his companions went back and found the deceased lying in the road perfectly unconscious. From what he saw he considered the deceased had met with a serious accident. Witness went on to Hamand's house, and asked him to bring a trap, as the man who had been drinking there had been thrown. He suggested that a doctor should be called, to which Mr Hamand replied that he did not know the man, or words to that effect. When the deceased was at the George Hotel he did not appear to be able to walk straight. he rode past them at a stretch gallop, and they passed the remark that he would not go many yards before he was off the horse. Witness asked the landlord if he could trust him to see that the deceased was properly looked after, and Hamand replied that he could. - Thomas Sampson May, provision merchant, Devonport, stated that he was returning from Tavistock with a friend, and when within a few yards of the lane leading down to Plym Bridge they saw an object in the road, who, on coming up to, they found to be the deceased. Witness dismounted and found him unconscious. A hat and riding whip were found some distance from him, from which witness concluded he was one of four horsemen who had passed him on the Downs. He called to two lads to assist him, saying a man was dead in the road, and with their assistance the man was got on his back. One of the lads lifted his head, and said "This is the man who has been drinking at Mr Hamand's." Witness took possession of the deceased's watch and chain. He reported the case, and handed over the watch and chain to the policeman at Knackersknowle. The man was lying on his left side in the middle of the road. One eye was open and the other closed, and he was lying at full length. He did not appear to have been dragged for any distance along the road. he did not believe he was intoxicated and did not smell any drink. Witness believed the four young men whom they passed on the road were sober. There being plenty of assistance at hand, and witness's friend having an engagement, they drove away. - William Ellis, printer, Chapel-street, Devonport, saw the deceased at the George Hotel, at 8.20, and was with him about twenty minutes. Deceased was perfectly sober then when he left him, and witness would have had no hesitation in [?] home by him. - George Frederick Sibley, landlord of the Tavistock Hotel, Devonport, stated that about ten minutes to eleven on the night in question, Mr Hamand inquired for him. He [?] privately at the side door to which he beckoned him, "I have BARONS here - he is dreadfully drunk. He has slipped from his horse, but is not hurt. Do you know where he lives?" Witness replied that he did not, and at once went to the yard with him, and saw the deceased in the back of the dog-cart, with his head lying over the tailboard. Witness did not think any injury had resulted to the deceased through riding in the cart. Previous to this he heard some traps coming driven by others, and someone in the yard suggested that to avoid being seen in that state the deceased should be put in the harness-room, which was done. He was laid on a bundle of straw and a number of horse rugs. From what Mr Hamand said, and not thinking it desirable the deceased [?] and went and engaged the [?] attention. On Mr Hamand remarking that he was "horribly" drunk, Mr Sibley suggested that a drink of carbonate soda and water might make him sick and relieve him. Witness did not like to expose the deceased by making enquiries as to his place of residence. No one told witness that he had been picked up on the road. Witness left him as he thought fast asleep in the care of a gentleman and two men. At 5.45 when he saw him again, he was breathing freely. There was vomit on his shirt front, but no stains of blood. The deceased was not disturbed till his address had been found, when a cab was sent for and the deceased taken home. It was about a quarter to seven when the cab came. They had some difficulty in rousing the deceased, and seeing this, it occurred to him that a doctor should be sent for, but thinking it would be better for him to be attended by his own medical man he was driven home. His impression up to that time was that the deceased was in a state of intoxication, from which he expected him to recover after a night's rest. Witness did not look for any marks as he had not been told that any accident had happened to him. - Alfred Harris, 17 Duke-street, Devonport, a stableman in Mr Sibley's employ, was called by Mr Loye, and examined by the Coroner as to the words Mr Hamand used in the presence of Mr and Mrs Sibley with reference to the deceased being intoxicated. The witness, however, did not seem to understand the Coroner's questions, and could give no intelligible answers thereto. - Dr Rolston said that between nine and ten on Thursday morning he received a message to attend MR BARONS, at his residence. He learnt from the messenger that the deceased had had a fall. Witness went at once and gave directions as to his treatment. He was lying quite insensible, and could not swallow anything. The deceased lived about two hours after he first saw him, but was not able to speak. Witness was of opinion that the deceased was suffering from compression of the brain as the result of the accident. There were no marks of vomiting about him, and no smell of any kind of alcohol about him, or his clothing. Witness considered that his death was caused by a rupture of a vessel of the brain from injuries he received at the time of the accident. There were externally no signs of a blow or any injury. - The Coroner stated that he had considered it right to order a post-mortem examination, but the body was in such a state that Dr Rolston did not think it necessary to do so - he was able to form an opinion as to the cause of death without this. - Dr Rolston stated it was his opinion that even if a medical man had been sent for at the George Hotel nothing could have saved the deceased's life. - The Coroner, in summing up, was glad that many things on which he had been anxious at the commencement of the Inquiry had been cleared up. It seemed to him clear, however, that from the position in which the deceased was found, and from the medical evidence, that the deceased was thrown from his horse, and that death resulted from compression of the brain, through his being thrown. He commented strongly on Mr Hamand's conduct, as according to his evidence, the deceased was a perfectly sober man. Although hearing that the deceased had met with an accident which might prove fatal, he did not send for a medical man, and did not take him back to his house because he would have to get a doctor. Mr Hamand had placed himself on the horns of a dilemma as the evidence had shown. Mr Sibley, he thought, acted under the impression that MR BARONS was in an intoxicated state, and being anxious to screen the deceased and being busily engaged in closing his house, his mind would naturally be distracted. His (the Coroner) [?] matter was clearly this. That the greater responsibility rested with Hamand. It was satisfactory to know that the medical evidence showed that even if a doctor had been called to the deceased would not, in all probability, have lived. But he thought it should be a warning to all to at once summon medical aid in any similar case, and not take the responsibility upon themselves. He felt confident that if it had been represented to Mr Sibley that MR BARONS had been injured, he would immediately have summoned a medical man. - The Jury then considered their verdict. After some fifteen minutes deliberation in private, the Foreman announced their decision as follows:- "We consider the deceased came by his death through being thrown from a horse, which we consider to be purely Accidental; but the Jury recommend that in similar occurrences medical aid should be at once called in."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 September 1883 SOUTH BRENT - An Inquest was held at the Anchor Hotel, Brent, on the body of FRANCK PEATHEYJOHN, who died suddenly last week while working in a field. Deceased, who was 64 years of age, and had been ailing for some time, remarked to his wife previous to leaving for work, "Ah, I am worse than you think I am." The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 20 September 1883 PLYMPTON - An Inquest has been held by Mr R. R. Rodd (County Coroner) at Bovisand, on the body of GUNNER BELTS, wow as washed off the pier and drowned during the late gale. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 22 September 1883 EXETER - An Inquest was yesterday held on the body of a man, named MAUNDER, in the employ of Messrs. Moores and Collins, tailors, High-street, Exeter. He was found lifeless in bed, and after hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict that he died from Natural Causes.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 24 September 1883 LYDFORD - The Fatality In Princetown Station Yard. - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, re-opened the Inquiry at the Duchy Hotel, Princetown, on Saturday, on the body of WILLIAM JAMES. S. Hewitt, foreman in the employ of Mr Mackay, contractor, stated that on September 11 he and the engine driver was so positioned on the engine that the whole length of No. 2 line could be laterally commanded while they were entering station yard with some trucks which were being propelled by the engine. The deceased just before shunting had been cautioned to keep clear of the line. He must have been stooping, otherwise he would have been observed by them. It was at the instance of William Greening that the engine was stopped, he having seen that the deceased had been knocked down. Mr Hewitt, having perceived what had happened, immediately alighted from the engine and went to where the deceased was lying. He was apparently lifeless. Dr Harris, assistant surgeon at Dartmoor Prison, stated that he was summoned to the station at 2.45 p.m., and on examination found that JAMES was dead. Death was attributed to a severe shock to the system and injuries received. The Jury considering the evidence produced to be sufficiently clear and conclusive, other witnesses were not called and a verdict of "Accidental Death was returned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, touching the death of WILLIAM FINCH, aged 40, a gasfitter, who lived at 12 Frederick-street. The deceased's nephew, who lived with him, was awakened between five and six o'clock on Sunday morning by a noise made by his uncle, but thinking he was dreaming the young man went to sleep again. On awaking, about eight o'clock, he found that FINCH was dead by his side. Deceased had been working rather harder than usual of late, and this had seemed to tell on him. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 25 September 1883 YEALMPTON - The Fatal Accident Near Yealmpton - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Lyneham yesterday, on the body of NICHOLAS TOPE, farm labourer, aged 70, who died on Saturday from falling from a hedge which he was paring. The evidence of the young woman who found TOPE just after his supposed fall was taken, but Mr G. Atkins, the surgeon who saw deceased, had not been requested to attend, and Mr Rodd accordingly adjourned the Inquiry to Friday next.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Navy and Army Inn, Lambhay Hill by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, on the body of a little child named THOMAS HAROLD PETER BOGGIA. The parents retired to rest on Saturday night, the child lying between them. When they woke up at eight o'clock next morning, it was cold and dark in its face. Dr Thompson was called in, and pronounced the child dead. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Southey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 26 September 1883 BRANSCOMBE - The Branscombe Murder. Adjourned Inquest. - At Branscombe yesterday afternoon Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, resumed his Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PERRYMAN, who was killed by a gunshot on Culverwell Hill on the evening of the 8th September. Mr Superintendant de Schmid, appeared on behalf of the police: and Mr Every of Honiton, watched the case on behalf of the three persons; William Dean Dowell, Amos French and Elizabeth Williams - who were arrested on Thursday last on suspicion of having been concerned in the murder. Prisoners were accommodated with a seat at a desk to the left of the Coroner. Dowell appeared to be more at ease than when in the police-court, and nodded familiarly and smiled to such of the police and jurors as he recognised. Mr John Evans, surgeon, of Seaton, gave details of the post mortem examination he had made. One or two shots passed right through the body, entering at the chest and coming out at the back. The gun must have been fired at rather close quarters: at from twenty to thirty yards, and immediately in front of deceased. He would not say that the person firing the shot must necessarily have been on the left of the deceased; he might have been of course, but it depended on the direction given to the gun at the moment of firing. - P.C. William Martin, of Branscombe, said: After I had examined the spot where the deceased was shot on the 8th, William Dowell volunteered to go with me to try to find out who had done it. He had gone with me to the spot, and he offered to help to find out who it was that fired the gun. This was just after the occurrence. Q.: How did you come to see Dowell? - A.: I saw him first that evening, before PERRYMAN was shot, outside his own house in the village. I next saw him at the spot in question about eleven o'clock. He went there with me and others. He offered to go with me to Mr Amos Power's, of Alverway Farm, to see if either of the young Power's had been that way with a gun. We went part way. As we was going towards Mr Power's he said, "It must be someone that keep guns that done it. I don't know anyone that keeps guns barring myself and the young Power's, and Mr Gill." He added: "It couldn't be me, as I hadn't got my gun at home: my gun is out to Dunscombe, at my brother-in-law's, he took it with him when he changed houses." I said, "Where were you all the evening? Can you account for yourself? He said, "Yes, I never left home all the evening after I came home from Honiton, where I had been with my sister to get a summons for Pile." He also said, "You know what it is for; it's about the row we had the other night: I expect you'll have a letter about it on Monday morning." I called up several people, and found from some of them that neither of the young Powers had been out that evening; consequently, I did not go on to Mr Power's. The last person I called on was the gate-keeper, Skinner. I called him out of bed, and had some conversation with him. Dowell was with me, and joined in the conversation. Just as we were leaving, Dowell said to Skinner, "Have you got a drop of brandy in house? I feel awful queer, and I should like a drink." Skinner said he hadn't any. We then turned back to the village. I had ascertained that none of the young Powers had been out that way with a gun. I had heard from young Selway that they were at home just about the time this occurred, and that was the reason why I went back. On the way Dowell said, "If you'll call me in the morning, I'll go up with you and see where the man was shot." We then went back to the deceased's house and afterwards left Dowell at his own house. It was then about three o'clock in the morning. On the evening of Monday the 16th, about ten o'clock, I saw Dowell come out of the Fountain head Inn with several others. he remained in the road with the other men. About twenty minutes afterwards he said to me, "I don't quite like it, Martin, as I've been told you've been out to my sister's to enquire about my gun, and it much frightened her. My father has been to Sidmouth today, and someone told him there that it was me that shoot PERRYMAN and that I was run away. I can account for my time all the night after coming home from Honiton, which was about quarter to seven. The first thing I did when I got home was to go to Sarah Northcote's. I stayed there about a quarter of an hour, talking of the case I had been to Honiton about. After that I went into my house. Bessy Raffell came down, and I went down as far as the church with her. I returned, and went into Amos French's. I had a conversation with French, and also read a little book. I then went into my own house, got some sticks, lit the fire, and fried my meat, which I was eating when I heard David Pile say that someone had shot PERRYMAN." I went with Dowell to his house. I asked him if he had a gun in the house, or any powder and shot. He replied, "I haven't a gun. I told you where my gun was." He then told his sister (one of the accused) to let me see his powder and shot. Miss Gill had been with us during some part of the conversation on the way from the inn to Dowell's house. There were a lot of people about, but they did not hear what we were saying. Miss Gill went into the house with us. Eliza Williams, at Dowell's request, let me have some powder and shot, which I took charge of. On leaving Dowell's house the prisoner asserted he was innocent, and that the police were on the wrong scent. - Cross-examined: He had heard from Honiton with regard to a quarrel between Pile and French, and had been instructed to warn Pile against continuing to threaten Mrs Williams. Dowell had offered the police every assistance. had not seen Dowell with a gun for two months. William Searle, postman at Branscombe, deposed to passing Dowell's house at twenty minutes to nine o'clock on the morning of the 18th inst., but did not see any light in the window. - W. H. Sidwell passed Dowell's house about the same time, but could not say whether any lights were inside. - David Pile, labourer, on Edge Farm, stated he had had a quarrel with Amos French, who said that he would as soon die as live for him. He had not used the path where PERRYMAN was shot six times for the past six months. Dowell had no reason to believe that witness would use the path in question on the night of the 8th inst. - The Inquiry adjourned to Monday.

EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Railway Hotel, Exeter, on the body of a man named ARTHUR VINNICOMBE, aged 19, a porter in the employ of the Great Western Railway. An official stated that he signalled two South Western Railway engines coupled together. The deceased was just at that point going to cross the line, when witness called out to him. He looked at the approaching engine, and tried to dash across the line with a hand truck he had in front of him. He managed to push the truck off the line, but he was caught by the buffer and run over. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Singular Death Of A Child At Plymouth. Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the West Hoe Hotel, Plymouth, on the body of JOSEPH ERNEST JOHNS, aged two years and nine months. The mother, residing at 22 Bishop-place, stated that on Tuesday, the 18th instant, she put the child to bed as usual, and went herself about eleven o'clock in another bed in the same room. About four o'clock she was disturbed by a noise, and on going towards the bed witness found the child on the floor. She picked him up and took him into bed with her, and in the morning the child seemed just the same as usual. On Saturday the child, on returning from playing in the streets, commenced to vomit. Witness sent for Dr Hughes, who prescribed medicine, but death occurred the same night. Witness stated that the child was quite well from Wednesday to Saturday, and had its usual appetite. Dr R. H. Hughes said he was not told it had fallen out of bed. On Sunday he examined the child and found a bruise on its forehead. On the right side of the head he found a fracture through the skull about four inches in length. This fracture could not have resulted from natural causes, and must have been caused by a blow or a fall. He should think the vomiting the result of the fracture, but he could not see how the child, if he received the fracture on Tuesday, could have lived until Saturday, and during that time he was quite bright and ate his food as usual. He found a great deal of effusion of the blood on the brain. The effusion might have commenced on Tuesday and continued until Saturday, but he could not well connect the death of the child to the child to the fall received on Tuesday. But there was no doubt the child died from a fracture. Mr Brian briefly summed up the evidence and the Jury, of whom Mr Bishop was Foreman, returned a verdict that the child died from a Fracture of the Skull, but as to how the fracture was occasioned, there was no evidence to show. - The Coroner and the Jury commented on the ability with which Dr Hughes had acted in the case, and the Foreman on behalf of the Jury, stated it was their opinion that no blame was attached to the mother.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 September 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Guildhall as to the death of JOHN THOMAS, a waterman, 50 years of age, who on Sunday evening was drowned through falling off the Custom-house quay. - John Gibbs, waterman, deposed to having been in the company of the deceased on the night in question, and to leaving the Three Crown's Hotel together a few minutes after ten o'clock. Deceased was not quite sober, and in walking across the quay his feet were caught by a swung hawser from one of the vessels, and stumbling, the fell over. Witness at once ran to the edge of the quay, but could hear nothing, the wind blowing at the time very strongly. - James Adams, another waterman, said he was mooring up his boat at the quay at the time of the accident. He at once went with another man to the spot and found THOMAS lying in the water face downwards. they got him out and P.C. Gay took him to the hospital. P.C. Gay having given evidence, Mr G. Carter, resident surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that when deceased was received at that Institution, every possible restorative was applied without effect: indeed, witness thought life must have been extinct before he arrived there. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and asked the Coroner to communicate with the proper authorities, asking that adequate protection in the way of a railing should be placed around the quay.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 October 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall on Saturday as to the death of WILLIAM HAMMOND, porter, aged 49 years, who lived at Cremyll-street, Stonehouse. On Wednesday deceased was engaged in unloading a vessel at Mr Hargreave's coal wharf, and subsequently assisted in removing the plank from the vessel's side with the help of a "skid." Suddenly the ship lurched, with the result that one end of the "skid" struck HAMMOND in the back and knocked him into the water. He was rescued after about two minutes' immersion, and was found to be insensible, and to have received a severe cut across the temple. Deceased was at once placed in a cab and taken to the South Devon Hospital, where, in spite of the care of Mr Carter, the house surgeon, he died on Thursday evening from inflammation of both lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 4 October 1883 TORQUAY - At an Inquest held yesterday on JAMES WADE, 72, lodginghouse-keeper, of Belgrave-road, Torquay, who met his death the day previously by falling from a window, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 October 1883 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Loft. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Guildhall on the body of a pensioner and farm labourer named JOHN HANNAFORD, who died on Wednesday at the Hospital. - Wm. Edward Luscombe, son of Wm. Andrew Luscombe of Warleigh Barton, near Tamerton, said deceased was in his father's employ, and generally went into Plymouth on Saturday night and returned on Sunday night to be ready for work on Monday morning. On Sunday night deceased did not come back to the house, and next morning, on passing the stable about twenty minutes to seven, witness heard deceased crying out, and looking into the stable saw him lying on his back on the flags. - George Cann stated that when called by the last witness he went to the stable, and found deceased on his back with blood on the side of his head and on the flags around him. Witness questioned deceased, who said he thought he had fallen from the loft, but could not say when. He was conveyed to the house and afterwards to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Mr Carter, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that when deceased was brought there he saw that the case was hopeless. The man had a severe concussion of the brain and a broken spine. Mr W. A. Luscombe spoke to examining the loft after the accident, and finding an impression in the hay as if it had been lain on about a foot from the hole from which deceased fell. The loft was reached by a ladder in another part. The Coroner, in summing up, pointed to the probability of the deceased having arrived too late at the house that night, and had, therefore, gone to sleep in the loft. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 October 1883 BRANSCOMBE - Yesterday the Inquest at Branscombe was resumed for the fourth time, and concluded, into the cause of death of JOHN PERRIMAN, labourer, who was mysteriously shot on the 8th ult. The belief has now become general that deceased was accidentally shot by a poacher, but the Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 October 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Galatea Inn, King-street West, on Monday evening, touching the death of the child, aged ten months, of MR STRINGER, a fish seller. According to the father's evidence the child was taken to bed on Sunday night and was then quite well, but on waking the following morning the father found the child lying behind its mother dead. - Mr Miller, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of deceased. It was a very fine child and well nourished. On the back and on the right breast there were distinct signs of pressure. Internally he found that the lungs, especially the right lung, were much congested. The child died from suffocation caused, in his belief, from having been accidentally overlain by her mother during sleep. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this evidence, and whilst sympathising with the father and mother in the loss of their only child, fully exonerated the parents from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 15 October 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Pennycomequick Inn on Saturday evening, on the body of MRS MARGARET JARVIS, aged 76, wife of a retired captain in the army, living at 23 Stuart-terrace, Pennycomequick, who died between eleven and twelve o'clock the same day. The evidence showed that the deceased, who had had a great deal of anxiety lately owing to her daughter's illness, was taken suddenly ill, and died before medical assistance arrived. Mr Morris, surgeon, of Plymouth, who was the medical attendant of the family, gave evidence, showing that death was caused by the failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 17 October 1883 TORQUAY - Sudden Death At Torquay. - Mr S. Hacker, the District Coroner, has held an Inquest at the Torbay Inn, Torquay, on the body of HELEN CROKER, widow, Brunswick-terrace, who died suddenly on Saturday morning. Rumours had been set afloat that deceased succumbed to ill-usage and want of food, and various charges were made against a man named Gale, with whom she lived, but the medical evidence was that death resulted from syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the King's Arms, George-street, Devonport, on the body of a woman, named MARY BURT, living at 48 Pembroke-street, the wife of a wardroom servant of H.M.S. Adelaide. The deceased was taking tea with her three children on Sunday afternoon last, between four and five o'clock and expressed a wish that her eldest daughter should fetch a little cream. The girl went on the errand, and on her return found her mother dead. The evidence showed that the deceased, who was 40 years of age, had been ailing for some time past, and had been attended by Mr W. Pryn, who was called in soon after the death occurred. As the result of a post-mortem examination which he had made, he considered that death was due to congestion of the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 October 1883 HOLSWORTHY - The Sudden Death At Holsworthy. Miserable End Of A Naval Pensioner. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the White Hart Hotel, Holsworthy, by Mr Coroner Fulford, as to the circumstances connected with the death of JOHN YEO, of Pyworthy, near Holsworthy, naval pensioner, who died at the New Inn, Holsworthy, on Sunday, as reported by us yesterday. Mr James Higgs was Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner commented on the sad nature of the death, and said that he had never seen a finer looking man. It appeared from the evidence of THOMAS YEO, of Pyworthy, a brother of the deceased, and also a naval pensioner, that the deceased left his home at Pyworthy on the 4th inst. to go to Holsworthy to receive his pension, which was £4 7s. 6d. The deceased had been in the Royal Marines 23 years. Witness was not aware that deceased had paid any of the pension for clothes, but believed he had spent the whole at the New Inn, where, witness understood, he took up his abode from the 4th until Sunday, when he died. Witness was sent for on the latter day and found his brother in a dying state. Witness remained with him until his death at 9.30 a.m. on Sunday. After his death witness examined his clothes and found only 12s. 11 d. upon him. On first seeing his brother witness inquired what was the matter with him and he replied that he had lost some blood and was very weak. During the past three years - until just before his death - the deceased had not suffered from any illness, or had occasion for a doctor. In answer to a Juror, witness said he supposed that any person so disposed might have entered deceased's room at the Inn and taken money out of his pocket. - Corporal Chapple, recruiting sergeant of the royal Marines, said he was in the habit of visiting the New Inn every night, and saw the deceased there on the 4th and each evening until his death. YEO'S usual drink was rum. Witness had never seen him tipsy, but he was "always muddled." Mrs Jones, the landlady, asked him on Saturday to stay up with the deceased, as the doctor who had been called in had ordered someone to be with him. Witness went in about 11.30, and stayed with deceased up to the time of his death. Witness asked him what was the matter, and he said he had been in the same way before twice. He was very weak, he said, and had lost some blood. - Mr John Jones, landlord and proprietor of the Inn, deposed that on the 4th inst. when the deceased arrived at the public-house he appeared to be rather the worse for liquor. Witness knew that the deceased lived at Pyworthy, and that he was in the habit of spending his pension money in drink at one or other of the inns in the town, before he left the place again. After YEO came to witness's house he did not go out very much, spending most of his time in reading the newspaper and drinking. Witness gave a detailed statement of how deceased passed the day, and said that he began it by having some rum. Did not know what deceased had paid him altogether, but it was "a good bit." Deceased always had plenty to eat, and was never "properly drunk." Witness had lent the deceased 10s. on Friday, but he did not owe him anything for liquor or lodging. Deceased did not drink any more than he (witness) did himself. Witness put deceased to bed on Friday morning about 11 a.m., as he complained of being ill, but he would not have a doctor, neither would he consent to have his friends sent for. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said he did not think it advisable to call in medical aid or send for deceased's friends. - Mr Pearce, surgeon, at Holsworthy, was called on Saturday night to see the deceased, who was in a dying state and very weak from loss of blood, complaining of having suffered from dysentery. In witness's opinion the cause of death was haemorrhage, and his death had been accelerated in a great degree by excessive drinking. In summing up, the Coroner said the landlord's conduct in the matter was a scandal and disgrace. The Jury, after a short consultation gave a verdict in accordance with the evidence, and remarked that they were unanimously of opinion that the landlord was culpable in keeping the deceased so long as he did at his house.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 18 October 1883 DARTMOUTH - Alleged Manslaughter At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Dartmouth Guildhall before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, on the body of CHARLES BOWHAY, general porter, who was found dead yesterday morning in his house in Higher-street. Mr W. Atkins, draper, was chosen Foreman of the Jury. It appeared from the evidence that deceased and another man named Bennett, a coal lumper, had a quarrel on the New Ground on Tuesday evening, when deceased struck Bennett, who returned the blow, knocking him down. He was taken up and laid upon a seat, where he remained for some time in a semi-conscious state, the general opinion being that he was under the influence of liquor. Not recovering, however, he was taken to his home in Higher-street, placed in a chair, and remained there until the following morning. His wife having been told he was drunk, stayed up by him until 2 a.m., when she went to bed, visiting him again at 4 a.m., when, as she supposed, he was still sleeping. His daughter, however, coming down about 7 o'clock found her father had changed positions, and on feeling his hands she found them cold, and it was ascertained he was dead. Medical aid was obtained, but which was, of course, of no avail, and Bennett was apprehended, and by the order of the Coroner, Dr Dawson made a post-mortem examination, and his evidence proved that the vital organs were healthy, but on examining the head he found an effusion of blood over the region of the left temple, and also over the left side of the brain, also an effusion of blood at the back of the head, but no fracture of the skull. In his opinion the cause of death was haemorrhage pressing on the brain, the result of the fall, or blow, or both, most likely the fall. The Coroner summed up at some length, pointed out the difference between murder, manslaughter, and justifiable homicide. The first he considered there was not the slightest evidence to prove. With regard to the verdict of manslaughter, the law was very clearly pointed out. If in a fight the slayer did all he could to get out of the way and yet the deceased followed him up and he was obliged to strike him in self defence that was homicide: but in the present case the slayer pulled off his coat when requested to do so by the deceased, and accepted the challenge and struck the blow which knocked the deceased down. The hall, which was crowded, was then cleared, and the Jury, after consulting for about half-an-hour, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against William Bennett," and the man was taken into custody. The witnesses were bound over to prosecute. The prisoner will be examined today before the magistrates.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 19 October 1883 TORQUAY - The Sad Fatality At Torquay. The Inquest. - The Inquest on the body of FREDERICK ROLPH, confectioner, of Victoria Parade, Torquay, who was killed by falling over the cliffs at Daddy Hole Plain on Wednesday, was held at the Infirmary yesterday, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner. - Walter Phillips, 6 Abbey-road, banker's clerk, identified the body as that of FREDERICK THOMAS ROLPH. He proceeded (speaking with emotion): I was with him yesterday. We went for a walk on Daddy Hole Plain about a quarter after three. There was no one else with us. We went towards the cliffs to look at a vessel underneath. We saw her go about, and we turned to come back again. In turning round deceased's hat blew off. We had gone down the grass slope by Major Bridson's wall. About a 100 feet there is a precipice at the end of the slope. People walk on this slope. His hat went over the cliff some distance further off, down to the beach under Daddy Hole. There was a very high wind blowing at the time. He went to the edge of the cliff to see the hat fall: took his over-coat off, and put his stick down, saying "Take hold my coat." I said "Don't go down there and called to him twice to come back. I* saw him, as I leaned over the cliff disappear around a rock below, and then I saw him tumble and fall on a rock below where I was. I never heard him call out. I didn't see him climbing. He pitched on his should after falling about ten feet, and then he glanced off and fell among the rocks. I ran across the plain and went down by the path. When I got to the place I found him lying at the foot of the cliff dead, amongst the rocks. He was above high water mark. I think he must have been dead when I got to him. He was lying on his back. he did not tell me he was going to fetch his hat, but I understood that such was the case. I believe Daddy Hole was a favourite resort of his. I called to the coastguard for help as I was going down, and also to some other men and they came down after me. I got some water and put on his face, but he made no movement. I saw the body placed in a cab and driven away. I am not aware how he came to slip. The wind might have taken him down: it was very high. By the Jury: I think he was accustomed to climb about the cliffs. The hat has since been found by a man named Harley. It is about 200 feet from the place deceased fell to where he was found. After evidence had been given by Mr Edward Haarer, deceased's mother-in-law and John Neno, coastguardman, Mr Frederick Thomas Thistle, house surgeon, deposed that the deceased when brought to the Infirmary was quite dead. The chief injury was a fracture at the base of the skull. No bones were broken. The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a most distressing one, but the evidence as to the accidental nature of the occurrence was very clear. The Jury immediately found a verdict of "Accidental Death." The sympathy for the friends of deceased is very widespread. the funeral will take place on Monday.

Western Morning News, Friday 19 October 1883 CREDITON - ROBERT WARE has died under rather singular circumstances at Crediton. The deceased, a labourer, 41 years of age, obtained some medicine from a chemist for lumbago. The physic was oil of amber and oil of juniper, and Mr Tanner, in supplying it, appears to have carefully instructed the deceased as to the quantity he was to take. WARE, however, took an overdose, thus causing death. The Coroner commented on the "extraordinary" fact that the bottle was not labelled poison, and the Jury then returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Guildhall touching the death of REBECCA HARDING, late of 20 High-street, Plymouth. Mary Stuart stated that she was the niece of the deceased, and daughter of Mr Stuart, publican. Witness went to bed about 10.30 on Wednesday night, and her aunt came to bed shortly after eleven o'clock. On witness's awaking yesterday morning about seven o'clock she missed her aunt, and on looking on the floor saw her crouching down by the bed. She (the niece) spoke to her, but receiving no reply called assistance, when her aunt was found to be dead. - Mr C. M Jones, surgeon, stated that deceased had been a patient of his, and suffered from softening of the brain. She was also slightly paralysed, and from his knowledge of her and what he had seen and heard since her death, he had no hesitation in saying that she died from a paralytic stroke. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 20 October 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian yesterday held an Inquest in the Plymouth Guildhall on the body of ELLEN ELFORD, aged seventeen. When in the employ of Mr J. Northmore, farmer, of Goodmeavy, some three months ago, ELFORD was knocked down by a horse, which, it appears, she had undertaken to lead whilst the animal was attached to a hay-collector, and sustained injuries from which she died in the Hospital on Wednesday. The Jury, in returning a verdict of Accidental Death, exonerated Mr Northmore, but expressed strong disapproval of the conduct of the driver of the hay-collector, William Maddock, in refusing to say whether the horse was a bad tempered one, and concurred with the Coroner that he should not be allowed his expenses.

NEWTON ABBOT - The Sudden Death Of A Gentleman At Newton. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on MR ROBERT JAMES WILSON, a gentleman residing at No. 2 St Bernard's, Newton Abbot, who was found dead by the road-side near his residence on Wednesday morning. MR WILSON, who was 44 years of age, had been in the town during the afternoon of Thursday and left the Globe Hotel shortly after six. As he was leaving the waiter, noticing he was looking unwell, offered to get him a cab to take him home, but he declined, observing that he thought a walk home would do him good. About eight o'clock he was seen by another person going up Powderham Road towards his home. Nothing was heard of him afterwards till about half-past seven o'clock the next morning, when Mr Maddicott found him lying by the road side near his house cold and dead. He was removed to his residence by Sergeant Nicholls. Dr Ley, who made a post-mortem examination on the body, discovered a bruise at the back of the head as though produced by a fall. The bruise only extended as far as the fleshy par. The brain was covered with clotted blood, as the result of a rupture of a blood-vessel. He attributed death to this cause, or what was popularly known as apoplexy. It was also shown that there were not any marks on the ground as though a struggle had taken place. MRS WILSON proved waiting up for her husband till four o'clock in the morning. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, viz., that deceased died from the effects of a rupture of a blood vessel on the brain.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 22 October 1883 EXETER - Burning Fatality Near Exeter. The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest on Saturday on the body of EMILY ELLEN ROBINSON, aged 11, whose parents reside in the neighbouring village of Wonford. On Friday last the deceased was left in the house alone, and whilst reaching something from the mantelpiece, she overbalanced herself and fell into the fire, igniting her clothing. A lad named Brown, who was passing went to her assistance, and wrapped his coat around her, but she sustained serious injuries before the flames could be extinguished and expired the same day in the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and complimented Brown on his gallant behaviour.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 25 October 1883 WESTWARD HO! - Sad Fatality In North Devon. Finding Of The Bodies. - Last week was recorded a very sad and melancholy event which happened on Tuesday to two young ladies in North Devon, who met with their deaths by drowning under distressing circumstances. On the afternoon in question the daughter of MR E. W. VIDAL, J.P., of Cornborough House, Abbotsham (adjoining Westward Ho!), in company with a young lady named MISS EVELYN ALLEYNE, daughter of COLONEL ALLEYNE, of Clifton, visitor at Cornborough, left the house to watch the tempestuous sea and the rolling waves. They were last seen four o'clock descending the cliffs to the pebbly beach, but as they did not return to dinner at six o'clock the friends became anxious and, on inquiry, nothing could be heard or seen of them. As the night progressed much alarm was occasioned, and searchers were sent in all directions, but it was not until some days afterwards that their hats and portions of their clothing were washed ashore. Yesterday morning, about half-past six, the butler at Cornborough, the brother of MISS VIDAL, and another gentleman found both bodies washed up on the pebble ridge. They were very much disfigured. An Inquest was held upon their bodies yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, of Northtawton, who conducted the Inquiry in consequence of the death of Mr J. H. Toller, the late coroner for the Barnstaple district. The above facts were sworn to by the several witnesses, and Dr Rouse stated that death was the result of drowning. The bodies were placed out on tables at the ladies' bath. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and they expressed their deep sympathy with the parents of both young ladies, which the Coroner endorsed in some feeling words.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 30 October 1883 PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Penrose Inn, Penrose-street, on the body of a man named EDWARD PARKER, aged 70. Lewis Algernon Charles, residing with his parents at 17 Penrose-street, stated that PARKER was his grandfather. Shortly after seven o'clock that morning on going up the back yard he passed PARKER, who was fully dressed at the time, and was smoking a pipe. On again returning into the house his grandfather was still in the court. Witness, after washing himself, returned into the court, and went to the wash-house to get his hoop, but the door would only open a little way. He saw PARKER sitting on the stone floor with one of his hands in a pan, and he saw a drop of blood on the sleeve of his shirt. Witness ran indoors and told his aunt of what he had seen, and she called witness's father, who went to the wash-house. - George Charles, father of the last witness, stated he was called by his sister-in-law, she telling him that PARKER was in the wash-house, and she did not know what was the matter with him. On going there witness found that he could not open the door as PARKER'S feet were against it. He, however, saw a razor in the pan and guessing what had occurred, he immediately went for Dr Miller. Soon after, on entering the wash-house with the doctor, it was found that PARKER was quite dead. There was a deep cut in his throat. - Witness said PARKER had been failing in health for some time, and had been unable to accomplish all his work. This seemed to weigh heavily upon him. - John Perring, residing at No. 11 Henry-street, also gave evidence. PARKER had a razor in his right hand, and was lying on his left side. - SARAH PARKER, daughter of the deceased, said that about 12.30 on the previous night she was called by her father, who said he had something to tell her. She went to his bed, and he made a statement that someone named Willie Parker had said he had taken away cucumbers in his pocket from Mr Acland, and that the circumstance had been reported to Mr Kelly. He also stated that Willie had stated this for spite. Witness then again returned to her bed. She had found out there was no truth whatever in the statement of deceased. Mr Brian having briefly summed up the evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr P. Pellow, was Foreman, returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 1 November 1883 MILTON DAMERELL - The Suicide On The Holsworthy Line. Inquest And Verdict. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Robert Fulford, Coroner, at Ven Farm House, on the body of MRS ANN PALMER. Inspector Foster represented the London and South Western Railway Company. Mr Caleb Copp was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner said he was satisfied that they would spare a great deal of pain if they assumed that MRS PALMER went in front of the engine whilst in a state of mind for which she was wholly irresponsible. - ANN MARIA PALMER sated that she was a second cousin of MRS PALMER, who was about fifty-five years old. On Tuesday morning deceased rose about nine o'clock, and as the family had breakfasted, she got her own breakfast. She afterwards talked of matters relating to the family, and asked when certain religious meetings would be held in the neighbourhood, as she wished witness to go to them. Deceased also said that she would inquire when the meetings would take place. About half-past ten she went upstairs to lie down for rest. About lunch time witness took up something for her to eat and found MRS PALMER was not there. Witness began to search for her, but without success. - Mrs Woods stated that the deceased had for some time been in a very depressed condition. She had been greatly affected by religious subjects and frequently expressed herself as being a lost one. - Sarah Ann White stated that it was her duty to attend to the signal box at the Ven Down Crossing. On Tuesday MRS PALMER arrived at the box about a quarter to eleven, and asked several questions relating to the signals and how long before the train was due. She sat on the doorstep of the signal box for some time, and whilst witness was putting the flag out of the window to signal the train she went out as witness thought to look through the bars of the gate at the train, but she must have gone through the side swing gate, as witness saw her run against the engine. - James Lobb, a packer on the railway, stated that he was called by the woman in charge and found MRS PALMER about fifty yards from the signal box and lying about three feet from the rails quite dead. - Dr Bennet, of Okehampton, stated that MRS PALMER had been suffering from melancholia. She was under the delusion that she was a lost one. Witness could not succeed in persuading her to the contrary. There was nothing suicidal in her manner. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that he was sure there were many there who knew that MRS PALMER had lately been in failing mental health, but she must have been exposed to some sort of wild excitement and those who created the excitement were probably enthusiasts who may have been sincere in themselves, but who created thoughts and feelings in other people which overbalanced some minds, and in this case the mind of the deceased was probably distracted by the misguided teachings of religious enthusiasts, and at the fell moment that the spell was upon her the engine came and she rushed to her destruction. - The engine driver in charge of the train when the occurrence happened stated that he saw nothing unusual until he came to Okehampton. Did not think it possible for a person standing near to be drawn in by the draught of a passing train,. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was "Killed by a train whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 November 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport coroner, held an Inquest at the White Lion Inn, King-street, last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM JINKS, plasterer, of 12 King-street. From the evidence of EMMA JINKS, his sister-in-law, with whom he had been lodging, it appeared that of late the deceased had not been well. On Saturday he was taken much worse, and died at eight o'clock. No medical aid was procured for him, because up to even an hour before his death he obstinately refused to see a medical man. A post-mortem examination, made by Mr J. R. Rolston, surgeon, shewed that the whole of the internal organs were much diseased, the result of long continued intemperate living, the deceased having been in the habit of consuming large quantities of spirituous liquors. Death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt the man had shortened his days by excessive drinking. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 9 November 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall on the body of a child named GEORGE HENRY LAVIS, whose parents reside at 9 Higher-lane. The child had been healthy from its birth. It was put to bed on the previous night about ten o'clock, the mother retiring about an hour-and-a-half afterwards, and the next morning was found to be dead. Mr Prynne, surgeon, was afterwards summoned. Further evidence was given showing pretty clearly that death must have resulted from fits, and a verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned. In commenting upon the case the Coroner pointed out the late hour at which the working classes usually retired to rest, and the absence of circumstances that would induce them to stop up.

EXETER - The Death Of An Alleged Murderer At Exeter. - The County Coroner (Mr F. Burrow) held an Inquest yesterday morning at her Majesty's Prison at Exeter, on the body of GEORGE GEEN, aged 69, who died on Monday last whilst in custody on a charge of murder. The Coroner said that if any person died in a prison the law compelled them to hold an Inquest on the body. - Robert Rainford, chief-warder at her Majesty's Prison, said deceased was committed there on the 1st of August, 1883, by the magistrates and Coroner of the parish of Georgeham in the Braunton Division, charged with the wilful murder of Walter Creech at Georgeham on the 28th July. He was to have been tried at the Devon and Cornwall Assize this week. He had been in a low state of health ever since he had been there, and was so when he came in. GEEN would not have been in a fit state to take his trial. This fact was reported to the judge on Monday, with a view to having the trial postponed; but the same afternoon, about a quarter past four, he died. - James Hoppins, warder, corroborated. - Dr Caird, the surgeon of the prison, said he attended the deceased frequently since he had been admitted, and he considered the man died from a failure of the heart's action and decay, aggravated and hastened by protracted anxiety and shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TOPSHAM - The Fatal Affray At Topsham. Coroner's Inquest. - The District Coroner (Mr Burrow) held an Inquiry at Topsham, near Exeter, yesterday, on the body of ALFRED WONNELL, the young man who was fatally stabbed on the evening of November 5th by a labourer named Harris. The Jury sat at the Salutation Inn. Mr Friend, of Exeter, solicitor, appeared for the police; the accused was unrepresented. The evidence of Charles Collings, a butcher, of Topsham, was to the effect that on Guy Fawkes night, about ten o'clock, he saw several young men near the Sun Inn, and they were burning a tar barrel. They were dressed as Guys, and one of them (the prisoner) was attired in a sheep-skin and a red jacket, the former covering his head. Witness saw a man named Clapp catch hold of the wool of the sheep-skin and heard the deceased, who had left a procession in which he was taking part, say "I'll see who you are," or something to that effect. As this was said, witness observed the man in the sheep-skin flourishing a sword. WONNELL had the prisoner beneath his hand, and Harris continued to flourish the sword under him. He made a plunge with the sword, and deceased called out "I'm stabbed." Mr Ellis, a chemist, who came up, examined the deceased, and said he could do nothing for him. WONNELL was taken into the house of his cousin, where he died in about twenty minutes. A witness named Ballantine deposed to seeing Harris at the Lord Nelson Inn shortly after the occurrence. He had a short sword in his hand, and witness said, "I want that," but the accused put it under the table. P.C. Leyman shortly afterwards entered and apprehended the accused. - Robert Blackmore, a farm labourer, who was also at the Lord Nelson, said Harris put the sword on the table, remarking, "I have knocked it into 'em, for there is blood on the top of it," or words to that effect. - Charles Clarke and Robert Mears, both deposed to Harris's showing the bloody sword at the inn, and to his saying that he had "put it into somebody." Mears added that before they left St Mary Clyst (where he and the accused lived) Harris said "The first that interferes with me will have that," shaking the sword as he made the remark. When they reached Topsham the sword was hanging naked from a belt around Harris's waist. - P.C. Leyman proved the apprehension of Harris. The sword was a very old one, but it was very sharp. When told that WONNELL was dead, prisoner said "It's the first time I ever used a sword, and it will be the last." There was blood on his trousers when arrested. An examination of deceased's clothes showed that the sword had gone clean through the coat; the whole were saturated with blood. The sword belonged to prisoner's master, it had been taken without his leave, and had been recently sharpened. Some further evidence having been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Harris.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 13 November 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, respecting the death of AMELIA HEATHERSHIRE, aged fifty, wife of JOHN HEATHERSHIRE, a labourer, residing at 20 Stillman-street. The husband stated that his wife had very often threatened to destroy herself, but had not made that threat lately. His wife had been addicted to drink, but she gave it up, and about two months ago joined the Salvation Army. She, however, one day last week commenced drinking again. Witness had lately thought her mind was a little wrong, and she had been unable to sleep at night, and on Saturday morning her conduct was very strange. Deceased's daughter was married on Tuesday last. She had an objection to the young man, and seemed grieved at losing her daughter. Mr S. Robert Lillicrap, keeper of the Royal Exchange Inn, Vauxhall-street, stated that deceased came to his house on Saturday afternoon. She seemed quite sober, and asked for half-a-noggin of gin, with which he supplied her. She had a bag with her, and took a greenish glass bottle from it. She then tipped up her bag and sixpenny piece fell out and witness picked it up. He gave her 3 ½d. change, and then went upstairs. On coming down again he saw the woman in the bar. She gave witness the empty glass, saying "Here is your glass." Witness mentioned to her that it smelt of tar, and she said "It is nothing, it is all right." She then sat down again and asked for another drop of gin, with which he supplied her, and she put the money on the counter. Witness asked her for ½d. more, and she replied "I have the money about me, but I am too ill to take it out." She left the gin on the counter and sat down, and witness went out into the brewhouse. When he returned he found the woman lying on the floor, and she was speechless. Witness immediately went for a policeman. Mr Adams, chemist, 141 Exeter-street, stated that between twelve and one on Saturday HEATHERSHIRE came to his shop. She smelt of drink, and asked him to supply her with a little laudanum, but he told her he could not think of letting her have it. She then said she was tired of her life, and she was determined to destroy herself. Witness told her she was very foolish, and advised her to go home and think better of it. Before she left the shop, however, she stated her determination to get laudanum and destroy herself even if she got a pennyworth at a time. She then left the shop. Between three and four he was called to the Royal Exchange Inn, and on getting there he saw deceased in a chair supported by a policeman. She was quite unconscious and in a state of collapse, and he recommended her removal to the Hospital. He smelt carbolic acid very strongly. - Mr Edward Maclachan, assistant at Messrs. Balkwill and Co.'s, chemists, Old Town-street, stated that HEATHERSHIRE came to the shop on Saturday afternoon. She asked for two-pennyworth of carbolic acid. Asked what she wanted it for, she first said that was her business, and then that it was to kill vermin. He asked her if she knew it was poison, and she replied, "Yes." He then supplied her with the required quantity in a bottle which she had brought with her. He labelled poison on the bottle, but did not call her attention to it. On her leaving the shop he noticed that when at the door she appeared to be unsteady in her gait, but she seemed quite sensible in conversation. - P.C. Harris said he was called to the Royal Exchange. Seeing the woman was in a very bad state he sent for Mr Adams, and then took her to the Hospital. - Dr Godfrey Carter, house-surgeon at the Hospital, said he applied the stomach pump, and the usual antidotes, but in spite of every effort the woman succumbed at 5 o'clock. He said he had made a post-mortem examination, and could say that poisoning by carbolic acid was the cause of death. On the woman's body were found two pawn tickets and other papers with the bottle produced. - Mr Carter here withdrew, but before doing so he remarked that it was his opinion that carbolic acid, although a strong poison, was not scheduled under the Act of Parliament - there was no restriction put upon its sale. - Mr A. P. Balkwill affirmed to being in the shop when the woman came in, and said he heard her request for carbolic acid to destroy bugs. Mr Maclachan put up the acid for her, and when she left the shop he remarked to witness if it was all right to let her have the acid, seeing her staggering at the door. He thought that seeing her sober demeanour whilst she was in the shop it was better to let her have it. It was not obligatory on him to supply the poison in blue fluted bottles. It was not scheduled as a poison. - The Coroner: Then it ought to be: it's a very strong poison. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that Mr Adams had acted with every kindness, but that he considered Mr Adams had hardly acted rightly in allowing the woman to leave his presence without having some restraint put on her. With regard to the other matter he hardly thought he should have been content when the woman told Mr Balkwill's assistant that it was her business. - A Juror was proceeding to remark that he thought the Coroner had been rather too severe on Mr Adams, when he was interrupted by Mr Brian, who said he did not wish his conduct to be impugned. What he had said about Mr Adams had been fair remarks, and he repeated that if he had been in Mr Adams's place he should not have let the woman go without some restraint. - The Jury, of whom Mr Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict that the Deceased committed Suicide by taking Poison whilst in a State of Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 14 November 1883 EXETER - Fatal Fall At Exeter. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquest yesterday on the body of RICHARD WEBBER, aged 63, a painter of the Mint, whose death resulted from fall from a window. On the 5th inst. deceased was engaged in some glazing work in Okehampton-street, when the window-sill on which he was standing gave way, and he fell to the ground, a distance of twelve feet. On being admitted to the Hospital it was discovered that his left leg was broken, and that the upper part of his body was completely paralysed. He did not rally, and expired yesterday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 19 November 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon last at the Navy and Army Inn, High-street, Stonehouse, on the body of JONATHAN PERKINS, aged thirty-six, who died sudden at his residence, High-street, on Wednesday night. Nathaniel Axley, seaman, John Marshall, P.C. Hannaford, and Dr Leah, having given evidence, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 November 1883 PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At The New Plymouth Pier. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday evening, at bishop's Hotel, West Hoe-road, on the body of SAMUEL JOHN CUDDEFORD, aged 36, a labourer, who was found drowned near the new pier under Plymouth Hoe on Friday evening. William Riddles, a labourer engaged in the construction of the pier, deposed that at 7.30 on Friday evening he was on the top of the south end of the pier. Deceased was standing at the foot of the derrick, having been assisting to lower the ironwork into a barge that was lying alongside. This was the first day he had been there to work. After some conversation deceased said he was going into the closet at the inner end of the lower flat. Witness went to get a drink of water, and on returning missed the deceased. About eight o'clock someone shouted that he saw a body in the water, and a man jumped into a boat lying by the barge and proceeded to the spot where the body was floating. It was immediately brought upon the pier, where it was seen to be that of the deceased. It was 20 yards seaward from the closet to the spot where the body was picked up. The tide was flowing at the time. Witness never heard anyone cry out, or any splash as of someone falling into the water. There was an opening near the closet and a strange might have fallen through it. There was plenty of light both from lamps and fires on the lower flat. - By a Juror: About ten minutes after witness returned from getting a drink, the diver said he had missed one of the men, but he (witness) thought he had gone to work in another part of the pier. On either side of the closet there were open spaces, but there were no guards to keep a man from falling into the water if he slipped his foot. Deceased was quite sober. - William Wooleridge, a waterman, stated that he was working in the barge on Friday night at the new pier. About 7.30 he saw deceased standing on the lower flat working. Shortly afterwards he was called to take a boat around to the steps near the closet. When there he saw a body floating about ten yards away. He brought it on the pier, and efforts were made to restore animation. A doctor and P.S. Yabsley were there; the former declared life to be extinct. The flooring of the lower flat was not completed yet. Sergeant Yabsley deposed to taking charge of the body. One of the men employed on the pier had remarked that deceased was nervous all the day and afraid to move about. JAMES THOMAS CUDDEFORD, shipwright and brother of the deceased, stated that the latter was not in depressed spirits, though when he left his home on Friday morning to go to work he was very nervous. The Coroner remarked that there could be no blame attached to the Pier company. The pier was in course of construction and there would be a certain amount of unsafety to a stranger working on it. It was clear to him (the Coroner) that deceased slipped through the boards and was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 20 November 1883 PLYMPTON - Death From Burning At Plympton. - Last evening Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at the Colebrook Inn, Colebrook, respecting the death of a little girl, named MABEL, the daughter of a groom named JOHN JAMES NEWTON, who resides at Elfordleigh Cottage, near Plympton. The mother stated that on the 26th ult. she had occasion to leave the cottage for a minute or two, the deceased being with her other children in the kitchen. She shortly afterwards heard screams, and on re-entering the cottage found her daughter MABEL on fire. She held a handkerchief in her hand, which was also on fire, and which she had evidently been playing with near the grate, when a draught drew it into the bars and thus ignited it. The mother extinguished the flames with her apron, and sent for medical aid, but the child had been burnt about the head and face and arms, and after the lapse of some days succumbed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 November 1883 PLYMOUTH - At the Penrose Inn, Plymouth, last evening, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the sudden death of MARY ANN MARTIN, a widow, aged 77 years. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased took a good dinner at her daughter's house yesterday, and about three o'clock in the afternoon was walking in Sydney-street, when she suddenly fell to the ground. A young man named Thorman, who was passing, went to her assistance, and a chair being procured she was taken into the All Saints Mission-room, where she died n a few minutes. Mr Miller, surgeon, who was called to see the deceased, just before she expired, said death resulted from apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the Coroner complimenting Thorman on his action in the matter.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 22 November 1883 NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. A Medical Man's Complaint. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cottage Hospital, Newton Abbot, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of THOMAS MORTIMORE, who died on the previous day from the result of injuries received whilst attending to a hydro-extracting machine at Messrs. Vicary's fellmongery works, Lower Bradley. Dr Scott stated that he attended the deceased about three hours after he was admitted into the Hospital. He was perfectly conscious, but suffering intense pain from injuries received in the lower part of the abdomen, and from the effects of which he died. These injuries were caused, he had no doubt, as described, by the chain overhead falling and getting entangled in the machine and then, being "whisked" around with great velocity, striking the deceased. One of the Jurymen asked if any medical man attended the deceased before Dr Scott and Dr Scott said he believed Dr Grimby was in attendance almost as soon as the accident happened. - Mr Dunn (a Juryman) thought Dr Grimby should have been examined. The Coroner said he did not think it necessary. - Dr Grimby said he had attended for the purpose of complaining. He was the first medical man to attend the deceased, and was with him nearly two hours and did what was necessary. Dr Scott did not see the deceased till afterwards, and as he (Dr Scott) was not any more the house-surgeon than he was, he thought he had a prior claim to be called as a witness in order to get the medical fee. This was not the first time he had been so treated, and if his services were required under similar circumstances again he should hesitate about rendering them. - The Coroner reminded Dr Grimby that it was always usual to call the medical man who last saw the deceased alive; and in the present instance there was no need for having the evidence of a second medical man to assign the cause of death. Dr Grimby must make a claim for his services elsewhere. Notwithstanding these expressions of the Coroner several of the Jurymen thought that Dr Grimby had a prior claim to Dr Scott to be called as a witness under the circumstances A verdict of "Accidental Death" was afterwards returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 23 November 1883 BRUSHFORD - Mr Burrow has held an Inquest at Brushford Barton relative to the death of MR JOHN LUXTON, aged 30, who was found drowned in Brushford Weir on Friday. It appeared that the deceased left his home on Tuesday night quite unperceived, and although a minute search was made nothing could be ascertained of his whereabouts until his dead body was found on Friday in the weir. A married man, he was separated from his wife, and lately he appears to have given way to excessive drinking, which had brought on delirium tremens. Apart from this, however, there was no reason why he should commit suicide, he being in affluent circumstances. Mr A. H. Norman, surgeon, practising at Winkleigh, who had attended the deceased, gave it as his opinion that death was due to a combination of apoplexy with asphyxia, and in answer to one of the Jurors, the medical gentleman further stated that he believed the deceased was more afraid of death than likely to court it. Acting on the advice of the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Death By Drowning At Devonport. - Inquiry was made by the Saltash Coroner (Mr W. Hawke) at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, yesterday, as to the cause of death of WILLIAM BUDGE, aged 61, a waterman, of Cornwall-street, Devonport, whose body was picked up in the water. Deceased was last seen alive on Wednesday. At 9 o'clock that evening he called on his sister, Mrs Daw, of 35 Cornwall-street, and before leaving announced his intention of going down to Northcorner to moor up his boat. It was then about eleven o'clock, and two hours later his nephew, Charles Daw, met him in [?]sen-street. He was then perfectly sober, and went down Cornwall-street towards the beach, remarking that he was going to see to his boat. The night was a squally one and BUDGE'S boat was made fast to the pile at the end of the quay, where the water was about ten feet deep. Nothing further was heard of him until three o'clock the next afternoon, when Charles Boxhall, of the Metropolitan Police, found his body lying on its side under the pontoon bridge, close to the quay, at low tide. The body was secured, and removed to the mortuary at Newpassage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 26 November 1883 EXETER - The Right To Hold An Inquest. At Exeter on Saturday an Inquiry was held by the Coroner (Mr Hooper) into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES FROST, a shoemaker, of Paul-street, who died on the previous day from lockjaw. Evidence was given showing that deceased, whilst at work, rested his hand on one of the machines in the workroom, when it was caught by the cog-wheel and badly mutilated. The injuries were attended to at the Hospital, and later on deceased was visited by his club doctor. Tetanus, however, set in, and resulted in his death. When giving his evidence, the medical man (Mr Fowler) observed that he had given his certificate of the cause of death, and did not, therefore, think an Inquest necessary. - The Coroner said he was the best judge of the necessity of holding an Inquest. This was a case of death due to violence, and it did not matter if twenty doctors gave certificates. Mr Rowden, one of the Jurymen, ventured the opinion that no Inquest was necessary under the circumstances, and the Coroner told him he was surprised at such a remark. The Jury eventually returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 November 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - The County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Westaway's Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of GEORGE SEAWARD, a Greenwich pensioner, who was found dead in bed early on Saturday morning. Deceased's wife was awakened early in the morning by feeling deceased's cold body against her face, and on looking at him she found that he was dead. Mr Marens H. Bulteel, surgeon, had made a post-mortem examination and finding a weak heart, and congestion of the liver and kidneys, which he considered sufficient to cause death, a verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board The Agincourt. - A sad accident resulting in the death of an able seaman named WALTER COOMBES, occurred yesterday morning in the Sound, on board the Agincourt, one of the ships of the Channel Squadron. At nine o'clock the evolution was being performed of sending up topgallantmasts, and crossing royal yards, and while engaged in this work COOMBES slipped from the maintopmast rigging, and falling headlong to the deck was killed on the spot. In the afternoon the body was conveyed on shore to the Royal Naval Hospital at Stonehouse, where Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, opened an Inquest and adjourned the further proceedings until today. The deceased, who was a native of Devonport, leaves a widowed mother, residing at Clyde-street, Ford, who depended almost entire on him for support. During the removal of the body from the ship yesterday afternoon the ensigns were lowered half-mast.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 28 November 1883 WEMBURY - Fatal Accident At Wembury. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon held an Inquest at the New Inn, Down Thomas, in the parish of Wembury, on the body of ELIAS WILLIAMS, aged 61, a farm labourer. - Davis Hammett gave evidence to the effect that on Saturday afternoon, about five o'clock WILLIAMS was in charge of a horse attached to a waggon laden with hurdles. WILLIAMS was leading the horse by the head, and when near the White Post gate, and going down the hill, the drag slipped, and the horse lost all control of the waggon. The fore wheel of the waggon caught WILLIAMS and seemed to draw him to the ground. Witness did not see the wheel go over him, but when he got up to WILLIAMS, he found him lying in the road, and he said to him that the wheels had gone over his arm. - Dr J. B. Jacobs proved being called to see the deceased. he found him with his right arm and right leg broken. He was sensible when he saw him but complained of a bad pain in his chest. Deceased lost a large quantity of blood, and to that he attributed his death. Witness believed deceased really bled to death. The Jury, of whom Mr S. Popplestone was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 November 1883 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Agincourt. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of WALTER COOMBES, an able seaman of the Agincourt, who fell from the maintop rigging to the deck on Monday morning, was held yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before the County Coroner, (Mr R. R. Rodd). - Jeremiah Harrington, first-class boy of the Agincourt, stated that about nine o'clock on Monday morning some of the men, including deceased, were crossing the yards. They had nearly all descended to the deck, and deceased was in the maintop rigging. He missed his footing and hold and fell to the deck, a distance of some 75 feet. When picked up he was dead. - Mr George Low, surgeon of the Agincourt, said deceased fell on his head and compressed the brain by a compound fracture of the skull. - The Coroner did not think it necessary to call further evidence, as it was clear that deceased's death was caused by accident. - A Juryman suggested that the officer in charge of the men should be called. On board a ship there was a lot of "hurrying and pushing" and probably deceased was told to descend rapidly and thus missed his hold. - George Buckley, "captain of the maintop," said that on Monday morning there was not the least haste in carrying out the work in the rigging. He had not known so quiet a day since he had been in the ship. The Jury were unanimous in recording a verdict of "Accidental Death." The funeral of the deceased took place yesterday afternoon at the Hospital Cemetery, Stonehouse, and was attended by a large number of men from the ship as a mark of the respect in which they held their late comrade.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 30 November 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Trafalgar Inn, Ham-street, on the body of THOMAS SHEPHEARD HAMMET, aged 42, a naval pensioner. Nannie Edwards, widow, residing at 11 Ham-street, stated that HAMMET, who lodged with her, had for the last two or three months complained of ill-health, and a pain in the heart. He had, however, to her knowledge had no doctor during that time. On Tuesday he remarked that he felt better and, about ten o'clock, retired to rest. A few moments after she heard a noise proceeding from his room and going there, she found him lying across the bed. Witness spoke to him but got no answer and she believed he died almost immediately. She sent for the doctor and on his arrival ten minutes afterwards he pronounced life to be extinct. She had never heard deceased make any threats that he was going to take his life. In reply to one of the Jury witness stated that to her knowledge deceased's life was not insured. James Stacey, residing at 18 Old Town-street, stated he knew the deceased very well. He had been invalided from the service about six months ago, suffering from an organic heart disease. On Tuesday just before five o'clock he came to witness's house and remained there half an hour. Deceased at that time was not at all depressed. Witness had obtained a paper from the Royal Naval Hospital to the effect that HAMMET was suffering from heart disease. The Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Knuckey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 1 December 1883 TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held last evening in the Town Hall, Torquay, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ROBERTS, of No. 1, Bethal Cottages, Ellacombe, who was found drowned on Torre Abbey sands on the previous day. - WILLIAM ROBERTS, coachman, residing at 15 Market-street, identified the body as that of his mother. She was a widow, and 53 years of age. She supported herself by doing a little sewing. He last saw her alive on Sunday morning last. She was then rather excited, and of late she had been suffering from cancer of the mouth and throat. - Thomas Priston, boot and shoe maker, residing at No. 5 Victoria-terrace, Ellacombe, stated that he saw the body between eight and nine o'clock. he saw the body in the water, which was washing over it. The body was lying on its face and hands and with assistance he pulled it in. The face had several cuts and bruises. - James Williams, gardener, Craven-road, Ellacombe, corroborated the last witness's evidence. - P.C. Trott stated that, from information he received, he went, in company with two other constables, to the Torre Abbey Sands and found the body of the deceased. The body was conveyed to the mortuary. The only thing that was found on it was a pocket-handkerchief with the initials "E.R.." on it. A jacket had been found on the sand but it had not been identified as belonging to the deceased. - Mr Gordon Cumming stated that he had examined the body, and found several bruises and cuts on the head, and scratches on the fingers. The fact that the blood was on the face was remarkable as this would not have occurred after death. His opinion of the ultimate cause of death was drowning. The appearance of the body was that it had fallen on rocks and fainted, and ultimately been drowned. - Eliza Gidley, residing at No. 1, Bethel-cottages, Ellacombe, stated that the deceased lodged at her house. She saw her on Wednesday night last; she had been in a very desponding state. - Dr Powell came to see her on Wednesday evening, and witness gave her medicine at a quarter past nine and did not see her after that time. She found in the morning when she came down the back door was open. Nothing in her room was disturbed. - Dr Powell said he had known the deceased for several years. On this occasion she complained of a severe pain in her head. She was in a weak, nervous condition; not suffering from any positive disease. - Hannah Fogwell recognised the jacket as that of her sister, ELIZABETH ROBERTS. The last time she saw her in it was on Saturday week. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 December 1883 ILFRACOMBE - At Ilfracombe on Saturday an Inquest was held as to the death of SAMUEL LOCK, whose body had been washed up on the beach at Broad Cove. Appearances denoted that he had fallen into the water, and being stunned, had been carried out by the tide. The sea had washed off all his clothes. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was recorded.

BARNSTAPLE - A Farmer Drowned At Barnstaple. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Saturday evening, respecting the death of JOHN JEWELL, 47, a farmer of St Giles, near Torrington, whose sad end by drowning we have already reported. The deceased was spoken of as a steady and sober man, and between five and six o'clock on Friday afternoon he was in shops in the town perfectly sober. About six o'clock persons at the Mill End Quay heard a splash in the water near the Town Mills. No one saw the deceased walk down the quay, as the evening was very dark; but on persons going down, JEWELL was seen in the water and he was heard to ask for help. There was about seven feet of water, and the tide was running up at the time. He sank and was dead before his body could be recovered. It is supposed the deceased purposed going over the Braunton drawbridge, but, in consequence of the night being so dark, he mistook the quay, which runs down parallel with the other road, and is in no way protected. The Jury desired the Coroner to make a strong recommendation with the Council to place gates or chains at the entrance to the quay, with a view to removing what is at present a great danger. The Jury also referred to the New road slip and that by the fish market as being also dangerous. The Coroner expressed agreement with their observations and promised to communicate with the Council. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased, who was much respected, leaves a widow and ten children.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 3 December 1883 EXETER - Singular Fatality. - The Exeter Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of ELIZABETH LANGWORTHY, aged eighty, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Deceased resided at Christow and on Wednesday last, as she was unhanging the bellows from the fireplace, the chair against which she was leaning overbalanced and her leg was by some means doubled up beneath it. On a doctor being called in, he pronounced that the limb was broken, and ordered her removal to the Hospital, where she succumbed from exhaustion on the following Friday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 December 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by the Devonport Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, at the New London Inn, Fore-street, yesterday, into the circumstances connected with the death of WM. EDWARD PRICE, aged 2 years, son of a blacksmith in the yard, living at 75 King-street. Since it was nine months old the child had been in delicate health and ten months since was under medical treatment for inflammation of the lungs and bronchitis. On Wednesday evening it was taken unwell and its parents applied poultices and procured some medicine from a chemist, but did not think the deceased was seriously ill. At five o'clock yesterday morning it suddenly became worse and expired almost immediately. Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, who was sent for, attributed death to congestion of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 10 December 1883 TAVISTOCK - The Suicide On The Tavistock Railway. Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Commercial Inn, Tavistock, before Mr R. R. Rodd, county Coroner, upon the body of JOHN MAYNARD, who met his death on Thursday last, under the painful circumstances which have already appeared in the Western Daily Mercury. Mr Richard Hole was foreman of the Jury. Inspector Chamberlain, of Tavistock, represented the Great Western Railway Company, and Inspector Trump, of Exeter, represented the London and South Western Railway Company. Mr J. Douglas Johnstone, the Deputy Coroner, was also present. - Mr Edward Yelland, draper, of Bedford-square, Tavistock, stated that he had known the deceased all his life. The deceased was twenty four years of age, and had been staying with the witness about two weeks. he was an engineer's fitter and had been sent to Tavistock by an order of the doctor at the Devonport Dockyard for change of air. There were no instructions as to his being kept under restraint. The witness had noticed that the deceased was of an unsound mind, particularly about three weeks ago, and knew that he had threatened to destroy himself. On consulting Dr Leamon about it, he said that people who talked about such things never did it. The letter produced from the Fleet surgeon at Devonport Dockyard, dated 30th November last, granting MR MAYNARD an additional months' sick leave, had on its back, written in pencil - "I cannot live longer in my present misery. J.M. May the Lord help me." Since the deceased had been at Tavistock he had always been in a low, desponding state. On Thursday morning he left the house at ten minutes after eight, having got up about half-an-hour earlier than usual. He went out alone, and was in the habit of doing so. - The Foreman here remarked that the deceased called upon him on the 29th November, and remained some time talking in such a way as to indicate that he intended to commit suicide. Mr Hole pointed out to him how wrong it was to contemplate such a thing, and tried to divert his mind from dwelling so much upon his state of health. Mr Hole was satisfied that the deceased was not in a sound state of mind. - Mr William Glubb, painter, of Tavistock, deposed to the deceased asking him, in Brook-street on Thursday morning, shortly after eight o'clock, as to the trains for Exeter, but had not the slightest suspicion that he intended to do such a painful thing. - Mr Andrew Palmer, a driver on the Great Western Railway, stated that he worked the 7.55 a.m. train from Launceston to Tavistock on Thursday last. He left Marytavy station at 8.38, after waiting for the narrow gauge train up. On arriving near the cattle crossing, about three-quarters of a mile from the Tavistock Station, and near the Kelly College, he saw something lying on the line about 100 to 150 yards in front of the engine. It appeared to be something that had been run over. Both rails were clear, and he did not therefore try to stop the train, which was going from thirty to thirty-five miles an hour. He thought at first it was part of a bullock, but on passing the object he saw it was the body of a man. He reported the circumstance to Mr Gale, the station-master at Tavistock, on arriving there. In answer to a Juror, the witness afterwards explained that the oscillation would sometimes throw the life guard - fixed two and a half inches above the rail - quite another two and a half inches higher, thus showing that the body of a man lying on the rail might possibly not be knocked clear by the life guard. - Mr James Spearman, a driver in the employ of the London and South Western Company, said he drove the 7.40 a.m. train from Devonport to Exeter on Thursday last. He left Tavistock at 8.29, but did not see anything on the line or feel the slightest jerk. Had anybody been standing upon the line at the place in question he must have seen same. After leaving Tavistock the stoker (Wills) was engaged in tending the fire, and was so occupied just before coming to the college, and at the time of passing the crossing. It was always customary to examine the engine at the end of the journey, and he did so at Exeter, when he found spots of blood on the wheels and also a small piece of flesh on the steam break cylinder. Had the deceased been knocked down there must have been some signs of it about the buffer beam. There was nothing about the life-guard. - Mr William Gale, station-master at Tavistock, stated that he found the body on the railway, above five minutes before nine, three quarter of a mile from the station. The legs and lower part of the body were lying in the direction of the public road, outside the rail, about eighteen feet from the cattle crossing. The liver, heart, and a kidney were separated and lying about, while the upper part of the body was inside the rails some feet further on towards Marytavy, with the head against a transom. In his opinion the deceased was lying down at the time and the life guard must have cut him in two. - Mr M. T. Leamon, surgeon, of Tavistock, stated that the deceased had been under his care off and on for two or three months, and almost daily observation for the last three or four weeks. He considered that the deceased was suffering from acute melancholia, with great depression of spirits. His mind was affected, and he had frequently said he wished the witness would give him some dose to send him off. He was not bad enough for an Asylum. There was insanity in the family. The father committed suicide. - In reply to a Juror, Mr Leamon said that from the fact of the deceased residing among his friends he thought that would be a sufficient guard upon him, and those who spoke about it were the last to destroy themselves. Mr Leamon was not under any apprehension that the deceased would destroy himself, neither was he a fit subject for restraint or an asylum. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind. The remains of the deceased were interred yesterday afternoon in the family grave in the old burying ground at Dolvin-road, Tavistock. The funeral was attended by a very large number of friends and sympathisers and several of the deceased's fellow-workmen from the Devonport Dockyard were also present.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by the Borough Coroner touching the death of JOHN VOSPER, aged 75, of 24 Glanville-street, who died suddenly yesterday afternoon. According to the evidence of MR WM. EDWIN VOSPER, son of the deceased, the old man had enjoyed very good health lately, with the exception of pains across his chest. About half-past two o'clock yesterday afternoon Eales Hawkey, a letter carrier, noticed the deceased sitting on the steps at the east end of Windsor-terrace. Thinking that something was amiss with him Hawkey went up to the deceased and shook him. The latter looked up, gave a gasp, and died. P.C. Hunkin was called, and also Dr Neild, who pronounced life to be extinct. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was recorded.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall yesterday, relative to the death of JAMES TAYLOR, alias MANNER, who was found dead in Sutton Pool on Saturday night. The sister of the deceased, Harriet Poulfrey, said she last saw her brother at her house a fortnight since, and he was then about to sign articles as a seaman. He was 26 years of age, and frequented the quays daily in search of work. John Kite, a labourer, deposed to seeing the deceased on Tuesday night week in Exeter-street, about 12 o'clock. He was then in a very intoxicated condition, and was using such bad language that his friends who were with him left him in disgust. P.S. Prout spoke to finding the body and having it removed to the mortuary. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Oliver was Foreman, returned a verdict of Found Drowned, there being no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 13 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the First and Last Inn, Jubilee-road, on the body of ROSINA ELLIS BOYES, aged one year and eleven months. MARY BOYES, the mother, who resides at 3 Brunswick-road, stated that since last Christmas the child had been weakly, and about three months ago was tended for croup. The child, however, was not at present under medical care. About six o'clock on the previous evening, whilst sitting at tea, her husband took the child on his knee. Shortly after doing this she was seized with a fit and witness took her out of her husband's arms whilst he went for the doctor. The doctor not being at home the husband returned, but before he arrived the child was dead. Deceased had lately been subject to fits. JOSEPH BOYES, packer, corroborated his wife's evidence and said that when he took the child on his knee he did not notice anything wrong with her. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Mitchel was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Inquest And Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry last evening at Moore's Caprera Hotel, North-road, into the causes attending the death of WILLIAM SAMUEL PITT, aged 16, of 15 Albert-road. The deceased who was an apprentice with Mr Spinney, painter and glazier, Cobourg-street, quarrelled about seven weeks ago with another apprentice named Frederick Hosking, aged 17. PITT, it is said, used to aggravate Hosking by joking him, and one evening after they had left work, Hosking met a cousin, and with him, it was alleged, waylaid PITT on his way home. A fight ensued, in which the deceased was to all appearances not much hurt. He went home, however, excited and with a bruised face. He was sick that night but went to his work as usual for a fortnight afterwards. During the whole of that time he complained of pains in his head; and he was at last compelled to remain at home. He did not get any better, and being seized in a fit a week before he died, a doctor was called. His services were of no avail, for PITT gradually sank and died on Saturday last from inflammation of the brain. Mr J. A. Christie was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Chief constable Wreford yesterday watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. The youth Hosking was present. - MRS EMILY PITT, mother of the deceased, and wife of a pensioner, living at 15 Albert-road, said that about seven weeks ago deceased came home at half-past five in the evening, having been to his employment as usual. She noticed that he looked excited, and his face was swollen. She asked what was the matter and he replied that he had had to defend himself against the eldest apprentice. Witness, continuing, said she remonstrated with deceased for fighting. He said he did not want to fight, but as he was standing at the top of Pennycomequick hill Hosking, the eldest apprentice, and his cousin came up. Deceased added that he had just taken off his spectacles, which he was in the habit of wearing, when Hosking knocked him down. Some men passing persuaded him to give Hosking a good thrashing, which he did. When rising from the first blow, however, Hosking knocked him down again. By a Juror: Deceased gave her to understand that while he was taking off his spectacles Hosking struck him. In answer to further questions, witness said deceased stated that when he had given Hosking a good thrashing his cousin called to him to go away. Deceased said the cause of the quarrel was that the other apprentice had been "chaffing" Hosking in the shops. There was a mark over deceased's right eye. Witness placed cold water cloths to the forehead and when he laid down he vomited very much. He went to bed about ten o'clock, and continued at work for a fortnight, although continually complaining of pains in his head. He lost his appetite and thought he had a cold. He seemed to be unusually depressed, and at the end of the fortnight he became worse and never went to work afterwards. She gave him medicine and he rallied, but not sufficiently to enable him to go to work. On Sunday week he had a fit, and Dr Thomson was sent for, and attended him up to the time of his death. He had never had a fit before. - By the Foreman: Deceased had been an apprentice with Mr Spinney since last April, and during that time he had never stayed away from work. He never spoke of any previous fight with Hosking. Witness understood that deceased and Hosking were not on friendly terms. - Frederick Bowden, labourer at Mr James's Starch Works, and cousin of the lad Hosking, stated that about seven weeks ago, about 12.30 p.m. he met Hosking, who stated that deceased was going to "bide" him that evening and would he witness accompany him to see that none of the other apprentices interfered. He asked witness to meet him at the shop at five o'clock. He met him at the shop door, but did not see deceased then. they walked together to Pennycomequick -hill, and stood there. Just afterwards witness heard his cousin speaking to someone, and on turning around saw PITT, who was walking along. He heard Hosking say, "Where shall we have it out?" but did not hear the deceased make any reply. Hosking then said, "Will you have it here or up in the field?" A gentleman passing said he would fetch a policeman. Witness watched the gentleman, and on turning around saw Hosking hit deceased on the cheek. Deceased staggered back and fell on one knee. He soon got up and struck Hosking. they closed and fell to the ground, deceased being underneath on his back. They fell a second time. The deceased knocked Hosking against the wall several times. The affair lasted about five minutes altogether, three rounds being fought. Hosking said he would not fight any more, and no more blows passed. Witness was standing by during the whole of the time, and did not interfere. Deceased, on leaving the, said that "he could take more of it." He did not complain of being hurt. - By the Jury: Witness did not think deceased wanted to go away. He believed he and Hosking had both agreed to fight. - Dr Eustace B. Thomson stated that he was called to see the deceased on Sunday, the 12th inst. He examined him and asked him questions, coming to the conclusion that he was suffering from chronic inflammatory disease of the brain. It might have been of a few weeks' standing, but witness could not satisfactorily estimate the time the brain had been affected. In questioning deceased ten days afterwards he made a statement as to how he received the injuries as that related by his mother in her evidence. Deceased did not improve, but continued to get worst and died on Saturday night. Witness had made a post mortem examination. There were no outward appearances of bruises on the scalp or any part of the body. On taking off the scalp there were marks of bruises over the right eye-brow of some weeks' standing, extending across the forehead. There were similar marks on the back of the head. On taking off the skull-cap, there was no sign of fracture, but the whole brain was ultimately congested: and at a spot corresponding to the bruise at the back there was a large abscess, which passed into the centre of the brain. The bruising of the brain was the cause of death. Witness was of opinion that it was occasioned by external violence. It was consistent with the state of the brain that the injuries might have been inflicted when the alleged fight took place. The bruises were such as might be occasioned by a person falling backwards from a blow. - The Coroner asked Hosking if he wished to make a statement, but being otherwise advised he declined to do so. He, however, called Courtney French Beavil, mason, who stated that he knew deceased. He saw him and Hosking working on a house in John-street and heard them talking together. They appeared angry with each other, and deceased said to Hosking "I will give you something before Christmas." - The Coroner, in summing up, explained that the law laid down that should a man receive injuries, which afterwards resulted in death, while fighting, his opponent was responsible. That law applied to the case before the Jury. - After a quarter of an hour's deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Hosking, and he was committed for trial at the Assizes. The Coroner accepted bail for him in two sureties of £25 each and himself in £50. Mr Spinney and Mr Agar became the sureties.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest at the Brunel Hotel, Millbay Road, last evening, relative to the death of MRS CHARLOTTE MARSHALL, 49, who died suddenly at her residence, 28 Millbay-road. The deceased had suffered from bronchitis and palpitation of the heart. Yesterday morning she complained of a violent pain at her heart, and went to lie down. Shortly afterwards she appeared to be dozing, but her husband looking at her found she was dying. In a minute or two afterwards she expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 21 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest, yesterday, at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, relative to the death of an infant named ADOLPHUS EDMUND OZANNE. Evidence was given by the mother to the effect that the child died whilst in a fit of convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 26 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest on Monday evening, at the Tandem Inn, Octagon-street, on the body of MARY ANN DOLAN, widow, aged 57, residing at 4 Flora cottages. From the evidence of deceased's son and of a woman living in the same cottages, it appeared that MRS DOLAN had gene having medicine from a dispensary. About three weeks ago she went to the doctor, and he had told her that medicine was no use, all she wanted was nourishment. On Thursday and Friday she was confined to her bed, but did not complain of being worse, and no doctor was sent for. On Saturday morning, on the son going to call his mother, he found that she was dead. According to evidence deceased was not in want of food. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 31 December 1883 STOKE DAMEREL - A Child Scalded to Death At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Fiddick's Barley Sheaf, Catherine-street, Devonport, on Saturday afternoon, by Mr James Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, on the body of ANNIE TWYFORD MORSE, aged seven months, the daughter of an eating-house keeper, in Pond-lane. On the eve of the 1st inst. a servant had the child lying in her lap and was stirring some food in a saucepan when a child two years old, knocked the arm in which she held the saucepan, the contents falling on the baby's back and arm. the mother applied oil to the burns and next day sent for Mr w. W. Pryn, surgeon, who prescribed for the deceased but she died on Friday. Mr Pryn said he would rather have seen the child sooner, but even if he had he did not think it would have lived. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from being Accidentally Scalded.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 December 1883 PLYMOUTH - Singular Death Of A "Boxer" At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Galatea Inn, King-street West, on Saturday touching the death of GEORGE RATHBONE, alias "GEPSON," who has been known at fairs and markets as a "boxer." The deceased, who was 42 years of age, enjoyed unusually good health until after the St. Lawrence Fair. About a month ago his daughter, GEORGINA SULLIVAN was called to him, he being then in bed suffering from pains in his head, which he attributed to the ill-usage he had received at the hands of some farmers. From the explanation obtained from GEPSON before he died, it appeared that on remonstrating with some farmers at the fair, who were injuring his "sparring" booth, he was beaten with sticks. He followed them into a field adjoining where he was again brutally treated. He died on Friday about noon. - Wm. Allen, who usually travelled with deceased on his "sparring" tours, deposed to seeing him ill-treated by the farmers at St Lawrence Fair. Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said he found a considerable quantity of fluid in the lateral ventricles of the brain; but this might have been there in a natural way. The Jury returned a verdict of "natural Causes," but considered that the deceased had been most brutally and cowardly used at the fair above mentioned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 January 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In A Plymouth Public-House. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, respecting the death of RICHARD HARDING, a waterman, who died suddenly on Saturday at the Devon Inn, Buckwell-street. MARY ANN PEEK, a sister of the deceased, said she was a widow, and had lived with her brother (the deceased) at 7 Higher Batter-street. He was 38 years of age, unmarried and had been a waterman on the quay. Within the last seven week she had complained of pain in the chest, but before then was fairly well. He had received medical attendance from Mr Jones between the 20th and the 26th of last month, but not since. She thought him to be suffering from heart disease. He took "a glass" occasionally, but was quite sober when he left her about 9 o'clock on Saturday morning. He came home during the day, but she did not see him any more until the evening about six o'clock, when she was sent for to go to the Devon Inn, where she found her brother dead lying on the seat. When he left in the morning he was quite lively and did not seem to have anything on his mind which would lead her to think that he would do any harm to himself. - Elizabeth Choake, landlady of the Devon Inn, said the deceased had visited her house occasionally. He came there on Saturday night about six o'clock, but had not been in more than five minutes when she notices his eyes rolling in an unnatural manner, and he seemed to "go faint," whereupon she called upon Mr Hunter, who was sitting by his side, to hold him up. She then bathed his head, but in about a minute or two he was dead. - W. J. Hunter, a diver, said he had known the deceased for a long time. He came into the tap-room of the above-named public-house on Saturday evening and sat down by his (witness's) side. He had not anything to drink, and was perfectly sober. Nothing was wrong with him as far as he could see. witness further corroborated Mrs Choake's evidence, and added that deceased when he came in mentioned that he was suffering from a slight pain in the head; but he made no other complaint. He knew the deceased drank very heavily at times. P.C. Stokes having spoken to assisting in taking the body from the Devon Inn to his (deceased's) sister's residence, the Jury, of whom Mr R. Oliver was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Western Morning News, Friday 4 January 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Death Through Excessive Drinking At Devonport. - The Devonport Borough Coroner, (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the London and South Western Railway Tavern, Fore-street, yesterday, relative to the death of EMILY KATE HEMMINGS, a single woman, aged 25, who was found dead in bed that morning. Deceased, who was the step-daughter of the landlord, (MR HICKS) served in the bar, and lived on the premises, and the evidence shewed that she was addicted to drink. She was in the habit of taking liquor in small quantities constantly during the day, and was known to occasionally drink raw spirits. Twelve months ago last August she was treated by Mr James Harrison, surgeon, who found her suffering from delirium tremens, and eight months since she again came under his care for the same complaint. During last week she was at times the worse for drink, and was low-spirited and cried a good deal. On Monday she complained of being unwell, but on Wednesday night she appeared sober and in her usual health. She went to bed at twelve o'clock, sleeping with the bar-maid, Sarah Reeve. At eight o'clock yesterday morning Reeve got up, but did not then notice the deceased. On going to her room, however, about an hour afterwards with a cup of tea for her, she could get no answer from her, and found that she was dead. Mr Harrison, surgeon, was at once sent for. From an examination which he subsequently made of the body, and his knowledge of the circumstances of the case, Mr Harrison attributed death to heart disease brought on by the habit of drinking spirits to excess. It was stated that the deceased was able to indulge her drinking habits unobserved by her stepfather, and contrived for a long time to keep those about her in ignorance of the extent to which she drank. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by the Excessive Drinking of spirits."

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 January 1884 BERRY POMEROY - Death From Suffocation At Berry Pomeroy. - An Inquest was held yesterday at True-street, Berry Pomeroy, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of GERTRUDE LOUISA BENNETT SEWARD, the infant daughter of a groom in the employ of Mr Ford, of True-street. The evidence of the father was to the effect that the deceased was taken to bed with her mother on Wednesday night about 10.30, and that the mother lay with her arm under the child's body. About seven o'clock on Wednesday morning the father found the child dead, the body being in the same position as during the night. He at once sent for Mr Currie, surgeon. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said the bedclothes were somewhat heavy, but did not cover the infant's mouth. - MARY JANE SEWARD, the mother, corroborated this statement, and added that the child was thoroughly healthy. Some years ago she had another infant who died in a similar manner, but she could not in any way account for the death. - Mr Currie stated that he found the child in the position described by the father. The hands were clenched and contained wool from the blankets. The body was discoloured, and he was clearly of opinion, after a post-mortem examination, that the child was suffocated. He could not find any signs of convulsions. The Coroner said he very frequently had to conduct Inquiries into deaths of this kind. No doubt, in the present instance, death was caused by Suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 January 1884 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday as to the death of JACOB MAUNDER, aged 47 years, skilled labourer, and keeper of a lodging-house in Osborne-place. - Henrietta Ayres, domestic servant in deceased's employ, stated that on Saturday, shortly after 7 p.m., she heard a rumbling noise in the area followed by groaning. At MRS MAUNDER'S request she looked out and saw her master lying in the steps insensible. He was brought into the kitchen and died within a few hours without recovering consciousness. - JOHN MAUNDER stated that he was with the deceased, who was his brother, on Saturday afternoon, and left him about 4 o'clock. He was perfectly sober and well in health and was a very temperate man. - Mr W. P. Jago, surgeon, who, with Dr W. Pearse, was called in to see the injured man, stated that he found him suffering from a large scalp wound at the top part of the back of the head. This wound covered a depressed fracture, and there was blood issuing from the ears, indicating that the base of the skull was also fractured. The case was hopeless from the first, and the injuries were just such as would have been caused by the man falling down area steps. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", the Coroner thanking Mr Jago for his clear and explicit evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 January 1884 PLYMOUTH - the Sad Accident At Bovisand. Inquest At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening as to the death of MR ARTHUR SAMUEL CANNING, aged 28 years, who on Saturday last was discovered insensible on the rocks near Bovisand, and evidently suffering from the effect of a severe fall from the cliffs above. He was brought to Plymouth on Monday, and died on Thursday without ever regaining consciousness. Mr N. Barter was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Henry Warren, senior clerk with Messrs. Gibbs and co., and residing at 4 Saltram-view, Laira, stated that he knew the late MR A. S. CANNING well. Witness saw him on Saturday, the 5th inst., about twenty minutes to two o'clock, at his office, 9 Westwell-street. It was deceased's custom to take a walk on Saturday afternoons, and witness believed he left the office at the hour mentioned on Saturday with that intention. Saw MR CANNING again on Monday when he was brought to Plymouth insensible. He died on Thursday afternoon. - Walter Dunstan Finch, assistant master at the Plymouth School of Art, said that on Saturday afternoon, with his friend, Mr Brown, he went for a walk round the Bovisand cliffs. At 4.30 they reached a point on the coast about two miles beyond the fort. It was just at the head of a little cove, and witness and his companion were looking round when they noticed something of a pink colour on the rocks. They walked round the cliffs until they were just above the object referred to, and witness then saw a coat and stick on the rocks. On a smooth, flat ledge lower down a man was lying on his face, with his hat a few feet in front of him. Witness and his companion reached the man by a circuitous route, and found that he was living, though insensible. They turned him over and placed a coat under his head. Deceased's pipe was close to his face with the amber broken. While witness was on the rock, MR CANNING moved his hand until he touched the witness's arm and then continued to the motion until he caught his hand. The height of the whole cliff from the spot where the body was found was, he should judge, 40 feet or 50 feet and it was about halfway down that the coat and stick were lying. Mr Brown, after assisting to place the deceased in an easy position, went to the coastguard station, and in about an hour a party of five coastguardmen and three artillerymen came, and with great difficulty conveyed the body on a stretcher to the station. Witness returned to Plymouth in the evening, and informed MR CANNING'S friends of what had occurred, and at their request summoned Mr Whipple, surgeon, who then left in ]cab for Bovisand. - By the Jury: The coat and stick were together, and, from the glance he had of them, appeared to have been placed there and not to have fallen accidentally. Witness thought deceased could have got down to this spot. From here, however, to the spot where the body was found the rock was rather overhanging. - Mr Connel Whipple, surgeon, stated that last Saturday night, at 10.30 p.m., he was called to go to Bovisand. He arrived there at 12.45 and found deceased in bed at the house of the chief officer of the coastguard. He was unconscious. Upon examination witness discovered injuries of the head and left arm, with paralysis of the left half of the body. He continued to attend MR CANNING at Bovisand until Monday morning, when, with witness's sanction, he was removed to Plymouth by water. Dr Jacobs, of Plymstock, who had been called in before witness arrived at Bovisand, always visited MR CANNING prior to the injured man's removal to his home. Upon deceased's arrival in Plymouth he was seen, at witness's request, by Mr Square and Mr Swain, surgeons. He considered the case a hopeless one from the first. Such injuries as deceased was suffering from might have been caused by his falling down a cliff upon the hard rock. He never recovered consciousness to the time of his death. - By the Jury: The paralysis was a symptom produced by the fall. - William Henry Brown, who was with Mr Finch on his excursion round the cliffs, corroborated the evidence of the latter. When they discovered MR CANNING there was nobody else in sight, nor had they met anybody for some time previously. - John Hoskings, chief officer of coastguard, stationed at Bovisand, stated that at 5.10 on Saturday evening he was called by the last witness and on learning what had occurred sent five of his men - who were accompanied by three artillerymen with a stretcher - to the spot indicated. Another man was sent for Dr Jacobs, of Plymstock. About 7 p.m. MR CANNING was brought to witness's house, and as Dr Jacobs forbade his removal he was put to bed. Everything was done to restore him. Visitors were frequently walking round the cliffs in the neighbourhood of Bovisand. He had examined the spot where the accident occurred, and he was perfectly satisfied that no one could get down to "place" the coat and stick where they were found. His opinion was that deceased caught his foot in the low bushes at the top of the cliff and fell over the broken ground and between two rocks to the spot where he was found. His coat and stick he was probably carrying, and these he let fall in his descent, and they were caught on the ledge on which they were picked up. - Edward Pound, commissioned boatman at Bovisand, stated that he accompanied the party with the stretcher. The return journey was very difficult, and although but a short distance, occupied an hour and a half. Witness examined the cliff on Sunday morning, and saw marks on the earth as if a body had fallen over. There were, however, no footprints, though the ground was soft. He concurred in Mr Hoskings's opinion as to the cause of the accident. There was an opening in the hedge just above the spot referred to with a low white thorn growing, over which a person would be very likely to stumble. - The Coroner remarked that everything that human energy, ingenuity and skill could do was done for the deceased from the time he was discovered on the rocks until his death. The evidence had been very clear and complete, and, short of any person actually seeing the accident - which was not the case - it was impossible to carry the matter further. - The Jury at once agreed to a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner said he should like to point out that this was one of those cases in which the conduct of all the witnesses, of everybody concerned, in fact, seemed to call for some mark of approbation on the part of the Coroner and Jury as representatives of the public. Messrs. Finch and Brown were both young men, and he dared say where a good deal startled by what they saw. They, however, behaved coolly and collectedly. With considerable difficulty they got down to the body, and having made the man comfortable one remained with him - not an enviable position on a wild coast with night coming on - and the other ran and roused the whole neighbourhood up. Mr Hosking, and the coastguardsmen and artillerymen were all entitled to their thanks. Mr Hosking, indeed, seemed to have acted the part of the Good Samaritan throughout. The man was brought to his house, and very likely put into his own bed, for an indefinite length of time. Then there was Mr Whipple again who, at the dead of night, went to Bovisand to attend the injured man. All concerned went out of their way in a most disinterested manner in order to try and save a fellow creature's life. - The Foreman was sure the Jury would heartily concur in the remarks of the coroner. (Hear, hear). He tendered his thanks to all concerned and particularly to Messrs. Finch and Brown, who were probably unaccustomed to such situations, and yet acted with an energy and presence of mind which were highly commendable. - Mr Brian remarked that while Mr Finch was occupied until past ten o'clock on Saturday night in connection with the sad affair, he had that day made two sketches of the spot on which MR CANNING was found as well as of the bay, in order that the Jury might be assisted in their deliberations. In such out of the way spots as Bovisand people who met with misfortunes such as occurred to MR CANNING had only the coastguard to rely upon, and the way in which the officers and men of that service frequently placed their lives in jeopardy and sacrificed their own comfort and convenience in the cause of humanity had often been a subject of admiration to him. Mr Hoskings and his men had behaved in a prompt and kindly way which deserved the thanks of the Jury and the public. - Mr T. R. Bond (a Juryman) said all concerned had behaved, not only with rare, but an amount of tenderness for the injured man which must strike everyone as being gentle, kind and Christian in its character. - Mr Warren said that on behalf of all those who had been associated with MR CANNING, as well as on behalf of the bereaved relatives, he wished to add his thanks to those of the Jury to all who had behaved so kindly to the deceased gentleman. - The Coroner said that a very praiseworthy feature in connection with the matter was that when all this preparation was made for MR CANNING at the coastguard nobody knew who he was. The injured man, for all they knew, might have been penniless and friendless. - Mr Hoskings confirmed what the Coroner had said. All they knew was that a man had fallen over the cliff. - Before separating the Coroner and Jury expressed their condolence with the friends of MR CANNING in their bereavement.

NEWTON ABBOT - The Suicide Of A Lady At Newton. Inquest And Verdict. - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Buckland House, Newton Abbot, touching the death of MRS JANE PINSENT, wife of MR J. B. PINSENT, whose sad end was reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. The following evidence was adduced:- Mr Thomas May said the deceased was his sister, and she was 37 years of age. She had a private income under a marriage settlement, of which he was the trustee. She had overdrawn her account at her bankers, and he, accompanied by his wife, came to Newton on Thursday to see her on the subject. They reached Buckland about four o'clock in the afternoon, and first saw his mother - who resided with the deceased - and she settled the business in the absence of the deceased and MR PINSENT, the latter being from home at the time. they then sent for the deceased, who was in her bedroom, and she sent back a message that she would be down in a minute, but as she did not come he and his mother went upstairs, when they found the bedroom door locked. He knocked, but did not get any answer, and apprehensive that something was wrong he tried to force the door, but failed. He then went and got a ladder and entered the room by the window from the outside, when he found his sister, who was fully dressed, lying on her back on the bed: she was unconscious and apparently dying. He gave her some brandy and applied a hot water jar to her feet, but all was of no avail, and she expired within ten minutes from the time he first saw her. On the mantelpiece he found a small dark bottle, with a glass stopper, labelled "poison." He inferred from that the bottle contained laudanum and that the deceased had poisoned herself. The bottle was here produced by Sergeant Nicholls, and the label on it was as follows:- "Hydrocyanic (of Steele's strength), dose one to four minims, Layman and Anmery, London." Witness continuing said he believed the deceased was on the best of terms with her husband and her mother: nor was there anything in reference to her having overdrawn her banker's account for her to trouble about. In fact everything was set right by him and her mother before the deceased was sent for. he had not seen her as to her having overdrawn her account, but it was quite possible she might have heard from the bankers on the matter. The deceased was always of a peculiar disposition, and any kindness shown her she did not seem to appreciate. He was not aware of any of his relatives ever having been subject to insanity. - Mary Ann couch, domestic servant, in the employ of MR PINSENT, deposed that her mistress went out on Thursday morning with a letter in her hand just after eleven o'clock, and returned home to dinner at the usual hour. She took dinner with her husband, her mother, and two of the children. She went out again just after three o'clock, and returned shortly afterwards and went to her bedroom. Just after Mr and Mrs May came witness went to her bedroom door, to ask her to go down. The deceased was then standing at the door with the handle in her hand, and she told her (witness) that she would be down in a minute. She did not, however, go down, and on her (deceased's) mother and brother going up they found the door locked. Mr May entered the room by the window. She had never heard the deceased complain, and she did not even infer anything was the matter when she last saw the deceased standing at the bedroom door. MRS PINSENT was not in the habit, so far as witness knew, of keeping "cordials" in her room. MR PINSENT was always very kind to her, and she had never seen any unpleasantness between them. - MR JOHN BALL PINSENT, the deceased's husband, said that he had dinner with his wife, children and mother on the previous day, and everything passed off as usual. The deceased said she had made a good dinner, and she conversed freely and appeared to be in her usual spirits. He left about five minutes to three, his wife at that time being engaged nursing the child. He had even arranged with her for a friend to come back to tea. The deceased had complained lately of pain in the stomach and Dr Scott had attended her; and about a fortnight previously she consulted Dr Cann, of Dawlish. Witness was sadly distressed to find, when he returned home on Thursday evening, that his wife was dead. He knew nothing whatever of her private money affairs; nor did he know anything about the business her brother came to see her about. - Ann Nathan, also servant to MR PINSENT, stated that she had never seen any unpleasantness between the deceased and anyone. Deceased about a fortnight ago complained of not being able to sleep at night and said she would take a dose of poison. She thought, however, at the time that her mistress was joking. - Mr Scott, surgeon, said that he saw the deceased about six o'clock on the previous evening: life was then extinct, the deceased having to all appearances been dead for about an hour. Mr May drew his attention to a bottle on the mantelpiece, which, on examining, he found to have contained prussic acid of twice the ordinary strength, and a small dose of which would be sufficient to cause death. He had no doubt, judging from the livid appearance of the body, that death had arisen from that cause. He subsequently made a post-mortem examination, which left no doubt in his mind that death was caused by prussic acid. - Mr Bibbings, chemist, stated that the deceased had been a customer of his for about five years, and was, consequently, well known to him. On Wednesday morning, about 11.30, she entered his shop and purchased several articles. Among these she asked for some prussic acid, and said that she was going to poison a favourite dog which someone had given her, but which she did not wish to keep. He cautioned her, and told her not to let the poison go out of her hands on any account. She promised that she would be very careful with it, and he let her have about 6 drachms, just enough to kill a dog. He did not make an entry of the transaction in the book provided as he had known the deceased so long. - The Coroner here cautioned the witness as to future similar transactions, and witness promised to insist on the entries being signed by the applicants. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a Temporary State of Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 January 1884 NEWTON ABBOT - The Alleged Child Murder Near Newton. Committal Of The Mother. - Yesterday at Newton Abbot Mr S. Hacker, and a Jury, of whom Mr J. Williams was foreman, held the adjourned Inquiry respecting the drowning of an infant at Kingsteignton on Friday night. Mr Templer watched the case on behalf of MRS LOVERIDGE, the mother. - Mary Ann Gibbs deposed that she resided at Kingsteignton, and on Friday night she was returning from Newton when she met the prisoner near the Old Turnpike Gate. this was about ten minutes to nine o'clock. MRS LOVERIDGE had nothing with her, and was rambling about the road, giving witness the impression that she was intoxicated. - In reply to the Foreman, she said of course she could not say that MRS LOVERIDGE was intoxicated. - Reginald Bulley, a plumber at Kingsteignton, said that on Friday night he was returning from Newton, when he met MRS LOVERIDGE near the arch crossing the Moretonhampstead Railway at twenty minutes past nine o'clock. She was walking very fast towards Newton. She was on the footpath, and so was witness, and he touched her as they passed. He said, "Good night," but she made no reply. She was wet and was walking perfectly straight. She was rubbing and wringing her hands as she passed in a very excited manner. - James Small, a hawker, living in a van in the Newton Market-place, was then called; and on the Coroner asking him to take the Testament he asked what it was for. - The Coroner explained to him that he was about to take an oath that he would speak the truth. - Witness replied, "Oh yes, yer honour, I'll do that." - The Coroner: Of course, you know there is everlasting punishment for doing or saying what is wrong? - Witness: Yes, yer Honour. - He then took the oath, and said he was a horse-dealer and hawker. He knew MRS LOVERIDGE; and on Friday last she came to his van and "rattled" the top door about half-past nine at night. Witness was in bed, and hearing the noise he got up and opened the door, when he saw a woman standing there shaking and trembling. He was very much frightened, and thought it was a "ghost," but the woman spoke and said she was "BECKY" LOVERIDGE, and wanted to come in. He let her in, and said to her "You are crazy mad-drunk," but she made no answer. He then put on some clothes and went out and gave an alarm. The woman's clothes were dripping wet, and her head was wet; her hair was hanging down and she had no hat on. Her boots appeared to be full of water. He ran towards Kingsteignton to tell MR LOVERIDGE what had happened, but he met MR LOVERIDGE near "Barrett's" stables and told him the state his wife was in: and they went together to his van. In reply to a question from the Foreman, witness said he did not know the baby was drowned when he met MR LOVERIDGE. He had since given some clothes to the police-sergeant, which were handed to him in a wet state. He could not say to whom they belonged; but MRS LOVERIDGE was in the van when he took them from someone whom he could not see. - Ellen Small, wife of the last witness, said she was in her van on Friday night, when she saw MRS LOVERIDGE come in and sit down. She kept shaking herself about and saying "I've done it." Witness said, "What have you done ?" but she only replied, "Oh dear, oh dear, I've done it." Witness thought she was drunk. She sat there until MR LOVERIDGE and the police came. MR LOVERIDGE said, "Where's my baby?" and MRS LOVERIDGE answered, "I've drowned it." MR LOVERIDGE asked, "What made you do it?" and she replied, "Because I was mad." Witness then gave MRS LOVERIDGE some dry clothes, and she took off her wet things and put on the dry ones. Prisoner told her husband that she tried to drown herself, but could not do it. She had known MRS LOVERIDGE for fifteen years, and during that time had never known her drink or do anything wrong. - Sergeant Nicholls repeated the evidence he gave before the magistrates as to the finding of the body; and, in reply to Mr Templer, said there were marks in the bed of the pond where the water was about four feet deep. He should think they were footmarks caused by someone trying to get out. The broken rail which was in the water supporting the baby had been fixed originally about sixteen inches high from the water, but it had been broken in two and dropped in the water. Anyone sitting on it might have broken it, and fallen back into the water, or anyone might have fallen over it into the water, and in either case the water would be of sufficient depth to completely cover the person. Anyone walking up the lane might have fallen unawares over the rail into the water. He noticed that some rushes were growing in the pond, and just at the spot where he found the body the tops of the rushes were gone, whilst all along the rushes were standing up all right. - Mr J. W. Ley, surgeon, Newton, said he was called to the police station about ten minutes to eleven on Friday night. He went and saw the dead body of a child, which from appearances he considered had been drowned. He made a post-mortem examination on the following day and found that death had been caused by drowning. The child was well nourished and there were no marks of violence. In reply to Mr Templer, Mr Ley said that a sudden immersion only was sufficient to cause the death of a child. In this case he considered the body had been in the water for at least an hour. With regard to the state of the woman he examined her to see if she had been drinking. He found that she had not, but that she was very much excited. He had known the woman for several years, and had never seen or known her to be the worse for liquor. Suicidal mania was hereditary and if this woman's father committed suicide, it would be a very fair presumption that she had attempted suicide in a similar manner. She made a statement to him (witness) that she attempted to drown herself twice, but could not sink, as her clothes kept her up. She came out of the water the first time with the child, and found it dead, and then tried again to drown herself, but she could not sink. - REBECCA LOVERIDGE, a young woman, and the eldest sister of the deceased child, said she lived at Kingsteignton with her parents. On Friday morning she gave her mother the apron produced. Her mother took very much to heart the angry words her father used in the morning, and when he entered the house during the day her mother left. She knew nothing of what took place in the evening, as she left the house at half-past six o'clock. - William Ward, butcher, of Kingsteignton, said he went to MR LOVERIDGE'S at a quarter to ten on Friday morning to kill a pig, but the water was not ready and MR LOVERIDGE got into a rage and swore, and called his wife a lazy wretch. This she seemed to take to heart very much, and cried bitterly, although she did not answer her husband. MR LOVERIDGE went away and so did witness. He returned to kill the pig at half-past twelve, when the water was ready. MRS LOVERIDGE assisted in bringing the water. She referred to the suicide of Mrs Pinsent, and said, "it would be no wonder if I did the same." The accused was a very hard-working woman. MR LOVERIDGE came home about one o'clock and was then very angry, just as he was when he left in the morning, and he swore at her several times. - The Foreman was about to question the witness as to the language LOVERIDGE used to his wife, but Mr Templer suggested that it would not be advisable to wound the husband's feelings more than necessary. MR LOVERIDGE had given all the assistance he possibly could in the matter, and he might say that MRS LOVERIDGE had told him (Mr Templer) that she was sorry she had given way to her temper, although her husband had done so. - The Foreman: We only want to get hold of all the facts. - The question was not, however, repeated. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that they were not trying any person for an offence but were simply Inquiring into the death of JESSIE LOVERIDGE, and any circumstances which would shew to what the cause was attributable. If they came to the conclusion that MRS LOVERIDGE was responsible for the death of the child, they must return a verdict of wilful murder against her: but as to the state of her mind at the time, that question was not for them but for another tribunal to decide. If, again, MRS LOVERIDGE went into the water to drown herself and then the child was drowned, under those circumstances MRS LOVERIDGE would be guilty of murder. - The Jury retired to consider their verdict and on returning the Foreman announced that they were unanimously of opinion that the child died from Drowning, and they returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against MRS LOVERIDGE. [Note: Magistrates report followed the Inquest.]

PLYMOUTH - Death From Choking In Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquiry on Monday at the London Mail Inn, Richmond-street, relative to the death of JANE HUXHAM, aged 72 years, the wife of HENRY HUXHAM, 40 Richmond-street. The evidence shewed that deceased had been failing in strength for some years. At dinner on Sunday she was seized with a fit of choking and died about a quarter of an hour afterwards. Mr Square, who made a post-mortem examination, found a piece of meat (produced) in the upper part of the deceased's windpipe. It was unmasticated and had caused death. The Jury, of whom Mr Saltmarsh was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Choking." Mr Square observed that an accident of this kind might easily happen, both to juveniles and people in the prime of life.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 January 1884 NEWTON ABBOT - The Drowning Case At Newton Abbot. - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr W. J. Tompkins was Foreman, held an Inquest yesterday at the Courtenay Hall, Newton, respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY NOTT, aged 2 years and 3 months, son of MR NOTT, county court bailiff, who resides in Cricket Field-terrace. The evidence shewed that the deceased was drowned in the mill leat, near his house, under circumstances already reported in these columns. Several of the Jury spoke very strongly of the dangerous place at which the child fell in, and of the neglect of the owners in not erecting a proper fence. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned, added to which was the rider, "That the Jury desire to call the attention of the Duke of Somerset, Messrs. Stockman Bros., and Mr J. Chudleigh to the unprotected and dangerous state of the bridge and roadway adjoining the leat at Cricket Field-cottages.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 January 1884 TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, Torquay, respecting the death of WILLIAM HARRIS, aged 40, who died suddenly and without medical attendance, on Tuesday morning, at 4 Orchard-terrace, Ellacombe. The deceased was an imbecile. He came from Staverton to Torquay about nine years ago, and had since been living with his brother, SAMUEL HARRIS, a dairyman, at the above address. Although he died on Tuesday, the fact did not come to the knowledge of the police until Thursday afternoon, and in consequence of this, together with certain other apparently suspicious circumstances, the Coroner was communicated with. The Jury exonerated MRS HARRIS from all blame, and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 January 1884 TOTNES - The Fatal Accident Near Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Totnes Guildhall by Mr Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of SOPHIA ELLIS, the wife of a farmer residing at Harbertonford, who was killed by the falling of a tree on Saturday afternoon. Mr Windeatt attended to represent the relatives of the deceased. RICHARD LANGWORTHY ELLIS, the deceased's husband, stated that they left Totnes between four and five o'clock, and just as they reached the old turnpike-gate they passed a trap in which were two persons. He drew towards the wall to pass, and immediately he heard a tree crack, and no sooner had he heard it than it was down upon them. When he recovered from the shock he looked through the branches and saw that the horse was dead. He could not see his wife as she was beneath the tree. Deceased was sitting nearly in the centre of the trap. He could not get out until the two gentlemen in the other vehicle came to his assistance. His wife was leaning forward to shelter herself from the storm, and when the tree fell, it fell upon her head and back. He found it useless to try to get her out, so he ran down the road to Mr Kellock's for help. His two men came up and cut away the branches. He then saw that his wife was dead. He lifted her head, and ran towards the town for a doctor, and when he returned the men had got her out. Witness was struck in the trap, and one of the sprigs of the tree caught him in the eye. - George Tucker, a labourer in the employ of Mr Kellock, deposed to finding the body under a limb of the tree. The deceased was lying in the trap on her right side under a large branch, which was on her shoulder and head. She was quite dead. The tree was an elm, and the roots were not decayed. - Mr Jelly, surgeon, of Totnes, spoke to being summoned to the spot where the accident happened. The last witness was engaged in cutting away the large branch of the tree. The limb of the tree lay across the deceased diagonally, from the right thigh to the left shoulder. It was about ten or eleven inches in diameter. When the branch was cut away the body was taken out, and he ordered it to be removed to the Kingsbridge Inn. Deceased was then quite dead. The cause of death was a fracture of the base of the skull, several ribs on the right side were broken, and the left thigh was also fractured. Not more than two years ago two of these trees were blown across the road in the same manner; and he considered these trees decidedly dangerous. He believed at that time three or four of the trees were taken down. - By the Coroner: He did not mean that these trees alone were dangerous: there were many others around Totnes, Follaton, and other places that were dangerous. - By a Juror: There were other trees blown down at the time he referred to. - The Coroner summed up. He said that against the evidence of Mr Jelly, they had a statement of the witness Tucker that he considered the trees sound and that no intimation had ever been received that they were dangerous. The Jury retired, and after a short consultation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". They added the recommendation that the owners of the trees on both sides of the Kingsbridge road be requested to examine them, and take down any that were found to be dangerous. Mr T. C. Kellock, the owner of the property from which the tree fell, resulting in MRS ELLIS'S death, said no one regretted the melancholy occurrence more than he did. He expressed his deep sympathy with the relatives of the deceased. He added that he had never received any intimation of the trees being dangerous and offered to let Mr Foster, a member of the Jury, examine the trees and remove any that were unsound.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 January 1884 PLYMOUTH - Suspected Child Murder At Plymouth. - Last evening a newly-born male child of ALBERTHA BUZZA, a domestic servant in the employ of Mr William Ham, builder, 75 Cobourg-street, Plymouth, was found dead under very suspicious circumstances. BUZZA, who is apparently about 24 years of age, is the daughter of a mine carpenter, a highly respectable man, residing at Callington. She was in Mr Ham's service about two years since, when she left and obtained a situation at Plymstock. Subsequently, however, she went to reside at Callington with her parents. Three months ago the girl's mother called upon Mr Ham, and telling him that her daughter was then out of a "place," begged him to re-engage her. Mr Ham was not just then in want of a domestic, but knowing BUZZA to be honest and industrious he again took her into his employment. Although shortly afterwards it was noticed that the girl appeared to be getting stout nobody suspected her of being enciente, and no questions were put to her on the subject. Yesterday she rose at her usual hour and performed her customary duties. In the afternoon she complained of feeling unwell and took a brief rest, her indisposition being attributed to indigestion. The girl prepared the tea as usual, but afterwards retired to her room. She then seemed to get so much worse that Mr May, surgeon, was sent for. On his arrival he questioned BUZZA, and found that she had been confined, and immediately afterwards the body of a fully-developed male child, wrapped in a flannel petticoat and with a pocket-handkerchief tied tightly round its neck was discovered under the bed. The child was dead, though still quite warm. The police were communicated with and Inspector J. Hill proceeded to the house and took charge of the case. BUZZA, who is of course confined to her room, has volunteered no statement and until a post mortem examination has been made, it is impossible to say accurately whether the child had breathed or not. An Inquest will be held by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) today. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Ham and his family in the disagreeable position in which they have been thus inadvertently placed.

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 January 1884 ASHWATER - Alleged Manslaughter By A Mother. A Sad Case. - A melancholy case of want, misery, and agonising neglect has this week come under the notice of Mr Fulford, Coroner, and a Jury, who, at Quoditch, Ashwater, have held a somewhat protracted Inquiry relative to the death of a seven-months-old child, named FLORENCE SAUNDERS. The facts are these:- About seven months ago the deceased's father died suddenly, and the mother was left with four small children and without any means of maintaining them. The day after the man's funeral the woman and the little ones were admitted into the Holsworthy Workhouse, where, on the same day, she gave birth to the deceased. About a fortnight after her admittance, or, in other words, as soon as she was convalescent, MRS SAUNDERS refused to remain in the house and accordingly removed to her house at Ashwater. She then obtained relief to the extent of 5s. per week, and soon after, on a renewed application, a further sum of 2s., making 7s. in all. With this she managed to maintain herself and children. On the child being vaccinated in October last the mother called the attention of the medical officer (Mr Pearce) to the state of its body, which was covered with an eruption, the result of skin disease. Mr Pearce did not again see the child alive, he not having been called upon to attend her. On the first day of the present year the mother married again, her second husband being MICHAEL BASKERVILLE, a one-armed man, who, it is stated, has since been unable to work. When the marriage took place the relief was discontinued. Receiving a letter from BASKERVILLE that he was ill and that the family were in want, he not being able to follow his employment, Mr Oliver, the relieving officer, paid him a visit, but, considering that the man might, if he chose, earn ten shillings per week, Mr Oliver refused to advise that assistance should be given from the Union funds. On Saturday week the mother went into Okehampton, where she purchased a pot of "mercurial ointment," which is commonly used in the treatment of sheep affected with scab, and with this she treated herself and other members of the family, who had now taken the disease that had shewn itself in the baby. Several of them were ill, in consequence of using the ointment; and it is even said that the husband was salivated through it. Meanwhile the family were reduced to great straits. It was stated at the Inquiry that for one whole week they had nothing to eat beyond potatoes and flour. As for the infant, the mother gave it bread and sugar, not being able to afford milk for it. The Coroner in view of these and other facts, directed that a post-mortem examination should be made of the body by Mr Pearse. The latter, in his testimony, stated that he failed to find any disease that would account for death, which had evidently been brought about by starvation. There was next to no food in the stomach or bowels. All that was found there would not fill a teaspoon, and the intestines were distended by wind. The infant weighed only 7 ½ lbs., whereas it ought to have been treble that amount. The relieving officer and BASKERVILLE were examined in the course of the Inquiry, and the former deposed that when he called at BASKERVILLE'S request to see him the man ran away. He requested the doctor to visit BASKERVILLE if he (the doctor) happened to be passing the man's house. The Jury, having patiently listened to the evidence, found that the child had died from want of proper nourishment, and that the mother was criminally responsible. - The Coroner remarked that this was tantamount to a verdict of manslaughter, and he adjourned the Inquest until today in order that he might make a full note of the evidence.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by the Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) at the Castle and Keys Inn, Prospect-row, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL JAMES LYLE, a sailor, aged 56, of 9 Prospect-row. For the last fortnight the deceased had been unwell, complaining of a pain in the side, but he applied some simple remedies, and as he was able to continue at his work, he did not procure medical advice. Shortly before twelve o'clock on the previous night whilst winding up the clock preparatory to going to bed, he suddenly fell backwards and died in a few minutes. Dr Row was at once sent for and came immediately, but life was extinct. Dr Row attributed death to heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 1 February 1884 HARBERTON - The Fatal Accident At Lincombe Quarry. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Church House Inn, Harberton, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr S. Varder was Foreman, touching the death of WM. FOSTER, a quarryman, who was killed on Tuesday by the falling of a slate as reported yesterday. - THOMAS FOSTER, the father of the deceased, having identified the body, said his son was employed as a "rubble man". He was engaged at the foot of the quarry loading the carts. - Owen Dennis, a fellow quarryman, said he heard something fall and saw deceased on his hands and knees. On going to him he was insensible, and witness put him into a butt and took him to the wagon on the top of the hill. Did not hear any stone fall, but another workman afterwards picked up a stone at the spot, which he thought had fallen from the top of the quarry, and had in all probability struck the deceased. Witness admitted that there were many stones similar to the one picked up. He did not think the stone which struck the deceased could have fallen from a loaded butt. The wall built under the brace-head was not constructed with mortar, and had given way on a previous occasion. Other evidence having been called and Mr J. T. Cape, surgeon, of Totnes, having described the deceased's injuries, Mr E. L. Middleton, owner and manager of the quarry, said the deceased had been employed at the quarry for ten years. It was the duty of the man who went with the wagons to keep a sharp lookout, and the man at the brace-head was also always on the lookout. - Henry Hatch, foreman at the quarry, stated that he could not say where the stone came from that struck the deceased: but during the previous night a part of the wall under the brace-head fell in. - Mr Middleton said that he had not been informed of this. - The Coroner, in summing up, commented on the fact that this was the second Inquiry he had held as to the death of persons employed at the quarry, and besides this, he believed there had been several other accidents. It would be for the Jury seriously to consider whether they could not recommend by a rider some improvement to the mode of working the quarry. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Foreman stated that they could not come to any agreement as to recommending improvement at Lincombe Quarry, but they strongly urged that a Government Inspector should be invited to inspect the quarry just as mines were inspected. The Coroner promised to communicate with the Home Secretary.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 February 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by the Devonport Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, at the Portsmouth Passage House Inn, Cornwall-street, on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of GLOUCESTER JOHN HUDDY, the infant son of a labourer living at 25 Cornwall-street. The child, which was a strong and healthy one, was taken suddenly ill on Friday morning and died in a few minutes, before medical aid could be procured. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, subsequently made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that the parietal bones had prematurely ossified, causing compression of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry at the Galatea Inn, King-street West, on Saturday afternoon, respecting the death of JOHN SULLIVAN, who died suddenly at his residence, 112 King-street West, on Friday night. - According to the evidence of Elizabeth Dorman, widow, of 2 Quarry-street, she had during the past three weeks acted as nurse to the deceased, who was 56 years of age. He had been attending the dispensary, but was not there at all last week, as he seemed a little better. On Friday evening he was in excellent spirits. She took him some gruel about 9.30 and left half an hour afterwards. On Saturday morning she went to his house about 8.10, and found him dead in bed lying on his left side. There were no signs of any struggle. - P.C. Walters, who had known the deceased, said he was a man of a very good character and worked at Devonport Dockyard. Witness conversed with him on Friday afternoon, when he was quite cheerful and said he was going to work on Monday. SULLIVAN had been at home for the past fifteen weeks attending his wife, who was ill and had recently died. Witness was of opinion that the bereavement affected his health. It was elicited by the Jury that after the deceased's death, and before the police arrived, some of his friends took his gold watch and chain out of his room. This act was very much commented on by the Coroner who said that nothing should be touched in such cases before the proper officials arrived. The Jury, of whom Mr John Brock was Foreman, returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 8 February 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquiry at the First and Last Inn, Exeter-street, last night, relative to the death of ADELAIDE BUNNY, aged four years. The deceased had been delicate from her birth, and died suddenly from a fit about 12.30 a.m. on Wednesday. Mr W. Lee acted as Foreman of the Jury, who returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was held yesterday at the New Town Inn, York-street, Plymouth, into the death of JANE TURPIN, aged 71, who died suddenly on the previous evening. Deceased lived with her son-in-law in York-street, and was sitting before the fire talking with him on Wednesday evening, when she suddenly fell back in her chair and expired. The Coroner said that the deceased had died from heart disease, and a verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 February 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sad Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, relative to the death of LOTTIE SUSAN LANGMAN, aged 6 years, who lived at 32 How-street. MARY FLORENCE LANGMAN, 11 years old, said that about seven o'clock on Sunday morning she was awakened by the deceased imploring her "to put out the fire." Three girls of the family slept in one bed in a room by themselves, and as they were in the habit of rising about seven in the morning they are provided with a lamp and matches. The witness generally lighted this lamp, but on the morning in question she was asleep, and the deceased, therefore, for the first time, attempted to light it. On finding herself on fire she at once jumped into bed and awoke her sister. The latter, with great promptitude, pulled the deceased out of bed; and witness ran for her father, whilst a younger sister was endeavouring to extinguish the flames. The father rushed in and tore off the child's burning night dress, and took her into his room. Dr Cash Reed, who was sent for, pronounced the case to be hopeless. - THOMAS LANGMAN, a blacksmith, father of the deceased, said he never knew the deceased to be fond of playing with matches. The moment he was called he hurried to the child and after tearing off her burning garments took her to his bed. He sent for the doctor, but in spite of all that was done the little sufferer died about half-past four in the afternoon. Before her death the father asked her if she could account for the accident, and she said, "I got out to light the lamp to get something to eat, and caught my nightdress." - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded, and the Jury expressed their approbation of the conduct of the sister, MARY FLORENCE.

ILFRACOMBE - Inquiry was made at Ilfracombe yesterday respecting the death of JOHN STANNER, a Cardiff pilot, who was fatally injured under circumstances as already reported, by falling in descending what is known as an accommodation ladder at the harbour in endeavouring to reach his boat. Suggestions were made as to making the ladder safe, and the Jury, to their verdict of "Accidental Death," added - "In consequence of its having been brought to the knowledge of the Jury that three serious accidents have already occurred to men descending the accommodation ladders, which are fastened to the sides of the walls of the harbour of Ilfracombe, they recommend that the harbour authorities should provide additional protection in the form of stanchions and hand-rails at the head of each ladder." The Jury gave their fees to the deceased's widow, who has been left with eight young children to provide for.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 February 1884 ILFRACOMBE - The Late Accident In The Hunting field. - Yesterday Mr H. B. Bromham, Coroner, held an Inquest at Ilfracombe, respecting the death of MR SHEARMAN, deputy-master of the Ilfracombe Harriers, who died on Saturday in consequence of injuries received while out hunting near Helland Wood, High Bickington, on the previous Thursday. The deceased was leaping a fence, when his horse caught one of its knees, causing the animal to stop, and the deceased was thrown upon his head into the road. He thereby fractured his spine. He received every attention, and remained conscious until nearly the time of his death; but from the first it was seen that the case was hopeless. Had the fracture been a little higher the death must have been instantaneous. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. The Jury gave their fees for the benefit of the family of the pilot as to whose death an Inquest was held on the previous day.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 February 1884 EXETER - An Exeter Tradesman Drowned. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Plymouth Inn, Exeter, before the County Coroner (Mr F. Burrows), touching the death of JOHN BLACKBEARD, watchmaker, of 82 Paris-street, whose body was found in the Exeter ship canal on Tuesday last. The deceased, who was 51 years of age, was in his usual health, and on the morning of Tuesday last went, as was his custom, for a walk after luncheon. He had been subject to giddiness in the head, and had frequently been known to stagger while walking about. His hat and umbrella were found on the bank of the canal; but this fact was accounted for by his son, who stated that it was a common custom with his father to walk with hat in hand when taking outdoor exercise. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased was seen walking along the towing-path with his hat in one hand and umbrella in the other shortly before his body was recovered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 February 1884 SWIMBRIDGE - Suicide At Barnstaple. - Last night the Coroner for Barnstaple district (Mr J. Bromham) held an Inquest at Stowford Farm, Swimbridge, respecting the death of THOMAS HARRIS, 64, who committed suicide on the previous morning. About seven o'clock on Thursday morning deceased took breakfast and then went out. His son, requiring instruction as to some sheep, went in quest of his father, and on going into a linhay in the orchard he saw deceased on his face and hands with blood around him. Assistance having been obtained, HARRIS was found to be quite dead, he having cut his throat with a razor, which was afterwards found covered with blood in the manger. Deceased had also placed his necktie there. HARRIS is said to have suffered from an accident to his head some years ago, and he had recently appeared low spirited about business matters. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 February 1884 NEWTON ABBOT - Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Newton Townhall on Saturday evening, respecting the death of MR WILLIAM BROWNE, aged 68 years, a retired captain of the merchant service, who resided at No. 50 Wolborough-street. The evidence of deceased's daughter shewed that he was in his usual health up to half-past ten o'clock on Friday morning, when he complained of a violent pain in the stomach, and he died within half an hour and before medical assistance arrived. Mr R. H. Grimbly, surgeon, proved making a post-mortem examination and finding heart disease was the cause of death. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Crocker was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 February 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of AMY MARSHALL, a charwoman, aged 56 years. The evidence of MARY CHAPPLE, of 10 Exeter-street, a daughter of the deceased, and with whom she lived, shewed that MARSHALL was of very intemperate habits, and frequently came home drunk. She had been a little unwell for some time. On Saturday week she went out during the afternoon and returned late at night the worse for liquor, and fell down against the stairs. The next day it was seen that she had a black eye, and witness supposed that she received it by the fall on the previous night. Since that time deceased had been unable to go out of doors, but her illness did not appear to be serious until last Sunday, when she remained in bed during the morning. She could not eat any food, but refused to have the doctor when witness offered to get one. About six p.m. she grew worse, and witness went for a medical man, but before he arrived, a little after seven, she was dead. In answer to the Coroner, if there was any truth in the rumour that deceased had been knocked about, witness said that no one had ill-treated her mother to her knowledge, but she was aware that there had been a rumour to that effect. - Confirmatory evidence was given by Mary Ann French, a young woman living with the last witness, THOMAS MARSHALL, son of the deceased, and George Henry Candy, a son-in-law. The Jury, of whom Mr Christopher Whidbourne was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by an Accidental Fall."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, yesterday, touching the death of EDWIN NEWMAN, a shunter in the employ of the London and South-Western Railway Company, who met with an accident at the Queen-street Station on the 2nd inst., which resulted fatally on Saturday. Deceased was holding the points while some cattle trucks were being unloaded, when by some means one of his feet was caught between the wheel and axle guard of one of the trucks. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The great toe of the left foot was so crushed that amputation was found necessary. The patient did well for some time, but mortification set in, and it was found necessary on Friday to amputate the leg. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 February 1884 MODBURY - Shocking Death Of An Old Woman At Modbury. - An Inquest was held at Modbury yesterday, touching the death of EMMA PEARSE, about 75 years of age. About ten a.m. on the 5th inst., HENRY PEARSE, the deceased's husband, was filling a benzoline lamp by the fire, when the lamp was set ablaze, and he threw it under the grate. The deceased was unfortunately set on fire, which her neighbours, attracted by her cries, succeeded in putting out, but not before she had been dreadfully burned. Mr W. Langworthy, surgeon, attributed death to shock to the system, and the Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," exculpating the husband from blame.

MODBURY - A sad death at Higher Ludbrook, near Modbury, has formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry. The deceased was FREDERICK DAVIES, aged 52, a gentleman of independent means. It appeared from the testimony of the servant, Mary Ann Slee, and others that he had been addicted to drinking, but for a time broke off the habit. However, lately he again gave way to intemperance, and just before his death kept his bed for a week, scarcely eating anything. On the evening of the 16th Slee heard a fall, and found that MR DAVIES had fallen out of bed. He asked her for some gin, which she gave him: and the next morning, going to his room with a cup of tea, she found he was dead. Medical evidence shewed that death was the result of apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 February 1884 BARNSTAPLE - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was yesterday returned at the Inquest at Barnstaple on JOHN VAUGHAN, of Bideford. The deceased evidently intended walking to the station to return to Bideford on Saturday night, and by mistake walked out over the quay by the Fish Market, near which his body was found on Monday. A contract was last week accepted by the Council for the building of a wall on this quay to prevent any such accident as that which befell VAUGHAN.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 February 1884 ASHPRINGTON - An Inquest relative to the death of SAMUEL COLE, a gardener, of Totnes, whose body was found in a tributary of the Dart, at Tuckenhay, near Totnes, was held by Mr T. Edmonds, at the Malsters Arms, Tuckenhay on Wednesday evening. It was elicited that COLE left the Malster's Arms on Monday evening about seven o'clock , and a butcher named Foale, who was at the inn at the time, said he considered that the deceased was perfectly sober. The evening was very dark and the stream was much swollen by the recent heavy rains. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and the Jury added the following rider:- "We wish to express the opinion that the parapet of the bridge on the higher side and the end nearest Totnes is dangerously low, and that there are dangerous places adjoining the road leading from Bow Bridge to Tuckenhay." - The Deputy coroner promised to communicate with the authorities on the subject.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan the Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the New London Inn, fore-street, yesterday, relative to the death of GEORGE BARTLETT, aged 16, of Cannon-street, Devonport, who was drowned in No. 3 Dock in the Devonport Dockyard on the previous afternoon under circumstances already reported. Evidence was adduced that the deceased was seen struggling for a moment in the water, and that he then disappeared. The body was subsequently recovered by a diver in the employ of Mr Pethick, the contractor, in whose employ the deceased was. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 25 February 1884 SHALDON - Sad Death At Shaldon. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Shaldon, on Friday evening, respecting the death of EMILY JANE RITSON, aged 33, who died suddenly at her residence, The Green, Shaldon, on Thursday morning. From the evidence of Miss Pine, niece of the deceased, it appeared that about a fortnight ago she came to wait upon MRS RITSON, the latter being in a state of extreme weakness. They went together to Teignmouth, and saw Mr Rudkin, surgeon, who prescribed a tonic. A week afterwards deceased was seized with delirium, and Mr Rudkin again sent her medicine. From Monday to Wednesday last MRS RITSON appeared to be better, but she then became delirious again. Mr Rudkin, who was sent for, was unable to attend, and he directed the messenger to go to Mr Gibbs. That gentleman gave the deceased a composing draught, and after taking it she seemed much better. At one o'clock on Thursday, however, she suddenly ceased to breathe. - Mr Vaudrey, surgeon, who was called in soon after MRS RITSON had died, deposed that he had known her for over two years, and had attended her very frequently up to December 1883, when she was suffering from delirium tremens. At this time he spoke very strongly to deceased and her husband about their habits. The deceased's heart, liver and kidneys were diseased, and the disease was attributable to drink. He requested her to have a nurse of his own choice to watch her, but husband and wife both declined and from that time up to the present they had shunned him. He was of opinion that death resulted from heart disease and delirium tremens. - Mr William Bell, an assistant wine and spirit merchant, deposed that he had been staying at Shaldon about twelve months, and had known the deceased about ten months. He frequently visited the house and had never seen the deceased take any kind of spirit. She was of a very excitable disposition and had been suffering from extreme debility. Mr Gibbs said that on Wednesday night he was called to see MRS RITSON. He found her suffering from delirium tremens and extreme weakness. He prescribed a composing draught of a weak nature, as she was in too weak a state to take any other kind of medicine. He was of opinion that she had died of heart disease accelerated by drink. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 February 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Castle and Keys Public-house, Prospect-row, relative to the death of MAUD ELIZABETH PEDLAR, the infant daughter of a mason's labourer, living at 14 Prospect-row. The child had enjoyed good health, but whilst its mother had it out in the street on the previous evening it was seized with a violent cough and expired almost immediately after its mother returned home. A post-mortem examination made by Mr W. Prynn, surgeon, shewed that death resulted from a fit produced by congestion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 February 1884 PLYMOUTH - An Intoxicated Seaman Drowned. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall, respecting the death of DAVID ALLEN, aged 36, seaman of the brig Black Prince, now lying in Sutton Pool. It appeared that the deceased joined the vessel at South Shields on January last. About a fortnight ago she arrived in the port and had been lying at the North Quay since Saturday. She was moored about a foot and a half from the quay. Deceased went ashore on Tuesday evening without Leave, and was then perfectly sober. The mate went t bed at eleven o'clock and the deceased had not then returned. About 1.30 a.m. he was awakened by a noise as of someone splashing in the water. He rushed on deck and seeing a man struggling in the water he threw ropes down to him. Deceased did not seize them, and the mate lowered a boat. There was a rope from a foreign vessel in his way, and he could not get it clear in time enough to save him. Meanwhile deceased sank. Two policemen were on the quay and they fetched grappling irons and recovered the body about a quarter of an hour afterwards. Yesterday morning at daylight deceased's hat was found on the deck. It seemed that he had attempted to get on board by striding from the quay to the vessel, and that in doing so he fell "overboard," and him and his hat was thrown forward. - P.C. Dunstan stated that he was on duty in Treville-street on Tuesday night and saw deceased walking in the direction of Exeter-street. He was very much the worse for liquor and stood at the corner of Vauxhall-street as if he had missed his way. Witness directed him to his vessel, and told him to be careful in getting on board. P.C. Wyatt stated that yesterday morning shortly after one o'clock he heard a splash near the North quay, and a man shout. He ran in the direction and saw the mate of the Black P:rince throwing ropes into the water. When deceased sank witness ran to the Harbour Avenue Station and with P.C. Coombs brought the grappling irons. Deceased was brought on shore and efforts were made to restore animation. Rules laid down by the Royal Humane Society were followed but without effect, deceased being dead. The body was taken to the mortuary at the Central Police Station. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed the opinion that the mate and police acted with great promptitude.

Western Morning News Friday 29 February 1884 DARTMOUTH - Drowned In Dartmouth Harbour. - The body of JANE ANN LIGHT, a widow, was found in Dartmouth Harbour, near the New Ground, and some 30 feet from the Castle Hotel, yesterday morning, about ten o'clock. Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, subsequently held an Inquest at the Guildhall, where evidence was given that the deceased had been subject to fits and was at times strange in her manner. Nothing special was noticeable about her when she left home about seven o'clock on Wednesday evening. The night was very wet and dark, and the supposition is that deceased walked over the quay by accident. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

MODBURY - The Suicide In A Tank At Modbury. - An Inquest was yesterday held at the White Hart Hotel, Modbury, touching the death of CHARLOTTE BEER, who had committed suicide by drowning herself in a water tank at the rear of her house. JOSEPH BEER, the husband, stated that about 20 minutes past six o'clock on Wednesday morning she asked him if she could come downstairs, as she was feeling extremely well that morning. He had occasion to go out of the house only for a few minutes, and when he returned she was missing. He searched for her for some time, but could not find her. He and his daughter, however, at last found her, about 20 minutes to seven o'clock in the tank of water. She was quite dead. There were two feet six inches of water in the tank. Mr W. Langworthy, surgeon, stated that the deceased had had a suicidal tendency for years. He considered the family quite capable of taking care of her. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 March 1884 EXETER - Singular Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter touching the death of WILLIAM PATRICK CRAWLEY, fishmonger, of Coombe-street, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous day under peculiar circumstances. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was last seen alive by his wife about noon on Thursday. At about half-past nine at night he was found in a passage leading to one of the rooms of the higher barracks, whither he had gone to transact some business. He was perfectly unconscious; his coat and one boot were off, and a bag was under his head. He was admitted to the Hospital in a dying condition, apparently suffering from an attack of apoplexy. The medical officer subsequently certified that his death arose from this cause, and the Jury found a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 March 1884 TIVERTON - Alleged Manslaughter At Tiverton. - An adjourned Inquest was held at Tiverton on Saturday by Mr L. Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, as to the death of HENRIETTA FLORENCE PROUT, aged 1 year and 8 months, and the daughter of AMELIA ALICE PROUT, dressmaker, of Sandford, near Crediton. - The testimony of the mother, who is 21 years of age, and Mrs Emma Ellis, of Townsend, Tiverton, was to the effect that the deceased was born on July 23rd, 1882, and about an hour and a half after birth was placed in the custody of Mrs Ball, of Tiverton, who kept her for about seven months. She was then taken care of by Mrs Ellis, who is PROUT'S aunt; and prior to her death was seen by her mother twice. Though weakly at birth the child was healthy when Mrs Ball ceased to mind her, and retained good health, with the exception of having a cold, until last week when her breath became "tight." She was worse on Wednesday and on Thursday morning she suddenly expired in Mrs Ellis's arms without a struggle - a moment before the medical man, who had been sent for, arrived. A post-mortem examination was made by Messrs. J. Reddrop and S. H. Fisher, who found that the body was not well nourished. There were seven or eight bruises on the face received during life. The right nostril was eroded; there were two abscesses on the scalp underneath the skin, and several sores about the body. On the right hand there were numberless small sharply cut semi-circular wounds with red edges, which Mrs Ellis said were the bites of a rat. The bones gave evidence of rickets, and both the thigh bones were fractured, but softly united by cartilage. The ribs were very rickety, and the walls of the chest collapsed. The cause of death was rickets and inflammation of the kidneys, which made the heart so weak that it ceased to beat. Evidence having been given that the child had been well taken care of by Mrs Ellis, the Coroner summed up, and pointed out that these cases came under the familiar category of "baby farming." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Blameable Neglect," which the Coroner said amounted to manslaughter, against Emma Ellis. - Mrs Ellis was subsequently brought before the magistrates and remanded on bail.

PLYMOUTH - Sad End Of A Plymouth Brewer's Labourer. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, on Saturday evening, relative to the death of EDWARD J. HORN, 39, a brewer's labourer, employed at Mr Godfrey's brewery, Octagon-street. - MRS ELIZA HORN, widow of the deceased, said that on Friday morning her husband left home at the usual time to go to his work, taking his dinner with him. He was then apparently quite well, and was in good spirits. He was in the habit of coming home very drunk and "sleeping off" liquor. On Friday evening about seven o'clock he was brought home by several men, and a Mr Goad ran up to MRS HORN and said that her husband was at the door in a drunken condition. Being used to this, she did not trouble about the deceased, more than to ask the men to undress him; and thinking he was only the worse for liquor she did not send for a doctor. He had often been brought home in a state of stupor, and then he said tricks had been played upon his beer by someone. When he was brought in on Friday he was quite unconscious, but witness did not notice anything peculiar in his breathing. About half-pat one on Saturday morning she got up to give him some tea, and then found blood about his mouth. Mr Harper, surgeon, was at once sent for, but shortly after his arrival the man died. - Mr S. Goad, in the employ of Mr Godfrey, brewer, deposed that on Friday afternoon about five o'clock he found the deceased lying on the ground in the brewery intoxicated and unconscious. From dinner time to half-past four both were engaged in filling a vat with old beer. When they began deceased was quite sober. It was possible for the deceased to have gone to a cask and helped himself during the afternoon, or it might have been the smell of the old beer that had stupefied him. Witness had been affected by the smell of old beer on previous occasions. When witness found deceased he put him on a cask and after trying to force a cup of tea upon him, he washed his face. he had not, nor did he know of any occasion when anyone else had played tricks on the deceased. It was quite possible for the deceased to have drunk beer from the vat without witness knowing it. Having called some men, deceased was put in one of the wagons and taken home. Witness told MRS HORN that the deceased was drunk, he having been told to do so by the foreman. HORN smelt as if he had been drinking a quantity of beer. - Mr Harper, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased about 2.30 on Saturday morning; he found him in bed unconscious and dying. he could not say that the man had been drinking. About a quarter of a hour afterwards he died in witness's presence. He had made a post-mortem examination and from the state of the different organs, especially the brain, he at once saw clearly that the deceased had been suffering from sanguineous apoplexy, to which he attributed death. He did not in any way connect death with the smell that would issue from the vat. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes," and expressed their opinion that no blame was attached to any person, or to the work at which the deceased was engaged.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Singular Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening at the Eagle Tavern, Coxside, relative to the death of WILLIAM JAMES TONKIN, who was killed under somewhat singular circumstances. Mr J. F. Price watched the case on behalf of the Plymouth Sanitary Authorities. ELLEN TONKIN, of 49 Clare-place, widow of the deceased, having stated that her husband, an engineer, was employed by the Plymouth Sanitary Authorities to drive the engine in the stone-yard. R. Elliott gave evidence. He was a labourer in the same employ as the deceased. The engine was one of 8-horse power. Witness was in the engine-house when the accident happened, he was on one side of the engine and the deceased on the other. TONKIN was in the act of taking the belt off the fly-wheel, which was revolving slowly at the time, and to do this a thick stick was used, it being put between the belt and the wheel to prize off the former. But placing it too far it was wrenched out of his hand carried round by the wheel, hitting deceased, as it revolved in the lower part of the abdomen and knocking him down. - By the Jury: There was no loose rigger or belt guide to throw the belt off. The engine was revolving at half speed. Deceased was in the habit of taking the belt off in the manner described when the engine was in motion, as it was more difficult to do so when it was at a standstill. The steam was shut off before the deceased attempted to remove the belt. - Mr Thomas Harper, surgeon, said he saw the deceased on Saturday, February 23rd, about 7.30 p.m., and attended him until he died from the injuries last Saturday. From the first witness saw that the case was hopeless, and the deceased suffered very great pain. He said there was no blame attached to anyone. - The Jury, of whom Mr William Edwards was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and strongly recommended that for the future the engine should be stopped before the belt was taken off, so as to prevent further accidents. - Mr Price undertook to have instructions placed in the engine-room to that effect. Deceased had been recommended by Messrs. Willoughby as a practical man, and had driven the engine for ten months.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sad Death At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the London Mail Inn, Richmond-street, last evening relative to the death of REBECCA COVE, who accidentally fell into the fire about six weeks ago. MR EDWARD COVE, husband of the deceased, and a shoemaker, residing at 46 Richmond-street, said that the deceased, who was 54 years of age, had been an invalid for the past few years, and frequently a medical gentleman had to be sent for. About six weeks ago deceased was sitting near the fire for a few minutes whilst witness went out to fetch some water. When he returned he found her lying on the floor near the fire in an insensible condition. One of her hands was blackened with the dirt of the grate, and apparently she had pushed herself from the fireplace. There was also a red mark on her left temple, and another on the side of her face. She soon recovered consciousness, but her speech was very incoherent. A few days afterwards further marks were seen on the forehead. Mr May, surgeon, was sent for, and he paid the deceased two visits. By this time erysipelas had set in, and MR COVE, not being able to afford to continue having Mr May, obtained the gratuitous services of Mr Jackson from the Dispensary. The deceased lingered on until yesterday morning when she died. Mr George Jackson, M.R.C.S., gave it as his opinion that the deceased had a seizure and fell into the fire. He attributed death to "Natural Causes". A second seizure that the deceased had was very likely caused by the accident. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest at the Western Law Court, Plymouth, yesterday afternoon relative to the death of a child 18 months old, named MONTAGUE RICHARD FOAKES WESTLAKE, son of AMELIA WESTLAKE of 16 Zion-street. The deceased had been sickly for some time, but not seriously ill. Yesterday about 1.30 p.m. he was seized with convulsions and died in a short time. Mr Faull was Foreman of the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 17 March 1884 ST BUDEAUX - The Suicide At Bull Point. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Government Ground, Bull Point, St Budeaux, on Saturday, relative to the death of SAMUEL TRUSCOTT. - MR JAMES TRUSCOTT, brother to the deceased, and an assistant-foreman at the Bull Point Powder Magazine, stated that the deceased, who was a labourer at the works, was about 48 years of age. Witness last saw him alive on the 13th inst., about 6.10 in the morning. He was then going into the workshop. His residence was about a mile and three-quarters from the works, where he had been employed for about twenty-four years. He was under witness's care until Christmas last. Deceased's father died of softening of the brain, and an uncle had committed suicide. For the last five months witness had observed that the deceased was exceedingly quiet, and his wife gave several instances shewing that he was in a sad state of despondency. - Mr Lakeman saw the deceased walking along the railway lines on Thursday morning with an oil can slung over his shoulder. He seemed strange then, and was not inclined to speak. Shortly after he returned without the can, and he then said "Good morning" to the witness. - Samuel Stanbury deposed that the deceased was missed at breakfast time, about 8.15 on Thursday. Witness went in search of him, and found him in a store, hanging by a rope from a beam. - Mr Radford, brother-in-law of the deceased, had noticed that TRUSCOTT'S manner had changed of late. About two months ago he complained of great suffering, and said he should have to go to the asylum. - Police Inspector Wonnall (Metropolitan) deposed to finding the following letter on the person of the deceased:- "My dear Ann, - I have been dreadful whist and nervous again this two days past. I can't shake it off at all; I can't rest day nor night no place. I wish you had never known me. I can't live like this any longer. My dear, it is no fault of yours. It is all my own bringing on. Do forgive me my dear Ann and dear children." A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was recorded.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident At Bideford. - A shocking accident befell a carpenter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway at Bideford on Friday afternoon. The man, whose name is STEPHEN BRAUND, of Bickington, near Barnstaple, was engaged on a bridge near the Bideford Railway Station. He had removed some of the planking spanning the bridge, leaving the opening unprotected. By some unaccountable means the deceased slipped his foot and fell through the gap on to the road beneath, a distance of about twenty feet. His fellow-workman seeing him disappear, at once proceeded to where he was lying on his back in the roadway beneath. He was totally unconscious and life was extinct in a few minutes. The body was removed to the Blacksmith's Arms near by, where the same evening an Inquest was held. The immediate cause of death was dislocation of the spine. Deceased, who was about 55 years of age, was a widower, and leaves a family of three children.

ST MARYCHURCH - Suicide At Babbacombe. - On Saturday evening Mr G. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Babbacombe, as to the death of EMMA REED, a single woman, aged 30, whose body was found on Oddicombe Beach the previous day. The evidence went to shew that the deceased when 15 years of age, fell over the stairs of her mother's house and sustained injury to her spine and brain. Ever since she had been an invalid, partly maintained by the other members of the family, and receiving relief from the parish. She had always been more or less in a state of despondency. She was last seen alive on Thursday night in the house of Mrs Mary Ann Heath, of Babbacombe, with whom she lodged. On Friday morning the deceased was missing, and the result of a search being made was that later in the day her body was found a few feet from the water on Oddicombe Beach. The statement of Mr Chilcote, surgeon, pointed to the low mental condition of the deceased consequent on physical weakness, and to the fact that the appearance of the body was consistent with death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict that REED Drowned Herself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

DARTMOUTH - At Dartmouth on Saturday an Inquest was held relative to the death of a seaman named BANNERMAN, who was landed from the steamer Eglatine on Wednesday, he having fallen from aloft during the voyage. His injuries were of a severe internal character, and although every care was shewn, he expired on Friday morning. A verdict in accordance with these facts was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Supposed Death From Taking Chlorodyne At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, relative to the death of CHRISTOPHER SNELL. Mr Thomas Higman was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - AMELIA CHARLOTTE SNELL, wife of the deceased, residing at No. 3 Wolsdon-street, said that her husband was 64 years of age. He had been superannuated from the Dockyard as a rope-maker. For a year or so his health had not been very good, although, on the other hand, he had not been so unwell as to require medical aid. for about five years he had suffered from a cough. He did not appear any worse than usual when he rose on Sunday morning. About nine o'clock, however, he seemed so ill that Dr Jones was sent for, but that gentleman was out when the messenger called, and he did not afterwards attend. About 5.30 yesterday morning he woke up and told witness that he did not think he was any better. He took his breakfast and about ten o'clock witness noticed a great change for the worse. A medical gentleman at the St Peter's Dispensary was sent for, but did not arrive until about ten minutes after death. Witness had given the deceased chlorodyne since Tuesday last. She usually administered ten or twelve drops in the evening, but she discontinued it on Friday because she thought the cough was better. Witness was certain that he had not taken any chlorodyne without her knowledge. - At the suggestion of the Foreman, Mr Brian again asked the witness her reason for discontinuing the chlorodyne, and she now said it was because he seemed stupid. Now that her attention had been called to it she fancied that the deceased had seemed drowsy after every dose. She had bought this medicine at Messrs. Wills, Son, and Box, in George-street. Deceased died in a stupor, but complained of a pain in his side. - William Henry Andrews, an acquaintance of the last witness said that the deceased had often spoken of his cough. On Tuesday evening witness was at the house and the bottle of chlorodyne was produced, when the deceased requested him to read the directions. He did so, and poured out ten drops, and having put them into half a glass of water, gave them to the deceased. On Wednesday he had two similar doses. The directions stated that the dose must be given when the cough was troublesome. MRS SNELL, recalled, stated it was a fact that the deceased took the dose twice in one day; it was given him by her son. - The Inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday in order that a post mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - The Supposed Death From Chlorodyne At Plymouth. - A post-mortem examination having been made on the body of the late CHRISTOPHER SNELL, who died under circumstances already reported in these columns, the Coroner's Inquiry was resumed last evening at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth, before Mr T. C. Brian. - The widow, recalled, said the bottle of chlorodyne used by the deceased was not kept in the room occupied by the deceased. As far as she knew the medicine had not been touched since she placed it in the kitchen on Friday. When he awoke on the Monday morning deceased was not drowsy. She first saw a great change in him about half-past ten in the morning, and from then to his death she did not leave him. - Mr E. H. Ellis, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination. The brain was slightly congested and in a state indicative of disease. The heart was flabby, there being fatty degeneration. The right lung was also in a congested state, indicating chronic pleurisy. There was, however, nothing to account for death under the circumstances described. According to the evidence the deceased did not take a dose of chlorodyne after Friday, but if it had transpired that he had had one on the Friday morning, witness would have considered that with the disease it had accelerated death. Chlorodyne was very poisonous, and contained three distinct poisons, for any one of which, bought separately, the purchaser would have to sign a book at the chemist's shop. He considered it a very unsafe thing. - After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding a rider to the effect that "The Jury consider it is a matter of regret that Chlorodyne can be freely purchased by the public, without any kind of restriction." - Mr Andrews, a witness, wished it to be stated that Dr Jones did arrive on the Monday morning, but MR SNELL was then dead.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 March 1884 NEWTON ABBOT - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Newton relative to the death of ERNEST BEARNE, aged 12, son of a house painter living in Wolborough-street. The evidence shewed that the lad was accidentally drowned in the River Lemon, which runs through Bradley Woods, on Wednesday, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. A young man named Wm. Bearne (no relation to the deceased) was complimented by the Jury for the manner in which he had acted. Hearing that a boy was in the river, Bearne jumped into deep water and brought the deceased out, but too late to save his life. The Coroner said he quite agreed with the Jury in their commendation. Some of the Jurymen gave their fees to the father of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 March 1884 SAMPFORD COURTENAY - The Fatal Gun Accident At Sampford Courtenay. Sad Results Of Carelessness. - Mr R. Fulford, County coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Clison Farm, situate midway between Sampford Courtenay and Northtawton, into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS REDDAWAY, a servant, employed at the farm, who was shot on the previous afternoon. Mr W. Kelland was the Foreman of the Jury, and Sergt. G. Hendy, of Northtawton, attended as representative of the Police. - WILLIAM REDDAWAY, a labourer, and father of the deceased, who identified the body, stated that his son, who was aged 22 years, was brought to his house dead at 4 p.m. on the previous afternoon. The deceased had for the past twelve months been employed at Clison Farm. - Mr Arthur Kempe, M.R.C.S., of Northtawton, deposed that on the previous afternoon he was sent for to see the deceased at Clison Farm. He arrived shortly after three o'clock, and then found the deceased lying dead in the turnip-house. There was an extensive wound on the left breast, besides a number of small gunshot wounds all round it. He had no doubt that the shots which caused those wounds entered the heart and killed the deceased. The weapon causing the injuries must have been very near the deceased at the time of its going off. - William Dayment, son of the occupier of the farm, said deceased had been invariably a steady and well-conducted young man. Another farm servant named George Piper also resided in the house, and had been with them for about twelve months. His conduct had always been of an irreproachable character. The two men were first cousins, and during the time that they had been in the house they had always been on the best of terms. On Tuesday afternoon Piper was out on the farm working the horses, and deceased was in the barn and about the farmyard tending the cattle. Witness kept a gun in the barn, and it was always ready loaded in order to scare away the birds. He last loaded it on Monday morning with an ordinary charge, and left the gun in its usual place. The hammer of the gun was then resting on the nipple; and he was quite certain that the gun was not cocked. It was, however, capped. - George Piper, after having been cautioned, was sworn, and said: I and deceased have always been on the best of terms. About half-past twelve yesterday I went to the barn for a bundle of hay in order to feed my horses. REDDAWAY was standing a little away and asked me how I had got on with the "dragging." I told him I should finish by the time we left work. He asked this because we were going out to a tea party in the evening. When I first went into the barn I saw the gun standing against the wall. I had the gun in my hand whilst I was talking to the deceased, who was just in front of me. When I was going to turn round to put it back it went off. At that time I had my stable jacket on, and was holding the gun by my side with the right hand under the butt and the left hand just under the barrel. The deceased was standing close to and in front of the muzzle, and never said anything about my having the gun in my hand. I did not know whether the gun was cocked or not, and know nothing about guns, never having fired one in my life. In talking to the deceased I never played with the hammer, but in turning round the gun went off, and I think it did so because it caught in my jacket and knocked my right side. He took up the gun out of curiosity to look at it. - The witness was closely questioned, but nothing further could be elicited from him. He is a young man of 20 years. He appeared utterly dazed and since the sad affair he has been so affected that he has to be closely watched. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, remarked that he hoped this case would sound a note of serious warning to masters not to leave loaded firearms about, and to servants not to indulge in foolish and careless meddling. Mr Dayment, however much he might regret the affair, as he knew he did, had been both imprudent and incautious in leaving a loaded weapon about under such circumstances. - The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict "That the death of THOMAS REDDAWAY was the result of a gunshot wound caused by the incautious handling of a gun by his fellow-servant - George Piper." The Foreman added that the Jury were unanimously of opinion that Piper should be exonerated from all blame. The Jury handed their fees to the father of the deceased, who was stated to be in very poor circumstances.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Warne's Crown Hotel, Anstis-street, into the death of MRS ELIZABETH SMALE, a widow, who lived at 7 Neswick-street. - Deceased's son, a seaman in the Royal Navy, stated that his mother was 68 years of age. She had enjoyed good health, but recently suffered from a slight cough. On Wednesday she did her housework as usual. About 6.30 yesterday morning her son, who sleeps in an adjoining room, heard her coughing and calling for him. She asked for a cup of tea, and while he was getting it ready she died. - Mrs Isaacs, the landlady of the house, having given evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr Nicholls was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 31 March 1884 PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Foreign Seaman At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Sailors' Home, Plymouth, on Friday night, touching the death of EDMOND PIERRE BOULOT, a French sailor, who died on board the brig Gasonager on Thursday afternoon. The evidence of the captain (Alphonse Franzois Gaillard) shewed that deceased, who was cook, complained of being unwell after they had been 50 days on the voyage; but he (deceased) refused to say for some time what was the matter. Witness told him to discontinue work, and put another man in his place. BOULOT, however, gradually grew worse, and it was ascertained that he was suffering from a contagious disease. The captain put into Plymouth for the purpose of obtaining medical assistance, but after entering the Sound the sick man rapidly sunk, and succumbed on Thursday. On their arrival at Plymouth the French consul (Mr Bellamy) was informed of the man's illness and that gentleman immediately instructed Mr Geo. H. Eccles, surgeon, to go aboard. Deceased, however, was dead before he arrived. - Mr Eccles examined the body, and was convinced that death resulted from natural causes. - The Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) and the Jury highly commended the conduct of the captain, as well as that of the surgeon. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 April 1884 ILFRACOMBE - Mysterious Death Of A Gentleman At Ilfracombe. - An Inquest was opened yesterday afternoon by Mr James F. Bromham, Coroner for the District, at the Ilfracombe Hotel, touching the death of JAMES SHIPWAY, an independent gentleman, whose residence was at Roslyn Hoe, Torrs Park, and whose demise occurred suddenly on the previous Friday morning. Mr Heathfield, solicitor, of London (the deceased's gentleman's legal adviser), was present at the Inquiry, and Mr J. Thorne, barrister of the Western circuit (instructed by Mr Heathfield) represented the executors. Mr E. G. Withycombe was Foreman of the Jury. - Mr Richard Huxtable, secretary of the Ilfracombe Hotel Company, identified the body of the deceased. He was a neighbour of witness's and had lived in the town about five years. A short time before his decease he told witness he had just "turned" 70 years of age. Witness last saw him in Torrs Park on the Tuesday previous. For a man of 70 he appeared to enjoy very good health, with the exception of constant colds, and he had lately complained of suffering from sciatica. He was a man of regular habits and very abstemious; in fact, witness did not believe he took stimulants. His establishment consisted of two servants, who were sisters, one of whom witness should say was about 28 years of age, and the other 25; and both had been with him for some years. - Robert George B. Sheils, of 59 Middleton-road, Dalston, London, lithographic writer, nephew of the deceased, having given some unimportant evidence, Mr H. R. Foquett, surgeon, said he knew the deceased well, and first attended him professionally in September and October last for a cold. Witness was sent for on March 7th, when deceased told him he thought he had had a slight seizure. He had been to sleep before the fire and fell off his chair, and in trying to get up found he had lost the use of one of his legs; but he had quite recovered its use before witness got there. Witness told him it was not a seizure, and he had lost the use of the limb by pressure on the nerves whilst asleep. Two or three days afterwards deceases complained of pain in the calf of his legs, and witness told him it was rheumatic pain. He became a good deal better; but on the 21st again sent for witness, complaining of diarrhoea and sickness, accompanied by pain. On the following day witness found him better. He saw him again on march 24th, when witness thought him so much better that he did not intend to see him again for a day or two. On the 25th witness took tea with the deceased, who seemed very well and cheerful. On the following day, about noon, witness received a message to go and see him. He found him in bed. He said, "I have got another of these attacks." Witness asked "What can bring them on; you are living very simple and plain." Deceased said, "It came on soon after breakfast." Witness asked what he had for breakfast, and he replied, "gruel, but it went down like poison." Deceased also told him that he had gruel for supper. He then became very sick, and diarrhoea, and was in very great pain - the pain was much more acute than on previous occasions. Witness sent some medicine, and again visited him about nine o'clock. He then found him in intense pain, but there was no sickness or diarrhoea. Witness made up some more medicine, which he gave him throughout the night, remaining with him until three o'clock next morning. He went home during the night for a dose, but was not away for more than half an hour. The elder servant remained up during the night and brought what was required, such as gruel, mutton broth, brandy &c. Witness applied linseed meal poultices to the stomach, with belladonna and laudanum, but nothing seemed to give relief. Witness left at three and returned about eleven o'clock. He found deceased sitting in an armchair in his bedroom dressed. He expostulated with him for getting up, and he said he thought it was the best thing he could do, as he was in so much pain he could not lie still. He seemed so very much worse that witness went away and brought Mr Cornelius Fox to see him. They arrived about twelve o'clock. His breath had then become very short. He was lying on the bed, dressed. They undressed him and put him to bed. His pulse was very weak and irregular. They gave him some brandy at once, and Mr Fox prescribed for him. They remained for about an hour. In the evening witness was again sent for, with an urgent message that the deceased was out of bed, very ill, and the servants could not get him back. Witness drove up at once, and found him dying. He was then in bed. The eldest servant was with him. He talked indistinctly, and within half an hour after witness's arrival he died. Witness then detailed his treatment of deceased and added that he was unable to say what was the cause of death. Was unable to account for the pain from which he suffered or for his death. There was nothing in the medicine to cause anyone's death. A post-mortem examination was made on Saturday, Dr Fox assisting. They found the deceased's stomach and bowels distended with wind and discoloured. They removed them from the body, together with all the other abdominal organs. The heart was healthy, but there was some congestion of the lower lobe of the left lung. The small intestine was deeply congested and contained a dark bloody fluid and the same condition existed at the entrance of the large intestine. The stomach also contained some dark fluid. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said there was no poison in the medicine he prescribed. In his opinion the appearance of the stomach and the intestines, and the contents of the latter, were inconsistent with death from natural causes, and pointed to the fact that there must have been some local visitation. He did not know any disease that would produce all the symptoms which had been shewn in this case. He had a suspicion that deceased died from poison, and from an irritant one. It was impossible to say whether death was caused by poison without having an analysis of the stomach and contents. - By the Jury: Witness did not taste the gruel. It was not a copper vessel in which the food was prepared, but a china-lined saucepan. Deceased had been in the habit of taking lozenges, but not in large quantities. Mr Fox now had the remainder of the lozenge in his possession. - In the course of a rigid cross-examination by Mr Thorne, solicitor, Mr Foquett said the appearances were inconsistent with a natural cause of death. It was unnatural to find blood mixed with the contents of the alimentary canal, or for the intestines to be in such a highly congested state. Had verdigris been in the vessel in which the food was prepared that might have caused death. - Dr Fox was also examined. Was of opinion that the appearance of the intestines and stomach was not consistent with death from natural causes. What Mr Foquett and he saw was sufficient to cause suspicion, consequently they declined to grant a certificate. - In answer to a question, the elder servant said she prepared food in a copper saucepan lined with enamel and sometimes in an iron pot. She attributed death to the lozenges deceased had used. - The Inquest was adjourned for a fortnight, and in the meantime the Coroner will communicate with the Home Secretary, respecting an analysis of the internal organs.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter touching the death of a lad named JOHN MUDGE, who was drowned in the mill-leat on Sunday near the Bishop Blaize Inn. The Jury found a verdict of "Death by Accidental Drowning," and the Coroner (Mr Hooper) intimated his intention of communicating with the owners of the property as to the dangerous condition of the spot where the accident occurred.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, relative to the death of ROBERT PALMER, a pensioner, 55 years of age, who lived in King-street. The deceased added to his income by keeping a small coal store, in Jessamine-lane, and at eleven o'clock on Monday morning he went there for the purpose of removing an empty crate. His wife, on going to the store shortly afterwards, to look for him, found him lying dead on the floor. The crate was then in the pony cart outside. A post-mortem examination made by Mr E. W. Paul, surgeon, shewed that death resulted from the breaking of a blood-vessel in the region of the heart caused probably by the exertion of lifting the crate into the cart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Fatal Accident At Moretonhampstead. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of JAMES BRIDGEMAN, of Moretonhampstead, aged 72 years of age, who was fatally injured by an accident at Moretonhampstead on the 15th of March last. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Crupp, farmer, was engaged in connection with a turnip pulping machine, when his clothing became entangled in some couplings, causing him to be twice forcibly carried round the wheel. His ribs were fractured and his right leg was broken. In this condition he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where his injuries were skilfully treated by Dr Bromfield. Death, however, resulted on Monday. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 4 April 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Keyham. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, lat evening, relative to the death of THOMAS SMALLRIDGE, aged 54 years, a labourer in the employ of Mr Debnam, the contractor for the erection of the new Naval Barracks at Keyham. - The Jury, previous to the evidence being taken, proceeded to the Naval Barracks and viewed the scene of the accident. - On their return, Wm. James Gregory, a labourer, stated that at about eight o'clock on the previous morning two trucks laden with sand were being drawn up on a tramway from the quay to the works by means of a wire rope, which connected the trucks with a stationary engine near the buildings. Witness was standing close to the trucks when they reached the top of the incline, and the deceased stood on the other side. SMALLRIDGE undertook to couple a line to one of the trucks as it was moving past him, for the purpose of the trucks being drawn back again after they were emptied. Instead, however, of attaching the rope to the back of the last truck, as he should have done, he coupled it in front of the foremost one. This caused the rope to tighten and being at the back of his legs, it threw the deceased down in front of the moving trucks, which passed over his thigh. The trucks themselves were at the same time pulled off the line by the rope tightening. They were stopped as soon as possible by a signal made to the engine driver, and had not gone further than the length of one truck before being brought to a standstill. On seeing the danger deceased was in, witness ran round the back of the trucks to his assistance, but the accident had happened and the trucks had been stopped before he reached him. He found that one of SMALLRIDGE'S legs was almost severed from the body. With assistance witness procured a stretcher, and removed the deceased to the Hospital. Nothing could be done for SMALLRIDGE at the works, because there were no appliances there to bandage his legs and stop the bleeding. Not more than half an hour elapsed, however, before he reached the Hospital. - William Matthews, another labourer employed at the Barracks, stated that he himself had often hooked the wire to the trucks, and he had seen the deceased do it. If the wire had been attached to the back of the truck, as he had without exception seen it done, there would have been no danger. He saw SMALLRIDGE fall, and at once signalled for the engine to stop. - Mary Crago, nurse at the Hospital, deposed that the deceased died within a few minutes after his admission. - The Coroner, in summing up, expressed a hope that proper appliances for bandaging injured limbs would be kept at the works, and that Mr Debnam would have two or three of his men instructed how to stop bleeding in case of any serious accident occurring in the future. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 April 1884 PLYMOUTH - At Crabbtree yesterday an Inquest was held regarding the drowning in the Laira of the boy CHARLES HENRY WILLIAMS, who was an inmate of Plymouth union Workhouse. The details of the lad's death given in our columns yesterday were substantiated in the main, but it was elicited that the strong current prevailing had taken the body under an arch in the railway embankment, where it would have been dangerous for anyone to have attempted his rescue. The industrial trainer, Mr Newton, did rescue another lad, named Risky, from a similar fate, and for his conduct the Jury strongly commended Newton. No blame was attached to anyone in respect of the death of the other boy, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was recorded. It was denied that WILLIAMS had been subjected to any ill-treatment of which there had been rumours.

EGG BUCKLAND - The Singular Suicide At Laira. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest last evening at the Old Road Inn, Laira, relative to the death of a man, whose body was found in a field in the vicinity on Sunday. Robert Brooks, farmer, said that as he was crossing his field on Sunday, about 1.30, he noticed the deceased lying about nine feet from the hedge. There was no blood on the spot where he was lying, but in the hedge there was a quantity. His face was very white and the body was cold. - P.C. Regler spoke to visiting the field at Little Efford, and seeing the deceased. On the left arm he found a gash, from which blood had apparently been flowing freely. A penknife, which was shut, was lying near him. - Mr E. C. Langford, surgeon, spoke to examining the arm. The cut, which was in the bend of the left elbow, was of such a size as to lead him to think that it had been caused by the penknife that was found. He considered that death was the result of loss of blood. - Detective Inspector J. Hill, of the Plymouth Police Force, said the deceased answered to the description given in a bill issued by the Somerset Police of a man named EDWARD ABBOTT, a mason, of Stanley Hill, Totterdown, who in May last was discharged from a criminal lunatic asylum. A telegram had been received from some relatives of ABBOTT to the effect that if the deceased had a large scar on his right temple, they would come and take possession of the body. This scar was clearly visible, and the Jury accepted it as a certain identity of the deceased. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sad End Of An Old Woman At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest last evening at the New London Inn, Fore-street, relative to the death of ANN PRETTY, a single woman, aged 74 years. Deceased, who lived at 42 Cornwall-street, had for some time been suffering from the infirmities of old age, and during the last six weeks had been confined to her bed. She was in receipt of parish pay, and between one and two o'clock on Monday afternoon John Locke, the caretaker of the parochial-office, went to her residence with her weekly allowance. On entering the room he found her dead in bed with her head lying across a chair by the side of the bed. On the chair was a paraffin lamp. Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, was sent for, and found that the deceased's cap, hair and the side of her face were burned. From the posture of the body he came to the conclusion that the deceased fell against the lighted lamp and had not sufficient strength to move before she was seriously burnt. He attributed death to shock to the system caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 April 1884 INWARDLEIGH - Fatal Accident At Inwardleigh. - Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday afternoon at the New Inn, Folly Gate, near Okehampton, as to the death of GEORGE UNDERHILL, aged 69, a farm labourer, in the employ of Mr W. Burd, solicitor and town clerk of Okehampton. On Tuesday the deceased was employed with a pair of horses and a roller in rolling a field on Goldburn Farm, Inwardleigh. About five p.m. the horses, with the roller attached, quietly walked into the farmyard, and seeing this John Mills, a groom, went to the field, where he found the deceased lying in the hedge. He asked him what was the matter, and the unfortunate man replied "The horses started kicking, and the roller knocked me down and passed over me." The deceased was taken to the farm, and Mr G. V. Burd, surgeon, of Okehampton, was sent for. The medical man found him suffering from injury to the spine, having apparently fallen back against the roller, though the account UNDERHILL gave to the medical man before his death was that in turning the roller it went against one of the horse's legs, which began to kick; he tried to get away, but the implement passed over him. He died on Wednesday evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 April 1884 THURLESTONE - The Loss Of A Captain At Batham. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at Bantham, by Mr Sydney Hacker, and a Jury, of whom Mr Polyblank, of Burnt House was Foreman, respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY HAYMAN, captain of the smack Pantaloon, who was drowned on the previous Tuesday. The story of the accident as told by William Reed, mate of the Pantaloon, was that about 5 a.m. in taking the smack out of harbour to proceed to Plymouth, the captain got into a boat to tow. He afterwards ran a kedge, when Reed called out to him to come on board, as the water was getting rougher, and that there was a "topper" coming. The deceased was proceeding to do so, when a sea struck him broadside, his boat filled, and he was thrown into the water. Clarke, the pilot, threw a rope, which fell short of the captain, and then Reed put out a pole, by which the deceased held for a long time; in fact, he seems to have retained it until he was drowned. The crew were unable to render any further assistance. They worked at the winch to try and right the other boat, and on looking round the captain had disappeared. Other testimony having been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning," adding that these vessels should be provided with lifebuoys and that there should also be a proper system of flag signalling in case of danger. The deceased had been a member of the Wesleyan denomination at Torpoint for thirty years, and was highly respected not only there but wherever he traded.

EXETER - An Inquest held at Exeter on Saturday respecting the death of an old man named JOHN DODDRIDGE, whose body was found in the Basin on Thursday, resulted in an Open Verdict. DODDRIDGE had been drinking heavily for some time, and was last seen walking near the Basin shortly before his body was recovered.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 April 1884 EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of MRS MARY PRICE, who died suddenly on Sunday night. Deceased, who was 66 years of age, was the wife of MR WM. PRICE, a retired commercial traveller, residing at No. 1, Rosemount-villas. She left home on Sunday evening in her usual good health to visit her sister in Queen-street. On her way home again deceased got into a tram car at the bottom of St. Sidwell-street. As she did so she was seized with a fit of coughing, which lasted for some minutes. On alighting near St Anne's Chapel, the conductor noticed that she was unable to speak, and a few moments afterwards she was observed to stagger and appeared as if choking. She was removed to the residence of a relative in the neighbourhood and died a few minutes afterwards before medical assistance could be rendered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, last evening touching the death of an old man named DANIEL WINTER, who fell over a flight of stairs on Saturday. Abel Hill, a mason, residing at 35 Exeter-street, the same house as the deceased, who was 81 years of age, said that about a quarter to seven on Saturday evening he (witness) was in his room, at the top of the stairs, when he heard the deceased coming up and calling out "Hallo!" He went out and saw him standing four steps from the landing. Deceased said, "I've had a half-pint too much;" and witness told him not to trouble about that "as it was not the first time, and he would soon get over it." He got into his room and then witness left him. Almost immediately witness heard a fall over the stairs. - P.C. Thomas Coombs helped to take the deceased upstairs after the accident; he was then dead. Witness had known him for many years as a very steady man. - Mr Harper, surgeon, deposed to being called to see the deceased shortly after death. The vertebrae of the neck was not dislocated, as was rumoured, but there was an internal fracture of the base of the skull, which was sufficient to account for death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 April 1884 BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held yesterday at Croft Land Farm, Brixham, touching the death of MR SAMUEL COAD, who committed suicide on Tuesday by hanging, as already reported. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 April 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death Through Want. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an inquiry last night at the Castle and Keys Inn into the cause of death of an infant child named ERNEST ALFRED THOMAS MARSH, whose father is a lance-corporal in the 82nd Regiment. MARSH was stated to be in receipt of 5s. a week, the whole of which he gave to his wife, but it was stated in evidence that of this sum she had to pay 3s 6d. a week for the rent of her room and that 1s. 6d. a week was all she had to provide herself and child with food. Not having anyone to look after the child she was unable to go out to work. The deceased was nearly four months old, and she fed it with a pint of new milk daily and sometimes with cornflour, both of which were given on the advice of the regimental doctor. But the child wasted away and died on Thursday morning. Early that morning she sent for Mr Prynn, but that gentleman was unable to do anything for it as it was then in a dying state. - Mr Prynn was called, and he stated that he found the deceased in a very emaciated condition. It died from want of proper nourishment and he did not think that 1s. 6d. a week was sufficient to provide food for the child, to say nothing of the mother. - The Jury found as their verdict "That the child died from want of proper nourishment, but that the mother had not the means to provide this for the deceased."

Western Morning News, Friday 25 April 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Want At Devonport. - The Devonport Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of an elderly woman named ELIZA WALTERS, of 55 Mount-street. - Mary Jane Booth, residing at 68 James-street, said she had known the deceased for about eight years as a letter-writer for the uneducated. Witness was not sure that the deceased was married, and her real name was not known. About two months since witness lent the deceased a room and a bedstead. She had a great many friends who gave her meals. On Tuesday evening witness saw WALTERS alive, and she was looking as well as usual. On Wednesday witness went to the deceased's room about noon. The door was fastened, but witness opened it and found deceased lying on the floor as if asleep. Failing to arouse her, witness called Mrs Blackmore, who at once saw that WALTERS was dead. - Elizabeth Blackmore, a widow, living in the same house as did the deceased, deposed that she had known WALTERS for about two years as a very good scholar. Witness was in the deceased's room on Tuesday night about nine o'clock, when she asked for a little water for the morning. Her supper was a very meagre one, consisting of but a few cold potatoes and some pie-crust. Her bedding was only a small quantity of straw and a blanket which belonged to a society. She said that she was tired and would not get up until about noon on Wednesday. - The sister of the deceased informed the Jury that a man named ROBERT WALTERS, a shoemaker of Stonehouse, was the lawful husband of the deceased. - Mr F. E. row, surgeon, stated that about 2.30 on Wednesday afternoon he was called to see the deceased, who he found lying on a pallet of straw. She had apparently been dead about five hours. A post-mortem examination shewed that she was very poorly nourished. Her stomach was much shrunk - an evidence that she had had very little food. The heart was very small and flabby, which was also indicative of lack of nourishment. Fatty degeneration had set in, and left her heart, liver and kidneys in a very bad state. He thought that death was caused by congestion of the lungs, which might have existed for a day. There were no evidences of drink, and he thought want of nourishment had much to do with the death. The Coroner stated that this was another death which would not have occurred had the circumstances of the case been made known. The deceased could not have had a worse room to live in than that in which she died. A verdict was returned to the effect that WALTERS had died from want of proper nourishment, which she was too poor to obtain.

LYDFORD - A Coroner's Inquiry was held at Dartmoor Prisons by Mr R. R. Fulford, touching the death of STEPHEN EVEY, 24 years of age, who was undergoing a term of seven years' imprisonment for a criminal assault. The deceased had suffered from an abscess on the spine, which ultimately caused his death. A verdict was given accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 April 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Gloucester Arms, relative to the death of JOHN SULLIVAN, aged 54, living at the Victory Inn. According to the evidence of the wife of the deceased, he was in good health and cheerful spirits on Thursday. About a quarter past ten in the evening, he went to the back of the premises to bolt the door, when he fell against the tank and his wife found him apparently dead. Mr Gard, surgeon, was called in and pronounced life to be extinct, and death having been caused by the rupture of a blood-vessel. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 April 1884 PLYMOUTH - Strange Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - At the Plymouth Guildhall last evening Mr Brian, Coroner, held an Inquest relative to the death of BESSIE BEATRICE DAWE, an illegitimate child, who was found dead on Monday afternoon. The Coroner requested the special attention of the Jury to the circumstances, which, he remarked, were not of an ordinary character. - MRS CLARA STAMP, residing at 23 Princess-street, having stated that the deceased was her child, and that she was nearly three years old. Dr W. Cash-Read deposed that about half-past six o'clock on Monday evening he was called to see the deceased. The mother was in the room when he arrived. He could form no opinion as to the death at the time, and there were no suspicious marks. He made a post-mortem examination, but found nothing indicative of poison. The brain shewed slight traces of a former inflammation. It was also congested and this would interfere with the respiratory power. The appearance of the child was not inconsistent with death from convulsions. - MRS STAMP, recalled, stated that the child had been delicate from birth, and had been under medical treatment. She had received £5 per quarter for the support of the child from Capt. Bethune. MR STAMP and the witness had never had any differences respecting the child. For the past day or two the deceased had complained of headache, and for that reason was kept home. On Saturday night she administered a Steadman's soothing powder. On Sunday morning the deceased was lively, but on Monday she complained a little. She went to school in the morning and returned about noon. The deceased remained at home during the afternoon. About five o'clock witness placed the deceased on the bed, and when she was asleep witness left, locking the door and taking the key. When she left the child was apparently alive. She had often gone out, locked the door and left the deceased asleep. When she went out she visited a Mr Ganaway, and as he asked her to remain to tea, she requested him to go and fetch the deceased. She did not take the child out with her because she was not aware that she would remain out to tea. When she gave Mr Ganaway the key, she did not know whether the deceased was dead or alive. He returned about twenty minutes later and said that the child was dead. She expressed astonishment at this, saying that she had left the child asleep. She returned at once, and found the child dead, lying in the same position as she had left it. Dr Reed was sent for, and arrived within about five minutes. She wished to state that the child ought to have been registered in the name of Andrews. - Charles Ganaway, a waiter, spoke to receiving a visit from the last witness about six o'clock on Monday evening. He asked her to remain to tea, she consented, and he went to fetch the deceased. On entering the room he saw the child on the bed apparently asleep. He spoke to her, but receiving no reply he examined her and saw that she was dead. - A Juror remarked that he did not see any motive for the death of the child. The mother was in receipt of £20 a year for its support and it was to her interest to keep it alive. - In the course of a conversation that took place, some Jurymen expressed themselves satisfied with the evidence, and that an adjournment was not necessary, whilst others thought it was essential. On putting the matter to the vote it was decided that as the medical man had not analytically examined the intestines of the deceased the Inquest should be adjourned until Wednesday next.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 May 1884 BLACKAWTON - The Sad Occurrence Near Blackawton. Inquest And Verdict. - The Inquest upon the body of MRS LAURA SHORTLAND, wife of MR HUGH R. SHORTLAND, who, as already reported in the Western Morning News, was found drowned in a pond on the grounds of her father, MR W. PERCY DIMES, of Oldstone, near Blackawton, was held yesterday afternoon, at the residence of Mr Dimes, before the Deputy Coroner, Mr T. Edmonds, of Totnes. - Mr Stabb was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Police-Superintendent Dore, of Kingsbridge, was present during the Inquiry, which was opened by the Deputy Coroner with the brief remark that the death of the deceased young lady appeared to have happened under somewhat mysterious circumstances, and that particulars of the occurrence would be given in evidence. - The Jury then viewed the body, which was in an adjoining room. The countenance bore a very pleasant expression. - Mrs Martha Dimes, wife of Mr William Percy Dimes, stated that she had seen the body of the deceased, and identified it as that of her daughter, MRS LAURA SHORTLAND, wife of MR HUGH ROTHERFORD SHORTLAND. MR SHORTLAND was at present on his way to New Zealand, and the last advices from him were from Brindisi. He went from her house to Mallett's Hotel, Ivybridge, where he had been staying. The last time she saw him was on Thursday, April 10th. He went away on that day, wishing her and the members of her family good-bye, and saying he was going to New Zealand. They received letters from him again on the following Monday, but he had not then left Ivybridge. Witness last saw the deceased alive on Monday morning, about ten o'clock, when she went out riding, witness helping her on the horse. The deceased had been on perfectly affectionate terms with her husband. The last letter from MR SHORTLAND was received on Tuesday morning, it having been forwarded to Oldstone by his solicitors at Plymouth. - Mr Dimes had handed this letter to the Deputy Coroner, who intimated that he proposed to read it to the Jury. - Mrs dimes (who was somewhat agitated) objected to this. The letter, she said, concerned no one, and it was absurd to read it aloud. - The Deputy Coroner thought there were some portions of the letter of importance. - Mr Dimes said the letter was an affectionate one as from husband to wife. The Deputy Coroner was welcome to read it himself and he then left it to his judgment as to whether there was anything in it bearing on the present Inquiry. - The Deputy Coroner looked over the letter, after which he read a portion of it aloud. The writer said: "I am hurrying on at the fastest rate and shall soon be home again." There was also this observation, "I enclose a letter in a packet of letters to my solicitors from Plymouth." The Deputy Coroner said this would account for there being no postmark on the letter, which went on to say, referring to his Plymouth solicitors, "As soon as they have received the same, they will enclose this sealed letter in an envelope and address the same to you as directed." The Deputy Coroner added that the letter seemed to be written in a very cheerful and affectionate terms, but at present he did not think it necessary to read any further portion of it. - Mrs Dimes, continuing her evidence, stated that the deceased came back, after riding, soon after twelve o'clock on Monday. Witness did not see her, but she heard her take off her habit, change her dress and go out again with the dog. She very often did this, taking the animal down to the pond to wash it. Witness saw nothing of her daughter again until her dead body was brought home. - The Deputy Coroner: Do you know how MR SHORTLAND came to go away without his wife? - Mrs Dimes replied that he went away on business, and he intended being away for a short time only. He had carried on the profession of a barrister in New Zealand, where his father resided. - The Deputy Coroner: Can you tell us anything else which would throw any light on the subject? - Mrs Dimes: No, I cannot. - The Deputy Coroner: Was your daughter always in good spirits? - Mrs Dimes: Yes, always the same. - The Deputy Coroner: And in good health? - Mrs Dimes: In perfect health. - The Deputy Coroner: And you are quite unable to throw any light upon the occurrence? - Mrs Dimes: Quite unable. Witness added that deceased was 22 years of age. - Elizabeth Luckraft, a workwoman employed at Oldstone, and wife of the hind to Mr Dimes, stated that she last saw the deceased about nine o'clock on Monday morning. Deceased was then in the kitchen making pastry. Witness heard her come home from her ride about twelve o'clock, and call the collie dog. She did not return in the evening and the next morning witness went down to the pond and found her body there. Deceased was standing upright, with her hands held up in front of her. She was about three feet from the bank, and the water just covered her head. She had on an ordinary blue dress, and not a riding habit. Witness returned to the house and told Mrs Dimes of her discovery. She also gave information to her husband, and he and another man took the body out of the pond. - The Deputy Coroner: How was it the deceased's friends did not miss her and go in search of her the same evening? - Witness: Because Mrs Dimes said she expected her daughter had gone away with MR SHORTLAND, and I did not know but what she was at home. - The Deputy Coroner: What made you go to the pond to look for the deceased? - Witness: As she had not come back I thought there must be some accident. - A Juryman: You never heard her make any complaint? - Witness: No, not at all. - Mrs Dimes, recalled by the Deputy Coroner, was asked why she did not have a search made for the deceased on the Monday evening. She replied because she thought her daughter might have seen her husband and gone away with him, and that he had perhaps deferred his journey. Witness added that she went down to the pond herself in the evening, thinking that the deceased and her husband might be walking about the grounds, but she saw nothing. - The Deputy Coroner: Was your daughter in the habit of going out at night? - Mrs Dimes: She was never away like this before. - The Deputy Coroner: Did you not become much alarmed? - Mrs Dimes: I was very much alarmed. We could not think what had become of her. - John Luckraft, a hind in the employ of Mr Dimes, stated that on being told by his wife of the body of the deceased having been found in the pond he procured a door and went to the spot, where he saw the deceased standing upright in the water. He was assisted in getting out her body by a man named Langworthy. The deceased's hat was about an inch under water. There was very little mud where she was standing, and her clothes were up to her knees. Her feet were resting on pieces of dead branches of trees which had sunk to the bottom of the pond. The body was about three feet from the bank, or rather stone wall at the edge of the pond, and the water was about nine inches below the top of the wall, which was level with the pathway. When he took the body out he noticed no marks whatever on it to give the appearance that she had slipped in. The bank at the spot near where the deceased was found did not slope away, but went straight down. He had often seen the deceased take the dog down to the pond to wash the animal. She would throw in a stick and the dog would follow. - A Juryman explained that there were three large pleasure ponds in Mr Dimes's grounds, that the water flowed from one into the other, and that it was in the higher of these ponds that the body was found. - Witness, in reply to further questions, said the water was between five and six feet deep where he took out the body. He saw no marks as if there had been any scramble on the bank. The deceased usually rode out every afternoon, but she had not been out riding for two or three days previous to Monday. Deceased and MR SHORTLAND were married on the Tuesday in Good Friday week, and her husband left on the Thursday. When the deceased was removed from the water she had her gloves on. Her dress was not torn, nor were there any signs of violence about her clothing. - Mr Robert Wills Soper, surgeon, practising at Dartmouth, stated that he had that day made an external examination of the body of the deceased. The only marks of violence he could find were slight abrasions of skin on the left temple and on the right side of the tip of the nose. These would be the result rather of scratches than of heavy blows. There were no heavy marks of violence on any part of the body. Deceased had been so long in the water that he was unable to discover any of the usual effects of drowning, but the appearance of the body was in accordance with death from that cause. The scratches were probably caused by the deceased coming in contact with the wall of the pond. He did not see that any benefit would be derived from making a post-mortem examination. Deceased might have fainted, and fallen into the water, and her being upright when found was doubtless attributable to the fact that her clothes kept her in that position. - William Langworthy, a labourer in Mr Dimes's employ, who assisted the hind Luckraft in taking the body from the pond, corroborated his evidence. He added that there was nothing to shew that the deceased had been pushed or knocked into the pond, and no signs whatever of anything like foul play. - Police-Sergeant William Mills, stationed at Blackawton, stated that on Tuesday, from information he received, he went to Oldstone House, where he saw the deceased. She was then lying in the same state in which she had been taken out of the pond. She was fully dressed, with her hat and gloves on. Witness produced the latter, and a pair of yellow leather riding gloves. He further stated that on deceased's fingers were three rings, and in her pocket was a purse containing 14s. 3 ½d. There was nothing about the deceased's clothing to lead to the supposition that there had been a struggle, or that she had tried to get out of the water. The depth of water where she was found was 6ft. 3in., including about 6in. of mud. He examined the banks of the pond, but could see no signs of a struggle having taken place. When he examined the deceased's temples, on the previous day, there then appeared to be a bruise on them, as if caused by her falling against something, but since the washing of the body this mark had almost disappeared. He had not the slightest ground for suspecting foul play. - The Deputy Coroner, in reviewing the evidence, commented upon the fact that the deceased's husband had written a letter to his wife, as soon as he was able to post it on his way to New Zealand, viz. when he arrived at Brindisi; and, seeing that the parties had been married only a few days when they separated, that seemed the right thing to do, and tended to confirm the statement of Mrs Dimes that MR SHORTLAND and her daughter had up to the time of their parting been on the most affectionate terms. He also pointed out that it had been shewn that the deceased had been in the habit of taking the dog to the pond and that there was no evidence whatever to lead to the supposition that she had been the victim of foul play. At the same time, her mother was unable to throw any light whatever on the sad and mysterious occurrence. Under these circumstances and seeing that there was no one present at the time the deceased came by her death, he did not see that the Jury could do other than give an open verdict. - After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence to shew how she came into the water.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 May 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Camel's Head, Near Devonport. - The Mayor of Saltash (Mr W. Hawke), as Coroner, assisted by the Town Clerk (Mr F. W. P. Cleverton), held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Ferry Hotel, Newpassage, relative to the death of CHARLES WILLIAMS, aged 65, who was found drowned at Camel's Head n the previous day. - LAVINIA WILLIAMS , the wife of the deceased, said that they kept a beer-house at 7 Morice-street, Devonport. Early on Wednesday morning he left home for the purpose of going to a brewery to leave an order there, promising to be home at 8 o'clock to breakfast. Deceased was then well, but of late he had been very much depressed and addicted to excessive drinking. She knew no reason why he was so depressed, and on her asking him to have the doctor, on one occasion, he refused to see anybody, being, he said, all right. - By a Juror: She did not know her husband was in pecuniary difficulties; in fact he had paid a deposit on another public business at Plymouth, into which he was going, having given notice to leave his present house. Her husband was a naval pensioner, with a pension of 17s. per week, and he was possessed also of some house property. There had been some differences between the deceased and a grown-up daughter by a former wife. - James Hatherly, an apprentice residing at Camel's Head, deposed that about nine o'clock on Wednesday morning he was going to work, when he heard someone shouting, and a man who was in a passing wagon told him that there was a man in the water, and asked him to get a rope. He did so, and with the wagoner he ran on to the bridge. The tide was high at the time, and carried the body away from them, so that he could see only the jacket of the deceased, his head and feet being under water. They then got a boat and went after the body, the tide having by this time carried it some distance up the lake in the direction of Weston Mills. It was about half an hour before they recovered the body; and life was then extinct. They towed the corpse ashore, and it was taken to the mortuary at Newpassage. - Miss Ellen Goodman, the schoolmistress at Bull Point, stated that she left her house at West-end Terrace, Camel's Head, shortly before nine in the morning and on nearing the bridge she saw a man get up on the rails. Her attention was called to something else at the time, but on looking again she missed him. When about half way over the bridge she found a black felt hat lying there, with two stones in it and an envelope, on which was written, "MRS L. WILLIAMS, 7 Morice Street, Devonport, near Plymouth." She then looked over the bridge, but could not see anything, and on going to the other side she saw the man in the water face downwards and perfectly motionless. She did not think he was then dead, as only about three minutes had elapsed from the time she first saw him. She saw the deceased walk rapidly on to the bridge and quickly get up on the railings. Immediately on seeing the man in the water she raised an alarm. - P.C. Buscombe, of the Cornwall county Constabulary, stationed at Saltash, spoke to searching the body. He found a pocket comb, pocket knife, a purse containing 3s. 1d., and a "cage" of teeth. - In answer to the Mayor, witness said he made no inquiries as to when the body was brought on shore. No means were taken to attempt to restore life. At the time of his seeing the body at 11 o'clock it was quite warm. - MRS DEW, a daughter of the deceased, said her father came to her house a fortnight ago in a very low and depressed condition, and on being asked what was the matter, he replied, "That woman of mine has spent all my money, and now she wants me to mortgage the house for £200." On asking him about going into the house at Plymouth deceased said, "I shall never go there." On the following morning witness called to see her father, but her stepmother would not let her go upstairs, and told her to come again at three o'clock. She went at that time, and he then told her in the presence of his wife and her daughter, "I did not mean to be living by eleven o'clock this morning." The deceased, she believed, on one occasion had been found asleep on the Admiral's Head beach. The fact of having to borrow £200 to go into the business at Plymouth appeared to depress her father very much. - The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Monday 5 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - Attempted Suicide At Plymouth. - A determined attempt to commit suicide was made on Saturday evening by CLARA STAMP, who resides at 23 Princess-street, Plymouth. On Tuesday last an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner respecting the sudden death of her illegitimate child. The Inquiry was adjourned until next Wednesday in order that a medical examination of the intestines of the deceased might be made. Since then MRS STAMP has appeared to be much depressed but not to such an extent as to alarm her relatives. About 10 p.m. on Saturday she went to eh Lambhay Point and threw herself into the water. She was, however, observed by two men named Lillicrap and Crange, the latter of whom immediately jumped in and held her above water whilst Lillicrap procured assistance. He ran to the Barbican steps and with three watermen, named Edmonds, Kingdom and Harcombe, rowed to Lambhay Point, when Crange and MRS STAMP were rescued and brought on shore. She appeared to be dead, and was taken to the Admiral McBryde public-house. Mr Jefferson, chief boatswain of the Coastguard, hearing the alarm, went to the house and made use of the instructions given by the St. John's Ambulance Association (whose certificate he possesses) for restoring animation. In about twenty minutes' time MRS STAMP regained consciousness. Inspector H. Hill and P.C. Tabb were present and rendered assistance. They took MRS STAMP to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she received medical attention, and up to a late hour last evening was going on favourably. Great praise is due to Mr Crange for the promptitude with which he acted and also to Mr Jefferson and the others who assisted in the rescue.

TOTNES - Shocking Death At Totnes. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at the Plymouth Inn, Totnes, touching the death of JAMES N. HAM, aged 34, a journeyman tailor, who died at his lodgings in High-street on the previous Thursday night. The deceased had been in a consumption, and for the last five weeks he had partially kept his bed. For about a week he had been gradually sinking, and on Thursday night he had become so weak as to be unable to speak or move. He was left alone for a few minutes with a candle burning on a chair near the bed, and on the return of Mrs Crawford, the landlady, she found the bed on fire. Calling for assistance, the bedclothes were removed, and the fire was extinguished, when it was found the deceased was burned on the hands and arms, whilst his beard and whiskers were singed. The poor fellow died in about five minutes after. After the accident the candle was found on the floor and the landlady considered that he must have knocked it down in a "death struggle." - The Jury, of whom Mr R. H. Watson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," it having been stated by the medical man (Dr Hains) that the burns deceased had received would not be sufficient to cause death to a healthy person, though in deceased's condition they might have accelerated it. - The Jury considered that the conduct of Joseph Smith (a fellow lodger) in his attention and kindness to the deceased was worthy of their approbation. The deceased, it is stated, went from Liskeard to Totnes.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 May 1884 TEIGNGRACE - An inquest was held yesterday at the schoolroom, Teigngrace, by Mr S. Hacker, respecting the death of a man named FROST, a thatcher, who was found drowned in a pond near his house on Sunday morning. It appeared that the deceased, who was about 50 years of age, was in the habit of going to the pond to bathe his eyes, and it is supposed that in doing so he fell in and was drowned. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - The Strange Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an adjourned Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of BEATRICE BESSIE DAWE, aged nearly three years, the illegitimate daughter of MRS CLARA STAMP. It may be remembered that at the opening of the Inquiry on the 29th April it was stated that the deceased had complained of being ill on the Monday morning, and consequently she did not go to school in the afternoon. About five o'clock the mother went out to a Mr Ganaway's, leaving the child apparently asleep on the bed, and locking the door. As Mr Ganaway requested her to remain to tea she gave him the key of her room, telling him to fetch the child. He went, and then found the deceased lying on the bed dead. The Inquest was adjourned from the 29th until yesterday, in order that Dr Cash Reed might make an analytical examination of the contents of the stomach. - P.C. Bennett deposed at the resumed Inquiry that on Monday, the 28th ult., at 5.30 in the evening, he was called by Charles Ganaway to 23 Princess-street, where MRS STAMP lived, and he went into her room. She was there with Mrs Ganaway. The child was on the bed, dead, and was lying on its back with the right arm straight by its side. He did not notice the position of the other arm. - Mr Charles Ganaway, recalled, said he had known the mother of the deceased for a number of years, but could not speak as to her habits in regard to drinking. - Dr W. Cash Reed deposed that he was summoned to 23 Princess-street, about six o'clock on the 28th April. He was struck with the position of the child's left arm, which was bent at the wrist, a position, he inferred, that it had been placed in subsequent to death. He had analysed the contents of the stomach, and had tested for six poisons. He found no traces of any poison with the exception of oxalic acid. Of this the traces were very minute, and he could account for them by the vegetable matter which was found in the stomach. Morphia and its effects might have disappeared after a short time. The pupils of the deceased's eyes were not at all contracted; contraction was a symptom of morphia poisoning. He did not see the child until six p.m., and had the child died about three p.m. the contraction might, although that was not probable, have passed away. He could not say whether the congested state of the vessels of the brain was produced by natural causes or by the administration of any poison. He attributed death to the state of the vessels of the brain. He believed morphia to be a principal ingredient in Steadman's soothing powder, but he could not attribute death to such a medicine, as two days before the child had taken a powder, and, therefore, would, in taking a second powder, be able to stand a stronger dose. Convulsions were an exceedingly common cause of death in children, and after death no traces remained. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Boat Accident In Plymouth Sound. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry at the Sailors' Home last evening relative to the death of a training ship boy named BISHOP, aged 15, who was drowned by the capsizing of a boat in the Plymouth Sound on Easter Sunday. Mr J. P. Goldsmith and Mr C. A. Palmer, gunner of H.M.S. Lion, were present and watched the proceedings, the former for the Admiralty and the latter for the ship. - George Edward Thomas, a fisherman, living at 21 Stillman-street, deposed that about ten o'clock on Wednesday morning he was in his boat going to the fishing grounds. When just outside the Batten Breakwater he noticed something floating in the water. He and his mate steered for the spot and found the deceased. They towed the body to the Barbican Pier, where it was taken care of by P.C. Damerell. - Henry Conway, second class boy on board H.M.S. Lion, stated that on Easter Sunday he and four others of the same ship had an afternoon's leave. Their names were J. H. Bishop, Joseph Henry Hughes, W. Sims and S. Lockwood. On the proposition of Bishop, it was decided to spend the afternoon boating and accordingly they all five proceeded to Moon Cove and hired a sailing boat from Messrs. Francis and Burrington. They got it from the latter, who did not question them as to their ability to swim or anything else. The boat was a four-oared one, about sixteen feet long, and but without any ballast. They were furnished with a sprit sail. With the exception of BISHOP and Sims they could all swim. On leaving Moon Cove they made for the Sound going out on the eastern side of Drake's Island. The weather was very squally, but witness could not say in what direction the wind was blowing. He had the charge of the sheet, and had got it twisted once around the hook, with the slack in his hand. BISHOP was sitting on the starboard side of the boat and opposite to the witness. They safely reached the outer buoy in the Sound, and did not experience any "crankiness" in the boat. When out as far as this buoy, they found the sea was in great turmoil. As the boat was then making dangerous lurches, witness proposed their return, and this suggestion being agreed to, they were turning, when the accident happened. Witness told Lockwood, who was steering, to put the tiller "hard over" and he (witness) only partly slackened the sheet. The effect of this was that the boat began to turn about very swiftly in the water, and at times was tossed about in a dangerous manner. Seeing this witness told all hands to keep their seats. Immediately BISHOP fell against him, and he (witness) was knocked overboard. He sank and on rising saw all the boys, with the exception of BISHOP clinging to the boat which had capsized. Witness had heard that when he fell into the water BISHOP also did so, and that in trying to rescue him Lockwood had overturned the boat. About twenty minutes later they were all, except BISHOP picked up by a boat. Nothing more was seen of BISHOP, who they supposed had been drowned. Witness identified the body at the mortuary as being that of the deceased lad. - P.C. Damerell, stationed at the Plymouth Barbican, said the body of the deceased was landed at the steps of the pier by the first witness, at about 11 o'clock on Wednesday morning. It was very much decomposed, and witness at once took it to the mortuary. He had in his possession a silk handkerchief, on which was the name, "J. H. BISHOP." A small bag was also found containing 4s. 4d. - Mr Brian, in summing up, remarked that it was a pity the lads had gone out boating on such a squally afternoon. Perhaps owners of boats considered sailor boys as amphibious animals, and as capable of managing a boat in any weather. The Coroner went on to comment on the fact that the owner of the boat did not question the lads as to their capability for managing it, and Mr Brian remarked further that he did not think it justifiable for owners to let out boats that did not contain ballast. - Mr Francis, one of the owners, stated that the boat hired by the lads had an iron keel, and, therefore, required no ballast; besides that the sail provided was very small. - Mr C. A. Palmer, of the Lion, remarked that since the accident boys in the service who could not swim were prohibited going out in sailing boats, and those who could swim were cautioned as to the boat they engaged and in regard to the weather. - A verdict of "Death by Accidentally Drowning" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 May 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Foresters' Arms, Albert-road, Morice Town, relative to the death of FRANCES ROSE CROSSE, the infant daughter of a naval seaman living at 119 Albert-road. The mother with the deceased only came to Devonport on Wednesday from Ottery St. Mary, where the latter had been under medical treatment. On Friday she was taken unwell and the mother sent for Mr Gard, surgeon, but before his arrival the child died. In Mr Gard's opinion death was due to infantile convulsions caused by the pain of teething, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquest, relative to the death of JOHN TOWL, labourer, 53 years of age, was held at the Harvest Home Hotel, Plymouth, last evening. From the evidence of John Harvey, a dairyman, in the employ of Miss Dicker, of Market-alley, under whom the deceased also worked, it appears that on the 30th of April TOWL was conveying a sack of bran on his back into a loft about ten feet from the ground, when the ladder he was ascending slipped and he fell to the ground. He seemed to be very much hurt by the fall, but did not discontinue work for that and the following day. He, however, gradually grew worse, and died from the effects of the accident on the 11th inst. After he ceased work Mr Henry Greenway, surgeon, was called to see him, and on examination that gentleman found that deceased's ribs had been fractured. Inflammation subsequently set it and death was the result. Mr Greenway stated that he had no difficulty whatever in connecting the death with the accident which preceded it. - Mr John Parnell was the Foreman of the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They suggested that in future the ladder leading to the loft from which the deceased fell should be made a fixture to prevent similar accidents.

EXETER - Shocking Death From Burning At Exeter. - An Inquest was held by the Exeter City Coroner yesterday touching the death of ELIZABETH SERLE, aged 16 years, who met with her end on the previous day under the most painful circumstances. Deceased, who resided with her parents in Hicks's-court, Bartholomew-street, went downstairs in her nightdress on Sunday morning for the purpose of lighting the kitchen fire. A few minutes afterwards her mother heard loud screams and on going downstairs found the deceased enveloped in flames. She did her best to extinguish them and the poor girl in her agony rushed out of doors, when some of the neighbours came to her assistance. The garments she had on were, however, completely consumed before she could be divested of them, and the deceased was frightfully burned all over the body. She was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and died in that Institution during the afternoon. It is supposed that the deceased in order to make the fire burn quickly had poured some benzoline from a lamp in the grate, and that in doing so she had spilled a quantity of the spirit on her clothing, which took fire in striking a match. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sad Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr Coroner Brian held an Inquest at the Lord Ebrington Inn, Plymouth, last evening, touching the death of GEORGE DOWN, aged 22, who had destroyed himself. - Mr John Sydenham, a baker, stated that the deceased was in the employ of Mr C. S. Vincent as baker and confectioner. Witness left him on Monday evening at 6.30 tending the horses, when he appeared to be very much downcast. At dinner time the deceased said, "I've had a blooming row at home with my mother respecting a letter" (produced). He thought the letter had been opened, and when at home his mother called him a ---- rogue. Deceased complained of this to the witness, and said, "If I had been a drunkard and stopped out of a night she might have called me so," adding "I wish I was a hundred miles away." He then left witness to go his "rounds." On the following morning he was missing, and witness, going in search of him, entered a loft in the stables, and there found him hanging from a beam, his feet being about two feet from the ground. He raised an alarm, and a man named Wilkes came up, but neither of them had the presence of mind to cut down the body. Deceased was anxious to get the men to read the letter, but all declined. - Police-Sergeant Wood spoke to being called to the stables in Garden-street by Mr Vincent, and to cutting down the deceased. The rope was passed twice around the beam, and also round deceased's neck. Sergeant Wood searched the body, and found the letter referred to, a pocket-book, and several bills belonging to Mr Vincent. - MRS DOWN, the deceased's mother, deposed to a great change in the temper of the deceased, who was greatly agitated by his "young woman" breaking off an engagement. On Monday witness and the deceased had a quarrel respecting a letter which he alleged had been opened. As he had caused many "rows" for some weeks past, witness told him that if he did not stop them he would have to get lodgings. He was a very zealous follower of the Tabernacle, Plymouth, and it was very unusual for him to use bad language, which he did in the "tiff" with witness. The following statement in the deceased's handwriting was found on the body:-- "Fair well, Fair well, good friends far and near. I am sorry to leave you, but you must forgive me to leave you all here but I am only going home to heaven above where all is love there be no parting there - Here in the body pent, Absent from him I roam, Yet nightly pitch my moving tent, The day's march nearer home. - GEORGE DOWN. - Mr Vincent, Dear Master, I am sorry to leave you in this sort of way but sir will you grant me my last request and that is to let my horse follow me to the grave and to be led behind my funerall by a friend off mine a baker called W. Jutson off Park-street, Plymouth. I love my horse who is faithful and true who ever drives her next tell them not to serve her bad for my sake, I never served her bad, I hope she never will be served bad. - Mr Brian summed up to the Jury, and was about concluding, when Mr Purdy (a Juror) jumped up, and said he thought it a great neglect on the part of the man who first found the deceased in not cutting him down, and if it were possible he should like to propose a vote of censure. - Mr Brian: I think it would be better for the verdict to be found first. - Mr Purdy: We have heard you out, and we have not been summoned here to hold our tongues, and you don't dictate to us. - Mr Brian: Silence, sir, silence, take your seat, and hold your tongue. I do not wish to dictate to the Jury, and in charging them I was only doing my duty in merely advising them as to their verdict. (To the Coroner's Officer), Mr Manning, mind you never have that man on a Jury again. - Mr Purdy: If I was wrong sir, I beg to submit. - Mr Brian: Sit down, sir. - Mr Vincent then spoke of the good character of the deceased, and said he had not noticed anything strange in him. - The Jury having returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide by Hanging himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, Mr Brian remarked that that was the time for a Juror to offer any presentment. But before doing so he wished to tell them that with regard to Mr Sydenham not cutting down the body at once, he had his wife lying dead at the time, and he did not leave the place exactly without anyone being there, as two men quickly went in, and the whole transaction was only of about five minutes'' duration. After a little further conversation, Mr Purdy said he begged the Coroner's pardon. He withdrew his remarks and he hoped Mr Sydenham would not take any notice of them. The Inquiry then concluded.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident To A Driver In Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest last evening at the Guildhall relative to the death of JOHN DYER, a cart driver, employed by Mr John Freeman, tramways contractor. Mr Charles Henry Coles, a builder, living at 8 Regent-street, said that on Friday morning, about half-past nine, he was walking along Regent-street, when he saw a horse and cart going at a great pace. The deceased was endeavouring to stop the horse. A hay cart just ahead was promptly taken up a bye-street, thus preventing a collision. The horse stepped on the deceased's foot, tearing off part of his boot. He held on for a little while, and then suddenly let go. He was immediately knocked down on his back and the horse, rushing on, drew the cart over his left shoulder and arm. Witness ran to his assistance and he was taken in a cab to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Robert Collier, a cabman, of Mannamead, saw the horse and cart outside a saddler's shop in Tavistock-place. Deceased came out of the saddler's shop with a gimblet with which he commenced to make repairs in the harness. He took off the whole of the head-gear and this caused the horse to "bolt." Mr W. Buchan, the house surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, stated that the deceased was received at the Institution shortly before ten o'clock on Friday morning, suffering from a compound fracture of the left humerus. About one o'clock, on Monday morning death occurred; but witness could not account for it without a post-mortem examination, as the injury to the shoulder would only be the indirect cause. Witness had made such an examination. In the pulmonary artery a clot of blood was found, which was quite sufficient to cause death. The clot would not have been there but for the injury to the arm. - Mr W. H. Smith, Foreman to Mr Freeman, said the horse was a quiet one and he could only account for the accident by the fact that the bridle was suddenly removed. The deceased was a most careful and able driver; indeed, he was the best Mr Freeman had ever had. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Lord Clarendon Inn last evening by the Plymouth Coroner touching the death of a coachman named ALFRED STEVENS, who expired suddenly in the bar of Crowhurst's Queen's Arms. he had been treated for some time past for heart disease. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 May 1884 ASHBURTON - The Suicide At Ashburton. - Mr Hacker, Coroner, has held an Inquest at Ashburton touching the death of JOHN FOOT, who had committed suicide in his carpenter's workshop, as already reported in the Western Morning News. - Mrs Downton, whose mother was married to the deceased some years ago, spoke to having heard FOOT ask a neighbour's boy on Thursday morning to take the ladder from where it was kept and carry it to the workshop. - Elias Easterbrook, a neighbour, stated that on hearing the alarm given he ran to the workshop, where he saw deceased stooping forward with his feet on the ground, and with a rope around his neck attached to the beam, eight feet high. The ladder was resting against the beam. - The widow of the deceased said that her husband had been afflicted and unable to work for six months, and was on that account very low-spirited. Mr Fraser, surgeon, having stated that FOOT had died from dislocation of the neck and not from suffocation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 May 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr W. Harrison, the Plymouth Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon respecting the death of W. J. GLOYN, aged 25 years, of 16 High-street. From the evidence given by the widow it appeared that the first time deceased complained of being ill was early on Saturday morning, when he suffered from a severe pain in the head. On Sunday he grew worse and MRS GLOYN thinking he was suffering from yellow jaundice went to Mr Jones, chemist and got a bottle of medicine. This, however, did him no good and he died about 3.15 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. Dr Cash Reed also gave evidence to the effect that he examined the deceased and was of opinion that he died in a fit. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Burning At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening relative to the death of CHARLOTTE SOUTHWOOD, a married woman, aged 26, who had been fatally injured by burns. - EDWARD SOUTHWOOD, a coloured man, working as a labourer in the dockyard, stated that the deceased was the wife of his son, who was now in Liverpool. She rented two rooms at 6 King-street, and he lodged with her. Her husband within the last few months deserted from the Navy, and had been sent to prison, and the half-pay he allowed her was stopped. Since then she had been worried a great deal and been despondent and lately witness did not think she was quite right in her mind. She had hallucination that a man was staring at her whenever she looked out of the window, and was altogether strange in her manner. Witness went to bed at eleven o'clock on Saturday night, and the deceased, who slept in another bed in the same room, had already retired. He left a small paraffin lamp alight, with the wick turned low, in case the deceased should want to take her medicine, which she had obtained from a chemist. At about one o'clock in the morning he was awoke from his sleep by cries of "Oh! father; Oh! father," and saw his daughter-in-law enveloped in a mass of flames walking towards him. he got up and pushed her away with his hand, burning it n the act and upsetting the table with the lamp. She sat down upon the bedside twice and he pulled her off each time to prevent the bed igniting. He also tried to pull off portions of the burning garment, but he did not think of throwing any woollen article around the deceased to extinguish the flames. He called for assistance, and some of the neighbours coming to his aid the flames were put out. Mr H. Hinvest, surgeon, was fetched and he applied remedies for the burns, and ordered the woman's removal to the Hospital. He was with the deceased for over an hour on Sunday afternoon at the Hospital, but she did not say how her clothes caught fire. Connecting her recent strange behaviour with the occurrence, he was of opinion that she set herself on fire. - Nurse Jane Greet stated that the deceased was admitted to the Hospital at about two o'clock on Sunday morning. She was suffering from severe burns, and lingered until the evening when she expired. She was in too great pain to be able to make any statement as to the occurrence. - Arthur Dyer, a labourer, living at 6 King-street, deposed to going to the deceased's room just after one o'clock on Sunday morning in response to her father-in-law's calls for assistance. The flames were then extinguished. The Coroner, in summing up, said death was undoubtedly due to the effects of burning, caused either by accident or design, but he was by no means satisfied that it was a case of suicide. - The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from burning, but that there was no evidence to shew how her clothes became ignited.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 June 1884 BARNSTAPLE - An inquest was held at Barnstaple last evening touching the death of a Braunton labourer named WILLIAMS, who died at the Infirmary on Saturday from injuries received the previous Tuesday. Deceased was leading a horse past a steam-engine which some horses were drawing. The animal became frightened, bolted and deceased was knocked under one of the wheels of his cart, which passed over the middle of his body. "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 June 1884 EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of SOPHIA CHENNOEUR, wife of a brushmaker, living at 3 Friernhay-street. On the previous night the husband was aroused by his wife, who said "I'm going to a better land," and immediately expired. The verdict was to the effect that she had died from Heart Disease.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 June 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Sergeant At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner or Devonport, held an Inquest at the Military Hospital, Stoke, on Saturday relative to the death of SERGEANT HUGH COUSINS, of the Highland Light Infantry who had committed suicide at the Hospital as already reported. Staff-Sergeant Arberter, chief ward-master of the Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted as an in-patient late on Sunday night, suffering from slight fever. On Tuesday morning about half-past two o'clock a messenger came to him with the report that COUSINS had cut his throat. Witness went to the ward and found the deceased lying on his back on the bed. On examining him he saw a rather deep cut about two inches in length across the windpipe. The bleeding had been stopped and the doctor sewed up the wound. Witness afterwards went to the water-closet where the act was committed, and discovered a pool of blood on the floor. Deceased had no razor of his own, not having brought on in his kit, but ever other patient in the ward had a razor, and the deceased took one during the night, unknown to the owner. A patient who was considered dangerous was put in a separate ward, and every article with which he could possibly injure himself was taken away from him. COUSINS died on Friday. He had been into the Hospital several times during the last few months. - Lance-Sergeant Cooper, depot, D.C.L.I., a patient in the same ward as the deceased, deposed that he was awoke early on Tuesday morning by the door opening, and heard the deceased walk into the room. Hearing him breathing peculiarly witness spoke to him and COUSINS walked over to witness's bed and sat down upon it. Cooper then saw that his throat was cut and awoke some other patients, who took the deceased back to his bed and fetched the orderly. Witness was with the deceased during the Monday, but did not notice anything strange about him. He made no complaint, except that he could not sleep. - Captain R. Goold Adams, Highland Light Infantry, stated that the deceased was in his company, to which he had recently been transferred. He was a sergeant in the regiment 10 years since, but had been reduced to the ranks and was made a sergeant again last October. Deceased was with the regiment in the Egyptian campaign, and he was very much disappointed at not being recommended for the clasp of Tel-el-Kebir. There was no doubt that this to some extent preyed upon his mind. Personally he did not know much about him, but from the reports he had received from the other officers there was no doubt he was addicted to drink and was not a good sergeant. On Sunday night he was put under arrest by the colour-sergeant for being unfit to do his duty through the effects of drink, and an official report was made afterwards that COUSINS had been taken to the Hospital suffering from delirium tremens. Had he lived to have come out of Hospital he would have been placed under arrest for neglect of duty. - Surgeon W. Allin, Army Medical Department, spoke to attending the deceased after he had cut his throat. COUSINS was quite composed and rational, and, when able to speak, expressed regret for what he had done. He said he had a load of trouble on his mind and did not know what he was doing when he committed the act. At first witness thought he would recover, but his constitution was undermined by drink and he died from exhaustion. Witness's impression was that he committed the deed under the impulse of the moment. He was not suffering from delirium tremens when he was admitted. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Drink And Suicide At Plymouth. "Found Drowned." - The Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquiry on Saturday into the death of EMILY FREEMAN, aged about 50 years, who was found dead in the ladies' bathing pool, under the Hoe, on Saturday morning. The deceased was a seamstress and the widow of an army pensioner. - Ellen Ball, daughter of Walter Bell, merchant captain, 22 Hoe-street, stated that about 7.30 that morning she went to the ladies' bathing place to bathe. - As she proceeded down the steps she saw something lying in the water, and on approaching it she found it to be the body of a woman, quite dead. Witness gave the alarm, and shortly afterwards the policeman on duty came down and took charge of the body. - P.C. Shepherd, who was on duty above the bathing-place on Saturday morning, stated that at 7.15 he was called to the water's edge, where he found deceased lying on her face on the bottom of the basin about a foot under water. She had no bonnet or shawl on, nor were there any garments on the rocks. The body was removed to the mortuary, and upon it was found an empty oil flask, which smelt of paraffin, and a needle-book containing five pawn tickets, and a card shewing that she had signed a total abstinence pledge two months ago. - Sarah Easton, 23 High-street, stated that deceased had lived in her house a week. At four o'clock on Saturday morning witness saw deceased go into the water closet. On the previous evening deceased had been helplessly drunk, and when she entered the closet she appeared to be still suffering from the effects of her debauch. Witness did not see her afterwards. - Elizabeth Eagles, 2 Edgcumbe-place, Millbay, deposed that she knew EMILY FREEMAN, who was much addicted to drink. Witness employed the deceased to do work for her, but she repeatedly pawned the materials. This had occurred that week and on Friday afternoon she found the deceased drunk in a public-house with ale before her, and told her if she did not return the goods she (witness) would have to put the matter in the hands of the police. FREEMAN promised to go and redeem the articles, and witness waited three hours for her at the house in High-street, but she did not return. Deceased had been a teetotaller for five years, but had recently relapsed into bad habits. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" and expressed an opinion that there was no reflection whatever upon Mrs Eagles.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 June 1884 PLYMOUTH - Shocking Fatality At Plymouth. - Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr t. C. Brian, held an Inquest at bishop's West Hoe Hotel last evening into the death of a boy named WILLIAM THOMAS RICE, 13, who was mangled in a sawing machine at the works of Messrs. Fox, Elliott, and Co., timber merchants, Millbay. The chief witness was a labourer named Ogden, who was employed near the scene of the fatality in sending out deals that had been cut. A man named Wenmouth was actually in charge of the machine, the deceased standing near to assist in drawing the planks as they were cut. The man Wenmouth was at the front feeding the machine with timber, whilst the deceased was the other side; thus Wenmouth could not see either the accident or the cause of it. Directly under the frame of the machine was a hole eighteen by thirty inches, through which the frame and a connecting rod passed with great rapidity, but the boy's duties would in no way necessitate his going near this hole. Ogden was only about five feet from, and with his back to the machine, when he heard the deceased scream. He instantly rushed to him - the machine having then been stopped - and saw his body disappearing through the hole. Ogden looked down and saw the body was literally torn in pieces. He thought the deceased had slipped and was at once drawn down the shaft. - Thomas Alfred Joliffe, foreman of the saw mills, said deceased had only occasionally been engaged at the machine when the accident occurred. He concurred in the opinion that the deceased must have slipped and so been drawn into the machinery. It had been decided to place a guard around the machines. - In answer to a Juryman witness admitted the possibility of the flooring around the machine being oily. - Mr Brian thought the reply to the question of a Juryman was a solution of the whole affair, although he had noticed a quantity of sawdust around the spot. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating all persons from blame, and at the same time expressing a desire that a guard should be placed around the machine. It may be mentioned that although the firm of Messrs. Fox, Eliott and company has existed for nearly 20 years, yesterday's accident was the first fatal one that has occurred.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Barnstaple Coroner on the old man WILLIAM WESTACOTT, who died at the Infirmary from injuries sustained by being knocked down a fortnight since by a hansom-cab, the wheel of which passed over his leg. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but added a rider that cabmen should be more careful when driving through a crowd of people.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 June 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE COLES, aged 40, a naval pensioner, who committed suicide on the previous day. - Elizabeth Cook, a married woman, living at 38 Clarence-place, Morice Town, stated that the deceased lodged with her. He was very steady, but had lately been in the Royal Naval Hospital suffering from nervous debility. Prior to his going to the Hospital he attempted to make away with himself by getting out of an upstair window, and had to be constantly watched. He, however, never threatened to commit suicide, and since he had been out of the Hospital he had been very quiet. Witness went out on Tuesday for the day, but she asked some friends to go in and see him during her absence. - James Farell, naval boatswain, stated that he went to the deceased's residence at a quarter-past eleven o'clock on Tuesday morning to see him. After knocking, he opened the door and went upstairs and saw COLES lying on the floor in a pool of blood and a knife near him. Witness saw that the deceased's throat was cut and after tying a towel round it to stop the bleeding he sent for Mr May, surgeon, and also for a cab, and, by Mr May's directions, had the deceased removed to the Hospital, where he expired immediately on arrival. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 June 1884 EXETER - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Exeter yesterday at an Inquest on the body of a man named JAMES MCNISBEY, who received fatal injuries at St. David's Station on the 19th December last. Deceased was engaged with other men in transferring a cable from the broad to the narrow gauge when he slipped and fell from a truck on his head. It was found that he had received injuries to his spine, from the effects of which he died on Thursday last.

DAWLISH - "Found Drowned" was the verdict found by a Coroner's Jury at Dawlish yesterday in the case of WALTER CHORLEY, who was taken from the water near the Breakwater on the previous day. The evidence given threw no light upon the precise manner in which deceased met his death. His wife stated that he might have had pecuniary difficulties, but they were not serious, and had not worried him.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 June 1884 PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Alleged Concealment Of Birth At Mutley. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Hyde Park Hotel, Mutley, into the death of the newly-born illegitimate female child of EMMA JANE HATHERLEY, a domestic servant. On the 9th inst. HATHERLEY entered into the service of Mrs Osborne, 7 Hyde Park-road, as a general servant. Her mistress noticed her condition and questioned her. HATHERLEY denied the imputation of pregnancy and said she was dropsical. She did her work all right up to last Saturday, when Mrs Osborne was continually missing her. In the evening she was again accused, and her mistress told her she would have to leave her service. HATHERLEY did not finish her work until ten o'clock on Saturday evening. On Sunday morning she rose between 7.30 and 8 o'clock and went about her work as usual. Her mistress, on going downstairs, saw indications which led her to believe that she had been confined during the night. Mrs Osborne asked her if such was the case, and she flatly denied it. On going to the servant's room, however, Mrs Osborn's suspicions were amply confirmed, although no child could be found. HATHERLEY, who was very weak, was put to bed, and Mr Sedley Wolferstan, surgeon, was sent for. On his arriving at the house he attended to her and found the body of the child in the box in which she kept her clothes. Mrs Osborne, in her evidence, stated that she slept in a room adjoining the servant's chamber, and she did not hear any cry whatever during Saturday night. - Mr Wolferstan said he made a post-mortem examination of the body of deceased, who was a fully matured child. There were no external marks of violence on the body, nor were there any signs of decomposition. The umbilical cord had been torn, and was not tied. The internal organs were all healthy. On testing the lungs in the usual way witness found that the child had breathed, although respiration had not been completely established. He was of opinion that the infant had not had a separate existence from its mother, and that it did not live because there had been an absence of necessary care and attention at birth. - The Coroner said that the medical evidence had made the duty of the Jury very simple. They had nothing to do with the concealment of birth - that was a matter for the consideration of the magistrates. There was no evidence to shew that the child had lived after being born, and the only course was to return a verdict of "Found Dead." - The Jury, of which Mr T. Moule was Foreman, acted as the Coroner directed. - The girl HATHERLEY is now at Mrs Osborne's residence, and the surgeon states that she cannot be moved for several days. When sufficiently recovered she will be taken before the county magistrates at Roborough on a charge of concealment of birth. She is 22 years of age and a native of Tamerton. Previously to living with Mrs Osborne she was employed by Mr Phillips, a farmer, of Plympton, from whom she received an excellent character.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 June 1884 EXETER - Two Inquests were held before the Exeter city Coroner (Mr Hooper) yesterday. The first was on the body of a young woman named ROSS HAYDON, aged 18 years, who died suddenly on Wednesday morning. The evidence shewed that deceased died in a fit, to many of which she had long been subject. The Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

The second Inquiry was in reference to the death of WILLIAM SQUIRES, a farmer's son, of Clannaborough, near Bow, who died on Tuesday from injuries received whilst ploughing on the 5th of May. Whilst thus employed the horses were frightened by the appearance of three soldiers in the field. The deceased was knocked down and was wounded on the left side by the share of the plough. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and was considered to be recovering until Saturday last when he was seized with severe pains in the abdomen. Convulsions supervened, and the deceased died from exhaustion. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 June 1884 HONITON - Fatal Bathing Accident At Honiton. - On Saturday morning, about half-past six o'clock a young man named JAMES WALTERS was drowned whilst bathing in the river Otter. It appears that he and a companion named Landsdown were bathing together, when suddenly Landsdown lost sight of WALTERS. Not being able to find him he raised an alarm. After some time the billiard marker at the Dolphin Hotel dived and brought the body up. WALTERS was a tailor by trade, and was a young man of quiet habits and disposition. The Inquest was held at the Townhall at seven o'clock on Saturday evening before the Coroner, Mr Spencer M. Cox, Mr Sutton being Foreman. The verdict was one of "Accidental Death whilst Bathing."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Boat Accident In Hamoaze. Recovery Of A Body. The Inquest. - Soon after midday on Saturday the body of EMMA HOSKINGS, the unfortunate young woman, who, with a Jew named Fredman, was drowned through the collision between the Vivid and the boat they were in off Mount Wise, a fortnight ago, was picked up in the Hamoaze. The body was first observed by Joseph Bishop, the captain of the Torpoint Ferry Bridge, floating face downwards about a third of the distance off from Torpoint. The bridge at the time was going towards Torpoint and the body, as it was borne up by the flood tide, floated past the ferry scarcely more than a boat's length ahead. Bishop hailed a boat in which Joseph Dennis, the engineer of the Torpoint steam launch Link, was putting off to his vessel, and Dennis at once secured the body with a rope and towed it ashore at Newpassage, where it was taken charge of by Police-Sergeant Harper, and conveyed to the mortuary. The body was much decomposed, the features being totally unrecognisable, but the father of the deceased, as well as others who knew her, had no difficulty in identifying it both by the clothes and the hair. - In the evening the Mayor of Saltash (Mr W. Hawke) opened an Inquest at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, on the body. A Jury of fourteen, of whom Mr J. P. French was chosen Foreman, was empanelled. Inspector James, of the Metropolitan Police, watched the proceedings on behalf of the naval authorities. The Coroner, in opening, remarked that this was a very important matter which they were called upon to investigate, and as they would undoubtedly have to adjourn the Inquiry, he proposed that evening merely to take formal evidence to enable him to give an order for the burial of the body without delay. Before commencing, however, he asked them to disabuse their minds of what they had heard and read, and to wait before forming any opinion until they had heard all the evidence which would be brought before them. He would take care that all the evidence that could be got on either side should be laid before them. - The first witness called was THOMAS HOSKINGS, a shoemaker, living at 4 Monument-street, who stated that the deceased was his daughter. She was a single woman, and thirty years of age last May. He last saw her alive on Saturday, the 7th inst., when she came to his house. At that time she lived somewhere in Stonehouse, where he did not know, but he believed it was in High-street. Witness was questioned as to how she got her living, but he professed that he did not know. She was not a domestic servant. He happened to be at Mount Wise n the following Sunday afternoon, and witnessed the collision between the Vivid and a pleasure boat, of which he had since learnt his daughter was an occupant, though he was not aware of the fact at the time. His attention was occupied chiefly by the steamer. He knew one of the sailors who was in the boat, but he did not know his name, nor was he acquainted with any of the others. - A Juror asked witness if he had any idea how the accident occurred. - Witness replied that the steamer and the boat seemed to run into each other. - The Juror: had you any idea, as a disinterested party at the time, that it was the fault of those in the boat or the steamer? - Witness replied that at the time he considered it was the fault of both. - William F. Clark, licensed waterman, stated that he was present when the body of the deceased was brought ashore at the Pottery Quay. He assisted to land it, and at once identified it as that of EMMA HOSKINGS, whom he had known in her lifetime. On Sunday the 8th, he saw the deceased at a quarter past twelve in the afternoon, in her room at 11 High-street, Stonehouse. She was dressing herself and conversing with a sailor, one of the men who afterwards went out in the boat with her. He heard them talking of going out in a boat. Both the deceased and the sailor were then quite sober. he did not see the accident. No further evidence was taken and the Inquest was adjourned until 6.30 o'clock this evening.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 June 1884 NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Railway Accident At Newton. - Early yesterday morning a man named JAMES RENOLDS, aged 21 years, employed at the Great Western Railway Station at Newton Abbot, was crossing the railway near the workshops with a bag of coal on a barrow when he was knocked down by a goods train which was being shunted, and several trucks passing over his legs he was killed instantly. An Inquest was held on the body last evening, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatality In Hamoaze. The Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of EMMA HOSKINGS, the young woman who was drowned through the collision between the Vivid and a pleasure boat in Hamoaze, was resumed by the Mayor of Saltash, at the Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, last evening. Mr J. J. E. Venning attended on behalf of the naval authorities, and Staff-Commander Gravener of the Vivid, and Captain Carter, of the Royal Adelaide were also present. Mr T. C. Brian watched the proceedings in the interest of the relatives of the deceased. All the witnesses, with the exception of Commander Gravener, were ordered out of the room. - The evidence taken on Saturday having been read over, THOMAS HOSKINGS, father of the deceased, was recalled at the request of Mr Brian, in answer to whom he stated that he was standing at the top of the hill at Mount Wise when he witnessed the collision between the Vivid and the boat. From that point he could command a view of Devil's Point, and the entrance to the harbour. Before the collision his attention was attracted to the Vivid, but he did not notice the boat before the accident. To him the steamer appeared to be coming at a fair speed. The collision took place a few yards from the Vivid's moorings. From the direction the Vivid took he and others near him thought she was going towards the dockyard. She went beyond Mount Wise steps in the direction of the Dockyard. When the collision took place the Vivid's bows were pointing towards Mount Wise. Between the time the Vivid passed Devil's Point and that at which the collision took place, he did not think she slackened her speed. - Wm. Frank Hawke, alias Lang, a mason's labourer living at 11 High-street, Stonehouse, stated that at four o'clock on the afternoon of Sunday, the 8th inst., he and others borrowed a boat from Mr Webber at Richmond-walk. With him were a sailor, the deceased, EMMA HOSKINGS, a Jew named Fredman, Ernest Willis, Lydia Lukey. They went for a sail towards Cremyll, with only one sail up. Bradshaw was steering. Witness did not understand the management of a boat. On the way the Vivid overtook them and ran the boat down. they were going towards Cremyll and before they had time to get past her the Vivid came on top of them. The steamer was a few yards off when he saw her. They were not tacking the boat, but were going straight from Richmond Walk towards Cremyll. They had not time to do anything before the Vivid was upon them. As far as he knew nothing was done to alter the boat's course. The bow of the steamer struck the boat near the centre and she swung round under the paddle-box. One side of the boat came out, and the occupants were thrown into the water. He sank twice, and was picked up by someone with a boat-hook. The deceased was sitting next to him and had hold of him by the wrist when the boat was struck. He saw nothing of her afterwards. All his companions were perfectly sober. Whilst he was with them neither of them had anything to drink. - By Mr Venning: He was sitting in the stern of the boat on one side and looking towards Cremyll. Bradshaw was sitting in the stern sheets and steering. He saw nothing of the steamer until she was upon them. - By Mr Brian: He did not recollect whether the boat had passed the Mount Wise steps. He did not think the steamer was more than 20 or 30 yards off when he first saw her. She was going fast. There was not time for the boat to get out of the way between the time they first sighted the Vivid and the moment she struck the boat. There was nothing they could have done to avoid the Vivid. The boat was struck on the left side. Did not hear anyone hailing them from the steamer. There was no skylarking in the boat. All were sitting except Willis, who was standing beside the mast all the time they were in the boat. - By the Jury: The boat was on the starboard tack. He did not recollect whether any of the other occupants gave notice of the approach of the steamer. - Wm. Butland, stoker, serving on board the Indus, stated that he was an occupant of the boat. They intended, when they started, to go into the Sound. When he first saw the Vivid they were steering across to Cremyll. The steamer at that time about 100 yards off. He did not understand the management of the boat. When he saw the steamer he did not tell the others that she was coming. He was sitting in the bows with his back towards her. The Vivid struck the boat on the port side. The anchor in the bow of the steamer caught the boat's sail. he did not know at what rate the Vivid was going, but the paddle wheels were not stopped, and the steamer was still going ahead. He did not hear anyone call out to them. He was saved by the Vivid's boat. Those in the boat were all sober, and there was no skylarking. All were sitting at the time. There was no confusion in the boat before the Vivid struck them. - By Mr Brian: The Vivid, when he first saw her, was coming straight towards the boat at a good speed. He had not been previously examined by anyone about the accident. he did not know whether, between the time the Vivid was sighted and the boat was struck, the latter could have got out of the way of the steamer. He did not call out that the steamer was coming, because he thought the boat was clear of her. - By Mr Venning: Did not know whether the boat's course was altered or not. - By the Jury: could not say whether the Vivid altered her course after he saw her. - Samuel Bradshaw, able seaman of the Defence, stated that he was in the boat with the deceased. He understood the management of a boat. The boat was a large one, about 20 feet long, and 5 feet beam, built for sailing. Witness was steering, and could command a view of Devil's Point from where he was sitting. The Vivid, when he first saw her, was about 150 or 200 yards distant. Witness kept on his course, thinking the Vivid would give way to him. When the steamer was about 100 yards off, and he found she was not giving way, he brought the boat up as far as he could to the wind, expecting that the steamer would pass astern of him. The wind was about north-west. he could not tell whether the Vivid altered her course. he told those in the boat to keep still and not move. He could not tell whether anyone stood up. Previously, they had been moving about changing sides, and he had to caution them to be quiet. This occurred about three minutes before the Vivid struck them. If he had not altered his course the Vivid would still have run into the boat. He could not say whether the steamer's paddles were stopped when the boat was struck. He did not hear any alarm given from the Vivid. Witness saved himself by climbing up over the paddle-box. - By Mr Venning: He was quite sure when he altered the course of the boat that he put her up to the wind. He was quite sober. He had been spending the afternoon walking and had three glasses of ale before half-past two o'clock. - By the Coroner: there was no skylarking in the boat. - By Mr Brian: He was at present a patient in the Royal Naval Hospital, suffering from injuries received through the accident. He had previously made two statements concerning the occurrence. One was to the captain of the Defence in the sick bay. Besides the captain, the commander, doctor and captain'[s writer were present. Staff-Commander Gravener was not present. That was on Monday morning. No one else who was in the boat at the time was present. The next examination was in the Hospital before a paymaster, who was sent by the admiral, and took his statement down in writing. When in the water he dived for Lydia Lukey, and put her on the paddle. The Vivid, when first sighted, was just abaft the boat's port beam. As far as he could judge she was going at three-quarter's speed. He knew that when a steamer and a sailing boat were likely to come into collision, it was the duty of the steamer to give way. Accordingly he waited to see if the Vivid would give way. His only chance when she did not was to luff up to the wind. He should not like to swear that the Vivid did not give way, but she did not appear to him to do so. Seeing that she did not give way he knew that the result would be a collision. When he luffed up to the wind he felt sure it was too late to avoid the Vivid, which was then close down upon them. By luffing up he saved the boat from being cut in two by the Vivid, but she was broken up by the paddle wheel. There was nothing that he could have done to avert the collision. He should not like to say that the Vivid could have avoided the boat, as there were so many small pleasure boats near. Perhaps if she had avoided the boat she would have run into another one. The shifting about in the boat took place before the Vivid appeared in sight, and not afterwards. he did not hear anyone hail from the Vivid. - By Mr Venning: When he altered the boat's course, he only luffed up to the wind and remained on the starboard tack. He did not run the boat off before the wind. He was not frightened. By the Jury: did not know how far the Vivid was from her buoy at the time, but she was to the southward of it. - By Mr Brian:- The Vivid was on the Sound side of her buoy. - Lydia Lukey, a single woman, living at 9 High-street, Stonehouse, stated that she was an occupant of the boat which the Vivid ran into. She did not see the steamer until she struck the boat. One of the men in the boat called out to the Vivid just previously. The boat was struck on the left side near the stern. She could not tell whether the paddle wheels were stopped at the time. There was no confusion in the boat. No one in it moved, and Bradshaw did not tell them to sit still, as far as she was aware. She was sitting next to Bradshaw. All in the boat were quite sober. Just before the accident she heard several persons shouting out, she could not tell from where, but it was not from the Vivid. - By Mr Brian: The Vivid was going very fast when she struck the boat. - John Allen, captain of the Saltash steamboat Victoria, stated that on the afternoon of the 8th he was in charge of the Fairy, and at about 4.20 p.m. was going from West Hoe Pier to North Corner. Off Devil's Point the Vivid overtook and passed the Fairy, and went on towards Mount Wise. He saw the boat in question with sail up. He did not notice any other boats near the Vivid. From the course the boat was taking and the way she altered her course he saw that a collision would take place, and that the boat would not clear the Vivid's bow. The Vivid put her helm hard a-port to clear the boat, but he could not tell whether she slackened her speed. She was not going very fast. When he first saw the boat, from the way the Vivid was going, standing towards Mount Wise, and the direction the boat was taking towards Cremyll, he thought the boat would have gone the other side of the steamer. He afterwards saw the boat edge away her head towards Mutton Cove. He believed the boat would have gone outside the Vivid if she had not altered her course. He looked for the boat on the other side of the steamer, but the Vivid hid her from view. - A Juror: You would not attempt to put a boat about with one sail right in front of a steamer? - Witness: Perhaps, I should not. - In answer to further questions, witness said if the boat had kept her original course the Vivid would not have run her down. When the boat altered her course the Vivid ported her helm to go astern of her. He did not think the boat was managed in a seaman-like manner. - By Mr Brian: The Vivid was not going very fast. - Mr Brian: Don['t you know she had the Duke of Edinburgh on board? - Mr Venning objected to the inference the question conveyed, that because the Duke of Edinburgh was on board the vessel was going at a greater speed. There was nothing to shew that she was going beyond her ordinary speed. - Answering further questions, witness said the Vivid was not going at the rate of twelve or thirteen knots an hour. He stopped the Fairy's engines to allow her to pass. Previous to that he thought the Vivid was going to stop her engines to allow the Fairy to pass on. - Mr Venning: As a matter of fact she did stop. - Continuing, witness said: When he first saw the boat she must have been about 1,200 yards from the Vivid. She was then coming off from Mount Wise towards Cremyll, and the Vivid was heading towards Bullock's dock. He could not say what distance the boat was from the Vivid when the former altered her course. The Vivid was not then bearing down upon the boat. The Vivid ported her helm after that. Scarcely any time elapsed from the time of the Vivid porting her helm until he lost sight of the boat. It was a rule of the sea when there was a danger of collision between a steamer and a sailing boat for the steamer to get out of the way of the boat if she possibly could. It was the steamer's duty, if she could not avoid a boat by going on either side of it, to stop her engines and go astern. He could not tell whether it was possible for the Vivid to have avoided the boat. After the collision he saw people struggling in the water astern of the Vivid, but he could not tell whether the steamer was then going ahead. - By Mr Venning: After the paddle-wheels were stopped there would be some way on the vessel. Asked if it was true that he had to alter the course of the Fairy and stop his engines because the Vivid was bearing down upon him and endangering the safety of his vessel, witness replied that the tide was setting strongly away towards Devil's Point, and as he did not know whether the Vivid was going to the Victualling Yard or the Dockyard, he stopped his engines and went astern. He did not think the Vivid was at any time going at a dangerous rate. - The Inquiry having lasted four hours, the hour being past ten, the Inquest was further adjourned until ten o'clock this morning. As several of the Jury were employed in the Dockyard, Mr Venning undertook to make representations to the authorities with the view of their being granted leave for the day without loss of pay.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 June 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatality In Hamoaze. Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of EMMA HOSKINGS, who lost her life through the recent boat accident in Hamoaze, was resumed at the Ferry-house Inn, Newpassage yesterday, by the Mayor of Saltash. Mr J. J. E. Venning again appeared on behalf of the naval authorities, and Mr T. C. Brian for the relatives of the deceased. - Sergeant Smith Metropolitan Police, deposed to witnessing the collision between the Vivid and the boat. He particularly watched the boat, fearing there would be an accident unless the occupants put out the oars and pulled. When the boat was a short distance from the Vivid her course was altered to windward, and just as she got under the bows of the steamer she suddenly fell off from the wind, and was caught under the steamer's bows. He attributed the accident to the boat altering her course. He saw some of the occupants picked up by the Vivid's boats. - By the Coroner: Had the boat kept on towards Cremyll the accident might still have happened, but the boat would have had a better chance of clearing the steamer. - By the Jury: When he first saw the boat she was 400 yards from the Vivid. - By the Coroner: The Vivid was not going at more than her usual speed. She did not stop her paddles before colliding with the boat. - By Mr Brian: The steamer was about 100 yards from the boat when he considered the latter was in danger. The Vivid was then easing away towards Mutton Cove to clear the Fairy, which was just inside Devil's Point. From the time he first saw the Vivid until the accident he did not know whether she slackened her speed. The usual speed of the Vivid was about twelve knots an hour. He calculated at the time the boat was attempting to cross the bows of the Vivid, from the rate at which the Vivid was going, and the distance she was off from the boat, that unless the boat got out of the way of the steamer there would be an accident. The boat was sailing towards Cremyll, right across the direction the Vivid was taking in coming in towards Mount Wise. The course the Vivid was pursuing would bring her down upon the boat. He noticed the bow of the Vivid turn more towards the Victualling Yard, as if she had ported her helm to avoid the boat. The steamer was then only a very few yards from the boat. That alteration in the Vivid's course was made too late to save the boat, which at the time was falling off from the wind. He did not consider that all the exertion to save the boat should be made by the people on board it. There would have been sufficient time for the Vivid to have reversed engines and cleared the boat. The boat was fairly managed, and the occupants were very quiet, but he thought they made an error in luffing up to the wind, which necessarily stopped the way of the boat. - By Mr Venning: The alteration in the boat's course brought her under the Vivid's bow. The speed he gave at which the Vivid was going was a mere guess. He had no practical knowledge of her speed. - Mr Brian: Notwithstanding the luffing up of the boat was it not in the power of the Vivid, if she had liked, to have avoided the boat? - Witness: Had the engines been stopped and the helm put hard-aport probably there would have been no collision. - By Mr Venning: Assuming that the engines had been stopped and the helm put hard-aport that would not have stopped the way of the vessel at once. - By the Jury: If the engines of the Vivid had been reversed the steamer would have had sufficient way to touch the boat, but probably not to capsize it. - Staff-Commander J. J. A. Gravener, of the Vivid, said: On Sunday, the 8th inst., I was in command of the Vivid, and we were coming into harbour from the Sound, having on board Vice-Admiral H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh and his staff and other naval and military officers. Nothing unusual occurred on the way in, except our stopping once off Devil's Point, the reason being that the Fairy was passing the point at the same time in shore of us, and the swirl of the tide caught our starboard quarter and sheered us in towards the Fairy against our helm. We were about fifty or sixty yards off the Fairy at the time. I stopped the engines to allow the Fairy to pass, but the captain of the Fairy very politely stopped his engines also to allow me to pass, and I went on as before towards Mount Wise. After I had pointed the vessel up for our mooring buoy I noticed a small boat under sail on the starboard tack, the wind being from the northward, force about three, or what we call a gentle breeze. She was nearly ahead of us at the time, slightly on the starboard bow. I ported my helm a little so as to pass under her stern, but almost immediately afterwards, to my horror and intense surprise, I saw them bear up and come down before the wind straight for the ship as if to cross the bow. I immediately stopped the engines, put the helm hard-aport, and gave the order full speed astern. In the meantime the ship had carried her headway and the boat also approaching with a fair wind in the opposite direction, I saw she could not possibly clear the paddle-wheel. I then gave the order to stop the engines from going astern, fortunately just in time to prevent them all being smashed up and killed. As it was the engines only made really about the sixth of a revolution astern. The boat struck the bow just by the port bow anchor, the mast carried away, and the boat, scraping along the side, went under the fore sponson. I immediately lowered both gigs and took every possible means to save life. Four persons were brought on board the Vivid. One of our quartermasters, named William Ball, very gallantly jumped overboard and saved another man. Another of our men, Henry Toogood, jumped out of the bow of our gig and dived under the broken boat to see if anyone was there. Butland, the stoker, was saved by our gig. Bradshaw was saved by getting on the paddle wheel, and Lydia Lukey was taken off one of the paddle floats by one of our men. Bell and the man he saved were very nearly drowned. The woman Lukey was taken off the third float from the water, lying flat on her back, the back turn of the paddle-wheel having actually lifted her into a horizontal position. I ought to say, in justice to the engine-room department, I never knew my orders for working the engines carried out more promptly. Everything was done that could be done to save life. I wish to impress upon the Jury that this is no intricate question of the rule of the road at sea. - Mr Brian objected to the witness desiring to impress anything upon the Jury. - Staff-Commander Gravener: I merely wish to tell the Jury I considered it my duty to get out of the boat's way. I took the necessary steps to get out of the way of the boat, and if she had gone on her course, I should have cleared her. And even if she had remained stationary when she altered her course she would have been as safe as in a boathouse. I was standing on the bridge with a perfect view of the boat. There were with me the look-out man, Charles Butler, and John Littler, the signalman. There was no one else on the bridge. - Mr Venning: May the Court understand that your attention was not distracted in any way from the navigation of the vessel. - Witness: Not the slightest. I saw the boat as plainly as I see the gentlemen of the Jury here now. - By Mr Venning: Always in coming into harbour the look-out man is with me on the bridge, and the signalman, and forward on the grating, especially on coming up to our buoy as on this occasion, a chief petty officer is on the look-out. I give the orders to the man at the wheel chiefly by motions, and I always at the same time look at the man to see if he has obeyed my order. - Mr Venning asked what was the effect of porting the vessel's helm on the first occasion. - Witness: Just to move her head slightly to starboard, to clear the boat. We were standing in towards Mount Wise, and that would bring us slightly towards the Victualling Yard away from the boat so as to pass under her stern. - The Coroner: How do you account for the accident? - Commander Gravener: By the boat suddenly bearing up and the running down straight before the wind as if to cross our bow and get to the starboard side. - By Mr Venning: I immediately ordered the engines to be stopped and the helm put hard a-port. That was done at once but the ship does not answer her helm so quickly when the engines are stopped. I did everything that a human being could. - By the Coroner: The boat at first was going as nearly as possible at right angles to my course. - By Mr Venning: The Vivid was going at her ordinary full speed of about ten knots an hour before the accident. - Did you notice the condition of these men? - Yes. I noticed that Bradshaw was not sober and Butland was howling drunk. From the noise he made I thought he was hurt. In my opinion his conduct was not attributable to excitement occasioned by the accident. I have the medal of the Humane Society for saving life. My full attention was directed to navigating the ship. - By Mr Brian: After passing the Fairy we went on exactly as before at our usual full speed. When I ordered the engines to be stopped we were about 60 or 70 yards from the boat. I did not give the order to slow. Until I stopped her she was going at full speed, and she was going at about 3 knots when we struck the boat. We were then in mid-channel, between Mount Wise and Mount Edgcumbe, about 200 yards from our moorings and about 300 yards from the nearest point of the shore. - Mr Brian: You say you took certain precautions. Do you think if those precautions had been taken before the accident might have been averted? - If I had the remotest idea of the boat going to behave in the extraordinary manner she did. - Mr Brian: That is not my question. Had those precautions been taken before, would the accident have occurred? - Witness: Had I any idea the boat would have altered her course ---- Mr Brian, interrupting: If the precautions had been taken earlier, would they have been effectual? - Commander Gravener: Whatever is the good of my saying that? Any sensible man knows if I had stopped the ship at Devil's Point I should not have touched the boat. - Mr Brian: If the precautions had been taken a little before? - Commander Gravener: The accident would not have occurred if I had stopped the ship off Cremyll. - In answer to further questions, witness said: The boat did not come into my view until she came in the direction in which I was going. There were many other boats about, and I did not pay particular attention to this boat until she came into my course. Less than four or five minutes elapsed between the time I saw the boat and gave the order for the engines to be reversed. Directly I saw she was in my way I took every precaution to avoid her. - Do I understand you to say it is the boat's fault, and not the fault of the Vivid? - Entirely. - By the Jury: Having such illustrious persons on board did not in the slightest way distract my attention from the boat. I never spoke to any of them from the time I started in the Sound until I came in. They were away from me, on the quarter-deck, and did not influence me one bit. - By Mr Venning: The rate at which my vessel was going was not increased in consequence. The only thing I did was to put the quartermaster at the helm. I knew the tide was very strong, and told him to be very particular in steering; and I warned the look-out man to be very particular about any small boats. N one can regret this lamentable accident more than I do. - Thomas Whebby stated that he was the engineer in charge of the Vivid's engines on the 8th inst. The usual rate of the Vivid's speed was from nine to ten knots an hour, and she was going at that rate on the day in question. A few minutes before the accident he had an order to stop. Soon after going on again he had another order to stop. It was obeyed at once. A few seconds afterwards he had an order full-speed astern, which was also immediately obeyed. The engines made only half a revolution astern when he had another order to stop. Finding that an accident had occurred he went on deck and saw portions of the boat under the paddle-wheel, and the sail in the wheel. - By Mr Venning: The order was given to him by the telegraph. - Charles Butler, able seaman, stated that he was on the lookout on the bridge of the Vivid on the 8th inst. Commander Gravener gave him strict orders to keep a good lookout for boats. He saw the boat about 60 or 70 yards off and reported her to Commander Gravener, who at once gave the order to the quartermaster to port the helm, which was obeyed. The reason they did not clear the boat was because directly the boat was clear of the Vivid on the starboard side the man steering her put the helm about and came down upon the Vivid's port bow. He then reported to the captain that the boat was on the other bow and the commander ordered the engines to be stopped, and the helm to be put hard-aport. As the helm was being put over the boat struck on the port bow, and went under the paddle-box. In his opinion the accident occurred entirely through the boat altering her course. After the accident he saw Bradshaw whom he asked about the others, but his reply was, "B.... them, I am all right." He was the worse for drink. Butland was mad drunk, and was jumping about like a madman. He asked him how many there were in the boat, but his reply was that he was going ashore and have a b..... spree. - By Mr Brian: It was not possible for the vivid to avoid the boat. About two minutes elapsed after they sighted the boat before the order to port the helm and go astern was given. He did not see any uproarious conduct in the boat. - By the Coroner: The two sailors who were in the boat both used very bad language when on board the Vivid. - Mr Brain, in addressing the Jury upon the evidence, expressed surprise at those in the boat having been attacked on the ground of sobriety. All of them on the previous day swore most positively that they were sober, and unless they had deliberately perjured themselves they could not have been at all intoxicated. It was not a matter of surprise that they were in a state of excitement after the accident. He wished, however, to direct their attention to the fact that it was the undoubted duty of a steamer to avoid a boat. The Vivid had every means of getting out of the way of the boat. With regard to the evidence on that side, he reminded the Jury that it was always the case in Admiralty instances where two vessels had been in collision that the captain and crew of a vessel, one and all, gave their evidence in the same direction. - Mr Venning protested against the remark as unfair. There had not been the slightest influence brought to bear upon the witnesses. - Mr Brian, continuing, said it was true the captain of the Vivid ported his helm and reversed his engines, but it was for the Jury to determine whether those precautions should not have been taken before. - The Coroner, in summing up, said this was the third Inquest he had held in cases where life had been lost through pleasure boats being lent to incompetent persons. He thought if this boat had been in charge of a competent waterman, the accident would not have happened. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, unanimously returned as their verdict "That EMMA HOSKINGS came to her death by being in boat which came into collision with H.M.S. Vivid through the unskilful management of the boat by the parties in it, and that the commander of the Vivid took every precaution under the circumstances to prevent the collision."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Case Of Scalding At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Coronation Inn, Octagon-street, Plymouth, into the death of MAHALA FLORENCE CHARLOTTE COLICKET, aged 11 months and 2 weeks, who died from the result of scalds received on Saturday last. Deceased lived with her parents at the Octagon House. - PRISCILLA ELIZABETH COLICKET, sister of deceased, aged 8 years, was first called. The Coroner demurred at first to taking the evidence of so young a child, but she answered his preliminary questions so clearly and shewed so much intelligence that the Jury thought they were quite justified in hearing her statement. Witness then said that her mother went to Devonport on Saturday morning, leaving her and the baby home in charge of her grandmother. The latter went into an adjoining room, and witness got some coals to put on the fire, where there was a saucepan of clothes boiling. The baby was then sitting on the floor, a little distance from the fireplace. Witness moved the saucepan to the edge of the stove in order to put the coals in the fire, and it overbalanced and fell to the floor. The water ran over to the baby who cried. The grandmother then came in, and sent witness for some oil, which was placed all over deceased. Witness had bad eyes, but she could see well enough to place coals on the stove. - Elizabeth Magor, grandmother of deceased, said that she was left in charge of the children. There was an American stove in the room, and there was a saucepan of hot water on it. She was going to bathe the children, and went into an adjoining room to obtain a towel. She could not remember whether she told the last witness to put some coals on the fire or not, but she had not been in the other room half a minute before she heard a cry. On running to the children she seized the baby and tore its clothes from it. As they were removed the skin of its legs peeled off. She did all she could for deceased, and on Sunday sent for Mr Miller, surgeon. Deceased died in convulsions on Monday morning. - A Juryman thought that the witness was mistaken in the time she was absent from the room, as it would take small child more than half a minute to remove a large saucepan to put coals on the fire. - The Coroner concurred in this opinion. - The Jury, of whom Mr Lillicrap was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the grandmother from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 June 1884 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide In Hamoaze. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital on Saturday relative to the death of HENRY THOMAS STREET, aged [?7], ship's cook, mate of the Circe (tender to the Impregnable), who committed suicide by jumping overboard. The evidence shewed that shortly after eight o'clock on the previous Sunday evening the deceased went into the bathroom of the Circe, in which were two boys named Slack and Wardell, and walking to the porthole jumped through into the water, exclaiming "Good bye." As he sprung through the porthole the two boys noticed that he had two iron fire bars attached to the back of his trousers. Divers were subsequently sent down and the body was recovered by Wm. Row, mechanical diver, on Thursday, lying on the back with the iron bars fastened to the clothing. The deceased had of late been depressed in spirits through domestic trouble and monetary difficulties, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - A Child Burned To Death At Plymouth. - Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of WILLIAM WILLIS BARNICOTT, aged three years, who was caught on fire on Sunday morning. The child's mother left the room about ten o'clock and went to purchase some vegetables. The deceased was in the habit of playing with matches whenever an opportunity presented itself. On Sunday morning when MRS BARNICOTT went out, she left the matches on the mantelshelf, but she unfortunately neglected to remove a chair that was immediately in front of the empty firegrate. Mrs Matthews, a person living in the same house, smelled something burning, and hearing screams rushed downstairs to MRS BARNICOTT'S room. there she saw the deceased sitting on the floor enveloped in flames. She at once wrapped the child in a piece of carpet, thus extinguishing the fire, and then took it to a surgeon, who at once suggested the child's removal to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where it was attended by the house surgeon, Mr W. A. Buchan. It was severely burned all over the body, and shortly after half-past eleven died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and though they did not censure the mother they felt they could not exonerate her from all blame.

EXETER - Fatal Accident On The Railway At Exeter. - An accident, resulting in the death of one man and in serious injuries to two others, occurred yesterday afternoon within half a mile of the Queen-street Station of the London and South-Western Railway at Exeter. The deceased, THOMAS ANDREWS, and his two companions, Philip Langdon and Henry Miller, were engaged in constructing a small gullett close to the Exmouth Junction, where a new goods department is being erected. When thus employed as the base of the excavation a quantity of soil (owing probably to the recent heavy rain) suddenly fell in a solid form, a portion of it completely buying the three workmen. As there were not more than five or six barrowsful of earth they were soon disinterred, and it was discovered that ANDREWS had sustained severe internal injuries. Some brandy was readily procured and administered to the deceased, who, however, rallied only a few moments, and died before he could be removed. More than one fatal accident has occurred at this spot, and, strange to say, Langdon has been previously in the Hospital as the result of a mishap in connection with the work there. Langdon and Miller were both removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital as soon as possible, when it was found that one of them had sustained severe spinal injuries, the other having been badly hurt about the head and upper part of the body. The works have been in progress for upwards of twelve months. The body of ANDREWS was removed to the Mount Pleasant Inn to await an Inquest. Each of the men is married and ANDREWS leaves a wife and small family. - Our Exeter reporter telegraphs that upon later Inquiry at the Hospital last night it was ascertained that Henry Miller was in a most precarious condition, and little hopes were entertained of his recovery. - An Inquest on the body of ANDREWS was held last night before Mr Hooper, City Coroner. According to medical evidence death resulted from injuries to the lungs and other internal organs. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - Langdon is suffering from a dislocated hip and fractured ribs.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - The Late Case Of Drowning At Plymouth. - Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening touching the death of MR EDGAR KETT GIFFORD, who was recently drowned whilst bathing in the Sound. - Mr Edward Davy, a builder, resident at 52 King's-gardens, said that the deceased and he, on Saturday, the 14th ult., took a boat from under the Hoe at about 3.30 in the afternoon. They pulled out to the brigs, between the Island and the main, when the deceased bathed. he swam off from the boat for a distance of about twenty feet and then around the boat twice, when he suddenly called for the oars. Witness threw them out, but the deceased only caught one, the hold of which he lost. He called for help, as did witness. The deceased was apparently seized with cramp as there was no motion of his leg. A labourer, named Frost, found the body about a gunshot from the White Buoy. He brought it to the Hoe, where it was handed over to the Hoe Constable. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned owing to seizure by cramp" was passed, and the Jury expressed their sincere sympathy with the bereaved family.

PLYMOUTH - The Alleged Concealment Of Birth At Plymouth. - At the Plymouth Police Court yesterday, MARY JANE SAUNDERS, 17, domestic servant, was charged with concealing the birth of her illegitimate male child at 195 Union-street. - Mr W. S. Hearder said that SAUNDERS had been in his service for a month, and left on Tuesday morning without giving any notice. She did not take her box. Witness was away at the time, but on his return in the evening he was told that she had gone, and also that the water closet was choked. He at once sent for a mason and Detective-inspector Hill, and had the drain opened. About 20 feet below the closet and beyond the first syphon, the body of a male child was found. - Mr Wolferstan, surgeon to the police, saw the prisoner on Tuesday night about 11 o'clock, and when she was asked if she objected to being examined she said it was not necessary, as the baby was hers. Mr Wolferstan considered that the child was born about Sunday last. This evidence having been taken, the case was adjourned until Tuesday next. - In the evening the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brain, held an Inquiry touching the death of the infant. Detective Inspector John Hill deposed to going to Mr Hearder's house on Tuesday evening and having the drain of the water closet opened. In a bend of an earthenware drain he discovered the body of a newly born male child, which he had conveyed to the mortuary at the central police station. Witness asked Mr Hearder to detain the box of MARY JANE SAUNDERS, who had been in his employ and had left that morning. He then placed Detective Crabb outside to watch in case anybody should call for it. Whilst witness was away looking for SAUNDERS'S mother the girl called at Mr Hearder's for her box and she was then requested to go to the Station, where she was seen by witness. He told her she was suspected of having given birth to a child, but she replied that she did not know that she had, although she admitted that she was in great pain on Sunday, but she did not know what had happened. On Wednesday morning she was charged with concealing the birth of her child on the 29th of June last, and she then replied "Yes." Witness did not see anything about the child to warrant his charging SAUNDERS with a more serious offence than concealment of birth. - In answer to a Juror, Mr Hill said that the body must have gone through the water closet to get as far as the bend of the pipe, where it was found. The ground could not have been opened and the child then put into the pipe which was broken in his presence. - Mr Hearder gave evidence similar to that at the Police Court in the morning, adding that on Sunday afternoon he heard SAUNDERS go to the water-closet where she remained for a quarter of an hour. He heard her, on her way to the closet, make a noise as if in great pain. He was afterwards informed that the closet was choked, but before he got there she had gone down, and poured a bucket of water into it. On witness going down the closet was clear. Witness did not hear any sound of a child crying when SAUNDERS was in the closet, which he would certainly have done had any sound been caused. - Mr S. Wolferstan, surgeon to the Borough Police Force, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of a newly-born male child which had not quite reached maturity. There were marks of commencing putrefaction over the eyelids. Over the right knee there was a small contused wound, and a very extensive contusion over the sides and upper surface of the head. On examination of all the internal organs he found them to be in a natural condition. A test of the lungs shewed that the child had breathed. On the removal of the scalp an extensive effusion of blood was found, which corresponded with the external contusion. On opening the skull the surface of the brain was also found to be covered with a layer of blood, partly coagulated and Mr Wolferstan considered the injuries he had described were sufficient to account for the child's death. He could not positively say that the child had had a separate existence. The injuries might have been inflicted within a few minutes of its having ceased to breathe. MARY JANE SAUNDERS had admitted that the child was hers, and was born in the closet, about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. - A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned, there being no evidence to shew that the child was born alive.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr Davy was not with MR EDGAR K. GIFFORD when that gentleman was drowned while bathing, but identified the body. MR GIFFORD'S younger brother, a little lad, was his companion, and was, of course, quite incapable of rendering assistance.

PLYMOUTH - At the Inquest on the body of JOHN PORTMAN, who was killed while assisting in discharging the cargo of the Trevello, at the Great Western Docks on Wednesday, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased fell 20 feet into the hold of the vessel and his neck was broken.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 July 1884 ST MARYCHURCH - The Fatal Fall Over The Cliff At Babbacombe. A Dangerous Spot. - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner for the District, held an Inquest at Gasking's Cary Arms, Babbacombe, on Saturday evening, on the body of WILLIAM PYM, 23 years of age, mate of a stone boat or coasting vessel and son of WILLIAM PYM, the master of the vessel, living at 5 Bethel-cottages, Ellacombe, Torquay, who came by his death through falling over the cliff at Wall's-hill, Babbacombe, on the previous day. Mr J. H. Pope, builder, was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence shewed that the father of the deceased left Torquay in his vessel on Friday morning for the quarry at the base of the cliff at Wall's-hill, for the purpose of taking in stone and conveying it across to Exmouth. As he deceased was not home at the time, the father took a younger son with him. In the meantime deceased was at the house of John Potter, a mason, of Warberry-cottages, Plainmoor, with whose daughter he had been keeping company. He came there at six o'clock on Friday morning and remained in Potter's company for several hours. About midday deceased and Potter went to Wall'[s-hill and proceeding near the edge of the cliff they looked down and saw that deceased's father was loading his vessel from the quarry beneath. After both had sat down on the spot about half an hour, they went back towards Babbacombe, and when Potter left deceased, the latter, who was perfectly sober, intimated his intention of going to Exmouth with his father, to return the same night, either in the vessel or by train. Deceased was in his usual health and was laughing and joking. Three-quarters of an hour afterwards - at half-past one - he was observed by Alfred Stiggins, a fisherman, walking on the Downs in the direction of Wall's-hill. Nothing more was seen of the deceased until about ten minutes to three. By that time his father's vessel was loaded and had just started for Exmouth, when William Eales, a quarryman, whilst watching the setting of the vessel's sails, all at once heard a noise which directed his attention to the cliff. Looking up, he saw what at first appeared to him like a bundle falling, and it struck about a third of the way down. Exclaiming in horror, "Here's a man coming down," he noticed that the body, after glancing from the spot where it struck, fell down the almost perpendicular cliff to the bottom. The man was back down, and his arms and legs were outstretched. As he reached the quarry his head struck against a large stone three or four yards from the base of the cliff. Eales immediately went to the spot, but found that life was quite extinct. The only wound that he could see was one on the head, which was split open, and there was a quantity of blood coming from it. Leaving the body, which was that of the deceased, in charge of the other quarrymen, Eales (who had not previously noticed the deceased looking over the cliff) went for P.C. Meech, who obtained assistance and had the body conveyed in a boat round to the Cary Arms. Eales and the constable afterwards went to the spot where the deceased fell over. Close to the edge was found the deceased's hat. The constable saw no signs of anything like a scuffle, but he noticed that the grass was dry and the ground slippery. He mentioned this to the coroner and Jury, adding that the spot in question lay between Babbacombe and Anstis Cove, and that many people walked there at this time of the year in going from one place to the other. If while thus walking near the edge of the cliff persons should slip there was nothing whatever to save them from falling over. It was further mentioned that the public have a right of way across the Downs along the top of the cliff. The land is the property of Lord Haldon as lord of the Manor, and is rented by Mr J. Salter Bartlett, of Ilsham Farm, for grazing. Although situate in St Mary Church, the Local Board of that parish have no control over the hill in question. Eales, the quarryman, expressed a strong opinion that a notice board should be put up on the top of the cliff, not only to caution people against venturing too near the edge, but to warn boys and others not to throw stones into the quarry, and thus endanger the lives of the men at work there. He said this stone throwing was a thing of frequent occurrence, and that twelve months ago the quarrymen had a narrow escape of their lives owing to it. - In his summing up, the Coroner pointed out that the Jury could come to no other verdict than that of accidental death, the probabilities being that deceased, whilst on the edge of the cliff, either over-reached himself, or, having dropped asleep, woke up in a hurry, and whilst in a half-sleepy state fell over. He also commented on the dangerous nature of the place, and remarked to the Jury that it was their duty, if they considered it desirable, to make any recommendation which might be of benefit to the public. He suggested that a fence or rail should be erected near the most dangerous parts at the edge of the cliff, and also notice boards warning people not to go inside the rail. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and requested the Crooner to communicate with the owner or owners of the Downs, calling their attention to the danger, in order that protection might be afforded in the manner suggested, and also to warn people against throwing stones into the quarry.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 July 1884 BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday respecting the death of an old man named WATTS, who had died from burns, supposed to have been self-inflicted under circumstances reported by us yesterday. An Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 July 1884 EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held at Stonehouse yesterday concerning the death of SYDNEY PHILIP MILLER. Deceased was playing on the "flat rock" at Devil's Point on Tuesday and while trying to drop a large stone into the sea he over-balanced himself and fell into about seven feet of water. Harry Ball, aged 11 years, made a gallant effort to save MILLER, but the latter was ultimately pulled to shore by Mr W. Hockaday with the help of a fishing rod. Dr Leah was promptly in attendance upon the poor lad, but found life extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at her Majesty's Prisons, Plymouth, last evening touching the decease of an inmate, who died on Wednesday. CHARLES COKE, 30, was on the 16th ult sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment for assaulting his wife. On the 5th inst he was found to be unwell and placed in the Infirmary. The police-surgeon visited him, and ordered necessary alterations in clothing and diet, but on the 9th he died. The deceased was suffering from inflammation of the left lung. the Jury, in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" spoke in very high terms of the manner in which the officials had treated the deceased.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Railway Accident At Stoke. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital, yesterday, into the circumstances connected with the death of WM. RAWLINGS, 69 years of age, a watchman, of Saltash, employed on the Cornish Railway, who died from injuries received through being knocked down by a train. Deceased was found about 6.30 p.m. on the 3rd inst. lying down between the rails on the Cornwall Railway near Wingfield Villa, Stoke, immediately after a goods train from Plymouth had passed. He had evidently been knocked down by the train, and was much injured. He was taken by P.C. Johns to the house of Mr Margery, adjoining, where his wounds were bathed, and he was subsequently removed to the Hospital. He was there found to be suffering from severe cuts and bruises on the head and from other injuries. Deceased had been employed on the viaduct, near Plymouth, that day to signal the approach of trains, and had been relieved at six o'clock. At the time of the accident he was walking to the Devonport Station to catch the train to Saltash. At the junction of the Cornwall and South-Western Railways he met a ganger named Lang, with whom he remained in conversation for a few minutes, leaving him just before the train came up. The accident occurred almost immediately afterward. RAWLINGS was stated to be a vigilant watchman, well acquainted with the working on the line, and from the position of the body it was conjectured that he stepped from the six-foot way on to the line as the train, which was going at the rate of about twelve miles an hour, approached, and was struck by the middle part of the front buffer plank. The driver of the engine did not see him on the line, nor was he aware until he reached Liskeard that a man had been knocked down. RAWLINGS lingered until Tuesday, when he died from the injuries he received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 July 1884 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide From H.M.S. Cambridge. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of GEORGE MCKAY, A.B., on board H.M.S. Cambridge, who committed suicide by drowning under circumstances already reported. - John Dally deposed to having heard deceased say on the 24th of June, "I won't do much more work here." He thought MCKAY said it jocosely or would have had him arrested. MCKAY once shewed witness a photograph of a young woman living at Newton, but never complained of any quarrel between them. - Alexander Gray said that on the 25th June MCKAY was very curious and strange in his manner and remarks. - Charles Tregilgs saw deceased take a case shot of 50lbs weight and hide it on the evening of the 25th. - On the same evening at 10.30 Henry Mudden saw someone in MCKAY'S hammock, but could not see his face. The next morning at 5.30 MCKAY and the hammock were missing. - Thomas Goodchild, at 7.30 a.m. on June 26th, found a jumper, cap and pipe in the stern of the vessel. The pipe, he knew, was given to MCKAY by a fellow-sailor. - The body was identified by tattoo marks on the hands. Deceased was supposed to be 24 years of age. - The Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) said that in the face of the evidence he thought MCKAY could not possibly have been in his right mind. The Foreman of the Jury (Mr Sparrow) agreed and a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - At the Inquest at the Guildhall, yesterday, on the body of JOHN HOIT, who dropped dead in the Millbay Road on Saturday evening, the evidence of Dr Buchan shewed death to have been caused by Heart Disease, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held before the Plymouth Borough Coroner yesterday with reference to the death of BARRY MULLINS, a pensioner, R.N., aged 42, and living at 99 King-street. MULLINS had recently over-strained himself and had complained of pain at the heart. On Saturday he had a severe fall while drunk, and on Tuesday he died suddenly. The Jury came to the conclusion that the cause of death was Heart Disease, and returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Widow At Plymouth. Three Suicides In A Family Within A Year. - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, the Coroner for Plymouth, at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street, on the body of ELIZABETH ANN ROWE, aged 55, who committed suicide on the previous evening. Mr R. Percy was chosen Foreman of the Jury. During the past fortnight deceased had been living with her son at 63 Neswick-street, and of late she has appeared strange in her conduct. About ten minutes after five on Wednesday evening she left her daughter-in-law upstairs. Five minutes afterwards Mrs Wilson, a tenant in the house, discovered her in the bakehouse hanging to the handle of the oven door. A doctor was immediately sent for, but when deceased was cut down she was dead. She was hanging by three bootlaces. - Mr G. Jackson, F.R.C.S., deposed that deceased was a patient of his. He was sent for on the 10th inst., and found she had been suffering from apoplectic fits, and she was in one when he saw her. He was told that prior to that she had been extremely restless and violent. In a couple of days time the fits ceased, and deceased became quiet and low, so much so that he (witness) warned her son to guard her and not allow her to be alone. Her mind appeared deranged and she suffered from melancholia. Supposing she was left unwatched, witness was not surprised at what she had done. She was not responsible for her actions. Mr Jackson also stated that he knew deceased's family. Her husband committed suicide about twelve months since, and her brother hanged himself six months ago. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased strangled herself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - At the Inquest on Saturday on the body of JOHN FISHLEY, 11, who died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital the previous day, the evidence of Mr Wm. Buchan, resident surgeon, shewed death to have resulted from pericarditis, following on acute rheumatism brought on by the deceased being immersed in water on the 7th instant. The lad, who was but 11 years of age, had taken chill after saving his younger sister from drowning.

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner held an Inquest on Saturday into the death of JAMES O'BRIEN, 25, merchant sailor, who was drowned in Sutton Pool while going on board his vessel on Thursday evening. The testimony of George Lee as to finding the body with the grapnels having been taken, Richard Dickson, seaman on board the English Girl (deceased's vessel) deposed that O'BRIEN was drunk on the evening in question. Witness got on board and was turning to help deceased down when he saw him falling backwards from the ladder leading from the quay down to the vessel. His head came in contact with the paddle-box of a steamer near by. Witness went down to look for deceased, and waded until he got up to his knees in mud. But he never rose to the surface. P.C. Setters gave corroborative evidence and said that after the body was recovered he noticed the marks of a blow on the right side of the head. He made every effort to restore animation but without success. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased was Accidentally Drowned while in a state of Intoxication.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest on Saturday on the body of JOHN FORD, dockyard labourer, who died from apoplexy, the son, WILLIAM HENRY FORD, in his evidence said he was awoke at 1.15 a.m. on Saturday by his father's heavy breathing. He had had apoplectic fits before. He and his sister bathed his face and hands and he then went for Dr Jackson, who was suffering severely from lumbago and said he did not think he could do any good by coming. He sent directions as to the application of poultices, &c., but when witness got home his father was dead. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr Carne) said they acquitted the doctor of all blame in this instance, but there were cases in which his prompt attendance would doubtless result in life being saved. He wished the Coroner, therefore, to make representations to the authorities with a view to securing the payment of the doctor's fees in cases of poverty and emergency. - The Coroner said he had no power to make such representations unless the doctor were censured. Mr Carne expressed a hope that under the circumstances the Press would give expression to the opinion of the Jury. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BRIXHAM - Suicide At Brixham. - MR JOHN SHEARS, 66, a native of Brixham, was found hanging at his lodgings at No. 1, Bank-street, Brixham, on Friday evening. The deceased gentleman, who was formerly a master mariner, retired from sea about 25 years ago, and up to within the last five years lived at Brixham in comfortable circumstances with his sister. They then went to Torre to reside and about a week ago, his sister, having decided to go to London to live, the deceased expressed a desire to end his days at Brixham, whereupon lodgings were taken for him, and, accompanied by his niece, on Thursday afternoon last he entered his new quarters. The two remained together some time, and at 6 p.m. his niece left him and proceeded to her home at Torquay. Nothing more was seen of the unfortunate gentleman until the following evening, when the landlady's daughter entered his room and found him hanging from a large nail in the wall, his feet being about two inches from the floor. He was fully dressed with the exception of his hat. An alarm was given and P.S. Madden shortly came and cut the body down. Upon examining the room it was discovered that the bed had apparently not been slept in, and the candle, which was a new one that had been placed in the room, had not been lighted. In addition to this, a letter that came for him on Friday morning and was taken up and pushed under his bedroom door at 8 a.m., had not been broken open, so that it is probable the deceased committed suicide very shortly after his niece left him, and would therefore have been hanging nearly twenty-four hours before his body was discovered. In the pockets were found £3 10s. in gold, besides silver and bronze coins. Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Saturday evening, at the Bolton Hotel. The Jury could not agree for a considerable period, but a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was eventually returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Down Stairs. - Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening touching the death of EMMA SUMMERS, 32, charwoman, who was killed by falling over some stairs on Saturday night. After the body had been identified by a woman named Caroline Welch, a tramp named Bartholomew spoke to going to No. 111, King-street, on Saturday night, with his wife, for the purpose of obtaining lodgings. They were shewn to their room by the deceased, who in retiring fell over the stairs, which were twelve in number, very steep, and were without any banisters or ropes. The deceased, when leaving Bartholomew, took two matches to light her way, but immediately on shutting his door, which was directly at the top of the stairs, he heard a fall. Witness went out and P.C. Dawe was called. As deceased was not dead she was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, but life was extinct by the time she reached that Institution. Mr W. Buchan, the house surgeon, found a severe scalp wound and fracture of the skull which in his opinion were likely to be caused by a fall over such stairs as had been described. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death", expressed a wish that some kind of fencing should be placed over the stairs, and Detective Inspector Hill, who is also inspector of lodging-houses, has ordered accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - The Double Murder AT Plymouth. The Prisoners Before The Magistrates. EDWARD BATH EDWARDS and CLARA, his wife, were brought before the Plymouth magistrates yesterday morning, charged with the wilful murder of their two children on Saturday night. A large crowd collected round the door some time before eleven o'clock, and there was a great fight to get into the Court. The Magistrates on the bench were Messrs. R. C. Serpell (in the chair), J. F. Fortescue, H. J. Waring, and H. J. Howland. - On the Chairman calling the names there was a hush in Court to see the prisoners brought in. They walked into the Dock looking very serious but nothing more. They are a short couple, but well-built, and fairly good looking. EDWARDS wore no collar or neckerchief, but was otherwise well dressed. His wife has rather a fine face. She was wearing a felt hat with a feather in it and a long. cloth jacket. They stood at the opposite corners of the Dock facing the bench. - The Chairman read the charge. EDWARD BATH EDWARDS and CLARA EDWARDS were charged with feloniously and wilfully and with malice aforethought killing and murdering their two children, ALBERT EDWARD FIELDING EDWARDS, aged 7 ½ years and SYDNEY ERNEST EDWARDS, aged 10 months, on Saturday night, at 19 Bishop's-place. The Court then proceeded to take evidence through their clerk (Mr Bridgman.) - Elizabeth Clodden said: I am the wife of Joseph Clodden, and reside at 19 Bishop's-place, in the West Hoe-road. I am the landlady of the house, my husband being the principal occupier. There are thirteen rooms in the house, and three storeys, excluding the ground floor. We occupy two rooms on the ground floor. They are a kitchen and a sitting-room, the former being in the back, and the latter in the front of the house. There is another room on the ground floor at the back, which is occupied by William Skinner. On the first floor there are four rooms, one in the front and three in the back. William Newton occupies the front room. he is a married man with four children. Mrs Margaret Haddy, a widow, lives in two back rooms with her daughter, Laura Haddy. The third back room is rented by the prisoner EDWARDS and his wife. They have occupied that room since last Saturday fortnight. They had two children, one was a boy, but I do not know what the baby was. I did not know their names or their ages. On the second floor there are three rooms, two in the front and one in the back. The former are occupied by Thomas Elliott and the latter by Henry Bath and his wife. Above these rooms there are three attics. William Skinner rents one in the back of the house and the front ones are unoccupied. I do not know what occupation prisoner was. Both he and his wife came to me on the 5th of July. The wife came to me two days before, but no arrangement was made. On the 5th the husband took the rooms from me, and he was to pay 4s. per week. During the fortnight they have lived in my house I have heard nothing like disagreement between them. On Saturday, the 12th, when the first week's rent became due, prisoner did not pay it. On the 19th I was home early in the day, but I was away from 3 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. I do not remember seeing either of the prisoners during the morning, and I did not see either of their children for the day. The last time I saw them was on Friday, when the boy was driving the baby in a perambulator outside the door. I cannot remember what the time of the say was. When I came home on Saturday at half-past six I went into my back room, but I only remained there a few minutes. I went up to Mrs Bath's room to get some water to make tea. Mrs Bath met me at the top of the stairs and gave it to me. I then returned to my room. During that time I saw neither of the prisoners. My back room is underneath the prisoners' room. I remained in my room then having tea with my husband. At ten minutes to seven we saw the male prisoner pass into the court behind to get some water. There is a water tap in the court for the use of the whole of the occupants of the house. I saw the man pass back again into the house. I sat in my room alone until a few minutes past eight, my husband having gone out, and up to that time I did not hear the slightest sound from prisoners' room. I then went out into the town, and returned shortly after nine o'clock to my room. About a quarter before ten o'clock the female prisoner came into my room. I was there alone, and she gave me 4s. worth of stamps. She apparently had a letter in her hand. This was the first week's rent, and she asked me if I would take stamps instead of money, and I replied "No." She said she hoped to give me the remainder of the amount that was owing early next week, to which I said "Very well." She did not say anything more, but left my room. I think she went out of the front door. She always appeared excited in my room. During the fortnight she has lived at my house I have seen her frequently, and she generally appeared excited. I did not see the male prisoner at all during the evening. I remained in my room until half-past ten o'clock. Then Mrs Haddy and her daughter came into the room and we were chatting until about a quarter before eleven. Then I heard a footstep in the passage, and I asked Miss Haddy if it was the little man upstairs. She replied, "Yes," and I said I would close the front door. The man was prisoner, and he went to his room. Miss Haddy was standing with the door in her hand, and she could see anyone in the passage, which was lighted by a swinging oil-lamp at the bottom of the stairs. I shut the front door and fastened it with a spring, which was my usual custom. That was a quarter to eleven, and Mrs and Miss Haddy remained in my room. About eleven o'clock I heard a scream and the female prisoner crying "Mrs Clodden, Mrs Clodden." The male prisoner shouted, "No, no, don't". With the same the woman rushed over the stairs into my room. At that time she was totally undressed with the exception of her chemise. She threw herself on my shoulder and said, "My two dear babes are dead, they're dead; my husband has killed them, this trouble has made him do it." She said this in a loud voice, and in such a manner that anyone standing on the first floor could hear it. I said, "No, it cannot be possible." She said, "Yes, it's too true." She then turned from me and threw herself in Mrs Haddy's arms. I got one of my own dresses and put it over her, and she moved away from Mrs Haddy in order that I might put it on. I went to the door to send someone for a doctor. I believe the female prisoner remained in my room from five to ten minutes and then she went upstairs. All the neighbours were on the landing. I did not go upstairs until the doctor sent for me, which must have been half an hour after he had been in prisoner's room. The policeman came after I had sent for the doctor, and it was quite half an hour after the female prisoner rushed into my room. I did not see the male prisoner at all. At 11.30 o'clock MRS EDWARDS was in my room with the policeman, and she placed a letter and 6s. worth of stamps on the table, and asked me to take care of them for her. The constable was just then going to take her to the Station. - The Magistrates' Clerk (to the male prisoner): Do you wish to ask Mrs Clodden any questions? - Prisoner: I do. - The Magistrates' Clerk: It is right to tell you that you can reserve your questions if you wish to do so, but you must understand that whatever you may now say or in your questions you may state may be given in evidence against you on your trial. Now, do you wish to ask her any questions? - Prisoner, without answering the Magistrates' Clerk, said to the witness: You just now stated that when my wife came down to you, you head the words "Don't, don't." How do you know it was me, as you had not seen me come into the house? - Witness: I know your voice. - Prisoner: How do you know it was my voice when you say there were several on the stairs; the other lodgers were on the stairs? - Witness: There were no other lodgers on the stairs. - Prisoner: You said just now there were others there? - Witness: In my room. - Prisoner: that's all I have to ask her. - The Magistrates' Clerk (to the female prisoner): You have heard the evidence of this witness, Do you wish to ask her any questions? - Prisoner: Yes, sir. - The Magistrates' Clerk: You are not obliged to do so. - Prisoner: No, sir. - The Magistrates' Clerk: And whatever you may say now will be given in evidence against you when you take your trial. - The female prisoner: I think she said she did not see me until ten or once in the evening. I think Mrs Clodden remembers when I passed out through the passage when she was having her tea with her husband. I asked you (to witness) whether there was any post tonight or tomorrow? - Witness: I did not see you, but I heard your voice in the passage. I told you there would be a post at half-past nine or else in the morning. - Prisoner: I said I did not know whether there would be one tonight from London. Mrs Clodden said that she did not think she saw the baby after Friday. If she remembers she saw me with the baby near her rooms in the morning, when she was taking in some meat. A person ran to your house from the butcher's into your parlour, and I had the baby in my arms standing in the passage. - Witness: I did not notice you, I was attending to Mrs Elliott and what she had brought for me. - The female prisoner said she had no further questions to ask, and the examination of Mrs Clodden was concluded. - Margaret Charlotte Haddy said: I am a widow residing at 19 Bishop's-place with my daughter, Emma Laura. I occupy two rooms on the first floor back. I have known the two prisoners a fortnight tomorrow. Their rooms are a few stairs above. I returned to the house about a quarter to nine on Saturday. I was standing on the doorstep waiting for my daughter, when I saw MRS EDWARDS coming over the road from the town way. When she came up she said, "Look at these dear little mites out at this time of night." She was referring to some children in the road. I said, "Yes; it would be better they were in bed." She said, "I always like to put mine to bed in good time," and I replied, "So do I, and always did." She then remarked, "My biggest boy would go to bed at half-past five, but I think that rather early. Seven, I think, is a good hour." Her manner was quite cool, and I noticed nothing extraordinary about her at all. I went into the house, but I don't know where she went. I went into the kitchen, and remained there until a little before eleven. My daughter came in a few minutes after nine. I never heard any noise in the house from the time I came in until eleven o'clock. A little before eleven I and my son-in-law and daughter were having supper in the kitchen. My son-in-law is a widower named Skinner, and lives in the house. The postman came about 25 minutes to 10, and called MRS EDWARDS. My daughter took in the letter, and also called MRS EDWARDS, and she met MRS EDWARDS in the stairs and delivered it. I went to Mrs Clodden's room a few minutes before eleven, and my daughter went too. Having remained there about a quarter of an hour I heard a scream and heard MRS EDWARDS come to the door and call Mrs Clodden. MRS EDWARDS said, "I must call Mrs Clodden," and I heard EDWARDS say "Don't, don't." I looked out and saw MRS EDWARDS coming over the stairs, and on her way down she said, "Mrs Clodden, Mrs Clodden, my two happy babes are dead that I loved so well," and she threw herself in Mrs Clodden's arms. She said, "When I came home I went upstairs and found it was dark, and could not find the matches to get a light with. I had washed my babes, and fed them before I went out. He had brought me in some fish during the afternoon, and I cooked it, and we sat down and had it together. I said to my husband "I must go out, and make a shilling tonight," and I took my earrings and brooch, and went to pawn them. He promised to put the children to bed during my absence." MRS EDWARDS finished by putting her arms round my neck and said, "Do come up to my room; my babies are both dead; my husband has done it." I said, "How do you know your babies are dead?" and she said, "Both their throats are cut." She added, "When my husband came in I said 'Why did you take away the matches?' and she also said, "Oh, Ned, how could you leave down the window? My both babes are very cold;" and as soon as she had a light she found their throats were cut. I looked to see if there was any blood about her. She had nothing but her chemise on, and I could see no blood on it, nor on her hands or about her body. Mrs Clodden put a dress on her, and I then went up with her as far as the door. she took the dead baby in her arms and brought it out to me. I saw EDWARDS sitting on a chair with his hands on his head. He was leaning back on the chair and said nothing. When MRS EDWARDS brought the dead baby out I told her to take it back again, and she did so. She said again "My two happy babies are both dead and my husband has done it." Her husband could hear what she was saying. I ran downstairs and told someone to go for the doctor. I did not see whether the child was dead, nor notice any blood upon it then. I ran away for a policeman. - The Magistrates' Clerk: You have constantly seen the prisoners since they have been there? - Yes, frequently. - Do you know what has been his occupation? - No. - Have you ever heard any dispute or disagreement between them? - Not at all. - Were they generally quiet and well behaved? - Yes, very quiet. - Have either of them complained of their position to you? - No, neither of them. - Have you seen either of them addicted to drink? - No, neither of them. - When did you last see the children? I don't remember seeing them at all on Saturday. - Did you on Friday? - I don't know exactly; I have been in the habit of seeing them every day. MRS EDWARDS told me the baby was eight months old. I did not see EDWARDS the whole of the evening until he was sitting in the chair. He was then in his shirt sleeves. I saw no blood upon him. - Neither of the prisoners wished to ask this witness any questions. - Mr Thomas Edward White, M.R.C.S., said: I am in practice in Plymouth. I was called to this house on Saturday about a quarter past eleven by a man from the house. I proceeded to the room upstairs, first-floor back. There were a lot of neighbours there, but I do not think either prisoner was there. I saw the bodies of the two children lying on a made bed on the floor under the window and beside the bedstead. I examined the bodies. They were both boys, apparently of the ages of eight and about a year. They were dead, and their bodies quite cold. I found the younger child's head nearly severed from the body. The cut wounded the vertebrae column and cut the windpipe, and all the large blood-vessels on both sides. The elder child's neck was cut on the left side of the throat mostly. The large blood vessels were severed on the left side, but not on the right. The windpipe was cut. They were clean cut wounds effected by a sharp instrument. They were most likely done with a razor. They were caused by a similar instrument to the razor produced by P.C. Rule. there are some stains on the razor, which I should think it likely are blood stains, but I could not say so until I have examined it microscopically. - The Magistrates' Clerk: Can you say how long the children had been dead? - I should think about two hours. - The Chairman: What time was it when you saw them? - About half-past eleven. - The Chairman: And you think they had been dead at least two hours? - Yes. - The Chairman: Can you say whether or not the children were asleep when the wounds were inflicted|? - I cannot say, but there was no evidence of any struggle. - The Chairman: Were the wounds of such a kind as would have prevented the children making a noise? I mean could they have screamed? - No. - The Magistrates' Clerk: From the nature of the wounds should you say death was instantaneous? - Very nearly. - Mr Waring: Was there very much blood in the bed where they were lying? - Yes. - As if it had been done there? - Yes. - The Magistrates' Clerk: Did you notice any blood elsewhere? - Yes, there were some blood stains on the window blind just above where the children were lying as if it had spurted out from the wounds. - Neither of the prisoners desired to ask Mr White any question. - Chief-Constable Wreford then said he did not propose to go any further with the case at present, but to ask for a remand until Wednesday. They could not get through it all today. - The prisoners were accordingly remanded to Wednesday. The Inquest. - The Inquest into the deaths of the unfortunate children was opened at three o'clock yesterday afternoon at Bishop's West Hoe Hotel, West Hoe-road, by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian. A Jury of twenty-three gentlemen was summoned. Mr F. Wreford, the chief constable, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, said the Jury had a task before them which, they were glad to know, was a rare one. It was seldom they had a direct case of the kind in Plymouth. One had occurred now, and the attention of the Jury would be particularly concerned in order that they might come to a right conclusion, so that no one might be improperly accused of the crime, but the blame fixed on the right party. The Coroner then related the facts of the murder, and afterwards added that the woman had made statements concerning the affair, while the man had said nothing. The evidence would shew that the deed was committed either by one or both the parents. There was no doubt that one of them was concerned in it, and the Jury need not trouble themselves about any outsider. There was no doubt that there was a murder, and that it was committed by a certain party on Saturday evening. The question for the Jury would be to decide to whom the evidence pointed as the guilty party. If they found that there was no proof against any particular person they would return a verdict that the poor children were murdered by some person unknown. Mr Brian explained that he could not legally hold one Inquiry for both the children. The Jury would first have to consider how the eldest boy, ALBERT EDWARD FIELDING EDWARDS, came by his death. The evidence would be carefully gone through, and by the authority of the Jury he (the Coroner) could apply it to the second case, without the witnesses repeating their statements. - The Jury were then sworn in and Mr Nicholas Barter was elected Foreman. They then went to view the body. The children were lying on some bedding spread on the floor. They were in the same condition as they were found after the murder, and presented a rather ghastly appearance. Their countenances were placid and uncontorted, and the first impression produced by a glance at the bodies was that the children were asleep when the murder was committed, and had met with almost instantaneous and nearly painless deaths. - The Jury having returned to the Hotel, the Coroner proceeded to take the evidence. Mrs Haddy was the first witness and her statement was similar to the one she gave to the Police Court in the morning, when EDWARDS and his wife were brought before the Magistrates. In answer to the Coroner, she said she was positive the first scream she heard on Saturday night was in EDWARDS'S room, and from MRS EDWARDS. It was a sudden shriek of surprise, or shock. Just before the door was opened she (witness) heard a noise as though a struggle were going on, and EDWARDS was trying to prevent his wife from running down the stairs. - The Coroner (to witness): You saw the man and the baby. Is it your belief that MRS EDWARDS was acting a feigned part, or did the woman really seem in earnest and in distress? - Witness: I perfectly believe she was in earnest and distressed. - The Coroner: Do you believe she was shamming? - Witness: No, sir, not at all. - The Coroner: You saw her, and can judge the demeanour of the woman at that time. Did it occur to you that she was acting a preconceived part? - Witness: No, sir. - The Coroner: then I put it down she was not shamming? - Witness: No, sir. - In answer to further questions Mrs Haddy stated: When I went to the room with MRS EDWARDS her husband was sitting on a chair with his hands thrown over the back of his head. I saw the dead baby and then went for a doctor, leaving my son-in-law in the room to protect MRS EDWARDS. I met a policeman and shewed him to the room. The man was then lying on his face and hands on the floor. He was not groaning or making any sound. The woman was standing in the room in great trouble and crying "NED, NED, have you done it, have you murdered my happy babes?" He replied, "No, my dear, I love them too well; I don't know who has done it." - Mr T. Gray, a Juror: What state should you say MRS EDWARDS was it? Had she been drinking? - Witness: No, sir. - Another Juror: Was it customary for these children to sleep on the floor or on the bed? - Witness: I was never in the room before Saturday night. - The Coroner said that he gathered from the evidence that MR and MRS EDWARDS "kept themselves very much to themselves" . - Mr Gray: Should you think MR EDWARDS had been drinking? - Witness: I do not know; I should think not. - Mr Ivey: Should you think it possible for MRS EDWARDS to see the window open without seeing the children lying near it with their throats cut? - Witness: I don't know whether EDWARDS had drawn the blind. there is a very dark blind at the window. - The Foreman: The witness has given her evidence in a most clear and satisfactory manner, which is very creditable to her. - Mrs Elizabeth Clodden was the next witness, and repeated almost verbatim the evidence she gave at the Police Court. Witness stated that about seven o'clock MRS EDWARDS called to her and asked what time the last letters would be delivered from London, and she replied that it would be at half-past nine, or on the following morning. - It will be remembered that the witness forgot this fact at the Court in the morning, and the female prisoner asked a question bearing on it. - Mr Gray (to witness): Do you suppose that MRS EDWARDS was in bed at the time MR EDWARDS went upstairs? - Witness: I do. - Mr Gray: Do you think there was a light in the room at the time? - Witness: No, sir. I passed into the court to get a glass of water to drink a few minutes before her husband went to the room, and I then looked up to the window and saw the room was in darkness. - Laura Haddy said: I live with my mother at 19 Bishop's-place. I knew EDWARDS and his family. On Saturday I saw the eldest boy about quarter to two o'clock. He opened the front glass door of the house for me to go out to my business. I don't remember seeing either MR or MRS EDWARDS or the baby until the evening. About twenty minutes to ten o'clock I took a letter from the postman for MRS EDWARDS and gave it to her in the stairs. I did not look into the room. At a quarter to eleven I was standing at the door of Mrs Clodden's room. I saw EDWARDS come in at the front door. He was wearing slippers and went upstairs holding to the balustrade. He went to his room. I know there was no light there because I went into the court for water and saw the room was in darkness. MRS EDWARDS read her letter by the light of the passage lamp and said that she had no matches. - The witness then detailed the circumstances of MRS EDWARDS rushing over the stairs and giving the alarm of the murder, it being a corroboration of the statements of the previous witnesses. - Mr Gray: Was MRS EDWARDS fully dressed when she came out to take the letter Witness: Yes, sir. - Mr Gray: Do you know whether the blind was down? - Witness: There is no blind in the room; there are long dark curtains, and they were pinned together. - William Newton said: I reside at 19 Bishop's-place. On Saturday night I heard a scream proceeding from MRS EDWARDS'S room, and a noise on the floor. I heard her run downstairs, and I went to her door. It was open, and I saw EDWARDS sitting there in his shirt sleeves with his hands at the back of his head. I went for the doctor. - William Skinner said: I reside at 19 Bishop's-place, and am Mrs Haddy's son-in-law. On Saturday night, about eleven o'clock, Laura Haddy came to me and said that MRS EDWARDS'S children were dead. I went out of my room and saw MRS EDWARDS in the passage. She was in a very excited state, and was crying, "My children are dead, and he has done it." I went upstairs and stood at the door, and watched EDWARDS. His wife came up and went into the room, and brought out the dead baby in her arms. She gave the body to me and I put it on a little bed on the floor. Its head fell back and I saw that his throat was cut. I then saw the body of the deceased elder boy lying on the bed and his throat was cut also. MRS EDWARDS and the others went downstairs and I remained outside the door watching EDWARDS, who was inside. I had no conversation with him, and I waited until P.C. rule came. Just before the constable came EDWARDS slid off the chair and fell on the floor on his face and hands. He said nothing, but laid there. The policeman aroused him and took him downstairs. He did not appear to be drunk. - P.C. William Rule said: At 11 p.m. on Saturday I was on duty at Millbay. In consequence of what Mrs Haddy told me I went to 19 Bishop's-place. On arriving there I saw MRS EDWARDS at the bottom of the stairs. I was in uniform, and she said, "Policeman, it is in the back room upstairs." I said, "What?" She said, "Where my husband has murdered my two children." I went upstairs at once, leaving her below. When I got to the top, I saw Mr Newton standing outside the door, which was open about two feet. I pushed the door full open, and when I came in first I looked around, and on a little made bed close by the window I saw the eldest boy lying on his back. I saw a gash in his throat, and I got a cloth to wrap around it, but I then found he was dead and quite cold. I also felt the baby, who was lying by his side. He was also quite cold and dead, and his throat was cut. There was a quantity of blood on the bed clothes. The only person in the room was EDWARDS, who was lying on the floor on his face and hands. MRS EDWARDS came up and went to the bodies. She looked on them, and said, "Oh, they're dead - dead." I got EDWARDS on his feet. His wife said "Oh, NED, NED, have you done this?" He said "What?" She replied, "My two happy babes are both murdered. Tell me if you have done it." He said "I don't know anything about it." She again said, "Tell me, tell me, if you have done it." He said, "I don't know that I have done it; I love them too well myself." There was no further conversation, and I took EDWARDS to the Police-station. He went very quietly, and on arriving there I told the Inspector on duty the facts of the case. He charged EDWARDS with murdering his two children, and he made no reply. Prisoner understood what was said to him. I locked him up and returned to 19 Bishop's-place, and went up into the prisoner's room. I made a careful search. There were a few distinct spots of blood a little distance from the bed. I found a razor in a case on the table, as I produce it now. I examined it, but found no marks of blood on it. There were no stains of blood on any of the clothing in the room, neither were there any marks on the prisoner. After I took EDWARDS from the house his wife said, "There were two razors in the basket this morning." This was after I had found one on the table. I ascertained at the Station that the man had been to Mr Jory's Windsor Arms on Saturday evening, and I found that he was in the house at half-past nine and left a razor and a pipe there. I received the razor from Mr Jory. It was in a case, and there were some dark stains on the blade. That razor was handed to Dr White this afternoon, and he examined it under a microscope. - By a Juryman: I believe the man and the woman were both perfectly sober. - William Giles Jory said: I am landlord of the Windsor Arms, Windsor-street. Last Saturday evening, about half-past nine, a man whom I now identify as EDWARD BATH EDWARDS came to my house and had a pint of cider and half an ounce of tobacco. He did not pay me for it. He left with me the case and razor now produced and a pipe bowl, saying he would call again shortly. I gave them to Mr Rule on the following morning. EDWARDS appeared to be calm, and not excited. He was sober when he left my house. I did not look at the razor particularly. EDWARDS did not return to my house. - Thomas Edward White, M.R.C.S., gave evidence similar to the statement he made in the Police-Court. The witness added: I have examined the razors found. I could see no appearance of blood on the one the constable found on the table in prisoner's room. I received the razor which was got from Mr Jory. I have examined it microscopically. It has been recently used. There are marks of smearing on it as if had been wiped. There are marks of fingers at the top, probably made in closing it. I should say the fingers were bloody at that time. The stains on the blade are stains of blood. On putting it under the microscope I had no doubt that they were marks of blood. I believe it to be human blood. - The Coroner said this was the whole of the evidence he had to produce, and he thought it highly improbable that any further witnesses could be procured. There was the undoubted fact that the children were murdered on Saturday evening, and that their throats were cut by a sharp instrument which, there was no denying, was a razor. The only question to decide was, "who did it?" The father and mother had charge of these children, and no one could impute for a moment that there was any intrusion into their room by the other persons living in the house. MR and MRS EDWARDS were evidently in very poor circumstances, as it was shewn by the fact that she was only able to pay her last week's rent on Saturday. There was no evidence that any person had access to the room except the prisoners. The time of the act was found by the doctor as about 9 p.m. It appeared that the mother was in want of money and she went out and got advances on some articles by pledging them. About a quarter to ten she returned and found money waiting for her, it having come by the post. Like an honest woman, the first thing she did was to pay a portion of the rent due. She went to bed in the dark, as she could not find the matches. So far as she is concerned it is perfectly clear. But why had her husband put away the matches? He came home about a quarter to eleven, and quickly found a light. MRS EDWARDS then discovered the awful fate of her children. She shrieked loudly and rushed downstairs. Her conduct altogether shewed that she had no desire to conceal anything. but what did her husband do? He sat in a chair with his hands on his head and said nothing. What had his conduct been? He had been to Mr Jory's public-house and disposed of a razor, on which the doctor had stated he had found blood. Either the father or the mother committed the crime. The only way in which the poor woman could be implicated would be by supposing that she had agreed with her husband, on account of their extreme poverty and distress, that she should go out and leave him home to kill the children. This, however, was not consistent with the evidence, and was only a surmise. From the witnesses statements it would seem that she was extremely shocked at the sight which met her gaze, and she immediately raised an alarm. There evidently was a murder and who committed it? - The Jury considered their verdict and after a consultation of about ten minutes returned one of "Wilful Murder" against EDWARD BATH EDWARDS. - After evidence of identification of the body of the younger child had been taken, the Jury returned a similar verdict in that case. - The Inquest terminated at 7.45 p.m., the Jury having sat nearly five hours.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 July 1884 EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at Exeter concerning the death of JOHN DAVIS, aged 34, a driver in the royal Horse Artillery, stationed at Exeter, who was drowned through the capsizing of a boat on the River Exe on Sunday last. A number of artillerymen engaged a boat on Sunday afternoon and pulled down the river. Seeing the deceased they invited him into the boat, and in the course of the return journey two of the party were changing places when the boat capsized, and its occupants were precipitated into the water. DAVIS was drowned, but the others got safely to shore. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Drowning."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 July 1884 TORQUAY - At the Inquest at Torquay lat evening on the body of WILLIAM BEARMAN, the yachtsman, who lost his life in Torbay on Monday through the over-turning of a sailing boat, somewhat conflicting evidence was given as to whether the deceased came to his death by drowning alone or whether it was not partly attributable to his being struck in the head by the steam launch which came to the rescue. The medical testimony was to the effect that death was due to both causes. An Inquest was held at Torquay last night into the cause of death of WILLIAM BEARMAN, who was drowned in the bay on Monday by the capsizing of a boat. Evidence was given as to the saving of two other occupants of the boat at the time the accident occurred but the deceased sank before assistance could reach him. The body was recovered next day, and it bled a great deal when taken out of the water, and Mr Richardson, the medical witness, gave it as his opinion that death resulted partly from injuries to the brain and partly by drowning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 July 1884 LYDFORD - Mr Coroner Fulford held an Inquest at the Convict Prisons, Princetown, yesterday afternoon, on the body of a convict named JOHN MANDIN, 49, who was convicted of theft at Leeds after several previous convictions and sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. The Jury, of which Mr Land, was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from Consumption, in accordance with the medical evidence.

MALBOROUGH - The Fatal Accident In Kingsbridge Estuary. - An Inquiry was held at the Union Inn, Salcombe, yesterday afternoon, before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr W. S. Hannaford was Foreman, into the cause of death of WILLIAM DIGMAN, the lad who was drowned on Tuesday, in the Kingsbridge Estuary through the capsizing of a sailing boat. Neither Captain Stone nor MR DIGMAN, the father of the lad, was able to attend the Inquest, both being very ill from the effects of the immersion. - Thomas Jeffery and Henry Pepperell gave evidence as to their seeing the boat capsize, and their picking up the elder DIGMAN. They also stated that they saw young DIGMAN floating in the water, and heard him shout for help after the boat went down, they being in a boat not more than twelve yards distant, but by the time they had got the father into the boat the son had disappeared. - Benjamin Horn said the body of deceased was in the boat when found, with one of the arms around the thwart. In his opinion the lad never came to the surface after the boat sank, as the body could not have got into the position in which it was found if it had. - The Jury concurred in this opinion, and thought the first two witnesses mistook Captain Stone for the deceased. They returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and at the same time expressed a strong opinion as to the danger of pressing more sail on a boat than it could safely carry, and hoped this sad event would act as a caution to others.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 July 1884 PLYMOUTH - Singular Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Plymouth Guildhall, touching the death of JAMES DRAKE, aged 50 years. It appeared that on the 16th of June the deceased and John Graygoose, were hay hauling at Moor Farm, near Budeaux. The two men were on opposite sides of the top of a wagon of hay. Graygoose pitched DRAKE'S fork to him, intending that it should fall just in front of him, but owing either to a movement of DRAKE, or to the fact of his foot being hidden at the time, the fork entered the foot. The deceased worked for some time and then gave up. Three days afterwards a doctor was called in and on the 21st ult., DRAKE went to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. He was there recommended to have his foot amputated, but he declined at first, though he afterwards consented. However, the wound had then had very serious consequences, and he died on the 25th of July. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 July 1884 PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Staddiscombe yesterday touching the death of ARTHUR JAMES DODDRIDGE, 14, who was killed by being trampled on by a horse on the 21st inst. Mary Ann Cole saw the deceased fall from the horse when at Ridge Cross, and saw the animal tread on the boy's neck. He was taken to Staddiscombe, where he was attended by Mr Jacob, surgeon. Mr Jacob attributed death, which occurred on Friday, to the accident and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 July 1884 TOTNES - Fatal Accident At Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Seven Stars Hotel, Totnes, before Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, on the body of HENRY COOMBES, of Exeter, lately employed on the repairs of Totnes Church, who was killed the previous day by falling from a scaffold erected outside the church. - William White, of Marldon, employed on the work at the church, said the deceased and himself were at work on one of the scaffolds which was about 18 feet high. He did not see how deceased slipped, but he looked round and saw him falling off face downwards. Deceased was sober as far as he knew. In the subsequent evidence some questions arose as to the deceased's being sober at the time of the accident. - Henry Ham, foreman of the works, in reply to the Coroner, said COOMBES was sober, but P.C. John Nicholls, stationed at Totnes, said that when he spoke to him in the dinner hour he was evidently under the influence of drink, and said he was going to have a glass of beer before he resumed his work. He could not walk quite straight. He was told on inquiry that COOMBES only had one glass of beer at the public-house. - Mr R. Jelley, surgeon, testified to the nature of deceased's injuries. The immediate cause of death was fracture of the skull. He could not, from his own observations, say he had had too much to drink. He had heard the remark passed. - The Coroner having pointed out the evidence had shewn the scaffold to have been well constructed and safe, said that the death of deceased was due to a pure accident, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly, giving their fees to the widow, who is left with three children

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 July 1884 DAWLISH - At the Manor Inn, Dawlish, yesterday morning, before Mr S. Hacker, an Inquest was held on the body of ALBERT COTTON, boot and shoemaker of Manor-row, Dawlish, who was found in the mill pond on the previous morning. Deceased's married daughter, CAROLINE VICKARY, stated that her father was 60 years of age. The night previous he complained of pain in his head. Mr F. M. Cann, surgeon, stated that when he was called to deceased he found life extinct. On examination, and from what he could gather, he considered he was seized with an apoplectic fit and fell into the water. - John Wills, dairyman, proved taking the body out of the water with the assistance of John Wollacott. Deceased was lying with his face downwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMPTON ST MARY - An Inquiry was held at the Lee Mill Inn, by Mr R. R. Rodd, on Tuesday, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM R. HARPER, of that village, aged 8 years, who died from lockjaw on Sunday. - Wm. Collins deposed that on the 12th inst., he was driving a cart at a slow rate at Lee Mill, when his attention was attracted by a cry from the deceased, who was climbing on the board at the back of the cart. On going to see what was the matter, he found his leg caught in the wheel and carried around so that his foot caught in a crook in the side of the cart. This crook was quite fixed in the foot. With the help of John Harper, the boy's uncle, they liberated him. Dr Randell, of Ivybridge, was summoned, but in spite of his unremitting attention the boy died on Sunday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 August 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - At an Inquest at Devonport Workhouse yesterday a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned in the case of BENJAMIN WHEELER, 62, who was found in the stokehole upon his face dead.

LYDFORD - At the convict prison at Dartmoor, a verdict of "Death from Consumption" was on Thursday returned at an Inquest on a young man, named HARROD, who was sentenced at Leeds some eight years ago to fifteen years' penal servitude for murdering a playfellow, whom he first of all felled with a heavy ship and then held under water. He has been very refractory during his term of imprisonment, and has stated that he murdered his grandmother.

EXETER - At Exeter yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of a man named HENRY MORTIMER, aged about 60 years. The deceased resided at Rack-street, and was seen early on Thursday morning by P.C. Johns on the Broadstones Quay. He was not seen after that time until a lumper, named John Bastin, saw his body near the Port Royal in the water in an upright position. He took the body out and had it conveyed to the Custom House Inn. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Shortly before three o'clock on Thursday afternoon SAMUEL BEER, a porter, 68 years of age, living in a tenement at the back of the Mount Edgcumbe Inn, Mutton Cove, committed suicide by hanging. Deceased was seen to enter the house at twenty-five minutes to three, and ten minutes later his wife went into the yard to call him to dinner, and entering a shed there, found him suspended by a piece of white spun yard round the neck. She raised an alarm, and several persons coming in response to it the body was cut down, but life was found to be extinct. Deceased is said to have been eccentric in his habits and had been drinking lately. An Inquest was held yesterday, when a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned, it transpiring that deceased had harboured an idea that he would not be able to continue to maintain himself, and that he would die in the Workhouse. This preyed much upon his mind.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 August 1884 IVYBRIDGE - Between Ivybridge and Ludbrook Mills, a little boy of 8 years of age, son of MR MATTHEWS, of Peek Mill Cottage, Ivybridge, was killed on Friday evening. He was accompanying an elder brother, aged 12, to Ludbrook Mills in a cart, when the horse shied and bolted. The elder boy was thrown out and called to his brother to jump. He neglected to do so, however, and the cart being overturned shortly afterwards he was caught under the rail and his chest was so badly crushed that he was dead when extricated by some men who were working near. An Inquest was subsequently held and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 August 1884 TOTNES - The Double Bathing Fatality At Totnes. - An Inquest was held at Totnes yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the bodies of JAMES WM. DYMENT, of Okehampton, aged 21, and WILLIAM DYMOND FISHER, 18, who were drowned in the River Dart on Saturday evening under circumstances reported in the Western Morning News yesterday. - Edward Ball, employed on the Ordnance Survey, said he went to bathe with the deceased down the Marsh to a place called Sandbanks, about a quarter of a mile down the river. Witness was the first to go into the water. The tide was low and running out. He could not swim, and went in very carefully, and tried the depth. He did not get into any deeper water than would take him to his breast. After they had all been bathing about ten minutes he looked round and saw FISHER going further down the river, apparently trying to swim. He called to him not to go further down as he would not know where he was. Just afterwards he heard DYMENT call out that FISHER was out of his depth, and he saw DYMENT strike towards him. DYMENT could swim, and he thought he must have been seized with cramp. FISHER was then from 60 to 100 feet from DYMENT. He was splashing about and witness could see he was out of his depth. When last witness saw them they were from fifteen to twenty feet apart. He went towards them and suddenly got out of his depth. DYMENT appeared to be swimming when he last saw him. When witness got out of his depth he sank repeatedly, and it was only after a very hard struggle that he reached standing ground. When he got into shallow water he looked round, but could see neither of the deceased. There was no current in the river at the time. DYMENT had been suffering from a sprained ankle, but he did not think that interfered with his swimming. - By a Juror: There was no board of warning at the spot. He had bathed there once before. The deceased were both perfectly sober and so was witness. DYMENT was a teetotaller. - Edwin Sims, a boatman residing at St. Peter's Quay, Totnes, said that from what he had been told he went to the spot referred to by the previous witness. In about half an hour they recovered the body of DYMENT, and that of FISHER was shortly afterwards picked up. In the pit where he recovered the body of DYMENT there were from 8 to 9 feet of water. The pits were caused by dredging. People were in the habit of bathing there. It certainly was a dangerous spot for people who could not swim to bathe at. - Mr Richard Jelley, surgeon, Totnes, said he was present when the body of DYMENT was taken from the water. He tried artificial respiration and other means for twenty minutes to restore him. The body had been in the water about half an hour. Mr Jelley, on concluding his evidence, said he wished to remark that the two places used for bathing were dangerous. His son was drowned some years ago at the spot above the bridge, and after that a board was fixed there, but it was soon afterwards taken down. The spot they were now inquiring about was exceedingly dangerous and as dredging was continually carried on there it ought to be made public that the place was perilous for bathers. He considered that dredging ought to be so considered as not to be dangerous to life. (Hear, hear from the Jury). He would also add that there was no safe place for bathing. - Mr L. Harris, surgeon in charge of the men employed on the Ordnance Survey, at Totnes, testified to the abstemious habits of DYMENT and to assisting in the search for the bodies. FISHER was dead when his body was recovered. - The Coroner, summing up, directed the Jury to consider the advisability of making some recommendation with a view to the prevention of accidents in future in the part of the river in which these fatalities occurred, and after a short consultation a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and a rider added calling the attention of the Dart Commissioners to the danger to life caused by dredging in the river Dart, recommending the erection of warning boards at [?] spots, and also recommending the Town Council to provide a proper bathing place.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 August 1884 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of A Naval Officer. - General regret will be felt in naval circles at the extremely sudden death at Plymouth yesterday of MR E. H. WHYTE, the paymaster of H.M.S. Indus. The deceased gentleman, who was 47 years of age, fell down in George-street at a quarter to four in the afternoon and died almost immediately. An Inquest was held in the evening at the Guildhall by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner. - Mr Charles Vawdrey, assistant-paymaster of the Indus, identified the body, and stated that he last saw MR WHYTE at two o'clock that afternoon, when he appeared to be in his usual health. Deceased had never complained to him, but he had noticed at times a very peculiar action he had of passing his hand over his right ear. - Detective Mutton stated that shortly before four o'clock he saw the deceased standing outside the Globe Hotel. MR WHYTE subsequently crossed to the other side, and when passing Messrs. Moon's shop, suddenly fell on his knees and then on his side, with his head over the gutter. Witness ran over to his assistance, and finding him gasping for breath, loosened his collar and necktie. A chair was brought from an adjoining shop and the deceased was placed in it, and an attempt was made to get him to swallow some water, but he could not do so. Detective Mutton went away to procure further assistance, and on returning five minutes afterwards he found that MR WHYTE had been taken into Messrs. Moon's shop. Dr Boolay, of the Royal Marines, who was passing at the time examined the deceased and pronounced life to be extinct. P.C. Pill took charge of the body, and had it removed to the mortuary at the Guildhall. - Fleet-surgeon Astley Cooper deposed to having known the deceased for three months, and to seeing him at 3.30 that afternoon in Old Town-street. Witness had never attended him professionally, but he had noticed a twitching of the muscles of his face, a kind of spasmodic action which would indicate his having suffered from shaking paralysis. It seemed a specie of chronic paralysis, the result of some brain mischief. Witness had no doubt that there was some mischief to the brain, which would predispose him to sudden death, and believed he had died from apoplexy. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 11 August 1884 WEST DOWN - At an Inquest held on the body of the quarryman SMALE , killed near Westdown, in a blasting accident, as reported on Saturday last, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the evidence shewing that the accident was to be in some measure attributed to the non-removal of stones loosened by a previous blasting, the surveyor of the district having been obliged to place restrictions on the breaking of fresh ground for this purpose.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 August 1884 TAVISTOCK - Evidence given at the Inquest on the body of THOMAS STEPHENS DOWN, 15, who was drowned in a pond of Devon Consols Mine on Sunday, shewed that a praise-worthy attempt at rescue was made by a miner, named James Doidge, residing at Wheal Maria. Doidge dived for DOWN and caught him by the arm, but the drowning lad clasped him around the neck, and it was with difficulty he could get clear and save himself. The body was in the water about half an hour before John Dingle, engine driver at Devon Consols, dived for and brought it ashore. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

BOVEY TRACEY - Scalded To Death In Milk. - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at Challabrook Farm, Bovey Tracey, by Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, touching the death of an infant child, aged 15 months, the son of JAMES and SARAH GILLEY, of Walworth, London. The parents were on a visit to MRS GILLEY'S father, MR HAMLYN, at the above-named farm. On Saturday morning, about half-past nine, the child came from the garden into the kitchen and held on by his mother's dress. Close by, on the floor, was a pail of hot milk which had been scalded for cream. The child by some means let go his mother's dress and fell over into the milk. He was dreadfully scalded on the hand, arm and right side, and after lingering in great pain died at seven o'clock on Monday morning. Dr Goodwin gave evidence to the effect that death resulted from the shock to the system, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this testimony.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall From A Trap. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street, last evening, touching the death of WALTER RALEIGH COLWILL, 5, who was killed by falling from the box of a wagonette on Sunday evening. From the evidence it appeared that on Sunday evening ISAAC COLWILL, the father, was driving to the stables, and in the wagonette was one of his children, two others being on the box. The party were near the three lamps on Mutley-plain, when the horse suddenly fell on its haunches. The jerk caused the deceased to fall off. He was immediately taken to Mr S. Wolferstan, surgeon, and soon after driven home in a cab. Mr Harper, surgeon, was then sent for, but the deceased died after lingering on until half-past three yesterday morning. Mrs Wyatt saw the child fall and also a wheel of the trap go over his head and arm. Mr Harper found a large abrasion over the left temple and the child was suffering from concussion of the brain. This Mr Harper connected with the injuries received by the fall, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 August 1884 EXETER - Fatal Accident To An Exeter Lady. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Hooper at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David's, Exeter, on the body of MRS AMY BESLEY, wife of MR ROBERT BESLEY, printer of that city, who died last evening from the effects of injuries sustained by a carriage accident. On Tuesday last the deceased, with her son, a little boy, was driving in a carriage near the Obelisk, in the direction of the city, when the horse attached to the vehicle shied and bolted. One of the wheels of the carriage came in contact with a furniture wagon which was coming in an opposite direction, and MRS BESLEY and her son were thrown out. The former was picked up in an unconscious condition, and conveyed to her home in Carlton-terrace, St David's, where she lingered until Sunday evening. Mr Moon, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that death resulted from fracture of the skull and concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 22 August 1884 EAST STONEHOUSE - A man named ROBERT HAWKING, of 4 William-street, Morice Town, was yesterday morning found drowned off the new jetty, Stonehouse. HAWKING with another bargeman - Thomas Scott - had loaded the barge the night before with a quantity of earth and refuse from the graving dock, intending to drop it outside the Breakwater in the morning. They anchored off the jetty in apparent safety, but at one o'clock in the morning the barge sank. Scott managed to get out through the hatchway and swim to land, but it is supposed HAWKING was over-powered by the water before he could follow through the rather narrow opening. The reason of the vessel's sinking at present remains a mystery. Joseph Jennings, diver, in the Great Western Railway Company's employ, brought up the body. An Inquest was held in the afternoon at the Market House Hotel, before Mr R. R. Rodd, the Coroner, who adjourned the Inquiry until Tuesday.

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned yesterday at the Inquest on AMELIA HAWKEN, of 47 Flora-street, Plymouth, who died suddenly on Tuesday.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 August 1884 EXETER - Alleged Manslaughter Near Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday, on the body of a man named FRANCIS LEY, who has died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital as the result of a wound alleged to have been sustained in the course of a quarrel with his wife. MRS LEY was present during the Enquiry, and according to the statements elicited in the course of the evidence, it seems that on the 10th inst., the deceased, who was a paper maker, residing at Countess Weir, and was 28 years of age, was in the house of his brother-in-law, a man named Langdon, Mrs Langdon and RICHARD LEY, a brother of the deceased, being also present. They were taking supper together when MRS LEY made her appearance and ordered her husband home. According to the statement of one of the witnesses, MRS LEY was somewhat the worse for liquor and was asked by Langdon to go outside. She did so, but stood on the step at the outside of the passage, behaving in a very excited manner and insisting all the time upon being accompanied by her husband, and calling upon him to come home and mind his half-starved children. Deceased went out to her, but almost immediately returned, exclaiming, "She's done for me now, Dick." Blood was flowing from the left side of his forehead, and deceased fell into his brother's arms. He was unable to give any account as to how the wound had been inflicted. When, shortly afterwards, he had sufficiently recovered, RICHARD LEY accompanied his brother home towards Countess Weir. On the way deceased called at his brother's house and wished his sister-in-law farewell. When near home LEY said he was affair to go home in case his wife should murder him. His brother asked him to sleep at his house, to which he readily assented. On the following morning deceased left, stating that he intended to consult a magistrate (Mr Hamilton) about getting a separation from his wife. On Monday morning last the deceased was admitted into the Hospital. He complained of stiffness of the jaws, and on the following morning died from lock-jaw. A post-mortem examination was made by Mr F. H. Norville, acting house surgeon, from which it was ascertained that the cause of death was tetanus, unaccompanied by any other internal disease. The doctor gave it as his opinion that the exciting cause of the tetanus was most probably the blow on the forehead, which the deceased told him had been caused by a fall on the previous Sunday week. It seems that the deceased and his wife did not live happily together, and the apparent cause was a jealousy of RICHARD LEY'S wife. No instrument was seen in his wife's hand, and beyond his statement to the house surgeon, deceased was unable to give any account as to the manner in which the wound was inflicted. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said the case was a very sad one. The woman appeared to be of a jealous and excitable temperament. Whether there was any truth in the statement about the half starved children it was impossible to say, but jealousy appeared to have been at work. It was clear from the evidence of Mrs Langdon that MRS LEY made a jump at her husband. That was an illegal act and if the Jury thought that they fell during the quarrel or that death was the result of a blow inflicted during the struggle, they were bound to convict the wife of manslaughter. The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against SARAH LEY.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 August 1884 LONDON - Suicide Of A Plymothian In London. - An adjourned Inquest as to the death of ELON ABDON LUKE, lately a tradesman carrying on business in Plymouth, was resumed on Saturday afternoon at the Islington Coroner's Court, North London, before the Deputy-Coroner for Middlesex, Dr Wynn Westcott. The deceased was found dead in bed on August 14th, at lodgings he had occupied for about two months in Sudely-street, Islington. He had evidently committed suicide by strangulation. Very little was known of him by his landlady, a respectable middle-aged widow, dependent upon her income as a lodging-house keeper, except that he had occupied a single upper room in her house for eight weeks, and was so addicted to intemperance that she was compelled to give him notice to leave. The inquiries of the Coroner's Officer elicited that the deceased came from Plymouth, and had resided in the neighbourhood for nearly eighteen months, first in lodgings in an adjoining street, then with his wife and family while he carried on a considerable business as an outfitter in Pitfield-street, Hoxton, and afterwards at the house in Sudely-street, where he died. The whole of the evidence tended to shew that since the return of his wife and family to Plymouth the deceased had been drinking heavily, and had behaved very strangely in many respects. A constable, who was called in by the lodging-house keeper when she discovered the tragedy which had taken place, was able to inform the Court that on the night of the Hyde Park demonstration, July 21st, the deceased appealed to him in the street at one a.m. to see him home, as he had been roughly used by some men in the vicinity, and also that he was told at the Prince Alfred public-house, in the street where deceased had lodged, that deceased "was a great drinker and when he had any money would spend it all in drink." To this constable the deceased gave his name as EGAN L. LUKE." To his late landlady he was known as EDWARD LUKE. The name in which letters were addressed to him at his former lodgings was Grant. At times deceased had taken bromide of potassium, a well-known soothing medicine, and he had also used chloral, and Mrs Dilworth, the "landlady" of the house in which he lived, stated that at times he seemed stupefied. She was aware that his wife and three children were living in Plymouth, and that was also known at his former lodgings, but for some reason a correspondence which he had carried on with a young woman in South London was conducted from the address he had left for twelve months and in the name of Ernest Grant. The person in question, Amelia Sawyer by name, was the widow of a boat-builder and lived at New Cross, six or eight miles from the locality of Sudely-street - in fact quite at the other end of London. She was not known to the people with whom he lodged, and it seems she honestly believed that he was a widower and "kept company" with him with a view to marriage. Mrs Sawyer is a buxom woman, of no particular intellectual capacity. She was present at the Inquest on each occasion, and her behaviour was highly decorous, but she seemed on Saturday not to be very deeply impressed by the circumstances. She was only able to state at the opening of the Inquest that she had known deceased for six or seven weeks and had kept company with him and corresponded with him. He had told her he was a widower and that he had two children, a boy and girl. She had heard that one of his sisters had committed suicide, but had never heard him threaten to destroy himself. On one occasion when he met her he seemed strange in his manner, but he was a rational man in a general way; and on that occasion he told her he had been taking chloral. Mrs Dilworth, the lodging-house keeper, stated to the Coroner and Jury that MR LUKE continually drank to excess after losing a situation he had held in Holloway-road a month since, and she consequently gave him notice to quit. At times he seemed stupefied. He used to take various articles out with him, and she believed he pawned them to buy drink. She had often heard him speak about people committing suicide. He was an excitable man. On Wednesday night, August 13th, he returned home after witness was in bed. She went to bed about 11.30. She heard him come in and go upstairs. He walked rather heavily. On the following day she went to his bedroom door three times and knocked, but received no answer. As she had given him notice to leave, she thought he might be angry with her, and would not reply. After knocking for the third time, she burst open the door, and saw the deceased in bed, either in a fit or dead, and she fetched a doctor. It was then ten minutes to seven on the Thursday evening, and Dr Archibald Christy, who was called in, found that the man had been dead at least five or six hours. A white scarf was twisted tightly round his neck, a walking stick having been used to twist it, and one end of the stick had caught in the top rail of the bed. The deceased was lying in the bed in his night-shirt, partially covered with the bedclothes. Dr Christy found carious papers near the deceased, which had evidently been written by him just previous to the commission of the fatal act. The language in which the deceased had written indicated very clearly his excited condition at the time of his death, and the determination with which he had acted. They were begun apparently on the Wednesday evening and completed on Thursday after one attempt at suicide had failed. They consisted of a sort of testamentary document, a letter to the landlady, and a letter to Mrs Sawyer, the person alluded to above. The will was couched in the following terms:- "14th August, 1884, - 'My last will and testament are to leave everything to Mrs Sawyer. She must use her discretion. MRS R. E. LUKE and children I am thinking of, and my mother. God bless them! Others have only displayed so much selfishness and even vindictiveness. I can only wish them well. Signed by me, this 14th August, E. L. LUKE, in the presence of God Almighty. Choral has not taken effect. Must try again. If possible, I should like to lay in my grave by my little Mary and Mrs Fulton, but not in the vault with my sister Polly. - E. L. LUKE." - The letter to Mrs Sawyer was handed to her in Court by the Coroner's Officer on Saturday afternoon as soon as the Inquest was over. It was in the following terms:- "Wednesday, 13th August, 1884 - My last words to you, Milly, are - I have failed. My head is bad. I prefer death to madness. You will find instructions in the pocket of my double-breasted coat. In the drawer in the left-hand side of my box you will discover letters, which do not read, but destroy. I have played to win, but have lost. Everything is yours; and my last thoughts are of you. Do not grieve. Perhaps an all-wise Providence, in His infinite mercy, will forgive me, and bring us yet together. You must live for your children's sakes. It is morning now (Thursday) and I weary and tired with my efforts. Whatever may be my faults, and however much I have hidden from you, remember if all had gone well I would have been all in all to you. With best hopes for your future, I am yours only, ERNEST GRANT, alias E. L. LUKE." - The first note written was one evidently intended for the landlady, but not directed in any way, and was as follows: - "I am exceedingly sorry to disappoint you. It was beyond my ability to meet your legal demands until my people will settle with me. I have tried hard, but failed. I am too ill; my head is going wrong. You had better communicate at once with my father, THOMAS LUKE, 15 and 16 Union-street, Plymouth, by telegram. I cannot just now do more than express my sincere regret. - Yours, E. L. LUKE." - On the other side of the same sheet of paper was this additional communication, the contents of which shew it to have been also intended for Mrs Dilworth:- " You will permit Mrs Amelia Sawyer, of 65 Monson-road, New-cross-road, to take possession of my effects, and carry out the instructions I have left for her. She will pay if absolutely necessary. Break the news gently to her, for she has been too good to me. - ERNEST GRANT, alias E. L. LUKE." - It will be observed that none of the letters were signed by the deceased in his correct name, and at the opening of the Inquest the Coroner expressed doubt as to what was really the name of the deceased. The Jury were dissatisfied also that no communication had been made to his relatives, as a card found in his room contained the name "E. A. LUKE and Co., merchant outfitters, Plymouth." In order, therefore, to obtain evidence of identity, the Inquest was adjourned to Saturday last, when the father of the deceased and his late employer were called. - MR THOMAS LUKE, of West Park, Ivybridge, Devon, said the deceased was his second son, and was 25 last birthday. - Twenty-five? - No, 35. I daresay I may make some mistakes. I am suffering from incipient paralysis of the brain. - You identified the body in the mortuary? - Yes, but I did not recognise it by the photograph. - Was he married or single? - He was married, and his wife and three children were alive. He had been separated from his wife for a short time - a very short time on this occasion - but he had been separated from his wife on previous occasions. I have seen his wife recently - so lately as Tuesday last. - Was your son a man of sound mind? - I think not. - What evidence have you of his mental unsoundness? - He would get different hallucinations and monomania's on various subjects. He had delusions - very great delusions. - Has that been for long? - As soon as he began to drink it grew on him. He has had delusions of a very marked character for the last ten years. - He has been intemperate for ten years then? - About twelve, but for ten years he has drunk very hard. - When did you last see him? - I saw him two years ago this month. - And next? - Not since. - Your son had been in business had he not? - Yes for 15 years, as a hosier and man's outfitter. - Was he successful in business? - Most extremely successful. - But recently? - He was successful, but drink was the cause of his breaking down. - He had not failed in business then? - Yes, he failed two years ago. But he went into court with effects of 20s. in the £, and after he had passed through the ordeal of bankruptcy and then referred back, and various other things I cannot understand, his effects rendered 12s. 6d. in the £. - Since then has he had any business? - Yes, in London, in Pitfield-street. There he was also very successful. - But he failed there did he not? - Yes, he failed, unfortunately from the same cause. - From intemperance? - Yes, intemperance. - Mr George Lockwood, hosier, of 334 Holloway-road, said the deceased was lately in his employ for two weeks. - Was he intemperate during that time? - I am sorry to say he was from time to time. He gave me fair satisfaction, but from what I have since heard I find he went continually to the public-house. - Was there anything peculiar in his manner? - He would look at the customers in a fixed way, and would then put goods back into the fixture without serving the customer. - By a Juror: He was absent minded. - THOMAS LUKE recalled, said that so far as he was aware his son had no property remaining, except the clothes in which he stood. - The Coroner: There were a large number of pawn-tickets found on him you know? - So I understand, but I think these would be goods that had been pawned from time to time, redeemed and re-pawned. That is my opinion. - A Juror: He mentioned some property that he would like to be given to this Mrs Sawyer? - The Coroner: Yes, he says I leave everything to Mrs Sawyer. - The Coroner: I have a letter here from the Mayor of Plymouth, who says:- "I have read a report in the papers that the father of the deceased had treated him harshly," and adds that he is very sorry to hear of that report, and he thinks it grossly unjustifiable. - A Juror: What has that to do with the case? - The Coroner: You would like to have a report of the kind denied by a person in such a position of authority as the Mayor of Plymouth. - The Coroner, to MR LUKE: Is there any history of insanity in the family? - Witness: Perhaps, sir, I may be spared that question. - A Juror: That is no answer. We were told a sister died insane - committed suicide. - Another Juror: That was only hearsay. - The Coroner, after a consultation among the Jury: You find, gentlemen, that the cause of death in this case was that the deceased, having tied a scarf round his neck, attached it to his stick, caused suffocation, which resulted in his death; and you find, further, that the deceased committed suicide, being at the time in an unsound state of mind. The Jury assented and directions having been given for disposal of the few effects left by the deceased at his lodgings, the proceedings concluded.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 August 1884 PLYMOUTH - Singular Death In Sutton Pool. Truth Or Coincidence. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth guildhall last evening, as to the death of DANIEL BOX, fisherman, aged about 48, who was drowned in Sutton Pool yesterday morning. About six weeks ago it was reported by another fisherman that he had found BOX under a tree near Roborough, about to commit suicide, and that his timely arrival had prevented him from carrying his rash purpose into execution. BOX, however, indignantly denied the accusation and afterwards had some high words with the man who had brought the charge against him. Moreover the police, after investigating the matter, came to the conclusion that there was no evidence to sustain a prosecution for attempted suicide. There was certainly nothing in the testimony of the witnesses at the Inquiry yesterday to indicate that BOX'S death was otherwise than accidental. - Thomas James Trim, fisherman, 14 Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, stated that he worked in the drift boat Sisters, of Plymouth, with the deceased. Witness was in charge of the boat and BOX was in charge of the nets, which were his property. They were out fishing on Sunday night and came into Sutton Pool between three and four o'clock on Monday morning. They landed their catch at the Fish Quay, and then proceeded towards their moorings at the North Quay. Witness was forward rolling the foresail round the stay, and deceased was aft at the tiller with another man called Stokes. Witness looked round to ask BOX to let go the fore sheet and saw him in the act of throwing over the anchor which formed their stern moorings. The deceased seemed to get caught or in some way entangled in the anchor, and went overboard with it. Witness ran aft, but could see nothing of the unfortunate man, and he never rose to the surface as he would if he had not been held down. After about half an hour's "creeping" they recovered the body and witness then saw that the chain attached to the anchor had a half turn round one of the legs of the deceased. It appeared to witness to be a pure accident. There had been no unpleasantness or disagreement on board the boat. - Henry Stokes, fisherman, stated that he was standing with his back to deceased pulling an oar when the accident occurred. He heard a sudden plunge in the water and looked round. BOX had then disappeared, together with the anchor. The chain attached to the anchor had previously been lying in a coil ready to run out clear; it was only between two and three fathoms long. - Philip Popham, fisherman, stated that he assisted to "creep" for deceased's body. The depth of water at the spot where it was found was 15 or 16 feet and the chain was round his legs. - P.C. Gay deposed that he was at the North Quay when the body was landed. He had it conveyed to the mortuary where he searched it. The body was in the water more than half an hour, and there was no hope of restoring life. Nineteen shillings and a penny were found upon the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 August 1884 EAST STONEHOUSE - At an Inquest yesterday at Stonehouse on the body of RICHARD HAWKING, who was drowned in the barge Ann, of Saltash, which sank at her moorings in the Millbay Docks, the man left in charge with the deceased said that when the barge went down he swam to a steamer astern of her (said by the captain of the barge to be the Sir Walter Raleigh) and asked to be taken aboard until daylight. The Foreman of the Jury characterised this as most inhuman behaviour.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 August 1884 TORQUAY - The Bathing Fatality At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Torre, Torquay, yesterday before Mr Edmonds, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner, on the body of EDWIN JOHN VIGGERS, carpenter, aged 22, who sustained fatal injuries whilst bathing. The evidence went to shew that the deceased's parents live at 8 Bath-terrace, Torre, and that he was on a visit to them from London. He had made an appointment to meet his two cousins, young men named Easterbrook, at seven o'clock on Tuesday morning for a bathe together on Livermead beach. The cousins bathed there accordingly, but deceased was not in time, and they met him on their way back, at Corbyn's Head. He expressed his intention of bathing at this spot, and dived off from a ledge of rocks. It appears that the water was rather thick at the time and that there was a swell on. The deceased reappeared about nine or ten feet from where he plunged in, but as his head did not come above the water one of his cousins, Reuben Easterbrook, thinking that something was wrong, immediately pulled off his coat and jumped into about 3 feet 6 inches of water, and brought out the deceased. The latter had then lost the use of his legs. He was, however, quite sensible, and exclaimed "I'm done for." The deceased was a good swimmer and accustomed to diving, and he had evidently jumped into shallow water and struck himself. There was a slight bruise on his breast but none on his head. From the fact, however, of the lower part of his body being paralysed, it was considered that he had injured his spine. P.C. Prestwood, of Cockington, happened to be close at hand at the time, and he obtained some brandy for the deceased who was then dressed and taken home in a cab. He was attended to by Dr Richardson. He retained consciousness up to two o'clock, when symptoms of concussion of the brain shewed themselves and after lingering for several hours he died at half-past ten the same night. The Jury, of whom Mr A. Peek was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 September 1884 PLYMOUTH - At the Plymouth Office of the Ordnance Survey Authorities on Saturday evening a little girl six years of age, a daughter of SERGEANT-MAJOR GILLIES, of 5 Princess-square, fell over the banisters while running quickly downstairs. The distance to the floor below was 20 feet, and the child was picked up senseless, with her skull badly fractured. She died next morning. An Inquest was held yesterday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury added a rider calling the attention of the tenant of the building to the dangerous nature of the spot at which the accident occurred.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of BESSIE SMEATH, a single woman, aged 35, who was drowned in the River Exe on Saturday morning. From the evidence it appeared the deceased was a certificated school-mistress at Honiton, and had come to Exeter to spend her holidays. She was suffering from liver complaint and had been attended by Dr Shortridge. Deceased was in a depressed state of mind, but her condition appeared to have been somewhat improved during her visit. On Saturday morning she went for a walk and was seen to walk into the canal near the Weir fields by a dairyman named Bricknell. Being unable to swim the latter ran for assistance. Deceased was taken out of the water by two men, but too late to admit of animation being restored. - Another witness deposed that at the spot where the deceased went into the water it was very shallow, and would have admitted of anyone saving the deceased without necessarily being able to swim. A verdict of "Suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity" was returned by the Jury.

LONDON - Sudden Death Of A Torquay Gentleman In London. - An Inquest has been held at South Norwood by Mr Hicks, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MAJOR THOMAS WILLIAM KINDER, aged 66, retired from the militia, whose home was at Beaumont, Lincombe Hill-road, Torquay. Major Wood, of the Royal Artillery, identified the body of the deceased, whom he had known for eighteen years. He knew the deceased had suffered from heart disease. He had been abroad a great deal. For three years he was governor of the Mint at Hongkong, and for five years director of the Mint of Japan, he then being employed under the Japanese Government. About eight or nine days ago he came up to town on some business and had to go to South Norwood to arrange about some property, of which he was trustee, the owner being the widow of an old friend of his. Witness believed he was only in Norwood one day. - Inspector Moon, of the London, Brighton and South-Coast railway, said that on Tuesday night the deceased entered Norwood Junction Station and inquired of witness the time of the London trains, and after he had been told he went to the time-bill to compare with a card he had with him, and whilst thus engaged he fell forward and died, without a murmur in witness's arms. - Dr Churchward said he had made a post-mortem examination, and found that deceased died from syncope of the heart. The liver and kidneys were much diseased, no doubt from long residence in a hot country and the heart disease was secondary to the disease of the kidneys. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 September 1884 EXETER - Singular Death At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of MARY LEE, landlady of the Elephant and Castle Inn, who died on Sunday under somewhat peculiar circumstances. The deceased, who was over 70 years of age, ordered a servant girl to let loose a terrier dog which was barking in the yard. The girl did so, and was set upon by the animal and badly bitten in one of her legs. Her screams attracted MRS LEE to the spot, and while assisting the girl the deceased became hysterical and fell down. She was removed to a seat and brandy was administered, but before the arrival of a medical man the unfortunate woman died. Death, according to the medical testimony, was due to heart disease, intensified, probably, by excitement. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The adjourned Inquest on the body of RICHARD HOCKING, a bargeman, who was drowned on the night of August 21st by the sinking of the barge Anne, at the Great Western Docks, was held yesterday. Captain Short, the Cattewater harbour-master, gave a report of the condition of the barge, stating that it was old and in bad condition, the butts being open and there being seams in the vessel. There was a hole in the port side, evidently from the striking of the anchor. The Coroner, in summing up, said he had done as the Jury had requested in twice adjourning the Inquest and obtaining technical evidence, and he hoped that they were now satisfied. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - A Retired Naval Officer Drowned At Stonehouse. The Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday concerning the death of MR GEORGE JAMES GRAY, aged 34, retired surgeon of the Royal Navy, son of Lieutenant-Colonel GRAY, 79 Durnford-street, who was drowned whilst bathing at the Marines' bathing-place, Longroom, on the previous morning. Mr T. S. Bayly was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner having referred to the painful duty which they had to perform, briefly described the circumstances under which MR GRAY met his death. Of the conduct of Mr Barber and Mr Happs, who plunged in after the deceased, he thought the Jury would form a high opinion after hearing the evidence. He should, however, have something to say about that by-and-bye. - Lieutenant-Colonel GRAY, father of the deceased, stated that the latter left the house about 6.30 on the previous morning for the purpose of bathing. He was a good swimmer and formerly bathed a great deal. He had not, however, been in the water much lately. - Private James Maidment, R.M.L.I., stated he was on duty as sentry on Monday morning at the Longroom bathing-place. Deceased came there about 6.30 with a bathing-towel. He undressed and went into the water and swam out between fifty and sixty yards. he then turned and swam back, but when about ten or fifteen yards from the shore - it being then high water - he seemed to be swimming with one hand. Witness turned his back to the swimmer and immediately afterwards he heard a plunge in the water. He looked round and saw two civilians swimming towards MR GRAY. He was brought to land and a doctor was sent for, every effort being made meanwhile to restore animation. - By the Jury: Deceased made no noise. He was floating with his head down when the civilians reached him. - A Juror: Was one of the surgeons of the Infirmary sent for? - The Coroner: That has nothing to do with the cause of death. - The Foreman: I think that is a fair question, sir. - The Coroner: You sent for the Royal Marine doctor? - Witness: Yes, sir. - The Coroner: That has nothing to do with the cause of death; if the Jury like to say anything about the matter by-and-bye I shall be glad to obey their wishes. - Mr Wills: I think this is an occasion when the fullest Inquiry should be made. If a censure is deserved now is the proper opportunity for administering it. - The Coroner: After we have found the cause of death that may be discussed. - The witness, in reply to further questions, said about fifteen or twenty minutes elapsed between the time of sending for Dr Leah and his arrival. Deceased did not appear to be swimming with one hand because he was unable to use the other. He did not struggle and gave no indication of his being in a dangerous condition. On the contrary, his progress through the water was so rapid that he apepared an unusually strong swimmer. - Robert Drew, mason's labourer, stated that he was at Longroom when deceased entered the water. MR GRAY returned to within fourteen or fifteen yards of the land when his head fell in the water and his legs moved as if he were trying to dive. Two gentlemen rushed into the water and brought deceased ashore. Witness then went to the Infirmary and after some delay caused by his ringing the wrong bell the doctor came down. Witness told him what had occurred and he asked whether the man at Longroom belonged to the army or navy. Witness replied that he did not know, but that he had on civilian clothes. The doctor then told him to call the corporal, and he did so, and the corporal then said that the witness was to go to Dr Leah about the matter. - The Coroner: Now we are in order. This is evidence. - By the Jury: The surgeon at the Infirmary told the corporal that he (witness) was to go and fetch Dr Leah, and the corporal brought him the message. He called Dr Leah and that gentleman was down very shortly after witness had got back to the bathing-place. He told the doctor at the Infirmary that the man appeared dying and that he did not know whether he was breathing or not. - Mr Wills: If that man had been breathing the presence of a doctor a few minutes earlier might have saved his life. - The Coroner: But you must remember that no doctor is bound to attend by law. - Mr Wills: I don't know whether professional etiquette would stand in the way of an army doctor attending a case when a civilian might be called in; but I think a man who is paid by the country might have attended under pressing circumstances of this nature, when every second was precious. He thought it shewed very bad taste, to say the least of it. - The Coroner: you must not make statements now. That will come afterwards. - Witness, continuing, said the two civilians who plunged into the water kept MR GRAY'S head above water until he was on shore. The Infirmary doctor seemed to have just risen from his bed. - The Foreman: That might be some extenuation. - Dr Leah stated that yesterday morning about 12 minutes past seven he was called by the last witness to the bathing place. When he arrived everything was being properly done by those present to restore animation. MR GRAY was, however, dead, and the body was chilled. Had there been a plank and blankets kept at the bathing place there might have been a much better chance of restoring animation. As it was the deceased was exposed on a cold concrete platform with the wind playing round him, and any heat that might be generated under such circumstances would be immediately lost. From the evidence he had heard, in his opinion deceased had an epileptic convulsion in the water, the immediate cause of death being suffocation from drowning. He knew by hearsay that MR GRAY was invalided out of the service on account of an epileptic disposition. He was not a healthy man. With regard to the remarks of Mr Wills he should like to say that there was no etiquette to prevent a doctor attending a case when he was sent for. He would, however, remind the Jury that in the case of the Infirmary surgeon they were dealing with a public officer who was told off for certain duty which he was always expected to be ready to perform. Had he left his post to attend to other matters he might have been acting contrary to orders. - The Coroner said that had nothing to do with the cause of death, but if the Jury wished it he would write to the colonel calling his attention to the matter. - The Jury then returned a verdict to the effect that deceased met his death by Drowning, caused by an Epileptic Convulsion. - The Coroner then remarked that he thought their thanks and the thanks of the public were due to Messrs. Barber and Happs, 69 East-street, Stonehouse, who so gallantly jumped into the water with their clothes on and brought deceased to the shore. - The Foreman endorsed these remarks of the Coroner's and both Coroner and Jury then expressed their sympathy with Colonel GRAY and the relatives of the deceased. - The Jury also requested the Coroner to write to the Colonel-Commandant of Marines, calling his attention to the desirability of keeping some appliances for saving life and restoring animation in the apparently-drowned at the Longroom bathing-place.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 September 1884 SOUTH TAWTON - Suicide Of A South Zeal Tradesman. - A painful sensation was caused at South Zeal, and subsequently in Okehampton Market, on Saturday by a rumour, which unhappily turned out to be well-founded, that MR ALBERT POWLESLAND, butcher, of South Zeal, had committed suicide by cutting his throat. MR POWLESLAND was well known and much respected in the neighbourhood in which he was somewhat widely known. He had a stall in Okehampton Market and has been in business a year and a half. He was only 22 years of age. An opinion has been expressed that he had some financial difficulties and he had been observed to be somewhat nervous and uneasy for some time past. He was only once heard to speak after he had committed the act, uttering the words, "The Lord have mercy on my soul." An Inquest was held on Saturday evening, the Jury returning a verdict that the deceased Committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

ILFRACOMBE - The Tragic Occurrence At Ilfracombe. - An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe by Mr Bromham on Saturday on the body of MR FREDERICK H. BASLEY, auctioneer, of London, who was supposed to have shot himself with a double-barrelled gun on board the yacht Maude, of which he was the owner. - John Corner, the boatman who was engaged by the deceased, said he knew him very well. His office was at Cadogan-place, Belgrave-square, London. He had been out in the yacht every day and appeared in excellent spirits on the morning of the day on which he met with his death. On that day he took his own gun with him for the purpose of shooting gulls. In the afternoon he passed a remark about his gun being rusty and was below and commenced rubbing it with a chamois leather. Shortly afterwards he heard a report and going down saw MR BASLEY was shot. He was quite dead. The gun had previously gone off of its own accord, and was out of order a few days before when witness narrowly escaped being shot. The weapon was produced and examined in court, the result being that one trigger was found to have a very light pull and the other to go very hard. It was pronounced to be decidedly dangerous. - Other testimony as to the nature of the weapon having been given, Mr Foquett, surgeon, said he found the roof of the skull had been completely blown away. The skin just above the nose was charred and the weapon must have been close to the face when it exploded. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 September 1884 SLAPTON - An Inquest has been held at Slapton by Mr Sidney Hacker, the County Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY COAKER, senr., fisherman of Dartmouth, whose body was found in the water near the Sands Hotel, on Tuesday morning. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 September 1884 PLYMOUTH - Starved To Death At Plymouth. Shocking Privations. - Painful disclosures were yesterday made at the Inquest at Plymouth on the body of ELIZA SPARKS, 68, of 23 Howe-street. Deceased had occupied, with a daughter and two sons, one small room at the above address. One of her sons was sent to prison on Tuesday week and the other earned as a labourer 17s. a week, of which amount he paid 1s. 6d. as rent. According to his own statement he expended about 14s. a week in the maintenance of the family, and he added that his mother and sister might have had things at the shops, for which he would have paid, if they had cared to do so. Not much, however, seems to have been made of this privilege. The bed upon which the mother and sister slept was of the most wretched description, and the two sons, when all were at home, slept on the floor. The unfortunate woman, it seems, had been ailing for some time before her death, and had not been out of doors for three weeks as she had no clothes and was getting blind. When examined before the Coroner the son said he bought two pounds of pork on Saturday and on Sunday they all had some of it. On Monday he took away the rest when he went to work and he could not say whether his mother had anything to eat from that day to Wednesday, as he was away at Plympton, but he gave her money on Monday. When he came home on Wednesday night his mother was lying on the bedstead. She asked him the time, but did not complain or make any request for food. He rose at half-past four on Thursday morning and his mother had some tea. He went away to work at five, and his mother died soon after, though he did not know it until nine o'clock at night. - The Relieving Officer (Mr Annear) said the mother had not received relief for the past six years. He saw deceased's daughter at the Guildhall on Thursday morning. She was in such a condition that a cab could not be used for her conveyance to the Workhouse. She was now in a very bad state. - P.C. Venton described the condition of the deceased when he visited the house on Thursday morning as very shocking. The bed had only a sack and a few rags. Deceased was without any clothing but an old jacket, and was in a filthy state. The daughter, whom he believed to be not right in her mind (and who could give no coherent account to the Jury), he took to the Police Station. - At this stage of the proceedings the Jury visited the house in which deceased had resided, and expressed themselves astounded and horrified that such a hole could be found in Plymouth. The room was at the outside big enough for two to sleep in only, and the floor was so coated that the Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) received the impression that there were no boards, and that it was simply an earthen floor. - Expressing his opinion on the state of affairs, Mr Brian said he hoped there was not such another place in Plymouth, but from what he had just before been told he was afraid there was. It was the worst case he had ever seen. The poor woman was nothing but a skeleton, the bones being covered by skin and hardly anything more. She seemed to have been in a condition which forbade her getting any food and her daughter was quite incompetent to procure any. Were the son a better educated man he would stand in a very serious position, but his neglect seemed to have arisen more from an utter indifference to his surrounds than from intent. It was a wonder mother and daughter were not both dead. He was strongly of opinion the poor woman had been starved to death. - Mr Robins (a Juror) asked whether the Sanitary Authority had not the power to visit such places as that they had visited, and was informed that they could only enter a house on information received. There was a book at the Guildhall in which anyone could make an entry calling the attention of the Authority to premises they thought required visiting. - A verdict that the deceased died of Starvation, relief not having been applied for in the proper quarter, was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 September 1884 BIDEFORD - The Sudden Death At Bideford. - An Inquest was held at Bideford on Saturday on the body of MR GREGORY, veterinary surgeon, who was found dead by the roadside on the previous day. The evidence shewed plainly that the deceased could not have been on his horse at all when he fell, as the body was found close to the hedge, and not bruised or dusty. The medical evidence was to the effect that death, in all probability, resulted from apoplexy. Deceased some months ago complained of and was treated for giddiness and fullness of the head, and had himself apprehended brain disturbance. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - The Accident At Barnstaple Junction. - MR JOHN ELSTON, boot and shoe manufacturer, of Crediton, who was terribly injured at the Junction Station at Barnstaple, on the London and South Western Railway, on Friday, died at the Barnstaple and North Devon Infirmary two hours after the accident. An Inquest was held on Saturday, when MR FRED ELSTON, deceased's son, gave evidence of identification, and said his father was 62 years of age. He left Crediton on Friday morning to go to Barnstaple. Deceased was subject to fits and was of unsteady gait. Further evidence shewed that deceased was quite sober when the accident happened. He had attempted to cross the line earlier in the evening, but was led back by a porter, replying in a good-tempered manner when he was spoken to. The evidence of Mr J. W. Ware, house surgeon at the Infirmary, was to the effect that when the deceased was admitted to the Institution the medical staff decided to perform no operation as he was in a dying condition. The right leg was fractured and also the left leg below the knee, the foot merely hanging by a little skin. He was unconscious to the time of death, which resulted from loss of blood and shock to the system. Mr W. P. Bencraft, who represented the family, asked that the fact that deceased was sober at the time of the accident might be incorporated in the verdict, as some misunderstanding had arisen on the point, but the Coroner said there was no need for this as there had been no question of the fact in the evidence. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

ASHBURTON - A Coroner's Jury at Ashburton on Saturday evening returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of a lad named WILLIAM UNDERHILL who was found in a stagnant pool in a garden at the back of his mother's house, and died soon afterwards.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 September 1884 LYDFORD - The Suicide In Dartmoor Prison. - An inquest was held at Dartmoor Prison yesterday by Mr R. Fulford, on the body of PATRICK CONNOLLY, 28, undergoing a sentence of seven years' penal servitude to be followed by seven years' police supervision. CONNOLLY was formerly boots at an hotel and committed suicide on Friday last by hanging himself with his braces from a hot air pipe in his cell. Assistant Warder James Brind and Principal Warder Saltern gave evidence that at the time for lighting the gas in the evening they found the deceased suspended from the hot-air pipe in his cell. His stool had tipped from under his feet, and the back of his neck was resting against a shelf in a way which made it impossible for him to free himself. It was also stated that deceased was of a lazy disposition and did not care to work. It was thought that he was shamming illness in order to get into the Infirmary. The Jury, after viewing the cell with the Coroner, came to the conclusion that the stool had tipped over inadvertently and returned a verdict that deceased had met with his death by "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 September 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Story Of Neglect At Devonport. A Heartless Daughter. The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest on Saturday evening on the body of SELINA ELIZABETH PEARCE MUGRIDGE, an old woman in receipt of parish pay, resident at 21 Cross-street, Devonport, with her daughter and son-in-law. - In laying the outline of the case before the Jury, the Coroner pointed out to them that it was one in which was involved the question of the behaviour of the deceased's daughter and son-in-law, with whom she resided. Deceased was in a condition of filth which indicated want of attention, and the daughter was much addicted to drunkenness. According to her own admission her mother, who had been a bedlier for some time, was taken worse on Monday, and no doctor was sent for. She died on the Friday evening. Mr Rolston, the parish doctor, himself felt this an injustice, as he had attended deceased previously and had given her a good deal of help beyond her pay of 2s. 6d. a week. There had been gross neglect, therefore, and he felt it was right the Jury should have the facts laid before them previous to the evidence being taken. - The Jury having visited the dirty apartment in which deceased's body lay, the first witness called was Emma Bartlett, residing in the same house as deceased and who said she had been in bed five months. She saw her on the previous Tuesday and asked after her health, as she had heard she was not well. She said "As usual" in answer to the question. Witness believed deceased was neglected. The place was not kept clean, and she also believed that deceased was neglected in the matter of food, during the past week more than ever. The daughter had been drunk all the week and on the evening her mother died witness heard her falling about intoxicated. She was kind to her mother when sober. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said she believed if deceased had been properly treated during the last week she would have been living then. Her voice was quite strong on the Tuesday. Continuing, witness said that when the son-in-law came home at half-past eight on the Friday evening she heard his wife say she had felt her mother, and that she was cold. She added that her mother's eyes were shut and she would not open them, concluding by saying "I believe she's dead." The husband would not believe this at first, but afterwards crossed to the bed and at once commenced to cry aloud. The neighbours went in and found the old woman dead. - By a Juror: Deceased had never complained to her of being badly treated. - Bessie Browning, also residing at 21 Cross-street, Devonport, said that both the son-in-law and daughter drank, as did deceased when she had the chance. The daughter suffered from fits. When witness had been spoken to about getting a doctor for her mother she always replied that she had one. There was no reason why the daughter could not keep her mother and the room clean, as she did not go out to work. - MARY ANN COX, the daughter of deceased, was then sworn and said her husband had a pension of 11d. a day and earned a shilling or more a day as a licensed porter. Out of these earnings and her mother's relief she paid £1 3s. 6d. per quarter as rent. Her mother was taken with vomiting on Tuesday night. It continued more or less up to the time of her death. - By the Coroner: I think I saw Mr Rolston on Tuesday morning at his surgery. He lives in St. Aubyn-street. - The Coroner: Oh, does he? - In answer to further questions, witness said she gave her mother medicine of Mr Rolston's two hours before she died. It was four or five weeks before that Mr Rolston had seen her mother. On the Friday her mother had a little tea and toast for breakfast, but was unable to retain some broth she ate afterwards. Witness gave her also a little brandy and some biscuit. She was sober on Friday, as she had no money to buy drink. Between the three of them they had four pints of beer a day. - The Coroner: When do you expect to have your mother's club money? - Witness: I don't know. - When did you get the club paper signed? - No answer. - The Coroner's Officer: The publican signed it, sir. - From further cross-examination it transpired that the husband of the deceased was a joiner in her Majesty's Dockyard and that he died in 1859. Prior to his death, however, he insured his wife. On Tuesday last the deceased nominated the witness, her daughter, to receive this money at her death. Seeing that this occurred on the Tuesday and the deceased died on the following Friday Mr Vaughan, although there might be nothing in it, deemed it a strange coincidence. - Mr J. R. Rolston, surgeon, was examined and said he lived at 4 Chapel-street, Devonport. Five or six months since he attended deceased for bronchitis and general weakness. He did not think he had ever been asked to visit deceased from that time until the previous day. He had supplied no medicine for her for two or three months at least and was positive the daughter had never called at his surgery on the Tuesday. He had not thought it necessary to make a post-mortem examination. The body was not properly nourished and the slight dropsy of the legs which he discovered would be sufficient to cause death in the emaciated condition in which deceased was. Had he been called in earlier he could have stopped the vomiting spoken of and stayed deceased's strength. He could not say she would not have died. It was certainly gross neglect not to have called him before. The bottle from which it was alleged medicine had been given to the deceased was perfectly dry and the cork mildewed. He called the attention of the witness Browning to these facts. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he believed every word the witness Emma Bartlett had spoken and he did not think Cox ever went to see Mr Rolston about her mother. There was no reliance to be placed in the daughter's evidence. There had been, to his mind, gross neglect, akin to a criminal act. Although for neglecting to send for a parish doctor the daughter could not be held criminally liable, she was morally responsible. - After a lengthened deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" severely censuring Mrs Cox for her neglect. - The Coroner said the implication of neglect on Mr Rolston's part had entirely fallen through.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 September 1884 PLYMOUTH - Alleged Neglect By Railway Officials. - Mr T. C. Brian yesterday held an Inquest at Plymouth touching the death of ELIZABETH REBECCA LEAN MCANDREWS, of 4 Victoria-street, Plymouth, who had died from the effects of a fall occasioned by the alleged carelessness of the Great Western Railway officials. Mr Bennett appeared on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company, and Mr T. Parker represented Mr J. Walter Wilson for the executors of deceased. - JOHN MCANDREWS, a pensioner from the army, the husband of deceased, deposed that his wife and he went to Princetown Fair on the 3rd of September and returned by the last train to Plymouth. They were facing the engine and he and another were between his wife and the door, three passengers being on the opposite seat. When he arrived at Mutley he did not hear the station called, but knew it was Mutley. He and his wife rose to get out, and he asked the gentleman next to him to open the door, which he tried to do, but could not, nor could witness himself and he thought it was either locked or very hard. He then rapped the sides of the compartment with a stick to attract attention. He did not shout as he saw no one near. The train then began to move slowly out of the station and at that moment a porter came and opened the door, but he could not tell whether he unlocked it or not. He stepped out, and nearly fell in so doing the train being in motion. His wife attempted to follow and witness was unable to help her as he did not recover himself in time. His wife fell on to the platform and hurt herself severely. She lay on the platform in the same position for twenty minutes, moaning most of the time. He did not know whether she was unconscious or not. When she got somewhat better he helped her up and led her home, no cab being at hand. She complained of pain in the right shoulder and arm and went to bed at once. He sent for no doctor as it was very late. On Friday, the 5th, Mr Williams, who had previously attended her, saw her. She died at four o'clock in the afternoon on Saturday, the 27th. - By the Foreman: I cannot say whether my wife was in a perfect state of health when she went to Princetown. Mr Williams can answer better. - By a Juror: I do not think the porter opened the door until after the puff of the engine had sounded. - By Mr Bennett: I did not know the train was in motion before I got out, or I should not have tried to leave it. It was in motion when I landed on the platform. I did not help my wife out of the carriage. - Being asked the question particularly several times, witness said he could not swear he did not help his wife to alight - possibly he might have done; his memory was not clear on that point. His wife fell out straight in front of the carriage on to the platform, and when she had fallen the carriage was gone by. She lay from twenty minutes to three-quarters of an hour in the place where she fell. The time from her fall to leaving the station was about half an hour. Referred by the Coroner to his previous statement, witness said he meant three-quarters of an hour. He was quite sober. - John Henry Box, porter on the Great Western Railway, said he came in the Launceston train which was timed to arrive at Mutley at 10.15 p.m. on September 3rd. It was 36 minutes late. He and the guard shouted "Mutley" several times, and some passengers got out. The train remained still from two to three minutes at the station. Just before starting again he proceeded to the rear of the train and MCANDREWS asked him to open the door, which he did. It was not locked. The train was not in motion, and he passed on and got a hand lamp and put it in the guard's van, which was next to the carriage, the door of which he opened. He told the guard, who was just behind him, to close the door. The train did not start for nearly a minute after he opened the door and there was plenty of time for two persons to alight. After putting the lamp in the van he returned and saw that MRS MCANDREWS had fallen and the train was just starting. He went to her assistance and saw that MR MCANDREWS was not sober. He smelt strongly of fresh spirit, and spoke as he had in giving evidence that evening. He helped his wife up immediately. She was conscious and complained of being hurt. She remained seated, and railed on her husband, for having, as she said, tried to kill her, as he had done before. MCANDREWS then told her to shut up and be quiet. MRS MCANDREWS remained less than ten minutes, and then walked away with MR MCANDREWS. They were not more than twelve minutes at the station after they got out of the train. The deceased was not sober, but smelt of spirits. The door of the carriage did not go hard. He did not open it for anyone else. - By the Foreman: The guard shut the door before the train started, and had time to get to his place. - By a Juror: One minute is allowed at Mutley for stoppage, but that time is generally exceeded. - James Bartlett, guard of the Launceston train on the 3rd inst., said he called out "Mutley" on the train's arrival at the station. The porter did not ask him to shut the door - at any rate he did not hear him. He saw a gentleman get out of the carriage when the train was in motion, but he did not know who opened the door. He then went to shut the door, when a female attempted to alight and he tried to prevent her, whereupon MCANDREWS took hold of her by the hand and pulled her out, and she fell on to the platform. He hastily shut the door and had to be quick to get into his van. He did not hear MCANDREWS speak to his wife. - Mr F. M. Williams, M.R.C.S., deposed that he had attended deceased for some time before the accident and after. She was suffering from heart disease and affections of the kidneys. He was now called in on September 5th and she was in bed suffering from shock to the system, which accelerated the disease. Such a shock was likely to arise from an accident of the kind described. - After the room had been cleared for 20 minutes the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Organic Disease, accelerated by a shock received from a fall from a carriage whilst in motion at Mutley Railway Station."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Fight On Board H.M.S. Nautilus. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquiry at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN WILSON, a lad serving on board H.M.S. Nautilus, training brig and tender to H.M.S. Impregnable, who died on Saturday morning from a blow given him by a messmate, named Walter James Matthews. Mr J. J. E. Venning, Admiralty law agent, represented the Admiralty and Lieutenant R. N. Gresley, the commander of the Nautilus, was also present. Sergeant Holwill of the Devon County Constabulary, represented the police authorities. Mr James Taylor was elected Foreman of the Jury, and the Coroner having briefly outlined the case and pointed out the circumstances under which a verdict of manslaughter should be returned. - William Henry Treasure, ship's corporal serving on board her Majesty's ship Nautilus, stated that the ship was lying on Friday night last between Drake's Island and the shore. At seven in the evening he saw Matthews strike the deceased a violent blow in the left eye. He heard no words pass between them and saw no provocation given. Deceased put his hand to the eye, but did not take much notice of it. He saw the deceased again at eight o'clock the same evening and he then appeared all right. At 4.35 a.m. on the following day he was called to see the deceased, who was then insensible. He died at ten o'clock. Deceased, JOHN WILSON, was 17 years old and was a first class boy. He made no remark and did not attempt to return the blow when he was struck. Matthews was in the act of giving a second blow when witness stopped him. - By the Foreman: The accused was walking towards the deceased when he struck him. - By a Juror: Both the deceased and Matthews were good boys. - By Mr Venning: He had known the deceased and the accused for six weeks, and never saw either of them previously exhibit any ill-feeling. - By a Juror: Matthews gave no reason for striking the deceased. Witness did not know from personal knowledge what led to the assault. - Samuel Cooper, first class boy of the Nautilus, stated that about half-past seven on Friday evening he saw Matthews knock off deceased's cap. He was sitting on a mess stool near the mess table at the time. WILSON then ran after Matthews and gave him a blow on the back of the neck. Matthews then walked on and when he returned about two minutes afterwards, he asked deceased what he struck him for. WILSON said, "Go away, I want no skylarking." Matthews, however, repeated his question, and the deceased then got up and knocked Matthews down on the deck. The accused on regaining his feet then struck deceased a blow in the left eye. - The father of the deceased asked if there was any ill-feeling existing between the accused and the deceased, and witness replied that they were always good friends as far as he could see. - By a Juror: The deceased did not complain of being ill when he went to his hammock, but he lay on the table for a few minutes with his hand over his eye. - By another Juror: The ship's corporal was not in the mess at the time of the occurrence that he knew of. He came up after the deceased was struck. - By the Foreman: He knew both the deceased and accused and was not aware that any ill-feeling existed between them on board the Impregnable, from which ship they had been drafted. - John Henry Collins, quartermaster of the Nautilus, deposed that on Saturday morning he was going his rounds about 4.30 a.m., and his attention was drawn to the deceased being half-way out of his hammock. He went to shake him up and could not get any answer from him or make him move. On looking in the hammock he found that the deceased had a bandage around his head. he then took the deceased out of his hammock, and on finding him unconscious he laid him on the deck. By the order of Mr Prance, the officer in command, he went to the Pilot, another brig lying by, for the surgeon (Mr Lee) of that ship. It was about ten minutes to five when Mr Lee reached the Nautilus. - By a Juror: He had never known the deceased and the accused to be on unfriendly terms. Fighting, although usual on board ship, was not allowed, and if reported to the captain he would punish the parties. - Francis Wadds, another first class boy of the Nautilus, said that on Friday evening Matthews was going up the hatchway with a bucket of ashes when deceased went behind him and hit him in the back of the neck, saying "That's the way to kill rabbits." They had been skylarking before. Matthews went on and emptied the ashes and afterwards came down and asked the deceased what he struck him for. Deceased was then sitting on a mess form. Deceased replied "I was only skylarking with you." Matthews then asked the deceased to give him his hand, and the deceased knocked his (Matthews's) hand against the back of the table. Matthews then asked him what he did that for, and the deceased, in reply, struck him a sharp blow in the stomach with his fist, taking his breath away. Matthews then struck deceased a blow in the left eye. WILSON went to the mess and got a piece of raw beef, which he bound to his eye with a handkerchief. Deceased told witness when going to his hammock that his head was aching. During the middle of the night, he could not say what time, deceased got out of his hammock and did not seem strong enough to stand upon his legs. Deceased said nothing at that time to him. - By the father of the deceased: WILSON lay in the mess for a quarter of an hour after the blow was struck. The deceased, when he was found insensible the next morning, was sick. - By the Foreman: When the deceased struck Matthews at the back of his neck it was with the side of his hand, and the blow in the stomach was a deliberate and straight one, as was also the blow that the accused struck the deceased in the eye. - Collings, the quarter master, was recalled at the desire of Mr Venning and stated that it was his duty to visit between decks every half-hour, but he heard nothing to call his attention. The quartermaster (Isaacs) whom he relieved at four o'clock did not report that anything had happened during the night. - The Coroner here asked if the Jury were satisfied from the evidence before them that the deceased was struck a blow by Matthews. If so he would proceed to take the medical evidence. - Mr Venning said there were witnesses present who could speak to the feeling that existed between the two lads. It would only be fair to Matthews, he thought, that these should be called. - The Coroner: He is not on his trial here. I think the Jury are satisfied from the evidence that no previous ill-feeling existed between the boys. - Mr Francis James Lee, surgeon of H.M.S. Pilot, stated that he made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased at the Royal Naval Hospital on Sunday and was assisted by Mr Coolican, the surgeon of the Nautilus. The immediately cause of death was an effusion of blood on the right side of the brain. He observed the blow on the left eye and examined it. There was no fracture of the bone and the eye-ball itself was uninjured. Such a mark as was on the left eye could have been caused by a violent blow from a fist. In his opinion the blow was the direct cause of death. When he first saw the deceased on board the Nautilus he thought he was suffering from compression of the brain. Nothing could have saved him, even if he could have got there earlier. - Mr John Patrick Coolican, surgeon of the Nautilus, confirmed in its entirety the evidence of Mr Lee. - The Coroner, having briefly summed up the case, said that if the Jury were satisfied that a blow was struck by Matthews, and that that blow resulted in WILSON'S death, it would be their duty to return a verdict of Manslaughter, and after a short deliberation this course was followed, and Matthews was taken into custody. He will be brought before the Stonehouse Magistrates at 11 o'clock today.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 October 1884 ILFRACOMBE - At an Inquest at Ilfracombe yesterday on the body of JAMES BLACKMORE, who was thought to have jumped over the cliff at Compass-hill, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the evidence as to the probabilities of the case being one of suicide proving of a somewhat conflicting character.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of a widow, named SUSAN WILLIAMS, and her newly-born child, both of whom died on Saturday. The evidence shewed that MRS WILLIAMS died owing to neglect at her confinement, and that until the last moment she had done all she possibly could to conceal her condition. Dr Roper found her nearly dead and the child dead at the bottom of the bed. He administered brandy and did all he could for her, but she died soon afterwards. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict in each case.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 October 1884 ST MARYCHURCH - A verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" has been returned at St Mary Church in the case of JANE GREENSLADE, 59, who while staying on the Downs in the custody of a nurse jumped over a cliff, a height of 26 feet. Deceased had been suffering from softening of the brain.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 October 1884 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth Workhouse, last evening, into the death of JAMES SWIGG, builder, and late foreman of the West of England Fire Brigade, who died there on Wednesday afternoon. Deceased had been suffering from diarrhoea and softening of the brain. He entered the Workhouse at 9.30 a.m. on Wednesday in a shocking condition and died about three hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - At an Inquest at Devonport yesterday on the body of JAMES BORLAND, a commercial traveller, 55 years of age, living at Stoke, who was stated in the Western Morning News to have died suddenly the previous day while on business at Devonport, the evidence of Emma Rapson, of 43 Cornwall-street, Devonport, shewed that deceased called on her at 12.15 on Tuesday. After a few minutes' stay he went downstairs and witness was called to by her sister, who said deceased had broken his leg. They bathed his face, but he did not recover and when the doctor, who was immediately sent for, arrived, he was dead. Medical evidence was to the effect that deceased's heart was fatty and soft and that the kidneys were twice the ordinary size. Parts of the body were poorly nourished. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 October 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Excessive Drinking at Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Borough Coroner for Devonport, opened an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at William-street, Devonport, concerning the circumstances attending the death of CATHERINE WAKEHAM, 68, wife of a hairdresser carrying on business in that street. - WILLIAM WAKEHAM, husband of the deceased, stated that his wife had been ailing for some time past, but had refused to send for medical aid. Whilst attending to his work in his shop on Thursday morning he heard a fall, and on proceeding to the bedroom he found his wife lying there unconscious with her head cut. He sent for Mr Gard, surgeon, but the deceased died before he came. They had been married 36 years. About seven years ago the deceased took to drinking freely, and continued to do so up to twelve months ago. During the past year she had drunk less than previously. - Mr W. J. Gard, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased that morning. There were no marks of violence except a cut across the forehead, which he imagined she sustained through the fall mentioned by the husband. The body was fairly well nourished, but on opening the chest he found the lungs much inflamed from disease of long standing. The deceased had a most typical drunkard's liver, or in other words a "nutmeg" liver. He had no doubt she died from organic disease produced by excessive spirit drinking. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by excessive drinking of spirits."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 October 1884 EXETER - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday on the body of WILLIAM GOODING, labourer of Morchard, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Sunday morning. Deceased and another were seriously injured by a runaway horse and wagon on the 29th September at Crediton.

STOKE DAMEREL - Two sudden deaths formed the subject of Coroner's Inquiries at Devonport yesterday. MR WILLIAM WATTS, storekeeper, Keyham Dockyard, was found by his wife breathing heavily on Monday night. She tried to arouse him, but failing to do so, sent for medical assistance. Before, however, a doctor arrived, the deceased had expired. The death was attributed to heart disease. In the second case, that of LOUISA HENDERSON, aged 58, of 36 Charlotte-street, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. She had been ailing for many years, and was found dead in bed yesterday morning.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 October 1884 PLYMOUTH - Death Under Methylene At Plymouth. - Mr Coroner Brian held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening concerning the death of JOHN BRAY, aged 19, who expired that morning while undergoing an operation under methylene. Mr John Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. The Coroner said he much regretted having to meet the Jury in the new Hospital under such circumstances. The Inquest, however, was a necessity, and he was sure it would not prejudice the Hospital in the minds of any right-thinking person. - Mr Wm. Square, F.R.C.S., surgeon of the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted about three weeks ago, suffering from an accident while tamping a hole for blasting. A number of pieces or rock were blown into his arm. Mr Connel Whipple abstracted some pieces under methylene, and on that occasion deceased passed through the operation with perfect safety. Mr Whipple being out of town, the deceased came under his (Mr Square's) care, and he thought it desirable to unite a nerve which was severed and which made deceased's right hand useless. Uniting the nerve would have partly restored the use of his arm but before doing that it was necessary also to remove some remaining portions of stone. The operation was undertaken at the distinct wish of the deceased. About one o'clock that day deceased was brought into the operating-room. Mr W. P. Swain and the house surgeon, Mr Buchan, the assistant-house surgeon, Dr Bolton, and four pupils were also present. The methylene, which was decidedly safer than chloroform, was administered in the usual way. Methylene was in daily use and there had never been an accident before in connection with their Hospital. The heart of deceased was carefully listened to through the stethoscope before the methylene was administered and there were no symptoms to lead them to suspect that deceased would be unable to bear it. Deceased was not the least nervous, having undergone a similar operation before. He was about the usual time going off before the operation commenced. He was not completely insensible when witness began to operate. Two pieces of stone were removed and witness was then going to commence the longer operation of tying the nerves - which would probably have taken three-quarters of an hour, when deceased suddenly died. All the usual methods were tried to resuscitate him, but without success. It was always necessary to administer an anaesthetic for uniting a nerve. That was an operation which lasted a long time and produced agonies of pain. A similar case was just going out of the Hospital well. He had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased and had found the right lung rather gorged with blood and the heart a little hypertrophied on the left side. He considered the cause of death to be paralysis of the heart's action due to methylene. The number of deaths that occurred under methylene was given as about 1 in 8,000. He had seen many thousands of cases during his twenty-six years of experience and had never met with a death before. - In reply to a Juror, Mr Square said methylene was administered gradually, as it was required, and according to the length of the operation. Too much methylene could not be applied at once, because it would only evaporate at a certain rate. - The Coroner put it to the Jury whether Mr Square had not told them all they could possibly know of this occurrence. The young man was naturally anxious to recover the use of his right arm, and he consequently underwent the operation willingly. They had heard how every care was used in administering the methylene, that there was just an element of danger with it, and that danger, which was perfectly unseen, existed in this case. However, he wished the Jury to particularly understand that he did not wish to exclude any other evidence. This was the first case of the kind that had ever come under his notice, and he wished to be very careful with it. - The Jury said they did not wish to hear further evidence, and they returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, which was ultimately embodied in the following words:- "That deceased died from paralysis of the heart, caused by the administration of methylene under medical supervision and by medical direction; and we further find that the administration of the said methylene was necessary, was cautiously and properly administered and that there was no appearance of any premonitory symptoms from which it could be seen there was any risk, in the administration of the said methylene."

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 October 1884 TOTNES - Sad Death In Totnes Workhouse. Alleged Official Neglect. - An Inquest was held last evening at the Totnes Workhouse by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of an old man named SAMUEL HORSWILL, aged 82, recently residing at North Huish, who was brought into the House on Wednesday last by order of the relieving officer, suffering from a loathsome disease, and who died suddenly shortly after admittance. - Mr R. Gidley, relieving officer, identified the body as that of SAMUEL HORSWILL, shoemaker, who lived at North Huish. Deceased was 82 years of age and had been in receipt of out-door relief for two years. He was a widower, and lived in a cottage by himself. He had one or two grown-up children. On the previous Monday witness paid him his weekly relief. During his call he saw deceased's daughter, a MRS REED, of Kingsbridge, who spoke of the advisability of deceased being removed to the Workhouse, but said she had provided a nurse for him until he was removed. Witness saw deceased, and he quite agreed to the proposal made as to his removal. He thought there was too much trouble in getting someone to attend on him. On Wednesday morning last witness sent a carriage for deceased and he was removed to the Workhouse. Deceased did not complain on the Monday. He was perfectly willing to be removed. The medical report said he should be removed to the Workhouse, or a nurse provided for him. He did not think there was anything dangerous in his complaint, though he knew he was suffering from a disease he had contracted some time previously. - In reply to a Juror, the witness said he had no idea that there was the slightest danger. Dr Rendell reported the case to the Guardians the previous Saturday. - Edward Carston Leslie, cab driver, of Totnes, said he received an order from Mr Gidley to remove the deceased from North Huish to the Totnes Union. Deceased came out from his house about twenty minutes after witness got there. He could scarcely stand. He was helped out by some women, and then witness took him by the arm. He was very cold and was trembling. At Diptford they stopped at the inn, but he did not take anything to drink. Some person came out and said he was very ill, and would not live long. Witness stopped the carriage once or twice afterwards and asked deceased how he was. On each occasion he replied, "All right." On arriving at the Union witness and Mr Sloggett helped him out. Witness did not think deceased was dying, but saw that he was very ill. - Thomas Sloggett, of the Totnes Workhouse said that on the day mentioned he was informed that HORSWILL had arrived. He went to the gate and the carriage drove up to the Hospital. He got deceased out and helped him, with the assistance of the driver, into the ward. He asked him if he would go to bed, and he agreed to do so. Witness helped him to undress. He afterwards got out for a few minutes and sat on the bed, appearing to be in pain. He suddenly fell back and witness went for the nurse and for some brandy. On his return deceased was dead. - Mr J. M. Rendell, surgeon, practising at Ivybridge, and parish surgeon for that division of the Totnes Union, had seen the deceased on an average twice a week for the past month. He was suffering from a disease as described, but it was not such a case as would result in sudden death. Did not think the disease had anything to do with death. Deceased was in such a lowly condition, and required so much care that witness reported to the Guardians that he should be taken into the Workhouse or otherwise a nurse provided. He was keeping his bed, he should think, because he was feeble, and in his condition it was painful for him to walk about. On the Tuesday previous to his removal he did not see any symptoms which he considered dangerous. He thought he might have been conveyed in a comfortable carriage without danger. He had given deceased some medicine, but afterwards found he was taking some of his own, in which he had great faith. Witness did not see any harm in it, so he let him take it. He could hardly say whether the removal accelerated his death. It should not have done so. He was surprised to hear of deceased's death. - Mr L. Hains, surgeon, Totnes, and Deputy Medical Officer of the Union, said that on Wednesday afternoon, having been sent for, he went to the Workhouse and examined the body of the deceased. He could not form the slightest opinion of the cause of death. Taking the man's age into consideration, he should think he died from syncope. He certainly thought there ought to have been an attendant in the carriage and deceased should have been supported by a little stimulant on the way. It would depend upon the length of time he had had the disease and the severity of the case whether the removal would be sufficient to cause death. The body was fairly nourished. The excitement of the journey might have accelerated death. He wished to remark that unfortunately they got a number of such cases sent into the House, which, without speaking disparagingly of the relieving officers, he might say were only sent there to die, or at a time when they could give no assistance. Some cases were sent there when they only lived a few hours or died very shortly after admission. - Mr Gidley, in reply to the Coroner said he did not think it was necessary to order stimulants, because deceased's daughters were present at the time and had the means at their command. - Mr Hains, continuing, said that when reports were made by medical officers they were almost always ignored. - Mr Cape remarked, as a medical officer of the Union, that he could say the way in which medical officers' orders were carried out was simply abominable. - Mr Gidley explained that the relieving officers could not make people go into the House. He had advised the deceased to go before, and he had refused to do so. - Mr Cape said the strong remarks which he had made - The Coroner interrupting: "If you have any remarks to make for the public good, do so." - Mr Cape continued observing that he meant to say there was a long delay after a patient consented to go into the House and in the end he would not go. - This being all the evidence, the Coroner remarked that it was their duty to consider whether any blame attached to any one. Mr Gidley had given his evidence very clearly and had explained the whole circumstance of the case and it appeared that as soon as the deceased consented to go into the House he was immediately brought there. Mr Hains had said publicly that paupers were sent into the Union Workhouse simply to die. If that were so, it was a practice which ought to be stopped, but it was their duty at present to enquire into this particular case. - The Jury, without retiring, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their opinion that no blame attached to any officer whatever.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mysterious Suicide At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Borough Coroner for Devonport, opened an Inquiry last evening at the Devonport Guildhall as to the death of HENRY QUEENBOROUGH, 52, an army pensioner, residing at 81 James-street, Devonport. - Jane Andrews, wife of a shipwright pensioner, residing in the same house with the deceased, deposed that she had known him about four months. He was always very steady, quiet and reserved. Deceased was in the habit of not getting up until midday and the last time she saw him alive in his room was either on Tuesday or Wednesday night. On Thursday morning she knocked at his door between nine and ten o'clock, and asked him to have a cup of tea. Getting no answer, and believing him to be asleep, she went away. She knocked at the door again at about two o'clock in the afternoon and again got no answer. When her husband returned from work she told him, and he knocked at the deceased's door and got no answer. They therefore believed that the deceased had gone out without being seen. Towards nine o'clock her son thought he smelt something burning and they then sent for the police. On the arrival of the constable he tried the door and the window, but both were fastened. He managed, however, to lift the latch of the window, and witness, on going in with him, found the deceased lying across the bed dead. Deceased never told her anything about himself except that he came from Chelsea Hospital. - Clara Bushell, wife of the proprietor of a coffee tavern at 14 Catherine-street, stated that she had known the deceased, who came direct from London to her house to reside. He was a native of Boston, in Lincolnshire, and had been a corporal in the army. He used to take most of his meals at her house, and for a long time had complained of pains in his head, and of sleepless nights, as well as of internal pains. He had asked her to get him morphia, which he said he used to take when in the West Indies, but she declined. Deceased then got some laudanum, procuring a pennyworth from each of three separate chemists. On Friday night last deceased told her not to be surprised if she heard that he was dead at any time. He also said that that morning he thought he was dying and when he came to their house that day they had to help him over the steps. She last saw the deceased alive on Monday evening. - Inspector J. Matters, of the Devonport police force, deposed that with a constable he went to deceased's residence, and after some time, effected an entrance into his room. On the mantelpiece were two bottles marked "laudanum, poison." The labels were those of different chemists. Each of the bottles contained a little laudanum. On the table there was a small tin box labelled "Barber's phosphorus vermin killer." Some portion of the phosphorus was removed. In the cupboard he found a purse containing twelve half-sovereigns and on examining the clothes of deceased he found two shillings and sixpence and some coppers in the pockets. There was no indication of want in the room, and among other things the deceased had provided was a six pound packet of tea. On examining the papers of deceased he found that he was an army pensioner discharged from the 24th Regiment. Deceased was lying on the bed completely dressed with the exception of his coat. - Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, of Ker-street, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. There were no marks of external violence. On opening the stomach a strong smell of phosphorus was emitted. The internal pains which the deceased had complained of were due to gall stones. The heart thought fatty was comparatively healthy. All the tissues of the body were loaded with fat, and the state of the lungs was such as to shew that they had been affected by disease. The quantity of phosphorus in the stomach combined with the diseased state of the lung and the fatty condition of the other vital organs, was sufficient, he thought, to account for death. Laudanum or morphia was a proper medicine to take to allay the intense pain caused by gall stones, but not phosphorus. He believed the deceased took the phosphorus with the intention of poisoning himself. he had not been dead more than thirty hours when he saw him. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 October 1844 PLYMOUTH - HENRY G. EDNEY, aged 17 met with his death by being run over between Saltash and Callington on Thursday. From the evidence given at the Inquest on Saturday, it appeared that the deceased, who was the son of HENRY EDNEY, of 52 Wolsdon-street, Plymouth, was given a ride in a wagon by Albert Wakley (employed by Mr Hitchins, forage dealer, Stonehouse) on Thursday morning. After going some distance deceased rode on one shaft while Wakley occupied the other. Deceased made an observation about Wakley's father, who was driving a wagon in front, and then suddenly a sharp jerk was felt, leading Wakley to look on the ground, when he saw the deceased. The wheel had passed over the body of the latter, and he was removed in great agony, first to Saltash, and then by train to Millbay station, whence he was taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. It was then found he had received shocking internal injuries, from which he died early on Friday morning. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 November 1884 DAWLISH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Dawlish yesterday, in the case of HARRIET DAVY, who was found dead on Thursday morning at the residence of her son-in-law, John Tapley, the old turnpike house on the Exeter Road. Her husband left her about ten or twelve years since, and it was now stated that she had suffered from pains in her back and legs, and that outdoor relief had been twice refused her by the Newton Guardians. She had been living with her son-in-law only a week, and he found her dead in bed on Thursday morning. A post-mortem examination of the body made by Mr A. de Winter Baker, surgeon, shewed that the cause of death was the rupture of a large artery of the chest. During the Inquiry Mr S. Hacker, the Coroner, called attention to the want of a public mortuary for the town.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 November 1884 KINGSBRIDGE - The Fatal Explosion At Kingsbridge. - The Inquest on the young man WILLIAM CRIMP, killed by an explosion of chemicals in Mr Balkwill's shop at Kingsbridge, was opened on Saturday evening before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner. Evidence of identification was given by the brother of deceased and by Mr Balkwill, who was asked questions by the Coroner as to the cause of death. He replied that an explosion took place when chemicals were being mixed. This was all the evidence taken and the Coroner informed the Jury that the Inquest would be adjourned until Thursday, the 6th inst., for the attendance of a Government Inspector.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Alleged Murder At Stonehouse. Inquest And Verdict. - MR JOHN PINHEY, landlord of the Buckingham Inn, Stonehouse, died on Friday morning from injuries he received, it is alleged, on the 24th ult. from a lumper named William Cowley, in the Great Western Docks. There had been for years a feeling of animosity between deceased and Cowley, and the latter, who is a strong and burly man, had been continually annoying MR PINHEY. On the morning of the assault he went to the docks, where deceased was a master lumper, and struck him several times. Three days afterwards MR PINHEY was taken ill and never recovered. Mr Bulteel, surgeon, stated that death had resulted from the effects of the blows, and Cowley was consequently arrested. - The Inquest on MR PINHEY was opened on Saturday morning at the Buckingham Inn by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd). A double Jury was sworn in, and Mr T. Butcher was elected Foreman. Cowley was present, and after the body had been viewed, he said that he had engaged a solicitor to watch the case in his behalf. The Coroner said he had sent notes to Mr F. R. Stanbury, who was to represent the accused, and to Mr Bond, who had been engaged by the relatives of deceased, but neither of them had attended the Inquest. The Coroner added that he must proceed to call the witnesses, as Cowley was present as a matter of courtesy. - Mr C. T. McDonald produce deceased's depositions, taken, the day before he died, before Mr C. Simpson, J.P. Deceased said: On the 24th October I was standing at the pontoon in the Great Western Docks when William Cowley came up, and, before I was aware of it, struck me over the head with his fist and then struck me in the nose. He then said he would throw me down the pontoon and break my neck. I got away from him, but he ran after me and struck me in the face twice. Mr Elsworthy, a clerk in the docks, came and took me away. - Benjamin Samuel Johns, shipbuilder in the Great Western Docks said that about 7.30 on the morning of the 24th ult. Cowley came down near the vessel and said, "Mr Johns, do you know what I am going to do now?" Witness replied that he did not. He then walked over the plank and said, "Look here now, I am going down to give MR PINHEY the d...... lacing that he ever had in his life." Witness joked with him, and tried to "pass it off," to which Cowley replied, "I really mean it; don't think I don't." He added that he would do it, because deceased insulted him the night previous. Cowley then went ashore, and walked away. Witness did not see MR PINHEY at the time. - Henry Wingate, a labourer, said he worked for deceased. On October 24th he was at the pontoon. About a quarter to eight he was working the winch. Cowley came down and said, "Now, PINHEY, if you're a man for me, come on." He struck deceased then several times on his face and body with his clenched fist. The blows were not so violent as I have seen struck when men are fighting. They were hard blows and made deceased stagger. He put up his hands to defend himself, saying, "Cowley, go away, I want nothing to do with you." Mr Elsworthy then came and persuaded Cowley to leave. He went away and did not strike a blow afterwards. Deceased did not in any way attempt to hit Cowley. Witness could not say on what part of the body the blows were received. Deceased did not fall at the time, and worked after Cowley left. - By Mr W. W. Blight: Witness met Cowley in the evening and not a word passed about what occurred in the morning. - John Ash, labourer, employed by deceased, stated that on the morning of the 24th ult. Cowley came down to the pontoon and asked deceased "If he was as good a man as he was last night." He then struck him several times. Deceased went out of his way behind the winch. Witness heard Cowley said, "I will heave him down the ..... hole." Cowley had no right to be on the pontoon as he was not engaged there. Witness could not say that he was sober. - Mr Christopher Bulteel, surgeon, said: On October 27th last, about 9 a.m. deceased came to my house. He was in a very nervous and agitated condition and complained of severe pains in his head which had followed blows he had received on the 24th. The first blow, he said, he received on the left side of the head from a man in the docks. It was close behind the temple. He had also a severe blow on the root of the nose and the neighbourhood of the left eye. There was a slight swelling over the parts where the blows had been inflicted. He complained of feeling generally ill. I prescribed for him, and ordered him to go home and keep very quiet. In the evening he sent for me, and I found symptoms of erysipelas had set in. On Thursday morning last I found evidences of pleurisy and congestion of right lung. Considering him in extreme danger I called in Dr Hingston. After seeing him I arranged that his depositions should be taken. Deceased died at two o'clock on Friday morning. The cause of death was Erysipelas and congestion of right lung, both of which, I am of opinion, were caused by blows received. There was nothing to lead me to believe the blows were received from an instrument of any kind. They appeared to have been delivered with a fist. The blows were the primary cause of death. I do not think there is any necessity to have a post-mortem examination. - Cowley said that he hoped there would be a post-mortem examination. Such cases had been heard of before. - In answer to the Jury, Dr Bulteel said that he had frequently attended deceased and he had previously had erysipelas. In a man predisposed to this disease the blows would hasten it. There would be nothing gained by a post-mortem examination except that it would be to the disadvantage of the prisoner. - The Coroner then cleared the Court for the Jury to discuss the question raised by Cowley. They decided that as he had asked for a post-mortem examination it should be made. The Inquiry was then adjourned until five p.m. - On the Jury re-assembling at five o'clock, Jabez George Elworthy, steam-packet clerk, living at 3 Archer-terrace, Plymouth, said that on October 24th just before eight o'clock in the morning, he was on duty on the pontoon at the Great Western Docks. He heard a noise and saw Cowley strike PINHEY. He caught Cowley by the back and tried to pacify him. He was in a great passion then and made several attempts to strike PINHEY after that. - Mr Bulteel, surgeon said: By the Coroner's order I have made a post-mortem examination, assisted by Dr Cant of the Royal Albert Hospital. I examined the head but found no extravasation of blood there, nor any apparent injury to the brain or its membranes. I found evidence of recent pleurisy on the right side, and both lungs and the kidneys were congested. There was a good deal of swelling over the roof of the nose, and, I believe, the blow upon the nose was the only serious one deceased received. From the effects of that blow the erysipelas set in. I am not satisfied that his internal organs were in a healthy condition at the time. That being the case, it would add greatly to the danger of an erysipelatic attack. I still believe the blows were the primary cause of death. I do not think the congestion of the lungs and kidneys would have caused death apart from the attack of erysipelas. - Frederick Morgan James, inspector in the Great Western Docks, said that on October 24th he was going to the Docks from his house, when he met Cowley, who stopped him. He said, "I have been down to the pontoon. I have waited for you half an hour. I struck PINHEY hard and solid." Witness asked him why he did it, and he replied that MRS PINHEY threw some porter over him the night before and deceased called him names. Witness stated that the best thing would be for deceased to summon him, to which Cowley replied "He provoked me." - The Coroner, in summing up, said the Jury must be satisfied that deceased died from the blows he received. Mr Rodd then explained the difference between "wilful murder" and "manslaughter". If the Jury considered prisoner went to the pontoon to strike deceased, and with malice in his intentions, then it would be their duty to return a verdict of wilful murder. If, on the other hand, they believed he did not act with malice then their verdict would be one of manslaughter. - After about twenty minutes' deliberation the Coroner announced that the Jury considered Cowley acted with malice and had found a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against him. Addressing Cowley he said it was his painful duty to commit him for trial at the Assizes on that charge. He (the Coroner) thoroughly concurred in the verdict, there being no other course open for the Jury under the circumstances. He hoped the judge at the trial might be able to find some reason for reducing the charge to one of manslaughter, but the Jury had merely done their duty in returning a verdict in accordance with the evidence. - Cowley did not appear to be at all affected by the verdict, and was immediately taken to the Police Station. He will be brought before the Magistrates this morning. The Coroner's depositions were forwarded to Exeter on Saturday, and will come before the grand Jury either today or tomorrow. If the Magistrates commit Cowley without further remands, he will be delivered to Exeter Prison tonight, and will then be tried at the present Assizes, which were opened on Saturday.

TOTNES - A Coroner's Jury investigated at Totnes on Saturday the cause of death of the illegitimate child of JANE TUCKER, a widow. The child was stillborn on Wednesday, but as the mother had no professional assistance on the occasion, Mr R. Jelley, surgeon, who was afterwards called in, refused to certify, and an Inquest was ordered. Mr Jelley now stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body and found that the child had had a separate existence. A verdict to this effect was returned, but the Coroner, Mr Hacker, severely rebuked a woman named Mitchell who had undertaken the office of midwife in the case without being qualified to do so, and told her that had the fact of a separate existence been established she would probably have been charged with manslaughter.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 November 1884 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall At Plymouth. - Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, yesterday held an Inquiry into the death of a little 4 year old boy named JOHN DEWDNEY. - Eliza Hill, a married woman living at 41 Woolster-street, stated that the deceased, her brother, fell from the bed on the 16th ult. He was playing with his brother at the time of the accident. He, however, took little notice of the fall at the time, but subsequently he complained and was therefore kept from school. Two or three days afterwards he spoke of increasing pain in his head, and medical aid was then procured. - Mr W. E. Prynn, surgeon, stated that he continued to attend the child up to the time of death. On his first being summoned he found a swelling on the back of the deceased's head, which, after hearing that the child had had a fall, led him to conclude that the deceased was suffering from concussion of the brain. The child eventually died at six o'clock on Sunday morning and the death was traceable to the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 November 1884 ERMINGTON - "Suicide Whilst In an Unsound State of Mind" was the verdict of the Coroner's Jury who yesterday Inquired into the death of JOHN VELVIN, pig sticker, who was found hanging by a rope in a pigstye at Ermington on Sunday afternoon under circumstances already reported. Deceased had been in financial straits for a considerable time. Mr R. R. Rodd was the Coroner.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 November 1884 KINGSBRIDGE - The Fatal Explosion At Kingsbridge. Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned Inquest as to the death of EDWARD HARRIS CRIMP, 17, chemist's apprentice, who was killed by an explosion in Mr Joseph Balkwill's shop, at Kingsbridge, where he was serving his time, was held yesterday before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Major Cundill. H.M. Inspector of Explosives, was in attendance, and Mr W. V. Harris was Foreman of the Jury. Mr Square, solicitor watched the proceedings on behalf of Mr Balkwill. - The Coroner, in opening, commented upon the serious nature of the proceedings, and warned Mr Balkwill that he was not obliged to answer any questions which might criminate himself. - Mr Joseph Balkwill stated that on October 30th his junior apprentice, EDWARD CRIMP, and himself were making "red light" in witness's chemist shop in Fore-street, Kingsbridge. The component part of the mixture were nitrate of strontia, 10; chlorate of potash, 3; shellac, 1; sulphur, 2; and charcoal, 1.4th. It was between five and six o'clock when they commenced mixing these articles, and he cautioned the deceased that certain parts when put together were explosive and further told him that he (witness) would put the powders into the mortar in the order in which they should come. While the nitrate of strontia was drying in the oven deceased proceeded to powder the chlorate of potash in an iron mortar with an iron pestle. Witness meanwhile was weighing the other ingredients. - Mr Balkwill here assented to a rough plan of the shop drawn in the inspector's note book, and explained the position of CRIMP. Witness placed the sulphur on a piece of paper behind the dispensing screen, there being a piece of mahogany about two feet high between the deceased and the sulphur. He did not tell the deceased he had so placed the sulphur, and there was nothing to indicate that the apprentice noticed him do so. He then went towards the kitchen to get the nitrate of strontia. Witness stopped at the door leading to the kitchen for about two minutes talking to his wife, and then the explosion occurred. He ran out of the side door and into the front door of the shop and called on Frank Horsman, a former shopboy of his, who happened to be on the premises. Horsman answered, but CRIMP he could not find. Mrs Balkwill, witness's little child, and an errand boy were also in the shop at the time of the occurrence. When the explosion took place witness came to the conclusion at once that deceased had mixed the sulphur with the chlorate of potash. The shop was obscured and in darkness when he reached it. He called to deceased, and he replied, "Here I am, sir." Witness carried him to the centre of the shop and saw at once that he was fatally injured. CRIMP was afterwards carried into the house and there died, Dr Webb having previously been sent for. When witness went round the shop shortly after the explosion he did not see the sulphur. They intended making 2 lbs. and half an ounce of "red fire". Witness had no licence from the local authority for manufacturing explosives. - The Coroner: Have you a licence from the Home Secretary? - Mr Square thought the question was rather asking Mr Balkwill to criminate himself. - Cross-examined by Mr John Square: He never for a moment intended deceased to put the sulphur in the mortar. - By the Inspector: CRIMP had been his apprentice for seven or eight months. The red fire was for the use of the apprentices and was their "perquisite." It was usual for them to have it at this time of the year. They generally made it themselves with witness's consent and used it for illuminating the streets as a sort of fireworks. - By the Jury: It had been an annual custom for the apprentices to make this "red fire." - A Juror: Have you ever made red fire and sold it? - Mr Square objected to the question. - Francis Horsman, a former errand boy of Mr Balkwill's, stated that when he was in the shop on the 30th he saw Mr Balkwill weigh the sulphur and put it behind the dispensary screen. He did not hear Mr Balkwill say anything. Witness was standing in the passage leading to the inner shop when the explosion occurred. From this point the witness corroborated Mr Balkwill's evidence. - By the Inspector: Witness had been an errand boy for four years with Mr Balkwill. It was customary at this time of the year for the apprentices to make red fire for their own use. He had seen it sold sometimes by the apprentices in the shop. Could not say that he had ever seen Mr Balkwill sell any. If anyone wanted, say two-pennyworth, of red fire at this time of the year they could buy it at Mr Balkwill's shop. - William Gunn, shop-boy with Mr Balkwill, also gave evidence. - Mr W. H. Webb, surgeon, stated that on the day of the explosion he received a message to go to Mr Balkwill's. He there saw EDWARD CRIMP. He found the deceased's injuries so extensive that they admitted of no treatment and he remained with the boy until he died, about twenty minutes or half an hour afterwards. Deceased made no statement. - Major Cundill, being sworn, stated that Mr Balkwill did not hold a licence from the Home Secretary to manufacture explosives. Chlorate of potash and sulphur were largely used in the manufacture of fireworks. By themselves those substances came within the fulminate class. - By Mr Square: He gave Mr Balkwill the usual warning when he called upon him that day, but Mr Balkwill, as far as he knew, concealed nothing. - Mr Dore, ex-superintendent of police and inspector of explosives appointed by the local authority, stated that Mr Balkwill held no licence for manufacturing explosives. - By the Jury: He had seen squibs and rockets and other things about the town on every 5th of November, but he had never inquired where they came from and had never warned the druggists against making them. - The Foreman thought this shewed some neglect of duty on the part of the local inspector. - The Coroner, in summing up, explained that if, by the commission of an illegal act, a person's death was caused, the person committing that illegal act was technically guilty of manslaughter by the law of England. It was for them to apply that principle to the facts before them. As an illustration of what he meant he might recite a well-known case. A man was shooting his neighbour's poultry and while he was so doing an accident occurred which resulted in the death of a third party. The shooting of the neighbour's poultry was an illegal act and upon the principle he had stated the man firing the gun was guilty of manslaughter. It was for them to say also from the evidence whether anyone had been guilty of negligence, and whether that negligence amounted to culpability or criminality. The Act relating to the manufacture of explosives - which Mr Hacker quoted - defined explosives, among other things, to be "coloured fires and every other substance used to produce explosion or pyrotechnic effect". Taking that definition they could come to no other conclusion than that Mr Balkwill, in manufacturing this "red fire" was manufacturing an explosive and the 4th section of that Act stated that the manufacture of such explosives should not be carried on except at places lawfully existing or licensed for the same under the Act. They heard that Mr Balkwill had no licence from either authority by which such licences were issued, and they would probably come to the conclusion that in making this red light he was committing an illegal act. Mr Balkwill - they would all recognise - had given his evidence very fairly and very clearly, and they would notice the precautions he adopted and the caution he gave to the deceased. Mr Hacker then briefly ran through the chief points in the evidence, and, in conclusion, said - "You can, I think, come to no other decision than that the deceased met his death as a direct consequence of the making and mixing of these explosives, and the making of these explosives being an illegal act, I am afraid, gentlemen, you can do no other then return a verdict of manslaughter. - The Jury then retired, and after about half an hour's consultation the Foreman handed to the coroner a written verdict, in arriving at which he said they had been unanimous. It ran:- "The Jury find that the deceased, EDWARD HARRIS CRIMP, met his death by the explosion of chemicals, which explosion was caused by inadvertence in his employer's shop." The Coroner: Then you mean by that that the death was accidental? - A Juror: It amounts to that. - The verdict was then recorded and the proceedings terminated.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 November 1884 PLYMOUTH - Three Inquests were held at Plymouth yesterday. The first was as to the death of GEORGE FRANCIS TUCKETT. It appeared that the deceased was employed near the quay at Millbay Docks last Saturday morning, when endeavouring to keep off a raft with a boathook, he somehow over-balanced himself. An alarm was raised, and a quarter of an hour afterwards his body was found standing upright at the bottom of the water. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. In the second case, which was as to the death of HARRIET JORDAN, aged 69, of 45 Flora-street, the husband had left for his work, and entering her room soon afterwards, a neighbour found her in a dying state. "Natural Causes" was the verdict recorded. At the third Inquest which was in reference to the death of the male infant of ELIZABETH OLVER, of 38 Union-street, a similar verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 November 1884 WITHERIDGE - Suicide Of A Cattle Dealer. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Witheridge, before Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM SELLEY, a cattle dealer, well-known in the West of England, whose death was recorded in yesterday's Western Morning News. The evidence given shewed that for some time past deceased had been low spirited in consequence of crosses in business transactions, which he had attributed to depression in the markets, and lately he had been drinking heavily. On Monday last he complained of feeling ill, and afterwards purchased of a chemist two ounces of laudanum, which he said he wanted to mix with paraffin to dress his arm with for a skin disease. Mrs Parish, deceased's sister, was afterwards informed of the purchase, and her suspicions having been aroused she caused a search to be instituted, resulting in the discovery of deceased lying in a meadow in his occupation in a state of semi-consciousness. He was removed to his home and expired about two hours afterwards, the cause of death being opium poisoning. A bottle containing twenty drops of laudanum was found in a field where the deceased had been lying, in addition to a bottle containing adulterated brandy. The Jury, after considerable deliberation, returned a verdict that "The deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 November 1884 PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at Plymouth touching the death of HENRIETTE SUSMAN, 40, who died on Saturday evening as the result of poisoning. Mr A. Wolf was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Alexander Jacobs, 44 Cobourg-street, said deceased had acted as his housekeeper for a month past. On her arrival she complained of sickness and headache, which witness attributed to her having travelled a great distance during the day. She was not attended by any doctor, but took a quantity of medicine (which witness considered "enough to drown a horse"). On Saturday morning she took a walk, and at dinner made a very hearty meal. She afterwards lay down to rest and witness went for a walk. On his return at five deceased was missing, but had an hour later when she was called she made her appearance. At half-past seven when the servant was laying the tea she heard a noise upstairs, and going to a ascertain the cause found that deceased was ill. Of this she informed witness and Dr Thomson was at once sent for, but as he had to leave Mr Elliot Square was sent for. They were both present at her death. Witness had noticed a strange appearance in the deceased's eyes and at times had observed that she expressed herself in a strange manner. She also said she had had a great deal of trouble, and had lost a great many relations in a short space of time. - Bessie Parsons, domestic servant with Mr Jacobs, was engaged on Saturday evening at seven o'clock, when she heard a noise upstairs which had proceeded from the deceased, whom witness found in an unconscious state on her bed. - Dr E. B. Thomson was called to see the deceased about eight o'clock on Saturday night. He found her even beyond a state of collapse. The symptoms were those either of apoplexy or of certain poisons. Mr Square thought he distinguished a faint odour of prussic acid. They had both made a post-mortem examination, and found the whole of the organs intensely congested. There was a smell of prussic acid in the stomach, and he had no doubt it was by that poison that death had ensued. - Bessie Parsons found a letter in German addressed to deceased's brother. This letter shewed that she evidently contemplated suicide. - A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was accordingly returned.

IVYBRIDGE - MR JOSEPH PEARNE, of Pithill, Ivybridge, has died from erysipelas supervening upon a cut on the head received in a fall from his horse on the 7th inst. On that day MR PEARNE was, while mounted, trying to open a gate near his courtyard, when he overbalanced himself and fell off, receiving the wound which resulted fatally on Sunday. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned at an Inquest held yesterday.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 November 1884 LYDFORD - JONAH COOK, a stalwart man of 39 years, sentenced at Warwick in 1881 to five years' penal servitude for larceny, has died at Dartmoor Prison from heart disease. He had been a source of much trouble to the officials during his period of imprisonment. An Inquest has been held.

PLYMOUTH - "Death from Apoplexy" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held last evening at Plymouth Workhouse, before Mr Coroner Brian, into the cause of death of ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, an inmate of the Workhouse Asylum. Deceased had been in the Asylum since 1872 and suffered from epileptic fits. Eighteen months ago her breast was removed in consequence of cancer, and about two months since her refractory conduct led the medical officer to order her removal to a padded room so as to prevent her from doing injury to herself or the other inmates. She was removed by nurse Smith, the paid nurse in charge, with the assistance of some pauper inmates, and was so violent that Smith appears to have struck her two or three blows, for which Dr Aubrey Thomas remonstrated with her. Some time afterwards it was found necessary to remove WILLIAMS to the Hospital where, in spite of every care and attention which she received, especially from nurse Badcock, she died somewhat suddenly yesterday morning. The Jury found that there was no connection between WILLIAMS'S death and the blows that were struck some time previously, and the Coroner, while agreeing with the verdict, said he thought the case was one on which an Inquest was bound to be held.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 November 1884 TEIGNMOUTH - Yesterday at the Commercial Hotel, Teignmouth, the Deputy Coroner, Mr Edmonds, held an Inquest on the body of JAMES FREDERICK ROYCE, the infant son of THOMAS ROYCE, a Teignmouth fisherman. The child was fifteen months old and died on Monday evening, having been for a few days previously attended by Mr Cardew, the house surgeon of the Teignmouth Infirmary. The doctor had refused a certificate of the cause of death; hence the Inquest. In his evidence Mr Cardew stated that he considered the child had been insufficiently fed, but that the immediate cause of death was Suffocation from being overlaid by the mother. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

ILFRACOMBE - At Ilfracombe yesterday a Coroner's Inquiry into the death of the lad HARRIS, shot dead by his uncle while rabbiting, resulted in a verdict of Accidental Death being returned. Medical evidence was to the effect that the lad's death must have been almost instantaneous, nearly the whole of the charge having entered the forehead and the brain being quite separated from the skull. The Jury gave their fees to the Ilfracombe Tyrrell Cottage Hospital.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 November 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - JAMES FROST, a naval pensioner residing at James-street Ope, Morice Town, and a porter in the employ of Messrs. Graves and Son, Devonport, was removing some furniture on Wednesday afternoon when he broke a large blood-vessel near the heart. He was taken to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died on the same evening. An Inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 November 1884 PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - At Mutley, on Saturday, the County Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest relative to the death of the illegitimate female child of ELIZABETH KINGSLAND, which was found dead in a box at the residence of Mr Hawke, Mannamead, where the woman was a domestic servant. The Coroner, in opening the case, said it was a somewhat suspicious one and was likely it would probably result in a charge of manslaughter. Margaret Mann, servant at Mr Hawke's, Alma Villa, Mannamead, identified the body of the child, which she stated was born about 8 o'clock on Thursday morning. Mr Langford, surgeon, certified the inability of the woman KINGSLAND to attend and the Inquest was therefore adjourned until today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 November 1884 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquiry into an accident which terminated fatally to JOHN PETERS, who fell out of a cab on Saturday evening, was conducted by Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, last evening. - Charles Wood, 2 Nottingham-cottages, said that when he was going up Tavistock-road about half-past six on Saturday evening he heard a cabman ask from his box "What's up?" Witness then noticed the cab door open. To this he paid but little attention, but seeing a heap lying a short distance behind the cab witness went into the middle of the road and then found the deceased, who was unconscious. Witness perceived a strong smell of spirits proceeding from the deceased. There was a wound on his nose and blood was running profusely. Deceased was afterwards recognised as a MR PETERS, dairyman, of Penrose-street. A policeman was hailed, and deceased afterwards removed to the footpath, where, with the aid of a few people, he endeavoured to walk. Witness's impression was that the deceased had been drinking very heavily. The cabman had driven on. - The Coroner here spoke of the kindness shewn by witness in remaining with the deceased, and thought the public would appreciate such humanity on his part. The Coroner further thought the Jury would join him in thanking Mr Wood for the attention shewn by him. - Mr Wood acknowledged this, stating that he had done no more than his duty. - Wm. Lang, 44 Penrose-street, said deceased was 47 years of age. He saw him on Saturday morning, when he was in perfect health. About 7.30 the same evening he was brought home in a cab and placed in a chair until the arrival of a doctor at 11 o'clock. He died on Sunday afternoon. The deceased was unconscious during the whole of the time. - Wm. Stuttaford, cabdriver, in the employ of James Barons, said that two men hired his cab about half-past five on Saturday evening. The deceased was one of them, and was quite sober. Witness drove them to Higher Compton, where the fare alighted at a public-house. They both left the house, but afterwards returned, and the deceased had two pennyworth of gin. Deceased then left in the cab for Plymouth and all went well until they arrived at the top of North-road. When just near the reservoir witness turned his head to the left and noticed the cab-door was open and swinging, but he did not speak then. As soon as he could, however, he pulled up and alighting found the cab empty. He went back a little way but seeing nothing he drove on and took up another fare. When he got back to his stand at the Cattle Market he heard that the constable on that beat had gone up Tavistock-road because a drunken man lying in the road had been run over. Witness immediately said he would be bound that was his fare and he had fallen out. He did not, however, go up to see and the constable soon afterwards made his appearance. Witness then questioned him about the drunken man, and the constable said, "Oh! that's not much; it's only MR PETERS, of Penrose-street" - P.C. Prose was on duty in Tavistock-road on Saturday evening. His assistance was called for about seven o'clock. Near the reservoir he saw the deceased standing against a wall, but he was unconscious. He was smelling very strongly of spirits. With the assistance of a young man and woman the deceased walked as far as Torrington-place, but on reaching Endsleigh-place he seemed unable to proceed. A passing cab was then stopped and deceased was driven away with the young man. - The Crooner considered the constable had done his duty in following the deceased until he saw that he was put into safe custody. - Dr E. B. Thomson was called to go to 43 Penrose-street, soon after eleven o'clock on Saturday night. He there found the deceased lying in a chair. There were no bones broken, and with the exception of two slight abrasions, which were only superficial, there was nothing which indicated that a cab had driven over the deceased, who was suffering from concussion of the brain. This could be caused by the deceased falling from a cab which was in motion. He did not think deceased recovered consciousness after the accident. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 November 1884 EXETER - The death of JAMES BRACKENBURY, well known in sporting circles, who died suddenly on Monday, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at Exeter yesterday. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 December 1884 PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - The Concealment Of Birth At Mutley. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon resumed at Mutley the Inquiry into the death of the female illegitimate child of ELIZABETH KINGSLAND, a domestic servant in the employ of Mr J. Hawke, of Alma-villa, Mannamead. - The Coroner said the mother of the child, for whose attendance the Inquiry had been adjourned, was now well enough to do so, but refused, and it was not her wish that she should be represented by a solicitor. With the question of concealment of birth, only the magistrates had to deal. The Jury had to determine whether there had been any culpable negligence on the part of the mother. And in determining this they would have to depend almost entirely upon the medical evidence. - Margaret Mann, housemaid at Mr Hawke's said KINGSLAND, who was the cook, had been there about thirteen months. She noticed nothing peculiar in her condition or manner until Thursday week last. On the morning of that day KINGSLAND and herself came down as usual at half-pat six. KINGSLAND remarked that she was not feeling very well. She prepared breakfast for eight o'clock, after which hour witness missed her. Witness went to her bedroom, and on entering heard a little cry. KINGSLAND was lying or kneeling on the floor, dressed. Witness saw no signs of a child. KINGSLAND begged her to say nothing to Mrs Hawke, who was, however, afterwards informed, and Mr Langford, surgeon, was sent for. - By the Foreman: When witness entered the room she taxed KINGSLAND with having a child. This she did not deny, but begged witness to say nothing to her mistress. Within a few minutes afterwards KINGSLAND walked back into the kitchen, where she was interrogated by Mrs Hawke, to whom she replied, "There is nothing the matter; I shall be better directly." - Edwin Charles Langford, surgeon, of 7 Ford-park, Mutley, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the child. On the morning of the 20th of November he was sent for to go to Mr Hawke's. He found KINGSLAND quietly seated on a chair in the kitchen. He asked her what was the matter, and she replied "nothing," and wanted to know who had sent for him. He told her that she was looking ill, and must have experienced a loss of blood and followed this up by asking her pointedly whether she had not been confined. This KINGSLAND denied most emphatically. He then advised her not to commit herself by making any false statements, as everything was sure to be thoroughly investigated. She then paused and asked what he thought would be done to her, and then said, "The child is in my box in the bedroom." He asked her if the box was locked and she replied "Yes, and the key is in my dress in the bedroom." The key was afterwards handed to witness, and he opened the box in KINGSLAND'S presence and found the child there. KINGSLAND admitted it was her child. On making the post-mortem he found that the child was fully developed, weighing 9lbs., and measuring 1ft. 9in. There were no external marks of violence, nor were there any indications of suffocation. The umbilical cord had not been secured, and he fully believed the child bled to death. In this opinion he was strengthened by the fact that there was a large quantity of blood on the floor. He further believed that the child was dead before it had been hid away, as there was no blood in the receptacle in which it was placed. On opening the head he could find no fracture or any mark or any contusion. The lungs were fully inflated and he was satisfied the child had had an existence independent of its mother. If it had been properly attended to at the time of birth if would have lived. There was the possibility that the woman was unconscious at the time of delivery. He could only say there had been an act of "omission" on the part of KINGSLAND, and of "Commission." - The Coroner said there was a clear case of concealment of birth against the woman KINGSLAND, but the medical evidence he did not think sufficient to prove such culpable negligence as would warrant the committal of KINGSLAND for manslaughter. - The Jury, after a lengthy deliberation, returned a verdict of "Death from Neglect, but not sufficiently culpable on the part of the mother for a verdict of manslaughter." - KINGSLAND was afterwards taken into custody on a charge of concealment of birth. She will be brought before the Magistrates at Roborough tomorrow.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 December 1884 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry into the very sudden death of a young woman, ANNIE JANE OPIE, in Mildmay-street, Plymouth, on Thursday evening, the circumstances of which were reported in yesterday's Western Morning News, was conducted by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday. Deceased was 29 years of age, was a dressmaker, and lived with her mother, MRS OPIE, at 2 John-street. For twelve months she had been very delicate, but had never been actually laid aside from work. She seemed as well as usual at two o'clock of the day on which she died. The medical evidence of Mr Sidney Wolferstan, M.R.C.S., was to the effect that a post-mortem examination shewed pleurisy of long standing of the right lung and traces of more recent pleurisy of the left. The heart was abnormally large and one of its valves was entirely incompetent. There was, considering these affections, no matter for surprise in deceased's dying quickly. Her death was due to sudden congestion of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, and expressed their sense of the kindness of Mrs Harris, who, seeing deceased apparently faint had taken her in and endeavoured to afford relief.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 December 1884 SHALDON - The Suicide Of A French Woman Near Shaldon. - Yesterday afternoon Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Shaldon into the circumstances attending the death of FELICE CHAMPERRI, a servant, formerly in the employ of Lieut.-General Lucas, C.B., of Dunmore, Shaldon. Mr r. Devonshire was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - General Alfred Wm. Lucas stated that the deceased was head nurse n his family for seven years, and that she was about 30 years of age. She was a Swiss-French woman, and a very valuable, kind and trustworthy servant. About ten o'clock on Saturday morning she went into the library and asked Mrs Lucas for permission to take a parcel into the village. The permission was given, and she left at eleven o'clock. General Lucas further stated that the deceased received a letter on Friday evening and another on Saturday morning. He also produced a letter, written by Mr W. Gutowski, of London, to the deceased, and received at Dunmore on Saturday evening, after the disappearance of the deceased. It stated that an elder sister of the deceased, named JOSEPHINE, who had been a cutter of dresses and mantles in a place of business in London, had left her situation with overstrained brain and nerves and was placed in a lunatic asylum near Paris. The two first-mentioned letters had not been found, but they were in Mr Gutowski's handwriting and were supposed to have referred to the illness of the deceased's sister. The parcel which deceased asked permission to take to the village contained articles of female wearing apparel, and was addressed to Mr W. Gutowski, 30 Percy-street, Bedford-square, London, W.C. Deceased, added General Lucas, was perfectly happy, and was well off as regarded money, she having £80 in the savings bank and £9 at home in her drawer. - Mary Ann Stiles, under nurse at Dunmore, said when deceased left with the parcel she asked witness to look after the children. There was nothing unusual in her manner, nor had she previously said she had any troubles. - James Mitchell, a boatman, deposed to the deceased bringing him a parcel about half-past ten on Saturday morning to take to Teignmouth, and that she gave him 2s. 6d. to pay for its carriage. On leaving him she went towards home. - William Kirton, a boy in the employ of Mr Bond, farmer, Stokeinteignhead, proved seeing a woman answering to the description of the deceased walking along the Torquay road, between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday morning, at a spot nearly two miles from Shaldon. She had on a blue striped dress, and, as it was raining, she had her umbrella up. - John Netherway, of St Mary Church, drayman for Messrs. Parson and Co., brewers, said whilst he was coming from Maidencombe to Shaldon, shortly before noon, he met the deceased in the road as he was on the brow of the Dean-lane Hill. As deceased passed him he remarked to her that she would get streaming wet, to which she made no reply. Witness subsequently, on reaching the top of the hill, and turning round, saw the deceased leave the road, enter a grass field and proceed along by the hedge down towards the sea. - William H. Passmore, labourer, of Maidencombe, stated that, having been told by the last witness of what he had seen, on Sunday morning he went inside the gate of the field to the edge of the cliff. He also saw similar marks at a spot where there were some thorn bushes and ten or twelve feet further down, at a place where the deceased had apparently gone over. - William Rowdon, gardener at Ness Lodge, Shaldon, described his finding the body in a crevice between two rocks at the foot of the cliff, but some distance out from the bottom, near Labrador, on Monday afternoon. P.S. Bright, P.C. Trewin, and Capt. Mitchell were near in a boat, and they took away the body. - P.S. Bright, in corroborating, said there was neither hat nor boots on the body and the pocket of the dress was inside out. It was 68 feet out from the bottom of the cliff to the rocks between which the body was found. Deceased's handkerchief was picked up twenty yards off. The cliff was not so steep but that the deceased might have slid down and then walked out to the place where her body was found. - Dr. G. Vawdrey, of Shaldon, stated that he had made a superficial examination of the body. It was sodden, but there were no bones broken, and no dislocations, nor were there any external wounds sufficient to cause death. There was a severe bruise over the forehead, and several bruises on various parts of the body, especially on the outer side of the left leg. The hands were tightly clenched, but there were no pieces of bramble in them to shew that the deceased had caught hold of a bush in slipping down the side of the cliff. There was no skin broke anywhere except on the forehead, and that was only a slight puncture, and was probably caused by striking against the rock. All the marks on the body were apparently caused after death. There were the usual pink discolourations, shewing that death was attributable to drowning. - In reply to the Coroner as to whether the deceased had any money in her possession when she left Dunmore, the boatman said she had the 2s. 6d. in her hand when she gave it to him, whilst General Lucas stated that deceased's purse and money had been found in his house that day. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out the absence of any evidence tending to shew that deceased's death was caused by a second person, and in so considering the question as to whether her death was caused accidentally or by her own hand, he remarked that letters which she had received respecting her sister might probably have troubled her. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 December 1884 EXETER - Alleged Infanticide At Exeter. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner for the City of Exeter, held an Inquest yesterday morning relative to the death of a male child, the body of which was found in the premises of Mr Henry Braund, draper, High-street, on Friday last. - Captain Bent, assisted by Mr Lindford Brown, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police. - Mrs Braund deposed that on Wednesday, the 3rd of December, she found her general servant, LUCY ANN SPRAGUE, sitting on the end of the table in the kitchen crying. On being asked what ailed her she replied that she had slipped over the stairs on the previous day, and had not complained because she thought it would soon pass off. She gave her a cup of coffee and told her to go to bed. Half an hour afterwards she was seized with a fainting fit at the bottom of the stairs and was assisted to her bedroom by witness and her husband. Witness saw she was in a very weak state, and remarked to her that it appeared like a miscarriage. SPRAGUE strongly denied this, and afterwards denied that she had been pregnant. In the evening Mrs Braund sent for Mr Domville, surgeon, who examined her and expressed an opinion similar to that entertained by witness in the morning. The girl affirmed that this was not the case. The doctor subsequently asked her what she had done with "it," but she only repeated her formal denial. On the following Friday SPRAGUE got p and dressed herself, but was not allowed to go downstairs. Being strongly pressed by her mother as to what had happened, she admitted that she had been pregnant about four months - the time during which she had been in Mrs Braund's service. She afterwards went home with her mother. Witness had previously heard that the girl was enceinte but she had always repudiated the charge. A search was made on the premises but no discovery was made until the 11th inst., when it occurred to witness to examine a cistern on the ground floor of the house, in which she discovered the body of a child, in about two feet of water. - Police-constable Davey said he went to the house of Mr Braund on the morning in question and found the body as deposed to by the last witness. On taking it out of the cistern witness saw it was the body of a newly-born child. He thereupon wrapped it up in a cloth and removed it to the police station. There were eighteen inches of water in the cistern, which was situated in a water closet. - Mr E. J. Domville, surgeon, corroborated the evidence of Mrs Braund, stating that when he first saw the girl there was every indication of her having been recently confined. Upon the discovery of the body witness examined it at the Police Station, and found it to be that of a fully developed male child, above the average both in weight and size. Having made a post-mortem examination witness discovered no marks of violence, but there were indications that the child had breathed, and that it had died from want of proper attention. He considered the child must have been partially alive when it was put into the water. There was evidence that it had gasped in the water. It was not possible to say whether the child had a separate existence. - The Coroner said if the Jury came to the conclusion that the child was born alive the only verdict consistent with the evidence would be one of wilful murder against the mother. - The Jury, after a brief retirement, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against LUCY ANN SPRAGUE."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 December 1884 PLYMPTON ST MARY - Sudden Death In A Train. - Yesterday morning MR JOHN WALTER, proprietor of the Rose and Crown Inn, Old Town-street, Plymouth, left his home at about eight o'clock to meet the 8.25 train leaving North-road for Lifton, in order to attend the funeral of a relative. He entered the train apparently in good health, and joined in conversation with Mr John Westcott, of Plymouth, who shortly afterwards thought from his manner MR WALTER was about to sleep. A few moments later Mr Westcott was surprised by a strange sound proceeding from MR WALTER, and upon looking at him saw an alteration in his appearance, and suggested the window being drawn down in order to admit air, thinking he was fainting. The train soon afterwards arrived at Marsh Mills Station and MR WALTER was removed to the waiting-room with the assistance of Mr Henry Clark, of Efford Manor, who was on the platform waiting to join the same train. Mr Clark attempted to restore animation, but his and other efforts proved of no avail, for it was found life was extinct. The deceased for about 30 years farmed a large estate named Tetridge in Werrington parish, and was much respected. During the short period he had resided in Plymouth he has made numerous friends, who feel the suddenness of his decease acutely. An Inquest was opened by Mr R. R. Rodd yesterday, and was adjourned for Inquiry as to MR WALTER'S recent state of health. The funeral is arranged for Friday at the Plymouth Cemetery.

NEWTON ABBOT - A quarrel with his wife on money matters was mentioned at an Inquest at Newton Abbot yesterday as having immediately preceded the suicide of ROBERT LANG, on Saturday evening. Deceased hung himself to the banisters with lamp wick.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 December 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Death has resulted from burns received by a little child two years old named JAMES HALL, whose parents reside at 28 Warren-street, Devonport. At a Coroner's Inquiry held by Mr J. Vaughan yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, it was elicited that the injuries causing death were received on the 17th inst. On the morning of that day, at about 9.30, the child was left in an upstair room with his two little brothers. MRS HALL was downstairs when she heard loud screams. She instantly ran up and found the deceased enveloped in flames. These she extinguished and the sufferer was removed to the Hospital, where he died on Thursday morning. The deceased had apparently by the aid of a chair obtained a box of matches from the mantel-shelf and had ignited them on the fire-grate. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 22 December 1884 BRIDPORT, DORSET - What has been termed "the Bishopsteignton mystery" has been partially cleared up. Some four weeks ago, MISS MARY FEY, residing with her father at Bishopsteignton, disappeared from her home, and all endeavours to find her have been of no avail. A few days ago MR FEY received information that the body of a female had been washed ashore at a place called Eype, near Bridport, and on proceeding there identified it as the body of his daughter. The fellow boot to the one picked up near the River Teign was on one of the feet. At the Inquest held afterwards the father recounted the particulars relative to deceased's disappearance, and the Jury eventually returned an Open Verdict.

PLYMPTON - Sudden Death In A Train. - The adjourned Inquest concerning the death of MR JOHN WALTER of the Rose and Crown Inn, Old Town-street, Plymouth, was held at the Hele Arms, Plympton on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner. - SARAH ANN WALTER, daughter of the deceased, deposed that on Tuesday last he left home at ten minutes to eight a.m. for the purpose of attending a funeral at Lifton. He was apparently in good health, but on the previous Sunday had complained of pains in the region of the heart. - Mr John Westcott said that MR WALTER joined him at North-road on the day in question, and remarked that he had been waiting about some time for the train. When they were near Laira he heard him breathe loudly, and thought he had dropped asleep, but on looking at him he saw something was the matter, and although the occupants of the compartment tried to restore him, it was of no avail, death in his opinion, having been instantaneous. Mr John G. Doidge, surgeon, stated that it was his opinion that the cause of death was heart disease. After a brief consultation the Jury gave a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 December 1884 PLYMOUTH - Another death from burning formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at the new Hospital at Plymouth yesterday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned in the case of NELLIE BLANCHE LAUNDER, four years of age, and of 31 Buckwell-street. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased child was left alone for a minute or so - in a room where there was a fire - by an elder sister, who found her in flames on returning. The medical evidence of Mr Buchan, the house surgeon, shewed that the injuries received were very severe and that quite one-third of the body was badly burned.

PLYMOUTH - Death Accelerated By Neglect. - An Inquest, which had been anticipated with considerable interest, was held last evening by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian). The case was one which had been brought under the notice of the Coroner by the doctor, who, from what he had noticed, thought a certificate for the burial of the deceased could not be given without an investigation by a Jury. The Inquiry was relative to the death of a little boy named WILLIAM JOHN FORD, aged 1 year and 9 months, who lived at 7 Castle-street, Plymouth. Dr William Cash Reed said that on the 24th October the child was brought to him at the Dispensary suffering from inflammation of the windpipe. He prescribed and told the mother to bring the child on the following day if the weather were suitable. She did not, however, nor did she for four or five weeks. At the end of that time, when she came again, witness asked her why she did not do as he had desired, and she replied that she had been away from Plymouth for three weeks. At that time the child was exceedingly ill and he again prescribed for it, telling the mother that it was in a very critical state. On the following day he was sent for to see the deceased, and found him in an apparently dying state. On this he recommended to the mother that the child should undergo an operation to relieve the breathing, but to this she objected. After telling her that if she did not consent to the operation the child would die, witness left without any understanding that he would call again. On the 3rd inst., however, he was again sent for and then found the child very much in the same state. He asked the mother why she had not had medical assistance since his last visit, and she replied that she was under the impression he was going to call again. He visited the child on the 5th, but there was no improvement in his condition. On the 14th and again on the 16th he was called and on the former day he reminded the mother of the dangerous character of the child's illness and recommended her to obtain a dispensary paper and thus ensure medical attendance daily. On the 20th a message was sent witness to again visit the deceased, but he was out at the time. On arriving home several hours later, and having a double quantity of work to attend to, he sent a message to the mother, stating his inability to attend, and urging her to get another doctor. On Sunday afternoon he learned from the mother's sister that the child had died on the previous evening, and she asked for a certificate for the burial of the deceased. Witness told her that the mother herself must come; and she did so. He asked her why she had spoken what was untrue, with regard to her being away for three weeks. She said she did not bring the child because she was afraid witness would "jaw" her. He therefore declined to give the certificate, and intimated his intention of communicating with the Coroner as he was quite certain that she had neglected the child. She, however, pressed him for the certificate, in order to "get out of the Inquest." He considered that the child ought to have been carefully attended from the first time he saw it. He also thought that the mother wanted him to go at different times so as, if possible, to be there when the child died, and so give the necessary certificate. He had little doubt that if the operation had been performed when he suggested the child's life would have been spared. - ANNIE FORD, the mother of deceased, deposed that after the first time the child was seen by Dr Reed she did not see him again for about three weeks. She then told him that she had been away, because the weather was so bad that she had been afraid to bring the child outside the house. On the following visit Dr Reed recommended an operation, but she refused, as she thought the deceased had suffered enough. She pressed the doctor for the certificate because she would have given any money rather than to have had the fuss of the Inquest. - Dr Reed considered death resulted from 'Natural Causes,' accelerated by want of medical care. - A verdict of Death from "Natural Causes" was therefore returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 December 1884 TOTNES - The death of MR JAMES WILLIAMS, a commercial traveller, who suddenly fell down whilst walking along the Station-road, about 9 o'clock on Monday evening, in company with a friend, and died shortly afterwards at the station, to which he was carried, was Inquired into by a Coroner's Jury at Totnes yesterday. The medical evidence was to the effect that death probably resulted from heart disease, and the verdict was "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 26 December 1884 PLYMOUTH - Plymouth Borough coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest at the Guildhall with reference to the death of CAROLINE BROWN, widow of the late EDWIN BROWN, paymaster, R.N., living at 3 Hoe-street, Plymouth. Deceased was in apparently good health up to Tuesday morning, and on the previous Sunday had gone to church as usual. About twelve o'clock on Tuesday she was sitting in her parlour when she suddenly expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr Hallard, R.N., was present on behalf of the family.

ILFRACOMBE - Inquiry was made at Ilfracombe on Wednesday into the death of MARY JANE HANCOCK, aged seven months. The deceased was left asleep in a cradle on the previous Friday week during the absence of her mother on an errand, and her sister, aged five years, accidentally upset a benzoline lamp into the cradle, setting in on fire. The child was severely burnt about the face and neck, and tetanus supervening, died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the mother.

EXETER - ALEXANDER NAPPER, a labourer residing at Exeter, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday from injuries received to his head as the result of a fall on Friday last. When admitted to the Hospital deceased did well for a day or two, but erysipelas set in accompanied by extreme exhaustion from the joint effects of which he died on Wednesday. A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 29 December 1884 PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Workhouse on Saturday afternoon respecting the death of THOMAS JENKINS, aged 67, a well-known character. Ever since entering the House in 1877 the deceased has been an inmate of the lunatic ward, and has been subject to epileptic fits. On the 28th of November he was suddenly seized with a fit and fell down on the concrete floor of the lavatory, striking his head and sustaining concussion of the brain. He was attended to by Mr Thomas, the house-surgeon, but remained in a semi-comatose state until Friday last, when he expired. Mr Thomas attributed death to the accident and the Jury, of whom Mr Wright was Foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 December 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At Newpassage. - The Coroner for Devonport held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Royal Albert Hospital, relative to the death of ALFRED PHILIP CHEEK, aged 6 years, of 4 Mill-street, Devonport. Mr Bennett, solicitor, watched the Inquiry on behalf of Mr Pole-Carew, the proprietor of the Torpoint Ferry Bridge. On Friday last the deceased was incautiously sitting on the beach below the ferry tank at Newpassage, with his feet resting on the bridge chains, when the heel of his boot became entangled in the chain, and failing to free it, his leg was drawn into the aperture. His screams attracted the attention of the bystanders, who signalled to the captain of the bridge - then in mid-stream - and the signal being observed the captain reversed the engines of the bridge, thus enabling the boy, after some little delay, to be extricated. The lad was immediately taken to the Hospital, where it was found that the flesh had been torn from the thigh downward. It was not considered necessary to amputate the limb, but the boy gradually sank and died on Sunday evening. - Several Jurors remarked that not only children but grown up persons were in the habit of bringing themselves into perilous contact with the chains, in spite of the many accidents that had occurred, and the warnings that had been repeatedly given, and they considered that something further should be done to protect the chains. - Mr Benett said that this question had been considered by competent engineers, who were of the decided opinion that nothing further could be done than had been. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and Mr Benett promised to lay before Mr Pole-Carew at the earliest opportunity the various recommendations that had fallen from several of the Jurors.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 December 1884 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Scalding At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Devonport relative to the death of JOSEPH ARCHER, a child aged 3 years and 8 months, residing with its parents at 26 Edinburgh-street. The father of the deceased deposed that shortly after four o'clock on Saturday afternoon he and his wife were having tea, and the child was standing on the fender. Suddenly the boy slipped and in trying to save himself caught hold of the spout of the kettle, which was on the fire. The kettle was turned over, and the boiling water fell upon the child's neck, severely scalding it. Witness immediately applied oil to the scalds and the pain was relieved; but on Sunday evening the boy grew worse, and on Monday morning Mr Pryn, surgeon, was called in. The child, however, had a fit at 9 p.m., and died an hour later. - Mr Pryn stated that death was due to shock to the system, brought on by the injuries. Had it not been for the fit he thought there was every probability that the child would have survived the shock. - The Coroner wished that it should be more generally understood that in cases like the present a medical man should be sent for on the instant. With immediate professional treatment the child was far more likely to recover than if left to chance. - Mr Pryn also remarked that he should like to see more generally adopted in homes fenders of fire guards of such a character as would prevent children from playing in dangerous proximity to the fire. - The Coroner concurred in the doctor's remarks, and further said that although he did not wish to censure the parents, he could not understand why they allowed the child to be amusing itself on the fender. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Scalding."

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Colour-Sergeant At Devonport. - The Raglan Barracks, Devonport, were yesterday morning the scene of a very determined suicide. COLOUR SERGEANT GEORGE VASS, the company sergeant of G. Company 2nd Battalion King's Royal Rifles Corps, at present quartered there, had drilled a squad of men on the parade ground and returned to the barrack-room of his company. Passing through the room he was seen by some nineteen privates of his own company, who were seated before the fire, to proceed direct to his "bunk," or office, a space which is screened off at the far corner of each of the barrack-rooms for the use of the non-commissioned officer in charge. There was nothing unusual in the procedure of the sergeant, who shut the door of his office in order that he might be, as the men thought, as quiet as possible in making out his quarterly accounts. About half-past ten, however, they were startled by the report of a musket, and on looking in the direction of the office they saw smoke issuing from it. Some of them rushed to the spot, and on opening the office door found SERGEANT VASS lying on his face on the floor, in a pool of blood, with a discharged rifle and a signal flag by his side. Further examination disclosed the fact that the Sergeant was dead, and that he must have shot himself. The Borough Police were communicated with, and Inspector Evans soon arrived. It was evident that the deceased had placed the muzzle of his rifle in his mouth and pushed the trigger home by means of the stick of the signal flag, which was found to be notched so as to fit the trigger. The bullet passed through the brain of the deceased, and coming out at the top of his head, and through his helmet, which was on a shelf just above where the body was lying; it grazed the wall, and finally became embedded in the ceiling. No reason can be assigned for the act, the deceased, who is a married man, with no family, being spoken of as a smart and intelligent non-commissioned officer, well liked by all, and was among the crack shots of t