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Help and advice for Inquests 1885-1887

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News

[printed in Plymouth.]

1885 - 1887

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living. .


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Abbinett; Acton; Adams(2); Anthony; Armstrong; Avery; Babbage; Badcock; Baggs; Bailey; Baker(4); Bale; Balkwell; Balsom; Barratt; Barrett; Bartlett; Bastin; Batten; Battershill; Baugh; Bearne; Beer(2); Belcher; Bell; Benney; Bergfeldt; Best; Bickford; Blackburn; Blackler; Blackmore; Blanchard; Blatchford; Blatchley(2); Bolt(2); Bond; Bonny; Borlase; Born; Bottle; Boyland; Bradford; Braunton; Brealey; Bredford; Brend; Bright; Broad; Brock; Bromley; Brooking; Brown(4); Browning; Bryan; Bryant; Bryon; Bulleid; Bunker; Burke; Burnett(2); Burrington; Bye; Caldecott; Callaway; Cann(2); Cape; Carroll; Caspall; Challacombe; Chamberlain; Chapple(3); Chilcott; Clark; Clarke(2); Clement; Cockwell; Cole(2); Coles(2); Collard; Collingwood; Collocott; Comaskey; Congdon; Cook; Coombes; Copp; Corey; Corin; Cork; Couch; Coulmour; Couzens; Cowd; Cox; Crispin; Critchell; Crocker; Croote; Crowther; Croydon; Curtis; Cutmore; Damellweek; Dart(2); Davey; Davie(2); Davis; Denham; Denner; Deville; Dizney; Dodd; Doidge; Donnell; Donoghue; Dotson; Down; Downey; Downing; Drake; Drew; Driller; Drury; Dunrick; Durston; Dyer(3); Dymond; Eastcott; Elford; Ellis; Elmes; Elston(3); Evans(2); Ewings; Fell; Field; Fielding; Finch; Finne; Fisher; Fitzroy; Flaherty; Foote; Forwood; Foss; Fowler; Foxwell; French(2); Froom; Frost; Gale; Gange; Gardner; George; Gerry; Gilbert; Gist; Glenn; Gloyn; Goddard; Goldsmith; Goss; Griffen; Griffiths; Gutteridge; Hake; Handford; Hannaford(2); Hardinge; Harris(2); Hart; Harvey(4); Havill; Hawken; Hawkins; Hayman; Heard(3); Heathman; Herd; Hewish; Heyward; Higman; Hill(4); Hillman; Hindom; Hitchcock; Hitt; Hobbs; Hocking; Hodge; Hole; Hollywood; Honey(2); Honeycombe; Hooper; Hoppins; Horton; Hortop; Howard; Hughes; Hunt; Hutton; Huxham(2); Huxtable; Isherwood; Jackman; Jago; James; Jarvis; Jewell(2); Johns(2); Jolly; Jones(2); Jordan; Joslin; Keen; Keiley; Kelly; Kerby; Kerslake; King(3); Kingford; Kittle; Knight; Knowles; Labdon; Lake; Lakin; Lally; Langley; Langman; Lashbrook; Lavers; Leaman; Lear(2); Legg; Leggo; Lethbridge; Lever; Lewis; Ley(5); Lipscombe; Lishmund; Littlejohn; Lloyd; Lock; Locke; Lockey; Lockyear; Love(2); Lovell; Lovering; Luscombe; Lyon; Macey; MacFadyen; Mackay; Maddicott; Mardon; Martin(2); Matthews; Maye; May; McBean; McDonald; McEwen; Meldon; Metcalf; Miles; Milford; Miller; Millman(2); Mitchell; Monk; Moore(3); Morgan; Mortimer; Mount-Stephens; Moyse; Mudge; Murch; Murdock; Mutton; Nest; Netherton(2); Netting; Newman(2); Neyle; Noble; Norman; Northcott; O'Donnel; Oldenshaw; Opie; Osborne; Owen; Oxenham; Paddison; Painter; Palk(2); Parker; Parrish; Parsonage; Parsons(2); Partridge(3); Patey; Pearse(2); Pellow; Penwill; Percy; Peters; Pethick; Pettle; Phelps; Phillips(3); Philpott; Pike; Pinder; Pitt; Platt; Pollard(2); Pope; Pratt; Price; Prior; Prout; Pudner; Pugsley; Quinlish; Radford; Redmore; Reece; Reed(2); Rew; Reynolds(2); Rhodes; Rice(2); Richards(2); Ribbling; Richards; Roberts; Robins; Rowe; Rowse; Ryder; Sanders(2); Scattergood; Scotchburn; Scott(2); Seage; Shaddick; Shapley; Shears(2); Shepherd; Sheriff; Simmons(2); Singleton; Skedgell; Slocket; Smith(3); Snell(2); Snow(2); Sobey; Spicer; Spiller(2); Sprague; Squance; Square; Squires(2); Stadden; Stenson; Stevens; Stokes; Stoneman; Stratford; Sutherland(2); Sutton; Symons; Tanner; Tatham; Taverner; Taylor(4); Templer; Tester; Tew; Thomas(2); Thomson; Thorne(2); Tickell; Tollyson; Townsend; Tozer; Tucker(4); Turner; Tutton; Underhay; Underwood; Upham(2); Uphill; Vanstone; Veale; Vercoe; Vivian; Voysey; Wakeham; Walker; Wall; Ware; Waring; Warren; Watkins; Watson; Watts; Webb(2); Weekes; Weeks; Wellington; Welsh; West; Westaway; Westcott; Westgate; White(2); Willcocks(2); Williams(8); Wills(3); Winsborrow; Withycombe; Wood(2); Woodley; Woods; Woolverstone; Wyatt(2); Yeo(2)

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 January 1885

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident on Shipboard. - At the Plymouth new Hospital last evening the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest relative to the death of RICHARD JONES, 35, mate of the schooner Margaret Jane, now lying in the Cattewater. The evidence of Sidney Crutchley, cook of the vessel, shewed that about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 30th ult. the deceased was aloft on the mainmast, about 50ft. from the deck. Witness happened to look up, and saw the deceased fall heavily upon the deck. There was nobody aloft with the deceased. After falling he lay motionless, with blood flowing from his nose. Witness called for assistance, and Mr Lucas arrived. Witness then went for a cab, but before he came back a wagon was hailed, and the deceased removed part of the way to the Hospital. The deceased had not been ashore during the day, nor had any liquor been brought on board. The deceased had a fit on Christmas-eve. - William Lucas, a shipwright, who was working on the vessel, gave corroborative evidence. - Mr W. A. Buchan, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased expired at five o'clock, which was about half an hour after admittance. His skull was fractured so severely that the injuries were necessarily fatal. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death" expressed their satisfaction with Mr Lucas's conduct in getting deceased promptly removed from the ship and to the Hospital after the accident.STOKE DAMEREL - Another fatal burning was the subject of an inquiry by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough coroner, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday. The evidence shewed that GEORGE CARNELL HILL, 73, who lived at 7 Church-street, Stoke, when going to bed on the 21st ult., stooped to pick up something from the floor. In doing so, however, he stumbled and knocked a table over, the lighted paraffin lamp which was on it at the time being also over-turned. The oil at once ignited and the deceased, in attempting to extinguish the flames, had his clothes caught on fire. Aid was forthcoming and the deceased, who was severely burned, was removed to the Hospital but he died on Tuesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 January 1885
EXETER - Heart disease was yesterday certified by Mr James Moon, surgeon, of Exeter, to be the cause of the death of MR ADRIAN STOKES, a retired physician, residing at 16 Holwell-road, who died suddenly on the previous day and concerning whose death an Inquest was held. The deceased was in the drawing-room on the afternoon of New Year's-day engaged in playing a violin duet with Mr Moore, a professor of music, when he suddenly dropped down and expired. In the morning he appeared to be in much better health and spirits than had been his wont for some time past.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 January 1885
PLYMSTOCK - An Inquest was held at the Volunteer Inn, Elburton-hill, Plymstock, as to the death of SAMUEL PHILLIPS, aged 49, whose dead body was found on Elburton-hill on the 1st of January. The deceased was a native of Stonehouse, and was a driver in the employ of Mr Barker, forage dealer, Plymouth. It appears that he was driving wagon loaded with hay, and there was another wagon behind him. The horse of the second wagon finding the dead body lying in the road shyed at it, and the driver on going to see what it was found the deceased quite dead. The Jury, under the advice of the Coroner (Mr Rodd), returned as a verdict "That deceased died from internal haemorrhage caused by injuries received whilst driving a wagon, the wheel passing over him and breaking two ribs."

EXETER - From injuries received by falling from the roof of a house in course of erection near Dartmouth in May last, GEORGE BATTEN, joiner of Torquay, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter on Friday. From the evidence adduced at an Inquest relative to his death which was held on Saturday at Exeter, it seems that the deceased who was 23 years of age, fell from a height of about 20 feet, alighting on his back and sustaining severe internal injuries. He was conveyed to the Torquay Infirmary, whence he was discharged some time ago apparently cured. He, however, got worse and was admitted to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on November 13th. His case, on admission was considered hopeless and he gradually sank. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury.

STOKE DAMEREL - Killed In A Lift At Devonport. - A sad accident happened at the Royal Hotel, Devonport, on Saturday morning. A page boy named JAMES BROMLEY, fell down the lift, from the top of the house, alighting on his head at the bottom, and he only lived a few minutes afterwards. The lift extends through every floor of the hotel, and at the time of the accident deceased was supposed to be replenishing the coal-scuttles of the upper storey bedrooms. He appears to have entered the lift when another servant was at the bottom preparing to raise some goods upstairs. He commenced to pull down the lift for this purpose, but immediately heard a noise above, and deceased fell at his feet. An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon by the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan). - Selina Kernick, chambermaid at the Royal Hotel, said that shortly before nine that morning she saw deceased in No. 30 bedroom, which was at the top of the house. He asked her if the coal-scuttle wanted filling. At that time she did not think he had removed any scuttles. The accident happened about two or three minutes after he had spoken to her. - Albert Luke, second boots at the hotel, said he was at the bottom of the lift on Saturday morning He pulled it down a little way, and then heard a rumbling noise. thinking it was a returned coal-scuttle he stood aside, and the lift returned to its place. Deceased fell headforemost at his feet. There was room for a person to fall out of the lift when it was between the floors, but it was perfectly safe when on a level with a floor. Witness did not know deceased was at the top of the house at the time. He believed that he was pulling down an empty lift. - The Coroner said that his theory of the case was that the deceased was in the lift when witness unconsciously pulled it down, and that he fell out when it got between the second and third floors. - Witness concurred in this view. He said if anyone wished to descend by the lift, they would shout down to the person at the bottom, and before he lowered it he would have to ask them whether it was all right. Mrs Parker strictly enjoined witness to do this when he was taken into her service, but he would not swear he had always done this. He did not do it that morning. - The coroner pointed out that by the witness's act of thoughtlessness the Jury were assembled that day. He hoped the present case would be a warning to him to be more careful in the future. Witness replied that if deceased had desired to come down by the lift he ought to have shouted that he was there when he heard the chains rattle. Witness would then have asked him if he was all right. - Mrs Parker, proprietress of the Royal Hotel, said she had given Luke strict directions as to care in working the lift. It was only for goods and luggage and was not intended for people to go up and down by. That morning she was standing with her back to the lift and heard a heavy fall. She turned around and found deceased there. A doctor was sent for, and Mr Harrison came at once, and everything that could be done was done for the lad. - John Norman, head waiter at the hotel, also gave evidence as to what he saw when he was called to the lift that morning. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental :Death," and recommended that a guard should be placed around the lift.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was last evening returned by a Coroner's Jury, at an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, at Plymouth. The deceased was an army pensioner named JOSEPH WEBBY TOWNSEND, 57 years of age, who was found dead in bed on Sunday afternoon. He had been living at 19 New-street, kept by John Turner as a lodging-house. On Saturday he was out, and did not return until nightfall. He was suffering from asthma, to which complaint he had long been subject. He retired to rest about seven on Saturday evening. On the Sunday, at different intervals, food was taken to the deceased in bed. He could not, however, take anything, and soon after half-past two o'clock was found dead by Mrs Turner, who had visited him for the purpose of giving him a cup of tea. Mr James Wakeham was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 January 1885
SIDMOUTH - Medical testimony being to the effect that MR JAMES SUTHERLAND, who died suddenly at the Knowle Hotel, Sidmouth, on Sunday night, had been seized with apoplexy, a Coroner's Jury yesterday returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes. The Jury's fees were given to the funds of the new cottage hospital.

EXETER - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday, at Exeter, in a Coroner's Inquiry as to the death of an old man named THOMAS LOVELL, who while employed in feeding a chaff cutter on the farm of Mr Fault, of Kenton, on Friday, was accidentally drawn into the machine and received terrible injuries before he could be extricated. Several of his ribs were broken, his neck was badly cut and one arm had to be amputated in consequence of its lacerated condition. LOVELL was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Monday.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 January 1885
EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter yesterday investigated the circumstances attending the death of an old man named WILLIAM HENRY DEVILLE, who was admitted to the Exeter Workhouse on Sunday evening, and who died on the following morning. Medical testimony shewed that death had arisen from exposure and a weakened state of body. His condition when admitted to the House was described as "destitute, dirty and neglected." A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 January 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Natural Causes was the verdict recorded at the Inquest held at the White Lion Inn, King-street, Devonport, yesterday, on ROBERT HENRY MITCHELL, aged 13 months. The doctor gave it as his opinion that had medical aid been procured earlier death from bronchitis would probably have been averted.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - Temporary Insanity was returned yesterday at an Inquest held before Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, at Torquay, as the condition of SAMUEL WILLIAMS, cabinet-maker of 2 Pembroke-terrace, Ellacombe, who committed suicide on Sunday. Evidence was given by Henry Clapp, of 1 St. Leonard's-terrace, to the effect that he was called into the house on Sunday night last by deceased's wife and found the body suspended to the passage ceiling, and that it was immediately cut down. It was stated that the deceased had been attended by a medical man for brain disease, and that it had previously prevailed in the family.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was yesterday returned at an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall, in the case of THOMAS COUCH, 50, captain of the schooner Clara. Deceased fell over the quay at Cattedown on Monday night. He was found on Tuesday morning, by a labourer, lying on the beach with his head much injured by a heap of stones upon which he had fallen.

PLYMOUTH - The death of LOUISA RICHARDS, widow, inmate of the lunatic ward of the Plymouth Workhouse, was Inquired into by Mr Coroner Brian last evening. From the evidence of the Master (Mr dyke), Nurse Hellier, J. Wallis and Dr Thomas, it appeared deceased was 75 and in poor health. She had been in the lunatic ward for eighteen months, and yesterday morning, being previously in her usual state of health, she was heard to cry out. She fell on the floor in her bedroom and died soon afterwards. The Governor (Mr T. Jinkin) said they could fully rely on the nurse. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by the fall," this being the medical opinion.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - KATE FLAHERTY, a child three years of age, living at 139 Union-street, Plymouth, died yesterday about noon from convulsions. Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest in the evening at the Clarendon Inn, Summerland-place, when it was stated that the child had been delicate from birth and had great difficulty in breathing. No medical man was called in because the parents had not the means to pay for one. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - Heart Disease was, at an Inquest before Mr T. C. Brian, on Saturday, at the North-road Station, Plymouth, shewn to be the cause of the death of JOHN DYER, a plasterer, who on entering the train at Marsh Mills Station on the previous evening fell unconscious and was discovered, on the arrival of the train at North-road, to be dead. Mr May, who had medically attended deceased, had told his wife he would probably die suddenly.

TORQUAY - Two Inquests were held at the Torquay Police Court on Saturday evening before Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy Coroner. The first was upon the body of JOHN CASPALL, aged 37, a seaman, who died in the Torbay Hospital on the previous day from the effects of injuries received through falling into the hold of the collier Thursby on Tuesday evening. It was stated that the deceased fell a distance of eighteen feet, and that, in addition to a scalp wound, the whole of his body below the neck was paralysed, owing to a fracture of the upper part of the spine. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The second Inquiry was into the circumstances under which MR JOSEPH MURCH, cab proprietor, aged 63 came by his death. The evidence shewed that deceased had been attended for some time by Dr Richardson for palsy, and that on Tuesday he swallowed a quantity of poisonous liniment, containing belladonna and aconite, the two bottles being kept near one another. The liniment bottle was labelled "poison" and deceased was said to have taken a dose sufficient to kill a healthy man in two hours. Emetics were given and deceased rallied once, but died on Thursday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Poisoning."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - Killed By A Cherrystone. - Some extraordinary facts were revealed at an Inquest held by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital yesterday on the body of a child named ALFRED ERNEST HIGMAN, aged 6, son of EDWARD HIGMAN, foreman on the Great Western Railway. - MRS JANE ANN HIGMAN, mother of deceased, said that in either May or June of 1883 she had some soap-lye in a bottle in a cupboard. It was left there by her elder son to be used to clean paint. Deceased got at the bottle and drank it. Witness heard him scream afterwards,, and he ran to her. He was ill for a week and Mr Pearse attended him. He had always a difficulty in swallowing afterwards. On the previous Monday morning he had some bread and butter for breakfast and went to school as usual. He came home at twelve o'clock, and said he had vomited during the morning. He ate no dinner because he could not swallow it. Everything he asked for was given him. On Tuesday he could eat nothing and on Wednesday morning Mr Pearse saw him and recommended that he should be removed to the Hospital which was done about 5.30 p.m. He was placed in the Children's Ward, and died on Saturday afternoon while witness was holding him. - William Buchan, M.B., resident surgeon of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that when deceased was brought to the Institution he could not swallow anything. After consultation it was decided to perform an operation to secure his being fed directly into the stomach. That was the only chance of prolonging his life. The operation was carried out successfully, and deceased was fed a few times. He, however, sank from exhaustion and died on Saturday afternoon. Methylene was administered to him, and he completely recovered from its effects. The cause of death was exhaustion consequent on starvation. At the Coroner's request witness had made a post-mortem examination that day. There was a distinct narrowing of the gullet, which was attributable to deceased having swallowed the soap-lye. The chief narrowing was about four inches from the mouth, and the pipe was completely filled up with a cherry stone. Deceased must have swallowed it recently, for no food could possibly have passed down the throat while it was there. The stone brought about starvation, which caused death. Mr Buchan produced the cherry stone in question. The Jury, of which Mr Lang was Foreman, returned a verdict "That deceased came to his death by Accidentally Swallowing a quantity of soap-lye, which caused the gullet to be abnormally narrowed and a cherry stone which prevented his taking food, thus causing Starvation."

PLYMOUTH - "Accidental Death by Burning" was again the verdict at an Inquest held by the Plymouth borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday. The deceased was an elderly woman named ANNA BORN, who resided at 24 Union-place, Stonehouse. On the 8th inst., at about 10.30 p.m., Stephen Snowdon was aroused by an alarm being given that the house was on fire. He rushed to the deceased's bedroom and found her standing in the middle of the room with her clothes considerably burned. She had been looking out of the window to see if the back-door was bolted, when her night garments took fire from the candle on the table, over which she leaned to reach the window. Mr J. E. Square, surgeon, was called to see deceased on the 9th inst. She was then suffering from a burn extending over the whole of the left arm, the chest, and back. She lingered for a week and then succumbed to her injuries.

CULLOMPTON - Shocking Death At Cullompton. - Mr F. Burrow held an Inquest at Cullompton last evening on the body of MRS MARGARET DRILLER, widow, who met with a shocking death on Sunday morning. Evidence shewed that the unfortunate woman - who is 84 years of age - went to bed about 9 o'clock on Saturday evening, carrying to her room a small benzoline lamp. Shortly afterwards cries of distress were heard, and on an entry into her room being forced, she was discovered lying on the floor in a nude condition, terribly burnt about the face and body. It is believed that she tripped after undressing, and being too feeble to recover herself quickly her nightdress took fire from the lamp. No injury was done to the room, and the only traces of fire were pieces of smouldering rag and the ashes of paper. On P.S. Baker attempting to lift the deceased, whom he thought to be dead, she moaned pitifully. Her skin came off on his hands as he touched her. A medical man was sent for, but his services were of no avail, and all he could do was to endeavour to alleviate her sufferings. She lingered until three o'clock on Sunday morning, when she expired, having previously regained consciousness for a short time. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 January 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - Heart Disease was, at an Inquest held yesterday, certified to be the cause of the sudden death of JOSEPH BENNEY, a naval pensioner and Tyler to Lodge Friendship of Freemasons, Devonport.

PLYMOUTH - "Death from Bronchitis, accelerated by exposure in ignorance, not knowing he child was so ill," was returned as the verdict at an Inquest yesterday, touching the death of a child named MELDON, aged 15 months, of 28 Brunswick-place. The mother had taken the child on Saturday, in a bleak wind, to Dr Jago's, in Tracey-street. It was improperly clothed, and the child succumbed the next morning. Mr Brian, the Coroner, commented at length on the mother's thoughtlessness, the doctor having told her at the time of the risk run.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 January 1885
EXETER - "Found Drowned" was the verdict recorded by an Exeter Jury yesterday at an Inquest held in regard to the death of GEORGE COX, solicitor's clerk, whose body was found on the previous day in the Canal. COX had been missing for several weeks, but nothing was elicited to show that the deceased at the time of leaving home meditated suicide.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 January 1885
SYDENHAM DAMEREL - At South Sydenham on Saturday, Mr Rodd held an Inquest as to the death of RICHARD VOYSEY, 26, labourer, who died from injuries received whilst on horseback in a collision with a trap. Evidence was given by John Gilbert, of Stokeclimsland, who stated that shortly before eight o'clock on the previous Sunday evening he left Tavistock in a trap, in which were also a daughter and child. His son-in-law and another daughter were walking behind carrying a lantern. When near the toll-house on the Launceston road, about half a mile from the town, the deceased, who was on horseback, collided with the trap. The force of the collision was so great as to break the left shaft and throw the witness out of the vehicle. He was driving on the left side of the road, but in the darkness he could not see the deceased approaching. - William Woolcock, resident in the toll-house, deposed to the deceased being taken into his house after the collision; and Mr Theed, surgeon, of Tavistock, described the injuries VOYSEY sustained. The shaft of the cart had penetrated the left leg between the bones below the knee. Mortification afterwards set in, causing death. Woolcock stated that Gilbert had had too much to drink at the time, but the latter denied that this statement was true. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he did not put much faith in Gilbert's statement, but at the same time he did not think there was any carelessness on his part contributing to the accident. He regretted, however, that the law did not enforce the carrying of side lamps. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of proper care and nourishment," was returned by a Jury at an Inquest held by Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough coroner, at Warn's Hotel, Neswick-street, last evening, relative to the death of a widow named JANE WILLCOCKS, 38, who resided at 9 Frederick-street. The deceased was attended by Mr W. H. Waterfield, of Stonehouse, of whose kindness to his patient the Jury expressed their appreciation, as Mr Waterfield had given her medicine gratuitously, and had interested himself in the case in many ways quite outside the calling of a medical attendant.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 January 1885
PLYMOUTH - At the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr Brian on JOSEPH ALFRED LLOYD, 24, seaman. The evidence shewed that the barque Lady Dufferin, of Liverpool, had just come from the Bahamas and was anchored in Plymouth Sound on Wednesday afternoon. About six o'clock there was a stiff breeze and several men were aloft taking in sails. Charles Downey, mate of the vessel, saw deceased and another man named McGenty knocked off by a sudden bellying out of the sail. LLOYD fell to the deck and McGenty into the sea. Deceased was taken to the Hospital with McGenty. William Charlick saw deceased falling legs first, but catching in a rope he turned over. Mr W. Buchan said deceased was received unconscious at 7.30. He found the base of his skull fractured, and he died in three hours. The Jury thanked the captain and crew for their action in the matter, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 January 1885
WEMBURY - The Fatal Encounter On Board Ship. Inquest At Wembury. The Official Log. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner for Devon, opened an Inquest at Wembury yesterday concerning the death of CHARLES ARMSTRONG, captain of the Nova Scotia barque Wellington, who was killed by his crew on Sunday last about 300 miles to the westward of Scilly. The only witness examined was MR ALBERT ARMSTRONG of Liverpool, managing owner of the Wellington and brother of deceased. The Inquiry took place in a boat-house on the quay opposite the spot where the Wellington was grounded when she was towed in from her dangerous position off the Mewstone. The body of the deceased lay in an adjoining boat-house in a "cradle" in which it had been lowered over the side of the vessel and conveyed on shire. The Jury viewed the body, which presented a sickening spectacle. - Dr Adkins, jun., pointed out the wounds, the mark of the terrible blow which shattered the skull, and the large circular discolouration round each eye. It is exceedingly difficult at present to say whether the unfortunate man received more than one blow. Mr John Seque was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said it was his painful duty to summon them there that day to Inquire by what means the captain of the ship Wellington came to his death. The case was of such importance that he should deem it expedient to open the Inquiry and then adjourn it. He was very glad to say that the brother of the deceased was present. He must ask the Jury not to be influenced by any reports which they might have read in the newspapers, but to form an unbiased opinion on the evidence which would be presented to them. As he had said this was a case for adjournment, and he should order a post-mortem examination to be made by the surgeon. From all that he had heard it seemed to him to be a case of great suspicion. It was stated that the deceased was drunk, but MR ARMSTRONG would tell them that his brother was a sober man and a good master mariner. He should adjourn the Inquest until next Tuesday, and should order a post-mortem examination to be made in order to ascertain if there were any traces of excessive drinking or poison in the stomach. It was a very curious case and a very difficult case, and he was glad to know that MR ARMSTRONG had determined to employ a solicitor to assist in getting at the bottom of it and presenting the truth to the world. - MR ALBERT ARMSTRONG, being sworn, said: I am managing and principal owner of the barque Wellington, of Windsor, Nova Scotia. She is a colonial ship, and is 1,006 tons register. Deceased is my brother, and is called CHARLES ARMSTRONG. He is in his 47th year. He was master of the barque. I live at Liverpool. My brother has held a master's certificate 23 years,. I saw him three or four months ago. He left Havre on Tuesday morning, and was found dead, as I have heard, on Monday last. This last seven years he was always, to my knowledge, a sober, steady man, and this is the first time I have ever known him to have any trouble with his crew during the whole time he has been master. - The Coroner: You have hard that he was drunk? - A.: Well, I have my suspicions as to that. - The Coroner: Well, I am very glad you are here. I shall now adjourn the Court to the Jubilee Inn at eleven o'clock on Tuesday. In the meanwhile the contents of the stomach will be analysed by Dr Oxland of Plymouth. The Jury were then bound over to appear at the place and hour named The Jury, witnesses, and spectators were about to depart when Sergeant Coles, of the Devon County Police force, was called to arrest Charles L. Patterson, chief mate of the Wellington, an American; John Summerdyke, an American seaman; Jergen Madsen Jergensen, cook, a Dane; and Charles Jones, an American, who holds a second mate's certificate, but who shipped on board the Wellington as a seaman in order to get a passage to New York, where he resides. The sergeant then said to MR ARMSTRONG, "I believe you wish to give these men into custody?" - MR ARMSTRONG replied "Yes, I do; it looks so suspicious." - Sergeant Coles, addressing the men, said: You will have to be locked up in custody and brought before the magistrates on a charge of being concerned in the death of CAPTAIN ARMSTRONG. You must therefore consider yourselves in custody. - The men made no reply, but sat down on the seats vacated by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 February 1885
WEMBURY - The Fatal Affray At Sea. Resumed Inquest. Important Medical Evidence. The Second Mate's Story. - The Inquest as to the death of CAPTAIN CHARLES ARMSTRONG, who was found dead on board the Nova Scotian barque Wellington, of which he was the master, on the arrival of that vessel in the River Yealm on Thursday, was resumed before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner for Devonshire, at Wembury, near Plymouth. The prosecutor, MR ALBERT ARMSTRONG, brother of the deceased and managing owner of the Wellington, was present, with Mr R. G. Edmonds, solicitor, of Plymouth - whom MR ARMSTRONG has employed to watch the Inquiry on his behalf - and Captain Cunningham, deputy chief-constable for the county of Devon. Charles Logan Patterson, mate of the Wellington; Jergen Madsen Jergensen, cook; Charles Jones, seaman; and John Summerdyke, seaman, were also present in charge of Sergeant Coles, and a very large attendance of onlookers, shewed the great public interest felt in the Inquiry in the neighbourhood. - P.C. Halwill stated that on January 29th, about 6 a.m., he went on board the Wellington, and saw Charles Logan Patterson, the chief mate, now in custody. He stated that the captain on the 26th of January had the drunken horrors, and commenced shooting the crew. He said he shot two men, but added, "I can shew you the whole affair as written in the log-book." Witness here produced the log-book, the entry in which has already been published in the Western Morning News. The Coroner having read the statement, the witness continued: The mate did not tell me when he made the entry in the log. He also handed witness the revolver, which had two shots in it at the time. The weapon had seven chambers. - Mr Edmonds: This is the ship's log. Where is the official log? - The Coroner: We must have the official log. - Witness, continuing, said he went on board later the same day in company with Sergeant Coles. he went on board again on the following day and took possession of a belaying-pin, which he now produced. On Saturday he received the contents of the stomach from Dr Adkins, sealed in a jar, which he took to Dr Oxland, of Plymouth. On Monday he took the medicine chest of the barque Wellington to Dr Oxland, the latter having expressed a desire to have it. The doctor's report, which witness received that morning, he now produced. - Mr George Adkins, surgeon, stated that he made a post-mortem examination of the body of CHARLES ARMSTRONG on January 30th, in company with his father, Joshua E. Adkins, also a surgeon. He (witness) was called on the morning of the 29th January by William Gundry to proceed to the barque Wellington, lying in the River Yealm. He arrived on board at 9.40 a.m., and after attending to the injuries of three of the crew, he was conducted by the first mate, Patterson, to the after cabin, which was locked. He was there shewn a body - that of CAPTAIN ARMSTRONG - which was lying on its back, clothed with a sheet, and was in a state of post-mortem rigidity and smelling offensively. He observed blood in a coagulated state at right angles to the mouth and at both nostrils, with ecchymosis of eyelids on both sides. There was a contused lacerated scalp wound on the front of the head, exposing a depressed fracture on the frontal bone of the skull. He made no further examination until the next day. Witness then found the mattress on which the body was lying much stained with blood. On making the post-mortem examination he found the length of the body to be 6 feet 1 inch, well nourished and developed. It was offensive, with marks of decomposition over the whole body. A crust of coagulated blood was found covering a superficial wound about the size of a threepenny-piece, situated over the anterior border of the large bone of the left leg. On the front part of the head was found a contused lacerated wound reaching from one inch above the bridge of the nose vertically upwards for an inch and a quarter, and then inclining to the left for two inches, exposing the bone. The edges of the wound were gaping and covered with coagulated blood, enclosing some of the hair of the scalp. On the top of the head was another contused lacerated wound reaching to the bone, and quite distinct from the former wound. It had a transverse direction, and measured two inches in length. On removing the scalp the soft parts beneath were found generally ecchymosed. On the anterior parts of the skull, corresponding to the first described wound, was found a depressed fracture of the bone - a quadrilateral piece, one inch wide, and an inch and a quarter long, being detached and pressing in on the brain. From the left lower angle of the opening thus made a line of fracture could be traced to the middle of the upper border of the left eye, and another line from the right lower angle to the right eye, and about a quarter of an inch to the inner side of its centre. From the left upper angle of the opening a line of fracture could be traced running directly backwards for four inches, and then inclining to the left for three inches. On removing the top of the skull three lines of fracture were found right through the bone. The coverings of the brain presented a normal appearance, except at the part corresponding to the depressed fracture, where it was found lacerated and covered with effused blood. The brain was anaemic, but presented no signs of disease or injury except beneath its lacerated covering, where it was found contused and infiltrated with coagulated blood to the extent of a circumference of three inches and half an inch in depth. On removing the brain the line of fracture at the upper border of the right eye case was seen to extend backwards to the posterior border of the anterior fossa of the skull, and the fracture of the left orbit ran into this about its centre, the bone between being fractured in many places. On opening the abdomen he found the intestines and stomach distended with gas, but otherwise empty, and they shewed no sign of disease. The stomach was removed, placed in a jar, sealed and given to P.C. Holwill to convey to Dr Oxland of Plymouth. The liver and kidneys presented a healthy appearance. The heart was not contracted, was empty, and its walls were thin, soft and covered with fat. There was no disease of any of the valves. On the right side of the lungs there were remains of old pleurisy, but otherwise they were healthy. All the other organs were soft and discoloured from post-mortem changes. He received Dr Oxland's report last evening. As to the cause of death, it was his opinion death resulted from the injury to the brain, caused by the depressed compound fracture of the frontal bone. The injury might have been caused by a fall, or some heavy blow. - By the Foreman: He could not say whether the wound on the front of the head would have caused instant death. - The report of Dr Oxland was as follows: - On 30th January I received from the police officer Richard Holwill a hamper and a letter with instructions respecting the same from Mr R. Robinson Rodd, Coroner. I found the hamper to contain a stone jar tied down and sealed and two bottles, the one labelled "Opodeldoc," the other "Scotch whisky." The stone jar contained a stomach and a portion of the omentum, but with it there were no remains of food and but very little liquid. At the first opening of the jar and throughout subsequent treatment I could not discover either alcohol or camphor. I subjected the stomach to analysis. The bottle marked "Scotch whisky" was about half full. I find it is an ordinary quality whisky without admixture of any foreign matter. The bottle marked "opodeldoc" contained, originally twelve ounces of which three had been removed. It is a preparation for external use, of a solution of soap in alcohol, with camphor and small quantities of oils of rosemary and origanium. I have also received the medicine chest of the ship Wellington and have carefully examined its contents. I have not found any notable deficiency in the contents of such bottles as are at all pleasant for drinking purposes, such as paregoric, &c. - Robert Oxland, F.C.S. - By a Juror: He could not say how many blows the deceased received. He should not think it was necessary to put a man in irons after he had received the blows which he (witness) had described. - Mr Joshua Edward Edkins, surgeon, stated that he was present when the post-mortem examination was made, and he confirmed his son's evidence in every particular. - Thomas Bridges said he was second mate of the Wellington, which was of 1,006 tons, and belonged to Windsor, Nova Scotia - English flag. The deceased was called CHARLES ARMSTRONG. Witness went from London to Havre to join the barque, which he did on January 13th. They left Havre on the following Tuesday for New York, the prisoners all being employed on board. The log produced was the ship's log. It bore witness's signature. - The Coroner: All went well until when? - It did not go well. The captain blackguarded the pilot until he left two days out. The pilot was an Englishman, and he took the first boat he could get. CAPTAIN ARMSTRONG was always growling at him, and told him he was no pilot at all. A fishing boat took the pilot off, and the latter went on the poop to bid him "goodbye." The captain said, "Bid you good-bye! No, I will bid you good-bye when I'm dead." The pilot then left in the boat. He was a Channel pilot. he could not say how far the pilot went. It was thick. A tugboat took them four miles to sea. The captain was queer all the time and rarely came on deck. All went well until three p.m. on Sunday week. The ship would not steer. S he had only two lower topsails on: there was no wind. He sent the mizzen-staysail to keep her to the wind. The captain came up and told witness to come down to the front of the poop. He then said, "Now we will get along quietly. When you think she wants sail give it to her, and when you think it ought to come in take it off her." The captain went to lie down then. Witness set the reefed foresail and maintopsail. At that time it was eight bells - four o'clock. The mate took the deck and set the fore topsail and main topgallant sail. Witness took charge of the deck again at 6 p.m. About 6.30 or 7 o'clock the steward, Isaac Viguere, came. Witness was standing by the side of the man at the wheel. The steward had two whisky bottles in his hand. He said to witness, "Have a drink." He took one bottle; there was a little in it. He gave it back to the steward and told him he did not want it and that he was to heave it overboard. The steward went below and the captain came up a few minutes afterwards and asked witness how she was going. He replied that she was going about five knots, and he went below again. At eight bells he took the patent log in and reported to the captain and asked him if there were any orders. He said "No," and was lying in his bed. Witness went below and the mate took the deck. He had not been below long when the mate came and called him, and told him the captain wanted him. He got up and slipped his trousers on and followed the mate into the captain's room. The captain was on the couch. He asked witness if he would lend him a hand to put the steward, boatswain, and carpenter in irons. Witness replied "Yes, certainly." He said, "I can do it myself but I want your help." He then told him to fetch the steward in. Witness brought the steward in. The captain had a pair of irons in his hands. He said to the steward, "Hold your hands up." The steward said, "I have done nothing to be put in irons." The captain told him to hold his tongue and to put his hands up. The mate said to the steward, "Take it quietly, steward." The captain looked at the mate and said, "I don't care for anyone." He then put the irons on the steward and afterwards told them to fetch Brian, the boatswain, in. Witness went to Brian's room and told him to get up and dress himself, and then went the second time and hurried him up. At last the boatswain came without boots, hat, or coat. The captain put him in irons too, and said, "Take them out on the main-deck and lash them up." Witness could not find an "earring" and took his chest lashing. The captain took it and lashed Brian up to the stanchion which supports the skids, and took out his knife to cut the lashing. The mate said, "That's the second mate's chest lashing and he does not want it cut." Witness told him it was plenty long enough, but the captain said he meant to cut it and did cut it. He told them to take the steward and lash him to the maintopsail sheets. They did so, and the captain then called the witness and the first mate to his cabin. At the door of his bedroom he had two cases of liquor, both open. He said, "Take that up and throw it overboard." Patterson took one and witness the other on to the poop and threw it overboard, the captain following them. They commenced to throw the bottles, one at a time, out of the cases, and he said, "Throw cases and all," and they did so. The captain then said, "The damned stuff has been sent aboard to poison me." Witness then went below and left the mate in charge. A little after eleven the captain tried to get into witness's room. Witness woke and heard him called "Mr Cummings." He (witness) did not know who Mr Cummings was; but he sat up and opened the door. The captain said, "I want you to come out and reef the foresail." Witness said, "The foresail is reefed," and the captain replied, "No, the mate shook the reef out." Witness dressed himself and came on deck, and they reefed the foresail and set it. The captain then had the foretopsail and maintopsail taken in, and commence lowering the halyards himself, saying "Hurry up, hurry up." They went aloft and stowed both topsails, and when they came down the captain said they would have to get the foresail off the ship. They hauled the foresail up and stowed it, and then hauled the mizen staysail down. By that time it was eight bells - midnight or a little after. Witness took the deck. The ship would not steer. About 12.30 the captain came up and asked witness how she was going. Witness told him she would not steer. He then told him to come down in the cabin. Witness went down in a few minutes. The captain was standing in the middle of the cabin, and the steward was leaning against the door smoking a wooden pipe. The captain said he did not feel very well, and witness told him he ought to lie down and try and sleep. He said he felt strong and hearty enough, but he did not knock about enough. He asked witness if smoking would hurt him, and he replied that he did not think it would; and asked why he did not take something out of the medicine chest to make him sleep. the captain then said - "I have taken forty drops of laudanum and some pills;" and, turning to the steward, said, "Didn't I steward?" The steward said, "Yes, sir." At witness's suggestion the captain asked the steward to get him some coffee. The steward, boatswain and carpenter had previously been liberated from the irons. The steward and captain went to look for the key of the pantry to get the coffee. Witness heard them go to Brian's room and ask him if he knew where the key was. Brian said "No, sir," and witness then went on deck. At 1.45 the clock stopped and witness went below to tell the steward to wind the clock up. The steward said, "What do you think of him now?" Witness said "What's that?" The steward replied, "He has had two cups of coffee; I have got to light a fire in the cabin now to make him some tea and toast." Witness made some joking reply, and went on deck. About half an hour afterwards the captain came up on the house where witness was. He said, "Mr Bridges, I feel very bad indeed; " and witness asked him why he did not go and lie down and rest himself. He made no answer, but went off the house to the main deck. Presently he came back again and stood in the alley-way. The prisoner Jones came up the ladder and spoke to the captain. Then Jones backed down the steps, and the captain followed him to the main deck. In a few minutes Jones came up the poop ladder again and witness went to him, thinking it was the mate. Jones said, "What shall I do; the captain sent for me and said he was sick, and wants me to sit with him?" Witness said, "You had better go and turn in." He went away, and witness then heard the mate's door slam twice. A little while after the mate came up the port alley-way, and called witness to him. He said, "We shall have to do something with the captain; he is not right." This was about 2.30. Witness went into the alley-way, and asked him what was to be done. The captain came up in the alley-way at that time, and advanced towards them, asking where Brian was. The mate said, "Oh the main deck, sir." The captain replied, "He's on the main deck, is he?" and fired a shot at the mate from his revolver. The revolver produced was much like the one the captain had. The mate jumped on the house and ran across it to the main deck. The captain caught witness by the arm and fired a shot at him. The shot went past his head. Witness said, "Captain, what's the matter?" Witness then broke away and ran round the house. The captain went on to the main deck and into his cabin, and witness went forward and found all hands out. The captain then came out of the cabin and followed the men round the forward house, shooting whenever he got a chance. The mate and Martin (Martin Nest) ran aft, and Martin took to the main rigging. The captain fired three shots at him, one of which struck him in the eye. He hung round the main rigging. The captain then went into his cabin. Witness then went along the port side of the deck as far as the pump, and then saw someone come along the port alley-way along the poop. Three or four were under the break of the poop peeping in at the cabin door and through witness's window. The captain - witness did not know who it was at the time - started to come down. He got down two or three steps, and sang out, "Now you tons of ....., will you give in?" When witness heard his voice he turned round, expecting to get a shot. Witness had not run more than two or three steps when someone sang out, "We've got him." He could not say whose voice it was. He turned back to lend a hand to secure the captain, who was then lying on the main deck at the foot of the poop ladder. Three or four had hold of him. Witness could not say who they were. Witness knelt down to assist in securing his hands. While he was engaged at this the carpenter came up and struck him on the head with a pin - he could not say whether it was a wooden or an iron one. The captain was then lying on his back and had not spoken. He believed the captain was senseless before he was struck by the carpenter. Witness swore at the carpenter and told him to knock off doing that. The mate then came up with the irons and after putting them on they took the captain into the dining-room and laid him on the floor by the side of the stove. He came to before the irons were put on him and kept singing out to let him loose. After putting him by the stove they got some water and washed his face, and the steward got some Friars' balsam and put on the wounds. They then cleared a small room out by the side of the steward's, put a bed on the bunk, and laid him on it. He was raving all the time. A man was put to watch him while they went to look after the other wounded men and to put the ship about. Witness went into the cabin afterwards and saw that the prisoner Jones, who was watching, could not manage the captain. He told the mate that he had better send another man to help Jones. He did so, and they wore the ship round, and came back again to the first English port. This was about four o'clock. About six o'clock the mate came to the galley and called the witness, and said, "You had better come aft and look at the captain; I think he is dying." Witness went aft. The captain was still in irons. They took him out of the room, laid him on the floor, and took the irons off him, and got a bed and put under him and some pillows. He died about seven o'clock. They arrived in the Yealm on Thursday morning. Witness heard the entry in the log read, and signed it. That was all he knew about it, and it was the whole truth. - After a brief adjournment, Thomas Angear, master mariner, stated that he knew the deceased in Havre during the past month. He was with CAPT. ARMSTRONG every day and during the evenings for three weeks, and the only intoxicant he knew CAPTAIN ARMSTRONG to take was hot claret. He had often heard deceased refuse to take drink. - The Deputy Chief Constable said he thought sufficient evidence had been taken to justify an adjournment. This was a very important matter; it was very desirable to get at the truth, and they had now sufficient to go upon. - The Coroner acquiesced in this view, and the Inquiry was adjourned until eleven o'clock on Friday morning. - Before the prisoners were removed the three Americans requested the Coroner to call the attention of the American Consul to their case. They had no means of getting assistance, and did not know how to proceed in their unfortunate position. Jones also stated that he should have liked to have asked Capt. Angear whether CAPT. ARMSTRONG was not drunk at the Cafe Royal at Havre; but the witness had then left the court.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 February 1885
WEMBURY - The Fatal Affray At Sea. The Resumed Inquest. Verdict of Wilful Murder. - [Three columns of further evidence resulting in:] "That CHARLES ARMSTRONG met with his death by blows received on the head from belaying pins given by Adolph Haase, John Summerindyke, and Jergen Madsen Jergensen." The Coroner: That amounts to a verdict of "Wilful Murder," gentlemen, and on the evidence before you I am bound to say I concur in the verdict. Are these three men in custody? - Captain Cunningham: Yes. - The Coroner: I shall issue my commitment for their detention and they will stand committed to take their trial at the next Assizes for the County of Devon upon my Inquisition.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 February 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Affray At Sea. Inquest On MARTIN NEST. Verdict of Wilful Murder. - MARTIN NEST, a seaman of the barque Wellington, who is supposed to have been shot by Captain Armstrong, having died from his wounds, an Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, on Saturday by Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner. - Charles Logan Patterson, the first mate, emphatically denied there having been any insubordination among the crew to justify the captain behaving as he did. Captain Armstrong was mad through drinking spirits. Witness saw the shots fired at NEST by the captain when the former was in the rigging. Witness, after this point in his evidence, simply repeated the description of the affray as he had already given it at the previous Inquest and at the Magisterial Inquiry. - By the Foreman of the Jury (Mr R. H. Lang): He had been waiting for a ship at Havre before he joined the Wellington, knowing none of the crew at the time. He saw the captain two days before leaving and had a drink with him. Never saw any of the crew drinking. did not know whether the Channel pilot joined them in Havre Docks or four miles out when the mud pilot left. Was busy, did not see the pilot until they were four miles out. The wind was then blowing east by south and the sails were squared. The pilot was on deck except once or twice when the captain called him down to the cabin, and then witness was in charge. On the pilot's leaving the ship in a fishing boat off Portland Bill he sang out to the captain to steer west by south, the captain replying "You go to .... ; I'm master of this ship," and he steered west half south. The men steered and did their duty well. He could smell that the captain drank spirits and several times saw him throw bottles overboard. NEST was on the port side of the main rigging when he was fired at. - By the Jury: The pilot said several times to witness - "Poor fellow! poor fellow! I am sorry for him." He told witness he thought the captain would be all right after a few days out at sea. The pilot thought he drank. The captain had an impression there were magicians on the vessel. NEST was on duty on deck that night. The pilot left when they were about ten miles off from the Bill, and the weather was rather hazy. He had never been first mate before, only second. - The second mate, Thomas Bridges, corroborated the first mate's testimony, and also gave similar evidence to that offered by himself previously. He joined at Havre, the carpenter and boatswain being the only ones of the crew who sailed from New York to Havre. When the two men were put in irons they remonstrated and were told to shut up their noise. - John Bryant, the boatswain, who appeared to have been a favourite of the captain's, described him as being crazy and under a delusion. - William Buchan, M.B. resident surgeon at the Hospital, said MARTIN NEST was received on Saturday, January 31st, suffering from an injured left eye, the ball of which was destroyed. Last Tuesday it was found necessary to remove the eye. Deceased died on Friday morning at twelve o'clock from injury to the brain. He had made a post-mortem that afternoon and found a piece of lead - evidently a bullet - which he produced. It had carried away part of the bony framework of the eye, and had passed through the opening through which the optic nerve passed to the brain. It had travelled the whole length of the brain and lodged on the inside of the back of the head. Death resulted from abscess of the brain. - By a Juror: Deceased was conscious, and spoke while at the Hospital. He was sensible until Wednesday, and told witness he was in the rigging and bent over and the captain fired up at him. He suffered greatly at the last. - The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Charles Armstrong, the captain, deceased. - Mr Cummings, representing Messrs. Fox and co., was present, and to that gentleman Mr Brian expressed his thanks for his assistance in the matter.

MALBOROUGH - The Fatal Accident At Salcombe. - The workman SHEARS, who was injured on Monday last at Salcombe, while assisting to hoist the bowsprit of a vessel, died on Wednesday evening, and an Inquiry into the cause of his death was held before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, on Friday. - Charles Robinson, rigger, of Salcombe, in whose employ deceased was when the accident occurred, said he carefully examined the rope with which the bowsprit was being lifted into its place, and he considered it strong enough to bear a much heavier weight than they were lifting with it. There was no sign of weakness about it in any part, and it was a 3 ½ to 4-inch rope. When the rope parted the bowsprit had been hoisted about fifteen or sixteen feet from the ground, and the rope parted about half-way up without the least warning and the bowsprit fell into the yard. Deceased made an attempt to run from the handle of the winch at which he was working, when he must have been struck with the end of the broken rope, as it would run through the block and come down with great force. This rope must have struck deceased on the crown of the head, causing the injury to the skull and knocking him forward on his face, by which he became much bruised. Witness could not account in any way for the rope parting, as no extra strain had been put on. - Mr F Harding gave corroborative evidence. - Mr A. Pearce, surgeon, said the blow on the crown of the head cut through the scalp, and there was bleeding at the ear, so he should think the brain was injured, which would account for death. SHEARS when he saw him was in a semi-conscious state, and never regained entire consciousness. The Coroner having briefly reviewed the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death through the breaking of a rope whilst assisting to put a bowsprit into a vessel."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 February 1885
ASHBURTON - An Inquest concerning the death of EDMUND SKEDGELL, the labourer who hanged himself at Place, near Ashburton, on Sunday, was held yesterday by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner. The evidence of Dr Gervis was distinctly to the effect that deceased was probably not responsible for his actions, and a verdict of Suicide while of Unsound Mind was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A fit of apoplexy and accidental burns have caused the death of MRS SUSAN ANN MACFADYEN, 84, who died at her rooms at 10 Caprera-terrace, Plymouth, on Sunday morning. An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner. Mrs Knight, the occupier of the house in which MRS MACFADYEN lodged, stated that on Friday last a servant called witness, and she ran upstairs to deceased, who was on the floor close to the fireplace. She appeared to be in a fit. Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, was called, and deceased died on Sunday morning. Elizabeth Ann Wickett, attendant on deceased, stated that she found her mistress on the floor with her head pressing against the bars of the grate. Her cap was on fire. She lifted her out, and noticed a bruise and burn on her forehead. She was conscious, but gave no account of the fall. Witness believed that deceased rolled out of her chair into the fireplace. Mr May said he had previously attended deceased for an apoplectic fit, from which she partially recovered. He visited her on Friday evening last. He saw she had been burned, and, after examination, was of opinion that she died in a fit of apoplexy, death being accelerated by an accidental fall into the fire and the consequent burns. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly. Deceased was the widow of the late CAPT. MACFADYEN, who was for many years employed on the old East India liners.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 February 1885
BARNSTAPLE - The adjourned Inquest on the body of CAPTAIN OWEN, master and part owner of the schooner Hedessa, who was drowned at Barnstaple a month since, was concluded yesterday. The last date he was seen alive was the 13th January. He called at the Farmers' Inn shortly before eleven, and in consequence of not appearing sober he was persuaded to have soda-water instead of beer. He left almost immediately afterwards. At half-past eleven he was seen by a female rambling drunk. He crossed the Ilfracombe line to go to the quay, where his vessel lay. She saw him halt and, turning back, he then went in the direction of the North Walk. Nothing more was heard of him until the recovery of the body at Ashford Weir on Tuesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 February 1885
BARNSTAPLE - A case of sudden death was investigated by the Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft) at Barnstaple on Saturday evening. On Friday evening, just before eight o'clock, a woman named HARVEY, aged 47, left her house at Sunnybank, saying she was going out for half an hour. Nothing was seen of her subsequently, until just after nine o'clock, when a woman found her lying across the road, dead. It was stated at the Inquest that deceased had previously been treated for heart disease, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was accordingly returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 February 1885
TOTNES - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Totnes yesterday at an Inquest as to the death of MR EDWARD BROOKING, 69, formerly a coal merchant of Ashburton, but lately residing with his wife at Totnes. Deceased fell down some steps on the 30th ult. and died on Sunday from concussion of the brain. Mr Currie, surgeon, gave medical testimony to this effect.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 February 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatal Collision Off Plymouth. Recovery Of A Body. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall yesterday touching the death of ROBERT WOODS. The evidence of Mr Harcourt Foden, executor of the late Col. Hargreaves, and residing at 92, Durnford-street, Stonehouse, shewed that the deceased, who was at first unknown, was ROBERT WOODS, fireman of the steamship Holmhurst, of Fleetwood. He was 20 years of age, resided in Fleetwood, and had been in the Holmhurst about six months. The Holmhurst left Red Wharf Bay on her way to Cowes, and about 4.30 on Sunday afternoon a collision between that vessel and the Westernland occurred. Mr Foden could identify the deceased by some marks on his arm, and also by having seen him port frequently, and having had a voyage in the Holmhurst with the deceased as fireman. - Edmund Thomas, fisherman, and skipper of the sloop Excelsior, of Plymouth, deposed that about 6.30 on Thursday evening when about 12 miles south west of the Eddystone they drew up their trawl and made sail for home. When they arrived at Plymouth at 11 o'clock they found the body of the deceased in their net. The body was landed and handed over to P.S. Yabsley, who conveyed it to the mortuary. - The Coroner stated that they only had the rumour that the vessel on board which the deceased was acting had come into collision with another vessel, and that the deceased, with others, was drowned. He did not care to go to the Westernland for evidence, as he thought the Jury would like to have evidence from the deceased's own vessel. Moreover the Westernland was sailing under the Belgian flag, and they could not compel the men to make any depositions. - A Juror wished to know why the men of the Holmhurst were sent home so quickly. - Mr Brian did not think blame attached to anybody for sending the men away, as it was not probable that a man drowned so far from land would be washed ashore, and it certainly was not anticipated that he would be hauled up in a trawl, as such a thing very seldom occurred. - Mr Thomas did not think that if a body was hauled up it was brought ashore. (Laughter). - Mr Foden explained that the friends of the rescued men were very anxious to see them home, hence the despatch shewn in their departure. - A Juror did not think an adjournment was necessary, but Mr Brian stated that it would not be fulfilling his duty to stop the Inquiry as it then stood. The proceedings were therefore adjourned until Tuesday the 3rd prox.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 February 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - A verdict of Accidental Death was returned yesterday at an Inquest on the body of RICHARD BREALEY, who was killed on Monday by falling from a roof he was repairing in Devonport Dockyard, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. Mr Vaughan was the Coroner.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 February 1885
LYDFORD - At an Inquest at Princetown yesterday as to the death of the young girl LEAMAN, who died from blood poisoning consequent on getting something underneath her finger nail, Mr Fulford (Coroner) expressed an opinion that the medical man (Mr Collins) should have attended to the case earlier, and also that the father should have made a renewed application for medical aid.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 March 1885
PLYMOUTH - Lockjaw, the result of injuries by burning, has caused the death of MARYANN OSBORNE, 66, of 14 Neswick-street, Plymouth. Deceased was found in her room a fortnight since lying on the floor with her face against the bars of the grate. She had once, many years ago, had an epileptic fit, and medical testimony at an Inquest held on Saturday, was to the effect that she was seized with a fit on the day on which she received her hurt.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 March 1885
LYDFORD - At Dartmoor Prison a convict named JOHN O'DONNEL, who was undergoing sentence of seven years' penal servitude for an aggravated theft, has died from cancer of the liver. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned at an Inquest held before Mr Fulford, the Coroner, yesterday.

EXETER - With his head held fast in a roller towel behind the scullery door, a lad named WILLIAM THOMAS ISHERWOOD was yesterday morning found dead in the establishment of Mr Davey, draper, of Queen-street, Exeter. It is supposed that the lad was seized with a fit while drying his face with the towel. An Inquest was subsequently held by the City Coroner, at which medical testimony shewed that deceased had been overtaken by an epileptic fit, and that death had resulted from strangulation by the towel, which was found tightly pressing up on his throat. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury.

PLYMOUTH - The Loss Of The Holmhurst. Adjourned Inquest. - An adjourned inquest was held by Mr T. C. Brian at Plymouth yesterday, touching the death of ROBERT WOOD, fireman on board the steamship Holmhurst of Fleetwood, which vessel foundered in the Channel after being in collision with the Belgian mail boat Westernland. Mr Nelson, solicitor (Lawless and Co., London) attended on behalf of the owners of the Westernland. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that on the day the Inquest was opened they were obliged to adjourn in order to ascertain if any more evidence respecting the circumstances under which the deceased came into the water would be forthcoming. Mr Foden, the agent for the barque Holmhurst, which it was said was sunk in collision, then entered into an arrangement to procure the attendance of some persons connected with the Holmhurst. On Sunday he (the Coroner) received an intimation that those persons would not be present. there had been no time since then to force their attendance, and as they were not there he did not think it advisable to have another adjournment. The Westernland had gone to sea and it was unlikely she would call at any English port on her homeward voyage. It had been pointed out to him also that it would be unfair for the witnesses on behalf of the Holmhurst to be examined and cross-examined without any evidence being given by those on board the Westernland, and though that argument had not much weight with him, he did consider that it would be impossible for them to come to a fair or impartial conclusion with only one side of the story before them. Moreover, the Westernland was sailing under the Belgian flag and the collision took place more than three miles from British coasts, so that if they came to a verdict adverse to any person he did not see how it was to be enforced. He understood that it was exceedingly improbable that the Westernland would touch at any port in the United Kingdom on her homeward voyage, and he should ask the Jury to return a verdict of "Found Drowned." - Mr Nelson stated that he was there representing the Westernland to give any information to the coroner and Jury which they might desire. The Westernland was the mailboat between Antwerp and New York; she was, he hoped, by this time at New York, and there was no probability, unless another calamity should unfortunately occur, of her coming within the jurisdiction of the borough or kingdom. - The Jury then returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 March 1885
PLYMOUTH - At Plymouth Custom House yesterday, at an Inquest as to the death of GEORGE HILL, 46, an outdoor officer, who was seen sitting in the locker's office apparently well at half-past four on Thursday afternoon and was found dead half an hour later. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 March 1885
ASHFORD - Sad Sequel To A Pleasure Trip. - The Coroner for the Barnstaple district (Mr J. F. Bromham) held an Inquest at Ashford, near Barnstaple, last evening on the body of a man named THOMAS COOMBES, a native of Torrington. Deceased was a cabinet-maker working at the Raleigh Works, Barnstaple, and a party of shopmates, numbering eight, went to Morthoe on Saturday afternoon by the half-past one train. When they started to return only four of the party caught the train, deceased and three others, named Thorne, Blight and Kelly, missing it. Thorne remained at Morthoe the night and the others essayed to walk to Barnstaple, a distance of eight or nine miles. Blight and Kelly yesterday stated that before they left Morthoe village they were none of them sober, and on finding they had missed the train they remained at the Fortescue Hotel, by the station, for an hour. They arrived at Braunton about eleven, and tried to get a bed, but could not, and again started homewards. The constable at Braunton met them at half-past twelve on Sunday morning at Heanton, with Blight and Kelly arming deceased, who appeared very exhausted. Deceased lay down just after they passed witness, and asked the other two if they could get him a conveyance, but they said they could not, and it was not very far, as they could see the Barnstaple lights. They went on again, and he saw no more of them. Blight and Kelly said that COOMBES several times sat down in the hedge, and they sat down with him. He afterwards told them to go on, but they did not recollect his asking them for any assistance. They were too "far gone" to recollect very much, and got home at two o'clock on Sunday morning. They were told this the next morning. They had no idea but that COOMBES would get on. Blight said he remembered drinking out of a bottle of spirit which COOMBES brought away, he expected, from Morthoe. The constable, however, stated that Blight and Kelly did not appear so drunk but that they could have helped deceased home. COOMBES was found dead in the hedge - in a sitting posture - at six o'clock on Sunday morning by a man passing. A rum bottle and a stick were found some distance down the road. The medical evidence shewed that death resulted from failure of the heart's action and evidence was given that deceased suffered from a weak heart. Sunday morning, too, was very cold. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned, but the July censured Blight and Kelly for leaving deceased on the road, although in their condition there might be some excuse.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 March 1885
EXETER - Suicide Of An Exeter Chemist. - Mr Hooper, Coroner for the City of Exeter, investigated yesterday circumstances attending the death of JOHN JOSEPH BLACKMORE, a chemist, who for several years past has carried on business in Fore-street, Exeter, and whose death occurred on the previous day. According to the evidence, for some time past the deceased had suffered from nervous depression. He had also been physically weak, though not recently under medical treatment. Last summer he was attended by Dr Budd, and at that time was suffering from an acute state of mania resulting from an over-indulgence in alcohol. He was exceedingly nervous and desponding, but his tendencies were then of a homicidal rather than a suicidal character. It was found necessary to place him under constant surveillance. On Monday night last he was more than usually depressed, and complained during the day of a pain in his head. On Tuesday morning his wife remarked that he looked very ill, and on returning to him after a few minutes' absence observed that there was something seriously wrong with him. A neighbour was called in and some brandy poured into his throat, but he gradually lost all strength and died in a few minutes. The services of Dr Budd were procured, but on arrival he found the pupils of deceased's eyes dilated, the hands clenched, and other indications that respiration had entirely ceased. In the course of a post-mortem examination the doctor found strong traces of prussic acid, and there was no room to doubt that death had been caused by poisoning. Subsequent investigation in the shop led to the discovery that a bottle of prussic acid had that morning been opened, and about two drachms of the liquid taken from it. For some months the deceased had been a total abstainer and taken Dr Budd's opinion the result of the alcohol he had taken last summer might have affected his brain, and produced the low state of mind of which he had complained. - After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On Board A Steamer. - An Inquiry was held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday respecting the death of JOSEPH TANNER, who had died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital from injuries received on board the screw steamship Trio, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, on the 2nd inst. When off Ushant the vessel was overtaken by a terrible gale and the deceased, a seaman, was struck by a heavy sea, which threw him violently against an iron ladder leading to the upper deck. He was shockingly injured. On the ship's arrival at Plymouth on the following day he was taken to the Hospital, where he died on Tuesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 March 1885
BRIDGWATER, SOMERSET - A sailor named MICHAEL WELSH, belonging to Plymouth, and upon whom was found a certificate that he had been discharged, invalided from the Indus, was found dead upon the railway near Dunball, Bridgwater, on Wednesday afternoon. Evidence taken at the Inquest yesterday shewed that just before being found he was seen walking along by the metals. When discovered his body was lying on the down metals, with the legs against the bank. Several trains had passed but upon neither of the engines was blood found, and Inspector Green said that from inquiries he had made he believed deceased had been run over by the goods train leaving Bristol at 2.35 p.m. A verdict was returned that deceased had met his death by being run over but there was no evidence to shew how he got upon the line.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Burns occasioned by throwing benzoline on the fire has occurred to ANNIE LEGGO, 21, daughter of JOHN LEGGO, of St. Just, and servant in the employ of Mr T. Johnson, of the Birkhead Hotel, Plymouth. The accident occurred on February 17th. Deceased was pouring benzoline from the can onto a dull fire when the whole of the oil blazed. Her dress and the hearthrug ignited and she rushed about in alarm. Mr Johnson threw a mantle over her and extinguished the flames, afterwards taking her to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she died yesterday morning from exhaustion after having suffered great pain. At an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, and the Coroner expressed a hope that the sad end of deceased would act as a warning to those tempted to misuse highly inflammable oils without due regard to the risk run.

PAIGNTON - Fatal Result Of A Drinking Bout. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Manor Inn, Paignton, touching the death of WM. HUGHES, 29 years of age, whose body was found in a ditch in a field adjoining Preston Sands on Wednesday. Mr R. E. Drew was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Several witnesses were called, amongst them being Frederick Wyatt, who stated that on Monday evening he, with the deceased, went in a boat to the French fishing smack Mareo. He had been drinking all day with the deceased, and they took about half a pint of brandy whilst on board the smack. Soon after leaving the side of the vessel in a boat they lost their paddles and deceased fell overboard. Witness caught hold of HUGHES and dragged him back into the boat. The night was very rough, and after losing the oars the boat drifted on to Preston Sands. Witness then got out of the boat and assisted HUGHES as far as the marsh, where they both lay down on the grass and slept. Witness awoke first and aroused deceased, who said he would not go home. Witness then walked home to Torquay, arriving there about two o'clock on Tuesday morning. On getting up from bed he went to HUGHES'S home to see if he was all right. Finding that he had not arrived, witness went to Paignton in search of him, but did not hear anything of him. On Wednesday morning he again went to Paignton, and then observed the deceased lying in a ditch about four yards from the place where witness had left him on the Monday night. - Dr J. Goodridge stated that he had examined the body, and gave his opinion that deceased met his death by suffocation, there being no marks of violence whatever. - P.C. Smith proved finding the body face downwards in a ditch at the place mentioned. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased Accidentally met his death through Suffocation by Drowning."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 March 1885
HOLSWORTHY - Painful Revelations At Holsworthy. Sad Death Of A Navvy. - In the course of an Inquest held by Mr Fulford at Holsworthy Workhouse yesterday as to the death of WILLIAM PRICE, 30, a navvy, lately engaged on the Halwill section of the North Cornwall Railway, some revelations of a very painful nature were made. Deceased's death was due to inflammation of the lungs, and was declared by Dr Symons to have been accelerated by undue exposure on the occasion of his being removed to the House. PRICE was taken ill about ten days ago, complaining to his mate and attributing his indisposition to liver disorder. He was at the time sleeping in a loft belonging to Mr William Jenkins, of the Manor Inn, Ashwater. In his evidence Mr Jenkins stated that he received no consideration for providing this accommodation. There were sacks in the loft and hay and straw and the men were locked in by his servant every night, all lights and matches having been previously removed. The men who slept in the loft were those who started the work in the morning and who could not get other lodgings. There was great difficulty in this respect. Witness allowed the men to cook their food in his back kitchen. They, of course, drank at his house, but he would not object to a man who did not do so sleeping in the loft. There might have been ten men sleeping in the loft at a time. He did not know much about it as he was a cripple and could not go to the loft without considerable difficulty. Witness heard on Saturday last that deceased was ill. He wished to go to Holsworthy to see Dr Linnington Ash (medical officer for the railway) and witness lent him a horse and trap, gave him some brandy and food, and also provided him with a great coat and rug. - Henry Hill, servant to Mr Jenkins, said he had only once or twice cleaned out the loft where the men slept. Deceased first complained to him on Friday morning. He lay in the loft all day, his mate giving him food. On Saturday he was driven to Holsworthy. The doctor, relieving officer, and sergeant of police were all out, and deceased was therefore taken to the Workhouse, where he was at once admitted. In answer to a Juror witness said he had known as many as twenty men sleeping in the loft at the Manor Inn at one time. - Mr Turner, Master of the Workhouse said deceased was in a most exhausted condition when brought to the House on Saturday. He was at once put to bed, and Dr Symons sent for. Witness did not require the usual order of admittance to be produced as the man was so ill. PRICE told witness he was taken ill on Tuesday, March 3rd, but worked up to the following Thursday night. He had no friends, having been left an orphan when 2 years of age. - Dr Symons said that when he first saw PRICE he was suffering from inflammation of the lungs. The case was hopeless. Deceased was very insufficiently clad, and he had no doubt death was accelerated by exposure, Saturday being a bitterly cold day. - P.S. Stone of Holsworthy, said he had been to see the loft at the Manor Inn. He found it in a filthy state. The stench was very great, the place swarmed with vermin, and the straw was rotten. The dimensions of the loft were 27 feet by 15 feet, 5 feet from the floor to the eaves of the roof, and 12 feet to the centre of the roof, which was an open one, and in many places unsound. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the evidence left no doubt whatever that deceased had died from inflammation of the lungs, accelerated by exposure. He could not see that blame for that was to be attached to anyone. But he deeply deplored that the railway contractors and officials did not provide accommodation for their men. The place where they had been herded together like beasts was hardly fit for pigs, much less for human beings. He considered it was the duty of the contractors to provide proper sleeping accommodation and lodging for the men they engaged. He attached no blame to Mr Jenkins, who seemed to have been actuated by kindness in what he had done. - The Jury having consulted, returned a verdict "That deceased died from Inflammation of the Lungs, and that his death was accelerated by Exposure to cold prior to his admission to the Workhouse." They regretted to find existing a want of sleeping accommodation for the men employed on the North Cornwall Railway. - The Coroner was desired by the Jury to communicate with the contractors on the case, and to call their attention to the rider to the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 March 1885
PLYMOUTH - Poisoned By Alcohol. - Having taken brandy in excess of late, JACOB TESTER, 45, a fisherman of Worthing, yesterday died suddenly at the house of a friend at Higher-street, Plymouth. An Inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening at the Regent Inn, Exeter-street. From the evidence of Elizabeth Walker it appeared that the deceased had stayed at her house for the past five weeks. During the greater part of that period he had drank brandy very heavily. He had taken as much as two pints a day. On Sunday deceased was taken ill, and on Monday Mr Harper, surgeon, was sent for. The deceased was prescribed for, and he went out, but witness did not think he took anything to drink. On Tuesday he again went out and had some drink. Yesterday morning he left home soon after four, and at about six he was brought home and immediately expired. - P.C. Codd, who was on duty in Exeter-street at 5.45 yesterday morning, saw the deceased standing in the doorway of the Black Bull Inn. He did not appear firm upon his legs, so witness spoke to him. The deceased at once fell backwards, but was caught. He smelled strongly of spirits, but not in such a way as to lead witness to think he had been drinking recently. With the aid of a passing fisherman the constable took the man home. When Mr Harper saw the deceased on Monday he prescribed for delirium tremens. On Tuesday he called, but the deceased had then gone out. On Wednesday he was again called and found deceased dead. He considered death was caused by sudden congestion of the lungs accelerated by excessive drinking. A verdict to the effect that the deceased died "Through Excessive Drinking of Alcohol" was recorded.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 March 1885
CREDITON - Mr Burrow, District Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Yeoford on the body of a little girl named EMMA WARE, who was killed on Monday evening by a down train in attempting to cross the North Devon line. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 March 1885
DARTMOUTH - Shocking Affair At Dartmouth. - Revelations of a shocking character were made at an Inquest at Dartmouth on Saturday as to the death of OCTAVIA SCOTCHBURN, a governess, 53, who was found dead outside the Floating Bridge Inn on the morning of that day. Deceased was of intemperate habits, and the evidence of Mrs Elizabeth Taylor, landlady of the inn, was to the effect that MISS SCOTCHBURN called there at about 6.50 in the evening of Friday. She had a glass of beer, and afterwards two blue-jackets came in, and each gave her two glasses of whisky. She left at eleven o'clock, and the servant watched her up the road towards the town. One of the lodgers in the house, named O'Hara, came down and wished to see MISS SCOTCHBURN home if witness would let him in when he returned. To this witness assented and O'Hara went out. He returned at about twenty minutes after two. There were two seats outside the inn door. One of them was broken down in the morning when some men knocked at the door and called witness's attention to the deceased, who was lying on the ground quite dead. Deceased was not drunk when she left the inn the previous night. She was of very intemperate habits. Her occupation was that of a teacher of foreign languages and she often acted as interpreter. She had a little bread while she was at the inn, and told witness that was all she had had for the day. - By the Foreman of the Jury: Witness heard no one outside the house after O'Hara came back. - Thomas O'Hara, captain of the forecastle of the Britannia, deposed to being at the Floating Bridge Inn on Friday night at nine o'clock with another bluejacket named Samuel Dunn. Witness stood deceased a couple of whiskies. Did not know whether anyone else stood her anything. She left at eleven o'clock, and witness went after her, overtaking her at a distance of about thirty yards. He tried to induce Mrs Taylor to give deceased a bed, but she refused, saying MISS SCOTCHBURN had lodgings to go to. Witness went down the quay to go on board the Britannia. He failed to get a boat and returned, when he saw deceased sitting or lying just outside the door. He tried to lift her, and she shrieked out. Someone was passing at the time, but witness did not know who. He left her where she was and went into the inn. He did not mention to Mrs Taylor that deceased was outside. MISS SCOTCHBURN appeared drunk. The man who passed witness turned a light on him, but nothing was spoken. Witness himself was not drunk, though he might have been hazy. He had no improper intercourse with the deceased. - William Luke Rowe, a shoemaker and in the employ of the Gas Company as a lamplighter, said he knew deceased. At about 12.45 that morning he saw her lying with the last witness outside the Floating Bridge Inn. He turned a light on them and delayed a minute, afterwards going on to the Sand Quay. On returning and when between Mr Moore's house and the Inn, he met O'Hara. witness turned the light on his face and whistled, and O'Hara asked what he whistled for. When witness reached the inn he saw deceased lying outside the rails. He told her she had better move out of that, but she made no reply. Witness noticed she was looking very pale. He was certain it was O'Hara he saw with deceased when he first passed them, and was also certain as to what they were doing. When going home O'Hara called to him several times to go back, but he did not. - Questioned at this point by the Coroner, O'Hara said he wished to withdraw the statement that he had had no improper intercourse with the deceased. - Charles Truman, a labourer, deposed to seeing the body of deceased lying outside the door of the Floating Bridge Inn at 5.40 that morning. He touched her and found her quite dead. He then called the police. - Mr Soper, surgeon, testified to having made an examination of the body. There was only slight contusion over the left eye, and from his knowledge of the deceased he concluded that the cause of death was failure of the heart's action. He did not think a post-mortem examination necessary, and had no reason to suspect that any violence had been used to cause death. - A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of MISS ANNIE ELIZA MOORE, sister of MR MOORE, Plymouth College, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at Warleigh-villas, Mannamead, on Saturday. Mr Edlin, surgeon, stated as the result of a post mortem examination, that the deceased had died from syncope, produced by an enlarged liver pressing against the lungs and preventing breathing. A verdict in accordance with this testimony was recorded. Later the remains were sent to Yorkshire for interment there.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 March 1885
TOTNES - The death of MR GEORGE MACKAY, of Totnes, master of the Charity School, whose death occurred on Monday from self-inflicted wounds in his throat three weeks since, was the subject of an Inquiry by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, yesterday. Mr L. Harris, surgeon, in his evidence, said he concluded from deceased's manner when he visited him that he had been drinking, and he was reported to be of intemperate habits. Deceased said he was afraid he was going to have a serious illness, and could not stand it, and he had also stated that he had been injured by lightning while standing under a hedge. Another of his stories was that he had taken oxalic acid for Epsom salts, and that it was slowly poisoning him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane." Mr Harris desired to express on behalf of Mr Cape and himself the very satisfactory services the police had rendered in this matter. They had not only carefully watched the wounded man, but had been most efficient nurses. Their behaviour deserved public recognition.

BIDEFORD - The fatal accident at Bideford on Sunday afternoon to a young man named WILLIAM BROAD, who was one of a party from Torrington, and who was killed just after starting for the return journey, was Inquired into before Dr Thompson, Bideford Borough Coroner, yesterday afternoon. It was shewn that deceased had, previously to the accident, been refused drink at Tanton's Hotel, as he was intoxicated. No very clear account could be got from either of the witnesses as to how the accident happened, the only description of the affair offered being that BROAD fell while he was trying to run to the horses' heads. The medical evidence shewed that death was inevitable after the injuries which had been received, one side of the face being severely bruised, the lower jaw broken in two places, and the neck broken at about the fifth vertebra. - Dr Cox, the medical man who examined the deceased, did not consider such severe injuries could have been inflicted by such a fall as a person would receive who simply lost his equilibrium in running, but thought that such a fall as a person would get from a carriage in motion would account for the injuries sustained. He could detect no evidence of the wheels having passed over deceased's neck. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" - It is stated that some of the party are identified with the "Skeleton Army," and that they were at Bideford a fortnight previously to Sunday last.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 March 1885
BARNSTAPLE - Shocking Death At Barnstaple. - A shocking case of being burned to death has occurred at Barnstaple. A woman named ANN HILL, aged 65 years, lived by herself in a cottage in Bull-court. yesterday morning a little grand-daughter went to the house as usual with a cup of tea. The door was unlocked, and on opening it she found the kitchen full of smoke and subsequently distinguished the charred remains of her grandmother. Deceased was burned in a terrible manner. The features were quite unrecognisable and the bones and greater portion of the body were burnt to cinders. The only portions on which any flesh remained were one foot and part of the shoulders. MRS HILL was seen in a public-house on Tuesday evening, but was not apparently the worse for liquor. It is supposed, however, that when filling a benzoline lamp it fell, and, coming in contact with a light, ignited her clothes. An oilcan was found on the table. At the Inquest yesterday afternoon a verdict of "Found Burned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 March 1885
EXETER - An Inquest held by Coroner Hooper at Exeter yesterday on the body of MRS FRENCH, an elderly lady residing at 97 Paris-street, resulted in a verdict by the Jury of "Death from Natural Causes." Deceased complained of being unwell and died before medical aid could be procured.

SHALDON - The death of MRS MARY WINSBORROW, aged 78, wife of MR THOMAS WINSBORROW, retired boot and shoe maker, residing at West View, Shaldon, was the subject of an investigation by Mr Sydney Hacker, District Coroner, yesterday. A fortnight since MRS WINSBORROW fell down stairs, but, though she had been in failing health for the past three years, seemed not to be prejudicially affected by her accident. The next day she got up as usual, but after retiring to rest at night was taken ill and did not rise from her bed afterwards. No medical man was called in, though MR WINSBORROW was pressed to obtain the services of one. He said it would be all right and that a doctor could not do any good. The medical testimony of Mr George Vawdrey was to the effect that deceased was somewhat bruised by her fall, and that death from Natural Decay was accelerated by the accident. The Jury returned a verdict on consonance with this evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 April 1885
CRUWYS MORCHARD - Shocking Death At Cruwys Morchard. - Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Cruwys Morchard, near Tiverton, yesterday afternoon on the body of RICHARD REED, aged 10 years, who met with a shocking death on the previous Saturday. Deceased had been holding a pony, and getting upon the back of it, it galloped off. REED lost his seat, and his right foot becoming entangled in the harness he was dragged for a mile, his head being battered and disfigured in a dreadful manner. When picked up he was dead, the skull above the eyes being gone. The route the pony had taken was indicated by traces of the unfortunate lad's blood and brains. A verdict of Accidental. Death was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A case of almost instantaneously sudden death has occurred at Plymouth. A carpenter named STEPHEN PETHICK, 48 years of age, and living at 7 Granby-street, went into the wash-house yesterday morning to lace up his boots. He was observed to throw up his arms and fall, and he was dead within a few seconds. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held before Mr T. C. Brian.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 April 1885
TORQUAY - Sad Death Of A Torquay Tradesman. - Last evening Mr S. Hacker, District coroner, held an Inquest at the London Hotel, to investigate the circumstances under which MR DAVID PIKE, 61, dairyman and greengrocer of Fleet-street, came by his death. The deceased, who was a widower, was yesterday morning, soon after six o'clock, found dead on the stairs in a sitting posture, by Hannah Tunkin and Mary Vincent, servant girls employed in the house. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been much addicted to drink for several years, and more particularly so during the last six months. Susannah Bray, his stepdaughter, a middle-aged woman, who formerly acted as housekeeper to the deceased, had to leave him about a month since, owing to her health having broken down through the deceased's drinking habits. She said when he had delirium tremens he was unbearable. Five or six weeks ago, whilst under the influence of drink, deceased fell over the stairs and sustained injuries which necessitated his keeping his bed four days. He used to indulge in drink by himself, and the dark place in which he used to keep his liquor was called by his stepdaughter "the dungeon." When she left another housekeeper came, and she, too, left last Monday. Deceased had been drunk ever since, and was not in bed two nights previous to his death. When found dead in the stairs he was fully dressed, and his head was resting on his arm. He was cold and stiff, and had apparently been dead some time. Mr Gordon Cumming, surgeon, who had examined the body, said there was no external mark except that of the old wound in the forehead caused by the fall several weeks ago. On internal examination shewed considerable disease of the heart, great congestion of both lungs, and some recent congestion of the brain. The cause of death was heart disease and congestion of the lungs. Deceased must have bane ailing three or four days previous to his death. The condition of the heart was consistent with sudden death. From the appearance of the liver, he thought deceased's heard drinking was of comparatively recent occurrence, and it could not be said that death was directly attributable to hard drinking, although it was , no doubt, accelerated by it. Several members of the Jury, speaking from their personal knowledge of the deceased, said he was a hard drinker, and they returned a verdict "That his death was due to Disease of the Heart and Congestion of the Lungs, accelerated by drink."

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, before Mr Coroner Brian, as to the cause of death of WALTER THOMAS PRATT, a labourer. Deceased was trying to quiet a restive horse which he was driving at Cattedown on Tuesday, when he was thrown down, and the wheel of the cart passing over him he received severe internal injuries. He was taken to the Hospital, where he died on the same evening.

PLYMOUTH - A young fisherman named CHARLES HOLMAN MILES, living in Looe-street, Plymouth, complained of pains in his chest while at his home on Wednesday, and before assistance could reach him he was dead. Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Minerva Inn, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 April 1885
BRADNINCH - A Man Cut To Pieces. - An Inquest was held at the Bradninch Guildhall on Thursday afternoon on the body of JOSEPH BAKER, farmer, of Clyst Hydon, found killed on the Great Western Railway on the morning of the same day. Mr F. Burrow was the Coroner, and Mr t. Salter, chemist, was Foreman of the Jury. - Thomas Canniford, a platelayer, deposed that on coming on duty, a little before six in the morning, near the Kensham siding, he saw something lying on the line some distance above that place. He found it was the body of a man lying in middle of down line. A few yards further on he found one leg and a little distance beyond the other. There were also six shillings and a farthing lying on the ground. He called to Walter Bending and John Broom to come to his assistance, and sent the former to inform the ganger of the occurrence. Broom remained with him and assisted in gathering up the remains. - John Broom corroborated. - P.C. William Pike deposed that he was a police-constable stationed at Bradninch, and received information that morning that a man had been killed on the line. He went to the spot and found the two last witnesses and the body as described by them. He received the money which had been picked up, and assisted in gathering up and removing the remains to Bradninch. - William Green deposed that he was superintendent of the Great Western Railway Police, residing at Exeter, and that morning received a telegram from the station-master at Hele stating that the body of a man had been found killed on the line about two miles above that station. He at once proceeded to the locomotive shed and examined the engines standing there. On the wheels of the engine which brought down the train due at Hele at 9.39 he found portions of human flesh and hair. He sent for the engine driver, George Courley, and asked him if he knew of any accident having occurred during the journey, or whether he had any knowledge of having killed a man about two miles above Hele Station. He replied that he had not, and did not feel that his engine had passed over anything. The night was very dark, with a high wind blowing at the time. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 April 1885
COMBE MARTIN - JOHN NORMAN, the Combmartin labourer, who received very serious injuries through falling into a lime-kiln some days since, has died from his rt. A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

MAKER, CORNWALL - The Fatal Boat Accident In Cawsand Bay. The Inquest. - An Inquest was opened yesterday by Mr A. C. L. Glubb, County Coroner, at the King's Arms, Kingsand, on the body of ELLEN GOSS, aged 25, who was drowned in Cawsand Bay on Easter Monday. As stated in the Western Morning News yesterday, a married sister of the deceased, MRS ISNER, who resides at Tavistock-terrace, London-road, Upper Holloway, London, was communicated with by P.C. Shear, who had charge of the case. In reply to the first telegram she sent for particulars of the death. These were forwarded in a second telegram on Tuesday evening, but up to the time of the Inquest no further reply was received from her. A letter, however, was received from Mr H. J. Bolt, proprietor of the London Hotel, Sidmouth, where the deceased was recently engaged as barmaid. It stated that MISS GOSS had been living with him as barmaid since last July. She had always been a very good servant, but recently shewed signs of insanity. He communicated with her friends, and had the correspondence by him. His wife received a very nice letter from deceased on Tuesday morning. This letter was therefore in all probability written and posted on the day of her death. - The Jury, of whom Mr Richard Carne was chosen Foreman, having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken:- Mary Cummings, 46 Queen-street, Devonport, eating-house keeper, identified the body as that of ELLEN GOSS. The deceased came to her house on Tuesday night, the 31st of March, and applied to her to take her in. She was not in the habit of taking in females, but applicant looked so respectable that she took her in, and she stopped with her from then to the Easter Monday. She spent her days out doors, and said she was looking for a situation. On the Monday morning after breakfast she went out, saying she would go on the Hoe and sit for a while, and then go for a long walk. She took a book with her, a volume of Shakespeare, some knitting, and also some bread and butter. She had asked witness to take her for another week, and witness consented, deceased saying how kind it was of her. Witness waited up for her the night, and was in a worry about her. She saw nothing unusual about her, and she appeared cheerful and good tempered. She had left a bank-book and other things on her dressing table. - The Coroner read some letters found upon the deceased which corroborated the identification. One was the copy of a letter addressed to the proprietor of the Langham Hotel, Glasgow, in which deceased said she was leaving her situation at Sidmouth in consequence of having to serve in the commercial-room. She said she had been in Scotland and had friends there. Her letters shew the deceased to be a young woman of good education. There were also several advertisements of various situations cut out from papers or copied, the photograph of a man, under which was written "My Prime Minister" - 18.,3.85, in the handwriting of the poor girl. A letter from her married sister was also read, in which there was an allusion to some trouble in which the writer had assisted deceased. - Samuel Weber, boat lender, 19 Baker's-place, Richmond Walk, said the deceased came to him on Monday about one o'clock and asked for him particularly. She said she wanted a light boat. He launched the boat for her and she got in. He asked her if she was capable of taking care of the boat, and she said "Yes; she was quite able to manage any boat." He offered to put a boy in the boat for her, but she declined. She went off in a style that shewed she could pull a boat as well as anyone that got is living by it. She did not say where she was going. - Elizabeth Luscombe, the keeper of the Mount Edgcumbe Institute at Cawsand, said the deceased came to her house about a quarter after three on Monday afternoon and ordered tea and cake. She talked with her about coming in the boat in such breezy weather, and she replied that it was quite delightful and she quite enjoyed the trip. She seemed very cheerful and pleasant. She remained about twenty minutes, doing some knitting while there, and then left. - Richard Jago, a fisherboy, of Cawsand, said that on Monday between four and five o'clock he saw the deceased in a boat rowing by herself close to Sandway Point. The weather was very rough, there was a heavy sea on, though the wind was not blowing very much at the time. The boat was close to the shore, and the deceased was struggling and doing her best to keep off the shore. But she could not keep off. Witness kept on calling out to her to keep away from the shore, but she did not reply. At last she got in so close that a great sea hove her in and the boat overturned. She cried out, but witness could not understand what she said. The sea carried her in over the rocks and dashed her against them. She was dashed against the rocks several times before himself and two other young men (William May and Charles Matthews) got to her, and she appeared to become senseless. They had to get up to their necks in water before they could reach her. Where the boat capsized the water was much deeper and quite out of her depth. So far as he knew she was quite dead when they took her out of the water. She only spoke once, and he thought the first knock stunned her. - By the Jury: He ran along the beach following the boat before it capsized. - Susannah Cameron, Gary-street, Cawsand, saw the body after it was brought in on Sandway Beach. She had experience in bringing people round from apparent drowning. She did not discover any sign of life, but she did what she could to restore animation all the time before the doctor came. She took off her own coat and wrapped it round her to keep her warm. - A Juryman asked how it was that a ticket found on the deceased for the packages of luggage was dated the 6th of April. It seemed as though she had come from Sidmouth to Devonport on the same morning. - The Coroner said the probable explanation was that she had left the luggage at Devonport Station when she came first, and had gone to renew the ticket that morning. - Mrs Cummings added that deceased told her when she came that she had luggage, but she did not bring it to her house. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said the main points were - Were they satisfied of the identity of the deceased, and (secondly) was her death caused by accident, or did anyone else or herself contribute to it. He thought there could be no doubt she was what the letters seemed to indicate - a MISS ELLEN GOSS - and that her death was caused accidentally and by no act of her own. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Foreman, on their behalf, expressed their thanks to the coastguardsmen and others who had so promptly and kindly gone to her assistance. - The boat, a light one, but perfectly safe in the hands of one who knew the coast, was picked up on the sands, with its sides and bow dashed to pieces. The poor girl's exploit is regarded in the village as very daring and venturesome, and she was advised by a number of people in the village not to go back. Up to last night no further communication had been received from her friends, and the body has been placed in a parish coffin awaiting burial.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 April 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at the resumed Inquest into the cause of death of MARY WEBB, who was knocked down and killed on Saturday night by a tramcar as she was attempting to cross the road in Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse. It was clearly proved that the accident was unavoidable, and Mr R. R. Rodd, the Coroner, said he quite endorsed the rider which the Jury appended to their verdict exonerating both the driver of the car and the Tramway Company from all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 April 1885
PLYMOUTH - An old man named WILLIAM HAKE, 80 years of age, has died in the Plymouth Workhouse and at an Inquest held on Monday a verdict amounting to Death by Accident was returned. Deceased, who had described himself as an artist, had for a considerable time resided alone in a room at 8 Ashley-place, being in the greatest poverty and very dirty. A week ago he fell and badly hurt his elbow and ankle. Having no means he was removed to the Workhouse Hospital, where he died on Friday. Mr F. Thomas, the house surgeon said death resulted from shock to the system caused by the fall.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 April 1885
PLYMOUTH - Inquests At Plymouth Workhouse. Painful Revelations. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, on Saturday held two Inquests at the Workhouse. the revelations in one of the cases were of a very painful character. In the first instance the Inquiry was as to the death of FREDERICK JAMES PEARSE, 40, who had been an inmate of the House since January last. His state of health had been bad since admission and he was not of strong intellect. On Saturday, the 11th inst., he went, contrary to instructions previously given to him, to the tank, some distance from his ward, for the purpose of getting hot water, condensed from the boiler. He slipped and fell partially into the tank, receiving severe scalds to his right arm and leg. He was placed under the care of Mr Thomas, the medical officer to the House, and lingered until Friday, when he died from his injuries and shock to the system. This being the medical evidence the Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith. The second case was that of ROSA LINDA WARING, whose death took place in the House on Saturday morning under most melancholy circumstances. She was the daughter of the late JAMES SWIGG, upon whom an Inquest was held at the House some months since. The evidence shewed that MRS WARING was brought to the House on Thursday by order of the relieving officer, Mr Mayell. She was then very ill and in a deplorable condition from dirt and over-indulgence in alcoholic drinks. She died on Saturday morning, when by order of the Coroner, Mr Thomas made a post mortem examination. The result of this was that he reported her death to have occurred from very considerable brain disease, accelerated by blows at the back of the head received from falls while in a state of intoxication. Deceased was but 42 years of age, but her appearance, resulting from her intemperate habits and the way in which she had neglected the ordinary rules of cleanliness, was that of a woman of 70. She leaves three children, aged respectively 11, 7, and 5 years.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 April 1885
LITTLEHEMPSTON - Extraordinary Fatality Near Totnes. Killed By A Game Fowl. - At an Inquest held by Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, at Littlehempston, near Totnes, yesterday, on the body of a child named KING, 1 year and 9 months old, remarkable revelations were made. Deceased died on Sunday. On Friday he was taken out by a neighbour's child, and almost as soon as he was outside his mother heard him cry. She ran out and observed the child on his back with a large game cock upon his head, the bird belonging to a man named Westaway, whose little girl had taken the child out. When she picked the boy up he was bleeding very much from a wound behind the ear. Dr Hains, surgeon, was called and prescribed, but his efforts were fruitless. The girl Westaway described the attack of the bird as provoked by the little boy's pulling its tail, and said it immediately flew at the child, knocked him down with its wings and then struck at him twice with its spurs. The medical evidence shewed that the bird's spur had made a hole through the child's skull. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 April 1885
PLYMOUTH - On the 31st ult. a widow named SARAH BOTTLE, fell over a flight of stairs at her residence, 10 Harwell-street, Plymouth. Mr C. H. Eccles, surgeon, was called, and attended the deceased up to Sunday, when she succumbed to her injuries. At an Inquest held by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 April 1885
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held in Plymouth Guildhall last evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) on the body of WILLIAM JOHN LOVE, a fisherman. The evidence shewed that P.C. Boon was on duty at the barbican early yesterday morning and heard a sound proceeding from the water. He looked over and saw a man standing beside the quay, his head being just above the water. A lifebuoy was thrown to him but he appeared not to have presence of mind to seize and retain it. He held the rope for a little time, but fell back before a boat could be obtained. The body was picked up about seven minutes afterwards. Efforts were made to restore animation, but without success. From the action of deceased in the water and from his language, it appeared he was the worse for liquor.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 April 1885
PLYMOUTH - A sad end to a sad career was revealed at an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian at Plymouth yesterday, on the body of ELLEN TOLLYSON. Deceased was a woman of ill-fame, and resided at 2 Henry-street. Early on Wednesday morning she was found by two young men lying upon her back in the gutter in King-street. They carried her home and she was put to bed without being undressed, the fastenings around her neck being merely loosened. Next morning she was found dead. Inspector Price of the Plymouth Police, had seen deceased drunk in Summerland-pace shortly after midnight on Tuesday, and the evidence of Mr W. C. Reed, surgeon, was to the effect that death had resulted from apoplexy, induced by intemperate habits long practised. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Assault Upon A Woman At Plymouth. The Inquest. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Western Law Courts relative to the death of MARY MCDONALD, the woman who was fatally assaulted by William Heard, a fitter, with whom she had been living, on Saturday evening, at their residence, 20 St Andrew-street. Mr N. Barter was Foreman of the Jury. Inspector J. Hill watched the case on behalf of the Police. The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, recapitulated the facts of the assault as they have already appeared in the Western Morning News. He explained that there had been no opportunity of taking the depositions of the deceased, and that no direct evidence was forthcoming as to the committing of the assault by the man Heard. - Mary Ann Nicholls, the wife of a carpenter, and daughter of the deceased, repeated the evidence given by her before the Magistrates on Wednesday, and added that on Sunday last her mother complained to her of pains in her side, and said Heard kicked her there. On Monday evening witness drew Heard's attention to the condition of her mother, and he replied "All she wants is rest. I have served her worse than that before." At the time her mother was assaulted she was not the worse for liquor, and could not have sustained the injuries she received by falling about. Heard was the worse for liquor. - By a Juror: Witness had known Heard serve her mother very badly before this, so much so that at times she had left him for a little while. - John Henry Spicer, 14, residing with his parents at 20 St Andrew-street, said that the deceased at half-past seven on Saturday evening sent him for some tinned meat, and afterwards for coals. On returning with the coals he went up to the deceased's room and found her lying on the floor with her nose bleeding. There was no one else in the room, but he had previously met Heard in the stairs, coming from the direction of the room in which he, with the deceased, lived. Heard did not speak to witness, and he could not say whether he was drunk or sober. - Samuel Henry Nicholls, the son-in-law of the deceased, deposed that shortly after eight o'clock on Saturday evening he saw Heard, at 20 St. Andrew-street, and he was then, in the opinion of witness, half drunk. Witness, with Heard, went upstairs to the room in which deceased was. She was sitting in the window, her nose was bleeding and her left eye was blackened and swollen. Witness did not speak to Heard, but carried deceased down to his room. Whilst he was lifting her up Heard said, "Take her away, or I will finish her." On Tuesday morning, as deceased had grown worse, he told Heard he should send for a doctor, and he replied, "She don't want a doctor." - By the Jury: When witness went into the room he said to deceased, in the hearing of Heard, "Well, mother, what has he (meaning Heard) done to you?" and she replied, "Ah, Sam, he has finished me." Heard made no reply to this. Deceased had been drinking, but was not drunk, nor even the worse for liquor. - Mr C. H. Cuming, M.R.C.S., stated that he was first sent for to see deceased between eight and nine o'clock on Tuesday morning. He found her lying on a bed unconscious. Her left eye had been blackened, and her ribs were broken. He visited her four times that day, and her condition continually grew worse. On the Wednesday morning a message was sent him that the woman was dead. A post-mortem examination shewed a large bruise, about six inches square on the left side. There were four ribs broken, two of them in two places - completely smashed, in fact. The two upper broken ribs had penetrated the lining of the chest. The whole of the brain was covered with gelatinous mass of recent lymph, which peeled off and left the brain underneath soft. This might either be due to violence or inflammation. The spleen under the fracture of the two lower ribs was ruptured. This was, in all probability, caused by a kick. Either the state of the brain or the injuries to the body was sufficient to have killed the woman. The same thing that caused the black eye would perhaps bring on the inflammation of the brain - probably a blow. - By a Juror: Witness did not consider the condition of the brain due to the intemperate habits, neither did he think the injuries sustained by the woman were caused by her falling about the room. - The Coroner, summing up, said no reasonable man who had listened to the medical evidence could help coming to the conclusion that the injuries received by the deceased were the result of considerable violence. There could be no doubt either that the woman's death was due to violence. One of the witnesses swore that Heard said when MCDONALD was being carried out of her room, "Take her away, or I'll finish her." It was also material to notice that the daughter had treated Heard as the guilty party throughout and Heard had never repudiated her accusations. If they came to the conclusion that Heard did inflict these injuries it would be their duty to return a verdict of "Wilful Murder". The question of manslaughter, in his opinion, did not even arise, no provocation having been shewn. - The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Heard. The Inquiry lasted over four hours.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 April 1885
EXETER - MR T. H. PINDER, senior member of the firm of Messrs. Pinder and Tuckwell, High-street, Exeter, died suddenly on Saturday morning. An Inquest was held yesterday at which it was shewn the deceased had suffered from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury.

BROADCLYST - Seizure Of A Still Near Exeter. Death From Excessive Drinking. - A death from the immoderate drinking of liquor from a private still occurred at a house known as Williard's Cottage, near Broadclyst on Friday. The police have since then made an examination of the premises and discovered a private still, which, together with a quantity of liquor and certain utensils employed in the process of distillation, they have taken possession of. From circumstances which have come to the knowledge of the police, there is every reason to suppose that the illicit manufacture of liquor has been carried on upon an extensive scale by the inmates for a long time past. The cottage, which is situated near a farmstead of the same name, about two miles from the village of Broadclyst, was, up to within a period of twelve months, occupied by a man named Coombs and his wife, but the former having died, Mrs Coombs has herself tenanted the cottage, and with the exception of two grand-children was presumed to be the sole occupant. Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at Williard's Cottage by Mr Coroner Burrows relative to the death of HENRY TAYLOR, a youth 17 years of age, who resided with his father at Broadclyst and whose dead body was found in an outhouse adjoining the premises on Friday afternoon. From the evidence it seems that the deceased, accompanied by his brother, THOMAS TAYLOR, paid a visit to Mrs Coombs on the morning of Friday for the purpose, as was pretended, of taking a couple of tame rabbits to her grandchildren. Having delivered the rabbits the deceased asked for a drink and his brother and he were supplied with a jug of cider. A jar of "other liquor" was produced by Mrs Leaworthy, a married daughter of Mrs Coombs, and each of the men had rather less than half a pint served out to them, in glass mugs. The jar was left on the table and though THOMAS TAYLOR avers that, as far as he remembers, they had no more drink, the presumption is that the men both helped themselves to a considerable quantity. About an hour afterwards Mrs Leaworthy, who was in charge of the house at the time, being anxious to lock it up requested the TAYLORS to leave. She found, however, that they were utterly helpless, and called in Mr Mortimore, a farmer who was passing, to assist her in removing two drunken men. Mr Mortimore acceded to her request, and with some difficulty got the deceased and his brother removed into what was known as the "Pound" House. There they were left by themselves for two or three hours, when Mr Mortimore called to see whether they had become sobered. To his astonishment he found HENRY TAYLOR dead, and his brother lying beside him in a state of stupor. Medical aid was summoned, and in due course THOMAS TAYLOR recovered. Mrs Leaworthy was unable to say whether the men were drunk, but had no doubt about their being sober when they came to the house. By direction of the Coroner a post-mortem examination of the deceased was made by Mr James Somers, surgeon, of Broadclyst, and that gentleman gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from excessive drinking of still liquor. The brain and other organs smelled strongly of the liquor, and there were general appearances of alcoholic poisoning. There appeared to be nothing else that would account for death, which might, however, have been accelerated by exposure to cold and damp. Police-Sergeant Tucker found that a room on the ground floor had been set apart for the manufacture of the liquor. There was a still over the fireplace, and the necessary apparatus was also about the room, besides six hogshead barrels, three of which contained cider dregs used for the purpose of the distillery. The room was locked, and great care had been taken to conceal the illicit still. A quantity of liquor was found in other parts of the house and Mrs Coombs admitted that she was in the habit of making "a little still liquor." Mrs Leaworthy at first denied that either of the TAYLORS had tasted any liquor on the premises. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Excessive Drinking of Still Liquor". - The Supervisor of Inland Revenue at Exeter went to the premises yesterday morning and took possession of the still and its accompaniments, which were handed over to him by the Police. It is understood that the Inland Revenue authorities will very shortly initiate a prosecution of Mrs Coombs for having the still in her possession - for which she is liable to a penalty of £30 - and for illegally selling the liquor - for which the full penalty is a fine of £200.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 May 1885
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - A singular case of scalding to death has been investigated at Horrabridge by Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner. The deceased was ALFRED CHARLES VEALE, only child of MR G. VEALE, wheelwright. On the day on which the accident which resulted in his death happened he was in a cradle which was near the table, and was being rocked by his mother by means of a piece of cord. She placed the string on the table and made a cup of cocoa. Unfortunately she stood the cup on the string, and on moving the cradle pulled it over. The whole of the boiling liquid fell on the child. Dr Little attended it but it died shortly afterwards from shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ST BUDEAUX - The body of the man who was found dead in a field near Honicknowle on Wednesday evening was yesterday identified by Wm. Henry Weeks, lodging-house keeper, King-street, Plymouth, as that of PATRICK FINNE, a Marine pensioner, aged 45, who had been living with him for about two years. Deceased left home on Monday morning to gather some primroses, and walked to the Whitleigh estate. Nothing more was heard of him until he was discovered lying dead by a lad named Francis Henry Anderson. From papers produced by Mr Weeks at the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Rodd yesterday, it appeared that for over eighteen months deceased had been a charity patient at the Plymouth Public Dispensary, having suffered from heart disease. Dr Pearse gave him a certificate to his effect when he made an application some time ago for an increase in the amount of his pension. The Jury, of whom Mr Stephens was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 May 1885
SHALDON - Evidence given at an Inquest held yesterday as to the death of MR PHILIP PHELPS, retired surgeon, formerly of Exeter, which occurred under circumstances reported in the Western Morning News, shewed that deceased had suffered from heart disease. The bruises he received in falling from the Ness at Shaldon were considered not sufficient to cause death, but such a shock to the system to a person suffering from heart disease would probably prove fatal. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 May 1885
MILTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at Milton Abbott yesterday relative to the death of WILLIAM MOORE, who was found dead in a field near Down Farm on Sunday evening under circumstances already reported. The evidence shewed that the deceased was in the habit or riding, at times, with his hands in his pockets and the halter tied to his arm, and had been admonished against the practice. The position in which the body was found and the injuries the lad had sustained favoured the supposition that he had been thrown and trampled to death by the pony. The Jury returned as their verdict that the deceased died from injuries inflicted by the horse.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 May 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner held an Inquiry yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, touching the death of ANN UNDERHAY, who committed suicide by cutting her throat as already reported in the Western Morning News. A verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Of A Devonport Horse Dealer. - At the Barnstaple Infirmary yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr R. I. Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, as to the death of MR MATTHEW REYNOLDS, horse dealer, of Devonport. Deceased, the evidence shewed, got into a third class compartment of the 9.20 train from Exeter at Yeoford yesterday morning. At Eggesford he complained to the guard of being unwell and at his own request was put into a compartment where he could be quiet. He could then walk all right. At Portsmouth Arms the guard looked into the compartment and saw deceased lying on his face. He looked up and this was interpreted as a signal that he was doing favourably. At Chapeltown, the last station before Barnstaple, however, he was found lying upon his back and was then quite unconscious. His head was supported and two passengers got into the compartment and accompanied him to Barnstaple. William Stone, a cattle dealer, of Barnstaple, said that after deceased got into the train at Yeoford he began to beat his chest and complained of suffering much from indigestion. He lay upon the seat, and afterwards stood up in the compartment. At Eggesford he went to another carriage, and witness saw him again at Chapeltown, travelling from that station to Barnstaple in the same compartment with him. Deceased died something over a mile from Chapeltown. - Mr Stone's evidence was corroborated by John Sweet, who was his companion on the journey. The medical evidence of Mr J. W. Cooke was that death was due to heart disease and a telegram was read from deceased's family to the effect that they knew he suffered from a cardiac affection. A verdict that deceased died suddenly from heart disease was returned. None of the family were present at the Inquest, it being impossible for them to reach Barnstaple by the time the Inquiry was held.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 May 1885
PLYMOUTH - "Death from being Suffocated by Accidental Pressure during the mother's sleep" was the verdict returned on Saturday at a Coroner's Inquest held at the Wellington Hotel, Plymouth, by the Borough Coroner, in the case of ALICE HAMALIA SLOCKET, aged 5 weeks.

STOKE DAMEREL - A man named THOMAS MONK, of Ordnance-court, Devonport, was found dead in bed on Friday afternoon by P.C. Warne. Dr Row, jun., made a post mortem examination which shewed that deceased had died from failure of the heart's action, brought on by excessive alcohol drinking. A verdict to this effect was returned by a Coroner's Jury on Saturday.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 May 1885
LUSTLEIGH - At the Inquest held at Lustleigh yesterday, before Mr S. Hacker, District coroner, on the body of MARIA WILLCOCKS, who was killed on the level crossing on the Moretonhampstead branch line, between Lustleigh and Bovey, on Friday afternoon, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, coupled with a recommendation from the Jury that some bushes near the spot should be removed in order that persons using the crossing might be able clearly to see an approaching train.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Naval Warrant Officer. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Royal Albert Hotel, Morice Town, by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of GEORGE HENRY SHEPHERD, gunner, of the Belleisle, who committed suicide on the previous day at 9 Clarence-place. Mr R. Ovenden was elected Foreman. - Evidence was given by Mr and Mrs Rice, with whom deceased lodged, confirming the report of MR SHEPHERD'S death which appeared in yesterday's Western Morning News. It further transpired that the deceased spoke to Mrs Rice of having been at Bull Point on Saturday, but as he was not on duty on that day it was believed that this was an indication of his mind being unbalanced, especially as signs of vacancy had been observed for some days on board - according to Master-at-Arms Lawrence McCarthy. But these symptoms were not serious enough to justify any restraint being put on MR SHEPHERD, though they had also been observed by Mrs Rice. - Master-at-Arms J. B. Hobbs stated that for the past six months the deceased seemed to have been depressed and had suffered from loss of memory when overworked, and work had been much thrown on him of late. He suffered also, at such times, from a wound in the head, received by falling from aloft some years ago. His books on board the ship had been examined and found correct and in order. - Mr Vaughan, in summing up, said the evidence pointed to temporary insanity, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this direction. - Lieutenant Freeman of the Belleisle, was present, and Mr Gameson, for Mr J. J. E. Venning, as Admiralty law agent, watched the case. The deceased was made gunner in 1861 and had seen 24 years' service. He joined the Belleisle from the torpedo schoolship Vernon and had the reputation of being a clever and smart officer. He leaves a widow and five children.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 May 1885
SOUTH HUISH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday at Galmpton on the body of a man named THOMAS NEWMAN, who was run over by a wagon he was in charge of, belonging to Mr Balkwill, of South Huish.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 May 1885
PLYMOUTH - JOHN MARTIN, a waggoner, seeking employment at the Great Western Docks, Plymouth, was yesterday found drowned under the Hoe. An Inquest was held last evening at the Guildhall by the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, and an Open Verdict returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 May 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - JOHN WILLIAM COLLINGWOOD , first-class boy of the Lion, having died on Wednesday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, from injuries received in falling from aloft on the 13th, an Inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd. Evidence shewed that in his descent deceased struck the gunner's mate, John Fryer, and also the clothes line. Lieutenant Sock and Fryer having testified to this fact and Mr G. B. Murry having stated that fracture of the thigh and injury to the kidneys had been the causes of the mishap terminating fatally, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

TORQUAY - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held at Torquay before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of JAMES TICKELL, who fell over some steps on Tuesday evening and died on the following day from concussion of the brain and other injuries. The Jury added to their verdict a recommendation to the owner of the house to provide a proper handrail to the balcony adjoining the steps and the recommendation was conveyed to the son, who promised that it should be attended to.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 May 1885
PLYMOUTH - Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by constant drinking, was returned as the verdict at an Inquest on Saturday on the body of WILLIAM DANIEL COUZENS, of 39 Rendle-street, Plymouth.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 May 1885
PLYMOUTH - Death resulting from a boyish freak has occurred to JOHN HOPPINS, 11 years of age, son of a pilot of the same name. On Saturday afternoon he had climbed to the top of a public place on Sutton Wharf, whence he fell to the granite paving below. He was picked up insensible and never recovered consciousness, dying at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was carried. At the Inquest held yesterday by Mr Brian, Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed sympathy with the father, who by this sad occurrence has lost his only son.

PLYMOUTH - The finding of the body of RICHARD PITT under the Plymouth Hoe near the ladies' bathing place as recorded in the Western Morning News of yesterday was the subject of an Inquiry before Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday. PITT was a butcher, 62 years of age, and formerly had a stall in the Plymouth Market. He left his lodgings on the 3rd inst. and had not been seen since, until his body was discovered in the water by a second-class boy of the Impregnable, named Cunliffe. The only property found on the body was a bent sixpence and a bent halfpenny, the former of which PITT is said to have carried about with him for many years. Several witnesses were examined as to the probable cause of death, but the Jury were unable to arrive at any other verdict than that of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 May 1885
PLYMOUTH - Drunkenness And Drowning. - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquiry held before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, into the circumstances under which a boat was capsized on Sunday off the Citadel when JOHN HART, a dock labourer, was drowned. William Henry Bright stated that he, Thomas Jackson, James Drew - all of who had just completed their training as miltiamen - and a coloured man called Brown met the deceased in Union-street on Sunday, and the party hired a boat and pulled to Mount Batten. At the Castle Inn there they had "twelve or fourteen quarts of porter, perhaps more." Witness did not remember leaving the house nor anything further until the boat upset and he found himself in the water. He saw HART struggling and held him up for a short time, but was obliged to let the deceased go in order to save himself. Witness was picked up by a boat and taken to the Citadel. P.C. Boon deposed to receiving the body of deceased. He saw two of the other men landed on Sunday and they were so stupid with drink that he could get nothing out of them.

KINGSBRIDGE - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held at Kingsbridge-road in the case of the young seaman named WEST who was killed on the railway on Saturday, as already reported in our columns.

PAYHEMBURY - By falling on her head when alighting from a trap on Saturday last, MRS MARY ANN DENNER, wife of WILLIAM DENNER, road contractor, Broadhembury, sustained concussion of the brain, which resulted in her death. The deceased was returning from Honiton market and was getting out of the vehicle to walk up Hembury Fort-hill, when the accident occurred. The Deputy Coroner for the district (Mr C. Cox) held an Inquest at Payhembury yesterday when the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 June 1885
PLYMPTON - Shocking Discovery At Plympton. Suspected Infanticide. - On Monday at about four o'clock in the afternoon, EMILY BATTERSHILL, 18 years of age, and living at Brewer's Cottages, Plympton, was observed by the neighbours to leave the house carrying a basket and having such an appearance and demeanour as excited considerable curiosity. She was watched across a field and was noticed making her way into a secluded part known as Six-o'clock lane. Agnes Elliott, one of the women by whom she had been observed, followed in her track and overtook her near a barn in a field rented by Mr W. Stephens. Elliott accosted her and then opened the basket. She was horrified to find that it contained the trunk of a fine newly-born male child. the limbs had been removed, apparently with a tolerably sharp instrument. With very commendable care Elliott at once took charge of the basket and also of the girl BATTERSHILL, at once taking both back to Brewer's-cottages and sending for Dr Stamp. The Police were also immediately communicated with and the body was handed over to them, whilst BATTERSHILL was put to bed and cared for by her parents, with whom she still remains in a very weak condition and under the surveillance of the Police. Yesterday an Inquest was opened at the Foresters' Arms, before Mr R. R. Rodd, a Jury of sixteen being sworn. After hearing the evidence of Elliott, the Inquiry was adjourned until tomorrow, at five p.m. Dr Stamp and Drs. Rendle and Aldridge have made a post-mortem examination of the body, the result of which will be communicated at the resumed Inquest. The Police, acting upon a communication made by BATTERSHILL, yesterday opened the common sewer and in it found an arm and hand, the thighs and a foot of the child, which had been thrown by BATTERSHILL into the closet. They have also in their possession an old butcher's knife, which had apparently been used for cutting up the body. The matter has created a great sensation at Plympton.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 June 1885
PLYMPTON - The Infanticide At Plympton. Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned Inquest touching the death of the newly-born male child which was found in a shockingly mutilated condition on Monday afternoon in the possession of EMILY BATTERSHILL, a girl of 18 years of age, residing with her parents at Brewer's Cottages, Plympton, was held yesterday before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of sixteen. Major Brutton, superintendent of police was present. - Mr William Stamp, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased child, which was a newly-born male. The body was limbless and the witness described the points at which the members had been severed, and said they all corresponded and, he believed, belonged to the trunk which was handed to him. - The Coroner: Had the child a separate existence? - Witness: Shall I go on seriatim and describe what I found, in order, or answer your questions? - The Coroner: Do you think the child had a separate existence from the mother? - Yes; I do. - In reply to the Coroner's questions, Mr Stamp then stated that he found extensive ecchymosis extending from the nose to the occiput, and there was excoriation on the left side of the face. He imagined that the limbs were taken from the child after death. There was a fracture of the skull, which might - under circumstances which the witness described - have been caused in confinement. The fracture of the skull was sufficient, in his opinion, to cause death. - Replying to Jurors, Mr Stamp said the child might have lived but a short time, but it had had a separate existence. The cord had not been tied. On Monday he was called to see a young woman named BATTERSHILL, and he attended her, as she was very weak. She had not been long confined. The basket containing the body was produced, and he handed it to the police, as he did not consider it desirable it should remain in the house any longer. - Mary Jane Pitwood, wife of John Pitwood, stated that on Monday she heard a rumour that the girl had been confined, and she went to MRS BATTERSHILL'S house between three and four o'clock. She asked EMILY BATTERSHILL, the supposed mother of the child, if the rumour was true, and she said "No." Witness told her to speak the truth and she then said "Yes," and in reply to further questions, said that it occurred on Tuesday and afterwards that it was at 5.30 on Thursday morning. She further said she had sent the body away, about ten minutes before witness arrived at the house to Back-lanes to be buried. The girl undertook to go after the child if witness would promise to tell her mother, and while she was gone witness went for the mother. In answer to further inquiries by the witness she stated that she had broken the arms and feet off the baby. Witness said, "You bad girl," and then left the house. Yesterday morning she said to the girl "I am going against you at the Inquest; you know what you said to me, and what I said to you." She replied, "Yes, that is all true." - By the Jury: EMILY BATTERSHILL stated that her younger brother BOBBY took away the child in the basket. The girl told witness the child was born dead. - Agnes Elizabeth Elliott, single woman, stated that on Monday between three and four p.m. HANNAH BATTERSHILL sent for her and told her that she had heard her daughter had gone to the Back-lanes either with a baby or for a baby. She asked witness to go and try to bring her back. She went to Back-lanes and found the girl EMILY BATTERSHILL there. The latter admitted having a baby in a basket that she was carrying. Witness took the basket and led the girl home, and returned to HANNAH BATTERSHILL and told her to send for a doctor. Witness then returned to the girl, and having put her to bed sent for Mr Stamp. In that gentleman's presence she opened the basket and there found the trunk of a baby. She asked the girl where the limbs were, but she made no reply, and Constable Johns then came and took the basket. After being questioned by Sergeant Coles witness proceeded: This morning I saw the girl. I said, "Was there anyone in the house when you were confined last Thursday?" She said, "No, my friends were all gone to work." I said, "Where were you when you were taken bad?" She said, "I was in bed and felt poorly and went to make myself a cup of tea, intending to return to bed again. I could not do so, and had to stand and take hold of a form in the back kitchen. I remained standing there a short time and the baby was born. When I looked at the child it did not breathe." Shortly after noon she took the body upstairs to a little room and washed and dressed it. She then removed the body again to the kitchen, and wrapped a piece of sheeting round it and let it remain there until Saturday. As her mother was coming home on Sunday she concealed it in the room under some sticks, and there it remained until Monday afternoon, when she undressed it and cut the arms and legs off. Witness took the knife (produced) to the girl, and she admitted that that was the instrument she used. After cutting the body she wrapped it in a piece of sheet and threw the severed portions into the water closet. The girl had not told witness what she did with the trunk. - By the Jury: She told me that she cut the limbs off the child through fear, because the baby had fallen and killed itself. - P.C. Johns deposed that on Monday about 5.30 he was on duty in Brewer's-lane when he was called by Dr Stamp to CHARLES BATTERSHILL'S house. He was there shewn the body of a newly-born male child, of which he took possession. On Tuesday he was making inquiries, and he heard the mother say she cut the limbs off the child with a rusty butcher's knife, which the last witness found in his presence. The girl admitted that that was the instrument she used. There were stains of blood on the knife. - P.C. Greek stated that on Monday about 5.45 p.m. he saw EMILY BATTERSHILL in bed. He produced a quantity of baby clothes and a portion of a woman's underclothing. The girl admitted that she had thrown the limbs down the water-closet and with the assistance of Mr F. Hunt he opened the drain leading from the closet and found the arm and hand, two thighs, part of another arm and the right foot of a child. - The Jury, having consulted a few minutes, expressed a wish to have the girl's mother examined. - HANNAH BATTERSHILL was examined by the Jury. She said she knew a month ago her daughter was pregnant. Witness was in the habit of leaving home at 4.30 every morning, Sundays included, and returned in the evening. She never detected that her daughter had been confined, and knew nothing about it until Mrs Pitwood came and told her on Monday. She never went to the bedroom where the body lay. Her daughter was always very weak and would not, when questioned by witness, make any reply. She always burst into tears and would not tell her when she expected to be confined. - ROBERT BATTERSHILL, aged 11 years, brother of EMILY BATTERSHILL, stated that his sister gave him a basket to take to the fields, and told him to bury it. He was going to dig the hole with a stone. He did not know his sister had a baby. He never looked in the basket and did not know what was in it. His sister followed him and took the basket from him before he buried it. This occurred on Monday after dinner. - The Coroner said there was no doubt that EMILY BATTERSHILL had been delivered of the child whose body they had seen. The doctor had described how the fracture to the skull might have been caused and had stated that that fracture was sufficient to cause death. As regarded the severing of the limbs that had nothing to do with the matter since it occurred after death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."

Western Morning News, Monday 8 June 1885
EXETER - At Exeter on Saturday an Inquest was held on the body of a youth named SAMUEL CHURLY BLACKBURN, who, as reported in the Western Morning News, was drowned while canoeing on the river Exe on the previous day. Deceased was the son of MR BLACKBURN of the Trews Weir Paper Mills, and was thoroughly accustomed to boating. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 15 June 1885
NEWTON ST CYRES - At Newton St. Cyres on Saturday morning a Coroner's Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of a labourer named JOHN HUTTON, who died as the result of being kicked in the chest by a horse a few days ago. Dr Heygate, of Crediton, gave evidence stating that four ribs were broken at the left side of the chest.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 June 1885
EXETER - "Found Drowned" was the verdict returned by an Exeter Jury yesterday at an Inquest on the body of MARY WILLIAMS, fruit hawker, whose dead body was found in the Exe early on Sunday morning.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 June 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of The Devonport Borough Librarian. The Inquest. - Early yesterday morning P.C. Shopland, of the Devonport Police Force, was on duty at Richmond Walk when he noticed an object floating in the water. This he soon discovered to be the dead body of a man, which he had landed and conveyed to a boathouse at Mutton Cove. The body was afterwards identified by Inspector Matters, of the Devonport force, as that of MR THOMAS LAKIN, the Borough Librarian. MR LAKIN, who is about 43 years of age, has been librarian at the Devonport Free Library ever since its formation in 1882. A week since he was suspended by the Library Committee pending inquiry into apparent irregularities. In connection with this suspicion the committee are engaged in examining deceased's books, but it is understood that up to last evening nothing monetarily wrong had been discovered. Nevertheless it is a fact that, for a considerable time past, the discharge of his duties by deceased has not been of a satisfactory character. Evidence taken at the Inquest yesterday points pretty conclusively to a mental affection being the cause of this, and it would seem that MR LAKIN'S mind has been thoroughly unbalanced for some months. Mr J. Rolston, surgeon, had attended him, and thought he was suffering from a tumour on the brain. Added to this, MR LAKIN was addicted to intemperance, and his suspension from his office acted most seriously in the direction of causing him to be deeply dejected. He seems to have thought that instead of bearing his ills it was better to take arms against a sea of troubles, and, by opposing, end them, and his melancholy end is doubtless due to an abnormal condition of despondency, a view which the Coroner's Jury yesterday confirmed by their verdict. MR LAKIN was a son of the late MAJOR LAKIN, an officer very well known in the town. He at one time held a commission in the Royal Marines. He leaves a widow but no family. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body before Mr W. Shaddock, Mayor of Saltash. The first witness called was P.C. Shopland, who gave evidence as to the finding of the body. In answer to questions by the Coroner and Jury witness stated that the deceased was quite dead when he found him. The tide was low at the time. Inspector John Matters deposed that shortly after four o'clock yesterday morning he went to Bullock's Dock, where he saw a dead body, which he at once recognised as that of THOMAS LAKIN, the librarian of the Devonport Free Library. He saw deceased on the previous evening and his conduct then appeared to be unnatural. Deceased ran after him and said, "Matters, I'm mad." Witness replied, "Nonsense, come with me." He took deceased to the library, where he resided. On the way he spoke in a very incoherent manner. Witness asked him whether he would see a doctor, and he agreed to do so the next morning. Witness made an engagement to meet deceased that morning at 9 o'clock for the purpose of going with him to see Mr Rolston, who was deceased's medical man. On getting deceased home he left him with Mr Pound, the caretaker of the library. - By the Coroner: He did not think the deceased accidentally fell into the water. He thought he went in intentionally while he was not responsible for his actions. - By a Juror: There was not the least appearance of the deceased having been the victim of violence. - By Mr Cleverton (town clerk of Saltash, who attended as legal assessor): Was deceased a man of sober habits? - Unfortunately, no. - Did he drink? - Yes. - Then he was a man of intemperate habits? - Yes. - Was he sober last night when you saw him? - I believe he was, but he was excited. - Do you know of any circumstances that might cause him to be in this state? - Well, unfortunately I do. - Witness, in the course of further cross-examination, said that deceased told him nothing about his circumstances. He knew him most intimately, and to the best of his judgment deceased was not in his right mind on Monday evening. - A Juror was proceeding to press the Inspector to state what the circumstances were which had most likely led the deceased to commit suicide, when the Coroner remarked that they were not there to minutely examine deceased's private affairs. - The Juror: They might be public affairs. - George Pound said he resided at the Library as caretaker and had known MR LAKIN about three years. He last saw deceased alive at half-past ten on Monday night, when he was going upstairs to bed. Deceased had been suffering from melancholia during the past month, but witness noticed nothing unusual in his demeanour on Monday night. He went with the deceased to see a doctor on Friday evening. He spoke privately to the doctor, who told him that deceased was not a lunatic and could not, therefore, be placed under control. Mr Rolston had told MRS LAKIN that her husband was suffering from a tumour on the brain. Shortly after one o'clock yesterday morning witness was awaked by his wife, who said somebody was leaving the house. Witness partially dressed, ran downstairs and went out into the street, but could see no one. He then went back, and on going to MR LAKIN'S bedroom discovered that he was not there. He completed dressing himself and went to the Police-station, where he informed Inspector Matters of what had occurred. - By a Juror: MRS LAKIN was not at home at the time. She had been away for a week with her sister. He was certain that MR LAKIN was not sane. - The Coroner: Did deceased perform his duties up to yesterday? - No, sir. - When did he cease to perform his duties? - On Wednesday last. - A Juror: Was that through ill-health? - No, sir. He was suspended by the Committee. - Do you think that preyed upon his mind? - No, I think he was out of his mind before. - The Coroner thought the Jury would have no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that the deceased committed suicide when he was out of his mind. They could, however, adopt another course if they felt so disposed. It was open to them to merely say that the deceased was found drowned. - The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased Committed Suicide by Drowning himself in the Hamoaze whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 June 1885
PLYMOUTH - At the Plymouth Prison yesterday an Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of JAMES EVANS. Mr Brewer, the Governor of the gaol, gave evidence shewing that the deceased was admitted to the prison on the 11th inst. to undergo a one month's sentence for non-maintenance of his wife. It transpired from succeeding evidence that deceased became ill soon after admission, and ultimately died from bronchitis and inflammation of the lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr Lang was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." They expressed perfect satisfaction with the care and attention paid to the deceased by the medical officer )Mr Wolferstan) and the officials.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 June 1885
NORTHAM - Concealment Of Birth At Westward Ho!. Before the County Coroner at Northam on Monday, an Enquiry was held as to the death of a child which had been found at the Junior United Service College. The testimony was to the effect that MARY ELSTON, a servant at the college, kept her bed for a few days last week, evidently in great suffering. Certain circumstances aroused suspicions, and on Sunday a doctor was sent for, who questioned and examined the young woman, and it then transpired that she had been delivered of a child. Search having been made in the servant's bedroom, the dead body of a child was found in a drawer, wrapped up in a petticoat. It appears that the girl had stated that the child had been born dead, and the medical evidence was to the effect that the child had breathed, but imperfectly, and possibly before fully born. The verdict was "Death from Natural Causes." The Police will prosecute for concealment of birth.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 July 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Stoke. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, relative to the death of ALFRED GEORGE CORIN, the man in the employ of Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell who was accidentally killed on Monday morning, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. - Ex-Sergeant Hatfield, of the Metropolitan Police, said he witnessed the accident in Stuart-road at about 10.30. The deceased, who was driving a van belonging to Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell's Menagerie, was leading his horses out of the gutter, when one of them trod upon his foot, causing him to fall. Both wheels of the van then passed over his head. A conveyance was at once procured and deceased was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, but he died when nearing the Institution. The deceased, who was a journeyman coach painter, had been frequently employed by Mr James William Bostock, and on Monday morning he again joined the party. He had previously driven horses for the show and had the same horses to drive on Monday. Mr Bostock stated that these were very quiet, and were those appointed to be driven by every fresh hand taken on. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury exonerating all persons from blame.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 July 1885
EXETER - Another death, apparently to some degree attributable to the improper feeding of an infant, has occurred at Exeter. Yesterday the City Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms, Preston-street, on the body of the four-month-old illegitimate child of LUCY CANN, a single woman, living at Exmouth. The child, which was placed under the care of a woman named Martin, of Preston-street, died suddenly yesterday morning, and the evidence of Dr Perkins shewed that the cause of death was spasm of the glottis. It appears that the deceased had been fed on bread, milk, sugar and a little oatmeal, and the medical man gave it as his opinion that this kind of feeding was too varied. The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought it important that mothers and nurses should know that infants must be fed on a lighter and more suitable diet, and he hoped this case would act as a warning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 July 1885
BIGBURY - Evidence as to the death of EDWARD REEVES BROWN from falling over a cliff on Burrough Island, Bigbury Bay, was taken at an Inquest held before Mr R. R. Rodd on Saturday. The facts testified to were substantially those already given in the Western Morning News, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. Mr Langworthy was the surgeon in the case.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 July 1885
PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by a Jury at Plymouth Workhouse yesterday, at an Inquest held before Mr Harrison, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of an imbecile named ELIZABETH ANN TUTTON, aged 26, who had been subject to fits.

EXETER - The body of JOHN POPE, an old man, a native of Crediton, but latterly an inmate of the Exeter Workhouse, was yesterday found in the river Exe, just below Exeter bathing ground. An Inquest was subsequently held, at which the Jury returned an Open Verdict after there had been statements made to the effect that deceased was depressed at being deprived by Workhouse officials of materials with which he was in the habit of making mouse traps.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 July 1885
EXETER - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday at Exeter on the body of ALICE MAUD BREDFORD, aged 2 years, whose parents reside in Exe-street. The child died suddenly yesterday morning from convulsions.

ILFRACOMBE - Whilst a labourer named GEORGE GARDNER was standing on a plank leading from the steamship Velindra to the quay at Ilfracombe on Monday night, the plank slipped off the pier, carrying GARDNER with it into the water. An alarm was raised and Richard Lovering, carpenter on board the steamship Gall, jumped overboard and supported GARDNER until rescued by a boat. GARDNER was, however, insensible, and subsequently succumbed. An Inquest was held yesterday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and Lovering received the thanks of the Coroner and Jury for his gallant conduct.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 July 1885
PLYMOUTH - "Death through jumping from a third storey window while in an Unsound State of Mind" was the verdict returned yesterday at the Inquest on WILLIAM DAMELLWEEK, a fisherman, who died on Wednesday afternoon from injuries received under circumstances reported in the Western Morning News of that day. Deceased's wife saw his feet disappearing out of the window as she entered the room. Mr James D. Staple, assistant house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, pronounced the case a hopeless one from the first.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Westaway's Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of ALFRED GOLDSMITH, aged 23, able seaman of the schooner William Gilmore. Deceased was engaged at noon on Wednesday discharging cargo at the Stonehouse Quay. The running chain of the winch slipped and he was sent aloft to put it right. While endeavouring to do this he fell from the rigging to the deck. He never spoke and died a few minutes after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 13 July 1885
BIDEFORD - The Death From Dog-bite At Bideford. - The Inquest touching the death of the man HUXTABLE, who, as reported in the Western Morning News, died from the effects of a dog's bite, was held at the Bideford Dispensary on Friday evening by Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner. - Mrs Cook, in whose house deceased lodged, deposed to the circumstances under which the casualty happened. The gin, it appears, was set in a neighbour's plot of ground, contiguous to that belonging to the house of which deceased was an inmate. There was no fence between the two gardens. The dog in careering over the gardens got caught in the gin, and deceased hastened to liberate the animal - a pet of his - without taking the precaution to use a stick for that purpose; and it was while reaching down his hand to open the jaws of the trap that the animal bit him, in the fleshy part of the right hand between the forefinger and the thumb. Although it bled freely, deceased treated it lightly, saying it "was not much, and would soon pass off." He took the precaution, however, of having it cauterised by Dr Sinclair Thompson, and up to Tuesday no ill-effects were visible. On that day deceased, complaining that the limb was feeling stiff, adopted the very unwise course of bathing it in as hot water as he could endure, whereby, of course, the crust of the wound was softened and removed. Some bleeding followed, and the wound was again dressed and bandaged by Dr S. Thompson. On Tuesday, subsequently to being medically treated, deceased drank freely of rum and water, and became somewhat intoxicated, avoiding beer, as he said, "It might poison the wound." On Thursday morning after breakfast the wound burst bleeding and with an extra bandage round it he went to Dr S. Thompson's surgery, who, seeing the exhausted state of deceased, attended to him, and afterwards ordered him to the Dispensary for the sake of the skilled nursing he would there receive. He was there given some randy, and was put to bed, but remained cold and faint and his sufferings became very great. The medical evidence was to the effect that the bleeding was due to the extension of the original wound to one of the arteries, and that death was not the result of hydrophobia, inasmuch as deceased evinced no fear of water. It was explained at the Inquest by the neighbour who set the gin that it had been placed there to catch the vermin attacking the strawberries. A verdict of "Accidental Death following upon the bite of a dog" was returned; and it was given as the opinion of the Jury that no reason had been shewn why the dog should be destroyed.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 July 1885
EXETER HEAVITREE - The Drowning Of a Lunatic At Exeter. - At the Wonford House Private Asylum, near Exeter, yesterday Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest of the body of MR EDWARD HARDINGE, late an inmate of the asylum, who was found drowned in the Exe on Sunday. - Mr Frederick Adolphus Jelly, acting superintendent of the Institution, said that deceased, who was admitted on the 18th of May, was 51 years of age, and was a retired army surgeon of Taunton. At the time of his admission he was suffering from delusions, especially with regard to suspicions of other people. He was comfortably well off, but was under the delusion that he was very poor. His memory was greatly impaired. When first admitted he was placed at the back of the house, being classed as "dangerous". As, however, he developed no suicidal tendencies he was removed to the front galleries, where the patients were allowed to enjoy more liberty. Deceased was in charge of a special attendant. After his removal to the front galleries he was allowed to go outside the grounds, but he was always attended. During the time he had been under witness's care deceased developed no suicidal symptoms. In fact, had there been any he had plenty of opportunities for self-destruction, as he was permitted to shave himself (in the presence of an attendant). On Saturday afternoon, whilst deceased was on the lawn in front of the asylum watching a cricket match, witness conversed with him and found him much more cheerful than usual. He never had expressed any desire to go out, as he was under the impression that if he did so, being very poor, he would be in a worse position than before. About 5.30 on Saturday afternoon witness left the deceased to admit another patients, and about an hour afterwards information was brought to him that he was missing. A search was instituted and on the Sunday morning about 11.30, a boy came from Mr Manley, of Salmon Pool, with a hat and umbrella with the name "HARDINGE" on them. The river was searched and about 3.30 the same afternoon the body was recovered. It presented the appearance of the deceased having been drowned. Witness found the hands tied with a strap, which the patient generally wore around his waist. Precautions were taken to prevent the escape of patients, but the deceased must have got away unobserved when the gentlemen were being called in after the game of cricket. - In answer to questions from the Jury, witness stated that deceased had never before attempted to escape from the asylum. Unfortunately, however, there were many escapes, but the fugitives did not get far before being captured. The men who was told off to look after the deceased was a thoroughly capable person, and acted chiefly in the capacity of a valet. He had not had the care of insane patients previously, but when in the army had served in the Hospital. - Peter McLean, head attendant at the asylum, corroborated as to the non-suicidal tendencies of the deceased when admitted to the asylum. About twenty minutes to seven o'clock it was discovered that MR HARDINGE was missing, and witness immediately sent off six men in search, going himself to St. David's Station to see if deceased had taken train home to Taunton. No tidings of the deceased were gleaned, and the following day witness was present whilst the river was being dragged and saw deceased's body brought up. A military web waist-strap was fastened round deceased's waist in front of him. Deceased had never been punished, and there was nothing to make him reluctant to come back. In fact there was no punishment in the Institution even for the most refractory. - John Sobey, charge attendant of the Refractory Gallery (No. 4) gave evidence proving that MR HARDINGE had shewn no suicidal tendencies. - William Jeffery, who had attended deceased since June 4th, gave similar evidence. His principal duty was to look after deceased, but he also waited on him and others during meal times. About six o'clock on Saturday, Mr McLean (the head attendant) called in Jeffery to assist him about the taking charge of a new patient. Witness was absent for about half an hour and on his returning he found that the deceased was missing. He then made a report to Mr McLean. Witness was 23 years of age, had been in the asylum five weeks and his previous occupation was that of a footman. He had never had the care of an insane person before. - McLean (the head attendant) recalled, said that when he called away Jeffery, he told Sobey to look after deceased with the others, but Sobey denied this on being recalled. - Mr A. M. Webber, bandmaster of the 1st Devon Militia (Fourth Devonshire Regiment) deposed to seeing deceased walking rapidly away from the asylum about twenty minutes to seven o'clock on Saturday evening, and he gave information at the asylum. MR HESCOTTE HARDINGE, brother of the deceased (retired from the War-office), said the reason why deceased was placed in the asylum was because his friends feared he would commit suicide. Some twenty years ago deceased, whilst serving in the Royal Artillery in India, met with a serious accident by his horse falling upon his head, and leaving him insensible for eleven days. He had never been himself since that time. - In summing up the evidence the Coroner said that the statement of the head attendant was not all that could be desired. At any rate, it was not consistent with that given by subsequent witnesses. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind, and added that in their opinion there had been want of proper care, if not culpable negligence, on the part of the asylum authorities in not placing the deceased under such control as his relatives had a right to expect. - The Inquiry lasted from half-past two in the afternoon until eight p.m.

PLYMOUTH - Alcoholic Poisoning At Plymouth. - Excessive drinking was the cause of another death early yesterday morning at 79 King-street, Plymouth, necessitating an Inquiry by the Borough coroner, Mr T. C. Brian. Deceased's name was WILLIAM EDWARD CARROLL, and he gained his living by banjo playing at public-houses. The mother, a widow, deposed to his continual drinking of brandy and his abstention from food. His health had been declining for two years, and three weeks ago he had his first fit. On Monday he had some brandy but no breakfast and in the evening he was brought home drunk and in a fit. She endeavoured to get a doctor, but was only successful in obtaining medicine, as the relieving officer was not in to give her an order. - John Lowe, hawker, said he saw CARROLL in a fit at the Princess Royal, Stonehouse, and brought him home, calling on the way at a chemist's. - P.C. Mitchell having given some information, Mr George Jackson, F.R.C.S., gave the result of a post mortem examination. The heart, liver, kidneys and other organs were in a very advanced state of disease, brought on by deceased's manner of living and his death might have been daily expected. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was accordingly returned, and a Juror expressed the opinion that it would be well for a relieving officer to leave some order forms for a doctor when he was away from home. He was told that in this case the officer did so, but his wife did not care to give one as the mother of deceased was not quite right, and was very excited at the time.

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 August 1885
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Sleep At The Plymouth Citadel. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday afternoon in Plymouth Citadel before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the cause of death of GEORGE LOCKEY, a private in the royal Warwickshire Regiment. Deceased had absented himself from barracks during the previous night, but he reported himself on the following morning, and was ordered to be placed under arrest. Later in the morning he went to the ramparts with Private Turner, a comrade, their intention being to descend to the beach and bathe. But instead of doing this they laid down on the ramparts and slept. At this time a man named Thomas Stevens was bathing under the Citadel, and while he was dressing he saw LOCKEY turn over in his sleep and before he could reach him the deceased had rolled over the ramparts and struck his head violently against the rocks in his descent. Assistance was immediately at hand, and Surgeon-Major Duncan, on making an examination of the man's injuries found that he had fractured his skull and that he was bleeding from the nose, mouth and ears. LOCKEY died very shortly afterwards, the fracture of the skull being in itself sufficient to cause death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 August 1885
PLYMPTON - An Inquest was held at Plympton yesterday by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, relative to the death of JOHN HENRY HORTON, aged twelve, son of an agricultural labourer, who on the 1st inst. was drowned in a pond situate on Erle Hall estate, Plympton Maurice. - Deceased was seen by a little boy named Frederick Ford, aged 8 years, to go to the pond in question and bathe his head. He suddenly over-balanced himself and fell in. Ford at once ran for assistance, and fetched a Mr Pittwood, who arrived on the spot. Deceased had by this time gone to the bottom, where there was mud four inches deep. It was found impossible to procure the body until the pond, which contained 8 feet of water, was entirely drained out. - A verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned by the Jury.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death Of A Marine. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, concerning the death of JOHN FIELDING, corporal, R.M.L.I., aged 39, who died suddenly on Saturday last whilst under arrest. - Samuel Brown, provost sergeant, Plymouth Division R.M.L.I., said that on Friday last, at 11 p.m., he was sent for by the sergeant of the guard. On going to the barrack gate he saw the prisoner, who was sober. Prisoner was an hour late, and the fact was reported to the orderly officer, who ordered FIELDING to be placed under arrest. He visited him at midnight, and saw him again next morning at seven o'clock, and on both occasions deceased was sleeping soundly. At the last-named hour he roused deceased and told him to dress to pass the doctor. He left deceased sitting on the side of the bed preparing to dress. A very few minutes afterwards he was sent for by Sergeant Hanson, who stated that FIELDING was very ill. Dr Walsh, one of the divisional surgeons, was sent for, and only four or five minutes elapsed before that gentleman was in attendance; but before he arrived the deceased had expired. - Dr Walsh stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and was of opinion that death was due to heart disease of long standing. He did not think the detention of deceased in any way accelerated death. On referring to the medical history sheets of CORPORAL FIELDING he found that some time since he had been suffering from acute rheumatism, which would intensify the disease from which the deceased was suffering. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 August 1885
LONDON - Suicide Of An Ex-Artillery Officer. - Yesterday afternoon Dr Danford Thomas held an Inquest at the Middlesex Hospital, London, on the body of MR HERBERT MURRAY OLDENSHAW, aged 26 years, late lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, and lately residing at 10 Queen's-terrace, Exeter, who died in the above-named institution from injuries inflicted by a revolver. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was married about eight months ago, but lived a very unhappy life afterwards. On Thursday he left home presumably for a walk, but did not return. About four o'clock he entered the shop of Mr Grant, gunsmith, St. James's-street, and purchased a revolver for £6. From there he went to the Nelson Hotel, Great Portland-street, where he engaged a bed and sitting-room. Shortly after the report of a pistol was heard, and the porter on entering the room found the deceased near the bed wounded in both sides. He was conveyed to the Hospital, where it was ascertained that the pistol had been fired from the left side, the bullet passing through the body at the right side, and penetrating an artery. The shot lodged in the partition of the room, through which it almost penetrated. In answer to questions put to him at the Hospital, he said he had shot himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Friday 7 August 1885
PLYMOUTH - JOSEPH DREW, 62, a naval pensioner, having been seized with a fit of apoplexy on Monday night at Mutley Railway Station, was removed to the S.D. and E.C. Hospital, where he was kept under the care of the house surgeon, Mr W. A. Buchan, until Wednesday morning, when he died. At the Inquiry into the cause of death held by Mr T. C. Brian yesterday, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

SOURTON - A Warning To Schoolmasters. Sad Death Of A Child Near Okehampton. - An adjourned Inquest was held yesterday at Sourton, near Okehampton, by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, as to the death of a child named JOHN HEATHMAN, who had died after being struck upon the head by Mr J. H. Arbary, master of the public elementary school at Bridestowe. Superintendent Mitchell, of the Devon constabulary, watched the case on behalf of the Police and Mr J. D. Prickman, solicitor, of Okehampton, attended for Mr Arbary. - In his opening remarks the Coroner explained that the Inquest had been adjourned from Monday until that day in order that Messrs. Northey and Burd might make a post-mortem examination of the body of JOHN HEATHMAN. That examination left no doubt that death had resulted from a blow, and it would be for the Jury to say how and by whom that blow was administered. This rendered their position a very responsible one and the Inquiry most important. - Evidence was then taken. The boy's mother, the wife of a packer on the South-Western Railway, said the last time he went to school was on Friday fortnight. He came home crying the previous day, saying Mr Arbory had hit him on the head with a stick, and that his head was aching. The next day when he came home he was again crying. Shortly afterwards he was seized with vomiting, and this continued at intervals through the night. On Sunday evening he grew worse and was afterwards kept in bed. On Friday week Mr Burd was sent for, and attended the child until the 3rd inst., when he died. - Mr W. C. Northey, surgeon, of Okehampton, was next called, and described the result of the post-mortem examination he had made in conjunction with Mr Burd. At the back of the head there was contusion, and on removing the skull, which was thinner than usual, he found it fractured, though there was no displacement. There was inflammation of the brain membranes and other appearances shewed inflammation to be due to concussion. A short stick would cause the injury but the blow, however given, must have been a severe one. The child was very delicate, and had a strong tendency to tubercular affection. Its peculiar constitution made it especially liable to inflammation, and the same blow would probably not have produced so serious a result on a strong child. - Mr G. V. Burd, surgeon, also gave evidence. He said he could detect no bruise or swelling when he was first called in. The case was a hopeless one from the beginning. - The evidence of children of the Bridestow school was to the effect that the master Mr Arbory, had struck the deceased from behind with a stick but from a hedge, whilst HEATHMAN was seated at a desk. A lad, 10 years of age, identified the stick with which the punishment had been administered - a short, thin, ground ash plant. It was said that when deceased came out of school he complained that his head was smarting. - Mr Arbory was next called. He denied striking deceased during the whole of the week ending with the 18th and produced the school register to shew that the boy Down, who had sworn to his doing so, was not present on the day on which the punishment was alleged to have been administered. He also knew personally that Down was not at school on that day. - Louisa Pope, assistant-mistress at the Bridestowe School, said she was in the school the whole of the day in question and did not see Mr Arbory strike a child. - The Coroner then summed up, pointing out that although it was perfectly clear deceased's death was caused by a blow on the head, the evidence as to how and by whom that blow was given was not so clear, depending entirely upon the statement of the boy Down, who was very young (10). The statement of the deceased himself to his mother could have no legal weight. - After a lengthy deliberation the Jury found that death was due to compression of the brain, the result of concussion brought on by a blow on the head. There was not sufficient evidence, however, for them to say how, and by who, the fatal blow was administered. - The Coroner said that he had expressed to the Jury before the public were admitted to the Court he quite endorsed their verdict, and he now said the same publicly. He hoped the Inquiry might be a warning to schoolmasters, as to the mode in which they exercised the power given them to administer corporal punishment. Nothing could justify - and in his opinion it was a distinct offence against the law - any master striking a child on the head, either with a stick or with his hand. He had been glad to hear from the assistant mistress that Mr Arbory never used a stick across the head of the children. Anyone doing so could and ought to be summoned for assault, as he might inflict injuries on the children which might end in death, or in injuries from which they might suffer during the whole of their lifetime.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 August 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned by a Coroner's Jury yesterday at Stonehouse (Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner) who investigated the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT REYNOLDS, second class boy of her Majesty's ship Implacable, who fell overboard and was drowned on Friday last. It was proved that deceased was stunned in his fall, and the body was nor recovered until nearly a week afterwards.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 August 1885
The finding of the body of THURZA HONEYCOMBE, of Devonport, on the beach at Empercombe, near Millbrook, on Sunday, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry held yesterday by Mr Glubb. It was stated that the deceased had been a widow for about seven months, and that she was a tailoress, 64 years of age. There was no direct evidence to shew how she came by her death, and an Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 August 1885
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Street Accident At Plymouth. - At the Sportsman's Arms, Higher-street, Plymouth, the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of PRISCILLA ALBERTA PARSONAGE, a little child run over by a builder's cart on Tuesday morning. Deceased was living in the public-house where the Inquest was held, and was in the kitchen with the landlady, who had to go into the bar, and the child must have then slipped away, for about two minutes afterwards she was brought in, the accident having then occurred. She was in the habit of running into the street. - Mr G. D. Bellamy, Plymouth Borough Surveyor, witnessed the occurrence. The deceased was then under the horse. Witness shouted to the driver, but he apparently did not hear, and the wheel of the cart went over the child's neck, thus causing instantaneous death. Mr Bellamy did not attach the slightest blame to the driver, who did not, he (Mr Bellamy) thought, see the child. - William Hern, the carter, said he was walking at his horse's head, guiding it so as to pass another cart. He was loaded with about a ton of bricks. He did not see any children about at the time, but suddenly heard a woman scream, and then he observed the deceased lying in the road and thought the cart had gone over her. He at once stopped the cart and went back and picked up the child, afterwards giving her into the charge of a woman. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the driver being exonerated from all blame.

BARNSTAPLE - The Bathing Fatality At Saunton. - An Inquest was yesterday held at Barnstaple in connection with a sad case of drowning which took place at Saunton Sands on Monday. MRS TATHAM, wife of the chief clerk at Messrs. Brady's, and her two sisters, who were on a visit to Barnstaple, went to the sands for an outing. they had tea on the rocks, and on returning found the sea had surrounded them. They took off their boots and stockings to cross a small stream and a big wave took MRS TATHAM off her legs and carried her out with it. The sisters saw MRS TATHAM taken out to sea, but were powerless to render assistance. A gardener afterwards going down to the sands to endeavour to recover the body, saw it on some rocks, where the tide had gone back and left it. The body was conveyed to Barnstaple. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 August 1885
BARNSTAPLE - The body of the lad THORNE, drowned on Sunday last whilst bathing in the Taw at Barnstaple, was recovered yesterday a couple of miles up the river. An Inquest was held at the Infirmary and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 August 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - At the Police-office in Devonport Dockyard yesterday, Mr Shaddock, Mayor of Saltash, held an Inquest as to the death of HERBERT EDWARD WOOLVERSTONE, who fell overboard from the Valiant on Tuesday last. The Jury consisted of men from the various departments of the dockyard, with Mr Wm. Swan as Foreman. Evidence was taken which shewed that on the day of the accident deceased, who was about 22 years of age, was engaged with George Frederick taking off the maintopmast cap on board the Valiant. He left the top to go to the cross trees for some took with which to knock off the cap. Frederick, who was on the cross trees, suddenly felt a sudden jerk, and then saw deceased falling. He had a maul weighing about 35lbs. secured with a cord round his neck. In his descent he struck the chain guy of the gig's davits and the companion ladder and never rose to the surface after striking the water. James Henry Easton, fisherman, of John-street, Morice-town, deposed that on Sunday afternoon he picked up the body of the deceased about twenty fathoms beyond the bows of the Valiant, and he towed the body to Devonport Dockyard. He saw no cord whatever round the neck of the deceased. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that, in his opinion, death was not caused by drowning, but was the result of the blow the deceased received when falling. The Jury took the same view, and returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 August 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - ALFRED WALKER, captain and owner of the schooner Coraline, from Goole, with coal, was found drowned yesterday morning by the side of his ship close to Mr Friend's quay at Stonehouse. John Jackson deposed at a Coroner's Inquest held at Westaway's Hotel that the captain left the vessel at 10.30 a.m. the previous day. Witness saw him again several times, the last time being outside a public-house when he was sober. The conjecture was that it being a dark night deceased missed the plank leading to his ship and fell into the water. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 August 1885
PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of JOHN HITT, 63, an inmate of the Plymouth Workhouse, was the subject of an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, at the Workhouse last evening. John Sloggett, a messenger, said he saw the deceased on Wednesday night. He went to bed apparently quite well. In the morning he was found lying on the floor insensible and speechless. Dr A. H. Bampton was at once called, but HITT died shortly afterwards. Sloggett's evidence having been taken the Jury waited an hour for the attendance of the doctor. As he did not arrive, the Inquiry was adjourned until eight o'clock. Dr Bampton was then present and attributed death to apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 August 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - Upon the body of GEORGE NEYLE, who was drowned at Stonehouse on Thursday, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News, an Inquest was held, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned. Deceased was unable to swim.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest at the Plymouth Workhouse yesterday as to the death of a pauper named WM. COLE, it was shewn that deceased had risen early and smoked a pipe of "Irish twist" tobacco. Afterwards he dropped from a window sill upon which he was sitting to the ground, and on being attended to was found to be dead. Dr A. H. Bampton, who was soon in attendance after being called to attend to the case, told the Jury that deceased had a weak heart and had died from the failure of its action. He was of opinion that smoking strong tobacco upon an empty stomach in the early morning had probably precipitated death, as nicotine, the active principle in tobacco, was a powerful deterrent of the heart's action. Amongst sailors he had known several similar cases. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 August 1885
NEWTON ABBOT - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at Newton on Monday, relative to the death of CHARLES EDWARD FIELD, aged 14 months, son of GEORGE FIELD, a mason, living at No. 9 St. John's-place, Newton. The evidence shewed that the infant upset a pail containing some hot water on his chest and was so severely scalded that death resulted from shock to the system. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 August 1885
PLYMOUTH - A sad case of boyish daring, terminating fatally, was on Tuesday evening the subject of an Inquest held at the Plymouth Guildhall. It appears that JOHN HENRY ROWSE, ten years of age, living at 9 Hoe-street, was in the playground of St. Andrew's Parochial School last Thursday with others, and with them climbed to the top of a water-tank, ten feet above the ground, with the intention of jumping off. There were about a dozen other boys behind him when his turn came to jump, but his foot slipping, he fell to the ground, striking the side of his face. Blood flowed from the ear which was uppermost. He was immediately taken home and medical assistance obtained, but it was felt that his case was hopeless and after six days' suffering, he died of inflammation of the brain, caused by the fall.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 August 1885
TAVISTOCK - THOMAS YEO, of Germansweek, who was knocked down by General Morris's pony in Duke-street, Tavistock, as recently reported in the Western Morning News, never recovered consciousness after receiving his injuries, and died in the Tavistock Workhouse. At an Inquest held yesterday it was shewn by Mr S. V. Theed that death had resulted from erysipelas. Deceased had suffered from concussion of the brain and three of his ribs on the left side were broken. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 September 1885
DAWLISH - The Fall Of A Cliff At Dawlish. Inquest On The Killed. - The Inquest upon the bodies of VIOLET MARY WATSON, ELIZABETH KEEN and ELIZABETH RADFORD, who were crushed to death by the fall of portions of a cliff at Dawlish on Saturday, was held in the Assembly Room of the Royal Hotel yesterday afternoon before Mr Sidney Hacker, of Newton Abbot, the District Coroner. The Jury were composed of Messrs. W. C. Tapper (Foreman), W. M. Cornelius, R. Border, J. Lear, G. Hockaday, J. Cox, G. Curme, W. C. Hawking, L. J. Macer, G. T. Oliver, W. Bolt, J. H. G. Lamacraft and W. Lamacraft. Mr J. S.Whidborne, clerk to the Dawlish Local Board appeared on behalf of that body; Mr J. W. Friend solicitor, of Exeter, attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the relatives of MISS RADFORD and MISS KEEN, deceased, and MISS WATTS, injured; and Mr Watson, barrister of London, appeared with the same object in behalf of the dead and injured children of his brother, COLONEL WATSON, now in India. There were also present Mr James Luxmoore, of Newton Abbot, district locomotive superintendent of the Great Western Railway Company; Mr John Drew, agent to the Earl of Devon; and the chairman (Mr F. Lee) and several members of the Dawlish Local Board. In addition to the above, between two and three hundred of the general public also attended, and the painful proceedings were followed with considerable interest. At times there were demonstrations of feeling when apparent neglect was alleged. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, after they had been sworn and chosen their Foreman, remarked that a calamity had happened in the town, and, as they knew, they were summoned to hold an Inquiry into the circumstances under which the persons who were killed in that calamity came by their deaths. It would be their duty to Inquire carefully into those circumstances, and, in considering the manner in which the deceased came by their deaths, they would have to ascertain if possible whether anyone was responsible for those deaths, or whether it would be their duty to add any rider to their verdict censuring or imputing blame to anyone. He had no doubt that most of the Jury knew the spot where the accident happened; if no, it would be advisable, after they had viewed the bodies, to proceed to the place. - The Foreman and most of the members of the Jury informed the Coroner that they had already visited the scene of the calamity. - Mr Friend suggested, should there be any members of the Local Board on the Jury, the propriety of their retiring. - The Coroner, however, explained that there were no members of the Board on the Jury. - MR WATSON, barrister, in intimating that he was present on behalf of his brother, expressed his thanks to Mr F. M. Cann, surgeon, for the professional services he had rendered. - Mr Whidborne offered, as clerk to the Dawlish Local Board, to give the Coroner all the assistance he could in his official capacity. - The Coroner thanked Mr Whidborne and said it was likely he should ask him to give evidence. - The Coroner and the Jury then went to Portland-terrace, and viewed the bodies of the three deceased persons, returning in about ten minutes, when the Coroner proceeded to take evidence. - The first witness called was Dr James Campbell Macaulay, of Honiton, who gave evidence of identifying the body of ELIZABETH RADFORD. She was lady's maid to the Dowager Lady Sawle, of Ashfield House, near Honiton. Deceased was a spinster, aged 41, and the daughter of WM. RADFORD, gardener, of Silverton. - Mr George Kempthorne Watts, executive engineer of the Indian Public Works Department, on furlough, identified the body of VIOLET MARY WATSON, aged 9, daughter of JOHN WHALEY WATSON, colonel of the Bombay Staff Corps, and political agent at Kolapore, India, and MRS WATSON. VIOLET MARY WATSON had been staying at 2 Portland-terrace, Dawlish. He also identified the body of ELIZABETH KEEN, the nurse to the WATSON family, aged 24. She was in the service of COLONEL WATSON, and of Miss Matthews, who was in charge of the children. - WILLIAM KEEN, a young man, also identified the body of ELIZABETH KEEN, as that of his sister. She was the daughter of the late THOMAS KEEN, farm labourer. - Frederick William Short, 17 Brunswick-square, Bloomsbury, London, a demonstrator of chemistry, said he was staying temporarily at Dawlish. On Saturday morning he was sitting on the ledge of a cliff in the cove where the accident happened, about half past eleven. He noticed a group of ladies and children in a cavern, 6 or 8 feet from the side of the cliff. He heard a loud rumbling sound and looking round he saw the cliff falling on the group below. It was a very large fragment of rock, with a lot of rubble. He did not notice any train passing at the time, or immediately before, but a train might have passed without his noticing it. He was sitting on the ledge of a cliff, which was perpendicular above him, and on the site of a former landslip. On seeing the mass of cliff fall he ran to the spot and saw some persons half buried. He pulled out a lady, Miss Matthews, a part of her dress being left behind. He next took out a child and carried it on to the beach; it was uninjured. He then returned and saw the head and shoulders of Miss Watts among the rock, and two gentlemen helped him to extricate her. When this was done he helped to carry her to her lodgings. He saw no notices on the spot warning people of the dangerous nature of the cliff. He had seen such a notice in previous years, but it was not there on Saturday. - The Coroner asked witness if he could account for the accident. - Witness replied that the tide had been very high and the sea rough on the morning in question. At the time of the accident the tide was at about half ebb and the rocks were just uncovered. The sea washed the base of the cliffs. Just five minutes previously the little girl had waded round to the edge of the cliff. At the time of the accident the ladies were sitting still, but the children were running about. - In reply to Mr Friend, who produced a photograph of the cove for witness to look at, he said he remembered that the notice he had seen up, either twelve months or two years ago, was to the effect that it was dangerous to sit under the cliff. - By Mr Whidborne: The site of the accident was below highwater mark. - By the Jury: He did not notice any passing trains at the time. He was not quite sure about the exact time. He had looked at his watch at eleven o'clock, and he thought it was about half an hour afterwards. - MR WATSON, recalled, stated that MISS RADFORD'S watch was found to have stopped at ten minutes to twelve. - The watch was sent for and subsequently produced. - Elizabeth Caroline Boston, of Upper Winchester-road, Clapham Bridge, London, and staying at 6 Park-place, Dawlish, said on Saturday morning she was within two yards of where the accident happened. It was near twelve o'clock and a train had passed through the tunnel whilst she was on her way to the spot. Her husband was with her at the time, and she had not been there more than five minutes before the accident happened. She did not see the large mass fall, but she saw smaller portion fall on the little boy whose leg was hurt. This was ten minutes after the down train had passed. A very small piece also fell after the passing of the up train, whilst her husband was helping to get a lady out. Her husband remained until the lady and little boy were extricated, and witness stood watching the cliff, fearing other pieces would fall. She had been staying at Dawlish since Saturday week, and had been to the spot frequently. Having been told there were notices there she had looked for them, but could not see any. The sea was very rough at the time. - A Juryman suggested that Mr Williams, the station-master, should be called to state the exact time at which the up and down trains passed, and the Coroner promised that this should be done. - Geo. Bond, fisherman, of Dawlish, said about twenty minutes or half-past eleven, whilst on the beach, the nurse, ELIZABETH KEEN, came and asked him if the tide was rising or falling. She went on, and he followed. Coming near the scene of the accident he saw a little boy with a net running. He heard a creaking noise and saw the rocks falling and on going to the spot he saw a lady, who was half-buried. He went to her and caught hold of her hand and she said, "Oh." He then lent assistance to get the bodies out, being engaged in this work about an hour. All three were dead when they were got out. There were two notice boards in the cove, but the boys had knocked them down, he supposed by throwing stones at them. He had seen one of the boards up during this summer. The down train passed when the nurse spoke to him on the beach. That morning there had been a high tide, but not exceptionally so. The last time there was a fall of rock from the same cliff, previously to Saturday, was in 1880. - In reply to Mr Whidborne, witness said it was below high water mark when the accident happened. In reply to Mr Friend, he said that there was also a fall of rick in the cove last March, which broke away a portion of the wall underneath. A notice board was then knocked away, and he had not see it up since. - P.C. Wm. Stapleton, stationed at Dawlish, said that on Saturday, at one o'clock, he was where the accident occurred. He saw the deceased ELIZABETH KEEN, taken out quite dead by four fishermen, and the body was conveyed to 5 Portland-terrace. About a quarter of an hour afterwards he met four men coming towards him with the body of the child VIOLET WATSON, and this was taken into 2 Portland-terrace. Some time after this he saw the body of ELIZABETH RADFORD removed to 5 Portland-terrace. He had seen notices in the cove, but he could not say whether they were there during the last few months. He believed the last time he saw a notice board there was twelve months ago. - At this stage a man named Robert King called out in a loud voice that the notice boards which were formerly put up at the cove fell down by decay four years ago. This statement caused some commotion, and the Coroner called King as a witness. He stated that he was a naval pensioner and lived in Chapel-street, Dawlish. He was at present an assistant gardener, but he was formerly superintendent of the No. 2 Bathing Company for seven years, an occupation which he left last April twelve months. There were two notices put up - one just over the crown of the cliff, where it fell, saying it was dangerous to sit under the rocks. That was seven years ago, and the notices came down four years since. There was also formerly another notice a little further on where the rock came to a bend. During the time he was engaged in the bathing cove the notice boards fell down, and they had never been replaced. One had been put up by Mr Friend on the Dawlish side of the cove, at the entrance to Cowhole Cove, but this was not where the accident occurred. Witness, alluding to the fact that the notice boards warned people not to sit under the rocks, said it was quite as dangerous to walk under as it was to sit under. (Applause.) Then some persons went and built a footbridge there for people to walk into the lion's mouth. (Renewed applause.) Witness proceeded with a somewhat excited altercation with Mr Bolt, a Juryman and former member of the Local Board, upon which the coroner, observing that the witness seemed to take great interest in the subject, requested him to keep to the point. In continuation, witness said there was a great slip at the cove five years ago, when trees, as well as soil and rock, came down, but that was not in the summer. Another slip took place inside the railway since then, and in March last, within 20 yards of where Saturday's accident happened, hundreds of tons came down and broke the wall, which had never been repaired since. (Applause.) He gave warning at the time to four or five members of the Local Board. He thought Saturday's accident was caused by the extraordinary dry weather, followed by a sudden and heavy fall of rain, together with the vibration of the trains in going through the tunnel. The action of the sea had nothing to do with the falling of the cliff, but in his opinion the vibration of the trains had a great deal to do with it. The Lea Mount property, at the top of the cliff, was bought by Mr Lea, M.P., and presented to the Local Board for the town several years ago, but he did not know whether the lord of the manor had anything to do with it. He (witness) advised that the face of the cliff should be cut away and made to slope back. (Applause.) - Rev. Richard Harris D. Barham, residing at Broxmore, Dawlish, stated that there had been three distinct falls of cliff within the last six months. The first occurred somewhere about March and it crushed the wall which was used as a pathway to the bathing cove very near where Saturday's accident happened. A few weeks afterwards came the second fall at a spot called Cowhole, when part of the archway gave way. On that second fall taking place a notice was put up over the archway warning people not to pass underneath. That notice remained up a few weeks only. Shortly after its removal the erection of a footbridge was commenced, immediately under the place where it had been put up. Seeing this going on, he naturally remonstrated, considering that to put up a bridge where it had been stated to be dangerous was insanity. (Applause.) He spoke to several persons on the subject, including two now on the Jury; and he afterwards wrote to the Local Board warning them of the removal of the notice board and the erection of the bridge. In their reply the Board totally ignored the question of the notice, and said they did not authorise the erection of the bridge. - The Coroner asked for the production of the correspondence, which the witness proceeded to read as follows:- 'Broxmore, Dawlish, August 4th, 1885. - Sir, I beg to call your attention to the work now going on at the entrance to the gentlemen's bathing cove. There have been from time to time frequent falls of rock near this spot, and within the last few months two of an alarming magnitude took place. As more might reasonably be expected, you promptly and very properly posted a notice warning passers-by of their peril. Are you aware, sir, permit me to ask, that this notice has been removed and that a footbridge is being constructed along the very line known to be, and publicly declared by you, to be highly dangerous? I can scarcely believe that this scheme has received, as is asserted, your sanction: but surely immediately action on the part of the Local Board is demanded to save them from the imputation of utter indifference to human life. (Applause.) It may be impossible to prevent children and heedless persons loitering under these cliffs, though everything that can be done should be done to deter them. Actually to invite unwary visitors by the offer of a commodious footway to risk their lives for the benefit of the bathing companies is nothing short of insanity. A Coroner's Jury might deliver a more severe verdict. (Applause.) I feel that it is only courteous and proper to make this appeal to you before issuing any more public warning and protest. I am, sir, &c., R. H. D. Barham.' - To the Chairman of the Local Board, Dawlish. - Witness said he considered himself not only justified but bound to write this letter, and to it he received the following reply:- 'Dear Sir, - Your letter of the 4th inst. as to the footbridge in course of erection at the entrance of the gentlemen's bathing cove was read at the meeting of the Local Board held last evening, and I am directed by the Board to inform you that they have not given their sanction to the work being carried out, as you will see by the resolution passed by them on the subject, a copy of which is on the other side. - Yours truly. John S. Whidborne, Clerk. - [Copy of Resolution.] - Mr W. C. Tapper and Mr F. Davies attended as a deputation from the Ratepayers' Association and laid before the Board a plan of a bridge to be erected between the Cowhole and the small tunnel leading to the bathing cove. - Resolved, that while incurring no responsibility, this Board will offer no objection to the work being carried out so long as no approaches to the beach are blocked. - Continuing, Mr Barham said he remembered having seen a notice board in the cove where the accident happened, but he believed it disappeared after a fall of cliff three or four years ago. - By Mr Friend: In his opinion the footbridge should not again be used, inasmuch as, by thus presenting an easy access, people were invited to go along a most dangerous part of the coast. A dozen persons now passed that way to one formerly. Previously to the erection of the bridge most people went to the bathing place by the outside and much more safe, if somewhat rough, way. Now, by using the bridge, they walked directly underneath the cliffs. He looked upon the bridge simply as a trap. (Hear, hear, and applause.) The railway metals were about thirty feet in from the scene of the accident . He had no doubt that the passing trains affected the loose rock, and increased the chances of its falling. He did not consider that the new bridge was the direct cause of the accident, but it must have been indirectly, if the deceased persons passed over it. - A Juryman (Mr Hawking) said they did not pass over the bridge, but over the rocks outside; he saw them. - Mr Short, recalled, said he saw two of the ladies come through the tunnel by way of the bridge, but they were Miss Matthews and Miss Watts, who were injured, and neither of the deceased. - Dr F. McCann said when he examined VIOLET MARY WATSON he found her quite dead. There were no bones broken, but there were various superficial abrasions on the body. She died from compression, or suffocation. The young woman, ELIZABETH KEEN, was very severely injured, having sustained a compound fracture of the skull, fracture of the pelvis, and other injuries quite sufficient to cause death. ELIZABETH RADFORD was also tremendously injured. One-half of her skull was carried away, and almost the whole of the brain was gone from the main part of the skull. The spinal column was extruding from the body, together with the ribs; in fact, she was smashed to pieces and must have been killed instantly. The injuries were such as would be caused by the fall of cliff as described. In the case of the two women it must have come down upon them with tremendous force. The little girl, however, was not struck by any large masses of rock, but she must have been simply covered with earth and suffocated. In reply to Mr Friend, Dr Cann said he certainly thought it was the duty of some person or persons in authority, after the falls of cliff that had taken place, to see that notices were put up warning people of the danger. - Mr J. S. Whidborne, Clerk of the Dawlish Local Board, said the pleasure ground at the top of the cliff, known as Sea Mount, belonged to the Local Board. He could not say, however, that their right extended down the face of the cliff. The railway tunnel ran underneath Lea Mount, and as a matter of fact he believed that her Majesty's Commissioners of Woods and Forests were the owners of this particular place where the rock fell. The Local Board, in the person of their surveyor, had been convicted and fined for removing sand within a few yards of the spot at the instance of the railway company, who claimed the whole under a lease from the Commissioners of Woods and Forests. - The Coroner: Has the Local Board caused a notice board to be put up at or near the place giving warning of danger? - Witness said he had searched the minute books of the Board for this, more particularly with regard to the notice over the arch of the Cowhole, but he could find no record of any notice board being put there, and he did not think any order to that effect was given by the Board as such. He understood that the board in question was put up by the direction of the Highway Committee. - The Coroner: It would be within the power of the Local Board , I suppose, to stop up the tunnel leading to the bathing cove? - Witness: I think not. - The Coroner: Would not the Local Board have had power to refuse permission for the erection of the footbridge? - Witness replied that he did not think they would, but they could, if they deemed it desirable, lodge a complaint with higher powers. At the last audit the district auditor said if the Local Board spent any money on the spot in question it would be his duty to surcharge the members with it. - In reply to Mr Friend, Mr Whidborne said a portion of Lea Mount came down in a former slip, but he should not like to say that the Mount itself formed any part of the locus in quo of the accident. In fact he did not believe that the top of Lea Mount, where people walked, covered any portion of the spot. He was not aware that either of the two Dawlish bathing companies possessed any interest in the footbridge, which was erected at the instance of the Ratepayers' Association. - By a Juryman (Mr Hawking): He believed that the railway company possessed the power to double the line, and if this were done it would almost extend to where the accident happened. - Mr J. S. Delbridge, surveyor to the Dawlish Local Board, said he visited the spot in question four or five times a week. He was last there five days ago, and there was no apparent danger then. He reported the fall of cliff last March to the Highway Committee. About a month ago there was a gentleman in Dawlish from the office of the Woods and Forests, and he accompanied him to the beach, and understood from him that the whole of the foreshore, from Langstone Point down to Teignmouth - and therefore including the scene of the accident - belonged to the railway company. - In reply to Mr Friend, witness denied that the Board had any jurisdiction over the beach, but he admitted that one of their bye-laws gave them control over bathing on the beach, and that this bye-law included the words "within the Local Board district." - Mr Whidborne replied that these bye-laws were made in pursuance of the Act of Parliament for the regulation of bathing, and submitted that they did not give the Local Board any right of claim to the beach. - The Coroner asked if there was anyone present to give evidence on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. No answer was given, and on Mr Luxmoore being called upon it was stated that he had left. - The man King here endeavoured to make another voluntary statement, and he was so intrusive, after being requested to desist, that he had to be put back by a policeman. - The Coroner, in summing up, stated that they had had before them all the evidence available to enable them to come to some conclusion as to the cause of the sad calamity that had happened, and which had resulted not only in the deaths of three persons, but which might have a result in another way, and that was of materially affecting the prosperity of Dawlish as a watering-place. He thought they would not have much, if any, difficulty - after the evidence of the two witnesses who saw the occurrence, and of Dr Cann as to the frightful injuries to the deceased persons and their probable instantaneous death - in coming to a verdict of accidental death by the fall of the cliff. It was, however, their duty as a Jury to Inquire collaterally with that into the other circumstances of the case, with a view of ascertaining whether anyone had neglected any duty or whether any person had exhibited any negligence so as to contribute in any way to the occurrence. They had had a great deal of difficulty in ascertaining to whom the cliff belonged. No one seemed to know exactly whose property it was. It was thought that the Local Board, as the owners of Lea Mount, would probably be the owners of the face of the cliff immediately above it, but the clerk to the Local Board was doubtful on the point, and declined to say that that part of the cliff belonged to that body. It had also been suggested that it might belong to the railway company or to the Commissioners of Woods and Forests, but they had had no certain evidence on the point. He did not think, however, the Jury need trouble themselves as to who were the real owners of the face of the cliff - a portion of which had fallen. It would rather be for them to consider whether the Dawlish Local Board, being entrusted with looking after the welfare of the town, and having before it the facts that the rock at this place was dangerous and had slipped away on so many previous occasions - although, fortunately, before Saturday it was unattended with loss of life - it would be for them to consider whether they should not take some steps either to warn persons of the danger which had been threatening so long, which appeared to have been known to the Local Board, and was apparently a matter of public notoriety in Dawlish. It seemed that no satisfactory steps had been taken in this direction since the notice boards disappeared four years ago. It would therefore be for the Jury to decide whether they would not add a rider to their verdict, embodying some recommendation which might be for the benefit of the town in future. It had been suggested that the tunnel under the cliff leading to the cove should be stopped up, and persons not allowed to go that way, but whether that would be done, or whether a right of way had been created there, he did not know, but they might think it reasonable that the Local Board - knowing of this danger, and that overhanging rock might fall upon visitors in future - should undertake an investigation to discover who were the owners of the cliff, and having ascertained this, that they should call upon them to put it in such a state that it should cease to be dangerous. Perhaps the most radical way of dealing with the matter would be to have the cliff sloped down, and thus do away with the overhanging portion of it altogether. (Hear, hear, and applause). Another way would be to stop up the tunnel, and to put up notice boards warning people that the cove was dangerous. If the Jury added to their verdict a rider to that effect, no doubt such a recommendation, made on such an important occasion, would have its due effect. - The Jury retired, and after an absence of three quarters of an hour, they returned with a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added the following rider:- "That the Local Board do investigate and make themselves acquainted with the ownership of the cliffs and shore at and about the site of the late accident and compel the responsible parties to take immediate action in providing for the safety of the public for the future, and pending such inquiry notice boards should be erected giving warning of danger." - The Coroner promised that the rider should be communicated to the Local Board. - Mr Friend, on behalf of the bereaved relatives, for whom he appeared, thanked the Jury for the kind and attentive way in which they had listened to the evidence, as shewn by the practical and effective way in which they had given expression to it in their rider. - The Foreman added that the Jury desired to say how deeply they deplored the loss of life that had happened. They sympathised with the relatives of the deceased, and expressed their heartfelt wishes and prayers for the safe recovery of the injured. They also thought the greatest praise was due to the local police for the energy and promptness they displayed in recovering the bodies from the debris and conveying them to the houses where they were deposited. - This concluded the proceedings, which lasted four hours and a half. Prior to the Inquest the Local Board held a special meeting, at which they passed a vote of condolence with the relatives of the deceased and of sympathy with the injured. - Great sympathy is felt in Honiton and at Awliscombe for Lady Sawle in the sad calamity that has befallen her family. Lady Sawle has lived at Ashfield House, near Honiton for the past twenty years, and has gained the respect and esteem of the whole neighbourhood. It is said that the bodies of those killed will be taken to Honiton to be interred in the Awliscombe Churchyard.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - The death of two young children was Inquired into by Coroner's Juries at Plymouth yesterday, and verdicts of Death from Natural Causes returned. The first Inquiry was as to the decease of PHOEBE ETHEL, 1 year and 11 months, daughter of DANIEL BROWN, labourer, 96 King-street West. The other was on the child of GEORGE HENRY HONEY, plasterer, of 11 Chapel-street, who was 6 months old. In neither case had any medical man seen the patient for some time. To the verdict in the latter instance the Jury added that "Death had been accelerated by the administration of medicine not fitting to the child's condition (from a dispensary) and they also considered it unwise for a doctor to leave medicine already prepared in stoppered bottles, to be given by his assistant to anyone whom he had not previously seen."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - A shockingly sudden death in Plymouth on Monday formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry yesterday. The deceased was MRS ANNIE WEEKES, aged 64, of 1 Holborn-place. Her husband, HENRY WEEKS, had injured his hand that day by cutting it with a circular saw. Deceased complained of a headache at dinner and while her mother-in-law left the room to get her some medicine she fell off the chair dead. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," expressed their deep sympathy with the relatives.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Recent Bathing Accident At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of THOMAS JAMES YEO, 57, a cutter recently in the employ of Mr John Adams, of George-street, Plymouth, who died on Wednesday evening. On Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, MR YEO was bathing at Tinside, under Plymouth Hoe, and was rescued from drowning by a plasterer named Webber, under circumstances detailed in Monday's Western Morning News. It will be remembered that the unfortunate man was very ill after being brought round by P.C. Westlake, and that though he regained consciousness under the intelligent treatment of that officer, fears were entertained that the accident might, after all, result fatally. Mr Cummings attended him on Sunday and on Monday Dr Thomas Pearse was called in. He found MR YEO suffering from total paralysis of the left side, and he subsequently experienced great difficulty in breathing. His death on Wednesday evening was immediately due to congestion of the lungs, brought on by prolonged immersion in the water and accelerated by some unavoidable subsequent exposure. His sinking whilst bathing was due to a fit taken while in the water. - The Coroner, in summing up yesterday, complimented both Webber and P.C. Westlake upon their exemplary conduct, and hoped the Jury would add a rider to the effect that they very much appreciated the efforts of both these men and that they considered Webber's conduct was brave in the extreme. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned, and the Jury added a rider couched in the terms suggested by the Coroner.

STOKE DAMEREL - A Coroner's Inquiry as to the cause of the death of C. H. BURNETT, whose body was found floating in the Hamoaze on Wednesday, was held by Mr W. Shaddock, Mayor of Saltash, at Newpassage, Devonport, yesterday. It was stated in evidence that deceased was a stoker on board the Conquest, which sailed on Wednesday, and that he had been into Cornwall on leave which expired on the first of the month. Nothing was heard of him after leaving his friends in Cornwall, and there being no evidence to shew how the deceased came by his death, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. Deceased, it was stated, was an excellent swimmer and had taken several prizes for skill in the art of natation.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 September 1885
BAMPTON - Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Bampton, near Tiverton, yesterday on the body of MR RICHARD PEARSE, grocer, who died from injuries received at a recent fire. Amongst the relatives of the deceased who attended the Inquest was his niece, Mrs Brock, of Plymouth. The evidence shewed that on Wednesday night MISS PEARSE let fall a paraffin lamp, and a gallon of benzoline being ignited, the house was soon ablaze. MISS PEARSE rushed upstairs and subsequently she and her mother were rescued from the house, but not before both were seriously injured and are still in a precarious condition. The house was afterwards entered by a couple of men, who found the deceased on the stairs. He was assisted to the Swan Inn, and attended by Dr Guinness. He was dreadfully burnt about the head and body, and died on Thursday from the exhaustion consequent upon the injuries he had received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall on the body of JOHN HENRY SPICER, aged 12, the lad who was drowned in Jennycliffe Bay by the capsizing of a boat in which he and a seaman named Dolton were fishing. The facts have already been reported in the Western Morning News. The body was picked up on Friday by a man named Foster. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and complimented Dolton on the efforts he made to save the lad.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 September 1885
MALBOROUGH - The body of THOMAS CRISPIN, aged 55, fisherman, who was drowned through his boat coming into collision with the steamer Reindeer near Salcombe Bar on the 4th inst., having been found on Tuesday, an Inquest was held the same evening. Among the witnesses examined was Charles Edwin Hutchings, second hand on board the Reindeer, who said that had CRISPIN ported his helm the accident would not have happened. Seeing the collision, witness rushed forward and caught hold of the mast of the fishing boat, which he held for some seconds, shouting to the deceased to jump and catch his (Hutchings's) hand. CRISPIN, however, made no attempt to do so, though he did not appear to have been struck, and he was drowned, notwithstanding the efforts made to save him. Considerable evidence was given, which was somewhat contradictory. Joseph Partridge, seaman, Salcombe, said the steamer made a mistake in not porting her helm. Mr Gilbert Elliott, retired district magistrate of the Indian Civil Service, who was on board the Reindeer, stated that he thought no blame could be laid to the steerer of the steamer. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

EGG BUCKLAND - At Crown-hill Fort, Knackersknowle, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest as to the death of PHILIP PRIOR, the farm labourer, who was killed under a cart wheel the previous day, as already reported in the Western Morning News. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr Passmore was Foreman, and who gave their fees to the widow (the mother of ten children). Mr F. C. Langford, surgeon, added half a guinea to this welcome donation, and Mr Wyatt, of Knackersknowle, half a crown. Mr Langford and Mr Rodd both expressed their willingness to receive further contributions in the case, and the Rev. E. Roberts, M.A., vicar of Tamerton Foliot, will also act as custodian of any funds entrusted to him.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 September 1885
NEWTON ABBOT - Sad Death Of A North Bovey Farmer. - The body of MR GEORGE DODD, of Coombe Farm, North Bovey, was found in the Teign at Newton yesterday. He had been missing from home for more than a week. An Inquest on the body was held at the Newton Abbot Townhall last evening before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner. It transpired at this Inquiry that the body was found by a bargeman named Scott. The evidence shewed that on Wednesday, September 9th, the deceased came to Newton, went to the residence of Adml. Cornish-Bowden, and paid £26 rent. He was at the same time served with notice to quite his farm. Admiral Bowden requested him to remain to dinner, but deceased refused and left. Later in the evening he went to the Railway Hotel and left there at about eight o'clock for the railway station, saying he was going to Torquay. He was under the influence of drink, and it is supposed he missed his way and got into Quay-road, from which he fell into the river Teign. Nothing was seen of him until yesterday morning when the body was found floating in the river near Buckland Point. The face was eaten away, and the body was identified by the clothes and the contents of his pockets. Deceased's wife was telegraphed for but had not arrived in time for the Inquest. In the pockets were found three £5 notes and some other money. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 September 1885
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Saturday on the body of an old woman named MARY SHADDICK, 71 years of age, who on Friday night fell down the stairs and was instantaneously killed, her neck being fractured. It is thought she was coming down for something she had forgotten and accidentally fell. Her husband, who is over 80 years of age and had retired before the deceased, heard a noise, and on coming to the head of the stairs saw her dead at the bottom. "Accidental Death" was the verdict.

PLYMOUTH - The Terrible Death At Plymouth. - The Inquest held by Mr Coroner Brian on Saturday touching the death of THOMAS LALLY, who met with his death by falling into a cauldron of boiling water, as already reported in the Western Morning News, elicited the fact that when Mr Brown (deceased's master) left him smoking by the furnace he was intoxicated. Mr Brown thought he must have gone upstairs to see how the water was boiling, and in pulling a rope attached to a basket in the barking copper he fell in, but he had no business there at all. A discussion took place among the Jurymen as to the importance of having a guard round the mouth of the copper, which is raised eighteen inches above the floor. One Juryman, however, spoke to the fact of the copper having been as at present for fifty years, and it was generally agreed that most other coppers used for barking were constructed in the same way. Mr Brown had a moveable roller which could be fixed round the edge, but this was useless when men were at work, as it had then to be removed. Moreover, as no work was then actually being done a guard might have been left, but for the absence of everyone from the house except LALLY, who had orders to remain where he was. Mr Dyke was expected, too, every minute from the Hoe with his nets to bark them, for which the water was kept in readiness. It was also shewn that when men were engaged in a preliminary part of the operation they frequently stood on the edge of the cauldron itself, but no accident had ever happened previously. It was suggested that moveable posts several feet high should be fixed round the tank, with a rope running round the tope, which would be something to take hold of. Mr Brown expressed his anxiety to prevent a like occurrence, and his determination to alter existing arrangements if possible. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 September 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - At an Inquiry held yesterday by Mr Shaddock, the Saltash Coroner, at Shepherd's Ferry House Inn, Newpassage, on the body of a retired blacksmith named JAGO, who met his death under circumstances already reported, a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held before Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, relative to the death of WM. RIBBLING, who died on Saturday night in the Hospital. The deceased had been mowing some oats near Princetown, and when leaving he jumped over a wall, having previously thrown over his scythe. He fell and injured his arm, so that after his removal to the Hospital the limb had to be amputated. The deceased, however, died from acute blood poisoning.

PLYMOUTH - The death by drowning of Private JAMES BRYON, of the Royal Irish Regiment, was the subject of an Inquiry held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), at the Guildhall last evening. The deceased received his pay on the 12th inst. at the citadel. He was then quite sober, in fact for fourteen years he had been a very steady man. On the evening of the 12th four privates, including the deceased, left the citadel together. BRYON had some drink, but was not by any means inebriated. Private Pettit left him at the clock in George-street and did not again see him alive. George Jaques was out fishing at the east of the flagstaff on the Plymouth Citadel about ten o'clock on Saturday night. The boat was moored and Jaques saw something on the water. This floated close to the boat and when he had ascertained that it was a corpse he towed it to the Barbican and gave it into the charge of P.C. Boon. An Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - "Death by Suffocation while Asleep" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held last night at Plymouth before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, on the infant child of JOHN NORTHCOTT, of 7 Howe-street. The child was found dead in bed yesterday morning, and the evidence shewed that it had been accidentally overlain by its mother.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 September 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident To A Mason. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening as to the death of RICHARD BATE WHITE, aged 24, mason, who succumbed from injuries received through the fall of a scaffold in Lipson-road. A double Jury was empanelled. Mr J. Shelly appeared on behalf of Mr H. Clarke, in whose employ deceased was; and Mr F. R. Stanbury represented the friends of the deceased. - John Foster, mason, stated that he and deceased were in the employ of Mr H. Clarke at the time of the accident, which occurred on Tuesday afternoon last. They were engaged in the construction of a house in Lipson-road, and deceased was working one side of the wall and witness on the other. The scaffold consisted of upright poles, "Ledgers," and pudlocks, and witness and deceased assisted in putting it up. All the timber had been used before, but it was sound and strong and properly lashed. Mr Clarke as a matter of precaution, directed the men in some instances to use a second rope in order to make the scaffolding perfectly secure. They were working in pairs, Mr Clarke's brother and deceased forming one pair, and witness and Mr Clarke the other. There was a long, heavy ladder against the scaffolding, but he could not say whether anyone was coming up at the time of the accident. When the scaffolding fell everything seemed "to give way at once." Nothing came from above. Witness threw himself on the wall and remained there, between 20ft. and 30ft from the ground, until rescued. While in that position he looked below him and saw the deceased stretched out on the ground. - By the Jury: The upright poles were fixed in the ground about three feet, the earth being heavy and clayey. The ends of the pudlocks were placed in holes in the wall, and wedged in with wood or brick. Immediately after the accident witness assisted to take the deceased to the Hospital and within a couple of hours he returned to the building. Part of the wall was down and some of the "ledgers" were smashed by the weight of the masonry that had fallen. Some of the "pudlocks" had also been carried away. He picked up two of the pudlocks, and they were sound. He did not know whether the pudlocks "drew" from the wall, and he could not say how the scaffold fell. The lower lashings were loosened by the scaffold falling, but were not broken. - By Mr Stanbury: Mr H. Clarke personally superintended the erection of the scaffold. The height of the platform on which deceased was standing was 34 feet, and the length 14 or 15 feet. He could not say how many upright poles there were to this platform, but there were four "pudlocks". There were five men on the platform at the time and about 1cwt. of stones. There was a platform below attached to the same uprights, but he could not say how many pudlocks there were to this part of the structure. - By Mr Shelly: Witness had been a mason seven years, and had had a great deal to do with constructing scaffoldings. This particular scaffold was constructed in the usual way. - Mr Henry Clarke said the gable in question was to be 32 feet in height. He helped to tie up the scaffold, and he thought all the materials were sound and efficient, and he was sure it was erected in a proper manner. The upright poles going to the top of the gable end, and not being long enough, were all spliced and wedged. There were two platforms; in the top one there were four pudlocks, and five or six (he believed) in the lower one. He worked on the scaffold himself. He could not explain how the accident occurred. - By the Jury: He superintended the erection of the scaffold, and calculated it should bear six tons. The gable end was about fifteen feet across, and there were about four uprights to this distance. From inspections he had made he did not believe the accident had anything to do with the scaffold at all. - By Mr Stanbury: His theory was that the wall gave way first. Below the second platform - that was a height of 28 feet - there were no pudlocks - only ledgers. - By Mr Shelly: The pudlocks were doubled. The wall was eighteen inches through, and about six feet fell away on one side of the gable. Witness had been to work on the same scaffold that day. - By the Coroner: The pudlocks that were broken were of sound wood. - Mr G. D. Bellamy (Borough Surveyor) stated that he examined the building on Thursday. As far as he could judge the construction of the scaffolding appeared to be substantial, and it was put up in the ordinary way. The walls of the building were all secure and they were well built with good material. From all he had heard in evidence the accident appeared to him to be due to the vibration of the scaffolding, which acted as a lever and threw the masonry over. If a long ladder were against the scaffolding, and a person ascending with a weight, that might assist the vibration. - Dr Merrifield said that Mr Clarke was under contract to sell the building to him when completed. A piece of wood which Mr Bellamy had condemned as unfit for use in a scaffold had to his knowledge been used only as "strut" to the ladder, and not as part of the scaffold. - Samuel Clark, a boy, said he was on the first rung of the ladder with a hod of mortar on his shoulder when the accident occurred. - Mr Buchan, house surgeon at the South Devon Hospital, stated that deceased was admitted on Tuesday suffering from a compound depressed fracture at the back of the skull, which resulted in his death. - The Coroner said it appeared to him that the scaffolding was constructed in the usual way, and of sound and good materials. If the Jury thought blame or censure could be fairly and properly laid upon anyone's shoulder sit would be their duty to express themselves to that effect. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 September 1885
KINGSTEIGNTON - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Kingsteignton on Saturday evening before Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, into the cause of death of RICHARD SCOTT, fourteen years of age, who was killed on the previous afternoon. The deceased was driving a horse and clay cart, and was leaving the clay works in company with another lad, who on presently looking round saw SCOTT on the ground. Going back to him he found SCOTT with a terrible wound on the head, the wheel of the cart having apparently gone over his head. He was taken to his home and died in a few hours without regaining consciousness.

BIDEFORD - The Fatality At Bideford. The Inquest. - An Inquest on the body of the REV. W. WATKINS, who met with his death under the painful circumstances already reported in the Western Morning News, was held at the Bideford Dispensary on Saturday evening. - MR JONAH WATKINS, bank manager, of Llandovery, identified the deceased as his brother, who had retired from active ministry in the Church of England for a year past, and who, up to the time of coming to Bideford a fortnight since, had resided in witness's house. Deceased had been out of health, but not liable to any depression of spirits. His health having improved latterly he had left witness's house with a view to undertaking a tutorship at Kingsley College, Westward Ho! Witness had heard once from deceased on private mattes since he had been staying at Bideford. - In answer to the Foreman of the Jury, witness stated that deceased was not in embarrassed circumstances, nor was there the slightest reason to suppose there was anything whatever which would have prompted suicide. - Thomas Hoyle, by whom deceased was first discovered, deposed to the facts stated by us on Friday. Deceased was lying face downwards in a pool of blood, his silk hat being blown across the sand into the water. This was about 1.15 p.m. - Sergeant Dymond, of the Borough Police, said he knew deceased by sight, and saw him on the morning of the fatal occurrence about eleven o'clock in Cooper-street, Bideford. He noticed nothing unusual in his gait. He next saw the body of the deceased at Ford Rock at about 1.30 p.m., having been called to the spot on the discovery of the dead body. He examined the body, and found life extinct, having first despatched a messenger for a medical man. Dr Sinclair Thompson came, and pronounced deceased to be dead. Witness, on examining the spot, found at a distance of about six feet from where deceased lay, and about three feet from the ground, a sharp rock having hair on it and a few spots of blood. He saw no indications of deceased having crawled to the spot on the sand where found. He also examined the spot on the top of the cliff - a height of about thirty feet - and observed sliding footmarks. A person slipping in the manner suggested by these marks must inevitably go over the precipitous bank. - In reply to the Foreman, witness said there was no sign of any struggle, but the indications he had mentioned were suggestive of accidental slipping. The top of the bank was easy of access from the road. With that exception the whole of the roadway was protected by a stone wall. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said there were two terrible wounds in the head - one just over the right eye and the other on the fore part of the top of the head. - Replying to a Juryman, witness said the pathway referred to was not a recognised public thoroughfare, but rather a track made by boys over the bank which was itself the property of a private individual. - Remarks were made by the Coroner and members of the Jury as to the danger incurred by anyone attempting to reach the beach from the road by means of the track in question: and there was a general expression of opinion that an old and well remembered means of access to the beach from the new road, for vehicles as well as for pedestrians, should be preserved to the public; and that it was necessary steps should be taken to this end, as this old recognised right of way was gradually becoming blocked and obstructed and that this obstruction constituted an encroachment on public rights. - The Coroner said he had himself called the attention of the authorities to the need of this some three or four years since. - Dr Sinclair Thompson said he found on examining the body that a piece on the right of the frontal bone of deceased's head, of about the size of a half-crown, was clean knocked out, and through the wound the brain was protruding. On the sharp jagged rock on which deceased must have fallen, was a piece of the skull which had evidently been gouged out during deceased's fall by the jutting scrag. Death must have been instantaneous. - - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no question as to what the cause of death was, but there was a lack of evidence to shew whether the fall was accidental or intentional. - The Jury thought it was clearly an accident, and they at once returned a verdict of "Death by Accidentally falling over the cliffs." - The Coroner said it was a matter for the Jury's consideration whether or not they would make any recommendation to the responsible parties as to more effectually fencing off the cliff at this spot from the roadways; and the Foreman intimated that orders had already been given for doing this. - Several Jurymen, as well as the Coroner, remarked that they recollected when there was an open access to the river bed, without adopting any dangerous track such as that in question. The yard before referred to, the Coroner stated, was, when he first came to Bideford, an open space commanding easy access to the river, but it was now being gradually enclosed and obstructed. The Jury, through the Coroner, expressed their sympathy with the deceased's brother and relatives. - The remains of deceased were interred at Bideford on Saturday.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 September 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - At the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, the cause of death of WALTER FREDERICK STENSON, second class boy on board the training ship Impregnable, at Devonport, was yesterday the subject of an Inquiry before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr W. H. Simmons was Foreman. The lad was drowned on the 16th instant while taking lessons in swimming, and it is supposed that he was seized with cramp. Efforts were made to save him but without success, and his body was not recovered until Saturday. The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Thursday for the production of further evidence, but expressed his opinion, which the Jury shared, that there was no neglect of duty on the part of the officer who was in charge of the boys when the fatality occurred.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 October 1885
EGG BUCKLAND - "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Coroner's Jury which Inquired into circumstances attending the death of CHARLES ROBERT VIVIAN, aged about 22, fish hawker, who died in consequence of injuries received by being thrown out of his cart on Crown Hill, near Knackersknowle, on Saturday. The witnesses all concurred in stating that deceased was sober at the time of the accident.

EAST STONEHOUSE- A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held by Mr R. r. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, touching the death of ALFRED WILLIAMS, aged 30 years, private in the Royal Marines, serving on board the Cambridge. About half-pat two o'clock on Monday afternoon WILLIAMS was getting his accoutrements in marching order on the main deck of the Cambridge when suddenly blood issued from his mouth, and he exclaimed "I must see the doctor." He was taken to the sick bay, where Mr John Fogerty, M.D., surgeon on board the Cambridge at once saw that he was dying, and he expired in about three minutes. A post-mortem examination shewed that death resulted from haemorrhage of the left lung. Both lungs were diseased, the left one extensively.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 October 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - An adjourned inquiry into the cause of death of WALTER FRED STENSON, second-class boy of H.M.S. Impregnable, who was drowned on the 16th ult. whilst taking lessons in swimming at Devonport, was held yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before Mr R.R. Rodd, County Coroner. No further evidence was produced, except that of the waterman who found the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that they attached no blame to anybody. The Admiralty were represented by Mr Goldsmith, solicitor.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 October 1885
EXETER - An adjourned inquest was held at the North Bridge Inn, Exeter, yesterday, relative to the death of an infant named GEORGE HERBERT COREY, aged 11 months, who died on Thursday. The Inquiry had been adjourned for the presence of Mr Domville, who had attended the mother in confinement and the child for a period after its birth. His opinion was that the child died from want of suitable food, but he did not attach blame to anyone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday on HENRY WILLIAMS, aged 65, of 11 John's-road. Deceased was a storekeeper in Mr Hill's shipping yard, Cattedown, and was fixing a bar to one of the doors on Friday when the door was blown open and he fell down the stairs just outside. He was taken to the Hospital, where he died about seven o'clock on Sunday morning. Mr Buchan, the house surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body and found that death resulted from concussion of the brain.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 October 1885
NEWTON ST CYRES - At the Railway Inn, Newton St. Cyres, the Deputy Coroner (Mr Gould) held an Inquiry yesterday as to the death of JOHN LABDON, a signalman, who was found lying upon the line quite dead on Saturday night, as already reported. Nothing tending to explain the precise manner in which deceased was killed transpired in evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 October 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday on the body found in the water off Devil's Point on Tuesday, as reported in the Western Morning News. The body was identified as that of THOMAS COLLOCOTT, a naval pensioner, 67 years of age. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Dead."

CORNWOOD - The sudden death of MR WILLIAM LANGDON MARTIN, of Lee Moor, formed the subject of investigation by Mr R. R. Rodd, and a Jury at Lee Moor House, near Cornwood, yesterday. Deceased, it will be remembered, went out on Monday morning last in company of his son to inspect the clay works. He complained of being unwell and before anything serious was apprehended fell down and died. The report of the medical gentlemen who made a post-mortem examination was to the effect that deceased's heart was fatty and that there was also congestion of the lungs. Syncope had been the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict in consonance with this testimony, and expressed their deep sympathy with deceased's family. MR MARTIN was 58 years of age.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 October 1885
KINGSTEIGNTON - Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Kingsteignton on Friday evening on the body of a child 3 years old, son of ALFRED DONNELL, who died that morning from burns received on the previous day. The child was left in bed alone, and getting hold of some matches, set the bedclothes on fire, and so burnt himself that death resulted from shock to the system. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 October 1885
EXETER - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, yesterday on the body of a man named CHARLES DURSTON, who was knocked down by a cab in South-street, on Tuesday evening. The deceased was 78 years of age, and resided with his daughter. On Tuesday morning he left home for the purpose of proceeding to St Thomas, and on his way he was knocked down by a cab driven by John Beer. Deceased was removed to his residence and afterwards to the Hospital, where he died. Before his death he informed his daughter that the cabman was not to blame. The medical testimony was to the effect that death resulted from apoplexy caused by the shock.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 October 1885
COMBEINTEIGNHEAD - A verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was returned at an Inquest held last evening at Coombeinteignhead by Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR ELIAS FOWLER, farmer, 62 years of age, who committed suicide on the previous day by drowning himself in a tank of water. Deceased left a letter in which he declared his intention to destroy himself and the evidence shewed that he had been strange in his manner for some time.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Hospital on the body of THOMAS WILLIAM REDMORE, who was endeavouring to cross between some trucks at the Great Western Docks, when they rebounded after the engine had stopped, and crushed him between the buffers. He was taken to the Hospital, and died on the way. Mr Jolliffe appeared on behalf of Messrs. Fox, Eliott and Co., in whose employ deceased was. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and entirely exonerated the driver and fireman from blame.

EXETER - The Fatality On The Exe. The Inquest. - The Deputy Coroner for the County held an Inquiry at the Welcome Inn, Exeter, yesterday, relative to the death of ROBERT TAYLOR TUCKER, of Okehampton, and JANE HARVEY, of Colebrooke, who met with their death in the Exe on Sunday last, under circumstances already reported in the Western Morning News. The bodies have been removed to an outhouse of the Welcome Inn, and on visiting the place early this morning it was found that the rats had attacked the unfortunate girl, and eaten a part of her nose and left cheek. A piece of paper was stuck over the left side of the face the cover the horrid sight. - ALFRED HARVEY identified the body of the young woman to be that of his aunt, JANE HARVEY, domestic servant, aged 25, who went into the service of the Rev. Mr Diamore, of Colebrook on Friday last. - ELIZA TUCKER of Gloucester-street, Morice Town, Devonport, recognised the deceased man as being her brother, ROBERT TAYLOR TUCKER, aged 30, who was employed as a watchmaker and jeweller at West-street, Okehampton. A lad named Robert Boobier stated that TUCKER hired a boat on Sunday morning. The boat was a light one, and deceased would not take witness's advice to have a heavier one. Witness cautioned deceased not to go too near Trew's Weir. On that day the current was rather swift and a gale of wind was blowing down the river. Albert Call, mason, Bonhay-road, said he saw TUCKER rowing down the river and subsequently the boat disappeared over the weir. Witness ran down and saw that TUCKER and HARVEY were in the water. When last seen the man had his arm round the girl's waist, but neither appeared to be trying to swim. An attempt was made to render assistance, but without avail. Evidence having been given of finding the bodies, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Drowning." Some members of the Jury stated that a chain should be drawn across the weir, and the Coroner promised to bring the matter before the Town Council.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 October 1885
NEWTON ABBOT - JOHN MORRIS BEARNE, 74 years of age, who lived by himself in a house in Mill-lane, Newton Abbot, was on Saturday morning found sitting dead in his chair. At the Inquest death was attributed to failure of the heart's action and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 October 1885
PLYMOUTH - Falling over a flight of stairs at 2 Hicks's-lane, Plymouth, on Saturday night, ELLEN ELMES, 65, received such injuries to her head as to cause immediate death. An Inquest was held yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at which it was stated that there was a hole in the flooring of the landing at the head of the stairs. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Coroner signifying his intention of writing to the landlord of the house, requesting him to have the stairs repaired.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 October 1885
IDEFORD - Singular Death Of A Schoolboy. - Mr T. Edmonds, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon, at the Royal George Inn, Ideford, touching the death of CHARLES ERNEST MADDICOTT, aged 3 years and 10 months, the son of HENRY MADDICOTT, millwright. The boy went to school on Monday morning last, and, together with four others of his own age, was rapped on the hand by the master, Mr T. Brayfield, for misbehaviour. On returning home to dinner he complained of pains in his stomach and suffered from convulsions. When Dr Watson, of Chudleigh, arrived, the child was in a semi-conscious condition and died the next morning. The case excited so much attention in the village that the Coroner directed a post-mortem examination to be made, but the result proved that death was caused by an effusion of blood on the left side of the brain. Dr Watson admitted that it was possible that the effusion might have been caused by a blow, but in the opinion of his colleagues and himself the more reasonable supposition was that it had arisen through the bursting of a blood vessel during the convulsions. There were slight bruises on the left ear, but they did not communicate with the brain. - Mr T. W. Windeatt, solicitor, of Totnes, who represented the Teign and Dart School Teachers' Association, of Mr T. Brayfield, the schoolmaster, is a member, contended that the Jury could not from the evidence connect the use of the cane on deceased with the cause of death. After a short discussion, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 October 1885
TORQUAY - Fatal Cliff Accident At Babbacombe. - A verdict of Accidental Death was returned yesterday at the Inquest held at the Crown and Sceptre Inn, St. Mary Church, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of CHARLES RICHARD ADAMS, jeweller, aged 37, who died in the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, on Friday, from injuries sustained by falling over a cliff on Babbacombe Down on Wednesday afternoon last. The evidence shewed that deceased visited the Down with the intention of witnessing a shooting match at the Wall's-hill range between Torquay and Dawlish rifle volunteers, he being acquainted with one of the Dawlish team. He lay down on the edge of the cliff overlooking the quarry, and whilst doing so he spoke to Richard Henry Bird, a carter, who was underneath. The latter advised deceased to go back, or he would fall over. In reply, deceased said Bird could not lift a certain stone, and he offered to come down and help him. Bird again warned deceased to go back, but he did not do so; and the ground being very slippery owing to the rain, deceased fell over. He pitched on his head on a ledge of rock some way down, and then rolled to the bottom, falling altogether a distance of about 80 feet. He was removed in an unconscious state to the engine-house of the quarry, having a severe cut over the eye. He was subsequently conveyed to the Torbay Hospital, where Dr Heath, the house surgeon, found him suffering from concussion of the brain and injuries to the abdominal organs. The cause of death was peritonitis.

THURLESTONE - A Coroner's Inquiry as to the death by hanging of MR HENRY SQUARE, of Thurlestone, farmer, as already reported in the Western Morning News, was held by Mr Edmonds, Deputy Coroner, on Friday evening. Evidence was to the effect that deceased had suffered from intense pains in the head, and that he had said to a domestic that his troubles were greater than he could bear. No one, however, knew of his being in difficulty or perplexity of any kind. A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 October 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Orange Peel Danger. Fatal Results Of A Fall. - Details of a very sad description were elicited at an Inquest held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) yesterday, relative to the death of a young woman named DOROTHY PARTRIDGE, who died suddenly of heart disease on the previous day. - MRS EMMA PARTRIDGE, mother of the deceased, said her daughter, who was about 20 years of age, and lived with her at 3 Victoria-lane, had for six years been greatly deformed in the back, the result of a fall through stepping on a piece of orange peel in the street. She was taken to the Hospital at the time, and everything that medical skill could do to effect a cure was done, but unavailingly. Deceased's sufferings since the accident had been beyond description, and latterly she had been afflicted with disease of the heart. Witness saw her alive for the last time at about a quarter to seven on Tuesday morning, when she took a piece of bread and butter to her in bed, before leaving to go to work. About eleven o'clock she was called home, and when she arrived she found her daughter dead. - Jane Rowling, an elderly woman, said she went to MRS PARTRIDGE'S house a little before eleven on Tuesday and found the deceased lying on her face by the side of the fender, dead. - P.C. Prouse having also given evidence, Mr Eyeley, surgeon, said he had no doubt the cause of death was disease of the heart, but he was equally convinced that the disease of the heart and other ailments were the result of the fall deceased had about six years since. From that time to the present he had attended her at intervals. - The Coroner said he had no doubt the Jury would agree that the immediate cause of death was heart disease, and that indirectly death resulted from a simple fall in the street as described. This was another warning to the public to be careful in throwing things - especially orange-peel - on the pavements. He could not help remarking that many Plymothians were particularly careless in this respect. Ample evidence of this was supplied by the state of the streets, especially those near the market. Here they had the life of a strong, healthy girl at 13 or 14 years rendered miserable and eventually destroyed by the carelessness of thoughtless people; and in addition to the great sufferings of six years' affliction borne by the deceased, the trouble and expense that had thereby been brought upon her parents were more than could be estimated. He hoped the Press would take special notice of the case. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr E. Doherty), in announcing the verdict of "Death from Natural Causes", expressed an opinion, which was unanimously concurred in by the Jury, that the attention of the chief constable should be called to the fact of the wholesale distribution in some of the streets of rubbish which endangered the safety of the public, and that he should e asked to take some measures to assist in remedying this state of things. - The Coroner thought that not only those who threw orange-peel in the streets, but greengrocers and others who were often very careless in this way, should be severely punished for every such offence.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 October 1885
PLYMOUTH - Found Drowned At Plymouth. - An Open Verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned by a Jury sitting at Plymouth Guildhall last night for the purpose of Inquiring into the death of MARY EASTCOTT, aged 45, who had been staying with her sister at Boon's-place, Plymouth. Deceased left the house about four o'clock on Wednesday afternoon to visit her aunt but never reached there, and was found at nine the next morning floating in the Lady's Bathing Place, dead. Deceased's sister, Mrs Buchan, said that deceased had been very depressed ever since her mother died, about fifteen months since, from which time deceased had worn her mother's two rings every day. She also had a purse which they could not find in her room, and they supposed she must have taken it with her. Her aunt lived at North-road, a long distance from the Hoe. A labourer named Cosh deposed to seeing the body floating and calling the Hoe Constable, who, with the assistance of Mr Ridge, the keeper of the Smeaton Tower, brought the body ashore and searched it. They found nothing not even a pocket-handkerchief. The marks of the two rings on her finger were quite distinguishable, as though they had only recently been taken off, but the rings themselves were nowhere to be seen. Mr Brian, Coroner, drew attention to this and also to the fact that a young girl bathing there about an hour previously had seen deceased's hat floating, but not the body, while at nine the body was floating - a very noticeable circumstance.

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 October 1885
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Suicide At Plymouth. - A sad case of suicide was inquired into at Plymouth yesterday by Mr Coroner Brian, deceased being JOHN OXENHAM, 68, of 19 Morley-lane. - Elizabeth Adams, 35 Notte-street, daughter of deceased, said she had not seen her father for over six weeks. He was a forage dealer, and had in his time been a man of intemperate habits. Latterly he had been in difficult circumstances. The day she saw him he was in great distress, but witness told him she was unable to help him. His sister committed suicide a great many years ago, and his nephew hanged himself at Tavistock a few years since. In the latter case a verdict of suicide whilst temporarily insane was returned. - By the Foreman (Mr Stanbury): None of the family had suffered from insanity. His mind was not affected after drinking. - Sophia Eva, of 19 Morley-lane, said that OXENHAM had lived in that house about two years. She saw him last on Wednesday when he took some water into his room. He had been depressed and melancholy a long time, saying he felt ill. He was often in want. No one was ever in his room but his landlady, nor would he allow any other person to enter, things having to be passed through the window. He used to go to work at four in the morning, but had not for some time. The half-crown he had recently obtained from the parish went in rent. When he was washing his trousers three weeks before, witness said "You are too old for that," to which he made answer that he was afraid he should have to go into the Workhouse. - Albert Lee, 25 Well-street, said he called at deceased's house on Wednesday morning to give him some work from his master, Mr Dymond. Getting no response when he knocked, he opened the door, and saw OXENHAM in his shirt, with a sheet partly round him, lying on the floor, his feet under the bed, and his head upon his partly out-stretched arm. There was a quantity of blood on the floor. He had a fearful cut, extending from side to side of his neck, all the main arteries being severed. - P.C. Tabb said he last saw deceased on Sunday. He had been low for months, and out of work, not being, in fact, able to do anything. Several times witness had seen him crying, saying he would have to go to the Workhouse, of which he appeared to have great dread. He was called in on Wednesday, and now produced a long table-knife, without a handle, covered with blood. It had evidently been recently sharpened on a stone. A purse containing 6s. 3d. was also found, and an unfinished letter, dated from the Bedford Spirit Vaults, Old Town-street, September 10th, addressed to his son, 65 Chepstowe-place, Bayswater, London. In the course of it deceased said: - " I am in the greatest distress - a poor, worn-out old man. Days won't be long in this world. My troubles are more than I can bear. I have no creature to speak to. I am wretched as the grave. I hope the Lord will receive my Soul before long. Nothing but trouble in this world since I saw you last. It is my own fault, because I did not act rightly with you or you had never left me. I never see George, Kate, or Jessie, or Lizzie; I never go near. My dear son, pray for me and I will pray for you." - Robert J. Nicholson, relieving officer, said OXENHAM applied for relief on August 17th and received 2s. 6d. for eight weeks, thirteen weeks' relief being ordered by the Board. On Thursday week he had his last money, when he wanted to know how much had been paid him, as his son in London wanted to refund it and help him. He was told the amount. Witness said nothing about withdrawing his weekly money, and had he come last Thursday he would have received it as usual. He was in low spirits at the time. That day witness had received a postal order for 20s. from the son. - After a long hearing and a thorough investigation of the Jury, a verdict of "Suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 November 1885
NEWTON ABBOT - "Death from Apoplexy" was the verdict of a Jury which sat yesterday at Newton to investigate the cause of death of JOSEPH DRURY, a printer, who died suddenly on Saturday morning. Deceased was 42 years of age.

TIVERTON - Concealment Of Birth At Tiverton. - MARY SANDERS, 16, on bail, pleaded guilty to concealing the birth of her newly-born child, at Tiverton, on the 12th October. Mr H. Clark, who prosecuted said there were no marks of violence on the child's body, and the verdict of the Coroner's Jury was that of death from Natural Causes. His Lordship said the prisoner had done well to plead guilty. There was no evidence that she had done anything cruel to the child, although that did not entirely excuse her for her conduct. She would be kept in prison for one week, without hard labour.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 November 1885
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, yesterday, relative to the death of a railway porter named WYATT, who met with an accident at St. David's Station on Wednesday and died on Monday last. The evidence shewed that on Wednesday night deceased was assisting to unload a wagon at the cattle pens when he was knocked down by the doors of a van and dragged for a considerable distance. Deceased was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital where it was found that he had fractured his ribs. He died on Monday of congestion of the lungs, brought on by the injuries he had received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 November 1885
PLYMOUTH - Drowned In Sutton Harbour. - The death by drowning of JOHN LEGG, was Inquired into by Mr Coroner Brian, at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, yesterday. Samuel Pike, refreshment-house keeper, 64 Treville-street, Plymouth, said deceased was a sawyer by trade, but generally worked as a general labourer. He was 55 years of age. Witness last saw him in a public-house on Saturday night. he had been witness's lodger, but the neighbours complained of his filthy habits, and at last witness gave him notice to quit. He was accustomed to drink heavily, and at times would do this for a month together, when witness had difficulty in obtaining his rent. Deceased had been out of regular work for six weeks. When witness gave deceased notice he said "Something bad will come of me," and witness advised him to get some work. - Mr H. Cook said he saw deceased in Exeter-street on Tuesday at dinner time, and, in reply to a question, told him his (witness's) father had got work to which deceased said, "That's a good job." He was never in his proper senses when in drink. He would not answer as to where he was living at that time. - P.C. Setter deposed to seeing the body standing upright - apparently in the mud - on Thursday morning at 10.30 about ten feet from the edge of the North Quay, Barbican. The face was outwards. On the body being taken out it was found to be quite stiff. There was no shirt on it and the pockets were empty. Considering there was no proof as to how deceased got into the water, the Jury considered it their safest course to simply return a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 November 1885
PLYMPTON - An Inquest was opened at Underwood, Plympton, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, as to the death of ERNEST WILLIAM WILLS, an illegitimate child, about a month old, who was put out to nurse in the village on Thursday last, and died on Sunday. As the parentage of the child was unknown, and it was much emaciated, a post-mortem examination was held by Messrs. Stamp and Griffin at the Coroner's request. The evidence satisfied the Jury that the child had been well cared for at Underwood, but Dr Stamp having found a large bruise of some days' standing on the side of the head, the Jury were anxious to investigate the cause of this. The mother of the child, who gave her name of MISS WILLS, did not appear, and after this fact had been strongly commented upon the Inquiry was adjourned for her attendance.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 November 1885
PLYMOUTH - ROBERT SMITH was working as a fish packer for Mr Toms, on the Barbican at Plymouth, yesterday, when he suddenly, without a word, fell back dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, at an Inquest subsequently held, it being shewn that deceased was subject to heart disease.

NEWTON ABBOT - On Tuesday an Inquest was held by Mr Hacker, at Newton, relative to the death of MARY TULLY SHAPLEY, (youngest daughter of the late MR S. R. SHAPLEY) who was 35 years of age, and resided in Queen-street. Evidence shewed that deceased had always been of weak intellect and on Tuesday morning was found by the servant in bed with her throat cut. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide during Temporary Insanity.

YELVERTON - Shocking Accident On The Railway At Yelverton. - An accident resulting in fatal consequences occurred on Tuesday evening to a resident of Plymouth named GEORGE HEARD, a naval pensioner, who kept the Grand Duchess, beershop, 35 Gibbon-street. As far as can be ascertained the facts of the case are as follows:- Yesterday morning a labourer named Spiller, employed on the railway line, near Yelverton, four stations from Plymouth, whilst proceeding to his work suddenly came upon the body of a man by the side of the line. Life was quite extinct. The left foot was found cut completely off just above the ankle. The right boot was off and the stocking nearly so, whilst scattered about were small pieces of bone, flesh and clothing. The body was lying on the left side with the left arm underneath, and the right arm was raised from the side, the clenched fist pointing in the direction of the head, which was battered considerably, the skull being broken in at the top. Assistance was procured, and the body was taken to the Yelverton Station, there to await the arrival of Mr R. R. Rodd, the Coroner. It appears that deceased, who was 67 years of age, had on a former occasion left Plymouth for Clearbrook, and, with a friend had, after passing Yelverton, traversed a path leading high above the line and descending to it again near a spot where on the opposite side a number of steps lead to the main road to the village. On that occasion he went with the intention of buying a field of turnips, and a similar errand called him away on Tuesday afternoon, at half-past one. He booked by the train leaving North-road at 1.55, and arriving at Yelverton 2.22. Having visited the farmer he wished to see - Mr Hutchins, Maybor Farm - and transacted his business, deceased left him at a quarter to six. Mr Hutchins offered to go with him to the station, 1 ¼ miles distant, or to send someone with him, but deceased refused, saying he "knew the way all right." The night was dark and cold and a misty rain was falling. It is supposed that having crossed the line, he ascended the path to a certain spot where he should have crossed a stile and followed the path on the opposite side of a fence, but, either not seeing the stile, or wishing to attempt a rather more expeditious but even in broad daylight very unsafe track, he went another way. He was now about a quarter of a mile from the station, and within sight of it in daytime. Seeing the signal light he presumably made for it in the darkness, but keeping too much to the lower side reached the edge of the treacherous decline, fell. The rock shelves out a good distance, and a few feet from the top is now noticeable a quantity of loose stones and earth, as though a fruitless attempt to prevent a sudden descent had been made. Evidently deceased fell on his head, his feet or foot lying across the rail. The fall, taking into account the slope and the jagged nature of the rock, would be about fifty feet, sufficient to cause death. Where deceased was lying the rail is but six feet from the side and is a single one, the particular cutting being rather exceptionally narrow. Deceased had intended to leave Yelverton by the 7.13 Great Western train, and it would seem that a train, in passing, severed deceased's foot, carried him 28 feet, and then threw him over against the rock where he was found, by the side of the line. His watch had stopped at 8.30, the glass was smashed, and the rim which contained it, twisted, but no further damage was done to it. On Mr Rodd arriving to hold an Inquest Mr John Job was selected as Foreman of a Jury, and John Nott, of 16 Adelaide-street, Stonehouse, naval pensioner, brother-in-law of deceased, formally identified the body. The Inquest was then adjourned to Tuesday next at the Rock Hotel, Horrabridge, in order that Dr Liddell, of Horrabridge, might examine the body and say whether deceased was killed by the fall, or only stunned, and afterwards killed by the train.

Western Morning News, Monday 16 November 1885
A farm labourer named WILLIAM PUDNER, in the employ of Mr V[?] of Thorndon Farm, Sourton, had charge of a pair of horses and a cart a few days since, and it is thought that in attempting to alight from the cart he fell in front of the wheels, which passed over his body. When he was picked up it was found that his legs were fractured and that he had sustained other serious injuries from which soon afterwards died. An Inquest was held on Saturday before Mr Coroner Fulford, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

KINGSTEIGNTON - "That the deceased Drowned himself, but being under the influence of drink at the time, was not responsible for his actions," was the verdict of the Jury at an inquest held on Saturday at Kingsteignton before Mr Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of GEORGE WITHYCOMBE. Deceased, who was sixty years of age, was found drowned in the new canal on Thursday night, and the evidence shewed that he had been drinking heavily on that day. After he had left the public-house his hat, coat and waistcoat were found on the bank of the canal and his body was discovered later in the evening in the canal.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 November 1885
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Shocking Accident On The Railway At Yelverton. Resumed Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday concluded the Inquest relative to the death of GEORGE HEARD, on the Tavistock Railway, last Tuesday evening, the circumstances of which have been already reported in the Western Morning News. Deceased kept the Grand Duchess, 34 Gibbon-street, and was a flautist whose services were in much demand. The Inquiry was held at the Rock Hotel, Horrabridge, Mr J. Job, Buckland Monachorum, being the Foreman of the Jury. - John S. Liddell, surgeon, of Horrabridge, who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, described it as having received the following injuries. Extensive scalp wound of the size of the palm of the hand, over the right side of the head and the left ear, laying bare the scalp, which was marked. There was bruising of the right eye and eyelids, fracture of the upper jaw and right side of the face, a loosening of the back teeth, and a bruising of the right side of the face. The left collar bone was fractured, as also were six upper ribs on the left side and two upper ribs on the right side. The left upper arm had sustained a compound fracture; the right wrist was dislocated backwards, and the left foot and ankle completely severed. The right leg was deeply cut and the boot torn off the right foot. The right hand was rigidly bent and clenched towards the head, the fingers being smeared with black grease. The tongue was bitten through by the front teeth. On removing the top of the skull there was found no fracture, but on the right side the brain was bruised over the part corresponding with the scalp wound, but there was no clot or intrusion of blood on any part of the brain. Blood was effused into the tissues of the neck and upper part of the chest. The heart was healthy, the chest full of blood and the lungs were wounded by the fourth rib, which had been driven in. No wound or injury caused by the fall would, in all probability be sufficient to account for death, except that on the brain, which would not have caused instantaneous death, but would be sufficient to cause insensibility. The train went over the deceased, but he could not possibly swear to death being caused by the train. He thought, however, that HEARD might have had an amount of sensibility about him as the train went over him. The clenched hand led to that conclusion. - Mr Hutchings, Maybor Farm, Clearbrook, said he had known deceased for three weeks, and when he had gone along the path before he had been accompanied by a friend. He left witness's house for Yelverton at 5.30 on Tuesday. - Walter Crossman, miner, deposed that at ten minutes past six on the previous Tuesday evening, it being quite dark, he had answered HEARD'S knock at his door, and, in response to inquiry, directed him to the steps leading to the line, over which he must pass to the heights beyond The steps were 250 yards from his house, and deceased knew he had to cross the stile. - Albert Spiller, labourer on the line, said he was going down towards Bickleigh to fetch a trolly on Wednesday morning, and at about ten minutes past six he saw something lying by the side of the line. Thinking it was a brick cover, he put out his hand to throw it from the rail, and found what he saw to be the body of deceased lying two feet from the side of the line, on the right hand going down. Coming back with the trolly, he found deceased's hat outside the rail, and the boot with the foot inside it about thirty feet off. He then saw deceased's umbrella on the rock six feet up in a direct line with the position in which the boot was found. - Inspector J. Chamberlain, who watched the case on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company, in reply to a question, said that about a hundred persons daily went over the crossing to the path on the bank. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed by a Train whilst lying on the rail, having fallen from the bank above." They recommended that a fence should be placed on the edge of the bank to prevent such accidents in future. MR HEARD leaves a widow, but no children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 November 1885
BICKLEIGH (NEAR PLYMOUTH) - The Accident On The Tavistock Railway. The Inquest. - The Coroner's Inquiry as to the death of JOHN MILFORD, driver of the engine which fell over the embankment near Yelverton on Wednesday evening last, was opened at the Stationmaster's house, Bickleigh, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, conducted the proceedings. On behalf of the Great Western and the South-Western Railway Companies the following gentlemen were present:- Mr G. Burnison, superintendent Great Western Railway, Paddington; Mr Compton, Plymouth; Mr E. G. Bennett, Plymouth; Mr Margery, Plymouth district engineer; Mr G. T. White, Exeter; Mr Fisher, Exeter, district engineer; and Mr J. J. E. Venning, Solicitor, Devonport. Mr Walter King of Bickleigh was chosen Foreman. - The Coroner briefly narrated the facts of the case, and stated that he would adjourn the Court until he ad communicated with the Board of trade for one of their inspectors to be present. The body was then viewed. Deceased was already coffined and the principal injury observable was a large wound over the right eye, nearest the nose. The Coroner stated he understood that the keeping of the line in order devolved upon the Great Western Railway Company for both itself and the South-Western Company. - Mr George Summervill, draper, of Ilfracombe, deposed to being the brother-in-law of MILFORD, and identified his body. He supposed him to be about 35 years of age. The Inquest was then adjourned until Tuesday fortnight, December 8th, at eleven in the forenoon. It is hoped by that time the stoker will have quite recovered and be able to give evidence. The body of MILFORD will be taken to Exeter for interment.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 November 1885
EXETER - A Fatal Advertisement At Exeter. - Mr Hooper, the Coroner for the City of Exeter, held an Inquiry yesterday relative to the death of JOHN LITTLEJOHN, 67, whose decease occurred last week from the effects of injuries received on the 11th inst. Mr W. L. Brown, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the family of the deceased. - Mr Trelease stated that on the evening of the 11th November he was in St. Sidwell's, near St. Sidwell's Church. A band of music, followed by an illuminated advertisement and a large crowd, was coming down the street. The advertisement and the band frightened a horse which was drawing a van, and the deceased was knocked down, the wheels of the van passing over his body and a portion of his head. Deceased was conveyed into a chemist's shop, where his wounds were dressed, and he was then taken home in a cab. A policeman stopped the horse, and witness thought that great credit was due to the officer for the manner in which he acted. - In answer to Mr Brown, witness said the horse was undoubtedly frightened by the advertisement. - P.C. Vickery having corroborated as to the accident, proceeded to explain the advertisement. He said it consisted of a wood frame covered with white canvas, on which was printed in large black letters the advertisements relating to an Exeter clothing establishment. The whole affair was 9 feet long, 5 feet wide, and about 6 feet high, and it was lighted up inside. It was preceded by a band of music, and several hundred persons were following in the rear. It was enough to frighten any horse. - In answer to Mr Brown, witness said a bye-law was in force which stated that no procession should pass through the City without notice being given twenty-four hours previously to the chief constable. He did not know if that notice would apply to such a procession as the one in question. That bye-law was passed in consequence of a fatal accident which occurred in Exeter about three years ago, while a wild beast show was parading the streets. Witness did not think that deceased was crossing the street when the accident happened, but that he must have stepped off the pavement to allow someone to pass. - Edward W. Mole, carrier, Heavitree, said he was the driver of a spring van on the evening in question. When near St. Sidwell's Church he noticed a band and a large illuminated advertisement coming down the street. He told his boy to get out and walk by the side of the horse, but before the lad had time to do so the horse became restive and the procession came up. Witness shouted out to the people to get out of the way and he almost immediately afterwards saw deceased at the horse's head. That also frightened the horse, which by this time was unmanageable. Deceased was knocked down and the wheels went over him. The horse had passed bands of music and steam rollers before but had only shewn a little uneasiness and had never become unmanageable. - By Mr Brown: The fact that his horse had passed a steam roller was no reason why it should not get frightened at the advertisement in question. He had been in the shop of the proprietor of the advertisement nearly every day since the accident, but nothing had been said on either side about the affair. - Mr Perkins, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased at his residence in Commercial-road on the evening of the 11th inst. Deceased was in bed, and was suffering from a lacerated wound over the right eyebrow, scratched nose and mouth on the right side, three broken ribs on the right side, and a small wound on the right shin. Deceased was very exhausted and was suffering from a great shock to the system. Death resulted from the injuries received. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said it was most desirable that rules should be passed by the Town Council to regulate such processions. It is also desirable that such a practice of advertising should be put a stop to, and processions which were likely to cause accidents should not be allowed to parade the streets. No doubt the great competition of the present day rendered it necessary for a tradesman to keep his wares constantly before the public, but nothing could be allowed which would be in any wise detrimental to the safety and interest of the public. This sad case should be a severe warning, and rules should be promulgated to prevent the possibility of a repetition. - A Juryman stated that he saw two children narrowly escape injuries on the same evening in consequence of this advertisement procession. - The Jury having consulted together, the Foreman said they were of opinion their verdict should be "Accidental Death," but they were strongly of opinion that the illuminated advertisement was the cause of the accident, and a bye-law should be at once passed to prohibit such exhibitions. - The Coroner said he would bring the recommendation of the Jury to the notice of the proper authorities.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 November 1885
EXETER - Mr H. W. Hooper, the Coroner for Exeter held an Inquiry yesterday relative to the decease of WILLIAM COULMOUR, who met with his death by injuries received from a fall from a tree whilst at work on Lady Hotham's grounds, Saint David's, on Monday last. Deceased was engaged in removing some dead branches when the limb on which he was seated gave way, and he fell to the ground, a distance of nearly sixty feet. The medical evidence was to the effect that deceased died of concussion of the brain, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 November 1885
EXETER HEAVITREE - The Deputy Coroner for Exeter held an Inquest at Heavitree yesterday relative to the death of MR WM. POLLARD, who died suddenly in Matford-lane on Monday. The deceased was a town councillor, and carried on business in North-street as a printer. Evidence shewed that deceased was taken ill whilst out for a walk on Monday evening and expired before medical assistance could be obtained. The medical evidence was to the effect that deceased died from heart disease and excitement, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SOUTH HUISH - An Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker yesterday at Galmpton on the body of RICHARD BROWN, 22, labourer, who was found dead on the railway at Churston Bridge on Tuesday morning, as reported in the Western Morning News. It came out in evidence that the deceased had threatened the same evening to put his head on the metals and let the train pass over him. The medical testimony of Dr Searle was to the effect that the deceased had recently suffered from sunstroke and was very excitable. He considered that he was not responsible for his actions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 November 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES LOVE, 16, of H.M.S. Impregnable. Evidence was given shewing that a fortnight ago deceased, in company with another lad, was carrying a tub of boiling water down a ladder when he slipped and was badly scalded about the arms and lower part of the body. When picked up he was insensible, and was subsequently taken to the Hospital. Medical evidence shewed that deceased was much injured, but that the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, accelerated by the scalds. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 December 1885
PLYMOUTH - Inquest at Plymouth. A Surgeon Charged With Neglect Of Duty. - Mr W. Harrison, Plymouth Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT WESTGATE, boatswain, on board the steamship Porthia, who died while being taken to the Hospital from the Barbican on Saturday. More than usual interest attached to the proceedings in consequence of a rumour that proper provision had not been provided by the ship for taking the deceased to the Hospital immediately on the arrival of the ship in port. Evidence was given by Frank Lambert, seaman on board the Porthia, that they on the Thursday previous started from London to Plymouth to take emigrants to Sydney, New South Wales. They were examined by Dr Finley before they started, and that gentleman gave a certificate shewing that the crew were in sufficiently good health to proceed on the voyage, the deceased's name being among the number mentioned. Deceased worked on all right until Friday, when he complained of being ill and went to his berth. On their arrival at Plymouth on Saturday deceased was, on the authority of the surgeon, taken to the Hospital. From subsequent evidence, however, it came out that deceased was taken ashore in a launch and then on an ambulance to the Hospital, but from the time of the arrival of the launch at the Barbican until deceased reached the Hospital about two and a half hours had elapsed, and it was this that was complained of by those who witnessed the proceedings. The question was also raised as to whether the ambulance, when it was brought, was properly supplied with warm covering and clothing suitable for a man in a dying state. This question was, however, satisfactorily answered by the evidence of P.C. Sheppeard, but none of the witnesses could reasonably account for the loss of time before conveying the sufferer to the Hospital, and in the verdict the Jury, of whom Mr John Martin was Foreman, freely censured all who had anything to do with the affair. There were many witnesses, and the case was thoroughly investigated by Mr. Harrison, occupying about two hours. Eventually, on the authority of Mr Buchan, the house surgeon, who had performed a post-mortem on the deceased, death was decided by the Jury to have resulted from pleurisy and acute inflammation. He added that it was his opinion deceased had been suffering from the disease for at least a week, and had he been attended to several days before his life might have been preserved. But he did not hesitate to say that, although deceased might have lived a little longer if he had been brought to the Hospital as soon as he arrived at the Barbican, yet he must have eventually, and before long, succumbed to his ailment. Questioned by the Foreman of the Jury, Lambert said he was with the rest examined by Dr Finley before they started, but the extent of the examination to any of them was a look at his vaccination mark. Upon this point the Jury commented strongly, attaching much blame to the medical officer (Mr Finley) for not carrying out his duties in a more thorough manner. Had he done this they had no doubt the deceased would have been alive then. The reason Lambert was the only witness from the Porthia was because the ship had already started from Plymouth on her voyage to Sydney.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 December 1885
TORQUAY - Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Townhall, Torquay, last night, on JAMES UPHAM, aged seventy-four, who died from taking carbolic acid on Tuesday last. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased poisoned himself while in an Unsound State of Mind.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 December 1885
TIVERTON - Fatal Lamp Accident. - The Tiverton Borough Coroner (Dr Mackenzie) last evening held an Inquest on the body of the infant daughter of a labourer named THOMAS GALE, who was burned to death on the previous night. The evidence of the mother shewed that she left deceased on the floor and a minute afterwards, when she returned, another child, 2 ½ years old, had apparently taken a paraffin lamp from the table, and thrown it down by or on his sister, causing injuries which terminated fatally shortly afterwards. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Coroner expressing regret that a rider could not be added warning people against these paraffin lamps.

ST MARYCHURCH - Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Roughwood Inn, Babbacombe, on the body of ROBERT THOMAS, fish hawker, aged 37, who was found dead in bed on Tuesday morning last. Deceased had been an out-patient of the Torbay Hospital, suffering from ulcers on his head and legs. The evidence of Dr Heath the house surgeon of the institution, went to shew that the cause of death was apoplexy and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 December 1885
CHIVELSTONE - An Inquest was held at East Prawle on Saturday on the body of an old man, named JOSEPH PARTRIDGE, 73 years of age, a native of East Portlemouth, who was found in a running stream in the village of East Prawle, on Wednesday evening. It appears deceased left his home on the morning of Wednesday and proceeded to Chivelstone, where he recorded his vote for the election of a member of Parliament for the Totnes Division. Having done so, he with others, instead of returning home, went on to Prawle, and was last seen in the Providence Inn in that village. Evidence was given shewing deceased was very excited all the day, and he was found in the evening in the manner described, his head being completely under water, although the stream was very shallow. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was given.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 December 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Singular Death At The Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, at the Plymouth Workhouse, relative to the death of WILLIAM HENRY FOOTE, a patient in the imbecile ward, who died suddenly on Saturday evening. Mr Martin was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Mr E. G. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, said deceased was admitted on October 21st. He stated that his age was 57 and that his occupation was that of a mason. He was placed in the Hospital, and on November 25th was passed into the imbecile ward. On Saturday afternoon last witness was called to the recreation-room of that ward and there found deceased lying on his back. Mr Green, the attendant of the ward, and an imbecile named Blake were attending to him. Deceased was placed in his bed and Mr Square was sent for to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Deceased had expired before the doctor arrived. Brandy was administered previous to death. - James Green, attendant in the imbecile ward, stated that for the past two or three days deceased had been looking pale and was quiet. On Saturday afternoon he went into the closet to make some repairs. Whilst there he heard a scuffle. On going out an inmate called Rose said that another inmate named Blake was serving deceased badly. Roose and Blake were then standing at opposite ends of the ward. Roose said that Blake had knocked deceased down and knelt upon him. Deceased was found in the Recreation Shed with several inmates around him. On being asked what was the matter, he replied, "I forgive him; I was chattering." He said nothing as to Blake knocking him down. - Richard Roose, an inmate of the Imbecile Ward, stated that all the imbeciles were on very good terms with each other. On Saturday afternoon he saw Blake take hold of deceased and throw him on his back. He knelt on him twice. Deceased did not say anything. - The Coroner here called Blake. Dr Thomas told him that he would be examining a lunatic, and after some consideration Mr Brian decided that it would not be advisable to put him on his oath. - Dr F. A. Thomas, medical officer of the Workhouse, said that he first had deceased under his care on October 21st, when he sent him into the Hospital. He was suffering from a diseased brain, general paralysis, and heart disease. From reports he received from the nurse and inmates of the Hospital about the man's general conduct, he considered it necessary to send him into the Asylum on November 25th. Since he had been there he had behaved himself fairly well, but was gradually weakening. There were indications that the brain was losing its nervous force. He anticipated deceased would have died suddenly and that any nervous shock, or fright, or fall, would accelerate death. He (witness) saw deceased about two hours after he had died. There were no marks of violence on the body. His opinion as to the cause of death, bearing in mind Roose's evidence, was that deceased had died from disease of the brain and heart. Dr Thomas said that he had nothing to add to this evidence. - In reply to the Coroner, he said he did not consider a post-mortem examination necessary. - The Foreman: Do you consider that by being thrown down and knelt upon it did not hasten deceased's death? - Dr Thomas: If it were true that he was thrown down and knelt upon, I consider it might have accelerated his death. I do not say it did. - Mr William Square, surgeon, said that on Saturday he saw deceased about 12.20 p.m. He was in bed, and had evidently only just died. On making a careful external examination, he found no marks of violence. He questioned Blake, who said that deceased had begun "taking," and he tried to put him out of the ward, and in doing so he threw him down. He said he was very sorry for it. From the conversation he had with Blake he did not think that he was responsible for his actions. Witness's opinion was that deceased died of softening of the brain, of which he had been suffering for some time. He considered his rushing into the open air was from a want of sufficient air to breathe. Haemorrhage from the softening of the brain was the cause of death. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt deceased was suffering from disease of the brain, and the only wonder was that he lived so long under the circumstances. The officials of the Workhouse had done all that possible for them to do. The Master had acted with promptitude, as he had always done in cases of urgency. When the condition of deceased was reported to him, he sent for Dr Square, and administered restoratives. The Coroner pointed out that the Jury had only the statement of Roose to rely upon as regarded Blake causing the death of deceased. - The Jury, after half an hour's consideration, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner thanked the Jury for giving such patient attention to the Inquiry, which had lasted three hours and a half, and also expressed his gratification at seeing the Governor (Mr W. H Luke) and Messrs. R. Snow and W. Stidston, who were Guardians, present.

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by Mr Brian, Coroner, at Plymouth last evening to Inquire into the demise of EMMANUAL SWALES HANDFORD, 17, of 50 North-street. On the 14th ultimo deceased fell from a [?] in Martin Street, to the pavement below, a distance of [?] feet, hitting the back of his head. He went to his work as usual until the 30th, when Dr Greenway was called in. He gradually got worse and died on Saturday afternoon from inflammation of the brain.

EXETER - A fatal occurrence to a boy formed the subject of Inquiry by Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner of Exeter, yesterday. The deceased HENRY PAINTER, aged 13, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Saturday morning from injuries he received while at work at Stone Farm, Thorverton, on Friday. He was driving four horses in a threshing machine and in order to make one of them go faster he jumped off, when his coat caught in a cog wheel, and he was dragged into the machinery. The injuries thus received were of a shocking nature. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 December 1885
REVELSTOKE - At an Inquest held at Noss Mayor respecting the death of JAMES PENWILL, aged 57, naval pensioner, an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

BICKLEIGH (PLYMOUTH) - The Railway Accident Near Yelverton. The Adjourned Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday resumed at Bickleigh Station the Inquest on the body of JOHN MILFORD, engine driver, in the employ of the London and South-Western Railway Company, who was killed by an accident to a down passenger train between Yelverton and Bickleigh on November 18th. Major-General Hutchinson, Board of Trade Inspector, assisted the Coroner as assessor: Mr J. J. E. Venning, solicitor, of Devonport, was present in the interest of the London and South Western Railway Company; Mr J. Bennett, solicitor, Plymouth, on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company; and Mr J. D. Johnstone, solicitor, of Tavistock watched the proceedings for the relatives of the deceased. Some of the chief officials of both companies were also present, the London and South Western Railway Company being represented by Mr E. W. Verrinder, traffic superintendent; Mr G. T. White district superintendent; Mr B. J. Fisher, district engineer; Mr W. Adams engineer locomotive department, and Mr T. Higgs, chief of the running department; and the Great Western Railway Company by Mr Burlinson, deputy superintendent, Paddington; Mr C. E. Compton, district superintendent; Mr P. J. Margery, district engineer; Mr Simpson, superintendent locomotive department, Swindon; and Mr Luxmore, district locomotive superintendent. - Mr J. King was the Foreman of the Jury. - John Wills, fireman in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, stated that on Wednesday, November 18th he was fireman on the 4 p.m. train from Exeter to Devonport. At Yelverton the train was about a quarter of an hour late. They left the junction at about ten minutes past six. The driver, MILFORD, was perfectly sober and thoroughly competent in the discharge of his duties. Soon after leaving Yelverton the engine suddenly left the line, and the driver immediately applied the vacuum brake. The train was going at the rate of from 25 to 30 miles an hour. MILFORD did not speak to him. After leaving the rails the engine struck against the rock of the cutting on the right and bounded off across the line, falling over the embankment on the left hand side. Witness was thrown out and became insensible. - By the Jury: Did not detect any difference in the sound made by the engine after leaving Yelverton until it left the line. - By Mr Johnstone: At Okehampton the train was delayed from fifteen to twenty minutes waiting for the Holsworthy train. At Yelverton the deceased said to him "Mate, we are getting all behind, but we must not put our shoulder out, but jog down steady." By that expression MILFORD meant that they must not go too fast to make up for lost time. The driver and himself were paid according to the number of hours they worked. If they had made up time they would not in consequence be losers financially, because they had to work back to Exeter in the night. The engine was a six-wheel couple goods engine. It was customary for a goods engine to be attached to a passenger train. The difference between an ordinary goods engine and a passenger engine was that a passenger engine generally had a bogey in front, and the wheels were not all coupled together. He did not know whether an engine fitted with a bogey in front would take a curve easier than an engine without a bogey. Did not know the length of the wheel base of the engine. There were a great many curves on the line below Yelverton. - By General Hutchinson: He had been seven years in the service of the company, and three years a fireman. He had been working two years on and off on the line between Exeter and Plymouth. Had been a week or a fortnight with MILFORD, and the same time with the engine, which was numbered 442, and was a steady running engine. It was fitted with a steam and hand brake. The steam brake applied to the engine wheels and tender wheels, and the hand brake to the tender wheels only. The vacuum and steam brake were both applied by the same handle. When the handle was moved the vacuum brake would go on first, the steam brake going on almost instantly with it. After leaving Yelverton only a little steam was kept on, the train running down almost by itself. The tender hand brake was applied slightly before the accident to ease and steady the train down the gradient. The brake was just ribbing a little. No oscillation was felt on the engine before the wheels left the rails. he was on the left side of the engine and the driver on the right. The first intimation he had of anything going wrong was feeling the engine running on the longitudinals. The engine seemed to go off to the right. On feeling this, he saw the deceased at once apply the vacuum brake with full force. He thought there were about eighteen inches of vacuum at the time. the gauge shewed generally between eighteen and twenty inches. He did not feel much difference in the speed from the application of the brake, the distance being so short before the engine struck against the rock and went over the embankment. He did not feel the van break away from the train. There had been no increase of speed just before the accident, and he did not think it exceeded from twenty-five to thirty miles an hour. Could not say whether the driver closed the regulator when he applied the brake. He felt no sensation of the engine striking any obstacle before it left the rails. Did not remember whether or not it was moonlight, but it was not quite dark. Not a word passed between him and the driver after the engine left the rails. There was no conversation about speed or time after leaving Yelverton. He thought they had to pass a Great Western up train at Bickleigh. He did not remember having on previous journeys noticed any rough spot in the road at the place where the accident occurred. If it was stated that the vacuum brake was applied before the engine left the rails, it was a mistake. - By Mr Johnstone: The deceased took charge of the engine that day at Exeter at three o'clock. He did not know whether it had been previously employed that day. - By General Hutchinson: The driver and himself went on duty at three p.m. on the 18th, having left work between nine and ten p.m. on the previous night. - Alfred Edwards, guard in charge of the train, stated that the train left Yelverton junction at 6.9 p.m., thirteen minutes late. At the time of the accident the train was going about twenty-five miles an hour. As a rule, it went faster than that down the gradient from Yelverton, its usual speed being about thirty-five miles an hour. All went well until about a mile and a half from Yelverton, when he felt the van he was in off the rails. He caught hold of the brake wheel, and was then thrown down over the bank. he did not feel any oscillation or anything strike when the train left the rails. It left the rails very easily. After the accident he crawled out from the van and saw the deceased lying between the engine and the tender with a part of the hand rail across his neck. He was dead. - By Mr Johnstone: It was only by guess that he knew the speed at which the train was going. He did not know why the train was going slower than usual. Thirty-five miles an hour would not be an excessive speed over the curves on that line. He did not examine the line after the accident. - By General Hutchinson: Some little distance before the accident the vacuum gauge in his van shewed fifteen inches. The vacuum brake had been slightly rubbing after leaving Yelverton. That diminished the pressure in the gauge about three inches. The brake was applied to ease the train down the bank. He felt no sudden application of the brake after feeling the van was off the rails. After the accident he looked at his watch, which then indicated 6.12 p.m., shewing that the train had taken about three minutes coming from Yelverton. - How do you think that can agree with your idea of 25 miles an hour? - I don't think the speed could have been greater than that. - Why should you be going slower when you are late than the ordinary speed going down this bank? - I have no idea at all. - Your impression of the speed not being over twenty-five miles an hour was derived from what? - I judged the speed was slower than usual from the steadiness with which the train was running. I was afraid the driver was losing time. - Replying to further questions by General Hutchinson, witness said: The train had to pass a Great Western up train at Marsh Mills, and that train would be kept waiting if it was late. He had often run with MILFORD, and had always found him a regular and even driver, inclined to run more slowly down hill than up hill. He had never noticed anything wrong or rough in the road where the accident occurred. MILFORD had had the engine for two years. He had heard him praise it, but never complain of it. It was in the habit of running these passenger trains. - By Mr Johnstone: Had never had any complaint made to him about the speed of the train between Horrabridge and Bickleigh. - By General Hutchinson: The train was seventeen minutes late at Okehampton. They made up four minutes on the road - one between Bridestowe and Lidford, and they were allowed two minutes at Lidford and one at Mary Tavy, whilst they did not stop half a minute at either place. Three minutes were subsequently made up by station work and one minute running between Lidford and Tavistock. - James Thomas Paddock, sub-inspector of permanent way on the Great Western Railway, said he was in the train at the time of the accident, having got in at Tavistock. As they left the 6 ¼ post about 200 or 300 yards from where the engine left the rails, he felt the brake suddenly applied. He was sitting with his back to the engine, looking out of the window, leaning forward, when his back was brought sharply into contact with the compartment. The train went on some distance, the carriage vibrating as it went. He thought it was then on the line. Afterwards it bumped and came to a stop. - By Mr Johnstone: No portion of the railway within a quarter of a mile of the accident had been under repair lately. The gradient at the point where the accident occurred was 1 in 58. The radius of the curve was about 20 chains. - By General Hutchinson: Before the sudden check which threw him back against the compartment, he had not felt any gentle application of the brake. After the accident he did not go back to the spot where he felt this sudden check. He was quite clear that this sudden application of the brake took place 200 or 300 yards from where the engine left the rails. The speed was moderate, and had not been excessive in any time whilst he was in the train. He could not say what the speed was. He had ridden on the South Western six-wheel couple engines. They ran very stiff on the curves, and oscillated and were not steady. Going down an incline a person on the engine had to hold fast. He had not ridden on engine No. 442. - John Wotton, inspector of permanent way, stated that he came from Plymouth to Bickleigh by the breakdown train on the night of the 18th ult. After arriving on the spot where the accident occurred he took a lamp and inspected the rails. He found a mark on one of the rails shewing where the engine left the line. He went back some further distance towards Yelverton, but could find no other mark. The line had not been repaired recently. He could see no cause for the engine leaving the line. - By Mr Johnstone: The cant of the outer rail was about seven inches for the narrow gauge. That was a very good cant for a train going about forty miles an hour over that curve. For the broad gauge the cant was about eleven inches. After leaving the rails the engine ran about 140 yards before it turned over. - By General Hutchinson: There was nothing that he could find in his examination of the line to cause the driver to put on the brake. The cant of the line at the spot of the accident was what was used throughout his district, and was calculated for fifty miles an hour. The engine lay on the bank 14ft. from the edge. Nothing had been done to the spiking of the line after the accident before he saw it. - Frederick Meadway, district locomotive foreman, South Western Railway, Exeter, stated that he had examined the engine No. 442 since the accident. Everything appeared to have been in perfect working order previously to the accident. - By Mr Johnstone: The engine was thoroughly repaired in March last. It was not then weighed. There were six springs in the engine. He did not know whether the weight on those springs was equally distributed. The weight on each pair of wheels was about 13 tons. There would not be 2 cwts. difference in the weight on the springs. - By Mr Venning: The engine was examined every week by the shed foreman. It had been used for drawing passenger trains for three years. From what he saw of the engine after the accident every part appeared to be in good working order previously. - Mr William Adams, chief locomotive engineer of the South Western Railway, produced a diagram of the engine and a detailed account of the damage it sustained by the accident. Mr P. J. Margery, district engineer of the Great Western Railway, produced a plan of the line where the accident occurred. - Mr T. Higgs, chief of the running department of the South Western Railway, stated that the engine No. 442 was weighed in May. - By Mr Johnstone: If the weights were unequally distributed it would in some cases endanger the safety of the engine. - Mr Meadway, recalled, stated that he had not received any report from the driver or fireman of any defect to the engine. - Mr E. Anstey, accountant of Devonport, said he was a passenger by the train on the 18th of November from Horrabridge to Devonport, and rode in a third class compartment in the latter part of the train. After leaving Yelverton about four minutes, he felt a severe shock and the carriage appeared to roll from one side to the other. The train drew up with a sudden jerk. - By Mr Venning: The train was going at a moderate speed, certainly not more than 30 miles an hour. He felt the brake applied before the shock of the train leaving the rails. - By General Hutchinson: Just after the accident he looked at his watch, and found that it was four minutes after he left Yelverton. The train left Horrabridge station at 6.5. He did not look at his watch when the train left Yelverton. - Mr John Chamberlain, traffic inspector on the Tavistock and Launceston line, said he was a passenger by the train, which was going from twenty-five to thirty miles an hour. After leaving Yelverton about two minutes he noticed that the brake was on slightly, as if the driver were controlling the running down the bank. Three or four hundred yards further on the brake was applied suddenly and with great force. He thought the sudden application of the brake was before the engine left the line. The carriage then oscillated a little and jolted several times. He then felt that the wheels were off the rails and running on the ballast. After that the train stopped suddenly. - Mr Johnstone: In his opinion the vacuum brake was applied before the engine left the rails. He could not tell the object of that. - This concluded the evidence, and the Coroner, after retiring and conferring with General Hutchinson, briefly summed up, remarking that it was clear the only verdict the Jury could arrive at was one of accidental death. He regretted that the evidence given had failed to throw any light on the cause of the accident. It would have been more satisfactory if they could have found out the cause of the engine going off the line. But there was nobody to blame in the matter and that being so, all they could do was to say the deceased was killed accidentally. - The Jury thereupon returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 December 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - An adjourned Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Rodd at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, to Inquire into the death of HENRY SQUIRES, able seaman, of the Swiftsure. The deceased was killed on the 4th inst. by falling from aloft. The Inquiry was again adjourned for the attendance of the witnesses, who, owing to some misunderstanding, failed to appear.

IVYBRIDGE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Ivybridge yesterday relative to the sudden death of an illegitimate child named WILLIAM HENRY PROUT, who was found dead in bed on the morning of the 8th inst. Mr Randle, surgeon, gave evidence as to his visiting the child about two months since. He was then suffering from a hereditary disease from which witness thought it very doubtful he would recover. A verdict was returned to the effect that the child died from this disease.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 December 1885
PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Mr R. R. Rodd, the County Coroner, held an Inquest at Compton Gifford yesterday on the body of EDWIN HENRY THOMSON, 56, of 4 Ivy-cottages, who was speaking to a man at his door on the 9th inst., when he suddenly fell back dead. Mr Langford, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 December 1885
KINGSBRIDGE - Feeding with biscuit is regarded by Dr E. Elliot, of Kingsbridge, as the cause of the decease of an infant named EMILY WAKEHAM, the daughter of a cottager living near Coombe Farm, Kingsbridge. At an Inquest held by Mr Sidney Hacker, on Saturday, it transpired that the mother of the child found it dead in her arms on the morning of the 8th inst. Medical evidence was to the effect that undigested biscuit and not overlaying as was supposed, had produced suffocation. The Coroner remarked upon the danger of substituting biscuit for milk as infants' food, and said the possible result of such a course should be more widely known. Verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Scalding At Plymouth. - Inquiry was made by the Coroner for Plymouth at the Guildhall on Saturday evening into the circumstances connected with the death of JOSEPH CHAPPLE, the two-year-old son of JOHN CHAPPLE, warehouseman, living at 8 New-street. About six o'clock on the previous Tuesday evening MRS CHAPPLE, the mother of the deceased, was having her tea, and the deceased was playing about by himself, two other children being in the room. The teapot was placed on a table stand in front of the fire, and the child, in playing, tripping in the hearthrug, and fell against the teapot, which tipped the hot tea pouring over his back and scalding him. The little fellow screamed and his mother promptly took his off his clothes and applied some linseed oil to the scalded part. No medical aid was obtained , the parents not regarding the condition of the child as serious. On Friday morning, however, a marked change was noticed, and Dr Cash Reed was sent for, but the child died soon after his arrival. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Scalding" and exonerated the parents from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 December 1885
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fire At Plymouth. The Inquest. - The official Inquiry into the circumstances under which twelve lives were lost at the fire early on Sunday morning in Looe-street, Plymouth, was held last evening. Considerable interest was manifested in the event. The Mayor (Mr W. H. Alger) occupied a seat by the side of the Coroner. The Jury of whom Mr John Adams was Foreman, consisted of twenty three principally George-street and Bedford-street tradesmen. The Coroner explained that he considered the Inquiry could be concluded at a sitting, because owing to the terrible suddenness and completeness of the fire there was no reason for thinking they could ever get any more evidence; and there was no suspicion, so far as he could gather, of neglect or incendiarism. The Jury concurring with this view the evidence was proceeded with. EDWARD SPRAGUE, who owned the premises and used part of them for his business as a butcher, was the first witness called. It was 12.15, he said, when he went to bed that night, fastening the door and putting out the gas. He neither saw nor smelled any indication of fire at that time; and a woman named Davey, another inmate of the house who says she did not return until half-past twelve, subsequently gave similar evidence. The Jury also had before them the evidence of the constable on that beat, who says he actually tried the door at half-past twelve and yet neither heard nor saw any signs of the fire which in less than an hour from that time had been so terribly destructive of human life. At 1.20, when a labourer, named Ellery, ran and gave information at the Central Police-station, the fire had got such a hold that from where he stood in Whimple-street, he saw the reflection of it on the houses the other side. the police had to be called, and the reels and fire escape got to the spot all after that. There is, therefore, but the slightest reason to suppose that even if the house could have been entered, in spite of the flames which then came from every window, it would have been useful. The poor creatures who perished would have most surely then have been beyond all possibility of resuscitation after the suffocating effects of the smoke. But, as a matter of fact, the evidences of all the witnesses at the Inquest - of Inspector Farmer, representing the Police; of Mr McKeer and Mr Brooks, as representing the fire brigades - went to shew that the use of the fire escape when they reached the house was simply impossible. The flames from the windows reached half-way across the street and to have placed the fire escape against the windows would simply have been to burn the fire escape and expose the fireman who ascended it, to serious accident or death. Besides this, witnesses say they had no idea there was anyone in the house. All those who were operating upon the burning house were in the front street, whereas all those who escaped , with the exception of the injured man Goss, who made that terrible drop from the window, escaped at the back. One of the witnesses says he several times asked those around him whether anyone was left in the house, and they all said "No;" and it was not, it is believed, until SPRAGUE had got together some clothes and gone round into Looe-street from Buckwell-street, and said he could not find his wife, that any of the police or fire brigade had reason to believe someone was left in the house. But then the fire had done its worst, and it was felt impossible, if MRS SPRAGUE was there, that she could be alive. The fire had fatal hold of the premises, even before the first of the inmates of the house - a MRS KERBY - awoke. She called Miss Babbage, who slept with her on the ground floor and afterwards Mrs Davey, whose bedroom was on the first floor back; and both these, as witnesses, said that they could already see flames in the passage between the two shops, and the staircase was even then filling with smoke. Mrs Davey says she begged MRS KERBY, who aroused her to come through her room and save herself, but MRS KERBY said, "No; I am going to call the rest;" and she disappeared upstairs in the smoke That was the last that was seen of MRS KERBY. The staircase almost immediately afterwards became one mass of flame. And all this appears to have occurred in so brief a space of time that no fireman or even policeman had time to get there. No fresh light was thrown upon the origin of the fire by the Inquest. MR SPRAGUE and Miss Babbage were examined as to the turning out of the gas in their shops. This was done somewhere between twelve and half-past, and the best evidence, perhaps, that they considered everything was safe is found in the fact that they both went to bed and to sleep. Mr Brooks, the superintendent of the West of England Fire Brigade, speaking as an expert, gave a tolerably decided opinion that the fire originated in Miss Babbage's shop, and that opinion was shared by the other witnesses who were asked the question. Miss Babbage, in her evidence, admitted that amongst her other stock were two gross of boxes of matches, but these, she says, were on a top shelf a long way from any gas burner or fire. On the whole the Jury, without any difficulty, came unanimously to the conclusion that the fire was accidental, and that under the circumstances everything that could be done by the police and fireman was done. they also added their tribute of admiration for the heroism of MRS KERBY, who lost her own life in the endeavour to save the lives of the other inhabitants of the house. Nothing was said publicly in Court about improving the methods and the use of the appliances for saving life in case of fire at Plymouth, but there is a general feeling in the town that there is room for some effort of the kind. Mr James Moon suggests the formation of a salvage corps, the members of which should wear a fire-proof dress, and regard it as their especial duty to enter premises on fire and endeavour to save whatever there is to e saved, whether of life or property. At present, Mr Moon argues, that duty is discharged pretty much at hap-hazard by the firemen or the police, but the duty of the firemen is to put out the fire, and the police also have their own duties to fulfil, and the existence of a salvage corps would enable both these classes of officials to attend to their own duties. Mr Moon has explained the proposition to two or three gentlemen in authority, who, upon a prima facie view of it, have entertained it most favourably, and it seems likely that the idea will not be allowed to drop. Attention will probably also be turned once more to the condition of buildings similarly constructed to that in which this terrible loss of life occurred. Some few years ago a few members of the Sanitary Committee, acting as a sub-committee, visited this very house in Looe-street, and besides inspecting its sanitary deficiencies, called the attention of the man who was then the landlord to the very dangerous condition that any people who lived in the house would e in, in case of fire while a wooden staircase was the only means of exit. That was, however, all they had power to do in the matter. It is interesting and satisfactory to know that the houses which have been erected at Plymouth by the Workmen's Dwellings Company have outside staircases and balconies, which in case of fire would afford a mode of exit from every room. - An Inquest upon the bodies of the victims of the fire in Looe-street, Plymouth, was opened yesterday afternoon in the Sessions Court of the Guildhall before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner. The Mayor (Mr W. H. Alger) occupied a seat to the right of the Coroner. A double Jury was empanelled, with Mr John Adams as Foreman. There was also a large auditory. - The Coroner observed that they had met together on a grave and sad occasion. There had not been within living memory a catastrophe like this since 1835, when a Major Watson and his two daughters were burnt at the Citadel. They fell together, locked in each other's arms, and their remains were buried in one coffin. A few years afterwards there was a vessel wrecked on the Breakwater, and out of a crew of twenty-one, twenty were drowned, but that event did not come home to the public as this terrible calamity did. Without any disrespect to the public Press, he must ask the Jury to dismiss from their minds any remarks interspersed up and down the very full accounts in the newspapers. He need not go into any details, but there was one practical point he rather wished to consult them upon that materially affected their convenience and the conduct of this case. In such a case the general course was that a Jury was empanelled and viewed the bodies, which were identified for the purpose of enabling the Coroner to make out the necessary orders for their interment, and then the Inquest was adjourned for further inquires. That course was not invariably pursued, nor was there any rule that would constrain them to such a course. In this case, although there were many witnesses, so far as he could see, not from the newspaper reports, but from information from official sources, the facts were such that it seemed to him very possible indeed, and very practicable that they should conclude the Inquiry in one sitting. (Hear, hear). Not that there was any desire on his part, or on the part of those with whom he acted, to hurry over any Inquiry like that in Plymouth, or to curtail or shut out [?] evidence. But looking at the matter as a man of common sense, as far as he could see, there did not appear to be any element calling for adjournment - in great measure owing to the terrible completeness of the calamity. From what he had seen of the evidence likely to come before them, it did not appear there was any charge of neglect or of wilful misconduct that could be thrown upon the shoulders of any person concerned. Of course if there was a suspicion of anything like criminal neglect or wilfulness such as might put some persons in peril of being sent elsewhere for further Inquiry, it would be necessary to be more careful; and if there was any suggestion on the part of the Police which pointed to any probability of incendiarism, they could not yet shut up an Inquiry like this; but there was a total absence of anything of the kind. All the circumstances seemed to point to its being a visitation of Providence and an accident. If anything, however, in the course of the Inquiry, appeared to be wrong, and they said "No, Mr Coroner, this a case that requires further investigation, and you had better adjourn;" if there was such a feeling he should say "Very well, gentlemen, I will do as you wish." On the contrary, he thought, if they heard the evidence, they would say that the most sensible course would be to terminate the Inquiry. The Coroner then explained that although there were technically twelve separate Inquisitions - there being twelve bodies - the law allowed the proceedings to apply to all of them. The Jury were then sworn in to Inquire into the cause of the death of ELIZA JANE SPRAGUE, FREDERICK BICKFORD, EDWARD DOWNING, ELIZA KERBY and WILLIAM HENRY FOSS, and also the death "of an adult female, name unknown;" of two "male children, names unknown;! and four "young females, names unknown." - On the reassembling of the Jury the Coroner said he thought he might assist them with another observation. The Inquiry divided itself into three parts - first, the question of the identification of the bodies; secondly, what took place at the fire; and, thirdly, what means were taken to suppress the fire and save life. - EDWARD SPRAGUE said: I am a butcher, and did reside at 3 Looe-street. ELIZA JANE SPRAGUE was my wife and I identify her body. She was 31. I went to bed on Saturday at 12.15. My wife went with me. We had closed the shop about twelve o'clock, and were the last to retire. We had five gas burners in the shop, the meter being in the passage, by the side of the meter that belonged to the other shop. I had not noticed any smell of gas at all, and turned out all the burners myself. There is a small fireplace in the shop, and we had a fire there in the evening; but it was all made out before we left. There was very little fire there at the time. We had a candle to go to bed by, and left everything safe. A jet of gas was burning outside in the passage, and I turned that almost off at the meter, so as to have a little light upstairs, and then turned the passage gas quite out. There was a gas jet in our bedroom, which we kept just alight every night. Our bedroom was on the first floor, over Babbage's shop. I wished my wife good night, and went to sleep. There were two children with us - one 4 and the other 5 ½ years old. The next thing I remember was a great noise at the door, which woke me up. I jumped out of bed, unlocked the door and saw the house was on fire. The staircase was full of smoke, but there was no smoke in our room. I called to my wife but could not find her. I looked all round the room, and thinking there was no other course I then endeavoured to save the children and myself, I ran over the stairs, where the smoke was increasing, through a back room, and down over the ladder into the backyard. The fire reached the back door just as I had got outside it, and I could not go back into the house. The fire was coming up the staircase just after I left. I saw no more of my wife. - The Coroner: Have you anything to say as to what led to this dreadful conflagration? - Witness: My impression is it began in the lower shop - Miss Babbage's - Q.: What is the ground of that impression? - A.: I think so because the windows of that shop are most burned. - Q.: Were you the last person to retire? - A.: Yes; I fastened the door and turned the gas out. - Q.: When was that? - A.: that was about a quarter to twelve. Everybody was in before that, but we had to keep open late sometimes on a Saturday. The house is my property and I occupied shop, bedroom and kitchen. There were three floors and eleven rooms besides the two shops. I don't know exactly how many people were living in the house, but I believe 31. Two rooms were occupied by the FOSS family on the second floor in front. The FOSSES were nine in family. The house was insured in the Queen office in its full value - £800. My furniture was insured in £150. That included fixtures. My deeds and papers were in a fire-proof safe in the kitchen, and I have not at present been able to get at them. The Police did not consider it safe for anything to be moved. On the suggestion of the Coroner, witness altered the expression "full" value with regard to the insurance of the house to "fair" value. The furniture was insured with Mr Stancombe, Gibbons-street. He could not remember the name of the office. - To the Foreman: I have no idea at what time I was woke up. The fire I saw when I opened the door of my room was in the front passage, which was my nearest way out, but I could not pass it. There was also a body of fire just at the bottom of the staircase. - To a Juror: The last time I was conscious of my wife's presence was in bed. - To the Coroner: I had no time to look under the bed for her. - To the Foreman: Miss Babbage's shop was shut when we went to bed, but the light was not out. - The Coroner: Did you see the light? - Witness: No; I have been told so. - The Coroner: that won't do. What did you think had become of your wife? Was she in bed? - Witness: No, she was not in bed when I awoke. - The Coroner: It is quite possible MRS SPRAGUE fainted from fright. - Witness: That is my belief. - Miss Loveday Babbage said: I am a single woman and I have been residing at No. 3 Looe-street, since last August. I rented the rooms of MR SPRAGUE - a shop and two rooms. I had ELIZA KERBY sleeping with me. She had a room of her own upstairs. The body of the female outside I identified as that of MRS KERBY. I closed my shop at twelve. I had three gas burners in the shop and I put them out. I had no fire there. I locked my shop door and left no one behind me. My bedroom was behind the shop and there is communication with it through what I'd call a scullery and a little kitchen. MRS KERBY and I went to bed at half-past twelve. I fell asleep soon after going to bed, and the next thing I heard was alarm of fire. MRS KERBY woke me up and said, "There is a fire." I got up directly, and she left me to go upstairs and wake MR SPRAGUE. My place became full of smoke, and when I looked out the passage was ablaze. I could not say whether the fire was proceeding from any part of my premises or not, but the fire seemed to be coming down the passage from the front. I saw no one on looking out of my room. I escaped by the back door. I identified one of the bodies as that of EDWARD DOWNING, brother of MRS KERBY. I did not see anyone enter the premises at night the worse for drink. I heard of no disturbance that night upstairs. I know that MRS KERBY went upstairs, for I heard her shouting. - The Coroner: Was the furniture insured? - Witness: Yes, in £150 in the Essex County Office. It included the furniture and the fixtures and stock in the shop. The stock was grocery and provisions. It included about two gross of matches on a top shelf. The matches were five or six feet from the nearest gas burner. I had no calico or blankets or anything of that kind in the shop I insured the goods directly I went to live in MR SPRAGUE'S house. - A Juror: What light had you when you turned the gas out - had you a candle? - Witness: I had no candle. I was in the dark. - A Juror: Were the walls lath and plaster on each side of the passage? - Witness: They were wood. - The Coroner: Lath and plaster, you mean. - Witness: No, it was wood - like a bit of deal. - The Coroner: Where was your meter; side by side with MR SPRAGUE'S, or by itself? - Witness: By MR SPRAGUE'S I turned the gas off my meter at a quarter past twelve, as MR SPRAGUE was going up stairs. - ED. BICKFORD deposed: I am a labourer. I lived in a large room at the top of the house. My brother FREDERICK, 11 years of age, lived with me. I recognised one of the bodies of which the Jury have just had a view as my brother FREDERICK. I went to bed at half-past eleven. My brother did not sleep with me. He was in Mr Newcombe's room. I last saw him in my room between nine and ten. He left my room to go and sleep in the other room because the woman's husband was not at home. The first I knew of the fire was when I heard children screaming on the landing. I escaped from the back window. I had a mother and four brothers all sleeping in the same room as myself. There was also a young man named Denzil lodging with us. We were all in the one room. When my brother was there, there would be seven of us. When the door was opened I saw no fire, but I saw smoke. I do not know what became of those who were screaming on the landing. I believe they escaped from the window below. - EDMUND FOSS said he could recognise three of the bodies - those of his mother, his brother, WILLIAM, 16, and ALFRED EDWARD, 11 years, who he said was more easily identified than the others. - George Ellery said: I reside at 23 High-street. I was passing up Whimple-street at 1.20 on Sunday morning, and I saw the illumination as of fire against Leet's shop. I then heard shouts of "Fire," and I went to the fire-escape; I then went on to the police-station and gave the information. I returned with the reel, and saw a man jump from the window. I know that the fire was most fierce in the lower of the two shops. There was some slight appearance of fire from SPRAGUE'S shop, but nothing compared to that in Babbage's. - Police-Inspector Farmer said: I received the information at the Police-Station from the last witness at 1.24. I immediately went to Looe-street. The hose reel followed in charge of some constables. When I arrived the whole house was in flames. From every window in the front the flames were coming out. The hose reel came immediately, and the escape a few minutes later. I saw no one at the windows. If anyone had been at the windows we could not have got near them. The fire escape would have been of no service whatever. If we had used it the inflammable portion of it would have caught fire immediately, and any man attempting to ascend it would have been burned too. I did not see a man jump from the window, but I saw him on the footpath. I was told he was very much hurt, and I sent for an ambulance immediately. I was led to believe that everyone had escaped. I asked several people. I understood that the inmates had escaped at the back and that they were all right. We connected the hose and began to play on the flames directly. We were followed by the town and West of England reels and also the reels from the Harbour-avenue, Barbican and Octagon Stations. I never saw one of the inmates at the windows. The fire was got under at three o'clock. I think it would have been quite impossible for any man to have entered any one of the front windows and lived at the time I arrived. If there had been my own wife and children there I could not have saved them. After the fire was got under I received the body of MRS SPRAGUE from Mr Brooks, the superintendent of the West of England Fire Brigade. I conveyed that to the mortuary and when I got back I found the bodies of DOWNING and MRS KERBY. I afterwards received the other bodies, and saw that they were conveyed to the old Guildhall. One of the fireman named Willcocks handed over a purse he found in FOSS'S room, which contained a few coppers. I never heard so much as a cry from the building. - P.C. James Luscombe said: On the night of the 12th inst. I was the policeman on the beat that includes Looe-street. The last time I passed the premises previously to the alarm of fire was a few minutes after one o'clock. I then tried the doors. I was going down the street. I did not perceive any smell of fire whatever. I did not notice any light in either shop, nor did I see any smoke escaping. I did not hear any sound at all proceeding from the interior of the building. I went from there across the quays and met two other constables. I went with one of the constables to Exeter-street, and just as we reached that street we heard an alarm of fire. That was about a quarter of an hour after I had passed the premises in Looe-street. That was about 17 or 18 minutes after one. We then ran back to the scene of the fire. - Mr John H. McKeer said: I am chief officer of the Corporation Fire Brigade, and in the absence of Mr W. Lethbridge from illness had charge of the brigade. I was called at 1.25 and proceeded to Looe-street, where I found the house a mass of fire. At that moment it was impossible to have placed the fire-escape against the building. There were no signs of any human being trying to escape from the front of the house. FOSS had jumped out previously to my arrival. In my opinion every possible effort was made to extinguish the fire, which had just reached to the roof of the next house when it was stopped. - Mr Walling: Were you the first to enter the premises? - Witness: No, my foreman, Joseph Mitchell. - To another Juror: The fire-escape is never locked up. - The Coroner: You had charge of the fire-escape? - A.: Yes. - Q.: Was it quite ready for use? - A.: Yes; quite ready. - Q.: As a matter of fact it is never locked up? - A. Never. - Joseph Mitchell, the foreman of the Corporation fire-escape, said: I was at the fire on Sunday morning. There was no call for the use of the fire-escape. For a short time after I arrived it was not possible to place the escape against the windows. The fire was coming partly across the road. I heard no one inside and saw no sign of anyone at the windows. When the flames had subsided, at about a quarter to two, I entered the first floor by means of a ladder. I could go all over that room as the floor was found. It was the room over the general shop. I found a body (MRS SPRAGUE'S) partly under the bed. The head was under the bed, and it appeared as if she had crept under the bed. When we got that body out, we did not know of any more at the time and other men found the other bodies. - Mr Walling: When did you first reach the fire? - A.: At twenty minutes past one. - Q.: Had you the fire-escape then could you have used it? - A.: No. I saw the fire was right across the road, and that the escape was of no use. - To the Coroner: The escape was erected afterwards against the first top floor windows (FOSS'S) and we played water into the room for some time before we knew any bodies were there. - Mr C. J. Brooks local manager of the West of England Insurance Company, said: I am superintendent of the company's fire brigade, and was present at the fire. I arrived about twenty to two, and not finding the company's reel there I went to meet it, and found it in Bedford-street. We soon brought it down and set it to work. When the fire was subdued, about three o'clock, I took one of the firemen (Phillips) with me and tried to get up to the first floor by the stairs, but the top part of the stairs was destroyed, and finding we could not get into the room of the first floor that way we went out again and followed Mitchell up a ladder and through the window. After finding MRS SPRAGUE'S body we got into the next room with difficulty and found MRS KERBY and her brother. MRS KERBY was kneeling by the side of the bed, and the body of her brother was near the window partly dressed. We then tried the upper storey and found the other bodies. In my opinion the fire originated in the grocer's shop on the ground floor. I noticed, too, that the partitions, instead of being lath and plaster, were nearly all wood panelling, which materially assisted the progress of the fire. In the room at the top storey, we found the bodies of MRS FOSS and her five children. The fire escape could not be used in a room filled with flame. The body of the mother was on the floor and the bodies of the children in the bed. They were considerably burned. - Ellen Davey deposed: My room was on the first floor. I went to bed about half-past twelve. I do not know that I was the last in the house to retire, but thought I had heard the door shut before I went up. I perceived no sign of fire at that time. But in bout twenty minutes I heard screams of fire from MRS KERBY. When I opened the door I found her knocking at MR SPRAGUE'S door. The flames and smoke were then coming up the stairs from the passage. I asked MRS KERBY to come into my room, but she said "No, I am going to call the rest." I saw no more of her. My husband jumped out of the back window and got a ladder by which I and my children escaped. I saw nothing of MRS SPRAGUE. - This concluded the evidence. The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought they had heard evidence dealing with every phase of the case. MRS KERBY, who behaved so nobly and so bravely, seemed to have been the first to discover the fire and alarm the house; and the question how she came to discover it first, seemed to be explained by the statement that the fire began in the shop on the ground floor nearest to which she slept. The next questions were whether the fire occurred through the neglect of anybody; whether there was any evidence that the premises were intentionally set on fire; and whether there was neglect on the part of anyone whose duty it was to attempt to save life. There was no evidence at all that any of the thirty-one persons in the house were guilty of any neglect, and there was evidence that everything that could be done was done to save life. They must look at the plain facts, and not expect impossibilities. An absurd notion was abroad that the escape was locked up, but it had been sworn in evidence that it was never locked up. When it was brought to the fire, however, it was a physical impossibility that it could be used. The escape would have been burned, and so would any man who attempted to go up it, and at that time there were no cries for assistance, and the firemen believed that all the inmates had escaped at the back of the house. It struck him (the Coroner) irresistibly that all the FOSS family were dead before the fire-escape could possibly have been used. And where was there any evidence that the place was wilfully set on fire? There was no particle of evidence to shew any preparation for a fire, such as a case of incendiarism generally disclosed. It seemed that the fire commenced in Miss Babbage's quarter, but surely it could not be supposed that she would set fire to her premises in order to burn herself and MRS KERBY. The idea was preposterous. They were therefore left with the supposition that the fire happened accidentally. The exact origin of a fire was very rarely discovered, because as a rule a fire destroyed its own evidence. But did not the Jury think that these premises most suddenly and unexpectedly burst out into a flame from pure accident? - The Foreman asked whether it was considered the injured man FOSS could throw any more light upon the Inquiry? - The Coroner said FOSS was lying dangerously ill at the Hospital - much too ill to give evidence - but they had had witnesses quite as capable of giving evidence of the origin of the fire as FOSS, who lived at the top of the house, and must have been in a fearful state of fright. He believed the alarm came upon FOSS so suddenly that he jumped from the window at once. Was it, therefore, worth while to adjourn the Inquest for him to give evidence? He was far best of all from the origin of the fire. - The Jury agreed that it was not necessary to adjourn the Inquiry for the attendance of FOSS, and after a few minutes'' consultation the Foreman said: We return a verdict of "Accidental Death," and wish to add that everything was done that could be done under the circumstances to save life. We also desire to call attention to the noble conduct of MRS KERBY, deceased, who called the other inhabitants of the house at the loss of her own life. - The Coroner: I am sure the Press will take notice of that and I cordially agree with the rider that everything was done that could be done by the police, the superintendents of the hose reels and all others concerned. The proceedings then ended. Dead EDMUND DOWNING, stonemason, 42 years of age ELIZA KERBY, widow of independent means, sister of EDMUND DOWNING, 40 years of age SUSAN ALICE FOSS, wife of the injured man FOSS, 43 years of age ELIZABETH ELLEN FOSS, daughter, 18 years of age WM. HENRY FOSS, son, 16 years of age LILY PENELOPE FOSS, daughter, 13 years of age ALFRED EDWARD FOSS, son, 11 years of age AMELIA ALICE FOSS, daughter, 9 years of age FLORENCE FOSS, daughter, 6 years of age JOHN JENNINGS FOSS, son, 3 years of age EMMA JANE SPRAGUE, wife of EDWARD SPRAGUE, owner of the house, 31 years of age FREDERICK BICKFORD, son of MRS BICKFORD, who escaped, 11 years of age. Injured: Edward Foss, shipwright, employed in Devonport dockyard, 43 years of age, sustained compound fracture of right hip joint, fractures of both knee caps and injuries to head and ribs. Amy Newcombe, aged 4 years, fracture of right thigh. Escaped. Mrs Bickford, her three sons and a lodger Edward Sprague, owner of the house and his two children Robert Davey, his wife and three children Miss Babbage, who occupied the same bedroom with Mrs Kerby Upon Inquiry at the Hospital about ten o'clock last evening it was found that Foss was going on quite as well as could be expected, and that hopes were entertained of his recovery. With the exception of an elder son, married and living in Queen Anne-place, the whole family of this poor man perished.

TORQUAY - A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was yesterday returned (in accordance with medical testimony) at Torquay at an Inquest concerning the death of SAMUEL BALSOM, who destroyed himself under circumstances of a remarkable character detailed in yesterday's Western Morning News.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 December 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday relative to the death of THOMAS HENRY BELL, a first-class petty officer of the ironclad Invincible, who was killed on the previous day, when at work in Devonport Dockyard, under circumstances detailed in yesterday's Western Morning News. - Lieut. A. A. C. Galloway, of the Invincible, stated that 11.15 on the morning of the 16th inst. he was in command on the forecastle. Deceased was captain of the foretop. The men of the ship were engaged in hoisting the foretopmast from the dock to the ship. Deceased with two other men, had hold of a check rope, which was secured to the heel of the mast, to prevent it surging and damaging the ship's side. - The evidence of an able seaman, named Lonnon, was to the effect that deceased was holding the check rope, which had three turns around a bollard. He had apprehensions that it would jamb, and he, therefore, took off two of the turns, and the third at once followed. Deceased was dragged over the dock edge, and after being suspended in mid-air for a few seconds he fell a distance of 42 feet, fracturing the base of the skull and lower part of his thigh. Death was almost instantaneous. - The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from a fall in No. 2 Dock whilst employed in easing the mast, and that his death was caused by his zeal in the work of the service.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 December 1885
PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - The suicide of WILLIAM HOCKING, of 14 Old Town-street on Saturday morning formed the subject of an Inquiry before Mr Coroner Brian and a Jury at the Guildhall. The evidence of the widow and others shewed that the deceased, who had been foreman tin-maker at Messrs. Serpell's biscuit factory, but was an engine fitter by trade, had not done any work for the last fifteen months owing to ill-health. He suffered greatly from debility and lowness of spirits, at times having to endure much physical pain. He had been in attendance at the Medical Aid Institution, and Dr Cash Reed had prescribed for him. Several times the deceased declared that he could not live, and that he was tempted to do what he ought not to do. MRS HOCKING left him to go to her work about ten o'clock on Saturday morning, when he was in the sitting-room by the fire, and on her return about a quarter to one she went to the box-room, the door of which she had a difficulty in opening, but on her pushing it she obtained admittance, and then found her husband hanging at the back of the door, his feet nearly touching the floor. Mr Alexander Stephens, clerk, cut the body down and medical aid being procured, life was pronounced to be extinct. - The Jury, in returning a verdict to the effect "That the deceased had committed Suicide while Temporarily Insane," expressed their condolence with the widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 December 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - Alleged Death Through Negligence. A Caution to Mothers. - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon into the cause of death of EDGAR WILLIAMS, the illegitimate child of SARAH WILLIAMS, a single woman, living with her mother at 18 St John-street. From the evidence of the grandmother it appeared that she had nursed the child from its birth. On the 9th December a rash was observed to have broken out on the child, which was of a sickly disposition, and the grandmother took it to the dispensary in King-street, and was supplied with medicine. The child who was five months old took its food freely, but continued ill until its death, about two o'clock on Saturday. A witness, named Amelia Luscombe, who lived in the same house as MRS WILLIAMS, deposed to going to the dispensary between six and seven o'clock on Friday evening and asking that a doctor would come and see the child. On telling the doctor that it was covered with sores, he laughed and said it was the result of a foul disease. He added that he could not attend unless he were paid 2s. 6d. MRS WILLIAMS thought the baby was better on the following morning and did not get the 2s. 6d. to ensure the medical man's attendance. - Mr Everard Row, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased stated that it was very poorly nourished. The head and face were covered with scabs, sue to neglect and want of cleanliness. - The Coroner: do you think the sores were due to any congenital disease? - Witness: No; children are very liable to these sores if they are not properly cared for when they are young. - The Coroner: Then you think if the child some months since had had warm baths and been properly fed and attended to it might not have died? - Witness: I do not think it would have had the sores. - The Coroner: Was its death owing to this? - Witness: No, sir; death was owing to the inflammation of the lungs. - The Coroner: Had the child been well fed? - Witness: No, sir. - The Coroner: Was there any such great neglect on the part of the mother which would justify the Jury in finding a verdict against her of culpable neglect? - Witness: No. I think it was due to want of cleanliness, and the neglect in feeding it was due to ignorance. - The Coroner: If we could find such a verdict in this case it would do good. It would teach mothers that they could not bring children into the world and then neglect them in this way. - Witness said the mother never nursed the child, but in reply to the Coroner he could not say whether there was any cause for that. The child would have had a better chance of living if it had been properly fed and cared for. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it did not appear to him that the child's death was accelerated by the doctor not seeing it on the Friday, as the disease had gone so far that he could not have saved the life of the child. - The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held at the Crown Hotel, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, to investigate the cause of death of JAMES CURTIS, who died suddenly in Christ Church on Sunday morning. It was stated in evidence that he had previously complained of pain in the chest, and that he experienced some difficulty in breathing. The Coroner (Mr Brian) and the Jury expressed their sympathy with the widow and relatives of the deceased.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Starvation At Plymouth. A Sad Story. - An Inquest was held last evening at Plymouth Workhouse into the circumstances attending the death of an old woman named ELIZA ROWE. The Inquiry was conducted by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, and lasted over two hours and a half. - Mr E. G. Dyke, the Master of the Workhouse, was the first witness, and he said deceased was admitted to the House on the 10th inst. She was described as a widow, and was 65 years of age. Mr Annear, the relieving officer for the southern district, brought deceased to the House. She was in a very emaciated condition, and was unable to walk or to speak coherently. She was, therefore, immediately sent to the Hospital, and placed under the care of Mr Thomas, the Medical Officer. She died on the 19th inst. - Mr F. A. Thomas, the House Surgeon, said deceased was in a fearfully emaciated state and suffering from want of food, and he should think she had been short of the necessaries of life for a long time. Everything was done to raise her from her low condition, but she had been neglected too long for any services, medical or otherwise, to be of any avail. Consequently he entered in the medical relief book opposite the deceased's name "Starvation." The real cause of death was, in his opinion, tubercular disease of the brain, accelerated by want of food. He had, therefore, refused, as he could not conscientiously do so, to give a certificate of death. - Elizabeth Oaff, the next witness, underwent a severe examination by Mr Brian. Her evidence was to the effect that deceased had lived with her and her husband, a pensioner, for four months, at 21 Stillman-street. Deceased occupied one room on the ground floor, for which she paid witness 11d. per week. Witness could not say whether deceased had much clothes, but she brought no luggage with her except one bedstead. She used to earn a living by making boys' caps, which she hawked about the streets. She was very reserved and would not allow anyone to come into her room. She was, as far as witness knew, in good health up to the Tuesday previous to her being taken to the Workhouse. On that day witness did not see anything of her for the morning. About twelve o'clock she knocked at her door and asked if deceased was ill, to which she replied "No." On the Thursday evening in consequence of something Mrs McDonald, another inmate of the house, told her, she went to deceased's door, which she found open, and looked in, when she found ROWE sitting on a biscuit tin in a corner of the room with nothing on but her nightdress - such as it was. She looked stupefied and cold, but in witness's opinion was not emaciated a great deal. Witness asked her if she were ill, to which she replied "No." - By a Juror: She did not put any clothing on her when she found deceased in that condition. - Elizabeth McDonald, in addition to giving similar evidence to that of the last witness, said that when they entered the deceased's room on the Thursday evening the latter appeared to be very ill, and was extremely dirty. The floor was covered with water; the few clothes deceased had were very wet, and witness believed she had vermin on her body. There was no fire in the room. Witness on finding her in such a state went for Mr Annear, the Relieving Officer. - Mr Annear's evidence was corroborative of the description given above as to the condition of the deceased. He asked ROWE when he arrived why she was in such a state, but got no reply. He sent for Mr Cuming, surgeon, immediately he got there, and that gentleman gave instructions for her removal without delay to the Workhouse. Witness got a cab, and after wrapping deceased up in a rug and giving her some brandy and milk, conveyed her to the House. She was in a very critical state at the time. - Mr Cuming also gave evidence. He considered deceased died from want of food, but he had observed when visiting her room before her removal to the Workhouse a piece of bread and some pilchards which appeared to have become putrid. The room was almost destitute of furniture, and there was no fire in it. - In reply to the Coroner, Mr Cuming said it was possible, but he should not like to say probable, that had deceased not been attended to on the Thursday evening she would have died before the morning. - The Coroner, in summing up, commented strongly on the conduct of Mrs Oaff towards the deceased. Although the former was not legally responsible for the death of the unfortunate woman, he thought she was to be strongly censured for the great lack of humanity she had displayed in not putting some clothing on the deceased when she found her on the Thursday evening in the deplorable condition described. On the other hand, Mrs McDonald had shewn much kindness and was entitled to the commendation of the Jury. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Wood was foreman, returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased died of semi-starvation and tubercular disease, aggravated by the want of the necessaries of life"; to which was added as a rider, "The conduct of Mrs McDonald and her kindness to the deceased were very praiseworthy, while that of Mrs Oaff is deserving of censure in not having administered the comfort and assistance to the deceased that she might have done, and that she did not do what she might have done in bringing the condition of the deceased earlier to light than it was." Inspector Price was present, and watched the case on behalf of the Police.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 December 1885
TORQUAY - The Remarkable Discovery At Torquay. Inquest On The Child. Singular Evidence By The Mother. - The Inquest on the body of the young child found under such strange circumstances in a cellar at Springhill, St Mary Church-road, Torquay, on Saturday, was held yesterday at the Townhall, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr T. F. Graham was the Foreman. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, observed that the Jury had been summoned for the purpose of Inquiring into the circumstances under which a child which was found in a cellar at Springhill came by its death. having been informed that the body had been discovered under very peculiar circumstances, he had deemed it right to have the matter investigated, so as to ascertain whether death had occurred naturally or had been brought about by other causes. He thought, however, evidence would be adduced which would satisfy them that there had been nothing wrong in the matter. - The Jury then viewed the body in the mortuary close by, and on their return, the Coroner proceeded to take evidence, the first witness being Mr Thomas Memery, auctioneer, of Churston-cottage, Abbey-road, Torquay, who stated that in going over Springhill House on Saturday last for the purpose of taking an inventory of the furniture, his attention was attracted by the landlady (A Mrs Reed) to a large packing case in the coal-cellar. He told his assistant to open the case, as there might be some goods concealed in it. His assistant then took the cover off and exposed to view a lead coffin with a glass front. He went upstairs to MRS SUTTON'S mother-in-law and told her what they had found, and she said it was the coffin of a child that had been exhumed. He went and looked at the coffin again, and discovered that it contained the body of a child. He told the landlady (Mrs Reed) and she ordered that it should be removed from the house. He sent his assistant after the Police at once. He believed the occupants of the house were MRS SUTTON'S mother-in-law, two servants, and two children. P.S. Bastin afterwards came and conveyed the body to the public mortuary. - P.C. Bond said on Saturday last, about 5 p.m., he was at the Police Station, when Mr Memery's assistant came in and told him they had found the body of a child in a coffin at Springhill, St Mary Church-road. He went with P.S. Bastin to the house, and on going into the cellar they were shown the coffin, with the child in it, by Mr Memery. The glass was removed from the front and the coffin was lying on the cover of the packing case, on the floor. There was a quantity of straw and rags in the box and two newspapers, one dated January and the other April. There were also two withered wreaths of flowers. He fetched a horse and trap and conveyed the remains to the public mortuary. MRS SUTTON was not at home at the time he went to the house. Then newspapers were copies of the Devon Weekly Times. - Dr Richardson said he had made an examination of the body lying in the mortuary and found that it was in an elm coffin or shell, encased in lead with a face glass. The lead had been cut open, and the lid was loose. There were no marks of nails or screws. The body was clothed in a calico chemise, and dead leaves were strewn upon it. Upon the removal of the body the coffin was found to contain a quantity of sawdust and the ordinary fittings. The body was the exact size for the coffin. On making an external examination he found that the body presented the appearance of a well-nourished, well-developed child in an advanced state of decomposition, and there were, so far as could be ascertained, no signs of external violence. The height of the body was three feet. The sex could not be ascertained from the fact that decomposition had gone so far. His opinion was that it was a female child, but it was impossible to swear to this. The hair was of a light brown colour, but the colour of the eyes could not be ascertained. There were ten teeth in each jaw, and he considered the age of the child at death was about three years. The tongue and mouth were much decomposed, but shewed no signs of irritant poison. On examination of the cranial cavity he found no signs of injury. The bronchial tubes shewed signs of congestion. The left lung was healthy, but the lower lobe of the right lung was very much congested. He should say the child had been in the coffin nine or ten months. Where air was excluded decomposition was very slow, but in this case the air appeared to have been only partially excluded. As to the cause of death, he was unable to say anything definite, but he considered that the congestion of the base of the right lung had something to do with it, although it was hardly enough to cause death by itself. He considered that the child died from some acute disease for its well-nourished condition shewed that there had been no wasting disease. It would be very injurious to the inmates of a house to have a dead body in their midst unless it was entirely excluded from the air. - MRS RHODA GERALDINE SUTTON, mother of the child, was then called. - The Coroner informed her that she could make any statement she pleased, but if that statement was likely to incriminate her he should advise her to abstain from making it. - Witness replied that she was desirous of making a statement, adding that she had nothing to conceal and nothing to incriminate her. She proceeded to say that she lived at Springhill in the St. Mary Church-road, Torquay, and was the wife of EDGAR CHARLES AUSTIN SUTTON, professor of phrenology, farmer, and printer, of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada, W. The body in the mortuary was that of her child, CHARLES GERALD HERBERT SUTTON, who died on April 19th of this year, at No. 5 Dorchester-street, Bath, of bronchitis and diphtheria, at the age of 1 year and 7 months. The death was registered and the body was buried in the Landsdowne Cemetery, Bath, on April 28th. She was ill with diphtheria at the time of its death and on her recovery she had the impression that her child had been buried in a state of coma. This impression was created by the servant girl telling her that the child's complexion was the same as in life, and that the body was very warm. She made application and was informed that the Home Secretary would give the desired permission, and on applying to him he told her that she could get a faculty from the Bishop of Bath and Wells. she also wrote to the Queen and Sir Henry Ponsonby, the latter telling her that he could have nothing to do with the matter. She then applied to the Bishop of Bath and Wells and after great trouble and expense obtained a faculty which was not now in her possession. - The Coroner here produced the faculty, which was dated May 30th, 1885. - MRS SUTTON, proceeding, said application was made some weeks before she obtained the document. When the child's body was taken up it was conveyed to the house of a Mrs Hayes, a friend of hers in Bath. Shortly after it had been exhumed she removed to Teignmouth and took the body of the child with her for the purpose of having it buried there, but a sudden thought struck her at the last moment, and with the assistance of the servant girl she took the outer coffin, filled it with bricks, screwed down the lid herself, and sent word to Mr Reaford, the vicar of Teignmouth. She did not think the burial service was read, but the clergyman said a few words over the grave. The inner shell was afterwards conveyed to her bedroom at Teignmouth, and put in a cupboard, where it remained unopened for some time. She at last opened it, and she used to put flowers on the body every day. When she decided to remove to Torquay she came down from Teignmouth and purchased a piano case and took back. the coffin was packed in this, and it was conveyed to Torquay, part way by rail, and part by road. It was taken to Carrowroe, Warren-road, where it lay in the garden for three weeks. She afterwards had it placed in the cellar at Springhill. No one knew anything of the affair but the servant girl. - The Coroner, addressing MRS SUTTON, said she could not expect to keep a dead body in her house without an Inquiry being held on its discovery. She had also disobeyed the faculty granted her. - MRS SUTTON said she knew she had done wrong, but she hoped the Coroner would not blame the servant girl, as she had only taken part in the matter out of love for the child. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said she did not feel justified in telling the Jury how many children she had. - Clara Underhill, a domestic servant, in the employ of Mrs Seymour, of Teignmouth, said she helped the last witness to fill the coffin with bricks. She had lived with MRS SUTTON at Bath previous to coming to Teignmouth. She recognised the body when she saw it in the coffin as that of GERALD SUTTON. She also assisted MRS SUTTON to take the body to the cupboard in her bedroom. No one knew anything about it but MRS SUTTON and herself. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the story told by MRS SUTTON was a very extraordinary one, still he believed the Jury would agree with him when he said it was told in a very straightforward manner. They all knew that no one could keep a dead body in their cellar without laying themselves open to a searching Inquiry and also bringing upon themselves a deal of suspicion. After reviewing the evidence, he went on to say that as far as the law went there was no power of compelling any person to bury a body in any particular way as long as there was no infringement of the sanitary laws, but by the Public Health Act no body was allowed to be kept in any dwelling-house if it was likely to be prejudicial to health. Dr Richardson had said that the keeping of such a body was injurious to health and on that statement he should make an order for the burial of the body in pursuance of the powers given by the Public Health Act. Unless MRS SUTTON undertook within two days to have the body buried the order would be carried out by the relieving officer, and she would be charged with the expenses. - The Jury then retired for consultation. After an absence of about ten minutes they returned with a verdict that they were of opinion that the body was that of the child of MRS SUTTON, and that it died from Natural Causes. They added that they thought MRS SUTTON had given her evidence in a satisfactory manner, but further that they were of opinion that her action was very indiscreet and they recommended, if she found herself under similar circumstances in future, to act more in accordance with the general custom.

BARNSTAPLE - Sad Suicide At Barnstaple. - A case of suicide, which occurred under distressing circumstances, was investigated at Barnstaple last evening before the Borough Coroner, Mr R. I. Bencraft. The deceased was MR MICHAEL HEWISH, aged 32, manager of the ironmongery business of Mrs H. R. Williams, and was a person of great respectability. He was a widower, but was engaged to be married on Saturday next to Mrs Ryder, a milliner of the town, and a widow. He left her late on Tuesday night in unusually good spirits and nothing more was seen of him until he was found by the servant in the morning hanging by a rope, which was attached to a crook in the ceiling. Deceased's feet were touching the ground and his knees bent. At the Inquiry last night, the servant girl, Mary Perryman, said deceased, who lived in Fort-street with his mother, sister and nephew, was not home when they went to bed on Tuesday night. On coming downstairs in the morning she saw him hanging to a rope in the back kitchen. His back was towards her, and she did not speak, but ran upstairs for deceased's sister, who came down and spoke to him, but found he was dead. A medical man was sent for, and on his arriving he cut down the body. - Mrs Helen Ryder said she had been engaged to deceased about fifteen months and they were to have been married at the parish church on Saturday morning. He was busy yesterday about the books, and as she lived near his place of business deceased had tea with her and her son on Tuesday and said he would come over again as soon as he left the shop. He came just after nine o'clock and they went out to see the shops and called at Mrs Vicary's fish-dealer. They returned to her house just before eleven o'clock. He said he was very cold and went inside. He took out a small drop of brandy and she made a glass of brandy and water. He drank that, and smoked a cigar, and left about twenty minutes after eleven. He appeared in his usual spirits. He wished her good-night twice, and said, "God bless you." He asked her to get a cup of tea for him at half-past ten in the morning as he was busy about his books. She believed he had worried a good deal about his business, and he said sometimes it was almost too much for him. There was nothing unusual in what he said on leaving her Tuesday night. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said she could not say whether he was comfortable at home or not. They seldom spoke of the matter. He appeared anxious to make a home for himself. On Tuesday night he said he did not care about going home, and asked her to make him up a bed, but she thought it was in fun, and told him to go home. He also asked her to get married on Thursday instead of Saturday, but she told him everything was arranged, and they had better keep to the arrangements made. - Mr C. E. Pronger, surgeon, said that death evidently resulted from dislocation and not strangulation. Dislocation must have been caused by deceased jumping from the chair, and death would be instantaneous. After evidence as to deceased's occasional despondency, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned, and the Jury expressed their sympathy with the relatives.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 December 1885
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, as to the death of JAMES SILVER RICHARDS, who had been thrown down by a passing milk-cart. Inspector Price was present on behalf of the Police. Deceased was 75 years old and was employed as cashier and book-keeper at Messrs. Sparrow's, Cattedown. - W. Goss, in the employ of Mr Avent, dairyman, Prospect-street, stated that on Wednesday evening, just before six o'clock, he was driving slowly down Greenbank-road, and as he was about to turn the corner at the bottom to go up Tothill-road, he saw deceased crossing. He immediately shouted to him, but he took no heed. He then pulled his horse up sharply and the animal - as was usual when he drew the rein tightly, bounded forward and in doing passed the man, the splashboard knocking him backwards. A Mr Northcott coming by helped witness to take deceased to the Hospital, for he was insensible. - Mr W. Buchan, M.B., said deceased never regained consciousness and died from a fractured skull. - The Foreman (Mr Bickle) and the Jurors closely questioned Mr Goss and after the room had been cleared some minutes a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. A rider was appended , saying that the Jury thought it "imperatively necessary that drivers of milk carts should be extremely cautious while in the town and neighbourhood of Plymouth and should pass all corners slowly and carefully."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 December 1885
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death By Burning At Devonport. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Devonport on Saturday touching the death of MISS MAUD FITZROY, a step-daughter of MR Ed. St. Aubyn, who had been fatally burned on the preceding Wednesday evening. The Inquiry was conducted by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner for Devonport, and the Jury were Messrs. J. D. Collings, T. P. Horton, W. Bartlett, W. Ollis, J. Kinsman, T. Miller, G. Park. R. Welch, G. Tyrer, S. Pike, A. Swiss, G. Andrews, G. Bewes. Mr Horton was chosen as Foreman. - The Coroner, in his opening statement, expressed his grief at their being called together upon so melancholy an occasion, but said it was one of those events which had unfortunately happened before, and which would doubtless happen again. It was an event which he viewed as one of the most melancholy that could happen - a person in good health looking forward to enjoyment suddenly bereft of life, all the festivities of the house put an end to, and sorrow and gloom brought about in a way which a mysterious providence at times permitted. He was sure they must all feel great sympathy with Mr St. Aubyn in his loss. He believed he had been a father to those girls, and had promoted their happiness in every way. They had been brought up in a life of hopefulness and joy, and all this had been suddenly cut short by the sad event which had brought the Jury together. He thought they might anticipate the evidence so far as to know that there could be and would be no other verdict than that of accidental death and that everything that could be done by Mr St. Aubyn and those at hand was done, first of all to put out the fire, next to prevent, as far as possible, the accident being so serious, and next to prevent suffering. - The first witness was Phoebe Thomas, nurse to Mrs St. Aubyn, who said that on Wednesday evening she was dressing MISS MAUD for a ball, when they heard screams on the stairs. MISS MAUD and she (witness) rushed out, and they saw MISS ELLA on the stairs with her dress on fire. MISS MAUD, who was first, went to her assistance, and not thinking of her own dress she embraced her sister and her dress caught fire. Witness, who was close behind her on the top of the stairs, saw that they clung to each other for a few moments and on disengaging themselves MISS MAUD rushed downstairs with her dress still on fire. Witness went to MISS ELLA'S assistance and wrapped her in a rug, and thus saw no more of MISS MAUD for a time. - Mr Ed. St. Aubyn (step-father to the deceased) said he was at home between nine and ten o'clock on Wednesday evening, and heard the cries spoken of by the last witness. He ran upstairs and met MAUD FITZROY on the first floor landing with the whole of her dress on fire. He got a blanket and counterpane and wrapped round her to extinguish the fire. From the time he heard the cries to the extinguishing of the fire it was not nearly two minutes. She (deceased) was taken upstairs and attended to by Nurse Stevens, and Mr Thom, surgeon, was there within a few minutes. Everything was done that was possible. Deceased was 18 years of age. - Mr Thom, surgeon, said he was called in to Manor Lodge on Wednesday evening, when he was told that the young ladies had been severely burned. He found them in bed, where they had been placed by the nurses. He attended to MISS MAUD FITZROY, as her case was the most pressing. He found that she was suffering from burns over the whole of her body and on both her legs and arms. She was suffering great pain and evidently felt the shock severely. He ordered dressings to be prepared at once, and administered morphia. With the assistance of Dr Cutcliffe he dressed the burns as quickly as possible, and having wrapped her in cotton wool, left her under careful supervision to attend to her sister. She never got over the shock and died shortly before twelve o'clock on Thursday night. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the melancholy event happened in consequence of the natural love of one sister to the other. The deceased, led by an impulse which was irresistible, ran to the aid of her sister, whose dress was in flames, and thus contributed unfortunately but unintentionally to her own death. There was no doubt the Jury would feel with him that the death was purely accidental, that everything was done to prevent fatal results that could be done, and that great thought and care were displayed in what was done. In their bereavement the family must feel what satisfaction could be derived from that fact. It had pleased Providence to take MISS MAUD and they must trust that it would please Providence to spare her sister who was now alive, but whose life hung in the balance. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and desired to express their very deep sympathy with both Mr and Mrs St. Aubyn. The landlord of Gilman's Hotel, at which the Inquest was held, and the Jury gave their fees to the Children's Ward of the Royal Albert Hospital at Devonport. The body of MISS MAUD FITZROY was conveyed by the mail train last night to London, and will be buried at Brompton Cemetery on Tuesday. A hearse and two mourning coaches left the Manor House last evening for Plymouth Station. Mr Edward St. Aubyn, Sir John S. Aubyn, and his eldest son Major Chapman, brother to Mrs Edward St. Aubyn, and the Rev. W. St. Aubyn, the rector of Stoke Damerel, were the company in these conveyances, and Sir John's eldest son and the Rev. W. St. Aubyn travelled to London by the mail to make arrangements for the funeral. Mr Edward St. Aubyn would also attend the funeral, but his wife, since the sad accident on Wednesday last, has been seriously unwell and MISS ELLA FITZROY, the elder sister, who was so severely burned, is not yet out of danger. At Stoke Church yesterday morning the rector referred to the distressing calamity of Wednesday last, and also to other deaths which had occurred lately among the congregation. He also spoke of the kindly sympathy which had been universally extended to the bereaved family. The deceased will be buried in the family vault, where her father was buried several years since.

BARNSTAPLE - A Fatal Christmas Dinner. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Saturday on the body of MARTHA REW, aged 29, who expired suddenly at Pilton early that morning. The evidence of the deceased's husband and a neighbour shewed that she made a very hearty dinner on Christmas-day consisting of goose, plum pudding and about half a glass of ale. She subsequently ate some nuts and broad-figs, and before going to bed again partook of some goose. On getting into bed she complained of pain in the chest and turned almost black in the face. A doctor was sent for, but before he arrived the unfortunate woman had died. The medical man (Mr Ware) stated that he had previously treated deceased for weakness of her heart and indigestion. Death resulted from syncope induced by over-distention of the bowels and the exertion of going to bed. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A fatal accident that befell ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, of 11 Morley-place, Plymouth, formed the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, on Saturday. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was over 70 years of age, and very deaf, was about nine o'clock on the evening of the 28th of September last, in the act of crossing the upper part of York-street, just as a cab driven by the proprietor, Mr Burn, was coming down the hill. The driver seeing the deceased only a short distance in front of the horse called out loudly, and perceiving that MRS WILLIAMS took no notice, he did all he could to stop the horse, but the road being slippery he was unable to do this at once, and the animal knocked the deceased down, striking her with the hoof of one of its fore feet, and inflicting a gash in the poor woman's right leg. Burn at once had her placed in his cab and conveyed her to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where she was attended to by Mr Buchan, the resident Surgeon. MRS WILLIAMS, against the doctor's wishes, was removed two or three days afterwards to her home. Serious symptoms set in and after much suffering deceased died on Friday. It is but right to state that deceased had every care and the attendance of a trained nurse at her own house. Mr May, surgeon, having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and fully exonerated the driver from all blame.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 December 1885
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death By Drowning At Devonport. A Strange Oversight. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was opened at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before the Coroner, Mr R. Rodd, touching the death of JOHN METCALF, a stoker on board the Vivid, lying off Mount wise. - The Coroner, in charging the Jury, said deceased appeared to have left his ship one day last week and to have gone down to the beach with some of his comrades on Christmas-day with the intention of rejoining his vessel. There was no boat there to take him off, but he was determined to go and his comrades were unable to prevent his attempting to swim to the ship. He lost his life in the attempt and his body was found the next day. In the papers there was a question raised as to violence having been used, but the report he received from his officers did not attach blame to anyone. Of course, when any such suspicions were hinted at in the papers it was his duty to ask the Jury to investigate them if there appeared a possibility of their being well grounded. In this case they did not appear to be so, and of course he need scarcely tell them that in any case their verdict must be based upon the evidence taken in that Court and not on what appeared in the public press. The Jury then left to view the body and on their return it transpired that the body had not been seen by a medical man. A somewhat lengthy delay occurred whilst this omission was being remedied. On the Coroner's return he explained that he had not previously seen the body himself, and that now he had seen it the appearance of the face, especially about the eyes, was such that he did not feel justified in continuing the Inquiry without a post-mortem examination, and he should therefore adjourn the Inquest in order that this examination might be made. The Inquiry was accordingly adjourned until Monday next.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Over Stairs. - Mr T. C. Brian, the Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, last evening, touching the death of RICHARD OSBORNE TAYLOR, aged 65, living at 48 Vauxhall-street. Deceased fell over the stairs on Monday evening, and when picked up was bleeding very much from the ears and mouth. He was taken to the Hospital, but died half an hour after his admission. He was insensible from the time of the accident until his death. - Mr Buchan, House Surgeon of the Hospital, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination. Deceased was suffering from apoplexy. There were two large bruises on his head, both of which must have bled freely, and one was a fracture of the base of the skull. He could not say whether the fall was caused by the apoplexy, or that disease was the result of the fall. Both might have caused death. He, however, believed that the apoplexy preceded the fall. The Jury were of opinion that deceased died from a Fit of Apoplexy and returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

NEWTON ABBOT - Sad Accident At Newton. - Mr Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the residence of Mr A. Lee, corn merchant, of Newton, relative to the death of a domestic servant named BESSIE BURNETT, twenty-one years of age, who was in Mr Lee's employment. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who had lately suffered from an ulcerated throat, retired to bed on Sunday night with her fellow servant, named Williams, and wrapped some flannel around her neck. The benzoline lamp which they were using was left burning, the door was shut and the fireplace closed up to prevent any draught. On the following morning Williams awoke and got out of bed, but had a bad headache, and felt in a stupor. Mrs A. Lee on calling got no answer and on going to the bedroom she found Williams in a partly unconscious state, whilst BURNETT was dead. The room smelt very strongly of benzoline, and Dr Ley was quickly called in. He immediately attended to Williams, who soon recovered consciousness. Dr Ley gave it as his opinion that the deceased was suffocated by the fumes of the lamp, she at the time being in delicate health. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" and exonerated Mr and Mrs Lee from all blame.

NOTE: No newspapers in the Archive for 1886

Western Morning News Saturday 1 January 1887
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Drinking At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of SARAH BABBAGE, aged 32, whose decease occurred on the previous evening. Mr Honey was Foreman of the Jury. - ELIZABETH HARRY, mother of deceased, identified the body, and said deceased had been complaining of her health for the last seven months, during which time, until last Friday, she had been a teetotaller. She had often said that teetotalism did not agree with her. On Friday last deceased commenced to drink again, and was drunk, and had not been sober a day, or even an hour since. On Friday she bought a bottle of wine, but she had drunk whisky mostly. On Thursday last deceased went out herself, but witness did not know how much drink she had then. In the afternoon witness fetched her two noggins of whisky and deceased went to sleep about three o'clock, but never woke again. Between five and six o'clock witness's son went in to deceased, but he found she was quite dead and cold. Deceased was married, but her husband had left her about three years ago on account of her drinking habits. Witness knew she had been before the Magistrates for drunkenness at least 21 times. After she was dead witness found a bottle on the mantelpiece which contained liniment, and which she handed to Mr Waterfield. Deceased was a very violent woman, and if witness had refused to fetch drink for he she would have almost killed her. - Mr W. Waterfield, surgeon, said he was called on the previous evening about half-past six to the residence of deceased. He found her there on the sofa quite dead and cold, and he thought she had been dead at least two hours. At the Coroner's request he had that day made a post-mortem examination of deceased. There were no external marks of violence, but on opening the chest he found the lungs congested; the heart was healthy. On opening the abdomen he found the liver very much enlarged and congested. The posts of the stomach were greatly inflamed. One of the kidneys was diseased. All these organs smelled strongly of alcohol, and in his opinion their diseases were all symptoms of alcoholic poisoning, to which death was due. He had examined the liniment in the bottle, but found no traces of it in the stomach. - The Coroner said the doctor's evidence revealed a shocking state of things. The poor woman had lost her husband and her child some time ago, and now her own life through the drink. The mother had on the very day she died fetched her daughter some alcohol, but as she said deceased would have killed her if she had not done so, she did it through intimidation. He would ask the Jury to consider their verdict, and to say whether the mother was to blame in any way. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Alcoholic Poisoning," and fully exonerated the mother from all blame.

NEWTON ABBOT - At Newton Townhall yesterday Mr S. Hacker and a Jury of which Mr F. C. Rowe was Foreman, held an Inquest on the body of SAMUEL FROST, 49 years of age, a boatman, who was found in the River Teign, near Wright and Son's saw mills, on the previous day. The evidence went to shew that the deceased was Accidentally Drowned, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 January 1887
LAUNCESTON, CORNWALL - The Sudden Death At Launceston Police Station. - Mr G. G. White, sen., County Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr J. F. Geake was Foreman, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Railway Hotel, St Thomas, into the cause of the death of WILLIAM DOWN, reported in Monday's Western Morning News. The evidence was to the effect that late on Saturday night P.C. Wonnacott, stationed at St. Stephens, saw the deceased, who is a native of Lifton, and above 60 years of age, coming down St. Thomas-road. He was very much the worse for drink. He went so far as Newport-bridge, and then came back to the new railway bridge and asked someone for Mrs Dawe. Near the Railway Hotel, of which Mrs Dawe is the landlady, he fell down, the road being very slippery. P.C. Wonnacott assisted him to get up, and asked him how far he had to go. Deceased asked him whether he would see Mrs Dawe, and ask her for a night's lodging. The policeman called Mrs Dawe up, the house being shut at the time, but she told deceased that the house was full. Deceased then moved on a few yards and seeming to lose the use of legs altogether, fell to the ground. With the assistance of another man he was taken to the police-station, his boots taken off, and his collar and clothes loosened. The cell was quite warm, a fire being lighted in a room which had communication with it, and there was also a light burning in the cell itself. Deceased was first placed on a bench and had four warm rugs, but was afterwards laid on the floor - a wooden one - to prevent his falling, and six rugs placed on him. The police-constable Wonnacott visited him at various times during the night, and he appeared to be very comfortable, but did not speak. At six o'clock Superintendent Sherston had occasion to pass the cell and seeing the man inside called out to him and received an answer. Later in the morning about seven o'clock P.C. Worth called to the man, but got no answer and entering found him to be dead. - The medical witness, Dr Andrews, stated that deceased had recently consulted him about the loss of power in one side. He examined him, and found that he had had a seizure, but there was no valvular disease of the heart. Witness last saw deceased about a month since, and he then appeared to be slightly mending. It was dangerous for a man in his state to drink, and when witness saw him he told him so. From what he had heard of his state on Saturday he was not surprised to find that he had died suddenly. He had seen the deceased since death and his opinion was that he had had a more severe seizure than before, with an effusion of blood on the brain. The Jury found "That deceased died from Natural Causes, probably from an apoplectic seizure."

TIVERTON - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned by a Coroner's Jury at Tiverton, last evening, in the case of death of a girl named BESSIE DAVEY. On Wednesday last deceased was lighting a fire in her father's house, when her dress became ignited. Frightened, she ran into the street, and the flames were extinguished by neighbours, but not before she was badly burned. She was conveyed to the Infirmary in a state of collapse, from which she never recovered, and she died on Saturday evening.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 January 1887
TEDBURN ST. MARY - An Inquest was held at Tedburn St. Mary, near Exeter, yesterday, on the body of SAMUEL HENRY BRYAN, retired army captain. The evidence shewed that deceased complained of feeling unwell on Sunday evening. On Monday afternoon his wife left him for ten minutes, and on returning to the bedside found him dead. Internal haemorrhage, the doctor said, was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 January 1887
EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter, yesterday, Inquired into the cause of death of J. CARTER RICE, innkeeper and builder. On Monday deceased served on the Jury at the sessions. Yesterday morning he said, "I feel something rising; I don't think I can live much longer." He died twenty minutes later, the cause of death certified being syncope, arising from fatty degeneration.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held at Plymouth last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, in reference to the death of GEORGE HENRY PELLOW, 13 which was caused at Coxside by a cart, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News, it was shewn that deceased tried to pass between the cart and the wall, and was caught by the wheel and rolled against the wall. The Jury exonerated the driver from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 January 1887
TAVISTOCK - An adjourned Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Tavistock Workhouse, in regard to the death of WILLIAM LANGMAN, aged 14, which occurred on the 19th December last. Mr R. R. Rodd was Coroner, and Mr B. Candell, Foreman of the Jury. Charles Ford of Calstock, said the deceased worked with him on the quay at Calstock. On December 6th last witness started the horse drawing a couple of trucks along the East Cornwall Railway, and deceased should have been walking by his side. but they had not proceeded far before he heard a scream, and looking back, saw LANGMAN holding on to the top of one of the trucks, with his right leg dragging under the wheel. Witness immediately stopped the horse and went to the deceased, but before getting to him, he let go his hold and fell under the truck. Witness took him on his knee and held up his leg which was very much crushed. Deceased did not speak, and witness carried him into the company's office, close at hand. Dr Wood was soon in attendance, and after dressing the injured limb, ordered the lad to be taken to the Tavistock Workhouse. Witness thought the deceased intended to ride on the truck, but slipped in his attempt to get into it. Mr S. V. Theed, surgeon, said that he and Mr G. W. Northey amputated the injured leg, but deceased succumbed from [?]. In reply to a Juryman, Mr Theed said that he believed the removal of the deceased from [?] to the Workhouse hastened his end, as he felt that death must have resulted under any circumstances, seeing [?] of the injury. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - The Fatal Accident At Exeter. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at Exeter on the body of WILLIAM PARRISH, late foreman shunter at St. David's, on the Great Western railway. Deceased was 35 years of age, and lived in Toby's buildings, Lower North-street. On Saturday evening he was riding on a truck that was being shunted from the mileage line near the Exwick crossing. On passing the engine-house he fell. The driver pulled up, but the wheels of the trucks passed over his body and shockingly mutilated it. Death must have been instantaneous. - Verdict "Accidental Death." Deceased leaves a young widow and five children. He was a bell-ringer and was respected in the city.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 January 1887
TAVISTOCK - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Coroner's Jury at the Inquest at Tavistock yesterday afternoon on the body of WILLIAM GERRY, a quarryman, who was found dead in Hurdwick Quarry, near Tavistock on the previous day. Deceased was found lying at the foot of some rocks he had been engaged in dislodging, and medical evidence shewed that death had resulted from injuries to the chest. An examination of the spot where he had been working made by Mr Josiah Paul, mineral agent for the Duke of Bedford, shewed that the rock had broken away immediately over where the deceased was standing, and must have struck him in its descent, though only one piece of stone was found across his leg as he lay on the ground. The rock was described as being worked freely, and no blasting was necessary, the stone being liberated by wedges and bars.

PLYMOUTH - The Collapse Of A House At Mutley. The Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, by Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN COLLARD, aged 40, mason, 11 Devonshire-street, Plymouth, who was injured on Monday by the falling of a wall in Connaught-villas, Mutley, and died on Tuesday morning in the Hospital. Mr Edwin H. Stumbles was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said that he had felt it his duty to have the building inspected by a competent surveyor, and he had therefore requested Mr Bellamy, the Borough Surveyor, to visit the spot, and give in evidence the result of his inspection. It would be for the Jury to say if, in addition to that, they would themselves like to visit the buildings, or whether they would think Mr Bellamy's evidence sufficient. - Richard Osborne, mason, 7 William-street, Plymouth, said: I knew the deceased and I identify his body. On Monday last he and I were engaged at the building of a tenement to a house at Glenside. It is a house in a row. I had the job in hand, having taken it from Mr Foster. The deceased and Emmett were employed by me as masons, and we were working by piece work. Two labourers were working with us. For some days the weather had been very unfavourable for working, it being partly rainy and partly frosty. The wall that fell had been begun about three months ago, and we had worked at it from time to time. It was the front wall, and was 8 feet 9 inches high to the first storey; there were two other storeys, 8 feet 2 inches each; and then there were the joists, making about 27 feet altogether. I consider that we did our work in a proper workmanlike manner. On Monday we all looked at and examined it before we went to the top, and everything seemed all right. We went up by ladder. The bottom part of the wall, for two storeys, was of stone; the higher portion, where we were working, was of brick. We worked on the wall for four hours, raising it in that time about three feet. We were putting on the last course of bricks, when I and the deceased noticed the wall was bending in towards us, so as to make a hollow. I and COLLARD were together side by side on the scaffold. I called out, "Look out, it's coming in," and immediately ran to the end of the scaffolding, when it fell, and I went down with it. I found myself on the first joist, buried amid planks, &c. I managed to unbury myself and then saw the top of COLLARD'S head. He was buried under the debris of bricks and mortar. The deceased said, "Take it from my neck, it is choking me." I and others helped and we got him out. He was bleeding from the head and could not stand. He said his back was hurt. I was shaken, but not much hurt. We removed deceased in a cab to the Hospital. I have been all my life a mason. I cannot explain how it is that the wall fell, but I think it was due to the action of the frost upon the wet. The mortar was properly mixed, and there was no undue haste in carrying on the work. I have been engaged for ten years on similar work for Mr Foster, and this is the first accident I have ever been in. - In reply to Mr Foster, witness said he had received orders from him not to work when the weather was very wet or frosty; but he received no special orders on Monday. It was, however, frosty on Monday and had rained on Sunday. - By the Jury: About two storeys of the wall fell, and about twelve feet of the main quoin and six feet of the return wall also fell. It is a double tenement. We had no special reason for examining the wall before we went up. No one had said anything to us about the wall, and we had not noticed anything about it. The mortar was good. We had as much lime and sand as we liked. - Albert Emmett, mason, Woolster-street, Plymouth, gave corroborative evidence. - By the Jury: We were working on four tenements at the same time, that is, when one had been got up to the first joist, another was got to the same height, and so on. - Mr Reginald Lacey said: I am a B.M., and M.R.C.S., and am the House Surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The deceased was brought to the accident ward at 5.30 on Monday afternoon. I examined him and found he was seriously hurt. He was suffering from concussion of the spine, two scalp wounds, and other injuries. They were such as would be caused by the accident that had taken place. I did not think at first that the case would be fatal, but yesterday morning at half-past nine he died. There is no doubt that he died from the injuries he had received. - [The Coroner here stated that he had just been informed of the sudden death of the Earl of Iddesleigh, which they would all hear with regret. The announcement created considerable emotion, and some moments were passed in silence before the Inquiry proceeded.] - Mr Geo. D. Bellamy, the Borough Surveyor, said: At the Coroner's request I today visited the house in question. It is situated on the southern side of the eastern end of Connaught-avenue. The tenement of this house is the western half of a double tenement. A portion of the western wall and a small portion of the northern wall have fallen, also a small piece of the party wall between the two tenements. I gave my attention particularly to the character of the work. The remaining portion of the bottom part of the masonry wall I consider to be a fairly well-built wall; I mean fairly bonded, the stones of good size, and the brickwork all good. What I noticed particularly was that in the lower part of the wall, from the ground upwards, the mortar was quite green. I could see it and feel it. All the mortar was good. I think the fall was due to two storeys of the wall being 18in thick, and the upper storey 9in. thick, bearing on the outer surface f the all, all of which was green mortar, and this caused the outer portion of the wall to settle more than the inner. This would throw the wall out of the perpendicular. I have no fault to find with either the material or the construction of the wall. I attribute the collapse of the wall to the work going on in unfavourable weather. The frost immediately followed heavy rains, and the frost penetrated the whole thickness of the wall. As soon as the thaw sets in the men begin to work, and put more weight on the wall. This is the usual way of building here. It is not a safe way, but I do not remember any such accident as this one. - By the Jury: If the mortar on the lower part of the wall had been allowed to dry, there would not have been any danger of the wall falling. - Mr Henry Foster, the builder, said that it was true, as asked by one of the Jury, that some time ago there was a similar collapse of a chimney in the same row of houses, whereby some men were injured. Subsequently Mr Foster, in evidence, said: Osborne, the mason, was engaged by me, and he engaged the others. I was at the building at eleven o'clock in the morning of the say the accident occurred. No one was working there. It was thawing; the frost was just giving in. I gave no orders to Osborne to go on with the work. He was working without my knowledge. I had given orders on the previous Saturday that the work was not to go on, as I did not think it a favourable time to proceed with the building. I gave the orders through my foreman, and Osborne had the same intimation as the others. I have thirty masons employed, and Osborne, the deceased and Emmett were the only three who worked. After the accident, I spoke to Osborne about it, and told him he ought not to have been at work. He said that he thought it was perfectly safe, as it was but a 9-inch wall, the mortar abberthaw, and the bottom had been built so long. - The Coroner then pointed out to the Jury that the evidence tended to shew that the collapse of the wall was accidental, though from what Mr Bellamy and Mr Foster had said it would seem that Osborne had committed an error of judgment in going on with the work when he did, instead of waiting until the wall had dried from the severe weather to which it had been exposed. However, the men were on piece-work, and doubtless wished to get on as quickly as possible, hence an error of judgment, but for which they would not have had to make that Inquiry. - The Court was then cleared, and after a short deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 January 1887
NORTH DEVON - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held yesterday on the body of JAMES CHALLACOMBE, aged 19 (son of a farmer renting under Mr Charles Chichester of Hall), who had been shot while rabbit shooting on Thursday. The deceased was stooping over a rabbit's hole when his companion, a gamekeeper named Facey, fired at a rabbit which appeared over his head. CHALLACOMBE rose suddenly and the charge entered his head, death being instantaneous. In answer to a Juror, the gamekeeper stated he could not say whether or not the gun went off before he raised it to his shoulder.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 January 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Concealment Of Birth At Devonport. Alleged Irregular Burials At The Cemetery. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall, yesterday afternoon, on the body of the newly-born child of RHODA MARY GLOYN, domestic servant, brought to notice under circumstances reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. The Head Constable (Mr Lynn) watched the case on behalf of the Police. - Richard John Champion, 8 Garden-street, Morice Town, a labourer in the temporary employ of the Cemetery Authorities, said he had been working at the Milehouse Burial-ground about a fortnight. He had no instructions given him as to the buying of bodies. On Saturday morning, about a quarter-past eleven, he was at the bottom part of the Cemetery when a lady came to him with a box, and asked him to bury it. Witness asked her whether she had a certificate, and she said she had not, but she would get one by next week. Witness said, "I don't know what to do by it." She replied, "You had better bury it; I have been here before, and you may as well have a shilling as anyone else," or words to that effect. She gave witness the box and a shilling. Witness noticed that she was shaking, and he thought that she was very cold. - The Coroner: did it not occur to you that if she did not give her name and address, and said she had not a certificate, it was quite possible that she might not bring it? - Witness said that he thought Mr Simmons, the clerk, knew all about it, and that it was all right. After keeping the box by his side a few minutes he buried it. The woman remained while this was being done, and she told witness to bury it dry. Witness noticed that her dress was covered with mud, and she said, "I fell over the hedge." This was after witness had buried the box. Witness asked "What hedge?" And she said "Down at the bottom." Witness's suspicions were not excited by this statement. He thought she might have come from Ford, as some persons entered the cemetery at the bottom in such cases. After ascertaining that witness had buried the box without a certificate, Mr Rich advised him to take up the box again. He did so, and placed it in the tool-house, where it lay until the Police came. Witness thought Mr Rich sent for the Police. The box was opened in witness's presence. - The Coroner: Did you not state to me at my Office on Saturday that the woman told you, you did not need a certificate for that thing? - After a deal of hesitation witness replied: The woman said it was a midwife's child, and the midwife was not home. - The Coroner: Did you not tell me that the woman said "You do not need a certificate?" - Witness: She may have said so. I told her to mind the certificate, or we should hear more about it. - The Coroner: But you did not know her, and she might have come from a distance. - On the witness being asked to sign his depositions it was found that he could neither read nor write. - John Rich, monumental mason, carrying on business at the cemetery gate, said that just after eleven on Saturday he saw a woman pass his shop in a very dirty state, which excited his attention. She had what appeared to be a box under her arm. About ten minutes afterwards witness saw her come out of the cemetery entrance. Witness thought there was something wrong, and having the superintendence of the cemetery by the authority of the church-wardens of Stoke Church, he ascertained from the grave-digger that he had just buried a child. Champion told witness that the woman said she had been there before on a similar errand, and that the other grave-digger had buried the body and received the shilling. Witness explained that Champion did not put the shilling into his pocket. Bodies of still-born children were often brought to the cemetery and buried on the production of the certificate of a known midwife. At the suggestion of witness the body was taken up again. - Thomas Malley, labourer under the Local Board, deposed to seeing GLOYN as detailed in yesterday's Western Morning News. Witness told two policemen later in the afternoon that he knew the girl by sight, but he could not tell her name. He told Police he believed she was living in service in St. Aubyn-street or thereabout. - P.C. Clarke deposed to going to the tool-house of the cemetery, opening a box and finding a male child wrapped in a blue shawl. There was a handkerchief covered with blood in the box. Witness asked the grave-digger how he came to bury it without a certificate, and she said a woman came and asked him to bury it, and said he might as well have the shilling as old Frank - she had been there several times, and that old Frank had done it. Champion further told him that boxes had been left there several times without a certificate. He had seen the other grave-diggers have them, but he had not had any before. Champion, accompanied by witness conveyed the body to the Guildhall mortuary. Witness went in search of but did not find the woman. - Mr F. E. Row, police surgeon, deposed that he saw a woman named GLOYN, at the Police Station on Saturday night. In answer to witness's inquiry, the woman said she had had a baby in the Park about nine o'clock on Saturday night. Witness asked her whether it cried or breathed, and she said it had made no noise whatever. She was so weak that witness feared to ask her any more questions, and suggested her removal in a cab to her sister's house. Witness had made a post-mortem examination . The body was that of a fully developed male child. It had never breathed. There were no bruises about the body or abrasions of the skin anywhere. Witness was fully of opinion that it was a stillborn child. - The Coroner: It was a cold night. Supposing that the child had been born under better circumstances, might it not have lived? - Witness: Possibly. - In reply to Mr Lynn, witness said that the temperature of the night would not affect the fact of the child having breathed. - This concluded the evidence, and the Coroner remarked that that was the extent of their Inquiry, as they had nothing whatever t do with the matter of concealment of birth. It was for them to say whether the child was born alive, and if so how it came by its death. The medical testimony being that it was not born alive, he thought they could only find that it was stillborn. - The Jury immediately concurred. - The Coroner thought that the Cemetery authorities were to blame in placing a grave-digger in a position to receive a child and bury a body without giving him proper instructions as to his duties and the certificate required. When it became matter of evidence that an official of the cemetery who could not read or write, and could not tell whether any document handed him was a proper certificate or not, was in a position to receive a body and bury it, he thought such a proceeding ought not to be permitted. In this case the child was still-born, but it might have been a murdered child, and the absence of precaution afforded facilities for the disposal of bodies which ought not to be allowed. If a capable man had been at the cemetery he would not have allowed a woman to leave a body for burial without a proper certificate. - Mr Simmons, parish clerk of Stoke Church, who was present, but not called as a witness, explained that there was an official working at the cemetery at the time in place of the foreman, and that Champion ought to have communicated with him. - It was remarked by some of the Jury that there were no regular hours of burial at the cemetery and that this was a matter which should be altered.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 January 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Swing Accident At Ford. - At the Ford Hotel yesterday afternoon Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ALBERT JOHN HARRIS, 7 years of age, who died on Tuesday morning from the effects of an accident on the previous Friday. From the evidence of WILLIAM HARRIS (9), brother of the deceased, living at 45 Alexandra-road, Devonport, it appeared that the deceased was on Friday last swinging at the Ford Board school when he slipped and fell on his back. The deceased, who had been swinging about a quarter of an hour, was pushed by his brother backward and forward. It was a gymnasium swing with iron rings, to which the deceased hung by his hands. His feet when nearest the ground would be two or three feet from it. After falling the boy got up and said he had hurt himself, but went into school and did his lessons. Deceased told his brother not to tell his mother, who did not know of the accident until Monday night, when witness told her he had had a fall. - Ann Truscott, grandmother of deceased, said the child went to church on Sunday as usual, but on Monday evening he was rather poorly. On Monday after dark witness sent for Mr Row, surgeon. He did not, however, come on Monday, but sent medicine. He was telephoned for on Tuesday morning, and came directly, but the child was dead. - From the evidence of Mr Row death was due to congestion of the brain, caused by the fall. If he had attended the child on Monday it would not have prevented death. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and the Coroner suggested that the schoolmaster of the Ford Board School, who was present, should communicate with the managers to try and guard against a similar accident, it being pointed out that a quarter of an hour seemed to be an exceptionally long time for a boy of the deceased's age to be allowed to swing.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 January 1887
WHITCHURCH - Inquiry was made by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at Whitchurch yesterday, concerning the death of MAGGIE LEWIS, eight months old, daughter of FREDERICK LEWIS, a coachman in the employ of Mr W. H. Chichester, Grenofen. Deceased, after passing a restless night, was taken ill on Tuesday morning, and died before medical aid could be procured. A post-mortem examination made by Mr Brodrick, surgeon, shewed that the lungs were greatly inflamed and the heart clotted with blood, and the doctor attributed death to syncope and inflammation of the lungs. The Coroner remarked that he considered it necessary to hold an Inquest because he found there was a growing tendency among parents to insure the lives of very young children. Two-thirds of the children on whom he had held Inquests lately had been insured, and he had, in fact, given more certificates for children during the past three years than in the previous thirteen. Of course he was not saying there was anything wrong, but it was necessary watch very carefully infantile mortality. In the present case the child was insured, but had died before the expiration of the period which must elapse before the parents became entitled to the insurance money. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 January 1887
EXETER - The Fatal Accident At Yeoford Junction. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Exeter concerning the death of JOSEPH BRIGHT, a signalman lately employed by the London and South Western Railway Company. The evidence shewed that deceased rode in the guard's van of a luggage train from Exeter to Devonport last Wednesday evening. On arriving at Yeoford the guard left the van to signal the driver and in his absence the deceased endeavoured to jump out of the train whilst it was in motion. He was found between the platform and the trucks with both his legs and right arm broken, and cut about the head. The guard said he could not account for the accident. The van was next the engine. He had known the deceased twelve years and never saw him intoxicated. Another witness stated that in reply to a question the deceased said the accident was caused by missing his foothold when jumping from the train. He further told the witness that he had been to Exeter to fetch some medicine for his wife, who was unwell. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 January 1887
STOKE GABRIEL - The Strange Affair At Stoke Gabriel. Extraordinary Scene: Enforced Disinterment. - A remarkable scene attended the opening of the Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances under which SELINA LEVER, aged 46, late housekeeper to the Rev. J. H. N. Nevill, vicar of Stoke Gabriel, near Paignton, and wife of his gardener, came by her death. As stated in the Western Morning News of yesterday, the deceased, after an illness of several weeks, died on Tuesday week, and her body was interred by the vicar in the parish churchyard on Saturday last without the usual registrar's order, which was refused owing to there being no medical certificate as to the cause of death. An order had been given by the County Coroner (Mr S. Hacker of Newton Abbot), for the exhumation of the body yesterday morning, the notices for the purpose being sent to the vicar and churchwardens, Messrs. J. Peek and G. Churchward, and a request having also been conveyed to Dr Hains and Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) of Totnes, to be in attendance for the purpose of making a post-mortem examination. The vicar, however, refused to allow the body to be disinterred, whereupon the churchwarden dispatched a telegram to the Coroner asking for instructions under the circumstances. The telegram reached the Coroner just as he was starting for Stoke Gabriel to open the Inquest and on his arrival in the village he at once proceeded to the Church House Inn where the Inquiry took place. Rear-Admiral Dawkins, of Maisonette, was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and amongst the other Jurors were Mr H. Studdy, of Waddeton Court, and Mr Churchward, one of the churchwardens. There were also present the vicar and his legal adviser, Mr T. C. Kellock, ex-Mayor of Totnes. - The Coroner, in his opening remarks, spoke of the circumstances attending the death of the woman LEVER being such as to have aroused suspicion in the minds of many of the inhabitants. She died on Tuesday week, and on Friday last notice was given to the registrar, who made an entry in the registry-book, but did not give a certificate. The body was interred on Saturday, without a certificate, and although this was an irregular practice, it was not illegal for a clergyman, provided he gave seven days' notice to the Coroner of what he had done. This was the strict law on the subject, although, as a matter of fact, it was seldom acted upon. Having made inquiries, he had come to the conclusion that as a matter of public interest, and for the public good, an Inquest was necessary. Consequently he had issued notices in her Majesty's name, by virtue of his office as Coroner of the district, calling upon the vicar and churchwardens to exhume the body. These notices were served on Wednesday and the body should have been exhumed at eight o'clock that morning, but he had ascertained that his orders had not been carried out. It would perhaps be best first to know why his order for exhumation had not been fulfilled. - Mr Kellock, solicitor for the vicar, said it would be a very revolting step to have a disinterment and the vicar protested against such a step being taken in the following written objection:- 'To Sidney Hacker, Esq. - In the matter of MRS SELINA LEVER. I object to the course you are now taking on the following grounds: Because I consider in the first instance, at least, there should be an inquiry to ascertain if there are any suspicious circumstances to warrant an exhumation of the body; also because I consider it my sacred duty, as vicar of the parish, not to permit the churchyard or grave to be desecrated without sufficient cause. I shall, therefore, not consent to it, firstly without authority from the Home Secretary, to whom I have already written, secondly without the consent of the Bishop of the diocese, to whom I intend to apply immediately for instructions, having been advised that a corpse once buried cannot be taken up or removed without a licence from the Ordinary. In making this objection to your present line of action in ordering an immediate disinterment of the body, it is not my intention to defy authority, but to endeavour to have the law correctly and humanely carried out, after a preliminary inquiry, and provided sufficient cause is then shewn for such a revolting step. - (Signed) J. H. N. Nevill, January 27th, 1887.' - The Vicar added that he received a certificate, but handed it back to Mr Rossiter, district registrar, at his request. - The Coroner did not consider it necessary for him to reply to the vicar's statement. He had held a preliminary inquiry, which was sufficient to satisfy him that an Inquest was necessary. Until a body had been viewed by a Coroner's Jury they had no legal status. A post-mortem examination could be made now as well as a few days previously, and it would in no way be prejudicial to the public health. Under the circumstances he should certainly enforce his order and if anyone committed the misdemeanour of obstructing the Coroner and Jury they must take the consequences. - The Vicar wished to know, if he risked the consequences of being proceeded against, whether that would prevent the violation of the grave. - The Coroner replied certainly not. His order would be carried out, and if necessary by force. - The Vicar protested against the action of the Coroner, which he said was illegal and without authority. - The Coroner reiterated his determination of having his order of disinterment carried out, and explained that anyone obstructing the Jury would be guilty of a misdemeanour and would render himself liable to be proceeded with by indictment. - Calling on the Vicar and churchwardens to carry out his order, the Coroner then proceeded, accompanied by the Jurors, to the entrance to the churchyard, being met just outside the gate by the husband of the deceased, who said he objected to having the body taken up. The Coroner told him he had nothing to do with it, and that the Jury wished to view the body. He asked where the keys were, and, addressing the vicar as he slowly approached, he asked him: Will you admit the Coroner and Jury? - The Vicar replied: I refuse, in the name of the law, without a faculty from the Bishop. I protest against the violation of the churchyard. - The Coroner: Do you refuse to obey the order? - The Vicar: I shall proceed against anyone who does it, and they will do it at their peril. - The Coroner then requested the churchwardens to open the churchyard gate, but no reply being given the Coroner told the sexton (Mr J. Narracott) to unfasten the bolts at the bottom of the wood gate on the inside. The sexton, however, said he was afraid "he would get five years for it." Without more delay, the Coroner himself pushed the gate, and after the lapse of a few minutes it yielded, and was forced open without damage, the lock and bolts still remaining intact. At the order of the Coroner, the sexton shewed him the grave of the deceased, and upon the Jurors, the vicar, and others reaching the spot, the Coroner further ordered the sexton to open the grave, which is in an open space on the south side of the church. - As the sexton commenced his task, the Vicar again protested against what he termed the desecration of God's acre, exclaiming that it was "an outrage against God." - Admiral Dawkins asked the Coroner whether they were acting within the limits of the law, as if there was any possible doubt on the matter he should be inclined to hold his hand. - The Coroner replied that it was laid down authoritatively, and was a clear and well-known law, that within reasonable time of death the Coroner might order the exhumation of a body. - Admiral Dawkins asked Dr Hains whether he considered this was within reasonable time, to which Dr Hains replied that he did. - The same question was also put to Dr Fraser, and he, too, replied in the affirmative. - The Coroner then told the sexton to continue the disinterment, upon which the sexton said, "Mr Nevill said he would give me five years if I did it." - The work of clearing the grave was then proceeded with, the sexton being assisted by three or four other men, and in about three-quarters of an hour the coffin was lifted on to the bank, in the presence of about twenty or thirty persons, who had watched the scene with much interest. - The Coroner was then asked by the sexton where the coffin should be taken, when he directed that the question should be put to the churchwardens, who ordered it to be conveyed to an empty house near at hand, which was accordingly done. The lid was then unscrewed and the Coroner and Jurors viewed the body, after which they returned to the Inquiry room. The husband was called as a witness. He at first refused to be sworn, but on the advice of the vicar took the oath. He merely identified the body and deposed as to his wife's death on Tuesday week. - The Coroner said that as it would be necessary to adjourn they might as well do so at once, and the Inquiry was then adjourned until tomorrow at noon, when the result of the post-mortem examination, which was held during the afternoon, will be made known. - The proceedings, which commenced at noon, lasted about two hours. The Rev. J. H. Nevill was formerly curate at St. Matthias, Torquay, and previously he was with Canon Wilberforce at Southampton.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 January 1887
STOKE GABRIEL - The Strange Affair At Stoke Gabriel. Adjourned Inquest. The Post-Mortem Examination. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances under which SELINA LEVER, aged 46, housekeeper to the Rev. J. H. N. Nevill, vicar of Stoke Gabriel, came to her death, was held on Saturday before Mr S. Hacker, the County Coroner, the proceedings lasting over five hours. Deceased died on Tuesday week, without being attended by a medical man, and her burial by the vicar without the usual registrar's certificate, together with the enforced exhumation of the body ten days after death for the purposes of a post-mortem examination, have invested the affair with unusual interest. The proceedings were resumed in the Church House Inn at noon. Admiral Dawkins being again the Foreman of the Jury. Mr T. C. Kellock, solicitor, of Totnes, again attended on behalf of the vicar, who entered the room a few minutes after the commencement of the Inquiry. Dr Lalande Hains and Dr Fraser, both of Totnes, the medical men who made the post-mortem examination, were also present. About a score of the villagers were likewise present. - The Coroner, in opening, remarked to the Jury that they would now have to take the evidence, and if, as they might hope, it was proved to their satisfaction that the deceased came to her death in a natural way, they would have to congratulate the public on the result; but if, on the other hand, the evidence tended in any other direction, it would be their duty to follow it to its proper conclusion. - HENRY LEVER, husband of the deceased, was recalled, and stated that he was present at his wife's death, which occurred about 7 a.m. on Tuesday week. A nurse was also in the room when she died. Mr Nevill was there occasionally, but not exactly at the time of death. He had been in the room an hour previously. Deceased died in a convulsive fit, and was insensible at the time. She was insensible some hours before, but not on the previous evening when she said she did not think she should get over it. - At this stage Mr Kellock asked for an adjournment to a larger room and the vicar, in supporting the request, complained of the air as "perfectly poisonous," and said he would entirely give up his rights to the public to have the adjacent schoolroom used. It was decided that the examination of the witness should be first concluded. - The husband, continuing his evidence, stated that at 2 a.m. on the morning of her death the deceased had a prolonged convulsive fit, accompanied by twitching of the limbs, and the convulsions continued more or less up to the hour of her death. She had been ill for years, and had many heavy attacks before they came to Stoke Gabriel, which would be five years ago next March. Her last illness commenced three months before her death, and he understood she suffered from an abscess on the liver. They had been married many years, and lived on the best of terms. He took her out in a chair three times during her illness. She had eggs, new milk, oatmeal, oranges and everything she fancied or asked for. She had no strong liquids. He believed she took a little intoxicating drink before taking to her bed, but he never saw her anything the worse for it. He did not think she was so near her death until she had the fits in the morning when she died, as before she had improved a great deal. She had no medical attendance, and, although he considered her seriously ill when she took to her bed, he did not call in a doctor because he thought she did not require his attendance, and that there was sufficient in the house. - The Coroner: What do you mean by sufficient? Witness: She had medicine from different places. - Where did she get that? Now it is come to the point, I suppose I must tell. - Of course you must tell me what you know without my having to ask you for everything. Well, she had medicine from Mr Nevill. - And that's the reason you did not call in a doctor? - Yes, and because I thought the attendance she had was sufficient. - When she had these convulsive fits, and you thought she was going to die, why didn't you call in a doctor then? - I thought it was not necessary. She went off quicker than I thought she was going to. Witness added that Mr Nevill gave deceased her medicine up to the last. She was sick, and vomited two or three days before her death, but he did not know how long this occurred after her previous meal. - Mr Kellock here took exception to Dr Hains whispering to the Coroner, remarking that, if he was giving evidence, he should like to hear it. - The Coroner replied that Dr Hains was not giving evidence, but that he would do so later on. - Witness, continuing, said deceased did not complain of any pain, only of weariness. He did not know what she died of, and she never told him what she was suffering from. She did not waste much, except in her legs and arms and around the shoulders. In reply to Mr Studdy, a Juryman, witness said he was perfectly satisfied with the treatment his wife received at the hands of Mr Nevill and that she could not possibly have been treated better or more kindly. - Admiral Dawkins: Did not her falling away suggest to you that you should have further advice? - Witness: I thought she was coming round again, and I did not consider further advice necessary. - By Mr Rendell (Juror): On the first day he took the deceased out it was cold, and raining a little. - In reply to Mr Kellock, witness added that he remembered Dr Curry seeing the deceased two years ago, and also Dr Kingdon, of London, about the same time. Dr Kingdon was of opinion she had confirmed liver disease, and was likely to "go off" at any moment. "Dr." Wallace, of London, also saw her two months ago. During her last illness she was attended by Mrs Bull and two nurses from Torquay. One came in December and stayed with the deceased until the day before her death, and the other was there at the time, so that she was never left. Sometimes the deceased was in dreadful agony, which she described as burning pains in her side. This, however, was not in her last illness, but twelve months ago. She never expressed a wish for any other attendance. - At this stage the Inquiry was adjourned for a quarter of an hour and was resumed in the larger old schoolroom near by. - Ellen Bull, wife of a fisherman, and charwoman at the vicarage, stated that three or four months ago she was engage by Mr Nevill to attend to the deceased by day and do the work of her house. Deceased was poorly then, but not ill. Shortly afterwards she took to her bed, being weak and languid and got worse. She had plenty of nourishing food, but no strong drink. "Dr" Wallace came to see her from London. Three weeks or a month before her death a nurse was sent for. Deceased took very little medicine, which was given her by Mr Nevill. She was sensible the evening before witness left, and she did not then think she was dying. She did not think there was any necessity to call in medical aid. Witness denied having said that deceased complained of not having what she wanted, but she admitted her having said that if she had had a doctor she might have got round again. - Alice Penzer, trained nurse from St Raphael's Home, Torquay, said she was with the deceased at Mr Nevill's request nearly three weeks, from the 29th of December to the 17th of January. She found the deceased in bed very ill. She was supposed to be suffering from cancer of the liver. Witness took charge of her at night and sometimes saw her during the day. She was sick during the last week, and had a convulsive fit, during which she became insensible, and the pupils of her eyes were dilated for ten minutes. There was occasional vomit of a green colour, as though from the liver. Deceased had cramp in her legs, and her feet were swollen. When she had a convulsive fit it would commence with the drawing of her mouth and the twitching of her eyes, after which she would go off into a deep sleep. Witness administered medicine to her which she obtained from Mr Nevill. She did not know what the medicine was. Deceased gradually got much weaker. There was no doctor in attendance. - The Coroner: Did you not consider her so dangerously ill as to necessitate the sending for a doctor? - Witness: No, I did not. I was working under Mr Nevill and he was working under Mr Wallace, of London. - Admiral Dawkins: As a trained nurse, called in to attend a patient, and seeing such symptoms as convulsions and gradual weakness, did you not consider it your duty to call the attention of those who had charge of her, and to suggest that medical advice on the spot should be taken? Or were you satisfied by being in communication with a doctor who lives in London? - Witness: When Mr Nevill was there he acted as a doctor, and I was working under him. - Admiral Dawkins: But when you saw these serious symptoms did you not suggest that it would be better to have the advice of a local medical man? - Witness: I did not think anything about it. When I am sent to a case I work under whom I am placed. I left it to Mr Nevill. - Admiral Dawkins remarked that a trained nurse would not be of much benefit to him if in case of illness she acted in a similar way. - Witness added that she had been a trained nurse five years, and had never had a similar case before; in all other instances a doctor had been seeing the patient. The deceased was taken out in the day without her approval, but she was not the worse for it. Had she been there she should have protested against it. She was satisfied she had every attention and requirement. She had no animal food or beef tea, but plenty of eggs, milk and gruel. Animal food was not allowed, the deceased being treated on the vegetarian principle. She did not think animal food would have been good for her. She did not exercise her own judgment as a nurse as to what was good for the deceased; had she done so, she might have suggested that beef tea should be given. She simply administered the diet as prescribed by Mr Nevill, but she thought the diet the best for the case. She left the day before the deceased's death and she did not then consider she was in a dying condition. - By Mr Kellock: The other nurse was there before she left, having come on the Saturday. Deceased had as much bread, eggs, gruel, barley water, lemonade and new milk as she could take, besides oranges and vegetables and also extract of malt. She had every care and attention, was treated kindly, and no efforts were spared to make her comfortable. Notes of the treatment were made by herself and Mr Nevill and the results sent every week by Mr Nevill to Mr Wallace. Deceased was made sick twice by the smell of meat. The medicines administered answered their purpose - in fact, witness never knew medicines used better or so well, as these. They seemed to act in the most marvellous manner in stopping sickness and soothing the patient. - Isabel Paterson, trained nurse, also from St Raphael's Home, Torquay, stated that she came to attend on the deceased on January 15th, the Saturday previously to her death on the Tuesday. She thought the deceased very ill. She gave her medicine once on Sunday night and Mr Nevill administered two doses between 5 30 p.m. on Monday and 7 a.ml on the following morning, when she died. She had food every hour on Monday night and took it. At 2 a.m. on Tuesday she vomited gruel she had taken an hour before, and she soon afterwards had convulsions. Witness was a trained nurse of 12 years' experience. - Admiral Dawkins: Did it not suggest itself to you, when you saw such alarming symptoms, that a medical man should have been sent for? - Witness: A medical man would have been no good then. - Admiral Dawkins: How do you know? Are you one? - Witness: No. - Admiral Dawkins: It appears odd that no such suggestion was made by you, as a trained lady, in such a serious case, and that you did not consider it part of your business to do so. - Witness: I did not think of it. She added that she knew, when the convulsions came on at 2 a.m., that deceased was dying. - By Mr Kellock: She was of opinion that a medical man would have been no good, and she was perfectly satisfied with the treatment deceased received at the hands of those around her. - Elizabeth Jane Durant, a lady residing at Sharpham, near Totnes, gave evidence briefly to the effect that she saw the deceased on the 26th of December and had been in communication with Mr Wallace about her. - Joseph Wallace of 1 Oxford-mansions, Oxford-circus, London, next gave evidence. He described himself as a medical scientist. - The Coroner: Are you a qualified practitioner? - Witness: No, thank God. He proceeded to say that he was on a visit to a patient in Torquay on the 16th of November last, when Mr Nevill, who he knew was coming, waited upon him and drove him to Stoke Gabriel to see the deceased. Witness had been consulted about her case previously by Mr Nevill and had been giving advice as to her treatment. When he saw her on the 16th of November, deceased was in bed, very much prostrated, and with no power of movement. She had a tendency to dropsy, and her legs were beginning to swell. Her pulse was 124, excessively weak and irregular; respiration 24; temperature 99.5. He gave her malt extract to enable her to retain her food. He expressed his opinion that deceased was seriously ill and that there was no chance of her recovery, except by a miracle. With ordinary treatment she was likely to die in ten days, but with very careful nursing she might last for two months. He formed the conclusion that she was suffering from chronic disease of the liver and also cancerous habit of the body generally. He saw her again the next day and prescribed for her. Mr Nevill was a pupil of his, and knew how to treat patients. Witness prescribed two of his own patent medicines, called No. 2 and No. 3, and also malt extract. He had been in communication with Mr Nevill as to the state of deceased every few days up to the day of her death. He was not surprised at her death, but rather that she lived so long. He did not send the medicines: Mr Nevill prepared them himself. - Admiral Dawkins: Did you tell the husband that you were not a qualified practitioner? - Witness: No; I never said I was an M.D. It was not necessary. - Mr Nevill said he explained this matter to the husband several times. - Admiral Dawkins: I think it exceedingly unusual for a man who is called in, in this way not to say, "I am not a qualified man, but I have taken many cases." (Applause). (To witness) Were you not introduced to someone in this parish as "Dr" Wallace? - Witness: Not to my knowledge. - Mr Rendell, a Juryman, said that on one occasion when LEVER (the husband) met with an accident, he offered the loan of his horse to send for a medical man, when the vicar said it was unnecessary, as "Dr" Wallace was there. - Mr Nevill admitted that he might have spoken thus in a general way of Mr Wallace. - Mr Studdy: Anyone may call himself "doctor". - Admiral Dawkins expressed himself perfectly satisfied that there was no misrepresentation. - Witness added that he was a total abstainer and had not touched animal food for twenty years. If doctors properly understood the science of food they would never give their patients drugs. - Lalande John Cary Hains, physician and surgeon, Totnes, was then called upon to state the result of his post-mortem examination of the body, in which he was assisted by Dr Fraser. He first asked the Coroner whether it would not be better to postpone his evidence, as on account of the post-mortem he had had occasion to send some portion of the organs to London for analysis, and he should refuse on those grounds to give any opinion at present as to the immediate cause of death. - The Coroner decided that he would take the witness's statement as to the post-mortem and he proceeded to give it. He said he made the examination on Thursday, on the body being exhumed in the churchyard, ten days after death. As to the external signs, decomposition was well marked and rigor mortis was almost absent. - The Coroner: Was the condition of the body such as to enable you to obtain an opinion upon your examination? - Witness: Quite so. - The Coroner: It had not been too long in the ground for that purpose? - Witness: No. Of course it would have been better if the post-mortem had been made sooner. - The Coroner: Was the body in such a state that there was any danger of infection to the public by exhuming it? - Witness: Not at all. Continuing, Dr Hains said the body was fairly nourished, but about the legs and arms there was a tendency to emaciation. There was slight oedema of the ankles, the eyes were staring, and the pupils had a tendency to dilation. There was a good deal of haemorrhage from the mouth and nose. No marks of violence, or cicatricea of old sores, were at all discernible. On opening the skull, he found the dura matter very much thickened, and here was a slight effusion of blood. The vessels of the brain were very much congested and gorged; the brain itself was healthy, and weighed 42 ounces. As regarded the chest, the pleura of the left lung was firmly adherent to the left wall. The lung itself was very congested and friable, and studded in different places with hard calcareous bodies. It floated in water, and on a section being cut and on squeezing it was found to be filled with dark fluid blood. On the right side the pleura was non-adherent, but the cavity contained about a pint of liquid fluid of a bloody nature. It was not so congested as the left lung, and on squeezing did not emit so much fluid blood. On opening the pericardium, he found the heart quite flaccid and entirely empty either of clotted or liquid blood. Its valves were perfectly healthy. The stomach and intestines were distended, which was probably due to decomposition. The liver weighed 2lbs. 3ozs. It was very congested and on squeezing emitted dark fluid blood. The liver was soft; it had never been hard, and it was not diseased. In the main bile duct, leading from the gall bladder to the intestines, were two large gall stones, of long standing, weighing twenty-two grains. The gall bladder itself was full of bile. The stomach contained no fluid or any substance whatever. The inner surface was stained with an inky-looking material, as was also the external surface at its cardiac extremity. there was no food or liquid in any portion of the intestines. The circular vessels were congested and at different places there were patches of congestion. The right kidney weighed 2 ¼ ozs., and was soft; the left kidney weighed 3 ¼ ozs., and was healthy. The spleen was also very congested and friable, but all the other organs were healthy. - The Coroner: Did you find sufficient to account for death? - Witness: At present I would refrain from answering that question, without pressure. I acted upon your instructions, that if I considered it necessary to send any portion of the internal organs to London for analysis I was to do so, and I did so. - Mr Kellock: What portions were sent? - Witness: The stomach and a portion of the liver. He added that his reason for sending these for analysis was the appearance of the stomach and the entire congestion of the internal organs. There was no disease of the liver; he did not consider the disease of the kidney was sufficient to have caused death without such congestion as he had mentioned. Deceased had pleurisy of long standing. Owing to a communication from Dr Winter Blyth, the county analyst, that he would not be able to complete the analysis before the end of this week, it would be necessary to further adjourn the Inquest until February 7th. - Mr Geo. Rossiter, of Paignton, registrar of births and deaths for the sub-district, made a statement as to what he considered to be his instructions in regard to the circumstances under which he should grant a certificate for burial, and also as to what transpired between himself and Mr Nevill when the latter called for a certificate. Mr Nevill said he had no medical certificate , upon which witness said he could not register the death. Mr Nevill then assured him that the deceased was properly attended and that he was present at the death, and further that he could legally bury the corpse without a certificate and should do so the next day. Witness registered the death and handed the certificate to Mr Nevill, who, however, handed it back again on his (witness) expressing doubt as to whether he was doing right. He also told him he should communicate with the Coroner. - The Coroner told Mr Rossiter that he should have sent him formal notice before registering the death. He understood he (Mr Rossiter) had received a communication from the Registrar-General on the subject, and he was sure he would not commit such an error again. - Mr Nevill wished to make a statement on the matter, but the Coroner refused to hear him and requested him to sit down. He then further adjourned the Inquest until Monday next at noon.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 February 1887
PLYMPTON - The Serious Affair At Plympton. Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SERGEANT HENRY COLES, of the Devon County Constabulary, stationed at Plympton, was held yesterday at the Foresters' Arms, Plympton, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. In opening the Inquest the Coroner said they had met to perform a most painful duty. From facts which had come to his notice it appeared that SERGEANT COLES some weeks ago, while executing his duty at Plympton, had occasion to interfere with some soldiers who ill-used him badly, for which offence one of the soldiers was at present serving a term in gaol. Deceased had not recovered from the injuries he received on that occasion, although he was able to get about, and on Saturday he died almost suddenly. In view of these facts he (the Coroner) had deemed it his duty to hold an Inquest and meanwhile had instructed Messrs. Stamp and Griffin, surgeons, to make a post-mortem examination. In order to get the doctors' evidence it would be necessary to postpone the Inquiry. It would appear, however, that the immediate cause of death was blood poisoning, and at the adjourned Inquiry the doctors would be able to say whether this was the result of the injuries SERGT. COLES received at the hands of the soldiers, or otherwise. If it was, the Jury would then have to return a verdict either of murder or manslaughter against the persons who caused the injuries. - The Jury, sixteen in number, and of whom Mr Arthur Cloutte was Foreman - having returned from viewing the body, the evidence of P.C. Johns as to the identity of the body was taken, and the Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday next. - The Coroner thought that in view of the circumstances of this sad case he would be in order if he somewhat departed from the usual rule and asked the Jury to empower him in their name to send a vote of condolence to MRS COLE in her sad bereavement. The sadness of the case was emphasised by the fact that deceased was married only about three months ago. He (Mr Rodd) thought that a fitting opportunity to add how deeply he personally regretted the death of SERGEANT COLES. He had always been a most valuable officer of the Police Force, and while carrying out his duties in a thoroughly efficient manner, gained he esteem and respect of all in his district. The Jury unanimously concurred with Mr Rodd's suggestion, and endorsed the whole of his remarks.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 February 1887
PLYMOUTH - A sad case of fatal accident was investigated by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) last evening at the Guildhall. The deceased was MARY WILLIAMS, aged 72 years, and it appeared from the evidence of her husband, JOSEPH DAVEY WILLIAMS, that about 4 o'clock on the morning of January 21st, he was awoke by his wife falling on the floor. He assisted her into bed and sent for Mr Harper, surgeon. The witness had had a bad foot and deceased was in the habit of getting out of bed by stepping over the bed-rail on to a chair so as to avoid touching his foot. On this occasion she upset the chair and fell heavily on to the floor, breaking several ribs. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and expressed their sympathy with MR WILLIAMS.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 February 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of GEORGE FREDERICK BARRATT, late a painter and grainer of 5 Quay-lane. The deceased was 26 years of age. On Tuesday he was engaged upon a plank supported by a ladder at the Salvation Army Temple, about twelve feet from the ground. The plank slipped and deceased fell to the ground, receiving injuries from which he died some hours later. Compression of the brain, brought about by fracture of the skull, was the actual cause of death. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 February 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The sudden death of an old man named JOHN MOYSE, of Ford, Devonport, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest yesterday afternoon. It appears that the deceased was last seen alive on Wednesday night. On the following morning the deceased not re-appearing, at 10.30 the door was burst open and MOYSE was found dead in bed. Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination, and ascertained that the deceased had died of apoplexy. All the vital organs, except the lungs, were greatly diseased. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 February 1887
STOKE GABRIEL - The Strange Affair At Stoke Gabriel. The Adjourned Inquest: The Vicar And Nurses Censured. - The adjourned Inquest at Stoke Gabriel on SELINA LEVER, late housekeeper to the vicar (Rev. J. H. N. Nevill), and whose body was exhumed against his wish, was resumed yesterday, before Mr S. Hacker, the County Coroner, in the old schoolroom. The vicar was again in attendance, with his legal adviser, Mr T. C. Kellock, of Totnes. About fifty of the villagers were also present, and manifested much interest in the proceedings. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that the Inquest was adjourned from the previous Saturday week for the purpose of allowing an analysis to be made of the internal organs of the deceased. Dr Hains said there was disease of one of the kidneys, but owing to the congested state of the organs and other appearances he did not like to take upon himself to give an absolute opinion as to the cause of death. He (the Coroner) had since received a communication from Dr Winter Blyth, of London, the county analyst, in which he said he had found nothing which would lead to the supposition that the deceased came to her death by poison or anything except a natural death. Under these circumstances they would be able to proceed by taking the completion of Dr Hain's evidence, and also that of the vicar, if he had anything to say. - Dr Hains had his evidence read over, and he was then asked by the Coroner whether, having regard to the fact that the analysis had not disclosed any suspicion of death by poison, he could give an opinion as to the cause of death? - Dr Hains replied that he could from the symptoms which had been described and the post-mortem examination. He believed the cause of death to be chronic kidney or Bright's disease, followed by uremic convulsions. A person suffering from this disease should be kept warm and given medicines that should act on the blood. Good, nourishing, light diet should also be furnished, consisting of milk, eggs, white fish, game, or white flesh, and, if the patient was known to have been addicted to excessive drinking, a little light wine should be given. To take such a patient out of doors was most injudicious, especially if the weather was cold. - The Coroner: Can you say whether improper treatment of the disease would be likely to accelerate or cause death? - Dr Hains: So far as this Inquest has gone, I have to learn what the treatment has been. - The Coroner: I am asking it as an abstract question. In a disease of this kind would improper treatment be likely to accelerate death? - Dr Hains: Of course it would. If a person has Bright's disease, and the treatment is not such as should be given for that disease, of course it would accelerate death. Witness added that he considered proper treatment in such a case would be inhalations of chloroform, hot baths, hot fomentations for the loins, and strong purgative medicines. In reply to Admiral Dawkins, Foreman of the Jury, he said the convulsions of the deceased were of such a nature that he thought, had he been in attendance, he could have done her good. By Mr Kellock: He had seen patients in these convulsions, but had never cured any, because it was not their first convulsion. He had the same idea in his mind at the previous Inquiry as to the cause of death as now, barring the opinion of the analyst as to whether any noxious drug had been given. - Mr Rendell (a Juryman): Do you think, if you had been called in several days before death, you could have prolonged life? - Dr Hains: That is a very difficult question to answer, not having seen the deceased alive. - Dr Donald Alexander Fraser, Totnes, who assisted Dr Hains in the post-mortem examination, corroborated his statement as to the cause of death. He considered the congestion of the liver to be due to the convulsions, and not to disease. He should have expected to find a different appearance of the organ if the deceased had had liver disease for two years. - At the conclusion of Dr Fraser's evidence the Coroner asked Mr Nevill whether he wished to give evidence. He did not desire to compel him to do so. - Mr Nevill replied that he was quite willing to give evidence, but he suggested that the next medical witness should first be called, as he would not appear "amongst the prophets" until afterwards. - Dr J. Currie, parish medical officer, of Totnes, said he had been asked to give evidence of what he knew of the deceased, which was two and a half years ago. - The Coroner: Any evidence tendered which is likely to throw light on the case I will take. - Dr Currie: I don't wish to obtrude my evidence. - The Coroner: I should not call you unless I requested you to do so. - Mr Kellock, however, wished to have Dr Currie called, and he stated that he attended the deceased in April, 1884, when she was suffering from a liver attack, and he prescribed for her. He then considered she was not a healthy woman. He agreed with the other medical men as to the cause of death being kidney disease. The attack for which he treated the deceased was probably caused by alcoholic influences. Ample cause of death had been shewn, and he did not see how her life could have been prolonged. He considered she was treated rightly so far as diet was concerned, and that nothing more could have been done for her. - Admiral Dawkins: Don't you consider it very severe treatment to put a patient on vegetable diet and stop all meat and alcohol if you knew that she had been in the habit of taking these things? - Dr Currie: As a matter of treatment I should stop alcohol, and, as far as meat goes, I don't consider that milk and eggs are vegetable diet. If, however, the patient could have taken it, I should have no objection to meat; but in Bright's disease the powers of digestion are so weak that the simpler the diet the better. - The Coroner here again asked the vicar (Mr Nevill) whether he wished to give evidence. - Mr Nevill replied that he did not wish to force his evidence on the Court, but he had no objection to giving it. - The Coroner, in reply to Mr Kellock, admitted that Mr Nevill had been summoned, but it was his duty to intimate to him that he could refuse to give evidence if he pleased. If he thought there were any insinuations, or anything of that sort, against him, he should not compel him to make a statement. - Mr Kellock, as Mr Nevill's legal adviser, said he did not see why he should not go into the witness-box to clear up any points, if there were any to clear up, but after what had taken place that day, and especially after the result of the analysis, he did not think it was necessary. - Mr Nevill asked the Coroner what were the insinuations to which he referred? - The Coroner replied that it was not for him to say. - Mr Kellock said Mr Nevill had nothing to keep back. - The Coroner repeated that it was his duty to tell Mr Nevill that he was not compelled to give evidence. - Mr Nevill then proceeded to state that he had known the deceased since 1876 and that she entered into his employ in March 1882, she being then in a very delicate state of health. The witness produced a long written statement which he had prepared giving a history of the case, but after he had read a portion of it, the Coroner expressed a wish that Mr Nevill should give his evidence from memory. Mr Nevill seemed reluctant to comply, asking the Coroner, who had advised him to put the manuscript into his pocket, whether he wished to suppress it. Continuing, Mr Nevill said that in 1882 the deceased was suffering from kidney disease. She had taken brandy to stop sickness in her illness, but he did not think she took intoxicating drink habitually, and he had never seen her affected by it. After she was placed under Mr Wallace's treatment she got better, there being a great expulsion of drugs, of which she had taken gallons. Witness gave her medicines prepared according to Mr Wallace's direction. He had not been treating her for cancer of the liver. Some of the medicines he prepared himself and others he got direct from Mr Wallace, from London. - The Coroner: Do you know what drugs you administered to the deceased? - Mr Nevill: I administered what I call no drugs at all. - The Coroner: Whether it was drugs or herbs, or whatever it was, did you know what you were administering, or were you ignorant of it? - Mr Nevill: I knew what I was administering. - The Coroner: Then what did you administer? - Mr Nevill: Specifics 1, 2, and 3. - The Coroner: What were the ingredients? - Mr Nevill: I am not at liberty to state. - The Coroner: But you are bound to state this; it is important. - Mr Nevill suggested that, as the medicines were obtained from Mr Wallace or made up under his directions, he was the proper person to be asked this question. They were patent medicines. Mr Nevill complained of the Coroner pressing him on this point when at the outset he said he need give no evidence if he did not choose. - The Coroner: Very well, if you do not wish to criminate yourself. - Mr Nevill: I refused to answer the question, not on the ground of criminating myself, but on the ground of honour, the composition of the medicines being a secret of Mr Wallace's. They were prepared exactly according to his instructions. Continuing, the witness said he was more than contented with the deceased being left in the hands of Mr Wallace, although he lived in London, as he corresponded with him twice a week. He believed that under his treatment the life of the deceased was prolonged. He had studied chemistry himself for several years. Three weeks before the deceased's death he expected she would die. He did not consider it necessary to call in any other medical man except Mr Wallace. - The Coroner: Did it not occur to you that it was desirable that some other medical man should be called in apart from one who was in London, and who had not seen her for two months? - Mr Nevill replied that he agreed with the nurses that it was not necessary. He had seen many deaths from this form of disease, but in none had he seen life prolonged to such an extent. Two years ago he told the deceased's husband that Mr Wallace was not a qualified medical practitioner. From his own medical knowledge he should have stopped the administering of chloroform and strong purgatives. After handing in to the Coroner medicines similar to those given to the deceased, Mr Nevill said when he called on the registrar for a certificate he gave cirrhosis of the liver as the cause of death, this being the opinion of Dr Kingdon, of London, two years before. He considered he was justified in burying the deceased as he not only received a certificate, but signed it. In reply to the Coroner, however, witness admitted that after receiving the certificate, on the registrar expressing doubt as to whether he had done right, he immediately handed it back, and it was therefore not in his possession at the time of the burial. - Admiral Dawkins, whilst assuring Mr Nevill he had not the slightest suspicion on the point, asked him to clear up the doubt that existed by stating what the medicines were composed of. - The Coroner, however, advised the Foreman not to press the question. - Mr Nevill concluded his evidence by stating, in reply to Mr Kellock, that the deceased never applied for anything she was not supplied with, and that every care and attention wee shewn her. - Mr Wallace said he was not satisfied to accept the responsibility of the case, as attendants might give the patient intoxicants, but it would have been impossible for him to have come from London to attend it. Deceased, however, having organic disease which was incurable, it would have been no good to have called in any other medical man. He had confidence in Mr Nevill preparing the medicines under his instructions. He prescribed No. 2 for general cancerous condition of the body; No. 3 for periodic prostration; and No. 1 for restlessness and inability to sleep. - The Coroner: What are the ingredients of No. 1? - Witness: I decline to answer that question. My fee is £100 and my pupils are under a penalty of £10,000 not to divulge it until published. - The Coroner: Of the three medicines how much would be sufficient to cause death? - Witness replied that he really could not say, adding that he gave homeopathic doses. He caused some laughter by offering to take a drachm of No. 1 and a quantity of the other medicines in the court. - Mrs Bull, charwoman at the vicarage, was also recalled and severely questioned by the Coroner as to a statement she made, after giving her evidence on the last occasion to Mrs Soper and Mrs Kelland, that "if she had told all the truth she could have said a great deal more." What she meant was that she took in a little drop of drink to the deceased unknown to anyone. She paid for three threepennyworths of port wine out of her own pocket and gave to the deceased. As when she originally gave her evidence, the witness said the deceased had no drink during her illness, she was strongly censured by the Coroner. She further denied having said the deceased was not supplied with proper nourishment. - The Coroner said it appeared that the witness had been saying things out of court she would not repeat when in it, a course which was very prejudicial to the public. - HENRY LEVER, husband of the deceased, said his wife was 46 years of age, and that he was married to her 29 years ago, so that she was married when she was between 17 and 18 years old. He did not know, until after her death, that Mr Wallace was not a qualified medical practitioner. - Mr Rossiter, registrar of Paignton, said he committed an error in registering the death before reporting the case to the Coroner. In reply to Mr Kellock, witness said he told Mr Nevill that, though he did not think there was any suspicion of poison having been administered, he considered he was perfectly justified in reporting the matter. (Applause.) - The Coroner, in summing up, asked the Jury not to allow themselves to be biased by any rumours of by feelings of friendship or ill-will, and he then pointed out that the principal question with which they had to deal was whether the death of the deceased was natural or whether it was accelerated by actions or omissions of duty on the part of any responsible person or persons such as to render them criminally liable. He explained at length to the Jury the law bearing on the question, and also cited the opinions of Lord Lyndhurst and Mr Justice Parke. - The Jury retired for consultation, and after an absence of an hour and a quarter they returned with a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Foreman added that the Jury were of opinion that blame attached to Mr Nevill for not calling in further medical aid, and that they had also passed a vote of censure upon the nurses for not suggesting the calling in of medical aid. - The Coroner having recorded and read the verdict, Mr Hains said: May I ask that the cause of death be determined by the Jury? I have a special reason for asking this. - Mr Kellock: The Jury have returned into Court and given their verdict. - The Coroner, to the Jury: You do not find the cause of death. - A Juryman: Our verdict is death from natural causes. - The Coroner said it became his duty as Coroner to give effect to the rider of the Jury. Addressing Mr Nevill he said the Jury had added a rider to their verdict blaming him for not calling in further medical aid, and in that he (the Coroner) thoroughly concurred. The Jury had not referred to a matter which it was his duty to refer to - why his order to have the body exhumed was not complied with. A gentleman in Mr Nevill's position - a clergyman of the Church of England - should not have obstructed the Coroner and Jury, but should have aided them, as he was bound to do by law. He hoped this case and the scandal which it had caused would be a lesson to Mr Nevill as to the way in which he performed his duties in his parish in future. The trained nurses were then addressed by the Coroner, who said he quite concurred with the vote of censure passed upon them by the Jury. - Mr Nevill, addressing the Coroner, said he had acted with a strict sense of duty, and he believed he was not mistaken in taking the course he had. He should do the same again under similar circumstances. The proceedings lasted upwards of six hours.

PLYMOUTH - How The Poor Live And Their Children Die. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of a child aged five weeks, named BRIDGE CLARKE. Mr P. B. Clemence was Foreman of the Jury. - CATHERINE CLARKE, mother of deceased, said it had been a healthy child since birth. On Saturday evening she took it to bed with her about a quarter-past eleven. She put it outside herself, and not between herself and her husband. There were in the bed her husband and two children, aged 9 and 6, in addition to deceased and herself. She nursed the child and went to sleep. At twenty minutes after five she awoke and found that the child had slipped off from her arm. She picked it up, but found it was dead. Witness was drunk on Saturday night, as also was her husband. - P.C. Wyatt said he was on duty at the Octagon Police Station on Sunday morning when, about twenty minutes after six, MR CLARKE, the father of the child, came to him and told him that the child had been found dead. He went to the house and found the child quite dead and cold in a neighbour's arms. On the previous evening he had occasion to go into the room of the last witness about nine o'clock and found the father drunk and lying half in the cradle. He did not think the child was in the cradle then. Just before eleven he saw the mother of the child, who was also quite drunk; she had the child in her arms then. He had not heard that she let the child fall. - Mr Sidney Wolferstan, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body of the child, and found it to be well developed but poorly nourished. There was a slight discolouration on the left side of the face, probably due to pressure. The bones were perfect, and there were no marks of violence. He found the left lung very much congested, and the right also congested, but not so much as the other. The stomach was empty, and the child had had no food for some hours. He attributed death to suffocation, probably owing to overlying. - After some deliberation the Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from being Accidentally Suffocated, by being overlain, and requested the Coroner to severely censure the parents for going to bed with an infant in the state they were in. - Mr Brian reproved the parents at great length. He remarked that the Jury had taken a very merciful view of the case, but hoped the parents would learn a lesson from it. Had they gone to bed sober, he and the Jury would probably not have been sitting there then. The Jury could not overlook the fact that the doctor said the child was poorly nourished, probably due to the sad habits of its parents. He earnestly hoped they would neither of them again drink intoxicating liquors.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 February 1887
PLYMPTON ST MAURICE - The Serious Affair At Plympton. Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquiry into the cause of death of SERGEANT HENRY COLES, of the Devon County Constabulary, stationed at Plympton, who succumbed on Saturday week from blood-poisoning, was yesterday resumed by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) at Plympton St Maurice. The Inquest had been adjourned that a post-mortem examination might be made, this being deemed necessary by the Coroner, as a few weeks previously to his death SERGEANT COLES was badly treated by some soldiers whom he took into custody for being drunk and disorderly. - Major Bratton, chief constable of the division, was present to watch the proceedings on behalf of the Police. - William H. Rabbins, assistant-magistrates' clerk, produced the minute-book of the petty sessions at Yealmpton on the 7th ult., at which deceased preferred a charge against Frank Clancey, gunner of the Royal Artillery of Fort Efford, of the assault in question. Deceased stated on that occasion that while he was attempting to take Clancey to the Police Station for being drunk and disorderly he became violent and kicked deceased in the leg and other parts of the body. - Dr Stamp, of Plympton, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased and found a considerable swelling on the left arm and a small bruise behind the left shoulder. The primary cause of death was blood-poisoning, but the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, the right one in particular. Deceased first came to him on the 18th January complaining of a pain in his arm. The blood poisoning undoubtedly resulted from the injuries received in the arm, and the swelling under the shoulder was one of the symptoms. In answer to questions, Dr Stamp said he had not the least doubt that the blood-poisoning was the result of the bruise on the arm, and that had it not been for this deceased would in all human probability have been alive that day. Samuel Gordon and Charles Penwell were called respectively to give evidence with reference to the treatment deceased received at the hands of the soldiers. They happened to be passing at the time, and in response to an appeal from the deceased, went to his assistance in taking the soldiers to the Police Station. In the scuffle SERGEANT COLES fell to the ground with Clancey three or four times, and received several kicks about the legs during the affray. - The Coroner, in summing up, briefly reviewed the evidence, pointing out that according to the law if a Police Officer, in executing his duty, should receive kicks or other violence from a prisoner, causing his death, malice would be implied, and a verdict of wilful murder would have to be returned against the offender. It appeared in this case that deceased had died from blood-poisoning, the result of injuries to the arm; but there was no evidence to shew that those injuries were directly caused by Clancey. The doctor had told them that they might have been caused by a blow or twist. The main point, therefore, for the Jury to consider was how these injuries were caused. - After a short deliberation, the Foreman of the Jury (Mr Cloutte) said their decision was that deceased died from blood poisoning, the result of injuries received to the left arm while in the execution of his duty, but that there was not sufficient evidence to shew how or by whom those injuries were caused.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 February 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of JAMES BROWNING, fisherman, aged 48, of Shaldon, who was drowned on the night of the 11th of January, and whose body was found floating off the Promenade on Monday morning. The evidence shewed that on the day named the deceased, after visiting Teignmouth, left for Shaldon in his boat during the evening. He never reached home, and nothing more was seen of him until his body was discovered as mentioned. A boat with gear in it, and supposed to be that of the deceased, was found at sea shortly after his disappearance. A verdict of Accidental Drowning was returned, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow, who was deeply affected.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 February 1887
EXETER - An Inquiry was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of CHARLES GEORGE, a labourer, lately employed in Mr Sampson's brickyard, Newtown. The evidence shewed that a large quantity of clay fell on the deceased and broke several ribs and his collar bones, besides inflicting other severe internal injuries. The thawing of the clay by the sun was said to have been the cause of the slip. Deceased was described a s a sober, respectable man, aged 39, and married. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SEATON - Charge of Manslaughter Against A Husband. - At the Axminster Police court yesterday an agricultural labourer named THOMAS SNELL, 40 years of age, of Seaton, was brought before Mr J. I. Scarborough charged on the Coroner's warrant with the manslaughter of his wife, MARY ANN SNELL. - From the evidence adduced it seems for the past two years the prisoner's wife had suffered from softening of the brain, and had been attended by Dr Evans, of Seaton. On Sunday last she became worse, and remained unconscious until Tuesday, when she died. In consequence of the rumours which had been set afloat the Police made inquiries, and ultimately communicated with the Coroner (Mr Cox, of Honiton), who held an Inquest on the body at Seaton on Wednesday afternoon. The evidence brought before the Jury was sufficient to lead them to return a verdict of Manslaughter against the husband. In the doctor's opinion the actual cause of death was softening of the brain, but that it was accelerated through want of care and nourishment. One witness stated that he had found the deceased on several occasions in the house alone tied to a chair without any food and it was said this course was resorted to in order to prevent the deceased attracting the attention of passers-by. Dr Evans has made a post-mortem examination of the body, the result of which shews that the stomach is completely empty, and that the body weighs but 58lbs. Prisoner was remanded until Tuesday.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 February 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Neglect At Devonport. - An Inquest was held at Devonport Guildhall, before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, on Saturday, concerning the death of an infant named TRYPHENA LISHMUND, the daughter of JOHN HENRY LISHMUND, journeyman carpenter, of 27 St John-street. The father was out of work, and after giving temporary relief, the relieving officer offered him work, which he would not accept. The mother alleged that the child had not had sufficient nourishment. She was at a neighbour's house with the child till shortly after midnight on the morning it died. From the evidence of Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, it appeared that the child was extremely emaciated and that death was probably accelerated by injudicious exposure, which brought on acute congestion. - The Coroner said no doubt Mr Ryall had acted within his right in offering the husband work. He had no doubt if the woman had gone again to the relieving officer and stated her case she would have had further assistance. - The Jury found that the deceased died from "Natural Causes, and that its death was accelerated by the neglect of the mother and want of proper care."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 February 1887
EXETER - Suicide Of ALFRED BARRETT at Exeter. - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter yesterday Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of ALFRED BARRETT, single, aged 30, a native of Dartington, near Totnes. The evidence showed that deceased was formerly a steeplechase rider, but for the past six months had assisted Mr Heath, veterinary surgeon, 47 Southernhay, Exeter. He had suffered from concussion of the brain, the result of accidents on the racecourse, was rather deaf, and was absent-minded at times. On Sunday last he visited his brother at Newton. He was then indisposed. Yesterday morning about eleven o'clock he partook of a cup of tea while in bed. Later on he was found in a condition which suggested poison, and in a few minutes he expired. Death proved to be due to prussic acid. "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 March 1887
BIDEFORD - A fatal accident at Bideford necessitated an Inquest yesterday by Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, at the Bideford Dispensary, deceased being a young man named BEER. The evidence was to the effect that deceased, in walking over the joists on the first floor, stepped on a piece of short plank which did not afford firm foothold, and which consequently threw him to the ground. A fellow workman at once went to his assistance and found him unconscious and bleeding severely from the head. He was conveyed to the Dispensary, where his skull was found to be protruding through the scalp. Convulsions soon set in and he never regained consciousness. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 March 1887
BRIXHAM - At Brixham yesterday, at a Coroner's Inquest conducted by Mr Sidney Hacker, the Jury censured a MRS SHERIFF for having fed her two months' old baby upon biscuit, medical testimony being well understood to be to the effect that such nourishment was unsuited for so young a child.

PLYMOUTH - Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of HENRY ELFORD, aged 59, who died suddenly yesterday morning. Deceased was in the employ of the Tramway Company, and went to work apparently in his usual health. Frank Radcliffe, another horse-keeper, was going across the yard about ten o'clock, and noticed deceased's feet under the door of the stable. He went over and found him lying on his face motionless. He raised an alarm, and the foreman, Mr Jones, sent for a doctor, but when Mr Waterfield arrived he pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 March 1887
DARTMOUTH - Found Drowned At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held in the Dartmouth Guildhall on Saturday by Mr Coroner Prideaux touching the death of MR WILLIAM CUTMORE, baker, of East Down Farm, Near-street, whose body was found close to the Dartmouth pontoon, belonging to the Great Western Railway Company. The deceased was last seen alive on the 24th of January, and no trace of him could be found until Saturday, when owing to a strong smell arising in the vicinity of the pontoon, the body was discovered by two men named Roper and Radford. Mr Richard Stranger, a distant relative, said that on the 24th January he and the deceased went to the King's Arms Hotel, where they remained for some time, and on leaving about six o'clock, witness went out of the front and deceased out of the side door. Witness never saw him alive afterwards. Emily Preece, a charwoman stated that she noticed the deceased leave the hotel. He went towards the river and she said to him "You are going the wrong way," to which deceased replied "I'm all right I'm going home; where's my mate." She replied, pointing towards Mr Humphrey's chemist shop. He remarked, "I'll soon catch him up." This was the last time deceased was seen alive. - Evidence as to the finding of the body having been given, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 March 1887
PLYMOUTH - A somewhat singular case of sudden death occupied the attention of the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Guildhall last evening. An old man named WILLIAM CHILCOTT, who had for years been suffering from softening of the brain, was found dead in his bedroom on Sunday morning, quite naked. Eliza Usher, grand-daughter of deceased, identified the body, and said deceased was 74 years of age, had been in the Royal Navy, and was invalided in 1867. He had been suffering from softening of the brain for a number of years, but up to the last three months had not been confined to his bed. He was very hearty, and had everything he required. Two boys slept in the same room as deceased, and they went to bed about ten o'clock on Saturday. Witness ran up and down the stairs several times to deceased, and the last time she saw him alive was about a quarter-past one on Sunday morning. Mary Jane Usher, daughter of deceased, corroborated, and said she took deceased breakfast on Sunday morning about half-past nine and found him lying on the floor quite naked, and both his own clothes and the bedclothes torn into shreds. Charles Edward Bean, M.R.C.P., said he attended deceased about two years ago and he was then suffering from softening of the brain, caused by a slight attack of apoplexy. Death was probably caused by exposure to the cold, as for an old man in his state death would ensue in two or three hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by accidental exposure to the cold," and exonerated the mother and daughter from all blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 March 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of THOS. SANDERS, aged 2 ½ years, the child of MRS E. SANDERS, who lives in Victoria-street, Pensylvania. The evidence shewed that on the previous day the deceased was left in the room for a few minutes confined to bed. He had taken a box of matches, and before the mother could return had sent his nightshirt and the bedding on fire, receiving injuries from which he died a few hours later. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

TEIGNMOUTH - At Teignmouth last evening an Inquest was held touching the death of THOMAS MORGAN, a middle-aged man, whose body was found lying on the beach near the breakfast on the previous morning. The evidence of ELIZABETH MORGAN, sister of the deceased, was to the effect that he left home for a walk, and she heard nothing about him until the body was found. Thomas Henry Aggett, a railway porter, whilst going towards the signal-post, saw the deceased standing near the breakwater and looking over the wall. A young man named Harold Matthews found the body and gave information to the Police. Sergeant Richards had the body conveyed to the mortuary, and Dr Owen pronounced life to have been extinct an hour before the deceased was found on the beach. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - At the Inquest at Tavistock, yesterday, in relation to the death of JAMES DOIDGE, who was found at Wheal Eliza mine in a position which led to the supposition that he had fallen from a height, and been killed, medical evidence was to the effect that death was, in all probability, due to Natural Causes, and not to an accident. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 March 1877
EXETER - There has been a second fatality through burns at Exeter this week. The Inquiry of a Coroner's Jury yesterday related to the manner of death of a little girl named COPP. The deceased was two years of age and her parents live at Hawking's Buildings, St. Thomas. The evidence made it appear that on Monday morning deceased got hold of a box of matches whilst in a bedroom alone, and set fire to her nightdress, being severely burned upon the lower portion of the body. "Accidental Death" was the Jury's verdict.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatality In Hamoaze. - The death of a yachtsman named FERNANDO BARTLETT, employed on board the Cushie Dee, was Inquired into by Mr Vaughan, and a Coroner's Jury at Devonport yesterday. FREDERICK BARTLETT, son of deceased, stated that on Wednesday evening, soon after six o'clock he was sitting in the yacht's dingy, lying by the side of the Cushie Dee, in the Hamoaze, when his father attempted to get into the boat from the yacht. He stepped on the gunwale, however, and capsized the boat, and both witness and his father were thrown into the water. Witness was too excited to know what happened afterwards. - Richard V. Passmore, A.B., H.M.S. Hecate, said that on the previous evening, hearing that a boat had capsized, he, with others, pulled away in a boat to save the sinking crew, reaching the dingy in three minutes. The boy BARTLETT was rescued, and then, pointing to the water, said, "My father, my father." Witness saw MR BARTLETT a foot or two below the surface and immediately reached down and caught hold of his guernsey. He was standing upright with his arms outstretched on a level with his shoulders, his hands and head having drooped. He was in deep water. he was living after he was taken into the boat, but spoke no word. He was taken on board H.M.S. Cambridge, on the way foaming at the mouth. William H. Toms, H.M.S. Cambridge, said that BARTLETT died in about an hour and a quarter. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 March 1877
EAST BUDLEIGH - A Coroner's Jury at Budleigh Salterton on Saturday investigated the sudden death of HERBERT BOLT, who was waggoner for Mr Keslake, coal merchant, and who died suddenly on the previous day while unloading coals at Mount View Villa. the medical evidence was to the effect that death was the result of syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. They handed their fees to the widow.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - The death of LOUISA DRAKE at Tamerton Folliot was on Saturday Inquired into by Mr Coroner Rodd, Mr Edwin C. Langford, surgeon, W. DRAKE, the husband, and Patience King were examined with the result that a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. It appeared, however, that deceased had not had as much nourishment as was desirable, nor had she had the services of a doctor. The medical evidence was to the effect that the woman was very thin, and had the smallest heart the doctor had ever seen, death taking place from disease of that organ. After consideration of the whole of the facts the Jury censured DRAKE for his conduct towards his wife.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Excessive Drinking At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held before Mr T. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr George Honey was Foreman, at the Melbourne Arms, last week, relative to the death of THOMAS BAUGH, aged 41, a naval pensioner and keeper of the Durham Arms beer-house in Cecil-street. From the evidence of the widow it appeared that the deceased left the navy about two years ago, and had since indulged to excess in spirit drinking. Six months ago he was under the care of Dr. E. B. Thompson for delirium tremens, and he had since had several less severe attacks. On Wednesday he was suffering very much from the effects of whisky drinking, and went to Mr Filmer, chemist, of King-street, stating that her had been drinking heavily for a week and asking for a composing draught. Mr Filmer supplied him with a simple draught. Deceased the same evening went to St James's Hall, returning home at eleven o'clock. He went to bed and had a very restless night, his wife administering two or three doses of the draught. About midday on Thursday she went up to him and found him lying dead in bed. The Coroner offered to adjourn the Inquest for a medical examination of the deceased if the Jury required it, but they were unanimously of opinion that there was no occasion to adopt this course, and returned a verdict that the deceased was found dead in bed, and that he died from the effects of drinking.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 March 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Devonport Dockyard. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, last evening, by the Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, concerning the death of JOSEPH WILLS, 43, labourer, a sergeant-pensioner from the Marines, in the employ of Mr Bevan, contractor, who died on Saturday from injuries received at the Dockyard, as reported in the Western Morning News. - John Richards, labourer, Cecil-street, Plymouth, said that he and the deceased were on the bottom of the north jetty at Devonport Dockyard on Saturday afternoon, sawing the old piles in front of the stonework. Witness put in a wedge to cant one of the piles over, but found that he could not strike in front of him with his left hand. Deceased told him that he could do so, and, taking the maul, struck two blows, breaking the wedge. Witness gave deceased another wedge, and then stepped on one side just as a piece of wood fell on deceased. The wood was about eighteen inches long, one inch thick, and weighed about sixteen pounds. Deceased was picked up and taken to the Hospital. - By a Juror: The wood fell down on deceased from a height of about 22 feet. - William T. Hoskins, labourer, 10 Camden-street, Plymouth, said that he slung the pile which deceased was working at ready for hoisting. The pile was cut through to within an inch. the wedges might have started the piles above. The piece that fell on deceased was not a piece of the pile they were cutting. It was the end of a joist which they did not know was free at the time. It was hanging loosely over the pile at the top of the girders. It was supposed to have been bolted to the girders, as others had been. It appeared, however, that somebody had removed the bolt fastening the wood to the girder without removing the piece of wood itself. There was another piece of wood over this piece, so that he could not detect that the bolt was gone. - William Clemas, 78 Pembroke-street, Devonport, stated he was in charge of the gibb on top of the jetty, and above deceased. The wood struck the back of deceased's head. The driving in of the wedge would cause a vibration on the top of the jetty, and so shake down anything loose from it. - In summing up, the Coroner said that someone's neglect had resulted in the leaving of the piece of wood after removing the bolt, but who the guilty party was they could not say. He advised the finding of an open verdict. - Seth Bevan, contractor, wished to be sworn at this point, and stated that the piece of wood was fitted into a notch of the pile, but in every other case it had been found to be bolted to the girder. In that case witness had thought the piece that fell would have come away with the pile. He did not suppose that a bolt had been removed. This was the first fatal accident in connection with his work during the whole career of forty years. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, a rider being added that the person in charge ought to have seen that the wood did not endanger life.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 March 1887
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest at Pound Farm, Buckland Monachorum, yesterday afternoon, relative to the death of an old woman named CATHERINE PETERS, which occurred under singular circumstances on the previous day. On Tuesday last deceased's nephew, Mr Wm. Bloye took her to the farm, as he thought she was getting very thin and looking ill. The next morning she was told to stay in bed until she was called, and her breakfast was taken to her. About one o'clock her dinner was taken up by the servant, who found her head hanging over the side of the bed and her feet entangled in the bedclothes. She called her master and he at once sent for a doctor, but MRS PETERS died before he arrived. Mr Liddell, surgeon, having deposed that he had examined deceased and found that she probably died from apoplexy, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 March 1887
PLYMOUTH - Neglect Of A Mother At Plymouth. - The attention of the Plymouth Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, and a Jury was occupied for some time last evening in the investigation of the death of SARAH WILLIAMS, living at No. 1 Mill-lane, aged 67, who died on the previous day. Mr John Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. - EMILY COLEMAN, daughter of the deceased, identified the body, and said her mother had been suffering from asthma for years. On Thursday last deceased went for a walk, and when she came home went to bed. On Sunday evening, as witness thought deceased was getting worse, she went to see her brother, MR POTBERRY, living at 90 Cobourg-street, told him of the condition of his mother, and asked him to get a doctor. He promised to send one the next day. Her brother was not on good terms with his mother, and had not spoken to her for years. The next day his wife called at the bottom of the stairs about ten o'clock and asked how the deceased was. She then said that a doctor should be sent at two o'clock. At twelve o'clock witness noticed that the noise deceased had been making ceased, and on going over to the bed found she was dead. Her brother had not been near the place, although he had been told his mother was dead. He was formerly a warrant officer in the navy, and had a pension of £95 a year. He was also now an instructor on board the training ship Mount Edgcumbe, for which he received a salary of £100, making a total of £195 a year. He allowed his mother 2s. a week, and his father received 3s. a week from the parish. Some time ago Dr Harper had occasion to attend on witness's father, and then saw deceased: he said she did not require medicine, but the necessaries of life. - Elizabeth Horne corroborated. She told deceased on Sunday evening that she ought to have a doctor, and she said she expected one the next morning. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he considered this a very painful case. He could not help thinking that if a doctor had been called in he would certainly have prolonged life, even if he could not have saved it. There was a poor woman who died like a dog or a cat, without any medical care, although undoubtedly she must have needed it for some time. They could not blame the daughter; she had acted like the Good Samaritan, and had left five children whom she had to support to nurse her mother, and there was her son, who, although living within a gunshot and in good circumstances, had not been near the house. - The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes, but added a rider that her death was accelerated by want of proper medical care and attention, and desired to censure her son for not having provided his mother with medical aid and the necessaries of life.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 March 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The circumstances attending the death from burning of a little girl named FLORENCE MARY THOMAS, living at Ford, were investigated yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Potter was the Foreman. From the evidence of the mother it appeared that on Wednesday morning she left her daughter, aged four, in the kitchen. She was absent about three minutes, when hearing screams she rushed into the room to find the child in flames. She wrapped deceased in some woollen material and sent for Mr Gard, surgeon, who came shortly afterwards. The burns were very severe, and extended nearly all over the body. A piece of burnt paper was found in the kitchen, and it was supposed that in the absence of the mother the child lit this at the grate and so caught her dress on fire. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 March 1887
EGG BUCKLAND - Mr R. R. Rodd yesterday held an Inquest at Egg Buckland in regard to the death of the male child of MARIA JAMES, who was a servant with Colonel Briggs, of Furzdon. Mr Eustace B. Thompson, M.D., of Plymouth, gave evidence that the child was fully developed, and had breath. - There were no marks of violence upon the body, but several organs were congested and it had died by suffocation. The suffocation had been apparently caused by the child being wrapped in a night-dress - probably to prevent its crying - and put away in a box, where it was found. Without hearing further evidence the Coroner adjourned the Inquest to Monday next, Col. Briggs undertaking meanwhile to provide for the mother.

ST BUDEAUX - An Inquest was previously held at King's Tamerton on the body of the wife of a retired miller, EMMELINE KING, who had died in her husband's arms on Saturday, from heart disease. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest, which brought to light some unusual circumstances, was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday, by Mr T. C. Brian. JOHN H. M. PARKER was in his cart on the 4th inst. in King-street, on the way to his hay stores in Manor-street, when the vehicle lurched and he fell into the gutter. On reaching the Hospital her was found to have fractured the neck of his thigh. The Assistant-House Surgeon, Mr Woolcombe, stated that some days after admittance, pneumonia set in, delirium tremens followed, the patient died on 26th int. A nephew, JOHN PARKER, testified to his uncle's temperate habits, and this statement was corroborated by several Jurymen. A Juror asked whether it was possible for the deceased to have delirium tremens if he had not drunk heavily and Mr Woolcombe replied that he had never known such a case, but if the Jury were positive on the point of deceased's temperance it must be possible. The opinion as to the temperate habits of MR PARKER was shared in by the Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death in consequence of a Fall," saying that no aspersion was cast on deceased's life.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 April 1887
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Milton, Buckland Monachorum, on Friday, on the death of a child of three months, named JOHN F. DUNRICK, son of a labourer. A post-mortem examination, conducted by Mr Liddell, of Horrabridge, shewed that the infant had been suffocated by the bedclothes, and Mr Penny, the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" accordingly.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - An Inquiry held on the next day at Tamerton Folliot, on a baby, ETHEL A. E. BLACKLER, resulted in a verdict to the effect that she died from convulsions, Dr Langford, of Plymouth, having expressed that opinion.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 April 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - A pensioner named JOHN CONGDON, 67 years of age, died suddenly at Devonport on Sunday evening. The deceased, after attending evening service, went to 4 St Michael's-terrace, Stoke, where his wife was cook. He had felt unwell in church, and after his wife had given him a cup of tea he slipped from the chair on which he was sitting and expired before the arrival of Mr Crossing, surgeon, who was at once sent for. At the Inquest yesterday, held by Mr Vaughan, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EGG BUCKLAND - Inquest At Knackersknowle. A Serious Deliberation. - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, opened the adjourned Inquest at Knackersknowle yesterday afternoon, in reference to the death of the infant child of MARIA JAMES, 25, servant in the employ of Mrs Briggs. Mr Percy T. Pearce appeared on behalf of the prisoner, who was unable to be present. - Emily Briggs, wife of Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. J. Briggs, stated that MARIA JAMES had been with her for six months. On the 25th ult. witness saw her in bed, and the first intimation she received of anything being wrong was her request for a doctor, who came the following evening. An hour or two previously she told witness that on the previous day a child had been born to her, dead and that it was then in her box. - Elizabeth Corber, housemaid with Mrs Briggs, said she had heard a certain report outdoors, but on charging JAMES three months before the birth of the child, she denied it. - P.C. Greenwood said he went to the bedroom of prisoner at Fursdon House, on March 26th. He found a male child wrapped in a nightdress and a skirt. - Dr E. B. Thomson, of Plymouth, said he visited MARIA JAMES on Saturday week. He found her child on the top of her clothes in her box. It was tightly rolled up in her underclothing. He made a post-mortem examination. The child had had a separate existence, but it bore no marks of violence. The organs were congested and suffocation was the cause of death. He should believe that this was the result of the tight wrappings. Other things, however, might have brought about the same result. It was possible that the child was suffocated by accident prior to being enveloped in the wraps. - Questioned by Mr Pearce, witness gave his reasons for believing that the child had a separate existence. He adhered to that opinion, but would not say that respiration took place after birth, nor that the child was living after being fully born. - Mr Pearce then addressed the Jury. They could arrive at one of three conclusions only - that the child had been born alive and that its death had been caused by the violent action of its mother; that death was natural; or the child was not born alive. It was absolutely necessary before arriving at the conclusion that death had been wilfully caused to be certain that the child had been born alive, and that it was living when fully born. If they could not be sure on the latter point they could not return a verdict unfavourable to JAMES. If there was the shadow of a doubt - and he contended, from the doctor's evidence, that there was considerable doubt - there remained no evidence to justify the belief in a living, separate existence. Therefore, in the interests of justice and mercy, he asked for a favourable verdict for his client, and that she might not unnecessarily be branded with the name of murderess. The medical evidence supported his contention, and the reason of the Jury would acknowledge its force. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the doctor stated that accidental smothering was possible, and the words of Mr Pearce had given him doubts as to a separate existence. Their verdict must be wilful murder or nothing. If there had been separate existence, how came the child suffocated, wilfully or accidentally? If they had a doubt they must give the prisoner the benefit, and return an open verdict. - After half an hour's deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 April 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of CHARLOTTE E. NOBLE, widow of the late MR JAS. NOBLE, of Belfast, and daughter of the late Capt. John Playne, R.N. The deceased was staying with her son-in-law, the Rev. M. H. Le Pla, pastor of the Congregational Church, Exeter. She had been unwell for a month. On Saturday she was found in her bedroom on her back, dead. The verdict of the Jury was that death was due to Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 April 1887
PLYMOUTH - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at the East Cornwall Hospital by Mr Preston J. Wallis, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY COLE, an inmate who broke her leg when gathering blackberries last season. According to the evidence of Dr West, erysipelas set in soon after the fracture, and was followed by the formation of abscesses. eventually caused death. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of SUSAN KERSLAKE, aged 62, single, formerly living at Newton, near Crediton. The evidence shewed that deceased had been an inmate of the Devon and Exeter Hospital since March 18th. She was found lying by the side of her bed three days before she went into that Institution. Her thigh was broken in the left hip joint. She had apparently fallen out of bed. Death followed from exhaustion. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 April 1887
PAIGNTON - A Boy Drowned At Paignton. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Paignton on Saturday evening touching the death of WILLIAM GEORGE HUXHAM, aged 5 years, who was drowned on Good Friday afternoon whilst attempting to walk round the Redcliff Tower footpath, and who either fell off into the sea or was swept away by a wave, the sea at the time being very rough. The Jury, after viewing the body, proceeded to the place where the deceased was last seen, and were unanimous in the opinion that the footpath should be railed round, it being a most dangerous place for children. The principal witness was Susan Ann Battershall, eleven years of age, who told an affecting story. She said that on Friday afternoon she was playing on Preston Beach, near the Redcliff footpath, in company with the deceased and several other children. When she last saw him he was on the footpath crying, and she told him not to go that way, but to go up the lane. He said he did not know the way up the lane, and continued to walk on the path. Shortly after she saw him in the water, being washed in and out by the waves. She tried to pull him out, but could not on account of the splashing of the waves. - GEORGE DENBOW HUXHAM, father of the deceased, stated that from what he heard he ran to Preston Beach on Friday afternoon. He did not see anything of his child until about a quarter to eight, when he saw the body floating on the water close to the shore. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and added the following:- "The Jury strongly recommend to the Paignton Local Board that a rail be erected round the Redcliff footpath, for the protection of the public, as they consider it a most dangerous place, more especially for children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 April 1887
TIVERTON - A sad tale of domestic misery was told at an Inquest held at Tiverton on Monday. The deceased, WALTER FORWOOD, a mason, was described to have been "in the habit of taking a drop like another working man," and was drunk on Wednesday night. The next day he complained of illness; he went to bed on Thursday night and on Saturday morning was found dead. He has left a widow and eight children. His home life was little more than a series of quarrels; and his house was so dirty that the doctor was unable to hold a post-mortem examination in it. The cause of death was apoplexy, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 April 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - An inquest was held yesterday morning at the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of ROBERT HINDOM, whose body was found on Tuesday on the beach between two rocks near Labrador, as already reported. JOHN HINDOM, of Teign-street, hairdresser, son of the deceased, said he identified the body as that of his father, who was 64 years of age. Witness last saw him alive early on the morning of Tuesday, the 22nd, ult. His father had been much depressed of late. James Bowerman, an employee at the Post-office, deposed that he met deceased between three and four o'clock on the morning mentioned in the Exeter-road. Deceased asked him for am match. Thomas Knapman, of Shaldon, narrated the circumstances connected with the finding of the body, which was almost entirely naked and much decomposed. Mr Piggott, surgeon, of Orchard-gardens, Teignmouth, said he had been consulted by deceased's friends as to his condition, and had seen him a day or two before his disappearance, but he could not certify that he was dangerous, or totally unfit to be at large. It was stated that a man named Kernick had seen deceased at Dawlish on the evening of the day of his disappearance, and the Coroner desiring that Kernick's evidence on the point should be obtained, the Inquiry was adjourned until this morning for that purpose.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 April 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ROBERT HINDOM, found on the beach near Labrador, as previously reported in the Western Morning News, was resumed on Thursday morning at Teignmouth, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, when Mr Kernick, of Dawlish, attended and stated that he saw deceased near the Townhall, Dawlish, about a quarter past six on the evening of the day on which he left his home. Mrs Marrott, of Chapel-street, Teignmouth, deposed that she saw deceased on the Friday following his disappearance in a field near Mandlin-hill, on the Haldon-road. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The funeral took place in the afternoon.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 April 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Overdose Of Laudanum At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, touching the death of JAMES MOUNT-STEPHENS, which occurred on the previous evening. Mr William Rowe was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Mr Brian, in opening the case, said he wished the Jury to pay particular attention to the evidence, as the case was a very peculiar one. - MARGARET MOUNT-STEPHENS, wife of the deceased, said he was seventy years of age and a naval pensioner. He had been ailing for the last four months, suffering, as she supposed, from bronchitis, but he had not been attended by any medical man. He had been able to get up and go out of doors. On Friday he did not seem as well as usual, and about half-past ten he lay down on the bed with his clothes on. Acting on the advice of a neighbour, about half-past three she went to Mr Essery, chemist, and asked for a pennyworth of laudanum, after telling him it was for her husband, who was "bad on his chest." Mr Essery told her to give as a dose ten drops, on sugar. When she got home she gave her husband, as she thought, eight drops. She could not swear that she did not give him more as her sight was very bad. He took it, but did not know it was laudanum. He then went to sleep, and witness remained there the whole evening. He had one dose, and no one had touched the bottle since evening. At eleven o'clock she found he was not breathing and called a neighbour who said he was dead. At half-past two the next morning she went into the street and walked towards Stonehouse in order to borrow a sheet for a friend. She met P.C. Mitchell in Union-street, and he asked her whether she had lost herself. She afterwards told him what had occurred and he went with her to her house. - Wm. Essery, chemist, 69 York-street, said the last witness came into his shop on the previous afternoon and asked for a pennyworth of laudanum. She said it was to ease her husband's pain and cough. He gave her forty drops and told her to give ten drops as a dose. He had since examined what remained, and found it only twenty drops, half the original quantity being gone. It was properly labelled "poison." - P.C. Mitchell gave the facts of his interview with deceased's widow. When he went to the house he found deceased fully dressed and lying on a mattress on the floor, quite dead. He found the bottle (produced) on the window-ledge, and took charge of it. He was sure none of its contents was wasted while he had charge of it. - Ann Jewell said MRS MOUNT-STEPHENS called her just before twelve o'clock and told her she thought her husband was dead. She went down and found it was so. She saw the bottle, and MRS MOUNT-STEPHENS told he she had given her husband eight drops. - Mr W. A. Buchan, M.D., said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. there were no external marks of violence. He found deceased had been suffering from acute pleurisy in both lungs. It must have been of long standing, more than a week. Deceased had also been suffering from heart disease, both valvular and fatty degeneration. He examined the stomach and found a little liquid, but no distinct trace of opium. He made the post-mortem between four and five o'clock that afternoon, and considering the time which had elapsed between the taking the laudanum and the examination, together with the comparatively small quantity (supposing it to be twenty drops), he should not have expected to find a trace, as all of it would have been absorbed. He found the body very emaciated. Looking at his age and diseases, it was the worst possible thing to do to give deceased laudanum. If he really took twenty drops the witness considered that was the inciting cause of death. Death was due to natural causes, accelerated by want of proper medical care and attention and the administration of laudanum in any quantity. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very important case. Certainly blame rested with someone, for there they had a man who, on his wife's own statement, had been ailing for months, and yet he had not even seen a doctor. Had he been properly attended he did not think, humanly speaking, they would be sitting there; at any rate they would not have the laudanum question to deal with. Of course they got the usual answer from the wife, the man would not have a doctor, but it was her place to see that he did have one. With regard to the laudanum he believed the man took the twenty drops, but that it was given in ignorance. Her husband's death would do the widow more harm than good, as she would lose the 1s. 9d. a day pension, which was her living. But still he thought the wife was deserving of severe censure. - The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of medical care, and by the wrongful administration of laudanum." They considered the wife's trouble was sufficient censure for her.

BROADCLYST - A Coroner's Jury has recommended the London and South-Western Railway Company to erect a footbridge at Broadclyst Station, where a fatal accident occurred to a young man named BRADFORD, on Thursday.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter concerning the death of JOHN JONES, aged 28, labourer. The evidence shewed that deceased, while digging on the previous day in a trench on Pennsylvania, was buried by a fall of earth. There were no supports against the sides of the pit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but censured the deceased's employer (Mr Gibson, builder) for not engaging a competent foreman.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 April 1887
NEWTON ABBOT - A verdict of Suicide while of Unsound Mind was returned yesterday by a Coroner's Jury who Inquired into the death of WM. HEYWARD, 74 years of age, of Sandygate, near Newton. The deceased, who had been ill for some time and suffered from delusions, cut his throat on Saturday night with a penknife.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 April 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at Plymouth as to the sudden death of EDWARD DOTSON, which took place whilst he was working at Messrs. Burnard, Lock, and Alger's manure works, Cattedown. Mr Tippetts represented the firm. JOHN DOTSON stated this his brother, the deceased, was 33 years of age, and suffered from heart disease left by rheumatic fever. John Marshall deposed to deceased's death, and the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes. They, with the Coroner, sent a note of sympathy to the widow, to whom deceased had been married less than twelve months before.

PLYMOUTH - A Boy Drowned In Sutton Pool. - Inquiry was made by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Plymouth Sailors' Home, last evening, concerning the death of EDWARD UNDERWOOD, aged 6 years, son of a porter living in Stillman-street. Shortly after nine o'clock yesterday morning deceased was seen by a man named Rowe to get into a boat moored alongside the landing steps at the North Quay, in Sutton Harbour, and amuse himself by pushing the boat off and pulling it back to the steps. In doing so he stood sometimes on the gunwale and sometimes on the thwart of the boat. Rowe's attention was diverted from the lad to another object for a few minutes and on turning round again he found that UNDERWOOD was no longer in the boat. Looking about for him, he discovered his body floating in five feet of water, under the boat's quarter, between it and the steps. Rowe immediately took the body out of the water and efforts were promptly taken to restore animation, but without avail. No one was near the deceased at the time, and no splash or cry was heard by those standing on the quay. From the position of the body in the water, the witness surmised that the lad overbalanced himself in pushing off the boat and fell overboard. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" and expressed sympathy with the parents in their bereavement.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 April 1887
CHAGFORD - Alcoholic Poisoning At Chagford. - Mr Wm. Burd, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon at Chagford, on the body of MARIA PALK. Deceased was a single lady, 39 years of age, and resided with her mother at Ceylon House, Chagford. The evidence shewed that on Tuesday morning last she complained of being ill and required brandy. She drank the remaining portion of a bottle of brandy which was in the house, and then sent a little girl to the grocers for another bottle. She drank some from this also, besides porter and beer. Dr Hunt was sent for, and, failing to induce vomiting, resorted to the stomach pump. All his efforts proved ineffectual, however, for, though deceased partially recovered consciousness, she expired on Friday. A verdict of "Death from Alcoholic Poisoning, caused by drinking brandy," was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 April 1887
BLACKAWTON - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was last evening returned at the Inquest held by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, at Millcombe Farm, Blackawton, on the body of MR T. TUCKER, the occupier, aged 63, who fell through a hole in his loft on Thursday evening, and sustained serious injuries to his spine, from which he died on Saturday.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 April 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of MARY HONEY, who resided at No. 21 Rendle-street. Deceased had been a widow for nine years, and was in receipt of parish pay. She was last seen alive on Monday evening about seven o'clock, and appeared in her usual health. She was then going out, but was not seen to come in again. On the following afternoon Mr W. G. Chubb, a collector for the Royal Liver Friendly Society, called for deceased's subscription, but getting no answer to his knock , he opened the door. Deceased was sitting in the chair beside the fire, her head hanging back over her left shoulder, and quite dead. Her feet were on the bar of the chair opposite and her work had fallen from her hands. She appeared to have been seized with a fainting fit from which she did not recover. P.C. Wyatt was called in and took charge of the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 May 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held two Inquests at Plymouth on Saturday. The first was upon VICTORIA, the child of a domestic servant named ELIZABETH UPHILL. The baby had been nursed by Mrs Jane, 4 Plym-street, and Mr Harper, surgeon, said that death had arisen from the child being unable to digest the food - cornflour and milk - which had been given it.

PLYMOUTH - The death of a labourer at the Marine Biological works at the Citadel, occupied the attention of a Jury at the Guildhall later. The son of the deceased (JOHN HENRY HOOPER, 19 Henry-street) stated that his father had lived away from the family for four weeks, during which time they had received only a shilling from him. - John Ireland, labourer, said that about seven o'clock on that morning HOOPER and he started with an empty barrow to fetch a stone from a certain part of the works. Witness was behind with the barrow, and presently asked deceased where the stone was. On this his companion fell sideways, and he, dropping the barrow, caught him in his arms. He shouted for help, but HOOPER, though he moved convulsively, neither spoke nor groaned; the rattle sounded in his throat and he died immediately. He was a cheerful man, liked by his fellows and received £1 per week. No blasting had been going on at the time. - James Coulton, Hoe Constable, took charge of the body. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned in each case.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 May 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - At Devonport Guildhall yesterday, an Inquest was held by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, on the body of ANTHONY BULLEID, a labourer of Northtawton, who committed suicide at 23 Quarry-street, under circumstances reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. The evidence given by Mary Ann Spriddle, a widow, who had tended the deceased for some months past, shewed that he was very strange and changeable in his habits, and was so dissatisfied that he changed his lodgings, and soon afterwards returned again. Last Monday week he went to Northtawton, and came back on Wednesday. He frequently complained of pains in his head, and of having nasty dreams; on one occasion he dreamed that he should hang himself. He had not done any work lately because he had been on his club. The witness lived at 25 Quarry-street, and on Saturday night deceased called on her several times. His last visit was about eleven o'clock, when his manner was very strange and his eyes were unusually bright. He was about 60 years of age. - A labourer named James Tulley, who lived in the same house with the deceased, deposed that he sat with him by his fire until twenty minutes past twelve on Saturday night. Witness asked him whether he should stay with him longer, and he replied "No, go to bed." On going to open the shutters in deceased's room about half-past seven o'clock the next morning witness found him hanging by a rope from a bracket, around which the rope was fastened. Witness felt the body and believed he was dead. He did not cut him down, but at once ran for a policeman. The Coroner having remarked on the fact of witness not having attempted to cut down the man, who might then have been alive, the Coroner's Officer (Inspector Bryant) said several men were in the room looking on, and made no attempt to cut the man down. Witness said he did not think it was his place to do so - in fact he was too frightened. - P.C. Lawton deposed to cutting down the body, which was warm, as though just dead. Mr Row came just afterwards and pronounced life extinct. There was a wound near the inside of the elbow of the left arm, inflicted with a pocket knife, on which there was blood. The deceased was hanging in a sort of sitting posture, his feet touching the ground. He had been suffocated by the tightening of the rope round his neck. He was naked except his shirt, pants, and stockings. - Inspector Bryant produced two or three letters written by the deceased, in which he complained of being very unwell, that the doctors were doing him no good, and that, being dissatisfied with his lodgings at Devonport, he wished lodgings could be secured for him in Plymouth. Ten shillings and eleven pence was found in the room, as well as a document, dated February 24th, 1887, attested by two witnesses, in which he gave £6 deposited in the Post Office Savings Bank to his niece. - The Coroner having summed up the evidence, and said that he had been informed that the deceased's brother had died insane, the Jury found that the deceased Committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 May 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of EMMA GEORGINA TAYLOR, aged 70. the evidence shewed that the deceased died in a public place on Saturday from syncope.

TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at Teignmouth last evening, concerning the death of EDWARD GEORGE HENRY CROYDON, aged 20, eldest son of MR GEORGE HENRY CROYDON, of Regent-street, printer, who died on Saturday last from inflammation of the brain, caused by an accident which took place on Saturday, the 23rd April. Whilst returning from Torquay, the horse attached to the dogcart in which MR CROYDON was riding stumbled, and he was thrown out, pitching on his feet. This caused an injury to the spine which reached the base of the brain, causing inflammation. MR CROYDON did not feel any serious effects from the accident until several days after it had occurred, when symptoms set in causing great anxiety to his friends, which developed in an alarming manner. MR CROYDON was well known and highly respected amongst a large circle of friends, and much sympathy is on all hands extended to his relatives in their bereavement. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 May 1887
BERE FERRERS - Falling from a barge into the River Tamar has caused the death of JAMES OPIE of Beeralstone, two days after the mishap. At the Inquest a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 May 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at the Melbourne Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of an old woman named ELIZA LUSCOMBE. Deceased was in receipt of parish pay, and on Tuesday morning appeared to be very poorly. This continued throughout Tuesday, and on Wednesday she was worse, so much so that her nephew's wife sent at nine o'clock to Mr Mayell, the relieving officer, for a doctor's order. This was not obtained until twelve o'clock, and did not reach Dr Bean until 1.30. Shortly afterwards he received a message saying that deceased was dead, and consequently he did not go until three o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "~Death from Natural Causes," and added a rider that they considered sufficient attention and care were not paid to the deceased, especially in not procuring medical assistance earlier.

Western Morning News, Monday 16 May 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Explosion On A Torpedo Boat. A Third Death. Narrow Escape Of Another Torpedo Boat. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest on Saturday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, into the cause of death of HENRY HAWKINS, leading stoker, and FREDERICK PLATT, engine-room artificer, who died in the Hospital on the previous day from injuries received as the result of the boiler explosion on No. 47 Torpedo boat. - Mr John James was elected Foreman. The Coroner explained that he proposed simply to have the bodies identified so that he might give an order for their burial, and he should then ask the Jury to accompany him to Keyham, where the damaged torpedo boat had been taken, and to see for themselves the boiler the explosion of which caused the deaths of the two men. Evidence as to the nature and cause of the catastrophe would be taken on a future occasion. The Jury then viewed the bodies, and afterwards Thomas Pinnock, coxswain, gave evidence identifying the bodies. HAWKINS was twenty-seven and PLATT thirty years of age. The Court was then adjourned until Wednesday, the 1st of June. At the Inquest the Admiralty were represented by Mr J. H. Gameson, and Mr Harry Williams, chief inspector of machinery at Keyham; and Lieutenant-Commander Tower of No. 47 torpedo boat, were also present. - Later in the day the Coroner and Jury proceeded to Keyham and went on board the disabled torpedo boat, which is now in basin at that yard. They were accompanied by Mr J. J. E. Venning, solicitor, who was present on behalf of the Admiralty; and Mr Harry Williams, chief inspector of machinery; Mr Robb chief engineer of Devonport Dockyard; and Mr T. Scott, engineer, who has charge of the training of engine-room artificers, leading stokers, and stokers for service in torpedo boats, were also present to answer any questions and furnish any information the Jury might wish to receive. Lieutenant Tower went into the stokehold with the Jury, and remained with them a considerable time while they examined the damaged boiler and furnace, explaining many points on which they desired to be informed. The Jury afterwards returned to Stonehouse in the steam launch of the Royal Adelaide, which, by the courtesy of Admiral Augustus Phillimore, the Naval Commander-in-Chief, had been placed at their disposal. - JOHN ABBINETT one of the stokers who was injured by the explosion on board the torpedo boat, died at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, about half-past five yesterday morning. As already stated his injuries were of a very serious character, and his recovery was regarded from the first as hopeless. Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, will formerly open the Inquest this afternoon and adjourn it until the 1st of June, when the Inquiry will embrace the cause of death of all three of the deceased persons. The other two men, Henry Ferris and James Beckham, are progressing favourably towards recovery, and it is hoped that they will have so far recovered as to be able to give evidences at the adjourned Inquest. - The Admiralty have ordered an Inquiry to be held into the cause of the disaster and for this purpose a Court will assemble today on board the Royal Adelaide, flagship, at Devonport.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 May 1887
PLYMOUTH - The Fatality In Plymouth Sound. The Danger Of A Fastened Mainsail. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Sailors' Home last evening relative to the death of THOMAS HENRY FRENCH, who was drowned in Plymouth Sound on Friday. JOHN PHILIP FRENCH, brother of deceased, identified the body and said he last saw deceased on Friday morning about a quarter after nine in his boat at Guy's quay. About half-past ten witness found the boat gone. The boat was 16 feet long and 5 feet beam. Deceased could not swim. - Robert Robinson, mate of the schooner Lizzie, of Salcombe, said that about three o'clock he saw a man in a boat about 100 yards from the schooner and about 700 yards from the coastguard station at Mount Batten. He had a mizensail, a mainsail, and a small foresail set. There was a moderate breeze from the N.E., and it was squally. The man was beating in. Witness saw a breeze coming from the land, and shouted to the man, who was watching the schooner, to let go his sail. Deceased got off from the thwarts and was about to let go the sail when the breeze caught the boat and it capsized. Witness saw deceased in the water a few seconds. He lowered his boat and was on the sot within a minute and a half, but the man and boat had gone. He reported the occurrence at the coastguard station. - William Charles Fry, fisherman, deposed to finding the body on Sunday morning. It was about sixty yards from the schooner Lizzie. Witness saw deceased on Friday about noon at the Breakwater fishing. The Jury, of whom Mr William Perriton was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and commended the watchfulness and promptitude displayed by Mate Robert Robinson. Deceased was 27 years of age, and leaves a widow and three children.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Explosion On A Torpedo Boat. - A court of Inquiry into the cause of the recent explosion on No. 47 torpedo boat, which resulted in the deaths of three men, was held yesterday on board the Royal Adelaide, flagship, at Devonport. During the morning the members of the court went on board the torpedo boat, now at Keyham, and having examined the stokehold and damaged boiler, returned to the Royal Adelaide where the evidence was taken of Lieut. Tower and other witnesses who were able to throw any light on the cause of the disaster. The proceedings were, however, strictly private, and the result of the Enquiry was not made known. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday afternoon into the cause of death of JOHN ABINNETTS, who succumbed to his injuries on Sunday morning. No evidence beyond that of a formal character was taken, and the Court was adjourned until the 1st of June, when the enquiry will embrace the cases of all three of the men who lost their lives by the explosion. The funeral of the deceased men will take place at two o'clock this afternoon in the cemetery of the Royal Naval Hospital. Admiral Augustus Phillimore, Commander-in-Chief at Devonport, has given permission for as many men in the port who may so desire to attend the funeral, and a firing party from the Royal Adelaide, flagship, will be present.

HALWELL - A fatal accident which had befallen GEO. BOND, a farm labourer, employed by Mr John Irish, of Pulson Farm, Halwell, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry by Mr S. Hacker yesterday. It appeared that the deceased who was 52 years of age, in returning from Totnes fair on Thursday evening, mounted behind Mr R. Irish on a mare that was a very spirited one. Mr Irish, a practised steeplechaser, was unable to keep her in, and the deceased was thrown off, receiving concussion of the brain from which he died on the following day. The deceased was sober at the time of the sad occurrence; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". He leaves a widow and several children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 May 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Baths, Teignmouth, yesterday before Mr Coroner Hacker, touching the death of MR FREDERICK CLEMENT, aged 30, who hanged himself on Monday at that establishment, as already reported. No evidence was forthcoming that gave the slightest clue to the reason for the commission of the deed. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had hanged himself during a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 May 1887
TOPSHAM - Love And Suicide At Topsham. - Yesterday at Topsham, near Exeter, the Deputy Coroner, (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquiry concerning the death of ROBERT DENHAM, who, as already announced, shot himself on Tuesday. A labourer from Bristol identified the deceased as his brother, and said he was a naval pensioner, aged 66. - Evidence was adduced shewing that deceased entered his bedroom about nine o'clock on the night in question. A noise was heard, and on Harriett Fellowes, a widow, who lodged in the same house, entering the room, she found DENHAM stretched in a pool of blood. Dr Bothwell said deceased used a revolver, and the bullet entered his brain. One of the witnesses was a woman named Hall, who stated that she was a widow, and occupied a room directly over that lately used by the deceased. She had heard the deceased say that the cause of his depression at times was the breaking off of an engagement between himself and a woman of 36. About a fortnight since (the witness added on being pressed by the Coroner) the deceased told her he had a mind to take the lives of the persons who had been the cause of his unhappiness, and after that he would take his own. The engagement was broken off by the deceased, and since then he had cared for nothing. - The witness Fellowes was recalled, and added that she had heard the deceased threaten to take the life of the young woman with whom he kept company, as he had seen her walking with another man at Exeter. That was three months back. - The verdict of the Jury was that deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

TIVERTON - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned by a Tiverton Jury who Inquired last evening into the death of MR THOMAS CAPE, landlord of the White Hart Hotel, Cullompton. Deceased was riding home from Tiverton on Tuesday night, and his bridle breaking, he fell over the neck of his horse, sustaining a fracture of the skull. he leaves a widow and nine children.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, the District Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Stonehouse relative to the death of the female child of HARRY DYER, landlord of the Royal Standard Inn, which was found dead in bed on the previous morning. The father deposed that the child was put to bed on Tuesday evening, and appeared well. At 4.30 the next morning it was alive, but at a quarter to eight it was found dead. Its head was covered with a shawl, as it had been on the previous evening. Mr. M. H. Bulteel, surgeon, deposed to making a post-mortem examination. He found the right side of the heart full of blood and the left side quite empty. The lungs were congested, especially the right one. He considered death was due to suffocation, which might have been caused by the end of a blanket getting into the child's mouth. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 May 1887
TORQUAY - At an Inquest held at Torquay on Thursday evening, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, it was shewn that the infant child of GEORGE LAVERS, aged three months, had died suddenly the previous day, it transpiring that the cause of death was convulsions, through being fed with boiled bread and biscuits. The Coroner told the mother of her mistake in thus feeding so young a child, and pointed out that milk was sufficient for it at that age.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 May 1887
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide In A Police Cell. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the County Police Station, Barnstaple, before the Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY JOSLIN, who committed suicide in the police cell at that place. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased was apprehended by a Police Constable on a serious charge against the person of a young woman named Elizabeth Delve, and conveyed to the cell, where, after having supper, he was found about a quarter to nine hanging by a belt, which he wore round his waist, from the ventilator of the room quite dead, having deliberately committed suicide. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, but exonerated the Constable from any blame in respect of the attendance on the deceased while he was in confinement.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 June 1887
CHARLETON - The Mysterious Death At Prawle. Inquest And Verdict. - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on Monday evening at Croft House, Charleton, concerning the death of MISS GERTRUDE ELIZABETH MAYE, who was found drowned at Prawle under circumstances already described. Mr A. J. Coaker was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, expressed the hope that the Jury would be able to clear up the mystery surrounding the death of the young lady. The following evidence was given:- MARIAN MAYE, sister of deceased, deposed to her identify. She had no father, and lived with her mother, two brothers and three sisters. Mr Apjohn also resided with them. Deceased took lessons in Kingsbridge. Witness saw her pass the window on Thursday afternoon. Witness was at dinner with deceased previously, at two o'clock, when she was in her usual state of health, and laughed and talked. The Rev. J. Gratrex was at dinner with them. Nothing transpired to lead her to think anything was the matter. Her mother asked deceased if she would go to Kingsbridge, and she said she would and went out to see the pony put in the carriage. She afterwards said she would not go to Kingsbridge. She had her garden hat on when deceased last saw her. She had no friends where she was found, and had never been to the place before that she knew of. Deceased was of quiet and reserved disposition and on good terms with everybody. Witness had heard of no unpleasantness or jealousies. - Henry Apjohn said he was residing at Croft, and had known deceased for many months. He asked her to go to Kingsbridge at dinner time. Nothing unpleasant took place at that time, and she seemed pleased to go with him. Deceased joined him as he left the house to go to the carriage. He saw she was not dressed to go away, and remarked it to her, when she refused to go with him. She gave no reasons for altering her mind. Deceased went almost everywhere with him. He was surprised at her refusing, and thought she had suddenly made up her mind to go and get some flowers instead of going to Kingsbridge. She often took long walks to gather flowers for him. Deceased went to the pony chaise with him, and he never saw her afterwards. Her sister accompanied him. She shewed no temper, but cried when he pressed her to go with him, or to tell him the reason for not going. No one else was present when she cried. Deceased left him at the stable door and went across the orchard. She had on her garden dress at the time. He thought she said "Good-bye," but she was not crying when she left him. - Andrew Popplestone, who had a conscientious objection to taking the oath, was allowed to affirm. He said he was a member of the Salvation Army. He knew deceased, and saw her at 3.30 on Thursday afternoon passing up from the cliff at Frogmore in a hasty manner. She was further out in the mud than he had ever seen her before. A few minutes afterwards she was right out in the mud, which was over her boots close beside the stream. She was looking at the stream, and he thought she could not be wanting to cross there, as there was a good place to cross further up. He saw her pass by the hard part and return to the mud. He did not go up to her, as he often saw one of the MISSES MAYE by the cliff. He saw no more of her, but traced her footsteps across the mud. - Thomas Easterbrook of Ford, saw deceased pass between four and five o'clock along the road through the village of Ford on the way to Prawle, three miles from her home. She had on a dark dress and knitted hat. She was walking quietly. No words passed between them. He was close to her. - Clara Blank, servant at East Prawle, said she was upstairs at a bedroom window at about seven o'clock, and saw a young woman in black with a Tam o'Shanter hat coming from the direction of Chivelstone to Prawle village. She had a fern in her hand and one in her breast. She noticed nothing unusual, and knew she was a stranger. - W. H. Burner said he saw deceased at 6.20 in East Prawle in a field. When she saw him she began to run. He stopped and stared at her, and she got over the wall. Where she was found was about a mile distant. - P.C. Thomas White, South Pool, deposed to finding the body of deceased at Dictor's Rock, Rickham. The body was between the two rocks. The tide was out and there was a narrow bridge with one rail just over the spot where she was lying. Deceased might have been washed where she was found. She had lost her hat and left shoe, which had not been picked up. The path ran from the top of the cliff. There were a few bruises about the forehead. He took the body to the coastguard station, and afterwards to her home. - Dr Webb, of Kingsbridge, said he examined the body of deceased. Her clothes were saturated with water. He came to the conclusion that she died by drowning. There were only a few post-mortem marks about the body. There was no appearance of deceased's having fallen on the rocks. He considered that she died from drowning. There was no evidence of a struggle. He thought deceased had been dead from 24 to 48 hours. He did not think she had been in the water the whole of the time. - Sarah Damarell, nurse, of Charleton, who worked for MRS MAYE, said she found nothing in the pockets of the deceased, not even a pocket handkerchief. There were no valuables about her at all, and no broach. - MARIAN MAYE (recalled) said deceased had no valuables when she left home. She had a desk, but there was nothing in it bearing on the question of her death. - Henry Apjohn (recalled) was questioned about deceased's crying and replied that he did not consider she [?] crying; deceased was very reticent. She placed her head on his shoulder and appeared upset. She was always most affectionate to him. He was her trainer somewhat, and was trying to get her to throw off little habits. He often made her cry when he talked seriously to her. He treated her only as any gentleman would treat a child. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a mysterious one as regarded the manner in which deceased got into the sea. The medical evidence pointed to drowning, and there was evidently no foul play. It appeared up to Thursday deceased was happy and cheerful, and dined as usual with the family. She went out without being dressed for a walk. If they thought the case was one of suicide, they were bound to give a verdict to that effect. If they thought otherwise, they could give an open verdict, which, however, should be avoided if possible, as being unsatisfactory. He asked them to carefully consider the evidence. - After a short consultation the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned," there being, in their opinion, insufficient evidence as to deceased's motive for going so far from home. The Inquiry lasted nearly three hours.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 June 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Torpedo Boat Explosion. - The Inquiry into the death of FREDERICK PLATT, engine-room artificer; HENRY HAWKINS, leading stoker; and JOHN ABBINETT, stoker, who died from injuries sustained by the explosion on board torpedo boat No. 47, was resumed by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at St George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday. Mr J. J. F. Venning appeared to watch the proceedings on behalf of the Admiralty, and Mr Dunckwort, barrister, of the South-Eastern Circuit, instructed by Mr Attenborough, of London, on behalf of Messrs. Thorneycroft and Co., the makers of the boat. - The Coroner remarked that the Inquest was adjourned from the last occasion for the attendance of Artificer Ferris and the stoker, who were survivors of the accident. The stoker was now able to give evidence, but he was informed by the doctor at the Naval Hospital that Ferris got out of bed for the first time only on the previous day, and would not be fit to attend in less than a fortnight. Since the Jury had met last a court of inquiry had been held on board the Royal Adelaide, but he asked them to dismiss from their minds any reports they might have read in the papers and give their verdicts only upon the evidence which would be brought before them. He wished the Inquiry to be a very exhaustive one, and if the Jury were not satisfied with the evidence of the Government officials, he was prepared to call in the assistance of a civil engineer. As, however, the witness Ferris, who was in the engine-room and not in the stokehold at the time of the accident, was still unable to attend, he proposed to still further adjourn the Inquiry until he was well enough to give evidence. - Mr Dunckwort remarked that Messrs. Thorneycroft and Co., who were thoroughly acquainted with the manufacture of these boats, desired to place at the service of the Jury all possible information to assist them in arriving at a just conclusion as to the cause of the misfortune. He had therefore brought with him men who were, perhaps, more intimately acquainted with that class of work than any others, and the Jury could have no one better to explain to them how this particular boat was constructed and the probabilities as to how the accident occurred. - Mr Venning said he was present on behalf of the Admiralty to give all the evidence in his power, but having received an intimation from the Coroner that the Inquiry would be again adjourned, the officers who would be able to give information were not in attendance. - Mr Dunckwort said he understood that the man who was confined to the Hospital was not in the stokehold but n the engine-room. That was not where the accident to the boiler occurred, and he suggested whether, if the Jury heard first the evidence which was available, especially in reference to the construction of the boat, they might find it unnecessary to further adjourn the Inquest. - Mr Venning replied that he was quite prepared at a day's notice to ensure the attendance of the lieutenant who was in command and the stoker who fortunately escaped with their lives, and also the inspector of machinery who examined the vessel immediately she was brought into dock. From these witnesses no doubt a good deal of important information might be obtained. Unfortunately the three men who knew most about the accident were those who had lost their lives. - The Coroner said he should not close the Court until he had examined the artificer Ferris. - Mr Dunckwort suggested that the practical course to adopt would be to take all the evidence now available, and see afterwards what additional information could be obtained. - The Foreman (Mr J. James) thought it would not be satisfactory to the Jury unless those who were on board at the time of the accident were examined before any technical evidence was given. - Several Jurors expressed concurrence with the Foreman's remarks, and the Inquiry was adjourned until that day four weeks.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 June 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held last night at South Devon Hospital by Mr Coroner Brian, as to the circumstances attending the death of URIAH MATTHEWS. The evidence shewed that the deceased had had a varicose vein in the left leg, as the result of an injury received some time previously, and while carrying some heavy sacks of corn at the Great Western Docks, on the 31st ult., the vein broke and caused his death. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 June 1887
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was opened at Barnstaple on Saturday on the body of a newly-born infant which had been found under suspicious circumstances. It appeared that when ELIZABETH CROCKER, aged 39, in the employ of Mrs Seldon, of Joy-street, came downstairs in the morning various indications were noticed which led to a search being made. In the bedroom occupied by MRS CROCKER was found in a pail of water the body of an infant. Information was given to the Police and the woman was removed to the Workhouse. The Inquest was adjourned to Monday in order that a post-mortem examination might be made.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 June 1887
BARNSTAPLE - An adjourned Inquest was held at Barnstaple yesterday on the body of an infant which had been found under suspicious circumstances in the bedroom of a servant in the employ of Mrs Seldon, of Boutport-street. Dr Pronger certified that the child had not had a separate existence and a verdict of "Stillborn" was returned. The mother, ELIZABETH CROCKER, a widow, will be proceeded against for concealment of birth.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 June 1887
PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned yesterday at an Inquest held at Plymouth Guildhall before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the cause of death of EDWARD CLARKE, one of the crew of the steamship Kelsall, of Shields. The Kelsall was on a voyage from Port Royal to Plymouth, and on the 31st ult. the deceased was taken ill, and complained of pains in the head and of general weakness. Medicine was given to him and he received every care and attention from the captain and others on board, but he got worse, became unconscious during the latter part of the week, and died on the following Sunday morning.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 June 1887
ST MARYCHURCH - Drowned At Petitor. - Dr Fraser, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest at St. Mary Church yesterday, relative to the death of a young woman named ADELINE CHUDLEY LEAR, who kept an infant school at Hele, and whose dead body was found early on Thursday morning on the Petitor Beach, St. Mary Church. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased left her home about 4.30 on Wednesday evening, for the purpose of visiting an old lady at Babbacombe. As the evening wore on and she did not return, a search was instituted, but without result and early on Thursday morning the Police were communicated with. About seven in the morning a fisherman of Babbacombe, named William Taverner, was rowing in a boat from Watcombe to Babbacombe, and when passing Petitor Beach saw the body in the "land wash" a few feet from the shore. He took the body out, and informed P.C's Richards and Thomas of the fact, and they had it removed to Hele. There was a rock on the beach from which it would have been possible for anyone to slip into the water at high tide. Dr Finch examined the body and was of opinion that drowning was the cause of death. There was no evidence of the body having fallen any considerable height. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 June 1887
PLYMOUTH - Supposed Child Murder At Plymouth. Coroner's Inquest. - Last evening the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) opened an Inquiry at Plymouth Guildhall relative to the death of a newly-born male child, of whom the mother was ANN STRATFORD, living at 6 Willow-street, the wife of a seaman in the Royal Navy, serving on board the Wild Swan. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquest, said the case, so far as he saw at present, was likely to prove a very serious one, though it was true it was only respecting the death of a child scarcely born, and said to have lived one minute only. When he was first appointed Coroner it was quite possible for people to take children up to the age of three weeks old to the cemetery, where they were disposed of as stillborn children; but there was now a great alteration. The law stipulated that where a child was born at all it must be registered in the usual way, and a certificate given before it was buried. In pursuance of that he had been called upon sometimes as often as two or three times a week respecting deaths of newly-born infants in which no medical man had been summoned. The registrar had a certificate which required his (the Coroner's)( signature before such children could be buried. In the death which was the subject of the present Inquiry, the registrar (Mr Barter) sent him the following particulars:- "12th June, Willow-street, JOHN STRATFORD, male, lived one minute, son of EDWARD STRATFORD, seaman, Royal Navy; alleged cause of death debility." In answer to his inquiries the woman who brought the form said she was not a midwife. She said the father (the woman's husband) was a seaman serving on the Wild Swan. He told her that the ship had not been home for two years to his knowledge and that therefore, the child was an illegitimate one. He asked her how she came to register the child as the son of JOHN STRATFORD, and she then said that STRATFORD was her son, and she attended the mother. He had reason to believe that the husband knew nothing of his wife's condition, and that she was receiving half-pay. - The following witnesses were examined:- Ann Glaspy, widow of a market labourer, living at No. 1 Frankfort-lane, said she had seen lying at the mortuary the body of the newly-born male infant child which had been seen by the Jury. Deceased was the child of ANN STRATFORD, the wife of EDWARD STRATFORD, a seaman, and she was living at No. 6 Willow-street, where she was confined on Sunday morning. Witness was in the room at the time of the birth. The child was born alive. Witness left in about five minutes and the child was breathing when she went out of the room. Mrs Bushen, the mother-in-law, was at the bedside at the time, and the child was lying in the bed. Nothing was done for or to the child in witness's presence. The lips of the infant were of a dark colour, but no black. Witness did not hear the child cry before she left the room. - Dr Augustus Henry Bampton, practising in Plymouth, stated that, at the request of the Coroner, he had that day made an examination of the deceased. The body was that of a full term newly-born male child. He made an external examination and found nothing calling for notice except the condition of the lips, which had the appearance and consistency of dried leather, and were nearly black in colour. He thereupon examined the mouth and the tongue, which he found slightly discoloured and dry. He then examined the chest and on testing the lungs found that they floated. He had no doubt that the child was born alive and had an independent existence. On opening the abdomen he found that the stomach was perforated at the lower and gullet end, and a portion of it black and charred. There was a hole in the stomach of the size of the top of the little finger. The tissues and organs in the immediate neighbourhood of the left side of the stomach were also discoloured and charred to a lesser degree by something which had come through the perforation. The right end of the stomach was natural. On opening the stomach he found it discoloured throughout and portions burnt to a cinder. The windpipe was affected in the same way. The stomach was empty, and the appearances he had described were not natural. The discolourations were all produced by the same cause, namely, some corrosive liquid. He removed some of the organs and made a rough analysis, with the result that he believed the burning was due to the action of acid (possibly sulphuric acid) passed into the mouth. The acid appeared to have passed down both the gullet and the windpipe. The death arose from shock, occasioned by the action of the corrosive acid. He knew of no condition of the mother which would produce the effects described. - By the Foreman: The action of sulphuric acid poured into the child's mouth would be almost immediate. He could give no idea of the quantity used; it must have amounted to at least a teaspoonful. - The Coroner said the evidence given was of a very serious nature and it would, therefore, be well to adjourn the Inquiry for the presence of the mother. As far as he could ascertain the husband had not been informed of his wife's condition. At the adjournment they would endeavour to have the case completed. - It was then decided to adjourn the Inquiry to that day fortnight, at six o'clock.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 June 1887
TEIGNMOUTH - At the Teignmouth Infirmary yesterday morning Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry touching the circumstances connected with the death of GEORGE STADDON, plumber, who expired at that Institution the previous morning, after having taken by misadventure about a gill of weed-killing liquid contained in a cask in the coach-house of the Vicarage, Bishopsteignton, and which the unfortunate man mistook for cider. the Rev. J. S. Ogle, vicar of Bishopsteignton, was present, and gave evidence, stating that the cask had been in his possession about three weeks, and was duly marked "Poison" in large letters across the front. The coach-house was usually kept locked, and there was an entrance to it from the stable, but the workmen had no right there. The medical evidence of Dr Broughton, of Bishopsteignton, and Mr D. Ellis, the resident house surgeon at the Infirmary, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, shewed that deceased had died from the effects of an irritant poison, the symptoms being those of carbolic acid poisoning. A verdict of Accidental Death by Poisoning was returned. The deceased was 53 years of age.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 June 1887
PILTON - WM. GILBERT, a painter, aged 67, residing at Pilton, Barnstaple, was seized with a fit of syncope while working at the top of a flight of stairs yesterday, his dead body being found at the bottom of the stairs shortly afterwards. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at the Inquest, which was held last evening.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 June 1887
EXETER - Drowned In The Exe. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday concerning the death of EDWARD PERCY HILLMAN, son of a schoolmaster residing at Countess Weir. The deceased, a clerk, was 17 years of age, and on Friday was bathing in the river for a third time when he sank. The only witness of the occurrence was a younger brother of the deceased, aged 10. The body was found nine feet from the bank, and in ten feet of water. Deceased was in the habit of bathing, and could swim a little. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 June 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Domestic Tragedy At Stonehouse. Coroner's Inquest And Verdict. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Market House Hotel, Market-street, Stonehouse, concerning the death of HENRY CALLAWAY, aged 51, who committed suicide in the Great Western Docks on Sunday morning after a murderous assault on his wife under circumstances already described. Mr Henry Westaway was Foreman of the Jury. Inspector James watched the proceedings on behalf of the Great Western Docks. The following evidence was given:- John Lovering, residing at 60 East-street, said the deceased and his wife had lived at the same house for three weeks or a month. On Saturday night there was screaming proceeding from deceased's room, and deceased ran downstairs. Witness stopped the man, and asked him if he had beaten his wife, but he said he had not, that he could not live with her any longer, and was going to fetch a policeman. When it was found that the deceased had assaulted his wife witness went in search of him, but did not succeed in finding him. - EDWARD CALLAWAY, living at 13 Clive-street, Ford, said the deceased was his brother, and his age was about 51. He had been working off and on as a dock labourer. The black eye which deceased had, he told him, was done by his wife striking him with a slipper while he was in bed. - George Goodyear, dock gateman at the Great Western Docks, said he found the body of deceased at about half past nine on Sunday morning. The tide was then two-thirds ebb. Witness went on duty at six in the morning, but had not passed the spot where deceased was lying previously. He looked over the quay and saw deceased's body lying with his legs upward, as though he had made a jump. Deceased was about fifty yards westward of the dock entrance. The depth from the top of the dock to where deceased lay was about 20 feet. From the position of the body he considered that deceased had jumped into the water. The body was taken out and conveyed to the mortuary. - Francis Edward Teagle, police officer at the Great Western Docks, said he was on duty from six on Saturday evening to six on Sunday morning at the east entrance Millbay-yard. The outer gates were locked and the wicket-gate barred after eleven, and not opened till early next morning. He did not see the deceased at all that night, and he could not have opened and closed the gate without witness knowing it. It was very possible that deceased, knowing the docks could have got in without entering the gates. - The allegation having been mentioned that witness was asleep. The Coroner said this did not affect the case, but it was a matter affecting the Dock Company's management. The alleged statement of Lovering did not appear to be correct, for he did not repeat it in his evidence. The statement was, however, reported to him (the Coroner). - Inspector James said that if necessary he had a witness present who was in company with Teagle between one and two o'clock, and would prove that he was not asleep. He characterised the story as a cock and bull one. - Teagle emphatically denied that he was asleep, because he was particualrly busy. He could bring several witnesses to prove that he was attending to his duties. - The Foreman inquired how the deceased could have got into the docks? - Teagle said it was possible to get into the docks without going through the gates. - The Police desiring to have the point about the conduct of Teagle cleared up, a P.C. Stoneman was sent for, and stated that he saw a young man belonging to the navy who told him that he expected the deceased was gone into the docks. He (the young man) had been round to look, and he could very well get in, as the man "round there" was fast asleep - that was the man at the Millbay end. - The Coroner said that had really nothing whatever to do with the cause of death. If, after that evidence, the Dock Company chose to make further inquiries it rested entirely with them. - Mr Ridge, called by the Coroner, described the condition of the deceased's wife shortly after the assault. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict - "That the deceased committed Suicide while Temporarily Insane." There was no evidence as to how he got into the dock, and no one was to blame. - By the courtesy of Mr W. Waterfield, Surgeon, we are enabled to state that MRS CALLAWAY is progressing favourably. She is in a weak state, but the wounds are doing extremely well.

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 June 1887
HARBERTON - Suicide Of A Farmer's Son Near Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Sidney Hacker, at Moor Farm, Harberton, relative to the death of ROBERT PARSON ADAMS, aged 23, son of MR JOHN ADAMS, living at the above-named farm. The body of the deceased had been found on Monday in a shallow stream running through the farm. The deceased had been in ill-health and low spirits for some time, and had been attended by Mr Langworthy, surgeon, from whose evidence it appeared the young man was subject to delusions. About a quarter of an hour before the body was found the deceased was met by his sister, who did not notice anything unusual about him, or that he was in lower spirits than usual. A note written in pencil by the deceased and addressed to his mother was found, in which he stated he was obliged to do what he was going to do. On this and the doctor's evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 24 June 1887
TORQUAY - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at the Daddy Hole Coastguard Station, Torquay, last evening, relative to the death of a woman named SOPHIA ANN FISHER, wife of a coastguardsman, whose body was found in the sea beneath the cliffs of Daddy Hole Plain on Wednesday afternoon. From the evidence of the husband and neighbours, it seemed that the woman was suffering from pains in her head and was very strange at times. On Wednesday afternoon she left home, and was observed to walk across the green in the direction of the sea, that being the last time she was seen alive. About half an hour later a coastguard named Thomas Howes went to have a look up and down the coast when he noticed the body in the water. After calling some other men he got the body ashore. There were no bruises on it to lead to the supposition that deceased had fallen from the cliffs. There was a ledge a few feet above the water at the quarry, from which she might have fallen off. Dr. Pollard examined the body, and was of opinion that drowning was the cause of death. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 June 1887
ASHBURTON - An adjourned inquiry was held at Putsham Buckland, near Ashburton, on Saturday, before Mr Coroner Hacker, respecting the death of the child of SARAH ANN KING, 19, domestic servant. Dr Gervis, who had made a post-mortem, having stated that he considered death was caused by exposure and suffocation, the Jury found a verdict of Accidental Death.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) opened an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Saturday afternoon, relative to the death of a marine named OWEN REECE, aged 23, of H.M.S. Indus, who was drowned whilst bathing in the river Lynher, as already reported in the Western Morning News. Mr J. P. Goldsmith, solicitor represented the Admiralty. Lance-Corporal David Kennedy identified the body, and said the deceased was a private on board the Indus. On Sunday morning last, the 19th inst., deceased, with witness, hired a boat from Newpassage and pulled to Antony Point, where he prepared to have a bathe. Witness was a good swimmer, and REECE could swim about 50 or 100 yards. Witness got into the water first, told deceased not to come out far, and then swam to the other side of the river. On witness's return he got on a rock, and while resting there a boat, with three occupants, came and he got in. When he did so they told him that his chum had been drowned. This being all the evidence forthcoming, the Coroner said he should adjourn the Inquest until today, in order to have the evidence of one of the men in the boat.

SHALDON - Drowned In Returning From A Jubilee Feast. - Mr Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Shaldon on Saturday, touching the death of THOMAS CHARLES BRYANT, a young man of Shaldon, who with three others was returning to Shaldon from Coombeinteignhead jubilee celebrations on Friday evening. It appeared that on the way home they commenced larking and rocking the boat, which ultimately turned over. Fortunately a man named Westlake was near at hand in a boat, and, after a great deal of trouble, as his boat was loaded with passengers, he succeeded in rescuing the three lads who were with BRYANT, named Searle, Poland and Mias, but the deceased was found missing. E. BRYANT, father of the deceased, stated that his son was 18 years of age, and he last saw him alive on Friday evening when he left Shaldon in a boat with another lad named Searle to go to Coombe-cellars. About half-past ten witness was called up by some woman, who, asking if TOM was in, and being told he was not, said "Then he's drowned." Witness dressed, and, with another man, went up the river in search of his son, and about three o'clock they found the body lying on the mud near Archebrook. C. Searle, one of the deceased's companions, said they had a quart of beer among four of them at Coombe. On the way home, deceased got up in the boat to take flag from witness, and on his (deceased's) sitting down the boat overturned. Witness and the other two were saved by a passing boat, but BRYANT sank and witness did not see him again. William Westlake having given evidence, the Jury found a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and most of them gave their fees to the parents.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 June 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquiry was held by Mr Coroner Rodd at the Market House Hotel, Stonehouse, yesterday, concerning the death of ALFRED WILLIAM HILL, a printer, 26 years of age, living in Admiralty-street. Whilst bathing off the Eastern King on Saturday morning deceased was seen by a youth named William Bulley to suddenly fall down in shallow water close in shore. Bulley immediately went to his assistance and held his head up, whilst one of the lads bathing there procured help. P.C. Lake quickly arrived and with Bulley lifted HILL out of the water on to the beach. Deceased was breathing and means were taken to restore animation, but without avail. He expired within a quarter of an hour. Mr Leah, surgeon, arrived on the spot very shortly afterwards. For eight or nine years deceased had been subject to epileptic fits, and had been under Mr Leah's treatment. Four months ago he was also under his care with regard to his mental condition, which, then, it was thought would have necessitated his removal to an asylum. In Mr Leah's opinion deceased had had an epileptic fit whilst bathing, and death was due to suffocation from drowning. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony. The Coroner commended Bulley for his promptitude and conduct.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatality In The River Lynher. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of OWEN REES, private, R.M.L.I., belonging to H.M.S Indus, who was drowned in the river Lynher on the 19th inst., under circumstances already reported, was held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner. - Mr Damerall (Town Clerk's Department) watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty. - Richard Hurrell, warrant officer on board the Newcastle, proved finding the body at half-past twelve on Friday near the Newcastle, floating down with the tide; he sent it t the Naval Hospital. - William Vicary, carpenter, living at Antony Passage, deposed that on Sunday morning, the 19th inst., he, with two men named Brewer and Peters, was cruising in a boat near Sandy Point in the river Lynher. Witness saw the deceased, who was undressed, walk into the water at Sandy Point. He did not swim, but waded out. Suddenly he got into the pit at this point, and was carried by the tide to the westward. Witness was about 100 yards away at the time. Deceased shouted for a boat, but sank directly afterwards before witness could reach him, never rising again. The place where the deceased sank was a dangerous spot and the tide was "like a whirlpool." - Mr Dickson one of the Jury, suggested that the public should be warned against this dangerous spot. - The Coroner asked the Press to take notice of this, adding that the deceased was a trespasser at Sandy Point. Mr Hurrell said there were notice boards at the point stating that persons were not allowed there.

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 June 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, yesterday, by Mr Brian, in regard to the death of JAMES CALDECOTT. Thomas Kettlewell, inspector, Great Western Railway Company, Eliza Yeo and Walter Hill, assistant house-surgeon, gave evidence, from which it appeared that the deceased was booking clerk at North-road station until five years ago. He had been in poor health for some time, and recently fell down in his room and sustained a compound dislocation of the knee. Death followed upon amputation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Suspicious Death Of A Child AT Plymouth. Remarkable Evidence. - The adjourned Inquest as to the death of the infant child of ANN STRATFORD, was held in the Western Law Court, Plymouth, last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner. The evidence taken at the last hearing having been read over, Mrs Glaspey, recalled, stated that she entered the bedroom two minutes before the child's birth. Mrs Bushen had heard her voice and called her upstairs. She did not re-enter the room after having left it five minutes after the child was born. She had seen nothing of any poison or phial. It was not true that she fetched a bottle for the mother. - By the Foreman: She saw that the child's lips were discoloured whilst still alive, but after death they became black. - By a Juror: She had said that it was a fine, healthy child and likely to live. - Ann Bushen, who was at first unwilling to be sworn, stated that her daughter-in-law had had a miscarriage a year before. MRS STRATFORD had lived with her for three months. She asked Mrs Glaspey to assist her and she did. She left the room almost immediately after the birth. She ran to her own house and returned with a bottle. Her daughter had asked the woman to get some steel drops. The bottle (produced) was put on the table. There was a little more liquid in it then than at the present moment. When Mrs Glaspey came back the husband of witness called her downstairs to get his breakfast. Mrs Glaspey left the room as she re-entered it. The bottle was in the same position on the table. The baby was also in the same position. Mrs Northcott had told witness that she had heard the child give a heavy sigh and she replied, "Yes, I know you did," as she had also heard it give a little cry. She would not swear that she had said, "It is an unlucky day for me." An hour after the child was born Mrs Northcott said, "Act a mother's part." She replied that the child had died half an hour before. - In reply to questions as to the length of time the child lived, witness stated it to be six minutes, a quarter of an hour and half an hour, several times contradicting each statement. She had told Mr Barter that it lived one minute only. She produced a bottle taken from MRS STRATFORD'S cupboard, which Mrs Glaspey's daughter had given her. The child's lips were very dark, and the mother said it was owing to stuff Mrs Glaspey had given her. MRS STRATFORD told Inspector Hill that she had taken a tablespoonful of the liquid in the small bottle on the Saturday before the birth. That being so, she did not know why Mrs Glaspey had to go home to get the bottle unless she had taken it there after administering the dose. Her daughter had asked Mrs Glaspey to fetch "that small bottle." She did not consider the child a fine and healthy one and likely to live. - ANN STRATFORD, mother of the child, stated that her husband had been absent in H.M.S. Swan for two years and a half. The child was born on the 12th inst., between eight and nine o'clock, in the presence of her mother-in-law only. She did not ask Mrs Glaspey to fetch the small bottle. She had bought it from a chemist a month before. It was kept at Mrs Glaspey's house. She did not, as she told Detective Hill, take any from it on the previous day. She did not know where it was. She did not take any steel drops after the birth. She could not swear that nothing had been administered to the child, for after its birth she became unconscious. When she recovered, the child was by her side, but her mother was out of the room. She then recognised the larger bottle of black liquid near by. That bottle had been bought from a fortune-teller in Morley-lane, and she had taken a quantity of it. Mrs Glaspey had advised her to take laudanum to strengthen her back, but she had refused. She did not know what took place while she was unconscious after the birth. - Phillippa Northcott said she went into Mrs Bushen's house and heard the baby cry twice about nine o'clock. Mrs Bushen was upstairs at the time. At 10.30 Mrs Bushen came into her room in a very agitated state, and told her that the baby was dead. At eleven o'clock Mrs Bushen's daughter, Henrietta Glaspey, came in and said that the child was living when she took her mother some tea just before. She had not seen it, but had heard it cry. On Good Friday MRS STRATFORD had come into her room and said that her sister-in-law had had a child and Mrs Glaspey gave it something and it died. Mrs Bushen and Mrs Glaspey then took it and threw it over the Cemetery wall. - Mary Jane Damerell stated that she heard the baby cry at 10.30 on the Sunday. - EMMA STRATFORD stated that on Monday, June 13th, MARY ANN STRATFORD told her that the child was still-born, and that it was black as ink. The next day she went to her again and said that Mrs Percy had told her that they had given the child brandy and then strangled it. MRS STRATFORD replied that it would not be Ann Bushen who would get her into trouble, but Ann Glaspey. - Henrietta Glaspey stated that she went to her mother's room at eleven on the Sunday. She did not hear the child cry, only groan. - Detective Dart produced a small bottle labelled "Steel drops" and detailed a conversation he had had with Mrs Bushen and MRS STRATFORD, in which they told him that the child breathed twice only. - Dr Oxland, who examined the body of the infant, said the stomach was discoloured, but he was unable to discover the agent employed. He could not believe that it came about, however, by natural means. He discovered the presence of an irritant poison. The stomach suggested to him the introduction of hot water. The effect might have been produced by brandy. - In summing up, the Coroner said there were two very obvious facts in the case before them. The child was illegitimate and, if they had the slightest regard for the convicting evidence of Dr Bampton there could not be the slightest doubt that it had been wilfully destroyed. - After half an hour's deliberation, the Foreman, Mr G. Firks, applied for an adjournment for further Inquiry on Wednesday next. The Jury did not rise until 11.30 pm., there being a large attendance in court the whole time. Superintendent Wreford and Detective Inspector Hill were present on behalf of the Police.

Western Morning News, Friday 1 July 1887
TORRINGTON - A little girl named GERTRUDE PETTLE has this week died at Torrington through injuries received by falling out of bed. The accident formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry yesterday, when the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from Concussion and compression of the lower part of the brain or the top of the spinal cord, the result of the fall.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 July 1887
EXETER - The Accidental Poisoning At Exeter. - At the Exeter Hospital yesterday, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SARAH ANN PATIENCE COLES, aged 42, wife of the landlord of the New Inn, Alphington. The husband stated that on Tuesday last his wife, who was upstairs, called to him for a glass of port wine. Before he could take it to her some customers entered, and he was servicing them when he heard the deceased groaning. He ran upstairs, and caught her in his arms as she was falling. He asked her what was the matter, and she said "It isn't port wine - I thought it was," at the same time pointing to a bottle labelled "Saxum's Sanitary Fluid." He had never seen the bottle until that time and he did not know it was on the premises. Deceased always carried the key of the cupboard where the port wine was kept. The deceased was of temperate habits; she had not been well lately. - Mr Blomfield, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased died from failure of the heart's action, accelerated by acute inflammation of the stomach which must have resulted from the sanitary fluid produced. It his opinion it contained carbolic acid, although advertised as "non-poisonous." He did not think the deceased could have lived many weeks under any circumstances. The verdict of the Jury was that the deceased died from the effects of the fluid, taken in mistake.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 July 1887
PLYMOUTH - Determined Suicide At Plymouth. Verdict Of Felo De Se. - A most determined case of suicide was investigated by the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the Guildhall on Saturday afternoon. The body of the deceased - THOMAS JOLLY, aged 55 - was found floating off the North Quay on Saturday morning with the hands and feet securely tied. Mr Robert Tozer was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the case, said he wished the Jury to take particular notice as to how the hands were tied, and to see whether it was possible that deceased might have tied them himself, as their verdict would depend greatly on that. If from the position in which they were tied it was impossible for the deceased to have done it himself, of course someone else must have done it, and then thrown him overboard. - The Coroner and Jury then proceeded to view the body. The feet were tied twice round with a thick cord. Round the left hand the cord was wound twice and tied tight. It was then brought round the right hand once and tied in a "granny" knot in the middle, thus leading to the supposition that the deceased did it himself. - JANE JOLLY, daughter of the deceased living at No. 18 Moon-street, identified the body. Her father was a porter on the quay. Witness saw deceased on the quay at about six o'clock on the previous evening. He called witness over and asked her how her mother was. Her mother had been at the Hospital since the 21st June, suffering from injuries which deceased had inflicted on her. He had not been living at home since. Witness told the deceased that her mother was very ill. He said he was going to get a note from the relieving officer to go into the Workhouse. Deceased was given to drinking, and had lately been out of work, but had work on Friday last. - Mary Ann Tremlett, landlady of the foresters' Pride, Lower-street, said deceased came into the house on the previous evening between eight and nine o'clock and called for a pint of beer. He was quite sober. Witness asked him how he was getting on, and he replied that he was not very well. He had two pieces of thick cord in his hand, and shewed them to witness with the remark that he was going to tie his hands and feet and make away with himself. Witness told him not to talk such nonsense. He had another pint of beer and paid for the both. He left the house about ten o'clock and was perfectly sober. He did not appear to be talking in a joking manner, but as a rational being, and as though he meant what he said. It did not occur to witness to inform the Police. - Charles Lee, quay porter, said he saw the deceased on the North Quay at a quarter to eleven on Friday night. Witness asked him how it was he was not at home in bed. He replied, "You won't see me after tonight; I am going to tie my hands and feet and go overboard." Witness replied, "Go home and go to bed." - The Coroner: Did you not think it was your duty to see him off the quay? - Witness: I think it was my duty at that time of night to go home and go to bed. - The Coroner: yes, that was your duty to yourself, but what about your neighbour? - Witness: I was half drunk myself. - James Hall said that about 6.40 on Saturday morning he saw the body of a man floating, head downwards, off the North Quay. He fetched a policeman, and the body was got out and conveyed to the mortuary. - P.C. Boyes corroborated. The hands and feet were tied as the Jury had seen. He searched the body and found twopence, a pair of spectacles and a tobacco-box. - In summing up, the Coroner said the question of tying deceased's hands had been cleared up. It was evident that he intended to do it, and did do it himself. There were three questions for them to decide. First, the cause of death. There could be little doubt that deceased died from drowning. Second, did he drown himself? The evidence proved that he intended doing so. Third, the state of his mind at the time. He (the Coroner) thought it was a most deliberate and premeditated suicide. They had evidence that deceased spoke rationally, that he was in reduced circumstances, and that he spoke quite freely about what he intended to do, but they had no evidence that deceased was depressed or not in his right mind. - The Court was cleared and after some considerable time was reopened. - The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de Se, and added a rider - "The Jury think that Mrs Mary Ann Tremlett, after hearing the threats of deceased, should have communicated with the Police."

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 July 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest at the Pride of Devon Inn, Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of JOHN SNOW, 66, medical herbalist of Crediton. George Honey, proprietor of the inn, stated that the deceased left his house at 6.30 on Tuesday for North-road Station; near the Roman Catholic Church he complained of the violent beating of his heart. At the station he sat down and almost immediately became unconscious. He was driven back to the Inn and died soon after arriving there. Mr Brenton, surgeon, was called and considered that heart disease had caused death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMPTON - Singular Fatality At Plympton. A Juror's Protest. Strange Superstition. - At the Plympton Workhouse yesterday an Inquiry was held before Mr R. R. Rodd, The County Coroner, into the cause of death of BENJAMIN THOMAS RYDER, commonly known as THOMAS RYDER, a farm labourer of Cornwood. Mr John Dart was elected Foreman of the Jury. The Coroner explained that the deceased had cut his wrist while sharpening a scythe at the millstone of Mr Henry Corber, farmer, of Hill Farm, Cornwood. - Immediately after the Foreman had been sworn, and before the rest of the Jury were sworn, Mr harry Earle, of Ridgway, one of the summoned Jury, protested against the way that the Coroner's Officer, Police-constable W. A. Greek selected the Jurymen. He said that at the Inquests in that neighbourhood there was rarely a farmer summoned, rarely a half-pay officer, or anyone who had abundant leisure. The persons chosen were nearly always tradesmen, or others whose business kept them to their own establishments. He thought that was unfair and unjust; and was a practice that ought not to be continued. - The Coroner: I can discharge you if you do not wish to serve. - Mr Earle: That is not the point. I do not wish to be discharged. I am willing to do my duty as a citizen; but it is not fair - I am speaking for others besides myself - that others who have plenty of time on their hands should not be called to serve. There are plenty of persons in Saltram-terrace and other places that could well afford the time. - The Coroner: I suppose my officer does what is best. - P.C. Greek (the Coroner's Officer): Did you object to come? - Mr Earle: No. - P.C. Greek: Did I press you to come? - Mr Earle: No; but I am talking to the Coroner, not to you. You have no right to interfere. - The Coroner: I will make a note of your complaint. - Another Juryman: I must say that the Coroner's Officer, whenever I have objected to be summoned, has always found a substitute for me. - The Jury were then sworn, and the body having been viewed, the Inquiry proceeded. - George Newman, miller, Wisdom Mills, Cornwood, said he was in the employ of Mr Henry Corber He had known deceased for six years. On the day of the accident he came to the mill to sharpen his scythe. He was quite accustomed to the work; and while he was sharpening his scythe witness was not present; but on entering the place he found him with his wrist bleeding. Witness at once called in the people from round about, and his brother's wife bound up the wound. The deceased asked to be taken to the South Devon and Cornwall Hospital. He said he had been there before for something else, and seemed anxious to be taken there. - Mr Earle (a Juryman): I have heard a "charmer" was sent for. Is that so? - Witness: Yes; to stop the bleeding. I will never allow anyone else to sharpen. I should not have allowed him, but I knew he was used to it. The place is an awkward place to do such work, and the deceased said so, but he added "I will try and manage." The stone was only 15 inches from the wall. - Mr Henry Corber, Hill Farm, Cornwood, said as soon as his attention was called to the accident he got his horse saddled to fetch a doctor, but deceased asked to be taken to the Hospital, and witness, therefore, took his horse back, and got out a horse and trap. - Mr Earle: Is it true they sent for a "charmer?" - Witness: they did send for a man who said he could "charm" blood. But it came on bleeding again as we were driving him to the Hospital. He did not speak much. He was faint and asked for some gin. I gave him some brandy. - A Juryman: Do you believe in "charming?" - Witness: I do not know what it is. I do not understand it. They tied up his arm - above the elbow. - The Coroner: We have nothing to do with "charming." - Mr Earle: I beg your pardon. We have to do with the question of negligence; and if persons send for "charmers" instead of doctors, or instead of trying to stop the bleeding, that might be negligence. - Mr Lister, master of Plympton Workhouse, deposed that when deceased arrived there he was in a dying state. Blood was running from the trap. Several messengers were sent for Dr Ellery, who speedily arrived, but the deceased was then dead. Mrs Light, the "charmer's" wife, was in the trap with deceased. - The scythe was here produced, shewing the blood marks, and on Mr Corber being recalled, he said, in answer to the Coroner and Jury, that the reason he did not send for Dr Rendle, of Kingsbridge, was that deceased requested to be taken to the Devon and Cornwall Hospital. Witness had saddled his horse to fetch Dr Rendle, when RYDER asked to be taken to the Hospital. - A Juryman: If you had sent for a doctor, he might have been living now. - The Coroner: I believe so. - Dr Ellery then said he was called in and found the deceased already dead from syncope, caused by loss of blood. The two main arteries on the right wrist were severed. Doubtless death was accelerated by the journey in the trap, and his opinion was that if a surgeon had been sent for at the time the man's life would have been saved. It was quite proper to tie up the arm above the elbow. - Mr Earle (to the Coroner): Is there a law against "charming"? - The Coroner: We have nothing to do with that now. - Mr Earle: Is it not the same as fortune telling? It has to do with this case. - The Coroner: I have nothing to do with it. - A Juryman (to Dr Ellery): I suppose "charming" if it did no good, would do no harm? (Laughter). - Dr Ellery: Certainly not. - Another Juryman: The "charmers" applied tight bandages, and that is something to the good. - Dr Ellery: Yes. They stopped the brachial artery as well as they could, and that was something. - The Coroner then summed up, pointing out that the evidence shewed the affair was a pure accident; although if the deceased had not been in the habit of sharpening his tools at Corke's Mill, the witness Newman would have been pen to grave censure. The man, however, was in the habit of using the grindstone and, therefore, no blame attached to Newman. Certainly there had been negligence in not sending for a doctor, but they must remember the excitement people would be in, and it could hardly be said the negligence was culpable. - The Jury, without retiring, found a verdict of "Accidental Death" from syncope, caused by severance of the arteries of the right wrist, and that no one was to blame.

PLYMOUTH - Suspected Infanticide At Plymouth. Verdict Of Wilful Murder. - The Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, and a Jury sat for the third time yesterday, at the Western Law Courts, Plymouth, to Inquire into the death of the infant child of ANN STRATFORD, of Willow-street. - Dr Oxland gave his report of the analysis of a liquid found in a bottle in the room where the child was born. The fluid had a sediment of oxide and carbonate of iron. The liquid contained a solution of iron, and a little carbonate of soda, a solution of aloes, and traces of sulphuric acid. Its black colour was probably caused by the iron acting on the cork. There was less than two grains of solid matter to an ounce of the liquid, which was water. the mixture was similar to that which might be used to procure abortion. - Henry James Barter, registrar of births and deaths, stated that he had registered the age of the baby as one minute on the statement of a woman calling herself a midwife. She pressed him to register the death without further inquiry. - Dr Bampton said that in his last evidence he had referred to the stomach and liver of the child being charred. He had since then made experiments on the stomach and liver of a calf with acids, and had obtained results similar to the indications he had noticed in the infant. He still inclined to the opinion that the agent used was oil of vitriol; and he was positive that it was, at all events, caused by one of the corrosive acids. The most powerful of these, and the one most commonly used for criminal purposes, was oil of vitriol. By it very powerful effects might be produced on the stomach, and yet no trace of the acid be found. A teaspoonful of it would cause the death of an infant. He had already stated that he believed a teaspoonful of some acid had been administered. - ANN STRATFORD, mother of the child, was re-sworn, as she wished to make a statement. She said that when she became conscious, some time after the birth of the child, she found her mother-in-law Mrs Bushen in the room. Her baby was by her side. A small bottle was on the table. It was not the one containing the steel drops. It had something black in it. It was less than half full. (Detective Dart produced a small bottle, with a red label, marked "Poison." Witness said that was the bottle.) Mrs Bushen had a spoon in her hand. She took up the baby from the bed on her left arm. The spoon was filled with some black liquid like that in the bottle, and this Mrs Bushen poured down its throat, whereupon the child coughed. half an hour after she gave the child two spoonfuls of steel drops. Mrs Bushen left the room and on her return she gave the child another dose of steel. She again left the bedroom and came back in ten minutes with a basin of milk for her. Her child was then dead. Witness told her of the fact, to which she replied, "And a blessing, too." She said "I had rather my child had lived." She did not know what her mother was going to give the child. She did not ask her. She said to her "What are you doing?" Bushen answered, "Giving him some stuff out of the bottle." Later she said "It was given to poison him." Witness had had no idea what was being done with the liquid was given her baby. She never saw the bottle before. She did not know that the stuff now in the bottle (produced) was the same as that in it on the day in question. She never tried to find out what it was. Her mother-in-law wanted her to say that she had done it. Mrs Bushen said: "I should say I poisoned the child." She replied; "What! poisoned our child? That would be telling an untruth." Mrs Glaspey had nothing to do with the death of her child. She did not bring forward her evidence before because she was afraid of her mother-in-law. - Dr Bampton, re-called, stated that the liquid in the bottle produced by Detective Dart was pure laudanum. A teaspoonful of it, followed by steel drops, would kill an infant. Half a drop would be a medicinal dose for an infant, but a spoon would contain a hundred drops. The laudanum would not produce the charring of the stomach. He had yet to learn that the child had been given laudanum. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there were two clear points in the case. From the evidence of Dr Bampton it was certain that the life of the infant had been taken. There was a motive for murder. It was an illegitimate child. It had been stated that Mrs Bushen had administered poison. If they believed MRS STRATFORD'S evidence they must return a verdict of wilful murder against Bushen. - After 45 minutes' deliberation Mr Firks, Foreman of the Jury, said they found a verdict of Wilful Murder against Mrs Bushen. The Jury expressed their appreciation of the evidence given by Dr Bampton. - The Coroner then committed Ann Bushen to take her trial at the next assizes for the murder of JOHN STRATFORD, aged two hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 July 1887
CREDITON - An Inquest was held by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould at Crediton, on Saturday on the body of MRS W. H. BADCOCK, who met her death by falling over stairs, which were considered by the Jury to be most dangerous. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

GEORGEHAM - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held on Saturday at Georgeham, near Barnstaple, on the body of a lad named W. H. SMITH son of a farmer. When leaving a hay field the boy was knocked down by a runaway horse and killed on the spot.

EXMOUTH - At Exmouth an Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr T. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on the body of DAVID MURDOCK. Mr E. Balmanno gave evidence that he was bathing with deceased, whom he was teaching to swim. He left him standing in shallow water and swam out himself, and on turning round saw deceased struggling. He went towards him and tried to help him ashore, but was nearly taken under himself. He got to land and ran to Mr Peck, who was in his boathouse close by. He immediately came, launched a boat and saw deceased just below the surface, but was unable to reach him. Captain Parker then came and Mr Peck having procured a grapnel the body was recovered in about six or seven minutes, but life was extinct. Corroborative evidence was given, and a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was recorded. The place where the accident occurred runs off deep suddenly, and a lad was drowned there some three years since.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 July 1887
YEALMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Yeampton on Tuesday evening as to the death of MR J. H. ANTHONY, of Yealmpton Mills, which occurred on Monday, as already stated in the Western Morning News. The Inquiry was an important one, as upon the result of it depended a substantial sum in which MR ANTHONY was insured. The question was whether a fall he had on June 13th was the cause of death. The Messrs. Atkins, father and son, and Mr Jackson examined the body, and gave it as their opinion that death was due to natural causes (pneumonia and weakness of the heart), and not to the fall, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The funeral of MR ANTHONY took place yesterday and was very largely attended.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 July 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mistaken Treatment Of An Infant. - Mr T. C. Brian (Plymouth Coroner) held an inquest yesterday at the Railway Hotel, Mutley, on the body of CLAUDE BREND, eight months old. - EUNICE BREND, grandmother of the deceased, deposed to the child's unhealthy condition since birth. On Wednesday it had suffered from diarrhoea and at night she had given it some teething powder, as she thought that its teeth had caused the illness. On Thursday at five a.m. the child died. - Mr Edlin, F.R.C.S. stated that he saw the deceased at 6.30 a.m. on Thursday; it had died from exhaustion, caused by the diarrhoea. The powder was not eh right sort to have given; and the chemist had not known that anything besides teething was the matter with the child; but the last witness told the doctor that she had let Mr park know of the child's illness. - The Jury wished Mr Park to be called, and MRS BREND was re-examined in his presence. She stated that she had told him that the child was suffering from diarrhoea, and had been so for two days; and she also thought the child was teething. - Mr Park, chemist, 1 Mutley-plain, stated that the witness had asked for teething powder, and as far as he could remember she had not mentioned diarrhoea. He gave her a compound - James's powder - which he would not have done had he known of the child's illness. - The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Exhaustion, caused by violent diarrhoea, and accelerated by the powder. They considered that the mother and grandmother of the child should have procured medical aid, and they exonerated Mr Park from all blame.

TIVERTON - The Fatality At The Tiverton Railway Station. The Shunting Danger. - The Inquest on the body of MISS C. E. PADDISON, who died from the effects of injuries received through falling under a train at the Tiverton Railway Station, was held at the Tiverton Townhall last evening before Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner. The evidence bore out in the main the facts already published in the Western Morning News. It was further elicited that the unfortunate lady, after taking her ticket, crossed from the up to the down platform. Arrived there she appears to have noticed a train moving out of the station, and in a moment she was seen by two signalmen, named Lovell and Acland, to be clinging to the handles of one of the carriages. They signalled to the engine driver to stop, but before the train was brought to a standstill the deceased had lost her hold on the handle and disappeared between the carriage and the platform. After falling on the permanent way the footboards - to use the expression of one of the witnesses - "rolled her over on her back," whereupon the deceased's legs projected on to the rails, and were run over and frightfully crushed by the carriages. - The Stationmaster (Mr Harris) in reply to the Foreman of the Jury, admitted that there were no officials on the down platform at the time of the accident, although it was within twelve minutes of the time for the starting of the Exe Valley train. The only precaution in the absence of officials warning passengers against entering a train which was being shunted from the down platform was the fact of the engine being at the wrong end of the train. In summing up the Coroner, while believing that the presence of an official on the down platform would probably have prevented the accident, pointed out to the Jury that no one under the circumstances was to blame. - The Jury, of which Colonel Greatwood was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider desiring the Coroner to convey to the railway authorities their opinion that it was desirable to take precautions for warning and preventing passengers from entering trains which are being shunted.

DARTMOUTH - Yesterday morning JAMES TOZER, a retired shipwright, 64 years of age, living alone in rooms in Newport-street, Dartmouth, was found dead on the kitchen floor. The evidence given at the Inquest shewed that the last time deceased was seen alive was on the afternoon of Thursday, when he seemed in his usual health. About nine o'clock yesterday morning, not hearing him on the move as usual, a Mrs Chadder, who lives in the same house, went to his rooms, when she saw him lying on the floor. She called his sister, Mrs Dummonds, and both went into his room and found he was dead and had probably been so for many hours. The posture of the deceased was as though he had slipped from the chair to the floor, with his back against the window bench. His bed had not been slept in. There were slight bruises on the right side of the chest and face and on the right arm, such as would be caused by a fall. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 July 1887
CHURSTON FERRERS - A Coroner's Inquiry was held at Churston Ferrers on Saturday touching the death of META MARY ANN HAYMAN, wife of a labourer, who died suddenly on Friday morning. Medical evidence shewed that the deceased had died from haemorrhage, through not having early medical advice, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 July 1887
BRIXHAM - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of SAMUEL JOHNS, the boy found dead in Brixham harbour on Sunday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned, with a recommendation to stop up the narrow footway adjoining the Fish Market, from which it is supposed the deceased fell over, and which is considered to be highly dangerous to the public.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 July 1887
SHALDON - At an Inquest at Shaldon yesterday on the body of GEORGE PALK, whose death has been already recorded in the Western Morning News, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 July 1887
EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter yesterday Inquired into the cause of death of WILLIAM FINCH, butler in the service of the Bishop at the Palace. Deceased, whose age was 56, died suddenly the same morning, the cause of death being angina pectoris, from which he had suffered for some time.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 July 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death Of MR FOXWELL, of Devonport. A Society's Surgeons Censured. - MR FOXWELL'S death, which was announced in yesterday's Morning News, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at Devonport yesterday. The Inquest was held by Mr Albert Gard in the absence of Mr Vaughan, the Borough Coroner. The first witness called was JOB THOMAS FOXWELL, son of the deceased, who said his father was about 57 years of age. About half-past eight in the morning he found that his father was out of the house. He had been in the habit of going to Mr Ackland's Clarence Hotel before breakfast, returning about half-past eight. The previous morning about nine o'clock a messenger was sent to Mr Ackland's for his father, and it was stated he had been there and gone. During that time witness opened the shop. Witness was asked where his father was, but did not know. Two chairs were kept outside the counter of deceased's shop, and witness noticed that they were moved. His father had something to find in the cellar - pledges were kept there. Witness went down into the cellar, and found his father lying in an unconscious state upon a small wooden bedstead. Witness tried to rouse him, but failed. Witness noticed no unusual smell. He found no bottle or cup there. There was no sign of a struggle in the cellar. Mr Ackland, who was a friend of his father's, was sent for and came. Witness then fetched a doctor, leaving his father in the cellar with Mr Ackland and a Mr Ramsey. Later on Mr Ackland, Mr Gliddon, Mr Ramsey, and witness helped him from the cellar to the pledge-office. He was then still unconscious. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, attended him there. Mr Hinvest said he had heart complaint and another complaint beside. His father had been ill for some time of a painful disease, and had been under medical treatment. Deceased was quite comfortable in his home life and witness did not know that he had any monetary troubles. He was not intemperate. Witness did not know of any trouble affecting his mind. - By the Jury: Deceased was a traveller for the Eagle Brewery. - Alfred William White, manager of the Eagle Brewery, said deceased was a traveller on commission and collector of accounts. Deceased did not do very much business, but he always rendered his accounts in a very clear and correct manner, and as far as he was aware there was nothing in arrear. - By the Jury: As far as he knew, there was nothing between the brewery and the deceased to cause him to commit a rash act. He was a temperate man. - Frank Ackland, landlord of the Clarence Hotel, Morice Town, said the previous morning the deceased, in accordance with a custom he had observed regularly for two years, came to his house. he seemed strange in his manner, and quiet. Usually he sat and read the newspaper. The previous morning he asked for his "usual" and witness gave him two pennyworth of whiskey in some cider. He left without reading the paper, and did not stay to chat. He was not in the bar three minutes, and was quite sober. Witness, whilst standing at his front door, was asked by deceased's daughter to send her father home, as it was time to open the shop. About nine o'clock deceased's daughter CLARA, came for the deceased, and witness sent back a message that he was not there. Witness was shortly afterwards sent for, and went to the deceased's house. He found him in the cellar as described by a previous witness. He sent the deceased's son for Dr Harding, of the Medical Aid Society. Witness rubbed the deceased and fanned his face, but failed to restore consciousness. Dr Harding not coming, witness sent for another son of deceased to fetch him. He waited half an hour, but he did not come. Mr Hinvest was then sent for, and he came at once. The doctor ordered the deceased to be taken out of the cellar. Witness got a rope and passed around his waist and with the assistance of his son and Mr Ramsey, they got the deceased into the pledge office, where the doctor used the stomach pump, and rubbed the deceased. After this treatment he was taken to his bedroom. Witness found the glass (produced) on a shelf near the window. He made a thorough search of the room, but could find no trace of a bottle. He saw the deceased constantly from the time he first saw him in the cellar to the time of his death, which occurred about twenty minutes to three. He never recovered consciousness. - Edwin Jonathan Hinvest, surgeon, said the previous morning he was called about half-past ten to see the deceased. He was lying on a bench in the cellar, and he was in a state of profound coma; on examining the pupils of the eyes he found them contracted to a point. he was very cold and his lips and hands were very blue. The glass (produced) was handed to him, and he found about five or six drops of laudanum. The symptoms he found on the deceased were such as would have been produced by opium, and he came to the conclusion that deceased was suffering from opium poisoning. He then sent for a stomach pump. In the meantime the deceased was taken from the cellar to the shop very carefully. In the pledge-office witness used the stomach pump twice. The first discharge from the stomach was heavily charged with laudanum. The second was better. He then injected coffee, and after that deceased was put to bed. He was still unconscious, but seemed to rally a little. In his opinion the cause of death was an excessive dose of laudanum. Mr Hinvest added that he had seen MRS FOXWELL, who was too ill to give evidence. - By the Jury: Laudanum taken on an empty stomach would soon have been absorbed. Probably if medical aid had been obtained earlier the laudanum might have been removed. - Mr Gard, in summing up the evidence, called particular attention to the depositions of Mr Hinvest and also pointed out that although he had taken great pains to discover where deceased purchased the laudanum, he had failed to obtain any clue. Mr Gard pointed out the responsibilities of chemists in selling laudanum without entering the sale in their books, and the penalty they incurred for such neglect. - The Jury found a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," and added a rider to their verdict that they were of opinion that the surgeons of the Medical Aid Society did not give that prompt attention to the case which they ought to have done.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 August 1887
BIDEFORD - The Suicide At Bideford. A Courageous Girl. - Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner of Bideford, held an Inquiry on Saturday touching the circumstances attending the death of JOHN BROCK, a master painter, aged 41, who met with his death on the previous evening by hanging. - Dr Rouse, the deceased's medical attendant, states that he had attended MR BROCK only a few days previously to his death. He was then in a very depressed state of mind. He was a highly sensitive man, easily excited and easily depressed. Witness thought deceased might have fallen on the rope by which he was found hanging, and which was only 4ft. 8in. from the ground. - Montague Bray, an apprentice in the deceased's employ, said that on Friday he had been working in the shop with his employer up to half past four. MR BROCK seemed as usual. Witness had to go out, and on his return found his master hanging to a rope attached to the scales with which they weighed paint. Witness made no attempt to cut him down, but called out to the deceased's son to go for a doctor, and both started on the same errand. When witness returned MR BROCK was laid on the floor. Dr Ackland returned with witness, and pronounced life extinct. ANNIE BROCK, a most intelligent girl of twelve, and daughter of the deceased, deposed that on Friday she saw her father several times during the day, and did not notice anything unusual in him. He talked as usual, and did not seem depressed. About half-past five she went to the workshop at her brother SYDNEY'S request, and there found her father hanging by the rope attached to the scales. She fetched some brandy and a carving knife, and cut her father down. She thought she heard him gasp. After pouring some brandy into his mouth the doctor arrived and said her father was dead. - The Coroner complimented this witness on the pluck she had displayed, and said he had never, during the many years he had been Coroner, met with such a courageous and sensible child. The Jury, after a short consultation, found "That the deceased came to his death by Hanging, whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

ILFRACOMBE - A second death, resulting from the cab accident at Ilfracombe on Saturday week was Inquired into on Saturday last at the Tyrrell Cottage Hospital, by Mr Bromham, the County Coroner. The deceased woman, ELLEN DYER, was 63 years of age, and in general bad health, and although she only received a cut on the left leg and a few bruises, gangrene set in on Monday, and the poor woman succumbed to its effects on Friday afternoon. The only fresh fact elicited at the Inquiry on Saturday, was to the effect that Charles Hooper, a cabdriver, endeavoured to stop the runaway horse at the corner at the quay, and was knocked back by the shaft of the cab. MRS DYER fell out directly afterwards, and Hooper caught her with his right arm and broke her fall. Mr Gardner, the surgeon who had attended the woman, said she told him it was her intention to have remained in the cab, but one of the women who escaped without injury pulled her over the side of the vehicle whilst jumping out; she could not recover her balance and the quick turn of the vehicle around the corner threw her over. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave half their fees to Hooper for his plucky effort to stop the horse. The daughter of the deceased woman, who was also taken to the Hospital suffering from slight concussion of the brain, recovered and left on Wednesday last.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 August 1887
TIVERTON - The Tiverton Murder. The Inquest. - There had been no arrest up to late last night in connection with the dreadful murder of a river-keeper at Tiverton early on Saturday morning last. The Borough Police are as active as they can possibly be, under Superintendent Crabb, in following up every clue, or what may seem to be like a clue. The murder is the one subject of conversation in North and East Devon. The terrible way in which poor REED was mutilated and the absolutely merciless character of the attack, strike everybody with horror and indignation. People are also peculiarly impressed with the thought of such a tragedy being enacted in a dark and shady spot at dead of night - lonely yet within a stone's throw of human habitations - and with the fact of the undoubted odds against which one man had to contend at such a time without a soul at hand to whom to call for help. It is possible that the terrible death struggle was waged silently. The attack was clearly of the most determined character, and the resistance from such a firm-minded and well-knit man as REED was doubtless at least equally as determined, and for a time successful. Indeed, some there are who hold the view that murder was not at first intended on the part of the deceased's assailants, but was eventually provoked by REED'S fixedly and most likely up to them successfully standing his ground. There are all sorts of theories, but nobody knows, of course exactly what occurred. Nothing was elicited at the Inquest yesterday to throw further light on the murder. The Inquiry was of the most painful description. The deceased's handkerchief (produced in Court with other things) was saturated with blood - and all the other articles were more or less stained. It turns out that the two pipes picked up both belonged to the deceased, they being recognised by his widow. Indeed, all the articles found under the elms, with the exception of a piece of net rope, with which the body was probably dragged to the river, and a navvy's neckerchief, were the deceased's. This last article is a large one, blue and white stripes, and may be an important factor in the work of detection. MRS REED gave her evidence with great difficulty, utterly breaking down at times. The poacher she mentioned as having been named to her by the deceased as one of those he was tracking is a very powerful man, who has been charged with murderous assaults. He and other navvies were left behind after the completion of the Exe Valley Railway and the sewerage works, and they are a class of men who have infested the river and wood as poachers ever since. The action of the Police in letting off the man Western, of Bickleigh, after his examination on Saturday, is unfavourably commented on. Western is an elderly man, but of strong, muscular build, and has been known for some time as a poacher. Some two months ago he was convicted of disorderly conduct, and the deceased was one of the witnesses against him. He had been heard to threaten REED and on the murder becoming known on Saturday morning the constable at Bickleigh went to search Western's house. Western thereupon offered to go and be examined at Tiverton. On his head are two wounds, his right eye is blackened, and his left hand cut in two places. The doctor, one examining him, gave it as his opinion that the wounds were three days old, but Western himself stated that he received them the previous evening at five o'clock in falling over a hedge. After the doctor's statement he was allowed to go. Western made a statement to a person at Tiverton yesterday, in the course of which he said he had given up any idea of revenge upon the deceased. It was true they had some words on Bickleigh Bridge, but they were in reference to the case in which he alleged REED swore falsely. "How," Western asked in the course of this conversation, "could I tackle a strong man like REED when I have had both my arms broken?" The funeral of the victim takes place today. - Mr L. Mackenzie was Coroner at yesterday's Inquiry, which was held in the Townhall. The Jury viewed the body and the scene of the murder. - George Davey, the first witness, said he was employed as gamekeeper by Mr Sydney Stern. It was his duty to look after the woods from Collipriest to Pitt Farm, a distance of two miles. He was on his beat all night on Friday. It was bright moonlight up to two o'clock, when the moon went down and it became dark. He saw REED about nine o'clock on Friday night at the Country House Inn, and asked him to drink. He said, "George, as to what you told me the other day, they have been liming the river." Witness gave him a description of the men whom he had followed a week before, and he said he had heard they were going to lime Lock's Pitt, and added, "We'll have them between us." Witness replied, "Very well I shall be out all night." The deceased then asked him if he knew of anybody who could be relied upon to help him. He added that he himself knew of forty or fifty, but could not trust them. Witness replied that he did not know of anyone then, but that he would help him all he could. About a quarter to four o'clock on Saturday morning he passed down by the opposite side of the river to where the murder was committed. He did not then notice anything. He was certain, in fact, that there was nothing there then. After that he walked on to Pitt Farm and went around the coverts there. He returned by Collipriest-walk. Happening to look across the river he saw distinct mark on the grass in the opposite field. He next observed the body in the water. It was three or four inches from the bank, face downwards, and left hand stretched out towards the middle of the stream. His trousers were up a little, shewing the deceased's legs. Witness sent for a Police officer, and with P.C. Raymond's assistance the body was lifted out of the water. Raymond said "George, this is murder. Can't you see the blood across the field?" Witness replied that he did see it. They both saw pools of blood under the trees, a handkerchief, a pencil, two pipes, and a pocket-knife open. The handkerchief was a blue striped one. The removed the body on a handcart home. - MARY ANN REED, widow of the deceased, said she lived at Water-lane. She had been married three years. Her husband had worked for the Tiverton Fishery Association since February last. - The Coroner: What happened on Friday night? - Witness: Oh! It was all bright, bright as heaven (she wept). Witness added that he was going to have help, as the poachers were going to net a pit of the river that night. He said he had heard four men were going to be there. - Sid Ford, his nephew, another man in St. Andrew-street, and a fourth he did not know by name. Old Western, of Bickleigh, used to threaten the deceased, but her husband would say that Western was an old man and could do no harm. The deceased had mentioned the younger Western, and also Mr Sanders, son of the baker, as having used a net; but he never expressed any fear. It was she who was nervous, and on Friday night she said, "What would you be against four, ARCHIE?" He replied that he would leave them until they were down at the water, and then go up and say to them "Now what little game are you at?" She said, "They will murder you, ARCHIE," and he replied that in case of violence he would knock them on the head. He added, "They'll run, they like their lives too well. If I don't die before I am murdered by others I shall live to a good old age." He was a very sober man, and was always too anxious about his duty. He had said several times he would while he lived never give up tracking the poachers. The deceased had no watch with him on the night in question, but he carried a pocket-knife, which he kept very sharp, and with which she believed he was murdered. [Knife produced, and recognised by the witness as her late husband's. It was covered with blood.] Two pipes produced, she said, were her husband's. She also recognised his handkerchief, saturated with blood, his lead pencil and his scissors, all found on the ground where the murder was committed. A navvy's blue and white neckerchief was also produced. This was not the deceased's, witness said. [Supt. Crabb asked those in Court to take particular note of this article and also of a piece of net rope produced, and to give the Police any information possible thereon]. Her husband was 37 years of age, and perfectly healthy. His left arm was a little stiff, owing to an accident some years ago. - P.C. Raymond deposed to taking the body out of the water with the assistance of the gamekeeper Davey. - P.C. Sparkes described the appearance of the ground under the elm trees where the death struggle took place. The grass, he said, was trodden down in a circle of about eight feet. The blood was scarcely congealed at six o'clock on Saturday morning. On the Thursday in the previous week witness met the deceased outside the Palmerston Hotel, about 2.30 a.m. Witness said "You are about early this morning MR REED." He replied, "Yes; I thought there was going to be something doing down the river, and I wanted to catch them." Witness asked if he had any idea who the parties were, and the deceased replied that he knew them, but he would not mention any names. On the next morning - Friday - about three o'clock, witness again met the deceased in the street, and he said, "I want to drop upon them if I can." - P.S. Symons said he had had conversations with the deceased in reference to his work. On Tuesday and Wednesday last deceased told witness that he was on the look-out for poachers. "He knew they were doing it (liming the river), because he saw them lurking about by the river." Deceased mentioned the name of Sid Ford. - Charles Dicker, employed at Bickleigh, deposed to picking up the deceased's hat and stick in the highway which skirts the field. He was at the time on his way from Tiverton to Bickleigh. It was 5.30. the only persons he saw on the road were two boys named Dalling: a stone-breaker named Gerred, and a man named Snell, of Bickleigh. It was a clear morning. - Mr R. B. Collins, medical officer of health for Tiverton, said that upon examining the body he found one wound on the left side of the forehead, another on the left cheek, about an inch and a half long, another below the jaw on the same side. The head wound was contused, those on the face were incised wounds. The lower lobe of the left ear was just hanging on. There were no marks on the right side of the face, but on the back of the head there was an abrased wound, evidently caused by dragging the body down to the river. The left hand bore six wounds, five of them punctured and the sixth a lacerated wound, dividing the thumb from the hand. On the right hand there were five smaller wounds, apparently punctured. There was a slight wound on the right thumb. the throat was cut from ear to ear, dividing everything but the vertebrae. It appeared to have been done by one cut. He could not say from which side the cut commenced, it was so even. He believed the throat was cut during life. There were no marks on the body beyond an old sinus on the left wrist - not even scratches or bruises. Death was caused by the incision of the throat, and loss of blood. The injuries were not self-inflicted. Human blood was on all the articles produced. The face wounds were inflicted, no doubt, by an opponent in front. He would not give an opinion as to whether the assailant stabbed with his right or left hand, the wounds being principally on the left side of deceased's face. The throat could have been cut by the pocket knife produced. - The Coroner having addressed the Jury in private, the Inquiry was adjourned until Monday next.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 August 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Bathing Fatality Off Mount Wise. - An Inquest was held at Devonport Guildhall yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES ACTON, mason's labourer, who was drowned while bathing off Mount Wise on Sunday last, under circumstances already reported. - Benjamin Burt, living at 18 Morice-square, slaughterman, said that about a quarter to eleven on Sunday morning he was with the deceased in the bathing-house under Mount Wise. Before going into the water the deceased, witness and a lad named Wilton, lay on the sand for about three quarters of an hour, as it was low tide. Deceased said he had been invalided out of the navy in consequence of having fits. ACTON was the first to enter the water. Witness and Wilton partly undressed themselves. ACTON walked into the water some distance and then swam about four strokes in the sight of witness, after which witness did not think of him until Wilton asked where he was. Witness replied, "Out there." Wilton said, "I can't see him." Both witness and Wilton walked out to the edge of the new quay, but could not see deceased, and they concluded that he must be swimming under water. They waited a couple of minutes and not seeing him come to the surface they hailed a boat, which came immediately. They told the two watermen in the boat that a lad had gone down near the buoy. The waterman cruised about between five and ten minutes. Neither Wilton nor Witness could swim well enough to get out to the buoy. It was about five minutes from the time of missing the deceased to hailing the boatmen. About five minutes elapsed between witness seeing deceased swimming and Wilton inquiring of witness where deceased was. The boatmen went to Mr Brookshaw's and got a line. With the line, and something attached to it, they commenced to drag for the body, but did not find it. At the time deceased spoke about his having had fits he said he intended to swim round the little buoy, come in, dress, and go home. - Henry William Hanger, tobacconist, 9 Catherine-street, said that about eleven o'clock on Saturday morning he was looking over Brookshaw's wall and saw a man in the water swimming towards the buoy. When a short distance from the buoy, perhaps about four yards, he turned over on his back without a shriek or struggle. Witness at this time turned to speak to his son who was with him. On again looking for the deceased he found he had disappeared. Witness waited some little time, thinking he might be diving. Finding he did not come to the surface witness rushed to the bathing-place, where he saw two men partially undressed and a man with a baby in his arms. Witness asked Burt, the previous witness, where the man was who was out in the water. He replied, "I think he is drowned. He takes fits." Two boats put off immediately. Witness did not hear it suggested to go into the water after the man. They rowed about for a quarter of an hour. When witness saw deceased on his back he might perhaps have saved him if he had gone into the water immediately after missing him, but witness neither saw nor heard any symptom of distress when last he saw him on his back. Witness quite thought he was diving, and expected to see him come up again. Witness was positive deceased was lost when he gave the alarm. Perhaps two minutes elapsed between missing the deceased and giving the alarm. The place where deceased disappeared was a dangerous one, and witness considered that to dive there after anyone would be attended with great risk. - John Clarke, living at Morice Town, rigger and diver in her Majesty's Dockyard at Devonport, deposed to diving close to the small buoy off Mount Wise on the previous afternoon and finding the body of deceased about seven yards north of the buoy, and near where the deceased was supposed to have gone down. Witness found the body at high water at about six fathoms deep. There was a muddy bottom where it was found. - RICHARD ACTON, mason, 25 Cross-street, Devonport, father of the deceased, gave evidence as to identity. Deceased was 19 years of age. He had been in the navy, from which he had been invalided on account of fits. He had been in a hot climate. About two months since deceased had a fit. Witness had tried to prevent him bathing many times, but thought he saw no fear. - The Coroner considered that death was accidental, and that no one was to blame in the matter. He was of opinion that deceased had a fit while bathing. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury adding, at the Coroner's suggestion, that no blame attached to anyone.

BARNSTAPLE - A young man named BRAUNTON, in the employ of Mr Dalling of Barnstaple, was kicked in the abdomen by a horse while working at Tavistock, and he died in great agony at the North Devon Infirmary. At the Inquest which was held yesterday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The death of a child at Horrabridge by falling out of a window was Inquired into by a Coroner's Jury last evening at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. MRS VANSTONE left Brook Cottage on the morning of July 18th, her three children being asleep. On returning, a neighbour told her that FRANCIS, a boy of 3, had fallen from a window, which was nine feet above ground. Dr Liddle was consulted and the child sent to the Hospital at Plymouth. Knowning her child was in the habit of climbing on to the window sill, 2 ½ feet from the floor of the bedroom, the mother had tied the window inside in addition to shutting it, but he had overcome these difficulties. Walter Woolcombe, assistance house surgeon, said that a small piece of bone had been pressed into the brain. The fracture had nearly healed, however, when inflammation of the membrane set in, and the boy died on Tuesday at midnight in convulsions. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EAST BUDLEIGH - An Inquest concerning the death of MR HENRY COWD at Budleigh Salterton on Bank Holiday through the capsizing of a boat was held yesterday. Two fishermen stated that they would have entrusted Mr Williams (MR COWD'S companion, who was also drowned, and whose body has not been recovered), with a boat at any time, but one of them, Richard Pratt, said he saw the boat under foresail and mizen, and he considered the steering wild. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 August 1887
TIVERTON - The Tiverton Murder. Adjourned Inquiry. Fresh Evidence And Verdict. Poachers On Oath. - A prolonged Inquiry, the second within a week, has thrown no fresh light of an essentially positive character upon the dreadful crime which was perpetrated at Tiverton early on the morning of Saturday, July 30th. A mass of evidence was given at yesterday's adjourned Inquest, but it embodied nothing with pointed in any definite manner to the identity of the murderers. People are beginning to think that the ends of justice will, after all, be defeated. The Police are still hopeful, though not sanguine. The murderers are not likely, however, to be found out by any action of the Police or outsiders. If the shocking crime is ever expiated it will probably be by a different method. There is now a strong conviction that in this case "murder will out," if at all, by means of internal evidence. The proof must come from within the murderers' ranks if it is to be complete and finally condemnatory. The police have exhausted every possible clue, and their inquiries have advanced nothing in the direction so earnestly desired by all. What is now relied upon is the stimulus of the reward and of a possible free pardon to anyone but the actual murderer who may turn Queen's evidence. The Home Office is, however, loath to authorise the latter announcement. Officialism in London, apparently unable to take cognizance of local difficulties in the case, and of the fact that every possible means have already been adopted to detect the murderers, is of the opinion that more time ought to be allowed to elapse before a free pardon is offered to an accomplice volunteering information. All that Supt. Crabb has received from the Home Secretary is a formal acknowledgment of the receipt of his letter containing the application. The local Police cordially recognise the valuable assistance given them in the course of their inquiries by Detective Hill, of Plymouth. those who have investigated the circumstances of the murder, so far as they can be ascertained, have come to the conclusion that two powerful men committed the dreadful deed, and that one of them slipped a piece of rope round REED'S neck and held him while the other cut his throat. The noose at one end of the rope found under the trees was saturated with blood. Numbers of people continue to visit the scene of the death struggle. The Court was crowded throughout yesterday. Note: Three columns of evidence ending:- The Jury retired at 6.20 p.m. After an absence of five minutes they returned to court with the following verdict:- "That ARCHIBALD REED was found Wilfully Murdered on the morning of July 30th, but that at present there is no evidence to prove by whom." - The Inquiry which had lasted from ten in the morning until half-past six in the evening, was then at an end.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 August 1887
BROADWOODWIDGER - At Broadwoodwidger yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner for South Devon (in the unavoidable absence of Mr Burd, the Coroner of the district) upon the body of GERTRUDE ALICE BALKWELL, aged 2 ½ years. On Sunday last the child was playing in the kitchen, and accidentally tipped over a pan of scalding milk, which was on the floor cooling. Mr J. Doidge, surgeon, proved that the child had died immediately from the shock caused by the scalds, and the Jury, of whom Mr T. Squire was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 August 1887
ERMINGTON - Suicide At Ermington. - The District Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest at the New Inn, Ermington, yesterday, relative to the death of RICHARD MILLMAN, who committed suicide by hanging on the previous day. EMMA MILLMAN, daughter of the deceased, identified the body, and deposed that her father was 58 years of age and a grocer. On Wednesday night he came into witness's room twice, but did not say anything. On the previous evening he went to bed at ten o'clock, apparently in his usual spirits. He was accustomed to call her at seven o'clock in the morning, but as he did not do so on Thursday witness went to see for him, and she found him suspended from a beam. He had been depressed in spirits at times since his wife died some two years since. He seemed to feel that very much, and was continually speaking of her; he had often said he wished he was in his grave with her. He had nothing to complain of in the state of his business. Through the week he had been more than usually depressed. - Philip Witheridge stated that on the previous morning, between eight and nine o'clock, he went to the house and saw the deceased hanging from a beam in the passage by a rope. One of his knees was on a box, and his head was in a noose. Witness cut him down, but he was dead and cold. From his position he might have hanged himself. The beam was about seven feet from the ground. On the Wednesday deceased complained of pains in his head, said he did not know what to do, and was going to see the doctor. He believed a relative of deceased's at Modbury, named Callard, committed suicide some years since. - Mr William Langworthy, of Modbury, said he saw the deceased about eleven o'clock on Thursday morning. He was quite dead, and presented the appearance of having died from strangulation. Witness examined his neck and there were marks of a rope round it, and his face was congested. Having heard the evidence he had no doubt that it was a case of temporary insanity. - The Jury, of which Mr J. Luscombe was Foreman, returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner, Mr Vaughan, held an Inquest on Thursday afternoon at Devonport guildhall relative to the death of ARTHUR TEW, aged 54, a bank messenger employed at the Devonport Bank, who committed suicide on the previous day by taking carbolic acid, as already reported in the Western Morning News. A Double Jury was empanelled. - SARAH JANE TEW, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband was employed as a messenger at the Devonport Bank, and had been for nearly thirteen years. In May last witness received notice not to go near the bank, where she had been employed with her husband. She did not know why she received that notice. Witness had had words with her husband, but not lately. He had complained of pains in his head, and at times seemed lost, and would ramble in conversation from one subject to another. He had no trouble to prompt him to commit suicide. He had always been a genial and pleasant man. Witness was not a teetotaller, nor was her husband; she did not know whether he was in the habit of getting drunk. On the previous day at dinner time he complained of great pain in his back, and witness promised to go in the afternoon and help him with the shutters, which she did. After the shutters had been put up she remained in the bank, waiting for deceased. He went down to the kitchen, and was away about five minutes, but before he went he said, "I am in such pain, I would cut my throat before you. I can't endure it." Witness replied, "Nonsense, don't make yourself so silly." When the deceased came up from the kitchen she went round the other side of the counter and he had a blue bottle holding with both hands. Deceased was in very easy circumstances, having good wages and also a pension, and was in no monetary difficulties. - By the Coroner: When he came up from the kitchen he said, "JENNY, I am going to take oxalic acid." She tried to take the bottle from the deceased, but could not succeed. She then went for assistance, and returned with Mr Treleaven, who fetched both Mr Breeze and Dr Wilson. She believed he took the poison during her absence; she found the bottle in the kitchen below and he must have drank the acid and then take the bottle downstairs and walked up again. - Mark William Treleaven deposed that he was in Fore-street just before five o'clock and MRS TEW called him and looked excited. She asked him to go back to the bank with her, which he did, and saw the deceased in a sitting posture inside the counter. He had no bottle in his hands when witness saw him. Witness asked deceased what was the matter, and he replied, "I've done it." He smelt strongly of carbolic acid, water was running from his eyes, and he was foaming at the mouth. Witness went first for Mr Breeze and afterwards for Dr Wilson. - Geo. Frederick Youlton, manager of the Devonport Bank, said he had known deceased for fifteen years, during which time he had been employed at the bank. Notice was given to MRS TEW, through her husband, in May last, that she was not to come there again. That was because they considered her appearance was not what it should be. The clerks had complained that she almost daily looked as if she had taken more drink than was good for her. He believed she suffered frequently from delirium tremens. Deceased appeared to be much affected by the dismissal, but he was very cheerful and was the last man witness would think would do such an act. Deceased was very well off for a man in his station, having a salary of nearly £100 a year from all sources. - Dr J. Wilson stated that he was called to the bank about 5.15 on the previous afternoon. He found the deceased sitting in a chair in a collapsed condition. Mr Breeze was there, and had administered some sulphate of zinc, followed by another emetic. It was the best thing he could have given him, not knowing what poison he had taken. Witness laid deceased on the floor, and could smell and see plainly that he had been taking strong carbolic acid. He then administered olive oil and sulphate of soda, and also applied the stomach pump, but it was of no avail, and he died shortly before six, having lived about three-quarters of an hour since the taking of the poison. He was in a comatose state the whole time. About an ounce of carbolic acid would result in certain death. He was fully of opinion that deceased took the poison himself, as if it had been forced into his mouth some of it must have been spilled, and would have left traces. It was quite possible for deceased to have gone downstairs and put the bottle away and then returned, as the acid would not take effect for ten minutes. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was one of the most peculiar and difficult he had ever had. They had no direct evidence as to the state of deceased's mind, but they had heard that his wife was not altogether what she should have been. Deceased had probably been troubling about it, and in a moment determined to end his trouble by killing himself, and was not responsible for his actions. It was, however, a most extraordinary thing for a man after drinking the acid to walk down twelve steps, put the bottle away, and return to his former seat, but the doctor had told them that that might be done. The Jury returned a verdict that the "Deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 August 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of EMMA DOWNEY, 56, of 50 Cambridge-lane, Plymouth. It appeared from the evidence of Louisa Lugg that deceased went to bed on Sunday well and cheerful. On Monday, at 4 a.m. witness knocked at her door, and, receiving no answer, opened the window and saw her dead at the foot of her bed. Witness went in, raised her, and sent for Dr Brenton, who pronounced her death. A bottle marked "Poison" was found in her room; the contents, witness said, she used for her feet. The Coroner's offer of a post-mortem examination was declined by the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 August 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At The Royal Albert Hospital. The Night Supervision Of Patients. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of ELIZABETH GLENN, a patient in the Hospital. A double Jury was empanelled, Mr Willis being chosen Foreman. - Diannah Francis, nurse in the Hospital, said deceased had been an in-patient about six months. She was very quiet, and not cheerful. She was to have left the Hospital on Monday. Witness was called on Monday morning about half-past six, and was told MRS GLENN was dead . She was rather hysterical on Sunday afternoon, when she said she wished she was dead. She had said such words several times before. On Wednesday afternoon she was out visiting her friends. Witness last saw the deceased alive at half-past six on Sunday evening, when she seemed quite herself and cheerful. Witness was surprised at deceased's sudden death, but did not make any inquiry respecting the matter. - Jane Greet, Hospital nurse, corroborated the previous witness's statement as to deceased having said several times she wished she was dead. These expressions, witness thought, proceeded from weakness of the nerves. There were no means that witness knew of for deceased to poison herself. She was able to get out of bed, and was up until nine o'clock on Sunday. Witness supposed that deceased got at some pills intended for another patient. Witness had left a bottle containing morphia on a table in the ward deceased was in. She saw the bottle about nine o'clock on Sunday night, and noticed it again on Monday morning. The same bottle of morphia had been left in the ward several times before without serious consequences. - The Coroner pointed out the importance of keeping such poisons from the reach of patients. Witness would see that it was very indiscreet to leave in the ward within reach of a patient any such poison, especially for a long time, as it was a temptation for persons in pain or tired of their life. - Witness never thought about it. - The Coroner: Perhaps you will for the future. Were you told that she had drunk the poison? - No. She was told that deceased died about 6.30. She had told witness several times lately that she was very much better. Witness saw her last alive at nine o'clock on Sunday night. She was surprised at half-past six on Monday morning to hear that deceased was dead. - The Coroner: What was your first thought - that she had died from a natural cause? - Witness: When I first heard that she was dead I could hardly believe it, and I could not suppose she died from a natural cause. I said I did not think she could be dead. - And you never heard during the whole of yesterday what she died from? - I did not suppose what she had died from. I did not suppose it was my business to say anything about her. I was not in charge of her when called on Monday morning. - I only ask you whether she came to her death by any unnatural means? - We talked about the matter in the ward. We thought at first she had taken another patient's pills, as the empty box was found by her bedside. - In answer to a further question, witness said she knew that ipecacuanha pills were often given to relieve pain, and she did not know the effect of taking more than one. - Maria Passmore, of 114 Union-street, Stonehouse, cousin to the deceased, said she believed deceased was a married woman. She never heard what her husband was. She was about 35 years of age. She was in service up to the time of her going to the Royal Albert Hospital. She came to witness's house on Wednesday last, when she appeared very cheerful. Witness did not know that there was any insanity in deceased's family. Deceased told witness that she was all right now, and would leave the Hospital on the following Monday, when she would take a situation. She said to a tenant in witness's house, "The world is nothing to me; I feel all excited in my head." - Dr Robert Howell Perks, surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted a patient on the 3rd February, suffering from an abscess in the bowels. In the early part of its course the disease would be very painful. She was very much better lately, but the abscess was still unhealed, and would have taken a much longer time to get cured. About three weeks ago he told her that she was on the road to health, and would probably be much better out of the Hospital than in it. He proposed sending her to the Convalescent Home at Knackersknowle, where she would have been entitled to stay a fortnight, and longer if paid for. At her own request she was allowed out for a few hours on Wednesday. The last thing deceased said to him on Sunday morning was, "I will tell you when I go out why I would not go into a convalescent home." She appeared thankful for what had been done for her, but had fits of depression, and was hysterical at times. Witness saw her in the ward on Sunday evening about nine o'clock. She was talking as usual to other patients. She had been taking tonic medicines lately, and appeared to be suffering little pain. She had said at times that she wished she was dead rather than suffer pain as she was; but she had not said so very lately. About a quarter-past six on Monday morning witness was called by the night nurse and told that MRS GLENN was dead. he went at once, and found that she had been dead for three or four hours. He asked the nurse whether deceased had complained of anything, and she said deceased had been very sick about half-past ten the evening before. Witness found the bottle (produced) on the shelf where the medicines were kept. It had no business there. Deceased was seen by several patients in the ward to go across to the bed of a patient and ask her to give her one of her sleeping pills. She was afterwards seen to take the box, which had several pills in it then, and she said she was going to take one to get her to sleep. After she was dead the box was found in her workbox, and was then empty. She obtained the box shortly before ten on Sunday, and she was vomiting about half-past. Each pill contained half a grain of opium. Six or eight pills would kill a strong person, and two might kill a child. - In answer to the Coroner, witness explained that the medicines as prescribed for each patient were placed on a little shelf by each patient's bedside, and administered by the nurse. - The Coroner said it was not, in his judgment, common-sense to allow these poisons to be within the reach of patients. He thought medicine should be brought round when it was to be administered, so that patients might not have opportunity of taking medicines not intended for them. Perhaps this case would be a warning. - Dr Perks said this system would lead to confusion, as there would be a possibility of the medicines being mixed. This system had worked satisfactorily before, and he considered it to be the smaller of two risks. - The Coroner: Something ought to be done. We are not like the Chinese, who are averse to changes, and by the light of experience some other plan might be thought of. - Dr Perks said the subject had often been discussed, but no better plan had been suggested. - The Coroner: Why could not each patient's medicine be placed in a locked box over each patient's bed, and the nurse have the key? - Witness admitted that that plan would, of course, be much safer. - In answer to a further question, witness said deceased always slept with a sheet over her head, and was therefore supposed by the night nurse to be asleep. As the result of a post-mortem examination witness found that the abscess for which deceased was admitted to the Hospital was smaller than when she came in, but still large. There was nothing about it, however, to point to recent trouble. The lungs and brain were very much congested, the other organs fairly healthy. Witness examined the contents of the stomach. There were only very faint traces of morphia or opium. He found that the contents of the stomach contained traces of ipecacuanha. the intense congestion of the lungs and brain would also point to opium poisoning. The medicine he had for some time been giving deceased did not contain opium or morphia. From the fact of the bottle (produced) being found empty by the bedside, and that it had contained three drachms of solution of morphia and atropia at about nine o'clock on Sunday night it was probable that deceased had taken the contents. The bottle witness found, after the death of the deceased, on the patient's own medicine shelf, where it ought not to be. - The Coroner drew the attention of witness to the provisions of the law, which prevented the free sale of poisons, and asked, in view of this fact, if he did not consider that precautions ought to be taken to prevent patients from getting such poison in the Hospital. - Dr Perks said there was supposed to be proper night supervision, and the night nurse was supposed to be in the ward for that purpose. In the necessary absence of the nurse from the ward for a few minutes it would have been possible for deceased to have got the poison. Witness attributed death to opium poisoning. Deceased was perfectly sane in the ordinary acceptation of the word, but was subject to fits of depression, sullenness and wilfulness. Dr Perks exonerated the nurse from blame, saying he was responsible. The mixture in the bottle had been kept on a table in the ward as a matter of convenience, as it was often used for injection. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, pointed out the necessity that those acquainted with the routine of Hospitals should seriously consider this question with the view of introducing a better system. He was not inclined, personally, to blame the nurse for leaving this bottle about - the wisest person might leave a thing about which ought to have been put away. (A Juryman: Hear, hear.) He thought he should not be far wrong in saying that, should the Jury see fit, they had evidence to find that the deceased committed this act by taking poison herself: that in so taking it she intended to take her life: but that she was suffering from temporary insanity at the time. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 August 1887
NORTHAM - Bathing Fatality At Appledore. - An Inquest was held at Appledore on Wednesday before Mr J. F. Bromham, Coroner, concerning the death from drowning of a boy of 13, son of MR TURNER, of Sunnyside, Northam. Deceased had been in the habit of bathing with a schoolfellow some years older than himself. His friend being away, he had arranged to bathe with another youth named Mayne, who is a good swimmer, deceased himself being unable to swim. Boat Hyde, the spot selected, is considered a dangerous place for bathing, on account of a strong under current which sets outwards. It is conjectured that deceased was taken by this current and carried out of his depth. He was observed by a lad named Hammett, who shouted to him to inquire whether he could swim or not. Receiving no reply he ran and informed Mrs Garvice, whose house is close to the scene of the accident. She put off in her canoe, but the deceased had then disappeared. She then informed Mr Fisher, who was passing in a boat. Mrs Garvice soon afterwards saw deceased below the surface, and with the aid of a boathook, obtained from Mr Fisher's boat, she succeeded in getting him to land. He was not then dead, and Mr Fisher and others who had arrived meanwhile endeavoured to restore animation, but their efforts were fruitless. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - The Supposed Suicide Of A Girl At Crediton. Open Verdict. - Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at Crediton, before Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of HANNAH WHITE, whose body, as already reported, was recovered from Shobrooke Park pond on Tuesday last. - The mother of the girl, a widow named MARY ANN WHITE, who was much affected whilst giving her evidence, stated that the deceased was 13 years of age, and was expecting to go to a situation three weeks hence. At breakfast time on Tuesday witness had occasion to remonstrate with the deceased for ill-treating a younger sister by shaking and squeezing the child. Witness said to her "HANNAH, how could you be so brutish as to serve the child like that?" Witness left the house at half-past ten to go to a doctor's house and deceased was then upstairs. She had not made any answer to witness's remonstrance. On returning home at half-past twelve witness did not find deceased there. She left no message with anyone, and witness could not account at all for her being drowned in Shobrooke pond. The house had been thoroughly searched and no papers or letters of any kind had been found. Witness never heard deceased threaten to commit suicide. - In reply to the Coroner the mother said her daughter was of a quiet and sulky disposition. They were the best of friends up to the last moment. Deceased had no trouble to witness's knowledge. She had, however, complained of being ill, and Dr Boddy, who had said she suffered from indigestion, prescribed for her. - Elizabeth Doney, aged 10, said as deceased passed her at the park gates on Tuesday she asked, "Is there anyone up in the park," and witness replied, "There is a little girl." She saw deceased by the side of the pond, close to the water's edge, put down her umbrella and take off her hat. She thought deceased was doing something to her hair. Witness then went on. - P.C. Pike said a purse, containing 3 ½d. and a handkerchief were found on the deceased. - Mr Leslie Powne said death was due to drowning. The Coroner said there certainly seemed to be no motive for suicide. There was no evidence at all that the death was caused by accident. He suggested an Open Verdict. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and gave their fees to the mother. - The Coroner: I think that is the safest verdict.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 August 1887
BIDEFORD - An Inquest was yesterday held at Bideford on the body of ANDREW JEWELL, of that town, who had been missing for about ten days, and whose body was yesterday picked up in a very decomposed state in the river near Bideford Bridge. Deceased was formerly a driver for one of the posting masters of the town, and was of somewhat intemperate habits. There was no evidence to shew how he got into the water, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 August 1887
PLYMOUTH - Accidentally Drowned At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at Coxside, Plymouth, on Saturday on the body of ALFRED WYATT, 10, son of a labourer at Thistle Park. The father stated that his son habitually stayed out in the evenings until after ten o'clock. He was deaf and dumb. On Friday evening witness met him in Deadman's Bay, and signed to him to go home. The deceased had gone towards his home, whither witness shortly afterwards followed him, but found that he had not returned, nor did he return all night. Witness and another son searched until morning, and at last found the body in shallow water near the yards of the Messrs. Sparrow at Cattedown. - Wm. Spiller, a lime-burner at Messrs. Sparrow's, stated that on Friday evening he saw the deceased in his employer's yard. Between their yard and the next was a wall going out flush with the end of the quay. The deceased was trying to get round the end of the wall by sticking his toes into the crevices of the stone. The water below was ten feet deep and that spot was close to where the body was found. The Jury believed that deceased had slipped when rounding the wall, and being unable to call for help got drowned. They therefore returned a verdict of Accidentally Drowned, and added a rider requesting the Coroner to represent to the proper parties the dangerous manner in which the wall was built, with a view to induce them to alter it.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 August 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - A sudden death occurred at Devonport on Saturday and formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry by Mr Vaughan yesterday. A widow named MARTHA GUTTERIDGE, 75 years of age, who had not been attended by a medical man for twenty years, had been spending several days at St Stephen's-by-Saltash, and about nine o'clock on Saturday morning she complained of pains in the chest. Mrs Elizabeth Williams, a widowed sister, who had accompanied her, wished to send for a medical man, but the deceased refused, saying she would consult a doctor when she returned to Devonport that day. Deceased and her sister drove to Devonport in a trap, reaching their home, 42 Princes-street, a few minutes before noon. A medical man was at once sent for, but neither Mr Gard or Mr Wilson was at home at the time, and deceased died shortly before two o'clock. Mr John Rolston, jun., who had been summoned to deceased about a quarter before two o'clock, found that she had been dead about a quarter of an hour. As the result of a post-mortem examination he found that deceased had suffered from pleurisy and fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury found a verdict accordingly.

SIDMOUTH - At an Inquest at Sidmouth yesterday relative to the death of MR JOHN LETHBRIDGE, through falling from a window, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News, the Jury decided that death was due to Misadventure. MR JOHN LETHBRIDGE, jun., Fore-street-hill, Exeter, said in evidence that some year and a half ago his father had a seizure and his speech and memory had been affected since. Witness had never seen anything to make him fear deceased would commit suicide.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 August 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Shocking Accident At Keyham. The Inquest. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at Keyham, into the cause of death of MICHAEL JOHN KEILEY, a labourer in Keyham Yard, who was killed under circumstances reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. Mr Murch was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who after viewing the body proceeded to the scene of the accident, the boiler-shop in Keyham Yard. The shaft which drives the machinery in this shop, and which was the cause of KEILEY'S death, was in motion at the time, and the explanations given by the witnesses enabled the Jury to fully understand how the accident occurred. The boiler-shop stands eat and west and the horizontal shafting traverses the whole length of the building, about 18 inches underneath it being a platform, also running from end to end of the shop. Near the western end of the shop, where the accident occurred, and extending the whole width of the building, is the overhead travelling crane on which the deceased and the witness Tomlin had been at work. Underneath the gallery, at the spot where the accident happened, the wall is bespattered for some distance with blood. On the Jury returning to the Hotel the witness Tomlin was first called. Mr Goldsmith (Venning and Goldsmith) appeared for the Admiralty, and Inspectors Willmot and Wall attended on behalf of the Dockyard authorities. - Alfred Tomlin, 26a. Albert-road, fitter in Keyham Yard, said that about a quarter past five on Monday afternoon he was in charge of certain repairs which were being made to one of the travelling cranes in the boiler-shop, and was working with the deceased. Witness was on the platform below, and left deceased on the north end of the traveller, on which they had just finished their work. Deceased had remained behind to pick up the tools. He was dressed in a loose over-all duck jacket and trousers when witness left him. His braces were not loose as had been reported, and he was not working in his shirt sleeves. The traveller was about 5 ft. 8 in. above the platform. Deceased was on the top of the traveller when witness left him. Witness proceeded to explain how he believed the accident occurred. For the purpose of work the next day the deceased removed a piece of wood about six inches broad and twelve feet long from the angle iron of the platform where they had been working to another part of the platform. There was a space of about eighteen inches between the wall and the inner edge of the platform, and this wood was used to rest their feet upon, the wood being supported by a bracket in the wall. Deceased was in the act of shifting this bracket when he was caught by the shaft. He had a "wiper" in his jacket pocket, and a lot of cotton waste. In stooping down to remove the bracket he approached too near the revolving shaft, which caught the cotton waste in his pocket and so drew his body round the shaft. the waste was tight in deceased's pocket, and as it did not free itself it drew him with it by force of the revolving shaft, against the angle-iron and bracket. Witness did not see what happened, and what he had described as the manner of the accident was only what he believed occurred. He founded his belief on the position in which he last saw deceased after the accident happened, and from his knowledge of the place and work. Witness helped others in setting the body free from the shaft, around which witness saw deceased must have revolved. There was no other cause that witness could give for the accident. They had had to shift the piece of wood several times before, and had done so without accident. A small portion of the waste was now left on the shaft, so that the Jury might see it there. Witness thought it was worth serious consideration whether a small portion of the shaft near the angle-irons could not be cased over without interfering with its working. - In answer to Mr Goldsmith, witness said he had been working during the past 29 years in the yard, and, on and off, twelve years of that time he had been working in the boiler shop. He remembered no similar accident. During the time he had mentioned they had had the wheels cased over and a platform put along. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said he did not think that even if the platform had been six inches wider the accident would have been prevented. It had been under consideration to widen the platform, but it was found that it would interfere with the working of the weighbridge. This shaft had been at work for 32 years, without serious accident happening to anyone. There was a man caught round the shaft some years before, but he was not killed. - The Coroner questioned witness with reference to the rule in existence in the Yard against machinery being cleaned when in motion, and witness said he knew such a rule was in force. In reply to a further question, witness said he did not think it would be practicable for the machinery to be stopped while repairs of this kind were in progress, as that would mean that the shop would be partly idle during the time. - Mr Goldsmith took exception to the Coroner questioning witness as to whether the rules of the establishment had been broken. - The Coroner begged Mr Goldsmith would not make any remarks of that kind. He meant to examine every witness for the purpose of eliciting all the information in his power. - The witness thought the difficulty might be got over if strict care were exercised. - The Coroner asked the witness, if there was a rule against cleaning machinery in motion, was it not equally dangerous to repair machinery in motion? - A Juryman pointed out that the crane on which the men had been working was not the cause of the accident, but the revolving shaft. - The Coroner: Yes; but I think there is a close connection. - Another Juryman: There is no doubt if that machinery had not been in motion the accident would not have occurred. - Anthony Charles Sharp, assistant boiler maker in Keyham Yard, said he was at work in the boiler house when he saw deceased walk on the platform, stoop down and pick something up. Witness saw him get up and walk about two yards and stoop to pick something else up, and no sooner did he stoop than witness saw him caught. He faced eastward when he stooped, with his right side towards the revolving shaft. Deceased tried to jump up and put his hand to the stone wall to save himself. After the shaft had revolved a few times witness saw a piece of deceased's head fall on the floor about ten yards from where witness stood. The machinery was stopped within a minute after witness observed the commencement of the accident. - Charles Montague, 83 Charlotte-street, boiler-maker, said he was walking up the boiler shop, when he noticed the deceased standing on the platform facing the clock. Witness asked him whether it was all right, meaning had they completed their job. He replied, "it is all right." When witness had walked up the shop ten yards further, someone shouted out that there had been an accident. Looking around witness saw deceased revolving around the shaft. Witness at once ran to the engine-house and had the engine stopped. - James Osborn, 5 Wyndham-street, Plymouth, leading man of millwrights, said deceased and Tomlin were under his supervision. After the machinery had been stopped witness saw the man lying horizontally on the shaft. His clothes were nearly all torn from him and were fast around the shaft. He had no suggestion to make to avoid an accident of this kind. - By Mr Goldsmith: The part of the machinery (the traveller) on which deceased had been at work was topped during the work, and they need not have passed the revolving shaft. - By the Coroner: Deceased could have gone a safe way to pick up his tools and remove them, and to shift the piece of wood on which they had been placing their feet. - The witness, Tomlin, on being recalled, said deceased had removed the bracket to save the trouble and expense of getting another. - This concluded the evidence. - The Coroner, in his remarks to the Jury, said he could not lay any blame on anyone in this matter. If anyone was to blame it was the deceased himself because he did not take proper precautions. He only hoped their Inquiry might lead to more caution being observed by men in the Yard, and that men would not approach machinery in motion without thinking whether it was absolutely safe to do it. He also thought that whatever little cost it might necessitate the authorities would rather that repairs should be executed while machinery was not in motion. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Foreman said they were well pleased at the intelligent and satisfactory manner in which the witnesses had given their evidence. They believed that the death was purely accidental and that no one was to blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 August 1887
PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Lady At Plymouth. - For the past three years and a half MISS MARY ANN GORDON SUTHERLAND, daughter of the late MAJOR SUTHERLAND, formerly of Osborn-place, Plymouth, had resided at a home for invalids in Lockyer-street. She was frequently under medical treatment, and quite lately had been attended by Mr W. J. Square. She suffered from paralysis of the right side of her throat, and of her tongue. She was also subject to periodical paroxysms of a hysteric nature, during which she became almost ungovernable, but always yielded to the gentle and pacifying treatment which she received. Although no danger to herself was apprehended the windows of the room in which she slept were so fastened as to be capable of being opened only ten inches. MISS SUTHERLAND had one of her attacks two days ago, and partially recovered from it yesterday morning, the lady in charge of the establishment having been with her through the night up to seven o'clock in the morning. At a quarter-pat nine a servant saw some object fall to the ground in the court at the back of the house, and on going to the spot found MISS SUTHERLAND on the stones terribly injured in the head, and nearly dead. The servant called her mistress, who ran out and found that MISS SUTHERLAND was dying and she died within three or four minutes. No one was in the deceased's room at the time of the occurrence, and she must have forced herself under the window, a space of only ten inches in height. These facts were disclosed at an Inquest held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity," adding a rider entirely exonerating those in whose charge she was of any negligence or want of caution. The deceased was 52 years of age and had no relatives in Plymouth; but her brother, a paymaster in the army, is in Yorkshire.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 August 1887
PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at Plympton to Inquire into the death of FRED GEORGE WEEKS, aged 15 months, of 28 Queen-street, Devonport. The Jury were summoned for one o'clock, but shortly afterwards the Coroner telegraphed to say he could not attend until three o'clock. The Jury waited, and soon after four a telegram was sent to Mr Rodd for instructions. A reply came that he would attend at half-past six. On his arrival shortly after that hour the Jury were sworn. Mr J. Emery being chosen Foreman. The Coroner expressed his regret at the delay caused, and explained that when fixing one o'clock as the hour he was ignorant that his son had arranged for an Inquest in Stonehouse at the same time, and the case detained him until half-past three. - Mr H. Lister, a Juryman, accepted the explanation, but remarked that several of his colleagues felt very strongly on the matter. - Mr F. Phillips, sen., said that, speaking on behalf of many men who had been kept from their business since one o'clock, he could not so readily accept the Coroner's apology. - Dr Stamp was then called. He said he had never seen the child alive, and had made a post-mortem examination that day. The heart was healthy, the lungs were slightly congested at the base, the stomach contained a little fluid, and the intestines were nearly empty, a considerable portion being much congested. There was a large bruise over the forehead, and on removing the skull cap he found an extensive effusion of blood, which extended into the right substance of the brain. The body was rather thin, but was probably well nourished until lately. The injury to the head was the immediate cause of death, but the state of the abdomen accelerated it. - Mary Perkins said the child's mother was her sister-in-law. It had been very delicate, and she fetched it from Devonport on Thursday night. It had a very fair appetite, but suffered from diarrhoea. On Friday at noon it fell off the bed. It seemed much as usual afterwards, and on Saturday her husband took it out. On Sunday, about 9 a.m. it died. She laid it out and soon afterwards told a neighbour, Mrs Hill. She believed Mr Hinvest of Devonport, attended the child some time since. - Sarah Hill said she saw the child when Mr Perkins took it out, but heard nothing of its falling out of bed. It seemed very ill and as she came out of her bedroom on Sunday, Perkins told her it was dead. She told her she ought to get medical advice. Shortly afterwards Mr and Mrs Perkins went to Plymouth and not having returned at 8 p.m. she became somewhat alarmed and her husband spoke to the Police. Shortly afterwards Mr and Mrs Perkins returned with some friends, who wanted to remove the body. She thought the child was treated well while at Underwood. The Police prevented the removal of the body. - The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until tomorrow to secure the attendance of the mother and Mr Hinvest.

EAST STONEHOUSE - An Open Verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned at an Inquest held at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE SQUANCE, 67, who was missed from the dredger in the Great Western Docks, Plymouth, on the 20th inst., as already reported in the Western Morning News. Deceased was employed as night watchman on board the dredger, which was anchored about 150 yards off the western wall of the docks. On the 20th inst., about 9 p.m., he went to Stonehouse entrance of the docks and told the Policeman Frost that he was going out for a minute or two, and in about five minutes he returned. He was never seen alive afterwards, but the boat which he used in going from the pier to the dredger was found next morning moored to the pier, and it is surmised that in attempting to get into the boat deceased missed his footing and fell into the water. The body was found floating on the 29th inst. Mr H. James, Dock Inspector, watched the case on behalf of the Dock Company.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 September 1887
PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - Scene At An Inquest. - A Jury assembled yesterday at the Hyde Park Hotel, Mutley-plain, Plymouth, to investigate the cause of death of the infant child of MR BLANCHARD, jun., of Hyde Park-road. Mr R. R. Rodd was the Coroner, and Mr E. A. Pearn Foreman of the Jury. The deceased child was only twelve days old, and having been seized with illness a medical man was sent for. Before the arrival of Mr Eccles, surgeon, the child had died, and evidence was now given to shew that the cause of death was spasms of the windpipe. - Mr Pearn, the Foreman, expressed an opinion that in so simple a case it was scarcely necessary to have put twelve gentlemen to the trouble, and the county to the expense, of holding an Inquest. The Coroner contended, however, that he had no option in the matter; and in this view he was supported by several of the Jury, who thought that, although the cause of death had been satisfactorily established, yet that an Inquest was desirable, seeing that the child died without having been seen by a medical man. - While the Inquest was proceeding the Coroner, while in conversation with his clerk, was overheard to utter an adjective against which MR BLANCHARD, senior, strongly protested. He said it was not seemly that on such an occasion, and in the hearing of the Jury, such language should be used, and he appealed to the Jury to support him in his protest against the language and manner of the Coroner. These remarks were greeted with a general "hear, hear" from the Jurors, and before the Inquiry closed the Foreman expressed a hope that the next time Mr Rodd held an Inquest he would not drink anything stronger than coffee. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 2 September 1887
SEATON, CORNWALL - The Bathing Fatality At Downderry. Coroner's Inquest. - The deplorable bathing fatality, by which the three daughters of MRS CROWTHER, of Bryn Tirion, Mannamead, Plymouth, lost their lives at Downderry, was yesterday the sole topic of conversation in that secluded but charming seaside resort. During their annual visits to the place MRS CROWTHER and her family have won the general esteem of residents of all classes and it is not an exaggeration to say that the sad deaths of the young ladies are lamented by residents almost as deeply as though they were those of their own near friends. During the early part of yesterday search was made with a boat for the bodies of MISSES FLORENCE and IONE, who were drowned with their sister, MISS JULIA, but without success. The wind blew strongly from the west-north-west, as at the time of the disaster, increasing in force in the afternoon, and being accompanied by heavy showers. It is thought that the bodies may have sunk not far from where the young ladies met their death, and that the force of the weather may dislodge them and expedite their recovery. The deepest sympathy is felt with MRS CROWTHER, whose restoration to health is naturally retarded by her great sorrow, and the anxiety she feels for the recovery of her daughters' remains. - In a general way there is not very much to be added to the already published account of the disaster, but there are some circumstances connected with it which admit of ventilation. Downderry possesses an admirable bathing place formed by nature herself. Visitors who have used the bathing tents and enjoyed a dip in the sea below the coastguard station will have noticed the rocks which enclose the bathing place on each side like breakwaters, preserving between a calm stretch of water which gradually deepens seaward. The advantages of the recognised bathing place are not confined to those already enumerated. Its crowning recommendation is its accessibility in case of alarm of drowning. Had the ladies whose lives have been lost been bathing here they might have been rescued promptly, because the place is near the houses and under the observation of the coastguardman on duty, and the coastguard boat could be on the spot in a brief space of time. Seaton Beach is used by many bathers, chiefly because of the additional privacy it affords, but this is much more than counterbalanced by its many disadvantages. It is quite out of sight, and half a mile from Downderry, which can only be reached by a tiring run along the shingle, or by clambering to the cliff road. Even for expert swimmers, as the present disaster has shewn, the spot is terribly dangerous. The bottom is irregular, and is by some declared to be shifty, while at "young flood" tide, as it is called, the water runs with force between the little promontory on the Seaton side of the bay and a large rock and swirling round between this rock and a group of rocks on the Downderry side, forms a current which runs out to sea with much force. Local opinion holds the spot to be dangerous and it is a great pity, therefore, that there is not a local authority to take the necessary steps for placarding it as "dangerous to bathers." From inquiries at Downderry it would appear that both bathing and boating are practically free from control, and there are no by-laws of any kind in existence or any authority to make them. Before another season comes round, some authority to act in the matter should be sought by the leading inhabitants. - "An Eye Witness" furnishes us with the following corrections of some of the statements which have been published relative to the accident. Captain Brian Williams, a young gentleman holding an active commission in the army, "was not," he states, "walking" on the beach at the time, but reading the Western Morning News indoors, half a mile from the spot. On hearing a rumour that a girl bathing at Seaton could not get back to shore, he at once ran all the way to the place indicated, and (albeit somewhat out of breath) at once threw off some of his clothes and, together with the boatman Tiltman, who had also ran the same distance, succeeded in gaining a sunken reef of rocks between the shore and the unfortunate MRS CROWTHER, who must have been floating on her back - she cannot swim - quite twenty minutes before they arrived on the scene. Beyond this reef the tide and current were tremendous, and the sea so heavy that Tiltman at first considered it impossible to face it, resolved to swim back to shore for a lifebelt and turned to do so. Paying no heed, however, to Tiltman's proposition, Captain Williams plunged boldly in, and after a resolute swim at last got alongside of the now almost unconscious lady, who in response to his admonition to her to remain as she was and not to catch hold of him, faintly exclaimed, "I am going down" (Not, "Let me alone"). In the meantime, Tiltman - who, be it remembered is a married man with wife and family dependent on him - inspired by his example, and seeing him gaining his object, turned again and swam out and meeting Captain Williams (who was now supporting MRS CROWTHER, and already bringing her toward the shore), assisted him to sustain his burden the remainder of the distance, and through the breakers on to the sunken reef whence, on the arrival of fresh aid, MRS CROWTHER, whose presence of mind and pluck throughout her awful ordeal excited the greatest admiration, was safely borne to the beach. Captain Williams was at no time too exhausted by his efforts to support himself and the drowning lady in the water, but both he and Tiltman were badly bruised and cut by the rocks, and too fagged after their exertions and long exposure to make any fresh attempt to rescue the bodies of the children - two of which could be seen every now and again floating on the surface of the sea. - The Inquest relative to the death of MISS JULIA SELENA CROWTHER, aged 23, was held at the Sea View Hotel yesterday afternoon before Mr A. C. L. Glubb (of Liskeard), County Coroner, the Foreman of the Jury being Mr E. Williams. There were also present Mr T. Lea, M.P., for Londonderry South, uncle of the deceased young lady, and the Rev. G. B. Berry, vicar of Compton Gifford, the parish in which MRS CROWTHER and her family reside. Only one witness was examined. - Mary Stokes, servant to MRS CROWTHER said that the family came to Downderry about a fortnight since. On the morning of August 31st, at a little after ten o'clock, witness accompanied MRS CROWTHER and eight of the family of ten to Seaton to bathe. The family consisted of MISSES JULIA, FLORENCE, LILLA, IONE, ELLEN LOUISA and DAISY, Masters Charles Rowland and Godfrey Devereaux, two little boys. The whole party bathed except MISS DAISY, witness also going into the water. MRS CROWTHER, the two little boys, MISS LOUISA, and the witness came out of the water after bathing. They heard one or two cries but no notice was taken of them, because the young ladies were in the habit of playing, laughing, and screaming in the water. They did not, in fact, consider the cries to be those of distress. MISS LILLA, however, who was coming in, when standing at the edge of the water raised an alarm, and this was the first indication those on shore had that the deceased and MISSES FLORENCE and IONE were in danger. MISS LILLA called to her mother, and, on witness looking out, she saw the three young ladies in the water and heard their cries. She saw their heads and arms. They were struggling a great deal, and seemed to be carried outwards by the current. They went further out, and very soon disappeared from witness's sight. MRS CROWTHER ran into the sea and swam out to try to save her daughters, but witness thought that the current was too strong to allow of her getting near them, and the three young ladies were drowned. - The Coroner said the Jury had before them the facts of the sad death of the deceased young lady, and with their verdict the Inquiry - so far as he was concerned - came to an end. With the Coroner's sanction, however, questions were asked and explanations offered by Jurors and gentlemen present at the Inquiry. - The Rev. G. B. Berry said it was thought that the deceased lady might have been alive when she was taken out of the water. - Mr George Mantell (chief officer of the Coastguard) stated that Dr Sylvester's method was pursued for between two and three hours when the body was brought to the Sea View Hotel. Dr Nettle, of Liskeard, directed the efforts to restore animation, but there were no signs of life. - The Foreman (Mr Williams) thought it right that it should be known that everything was ready the moment the body was brought to the Hotel. They had blankets, restoratives, medical attendance, and the requisite assistance. - Mr Sambells, one of the men who was in the boat, said he should think deceased was dead when taken from the water. - The Coroner inquired what was the state of the sea. - Mr Tiltman said there was a nasty sea running, and it was flood tide. There was an under-current at the spot. - Mr Mantell asked the servant girl how far the young women were apart from each other when she saw them struggling in the water. - Witness said they were not far apart. The little girl (MISS IONE) seemed to be further off than the others. She believed that the little girl was first in danger, and that the other two young ladies went to her assistance. - In reply to a question from Mr Mantell, witness said she thought the ladies were on the Downderry side of a mass of rock at the extreme end of Seaton Bay, and Mr Mantell explained that there was a current at flood tide setting out between the rock mentioned and rocks on the Downderry side of the bay. - Witness said in reply to the Foreman that it was half an hour before assistance arrived. She sought help at Seaton while MISS LILLA went to Downderry. - Mr Williams thought it must be some satisfaction to the family reflect that the deceased lady had probably died in trying to save the lives of her sisters. He had known Downderry for forty years and had resided there for nearly four. He considered the bathing to be very safe, and had never heard of a single death. In justice to visitors and to people who lived in the village and got their living there, the place ought not to be cried down because of an accident which happened under exceptional circumstances. The storms came on suddenly, no doubt there was a ground sea, and a good deal of "under tow". In such conditions, it was as much as the strongest swimmer could do to save himself. Providentially MRS CROWTHER had been saved, but had she gone further she would not have been rescued at all. He repeated that he did not believe there was more danger in bathing at Downderry then elsewhere on the English coast. His own family had bathed at the fatal spot habitually. - Mr Mantell did not think there was what was, properly speaking, an "under tow." There was a "young flood tide," and with that there was an outward set of the tide between the rocks which was sufficient to carry bathers out to sea. - Mr Williams admitted that Mr Mantell was more capable of forming a judgment on this point than he was. - The Coroner did not think they need pursue the Inquiry further. The facts were very simple, though very distressing. - Mr Williams considered the Jury ought to recognise the kindness of the landlady of the Hotel (Mrs Sambells), and her efforts, and that of other ready helpers, to restore animation. - The Coroner said although such an observation could not be added to the verdict it was very properly made. - Mr Lea, M.P., asked, on behalf of the family, to be allowed to thank all who had taken part for the endeavours which had been made to restore his niece to life. He also desired to thank Captain Brian Williams and Mr Tiltman for the bravery and energy which they had displayed in saving his sister's life. - Mr Williams briefly returned thanks on his son's behalf, and he hoped Mr Lea would accept from him, on behalf of the Jury and the inhabitants of the place, an expression of the sympathy which was felt with MRS CROWTHER and her family. - A verdict that "The deceased was Accidentally Drowned while Bathing in the sea at Downderry on the 31st August" was then recorded. - The Jury having decided to hand their fees to the crew of the boat which picked up the deceased, the proceedings terminated.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 September 1887
PLYMOUTH - The death of FREDERICK BERGFELDT, first mate of the Norwegian barque Scaramanga, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at Plymouth Guildhall last evening. The vessel arrived in Cattewater on Monday last from Archangel, and deceased, who was in charge of the vessel, was superseded by Captain Overland, he being sent by the owners on account of the intemperance of deceased, who was drunk on Monday. On Thursday he worked all day at the cargo, and at midnight all hands were called up to secure the vessel. they were working at this until three o'clock, when a fender became loose and deceased jumped into a boat and secured it. On going back to a lighter he was seen to suddenly fall down. The captain himself went to his assistance, and had him taken to the cabin, where he tried for over an hour to restore him, but without avail. Dr Eyeley made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that deceased died from valvular disease of the heart. His liver was much enlarged and had the appearance peculiar to persons who indulged in excess in intoxicating liquors. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Jury commended the captain for his prompt action.

PLYMPTON - An adjourned Inquest on the body of FRED. GEO WEEKS was reopened at Plympton on Thursday evening. Dr E. J. Hinvest, of Devonport, said he saw the body on the previous day, and found it just as described by Dr Stamp. He had not seen the child for nearly a month, but he thought it was fairly nourished. The parents seemed kind and attentive to their children, and he thought that death was caused by the fall. The Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) intimated to the Jury that after this evidence they could do nothing more and requested the Jury to consider their verdict. Several Jurymen thought more light cold be thrown on the case, and wished to have the mother examined, especially as she had been summoned and was present. She was not called, but Mary Perkins was re-examined, and asked why she had not sent for a doctor after the accident. Her answer was that she had no money for that, and did not think it necessary. The Coroner again asked the Jury for their verdict, but many were anxious to pursue the matter further. Finally the Court was cleared, and the verdict was "Accidental Death." A rider was added censuring Mary Perkins for not obtaining medical assistance for the child.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 September 1887
EXMOUTH - The Suicide Of A Widow At Exmouth. - An Inquest was held at Exmouth on Saturday before Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS, a widow. - George Clarke, a wood dealer, of Lympstone, identified the body as that of his sister, aged 48 years. After the death of her husband, which occurred about six years ago, the deceased went into service and subsequently took a lodging-house, going into service afterwards. He last saw her alive on July 31st. Previous to that date he had noticed her to be in low spirits and strange at times, but he did not attribute it to any particular cause. He had never heard her say anything about suicide. She "took her glass in and out," but he did not think she had been the worse for drink lately. She was not in particularly poor circumstances that he knew of. She had a little means of her own. - ALICE MARY GRIFFITHS, the deceased's daughter, said her mother put her to bed on Thursday night and kissed her. On awaking in the morning she saw her mother lying on the floor, but she did not what had happened. She ran to Mr Shaw, a neighbour. - P.C. Vanstone said there was a knife, covered with blood, near the deceased. - Robert Shaw, a neighbour, spoke of delusions from which the deceased suffered. - Recalled, the constable stated that he found in the deceased's house upwards of £10, a gold watch and chain, four bank books, and other things. Everything in the house was disarranged. Dr Hodgson said the wound in deceased's throat was evidently caused by the knife produced, and was self-inflicted. "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 September 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on the body of JOHN SMITH, aged 65. Joseph Helliar stated that the deceased and he were at the Friary Goods Station on August 25th engaged in transferring deals from their master's (Messrs. Turpin's) wagon to a railway truck. SMITH was on the top of the timber pushing off a piece of wood, when he suddenly fell from a height of eight feet to the ground. He had had a glass of beer that afternoon. A passing dogcart conveyed him to the Hospital. Mr Reginald Lucy, House Surgeon, said deceased had a compound fracture of the thigh. He soon became delirious and was a man who drank heavily. The Jury found that the death was Accidental. Mr A. J. Avery watched the case on behalf of the South Western Railway.

EXETER - The Great fire At Exeter. List Of The Dead And Missing. Loss Of Nearly 200 Lives. Appalling Scenes [From Our Own Reporters.] The Inquest. Identification Of The Bodes: Painful Scene. - The Inquest on the bodies of the persons who had lost their lives in the fire, and had been identified, was opened in the Assembly Room of the London Hotel at two o'clock yesterday afternoon before Mr W. H. Hooper, City Coroner. Placards had been issued requesting the attendance of relatives and friends who could identify the bodies, and these relatives and friends attended in some numbers, and the scene was a most painful one, women sobbing for the loss of husband, father, daughter and son, and strong men bowed down with grief, which they strove to hid but which their distressed countenances but too clearly displayed. In one case, a Plymouth resident - MR CANN, rate collector, of Eton-terrace - had to mourn the loss of his son, a printer, aged 24; in another, a young woman spoke to the loss of father, mother, two brothers and a sister; in a third occurred the pathetic incident of a young man and his sweetheart sitting together and both being burned, the young woman not having been identified; and in a fourth, a mother, called from Bishopsteignton by telegram, found that her lad, who today would have entered upon his twentieth birthday, was one of the victims. In other cases the evidence shewed that husband, wife, son and baby had all shared a similar fate, in two instances the babies being but nine months old There were only two cases in which the dead occupied seats in the upper circle; the majority were occupants of the gallery. Perhaps one of the most painful incidents of the Inquest was that of a young wife who, soon about to become a mother, mourned the loss of her husband, aged 25, but who was happily relieved by an acquaintance from the terrible shock she would have received to gaze on her dead partner for the purpose of giving evidence of identification. A Double Jury was empanelled, the Jurors being Messrs. A. Damerel, F. A. Fraser, G. Osborn, G. Seymour, R. Pretty, G. James, M. Woolf, W. H. Daw, W. Marshall, W. Chudley, J. A. Martin, J. H. Sayer, W. H. Bowden, W. Featherstone, S. Loram, H. Glanvill, G. Vize, S. Diggins, J. Sandford, S. Limpenny, J. Baker, F. Burrington, and J. B. Cole. - Mr Seymour was chosen Foreman of the Jury. amongst those also present were Mr J. Colson, City sheriff; Mr C. Westron, J.P.; Captain Showers, Chief Constable; Mr I. Pengelly, Magistrates' Clerk; Mr G. Shorto, Deputy Town Clerk; Mr E. J. Domville, one of the directors of the Theatre Company; and Mr Herberte-Basing, lessee of the theatre. - The Coroner displayed some emotion as he opened the Inquiry. He said: After the lengthened period I have had the honour of filling the office of her Majesty's Coroner for this City, it has never come to my lot, and perhaps to that of few other Coroners, to have cause to Inquire into such a lamentable, fearful circumstance as we are here to Inquire into today. I scarcely know how to approach such a sickening and melancholy spectacle as the sight of so many of our fellow citizens who are now lying dead - and as you, the Jury, will be called upon to view - who have been hurried so suddenly into eternity whilst in the pursuit of an innocent enjoyment. I am sure you, gentlemen, will aid me on this trying occasion in rendering your valuable assistance in ascertaining the cause of so sad and dire a calamity, which has not only cast a gloom over this our ancient and loyal city, but also over the whole of this fair county of Devon. I propose today, with these few opening remarks to open the Inquiry and allow as many of the bodies to be identified as possible, and then to further adjourn, perhaps until tomorrow, for the further identification of such as cannot today be identified. As for those remains you will shortly have the opportunity of looking on, and which cannot be identified, for the sake of the public health I consider that a general order for their burial, from a sanitary point of view, should be issued; but before that is done I shall see that every effort is made to identify the bodies - all those which it is possible to identify - for the satisfaction of those who will have to lament the recollection of the result of last night. With these few observations, I will ask you to view with me perhaps one of the most sickening sights which you have ever beheld. - The Jury then proceeded to view the bodies in the adjoining yard, and on their return evidence was taken. - Captain Showers, Chief Constable of Police, was the first witness. He said: Last evening, about 10.30, a fire broke out in the Theatre Royal, Longbrook-street. I went to the spot and found the theatre on fire. A great number of people were brought out from the burning building - some living and some, I am sorry to say, dead. Some were sent to the Hospital, and others were taken to the yard and stables of the New London Hotel immediately opposite. - The Coroner: Have you any idea of the total number of bodies recovered? - Witness: As far as I can judge there are about 120 dead. There are 13 or 24 in the Hospital, of whom six have since died. There is also a mass of charred remains, some nothing but trunks and totally unrecognisable. The fire broke out between ten and half-past. - ELIZABETH HARRIS, who shewed much distress of mind, stated that she was the wife, and was now the widow, of JOHN HARRIS, a rough rider in the employ of Messrs. Pedrick and Brice. He lived at 4 Ivy-cottages, Paris-street, and he was 37 years of age. He was at the theatre last evening. He left home to go there about half-past seven. He went alone. (Here witness broke down sobbing.) About eleven o'clock I heard he was dead, and had been burnt in the theatre. She had since identified the body as that of her husband. James Partridge, a young man, a painter, of Paris-street, identified the body of EMILIA MILLER, aged 23, who was his sister and the wife of FREDERICK MILLER, a sailor. She lived in the same house with witness, and was in the gallery of the theatre the previous night. witness also spoke to the identity of the body of JOHN PARTRIDGE, his brother, aged 14, an errand boy. Witness added that he was a "super" on the stage, and that his dead brother was an occupant of the gallery. WILLIAM CANN, rate collector, of 6 Eton-terrace, Plymouth, who was deeply moved, identified the body of FREDERICK WILLIAM CANN, his son, who was a printer, aged 24. He lived at 119 Clifton-street, Exeter, and was single. Witness believed the deceased was one of the audience in the pit. Charles Piper, representative of the Western Times, residing in Old-Tiverton-road, identified the body of CHARLES DONOGHUE, aged 13, the second son of MR DONOGHUE, of Devonshire-place. He went with a school-fellow to the theatre the previous evening, and sat in the gallery. His father was at Bath. EMILY BELCHER, wife of JOHN BELCHER, hawker, 13 Mary Arches-street, identified the body of her son, HENRY BELCHER, aged 16. He was employed as a greaser on the Great Western Railway, and was in the gallery of the theatre. Witness had another son there, but he escaped. ABRAHAM BLATCHLEY, labourer, of Coombe-street, identified the body of EDWARD BLATCHLEY and HARRIET BLATCHLEY, his son and daughter-in-law. His son was a labourer, and lived in James-street. His son was 29, and his daughter-in-law 30. They attended the theatre, but he did not know what part they were in. George Elston, shoemaker, Quay-lane, identified the body of THOMAS TUCKER, shoemaker, aged 49, married, of 10 Preston-street. Deceased was in the gallery of the theatre. Elizabeth Kerswill, widow, Coombe-street, identified the body of ENOS PHILLIPS, baker, as that of her nephew, who lived with her. His age was 19, and he was a labourer. He was in the gallery of the theatre. JAMES FROOM, labourer, Coombe-street, identified the body of JAMES FROOM, as that of his son. He was a mason-s labourer, was 25 years of age and married. Deceased was in the gallery. Charles Newberry, labourer, Frog-street, identified the body of MARY HITCHCOCK as that of the wife of HERMAN CHARLES HITCHCOCK, travelling musician and witness's daughter. She was aged 26 and was in the gallery. CAROLINE TAVERNER, Holloway-street, identified the body of JOHN THOMAS HENRY TAVERNER as that of her son. He was a porter aged 22 and was single. He was in the gallery of the theatre. ROBERT BAKER, landlord of the Duke of York Inn, St. Sidwells, identified the body of CATHERINE JANE, his daughter, aged 14. She was in the upper circle. EMILY WESTCOTT, single woman, Stepcote-hill, identified the body of JOHN WESTCOTT as that of her brother, who was a labourer, and aged 19. JOHN BAKER, cowman, Summerland-street, identified the body of JOHN ROBERT BAKER as that of his son. He was aged 14, and was an errand boy in the employ of Mr Hoskins, baker. Deceased was in the gallery of the theatre. GEORGE BURRINGTON, cabinetmaker, Heavitree, identified the body of JAMES TUCK BURRINGTON as that of his son. He was an apprentice to Mr Luscombe, carver, and was aged 16. Deceased, he believed, was in the pit of the theatre. THOMAS LAKE, stoker at the Exeter gasworks, living in Preston-street, identified the body of JOHN LAKE, labourer, as that of his brother. His age was 40, and he was married. His wife, HANNAH LAKE, and child were with him in the theatre, and were still missing. The wife's age was 39 and the child's eight months. William Gale, cork manufacturer, Lower North-street, identified the body of ALBERT BEER, who was in his employ as a cork cutter and with whom he went to the theatre. Deceased's age was 44, and he was a native of Plymouth, and was married. They were in the gallery. - In reply to a Juror as to how it was he escaped and left the deceased behind, witness said, "To tell the truth I can't tell you how I came out." - The Coroner, interposing, said they would not go into that point at this stage of the Inquiry, which he desired should be confined to the identification of the bodies. He did not object to the question, but to the time at which it was put. JOHN ELSTON, labourer, Topsham-road, identified the body of JOHN ELSTON as his son. His age was 23, and he was a gardener and maltster and lived at Wonford, in the parish of Heavitree. He was married. Deceased's wife, RHODA ELSTON, was in the theatre with him, and also perished. Witness likewise identified her body. She was 24 years of age. DANIEL JACKMAN, landlord of the Odd Fellows's Arms, New North-road, identified the body of FREDERICK DANIEL JACKMAN as his son. His age was 14, and he was a telegraph messenger at the Exeter Post Office. he was in the gallery of the theatre. JOHN CORK, labourer, Commercial-road, identified the body of JAMES CORK, 14, carter, as that of his brother. He was in the gallery. FRANCES LEY, single woman, Day's-court, Frog-street, identified the bodies of EDWARD JOHN LEY, her father, brickmaker, aged 54; MARGARET LEY, her mother, aged 52; EDWARD JOHN LEY the younger, her brother, a labourer, aged 26; and SAMUEL LEY, another brother, also a labourer, aged 20. Both brothers lived at home. They all went to the theatre with her sister, LUCY, aged 19, whose body has not been found.] Ann Reddaway, wife of James Reddaway, Exe Island, identified the bodies of GEORGE HANNAFORD, labourer, 51, her father and ANN HANNAFORD, his wife, and witness's mother. Her age was 46. Her father, mother and brother, JOHN HANNAFORD, went to the theatre together, and the body of her brother had not yet been found. They sat in the gallery. JANE PARSONS, widow of JAMES SAMUEL PARSONS, fish hawker, Coffin's-court, Smythen-street, identified his body. His age was 35. He was in the gallery. EMILY ROBINS, wife of HUGH HENRY ROBINS, 76 Paris-street, telegraph engineer, identified the body of EDWARD ROBINS, her son, aged 15, a telegraph messenger. He went to the theatre with another boy, and sat in the gallery Richard Mudge, general dealer, Coombe-street, identified the body of JOHN LASHBROOK, plasterer, aged 30, married, of Chudley's-court, Coombe-street. Deceased went alone to the theatre, and witness believed he sat in the gallery. JOHN LYON, labourer, Preston-street, identified the body of EDWARD LYON as that of his brother, who was also a labourer, of Ewing's-lane, aged 35, single. Deceased went to the theatre with his sweetheart, Polly Edworthy, aged 34, whose body had not been found. Witness had been told that they sat in the gallery. Sarah Halse, wife of a shoemaker, of Preston-street, identified the body of SARAH HAVILL, her daughter, aged 22, wife of WILLIAM HAVILL, fish hawker. Deceased went to the theatre with a man and his wife. They came out before the fire, and the deceased was left behind. They sat in the gallery. MARY ANN HOLE, wife of THOMAS HOLE, sailor, living at Bishopsteignton, identified the body of THOMAS HENRY HOLE, her son, aged 19, and who would have been "20 tomorrow." He was an improver in the gardening business at Lucombe, Pince and Co's. nursery, and lived in Alphington-road. He sat in the gallery of the theatre, having gone there with Ned Brown and another friend. ELIZABETH HOWARD, wife of JOHN HOWARD, stone-breaker, Coombe-street, identified the body of JAMES HOWARD, her son, aged 16. Deceased went to the theatre with his brother, who came out at half-play. They sat in the gallery. KATE BASTIN, widow of SAMUEL BASTIN, porter at Kennaway's wine and spirit vaults, and living in Tighe-place, Rack-street, was called, but it appeared that she had not seen the body. She said the deceased was 25, and was in the gallery of the theatre. Witness, who was in a delicate state of health, said she could not bear to see the body, and its identification was spoken to by Eliza Hatchett, midwife, Paris-street, an acquaintance. ALBERT JAMES KNIGHT, mattress-maker, 53 Exe-street, identified the body of ROSINA KNIGHT, his sister, 24, unmarried, who lived at 5 King-street. She went to the theatre with Mr and Mrs Gillard and a soldier from Sandford. Mr and Mrs Gillard came out safe, but the soldier was burned. He was in uniform and belonged to the Marines. They sat in the gallery. Sarah Short, wife of a labourer, Clarence-place, Lion's-holt, identified the body of MARY ANN WOOD as the wife of WILLIAM WOOD, a labourer, of Plantation-buildings, New-town. She was witness's sister and was 40 years of age. Deceased went to the theatre with her husband, her son, WILLIAM WOOD, 20 years of age, and a baby, 7 months old. the son and baby were still missing. SAMUEL WOOD, labourer, Wood's-court, Summerland-street, identified the body of WM. WOOD, labourer, his brother, aged 43. He went by the nickname "COLLY" WOOD. When last seen, deceased was sitting with his wife and son in the front seat of the gallery. CHARLES MUDGE, labourer, West-street, identified the body of his wife, ELIZABETH MUDGE, aged 42. She went to the theatre with friends. JOHN DAVIE, shoemaker, 7 Alma-place, Church-street, Heavitree, identified the body of HENRY PERKINS DAVIE, who was at the theatre with his child, WILLIAM DAVIE, and his wife. His brother, who was a shoemaker, was 31 years old, and the child nine months. They lived at Oakfield-street, Heavitree. Witness also identified the child, but its mother, aged 27 had not yet been recognised. He was informed that the deceased persons sat in the gallery. WM. MILLMAN, painter, Coombe-street, identified the body of JOSEPH MILLMAN as that of his brother. He was a fish hawker and was 28 years of age, and married. He went alone to the theatre and sat in the gallery, from whence witness saw his body brought out. FANNY MARDON, widow, Stepcote-hill, identified the body of her son, WILLIAM MARDON, labourer, aged 18. Deceased went to the theatre with another young man named Joseph Pym, who was missing. Eliza Hutchings, wife of Samuel Hutchings, lamplighter, 22 Church-lane, St Sidwell's, identified the body of JESSIE SQUIRES, aged 18, who lived with Mr Seaward, poulterer, as shop assistant. Deceased went to the theatre by herself and sat in the upper circle. JOHN UPHAM, a young man, railway servant, of New-court, Bampton-street, Tiverton, identified the body of his brother, WILLIAM UPHAM, who had lately left the Army, where he was a rough rider in the Royal Artillery. He was unmarried and was of no occupation at the time of his death. His age was 29 and he lived at Red Cow Village, St. David's, Exeter. He went to the theatre with a young man named Taverner. WILLIAM JAMES SEAGE, engine fitter at the Bonhay Foundry, and living at 42 Commercial-road, identified the body of his son, ALBERT WILLIAM SEAGE, aged 13. John Folland, labourer, Friar's-terrace, identified the body of WM. POLLARD, aged 17, a porter, in the employ of Mr Veale, grocer, High-street, and who lived in Rack-street with his widowed mother. HENRY GANGE, shoemaker, 17 Holloway-street, identified the body of his son, HENRY JAMES GANGE, aged 18, an apprentice at brass polishing. Deceased went to the theatre with his younger brother, who got out all right. They sat in the gallery. MARY LIPSCOMBE, wife of HENRY LIPSCOMBE, tailor, 2 Melbourne-street, identified, the body of her daughter, MARY LIPSCOMBE, aged 17, dressmaker, who lived at home. She went to the theatre in company with her cousin, ELIZA THORNE, who was also burned to death. Witness was painfully affected as she attached her signature to her deposition, and had to be assisted, moaning, out of the room. WILLIAM THORNE, carpenter, of Bradninch, identified the body of his daughter, ELIZA THORNE, aged 20, a domestic servant, living with Mr Lisle, St. Thomas. She went to the theatre with MARY LIPSCOMBE. JAMES STONEMAN, labourer, 29 Friernhay-street, identified the body of WILLIAM STONEMAN, his son, age 18, labourer, who lived at home. He went to the theatre the previous night. CHARLES SPILLER, landlord of the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, identified the bodies of his wife SARAH, aged 55, and of his daughter MAUD, aged 15. they went to the theatre by themselves. Frank William Brown, landlord of the Golden Yall Inn, Mary Arches-street, identified the body of MARK LOCKYEAR, his ostler, who was 35 or 36 years of age, single, and lived in Rack-street. SAMUEL TUCKER, porter, of 15 Goldsmith-street, identified the body of his son, WILLIAM TUCKER, aged 15, who was learning the tailoring. Deceased went to the theatre with another boy, who escaped. JOHN SNELL, miller, Fore-street, identified the body of his son, EDWARD SNELL, aged 12, a schoolboy. He went to the theatre with his elder brother, who fell down over the steps and was saved. They sat in the gallery. John Trethewy, mason, Coombe-street, identified the body of his stepson, HENRY BALE, who was a waiter at the theatre, and was 18 years of age. Deceased was occupied in the gallery. SUSAN HEARD, wife of ROBERT HEARD, gardener of 8 Regent-street, St. Thomas, identified the body of WILLIAM HEARD, her son, aged 25, who had just retired from the Army Hospital Corps, and lived at 65 Magdalen-street. Deceased went to the theatre with his wife, ALICE, whose body had not been found. Mary Ann Howe, widow, 9 Paul-street, identified the body of JAMES EVANS, her son, aged 21, porter at Mr Newman's grocer. He went alone to the theatre and sat in the gallery. This was all the evidence forthcoming, although it was stated that there were a few more bodies awaiting identification, whilst there were 15 in the stable and about 20 in the yard which were in such a charred condition as to be beyond recognition. - The Coroner remarked that they had exhausted the Inquiry as far as they could. There remained four or five more bodies to be identified, but that would no doubt be done during the day, whilst with respect to others there were no means of identification. With regard to the latter, he proposed to take evidence to shew that to allow the charred bodies to remain where they were, would be detrimental to the public health, and that in a sanitary point of view they should be speedily removed. He should be unwilling that any bodies should be moved that could be identified, but he proposed, with regard to the others, to take evidence which would justify him in giving a general order that those remains which were past recognition should be buried. - A Juror suggested that with regard to the remains on Which there was no particle of clothing, it would be better that they should be buried as soon as possible. - The Coroner concurred in the suggestion and asked Dr Brash, medical officer of health, his opinion on the subject. - Dr Brash replied that the charred remains ought not to be allowed to stop where they were, but they should be removed to the dead house at the cemetery. The speaker proceeded to give evidence to the effect that all the dead bodies removed from the theatre had the appearance of having died from burning or suffocation. There was a mass of charred remains lying in heaps in the stable and yard of the London Hotel, and it was very desirable, in a sanitary point of view, that these remains should be removed as quickly as possible. There were a dozen or two of bodies among these remains, which were so completely charred and in pieces that their identification was impossible. There were no articles of jewellery or ornaments upon the remains by which they could be recognised. In the interest of public health, it was desirable the remains should e immediately buried. - It was remarked by a Juror that 65 bodies had been identified at the Inquest, leaving 55 unaccounted for. - The Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until 11 o'clock this morning, when, after completing it as regards the identification of bodies, he intimated that he should proceed to the Hospital to view the bodies there, after which he would hear the remainder of the evidence at the Guildhall. - A Juror said he presumed that, after completing the evidence of justification, the Coroner would go into the cause of the occurrence. - The Coroner: Yes, yes; that is another question. - The Inquiry, which had lasted close upon five hours, was then adjourned. - Later in the evening, in pursuance of the Coroner's order, the heaps of charred remains, representing a dozen or two of unrecognisable bodies, were removed to the mortuary at the cemetery, outside the city, preparatory to burial.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 September 1887
EXETER - The Disaster At Exeter. The Adjourned Inquest. Increase In The Death Roll. Burial Of The Dead. The Relief Fund. Identification Of The Bodies. The adjourned Inquest was commenced yesterday morning at eleven o'clock at the London Hotel Assembly Room, and lasted until three in the afternoon. There was again a Double Jury of twenty-four, whose principal duty was to listen to the identification of bodies. The Coroner (Mr Hooper) also granted certificates of burial, as the relatives of deceased persons who had been recognised applied for them. There was a large number of leading citizens present from time to time during the sitting of the Court. GEORGE BAGGS, a railway labourer living at Yeovil, identified No. 39, as his son, aged 19, single and a porter at the L. and S.W. railway station, Exeter. He lodged in Sandford-street. John Quick, boot rivetter, No. 1, Beadle's-terrace, Bridge-street, recognised No. 23 body as that of DAVID DAVIS, a boot rivetter, who came from Wales, and lodged in Bartholomew-street whilst in Exeter. He was aged 25, and was single. Witness saw the body removed from the theatre. did not know what part of the building deceased was in. The Jury then visited the Hospital: In the first room were laid out the bodies of WM. BAILEY, aged 19, suffocated; Bombardier SCATTERGOOD, a fine stalwart fellow of the Royal Artillery, aged 25; and of the railway man, WALTER RICE, aged 21. In the Lecture Room of the Hospital, which was next visited by the Jury, were the bodies of JOHN CHAPPLE, aged 72; and of JAMES A. MCBEAN, aged 16, both of whom had died just before. In another room were to be seen the bodies of three women, a post pitiful sight - MRS MORTIMER, a somewhat elderly lady, probably over 50, and stated to be a widow; MRS RICHARDS, of London, married and of middle age, who was on a visit to Exeter, and who had, prior to her marriage, served in the Devon and Exeter Hospital in the capacity of nurse; also the body of MISS LEAR, aged 24, daughter of MRS LEAR, who keeps the Black Dog Inn, Lower North-street. MISS LEAR was evidently a young woman of fine physique. Although her face was almost completely stripped of its skin, yet through all her agony a beautiful profile was preserved and in death the young lady looked but asleep. The faces of the others were in contrast frightfully distorted. After looking at the bodies and expressing their profound horror at the spectacle and their deep commiseration with the poor creatures in their agonising sufferings, the Jury returned to the Assembly Room at the Hotel and heard further evidence. ELIZABETH DART, of Countess Weir, wife of a labourer, identified body No. 5 as that of her son JOSEPH. He was a labourer, 28 years of age, married and had three children. His wife, one of the still missing, was 27 years of age. She did not know which part of the building they visited. WM. MORTIMER, letter carrier, residing at Chudley's Court, Coombe-street, recognised one of the bodies just viewed at the Hospital as his mother ELIZABETH. He had no father living. His mother's age was 47. She went to the theatre in company with a man named Diggins on Monday evening and sat in the gallery. The man who accompanied her was alive. John Slee, a builder of 6 Northernhay-street, recognised the body of MISS MARY JANE LEAR at the Hospital. He was no relative. She was single, and aged 24; lived with her mother at the Black Dog public-house, Lower North-street. She went to the theatre in company with her sweetheart, a young man named Marks, and his sisters, all of whom escaped. CHAS. HENRY RICHARDS, licensed victualler, of Merton, Surrey, who lived at Madras-villas, Eltham, Kent, recognised the body of ALICE MAUDE RICHARDS at the Hospital as that of his wife. She was aged 32, and had been staying at the Port Royal Hotel with Mr Edwards. Witness was in London, but he knew that deceased was at the theatre with a friend from Eltham and Miss Edwards. Both the latter were injured. They all went into the upper circle. JANE BAILEY, widow of a cork cutter, identified the body of WM. BAILEY at the Hospital as that of her son, a porter at Queen-street station. He lived at home and was 19 years of age. He visited the theatre on Monday night, and before leaving home remarked that he would not be late back. She did not know in what part of the theatre he sat, but believed it was the gallery. WILLIAM SCATTERGOOD, a police officer in the Borough of Wakefield, identified the body of Bombardier FRANCIS SCATTERGOOD, lying at the Hospital, as that of his brother, aged 25 years and 8 months. He was a farmer's lad before enlisting in the G. Battery Second Brigade Royal Artillery. Bombardier Foyle said he was with SCATTERGOOD on Monday night at the corner of High-street and understood that the deceased went into the eighteenpenny seats (upper circle). JOHN RICE, coach wheeler, Alphington, identified the body of WALTER RICE at the Hospital as that of his son. He was a fireman employed by the Great Western Railway Company, and resided at 10 Bartholomew-street. He was 21 years of age and single. Two men who were with him in the same gallery seat had a narrow escape. Mary Jane Rowe, wife of a labourer, living at Prospect-place, Rock-street, identified the body of JOHN CHAPPLE as that of her father. His age was 70, and he lived at 10 Rock-street. He was married. He visited the theatre on Monday night and had a ticket to sit in the upper circle. ELLEN MCBEAN, single, living at 35 Victoria-road, identified the body of JAMES ARCHIBALD MCBEAN at the Hospital as that of her brother. He was a clerk at Mr Sharp's, timber-merchant, and his age was 16. He lived at home. On Monday night he went to the theatre in company with a Mr Barrett, who escaped without any injury. Before leaving home the deceased said he thought he would go in the gallery. Mr Barrett, she believed, lived in South-street at the White Hart Hotel.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 September 1887
PLYMOUTH - The Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of WILLIAM SAMUEL BLATCHFORD, a coal porter, who committed suicide on Tuesday last. MARY BLATCHFORD, wife of the deceased, identified the body, and stated that on the 6th inst., about five minutes to six, after he had let work, she gave him a cup of tea, and noticed that he was looking very wild and that his eyes glared. Deceased then said, "Leave me alone for ten minutes," and witness went outside the door. In a few minutes she again opened the door and deceased dropped a cup and a piece of paper. He said, "I am a dead man in half an hour." He rolled over on the bed, and appeared to be in great agony. He had been very strange for some time. He was the treasurer of the Bristol and West of England Sick Club, and had not been able to meet the demands made upon him and was behind in his accounts, which preyed upon his mind. Deceased's father died mad, and his brother was also a little wrong in his head. Latterly he had taken to drink, having been previously a teetotaller for ten years. William John Adams, chemist, stated that he sold three-pennyworth of rat poison to deceased on August 30th. It contained three grains of strychnine. P.C. Setter proved removing deceased to the Hospital. He saw him about 6.30 when he appeared in great pain, and said "Drink has done this." Witness ordered salt and water and mustard and water and then took him to the Hospital, where he died on the way. Mr Reginald Lucy, house surgeon, said that the deceased was quite dead when brought to the Hospital. Witness had made a post-mortem examination and found in the stomach a fluid, some tea leaves, and traces of strychnine. Deceased died from a spinal poison. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Rowe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 September 1887
EXETER - Adjourned Inquest. - Last evening at the Guildhall the Coroner (Mr Hooper) and a Double Jury again assembled. - In opening the Inquiry the Coroner observed that since the last Inquest it had been discovered that a mistake had been made with regard to one of the bodies - that of MISS SPILLER. It appeared that when he ordered the bodies at the cemetery to be searched, there was found in the pocket of this young woman a letter which shewed her to be MISS SPILLER, so that MR SPILLER had got someone else, in fact had the body of MARIA MOORE. - ERNEST SHEARS, a joiner, residing at 33 Clarence-street, St Thomas, identified the body of EMMA SHEARS as that of his wife, who was 27 years of age. She was at the theatre on Monday night in company with MRS MOORE, and her daughter, neighbours. They went early with the intention of going in the gallery. The MOORES' did not escape. EDWARD MOORE, driver, living at 15 Clarence-street, St. Thomas, who was deeply affected, identified the body of his daughter, MARIA MOORE, who was 12 years of age, and lived with him. She went to the theatre with MRS SHEARS and her mother, who was also missing. [Further information given regarding the inquest, interviews, relief fund etc.]

Western Morning News, Monday 12 September 1887
TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Accident At Tavistock Station Fire. - An Inquest was held at the Cottage Hospital, Tavistock, on Saturday morning, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr J. D. Williams, jun., was foreman, touching the death of JOHN WARREN, a blacksmith, who had had his leg fractured and burnt whilst assisting at the fire at the Tavistock Railway-station on the 27th ult., and died from tetanus. - Mr Fitzgerald, stationmaster, stated that he was present at the Inquiry on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company, although he was not instructed to attend. MR JOSEPH WARREN, father of deceased, identified the body of his son, who he said was 30 years of age, and had left a widow and two children. W. R. Perry, packer, deposed to the deceased assisting at the fire when the beam fell upon his leg. Mr J. J. Daw, draper, said he was present at the fire: The deceased was asked to assist by an official. - Mr Doidge, a Juror, asked the witness if he knew the name of the official, but the Coroner said they had only to inquire into the cause of death. Mr Doidge said his question was a relevant one, as he knew the Company had a contingent fund, and if the man was asked to assist by an official of the company, the widow and family would, he thought, be entitled to help from the company. Mr Daw said he believed the men were under the superintendence of the foreman of permanent way. A Juror thought that a representative of the company ought to have been present, but Mr Fitzgerald said he did not know the Inquest was to be held that morning. - Mr S. V. Theed said death was due to tetanus by injury to the left leg. The Coroner said deceased voluntarily attended the fire and was asked to assist, and in doing so received certain injuries from which he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and agreed to hand their fee to the widow. The Foreman said the Jury thought the facts of the case should be laid before the directors of the Great Western Railway Company, and the Coroner said he should be most happy to forward any particulars which would strengthen the hands of the directors in anything they might desire to do for the wife and family, and the Jury might rely upon their suggestion being carried out.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 September 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday by Mr Coroner Brian on the body of MARY GRIFFEN, 77, of 52 High-street, found dead on the floor that afternoon. Dr Eyely stated that half the muscle of the deceased's heart had become fat, and she had died from a fatal syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY - Mr Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Torbay Hospital relative to the death of AGNES AVERY, aged 62 who was knocked down by a pony belonging to Mr Bindon, butcher, of Torre, ridden by his son, on Wednesday last, and sustained such injuries that she died in the Torbay Infirmary on Saturday. Deceased was crossing the road from Upton to Mr Main's shop and before the boy could pull up the pony it knocked the woman down. A witness named William Best stated that in crossing the road deceased at first halted and then went on again, when the pony came up and knocked her down. Had she not gone on after the halt the pony would have passed her. The medical evidence was to the effect that the deceased had had one rib broken, which perforated the lung. The immediate cause of death was bronchitis, accelerated by the injury to the lung and the shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the New London Inn, yesterday into the cause of death of an infant, nine months old, daughter of MARY ANN NETTING, the wife of a labourer in the Dockyard, living at 24 Cornwall-street. Medical evidence shewed that death arose from bronchitis and measles. The Coroner said the death was not so natural as it might seem. He wanted it to be generally known that children who could not make known their ailments ought to be protected by having a doctor sent for in good time. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 September 1887
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Child From Neglect At Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter Against The Mother. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquest last evening, occupying upwards of three hours, relative to the death of GEORGE HERD, at Plymouth Workhouse, and John Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. Mr Woolland, Governor of the Guardians and Mr Axworthy, a guardian, were present. - Edwin Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, said that on the 8th inst., he received the baby, GEORGE HERD, into the House. It was five months old, very dirty, wet through, and very scantily clothed. He ordered brandy and milk to be given to the child. Every attention was paid, but the infant died on the 11th inst. - Margaret Brooks, 37 Rendle-street, stated that the father and mother lived in the same house with her. The former was a steady man, a good husband, and a kind father, very fond of his children, of whom there were five living. Being a seaman he had been away a good deal during the past six months; when in port he came home every night. Having to rejoin his ship, however, at 7 a.m., he was obliged to leave the management of his children to his wife. The wife was a habitual drunkard; since deceased's birth she had been drunk continuously for weeks at a time. She consequently neglected the child, leaving it in charge of a girl of eleven. Witness had often given deceased the bottle to stop its crying. From Friday week to the following Tuesday the child had laid in one place and had not been removed - the mother being drunk all that time. Her husband often remonstrated with her concerning her conduct. He would often wash and feed the child when he came home in the evening. Before leaving in the morning the mother would occasionally buy two quarts of milk for the family, but witness believed that the elder children drank most of it. Last Thursday she was out drinking all day. MR HERD came home in the evening, and seeing the condition of the child, said he could stand it no longer. Witness took the child to the Workhouse for him. - Though warned by the Coroner, the mother persisted in asking questions, which, in conjunction with inquiries from the Jury, elicited facts relating to her own conduct and the condition of the child. - ROBERT HERD, boatswain, H.M.S. Flamingo, father of the child, stated that the baby was neglected owing to his wife's habitual drunkenness. She had been a drunkard for years, but had become worse lately. His remonstrances were of no avail. He supplied his wife with ample means to keep the family, but she drank it all away, as well as the half-pay she received from his stepson, who was a ship's steward. On Thursday the child was in a wretched condition, dirty and starving. He sent him to the Workhouse. At ten o'clock his wife came home beastly drunk. - Charles Joseph Mayell, Relieving Officer, said that JULIA HERD was a great drunkard. Eighteen months ago MR HERD wished to allow the Guardians a fixed amount to keep her and the family in the Workhouse, but the application was refused. At one time he was obliged to live apart from her. The child's sister came to him on Thursday and told him the baby was perishing from want. Unless the case had been a very extreme one he should not have sent the child to the Workhouse. The rest of the family at the house looked like chimney sweeps. - Mr C. E. Bean, medical officer, said that he saw deceased on Thursday. He had the appearance of suffering from starvation, being very emaciated. Its bones nearly protruded through the skin, its eyes were sunken and hollow, and its extremities cold. - Mr F. A. Thomas, medical officer to the Workhouse, said that he saw the child on Friday morning in a dying condition. That day he and Mr Bean had made a post-mortem examination of the body. The weight was seven pounds four ounces - a common weight at birth. It should then have been twenty pounds in weight. There was not a particle of fat in any part of the body. There was no evidence of any disease, but every part was totally devoid of fat, and there was every appearance of death being due to inanition, brought on by want of sufficient nourishing food to support its life. - Mr Brian said that the duty of the Jury was to decide who was responsible for the neglect. The father was the legal guardian, but the father was continually on active service away from home. Therefore, the mother naturally became the responsible person. - After a short private deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the mother and the Coroner accordingly committed her to take her trial at the next Assizes. He would accept bail in two sureties of £25 each.

WEARE GIFFARD - A verdict of Accidental Death was recorded at an Inquest held yesterday at Wear Gifford by the District Coroner, Mr Bromham, on the body of a labourer named GIST, who was killed on Monday by the stump of a tree, which he had been undermining in a hedge, falling upon him.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 September 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Jump From A Tram At Plymouth. - The Inquest on RICHARD MUTTON, a naval pensioner, of 37 Monument-street, Devonport, who died under the singular circumstances already reported, was held yesterday afternoon at the Devonport Guildhall by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner. The evidence shewed that deceased left his home about twenty minutes to ten on the night of Friday week with the intention of going to his work at Millbay Docks. He took a tram going to Plymouth, and when near the Exmouth Inn, in Union-street, jumped off the platform on to the road, in so doing falling on the back of his head. From the statement of Corporal Plumb, of the Military Foot Police, who was on duty in Union-street, and that of the tram conductor, Frederick Edward Lewis, it appeared that deceased jumped off the tram with his face towards Devonport, the conductor adding that he believed deceased left the car to avoid payment of his fare. With the assistance of Plumb, two civilians and a constable, deceased was taken into Mr Steele's, chemist, where the wound at the back of his head was dressed with sticking plaster. He recovered consciousness sufficiently to say that he belonged to Devonport, and was then placed in a 'bus going in that direction. MUTTON arrived home at half-past eleven, when he staggered indoors, appeared in a stupid and dazed condition, and was not able to give a satisfactory account of the accident, beyond saying that he had fallen and knocked his head. Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, was called in on the following Sunday evening, and prescribed for the deceased, in addition to re-dressing the wound and making a careful examination. The doctor, however, could not then detect any fracture of the skull. On the following Monday deceased seemed better, and got out of bed and was able to go out of doors for several days. On Monday last he became worse and died the following morning shortly after six o'clock. As the result of a post-mortem, Dr Row found a fracture of the skull on the opposite side to where the wound was. The fracture was four inches in length. There was a large amount of blood underneath the fractured part, and death was due to effusion of blood on the brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Foreman thinking that they might fairly exonerate the deceased from any attempt to avoid payment of his fare by being anxious to get early to his work.

LYDFORD - The Quarry Explosion At Princetown Prison. - The District Coroner (Mr William Burd) yesterday opened an Inquiry at the Princetown Convict Prison into the circumstances attending the death of the convict WILLIAM ROBERTS, who was killed in the explosion at the quarry on Monday last. Mr W. E. Duke was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Governor (Captain W. O. Every) and the Deputy Governor (Colonel Plummer) were present at the Inquiry. - In opening the Coroner remarked that under the Explosives Act he was bound to give four days' notice to the Home Secretary to enable him to send down an inspector, so that the evidence taken that day would be simply sufficient to enable him to give a certificate for burial. - The first witness called was Colonel Plummer, the Deputy Governor of the Prisons, who deposed: I produce the record of the deceased WILLIAM ROBERTS. He was convicted at the Central Criminal Court on the 25th of October 1886 for burglary, with two previous convictions for felony. His sentence was for five years' penal servitude, but without any subsequent police supervision. He was described as a bricklayer, and had been previously confined in Wandsworth Gaol. He was received here on the 20th of December, 1886. His conduct on removal here was "good," and it has since been "good." His number on the register was M461 and was described as of the Church of England. The date of ROBERTS'S death was the 12th of this month. His age on conviction was 24, so that at the time of his death he would be nearly 25. I was not present either at the death or the accident, though I had only just left the quarry when the explosion took place. - Warder William White said: On Monday, the 12th of September, I was on duty in the prison quarry in charge of No. 25 party. At about eight o'clock I saw Principal Warder Moore charge a hole for the purpose of blasting. It was situated at the south-west corner and the left-hand side on entering the gate. As soon as it was ready we marched out into the highway, so as to prevent any accident. Here we stayed for a considerable period, waiting for the charge to go off. After about three quarters of an hour Principal Warder Moore gave the order, "March back to the quarry." I filed my party just inside the gate, but did not take them to their work, as we were working nearest to the hole. Mr Moore waited for some time, I should think about twenty minutes or half an hour, and then, accompanied by Assistant Warder Bondiner and a prisoner, William Gaskill (M90), he went over to the place and commenced picking out the hole. As soon as they had picked out about seven feet of the "tampion" and powder - the hole was a 9ft one - I had orders to "break off" my prisoners to work around the off side. I employed them as much as I could away from the hole and Mr Moore then asked one of my men to bring up a bucket of water, and this the deceased, ROBERTS, did. Just as he arrived with the water and was putting it down by the side of the hole, the remainder of the charge exploded. I saw ROBERTS rolling back over the rocks, and the piece of rock blasted off was following him, and just as he came to the ground it fell on him. I, with the others, assisted to get the stone off, this being quickly done. The prisoners also went to the assistance of the other three, all of whom had been blown on one side, but driven back in separate directions of about three or four feet. All were cut and bruised, but I am unable to state exactly the injuries. They were all hurried off to the Infirmary. ROBERTS was not then dead but he was much battered about. He appeared to be conscious and spoke to one of the prisoners before removal. That is all I know about the affair. - The Coroner: But were you not present when he died? - Witness: No, sir. - A Juror: Are there any instructions laid down specifying the time that must elapse before returning to a hole once lit? - Witness: I cannot say, having nothing to do with the charging of holes. Mr Moore would do it. - The Juror: But is it usual to bore out a hole that has missed fire? - Witness: I believe it is done in every quarter. - Another Juror: What was the "tampion" and powder picked out with? - Witness: I believe a sharp piece of iron. - The Juror: Or was it copper that was used? - Witness: It might have been, but the other witness could speak better as to that. - The Coroner: Besides, I was about to suggest that it would be well to visit the quarry at the close of this Inquiry. - Captain Every: I have had everything left as it was at the time of the accident. - Henry Behenna, assistant warder in the Infirmary, deposed that on September 12th he was in charge of C. Ward to which ROBERTS was taken. He was alive when taken in, but died about noon. He was conscious the whole of the time. Witness identified the body as that of Convict WILLIAM ROBERTS. He made no statement, and only complained of his suffering. He had every care and attention in the Hospital, the doctors being in attendance from the time he was taken in. - Mr William Frew, medical officer of H.M. Prisons, Dartmoor, said: On the 12th inst. the deceased, WILLIAM ROBERTS was admitted to the Hospital suffering from injuries received at the quarry. On examination it was found that the left haunch bone was fractured in several places and the fracture involved the spinal column. There was a large wound communicating with that fracture. Several ribs were fractured on the right side, and he was suffering from severe internal injuries. The man was, on admission, in a state of collapse, and was, in fact, in a moribund condition. He gradually sank, and died about twelve noon. The post-mortem examination revealed the internal injury to be an excessive rupture of a right lobe of the liver. The cause of death was shock to the system, the result of the injuries. Brandy was given deceased and hot water bottles were applied to him, in fact everything was done to make him comfortable. - By a Juror: Was the man healthy otherwise? - The Doctor: Yes; and he was quite conscious up to within five minutes of his death. - Charles King (M743) a convict in the prison said: - On Monday morning last we went out to work in the quarry, the party to which I belonged being under the charge of Warder White. A hole having been drilled, Principal Warder Moore loaded it, a prisoner named William Gaskill handing him the sand. I was about 30 yards from where Mr Moore was. Before the charge was fired the parties were all marched outside the quarry. I should think it was more than an hour before we were marched back again, but as soon as we got there Principal Warder Moore told Warder White to keep his party (No. 25) back a bit longer. He did so, and Assistant Warder Bondiner went up to the hole and threw some water into it. I had given the pint cup to him myself. I should think he was working three-quarters of an hour in trying to clear out the charge. Mr Moore then went to him and a prisoner (Gaskill), but I cannot say whether Gaskill was told to go or not. Mr Moore ordered the deceased (ROBERTS) to fetch him another bucket of water. The hole must I should think have been pretty nearly cleared out by that time. Just as ROBERTS had given Mr Moore the water the charge exploded. ROBERTS did not go up on the block of stone that was being blasted, but was on a ledge lower down. The stone that was blown up from the hole rolled down on ROBERTS, who had slipped from the rock, and if he had not done so I think he would have been able to get away clear. When the smoke had cleared, I rushed over and found the other prisoners trying to take the stone from off ROBERTS and the other man, Gaskill. I went up to the hole and found Mr Moore in it. His legs were down in the hollow, and he was lying back against the rock. Assistant Warder Bondiner was lying on the ledge of the block that had not been blown up. I asked Mr Moore how he was, and he replied, "I am all right, but I can't see; how are the poor prisoners?" I helped him down to the gate where the Deputy Governor was, and handed him over to the care of Warder Davey. - The Coroner: I think I have taken sufficient evidence to admit of my giving a certificate of burial, and before I adjourn, if it is your wish - I think it would be more satisfactory - you will accompany me to the quarry, so that we might see the state of affairs. The things have been left exactly as they were at the time of the explosion, and if we see them we shall be better able to judge of the circumstances. - The Jury agreed, and accompanied Mr Burd to the quarry, where they saw a mass of stone weighing about 30 tons which had been dislodged. The tools were lying about and on several of the Jurors examining them they found that the "borers" or "scrapers" which were used to remove the "tamping" were made of iron, and had a sharp edge. The stone which rolled on ROBERTS was calculated to weight at least a ton and a half, and the wonder is that he was not cut in two. - On returning to the prisons, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Wednesday next at one o'clock. - Through the courtesy of Dr Frew we are enabled to state that the injured men are progressing favourably. The doctor does not think that Principal Warder Moore will be completely blind, but is of opinion that his sight will be partially restored. The convict Gaskill is severely injured about the lower parts of the body.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Drowning Case At Mutton Cove. - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, Inquired yesterday afternoon into the cause of death of PRIVATE COMASKEY, of the South Staffordshire regiment, who was drowned at Mutton Cove the previous day. George Webber, constable in the Devonport force, deposed that about ten minutes past one on Tuesday morning he was standing at the east side of Mutton Cove when he heard a voice coming from the other side as that of a man under the influence of drink. The noise appeared to proceed from someone in the water. He ran round and shouted "What's the matter?" and heard a person "blow" as if swimming. Witness went to the bottom of the steps and shouted. Someone from about the middle of the cove replied "Come here," and looking in the water he saw what appeared to be a man's face. Witness shouted to Jennings, the Custom-house officer, "There's a man overboard." Both of them got into a boat and proceeded to the spot, but could neither see nor hear anything, although they searched about for several minutes among the boats in the cove. It being high water at the time it was too deep to reach the bottom of the cove with a boat-hook. About ten minutes past five, when the tide got low, the search was renewed by witness, Jennings and P.C. Shopland. Witness saw the body of a private at the bottom of the cove. In answer to the Coroner, witness said about four feet of the quay was not protected by any fence. It was very possible that deceased might have walked over the quay at this point, as it was a very dark night. A cap, which witness believed to be deceased's, was found on the quay near the unprotected portion. From the marks on the ground of the eastern part of the quay witness inferred that the deceased had been lying down, that he got up and walked overboard. Witness thought the man was in the water when he first heard his voice. John Palmer, private in the South Staffordshire Regiment, said on Monday night he was in a public-house called The Star, when about half-past eight the deceased came in. He had two or three glasses of beer there, and remained in the house until about half-past ten. Witness came out of the public-house with deceased, and then left him. He appeared to go in the direction of Devonport. Witness thought he was a little far gone in drink, but was joking as usual. Deceased had been a sergeant two or three times, and had just lately given up his stripes. George Harmer, sergeant in the same regiment as deceased, said COMASKEY was about 40 years of age. He was often intoxicated, but witness did not believe he suffered from trouble which should induce him to take his own life. The Coroner did not think there was anything in the evidence to shew that deceased intended to take his own life. He, no doubt, met his death by inadvertently walking over the unfenced portion of the quay. He thought it dangerous that this quay was not properly protected all round. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and suggested that representations should be made to the proper authorities that the unfenced portion of the quay should be properly protected.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 September 1887
TORQUAY - The Fatal Accident At Torre Station. Extra Precautions Recommended. - The Inquest on the body of THOMAS JOHN SCOTT, formerly an innkeeper of Torquay, but recently living at St. Mary Church, who was killed by being run over by a train at Torre Railway Station on Wednesday night, was held at the Country House Inn, Ellacombe, yesterday afternoon, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Mr Eric Ward from the office of Messrs. Whiteford and Bennett, Plymouth, solicitors to the Great Western Railway Company, attended to watch the proceedings on their behalf, as did also Mr John Northcott, district inspector. Mr G. F. B. Pullen, Station-master at Torre was present. Mr H. Harding was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Mr William Motton, landlord of the Country House Inn, identified the body of the deceased, who was his brother-in-law, and who he said had recently followed the occupation of a joiner. He was 44 years of age. - John Searle, letter carrier, of St Mary Church, said he was in the company of the deceased at Newton station for half an hour on Wednesday evening whilst waiting for the train. Witness and deceased travelled in the last ordinary train to Torre, but not in the same carriage. On the arrival of the train at Torre station, when it was it had stopped, witness got out and he saw the deceased standing on the sideboard of the carriage, the door of which was open. He was apparently about to step on to the platform, when the train (which had over-run the station) was suddenly moved backwards, and the deceased fell sideways between two carriages. Witness ran to the engine driver to keep the train still and the deceased was removed from underneath by a young man. Whilst at Newton station deceased was jovial and merry, and witness saw nothing unusual in his manner. In his opinion, the cause of deceased's falling was the sudden jerking of the train. After he had been taken from underneath the carriage he seemed to recognise witness, but all he said was "Oh, my God," twice. He lived about ten minutes afterwards. In reply to the Jury, witness added that he heard the porters call out to the passengers to keep still, but he said this was after the accident and not before. He heard no warning given before the train was moved back. - Mr Frederick Thomas thistle, surgeon, who saw the deceased as he was lying between the up and down lines, said he had sustained a compound fracture of the left thigh and light leg. The muscles and skin were all torn away on the left side, from the hip to the ankle. The deceased died about ten minutes afterwards, at the station, the immediate cause of death being shock to the system. - Mary Sarahs, a passenger, said after the train had stopped, she saw the deceased standing on the platform, holding the door with his left hand, and talking to a woman in the compartment. As the train moved back very slow he still retained his hold and walked back some distance with it. Fearing an accident, she said to deceased, "I wish you would go away till the train stop," but she did not think he heard her. Just afterwards the deceased gave a lurch, his arm slipped from the door and he fell between the carriages. Before the train was moved back, the porters called out twice to the passengers to keep their seats and to those on the platform to stand back. The train was moved back slowly and gradually and not with a jerk. A porter passed the deceased as he leaned against the carriage, but she did not notice that he warned deceased of his danger. - George Mitchell, of Dartmouth, sick berth steward in the Royal Navy, who travelled in the same carriage with the deceased, said the latter was rather uproarious in his behaviour during the journey between Newton and Torre. He started singing, then he wanted to light his pipe, and all of a sudden he jumped up and wanted to get out of the carriage. He was certainly under the influence of liquor, and he appeared serious in his desire to jump out of the train, because, when witness sought to stop him, deceased threatened to punch him in the face. Witness stood up in the carriage with his hand on the hat rail until the train reached Torre station, to prevent deceased getting out. As he left the carriage, on the train stopping, deceased staggered on to the platform, noticing which witness said to the deceased, "Old man, you had better be careful, or else you'll get into trouble." Deceased walked away from the carriage, and a few minutes afterwards the accident happened. In reply to Mr Ward, witness added that he had not the slightest doubt that deceased was under the influence of drink, and very much so. He offered to give £5 for the red cross on the sleeve of witness's coat and also said he did not care whether he lived through the night. - John Thomas, guard of the train, stated that on its arrival at Torre, owing to the metals being a little slippery and the train long, it overran the platform by the two front carriages. He called to the passengers in these carriages to retain their seats, and after ascertaining that the passengers and luggage in the other part of the train had been got out and he had received from the station-master word that it was all right to move back he went to the engine driver and asked him to do so. He had previously walked the whole length of the train and seen that the people on the platform were clear of it. Just afterwards he was told that a man was under the third carriage from the engine, and going underneath he cleared the deceased's legs from the wheels. - Henry Tuckett, district representative of the Western Morning News, who was in the front part of the train, gave corroborative evidence as to the guard and porters warning people to keep back and passengers to retain their seats before the train was moved back, and also as to its being moved very slowly and gradually and not with a jerk. - The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out the difference between the statement of Searle and the evidence of the other witnesses, and left it to the Jury to say whether blame should be attached to anyone. After some consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding as a rider that, without in any way blaming the railway company, they recommended that in cases of long trains, extra precautions should be taken by the officials to prevent accidents occurring through passengers approaching too closely to the carriages just before a train was about to be put in motion. - The deceased's two brothers, who have been home on a visit from Australia, and were with him in his last moments, left by train for Plymouth yesterday afternoon en route for Australia, about an hour before the commencement of the Inquest. They were much distressed on leaving the station.

SIDMOUTH - The Fatal Lamp Explosion At Sidmouth. Danger Of Mixed Oils. - An adjourned inquest was held yesterday at Sidmouth before Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr H. T. Bolt was Foreman, touching the death of a married woman named MARY ANN WOODLEY, aged 26, who met with her death from the explosion of a lamp at Peak Lodge, Sidmouth, on the 17th of August. The Inquest was adjourned for the purpose of having the remainder of the oil left in the vessel examined. Mr Hamlyn, inspector, of Exeter, gave evidence to the effect that the oil he examined had a flashing point of 67 degrees, which was six degrees below the Government standard. The oil was dangerous in the inspector's opinion. The vendor of the oil also gave evidence. The Coroner pointed out that such oil should always be labelled "highly inflammable". The vessel which contained the oil sent to the deceased was not labelled at all. After an Inquiry lasting six hours and a half the Jury found "That deceased met with her death through an explosion of a lamp caused by a mixture of benzoline and petroleum oils, but that how the oils became mixed was unknown."

EXETER - [A long description of further evidence regarding the Fire at the Exeter theatre.] The Inquest was again adjourned. Death of Another Patient. - MR ALBERT PERCY, of Paris-street, who was burnt in the fire, died yesterday afternoon at the Hospital. He was well known in the City and much respected. He was a very strong man, and at one time it was thought he would recover; but his constitution was unable to bear the shock and consequent exhaustion. Other patients are in a critical condition, being unable to retain food and thus get strength to resist the injuries they have sustained.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 September 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan held an Inquest at Devonport on Saturday as to the death of ROBERT SOBEY, shipwright, 8 Haddington-road, Morice Town, aged 44, who committed suicide on Friday morning. Mr A. B. Hutchings represented MRS NEWMAN, wife of SOBEY. - Kate McCarthy stated that she entered the room of deceased at 10.5 a.m. and saw him kneeling by his bed with his throat cut. There was a quantity of blood about him, and in his hand was a razor. On telling Mrs Rawlings of the occurrence she sent for a doctor. Witness had seen him the night before. He then read her a letter from MRS NEWMAN, ordering him to quit the house at quarter day. He seemed upset about it, and said he did not know what he should do. He was troubled at his wife taking away his little child of 12. She had never seen him excited. MRS NEWMAN had promised to allow him £1 a week. She had never seen him the worse for liquor. he told her that since his wife left him eleven weeks before, he had had no money, and he was very low-spirited at being unable to pay the bills that came in. - By Mr Hutchings: Witness had lived with deceased's father, as housekeeper, for three years and a half, but she had never seen the son in a state of drunkenness. Deceased had a house in Garden-street. She had heard of the child's running away, probably on account of the parents quarrelling. - Mr Hutchings read the letter referred to in Mrs McCarthey's evidence. MRS NEWMAN said: "I left the house because of your drunken conduct, without a change of clothes, and I have had my darling EDITH ill. How many times has she left her hot bed and flown out of the house without shoes or stockings? I thought you should play Richard III to yourself, as you kept me out of bed all night. I have never asked you why you stayed in bed all day. I have spent twenty years of misery with you. You have lived a life of idleness for the past twelve years. You have the rent coming in from your two houses, and I am willing to allow you £1 and that should be sufficient for you. As it is nearly quarter-day I wish you to leave the house and my things untouched, for I shall not live with you any more. You had better make another will in favour of your sister and rob my child." - Dr Gard, who had attended the deceased for seven years, sometimes for a complaint brought on by drink, said that when called in he found deceased's face buried in the bed clothes and he was quite cold. The wound in his throat was five inches long and severed all the blood vessels and the windpipe. The deed had been committed five or six hours. His bed bore evidence of his having occupied it during the night. When last witness saw him he was depressed and melancholy. He did not care to go out for a walk for fear of having the house broken into and his apples stolen. He told witness he could not understand why his wife had left him; he was ill of the gout at the time. He saw MRS NEWMAN suffering from a black eye, about Christmas last. Six years before that he had attended SOBEY for a bad cut, which might have been self-inflicted. He was not surprised to hear of his suicide. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide during Temporary Insanity.

PLYMOUTH - The death of EMILY PHILLIPS, aged 44, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday. Deceased was a needlewoman, but was formerly a domestic servant, having had to give that up on account of being subject to fits. On Thursday last she was seen at her lodgings, No. 19 Devonshire-terrace, by her sister, and deceased then complained that she thought she was going to have a fit. She was not seen afterwards and, although the landlady, Mrs Turner, knocked at her door several times on Friday, she got no answer. On Saturday morning her suspicions were aroused and she sent for P.C. Oliver who burst open the door. He found deceased lying on the floor, quite dead, having apparently fallen whilst standing at the table. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

DODBROOKE - Found Drowned At Kingsbridge. - Between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday morning the body of a man, 53 years of age, was found lying on the mud in the estuary at Kingsbridge. Captain Eli Brown, master of the Express, steamer, was riding on the quay when he saw the body, which was identified as that of WILLIAM PATEY, who recently resided at Dartmouth. An Inquest was held in the evening at Dodbrooke. - Elizabeth Ball, sister of the deceased, said he had lived with her for some time and was a gardener, but in consequence of his health had not done any work for several months. He suffered from pains round his heart and in his head. At seven o'clock in the morning she went into the deceased's room to see how he was, but found that he had gone out. Mr Webb, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased who shewed symptoms of an aggravated form of indigestion, and he advised him to go to Dr Square, who gave him a prescription. Deceased was always in a desponding state and took a melancholy, though unfounded, view of his condition. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 September 1887
LYDFORD - The Quarry Explosion AT Princetown. Adjourned Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of the convict WM. ROBERTS, who was killed in the explosion at the Dartmoor Prison quarries on the 12th inst., was held by the District Coroner, Mr Wm. Burd, at the prison yesterday. Mr H. Wakeford, Director of Prisons; Capt. W. O. Every, Governor; Colonel Plummer, Deputy Governor, were present during the Inquiry. - The Coroner, in opening, remarked that he adjourned the Inquest from the previous week in order to communicate with the Home Secretary in accordance with the Explosives Act. According to a letter he (The Coroner) had received, the Home Secretary did not purpose sending an inspector down. They had had the evidence of one of the warders who was present at the quarry, and also of one of the convicts and he now purposed taking evidence of the Principal Warder Moore and Assistant-Warder Bondiner, both of whom were injured in the accident. It would be for them to say, then, whether they required any further evidence. They would be obliged to retire to the sick ward in order to take the depositions of those witnesses. - Principal Warder James Moore deposed: On the 12th September I was on duty at the prison quarry. As near as I can tell it was about nine o'clock when I charged a hole with pebble powder and tamping. The hole was situated at the left-hand extreme corner of the quarry. The men were marched outside in the usual order under the charge of the officers, the prisoner Gaskell and I remaining behind to light the fuse. Having done this we ran under cover outside the quarry, and waited to hear the explosion. The charge did not explode in the regular time. I should think it ought to have exploded in two or three minutes. With the prisoner Gaskell, I again went to the hole to find whether we could see anything wrong. We saw that the fuse was burnt below the surface and went away again under cover for about ten minutes or so. Afterwards I went to the main road where the other prisoners were, the prisoner Gaskell following me outside. My attention was here drawn by one of the officers to a van which wanted to pass. I said it could pass, and it did so. The men were then marched back to the quarry, and I ordered Warder White to keep his men back out of the way, as they were the party working nearest to where the hole was. I then asked Assistant-Warder Bondiner to pick out the hole, which he did, the prisoner Gaskell helping him. - By the Coroner: How long was it from the time the prisoners were marched out until they returned to the quarry? - Witness: I should think from half an hour to three-quarters of an hour to the best of my judgment. - Continuing, witness said: After Bondiner and Gaskell had been engaged at the hole some time I went over to see how they were getting on, and to my mind they were doing very well. During the time I was there the Deputy Governor made his usual visit to the quarry, and I made my report to him. Returning to the hole, the prisoner ROBERTS spoke to me, and he had scarcely finished when the explosion occurred and took me off my feet. - By the Coroner: You say that the deceased ROBERTS spoke to you. What was it about? - Witness: It was with reference to the pint cup, which he wanted to drink from, and I told him he could not have it, as it was in use. - Where were the two prisoners ROBERTS and Gaskell when you went back to speak to the Deputy Governor? - Gaskell was up on the block with Bondiner, and ROBERTS was on the block in front of the hole. - A Juror: How came the deceased prisoner in front of the block? - I can't answer that question, but I expect he was after the pint cup. - At the request of the Foreman further questioning of the witness was postponed until after Bondiner's evidence had been taken. - Wm. James Bondiner, assistant-warder in the prisons, deposed: On Monday, the 12th inst., I was at the quarry. Mr Moore came to me and asked me to pick out a hole. I ordered the prisoner Gaskell to fetch a bucket of water. I went to the smithy and ordered an iron pricker of five-eighths of an inch round. I then started to draw the tamping out with the sharp end of the pricker. Water was poured in, and a constant supply of water was kept in the hole from eight inches to a foot. I drew out the whole of the tamping and about a foot of the powder. When I had taken this out I considered the remainder of the powder would be damaged on account of the bottom of the hole being on beds and cracks in the rock, which would let in the waster, and I used the drill, striking only two or three blows when the explosion took place. - In answer to questions, the witness replied: I have been in the habit of doing this kind of work previously. The question of the time that shall elapse between the firing of a charge and the picking of the hole is generally left to the discretion of the officer in charge. I consider that the cause of the explosion was a faulty fuse. We used only one strand of fuse for firing the charge. About five or six buckets of water were thrown into the hole. The drill I used was made of steel. We usually use a swab-stick after the tamping is taken out, but did not on this occasion. I have worked in mines and quarries both in South Africa and in England. In a mine I should not have to deal with a hole as large as this one, but should think this was only a 2 ½ inch hole. I do not know that the size of this hole according to the drill would have been 3 ¼ inches. I do not know the depth of the hole. We had nothing whatever to draw the charge with except iron or steel. I have picked out only one hole before at the quarry, and that was done with an iron pricker and was successful. I have used copper prickers in coal mines, but there blasting is done in a different manner. It never occurred to me that there was any danger in using an iron pricker. - The Foreman (Mr Duke): Is it an assistant-warder's duty to pick out a hole that misses fire? - That is a question I should not care to answer. - The Coroner: It is a straightforward question, and you must answer it. - It is an assistant-warder's duty; I was there for the purpose of assisting Mr Moore. - The Foreman: Are you allowed to have the convicts assistance in charging a hole according to your regulations? - I very rarely do it. - The Foreman: I ask you whether the regulations allow you to do it? - I don't know of anything to the contrary. - Continuing, witness replied: I was not at the hole when it was charged, but I thought there was water under the charge from what I heard Mr Moore say and from the appearance of the granite. I don't think I should reckon on that again. I do not know that there has ever been any trouble at the quarry with the fuse before, and I have never missed fire with the fuse for six years, although I have detected bad fuse and have thrown it away. It is a red tape fuse, and is made by Bickford, of Hayle. - The Coroner: Have you any regulations laid down as to your blasting? - No, we have not. I suppose the deceased prisoner came for the pint cup to use it for drinking purposes. I did not notice Mr Moore take a bucket of water from ROBERTS. I never ordered him to bring any water for me. - Principal Warder Moore, replying to questions, stated that he had had charge of the quarries about five or six months, but had about forty years' experience in blasting. - The Foreman: Is it contrary to the regulations to employ convicts in blasting, or is it in accordance with them? - The convicts are supposed to assist in blasting. - The Coroner: Have you any fixed regulations for blasting? - No, not that I am aware of. He knew there was a certain amount of danger attached to picking a hole, and so ordered the men to keep back. He never ordered any convict to assist Bondiner, but told him that if he wanted any help he was to have it. He had only had one hole miss fire before this, and that was cleared successfully. He had not had much experience as chief officer, and could hardly express an opinion as to whether they had all the necessary tools. He did not order ROBERTS to bring him any water. - William Gaskell, a convict in the prisons, stated that he assisted Mr Moore to charge the hole, handing him the materials and lighting the fuse. He heard Mr Moore order Bondiner to pick the hole and take him (witness) with him, remarking that it was better to do it at once than to leave it until later on. The tools they used were a sharp iron spike, about two feet long; a long pricker, a sharp drill, and a long scraper to pull the mud out with. They had got all the tamping out and about two inches of the powder, and had also taken out about five or six feet of fuse, which both Moore and Bondiner cut and agreed that the fire had gone through, and that the hole was safe. Whilst witness was in the smithy, ROBERTS came up, and he heard Mr Moore tell him to go away, and had scarcely spoken, when the charge exploded. Witness was on the stone on his knees, with his hands over the hole, and Bondiner was standing over him. Witness was blown somewhere, but he did not know where. He believed that about a bucket and a half of water was used. No wooden instrument of any kind was used. The hole was 9ft. one, and Mr Moore said there were 4ft of powder in it. They kept two inches of water in the hole. Sometimes they used two strands of fuse, but only one was used on this occasion. Witness had frequently seen an iron drill strike fire on the granite. - This concluded the evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that there certainly were in the evidence several discrepancies, but it was pretty clear that they were in regard to minor details. The Jury had most of them the advantage of him in being cognisant of mining matters. Those discrepancies they therefore could better decide than he, and he should leave it to them to decide on their verdict. There was one point he would wish to mention - that the officers had been particularly careful that the prisoners should be as far as possible out of danger, except perhaps in coming back to the quarry so soon. The risk appeared to have been taken more by the officers than the men. - The Court was cleared for the consideration of the verdict, and after about twenty minutes was re-opened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider that "We are of opinion that a set of regulations should be framed for the guidance of persons using explosives in quarries, with a view to guard against such accidents in the future, and that such regulations should specify what tools are to be used."

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 September 1887
MILTON DAMERELL - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at an Inquest held at Milton before Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, into the cause of death of a labourer named WILLIAM KINGFORD. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Metters, of Venton Farm, had been working with a cart and two horses, and the task on which he was engaged being finished he had fastened the leading horse to the tail of the cart, and as the result of the horse hanging back the cart was capsized. KINGFORD ran to relieve the horse in the shafts when the animal, which was struggling very much, caught its head under the man's chin and threw him with such force as to dislocate his neck. A post-mortem examination by Mr Revell, surgeon, shewed that death was due to injury of the spine.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 October 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of EMMA CHAMBERLAIN, aged 28, wife of a labourer living in Bartholomew-street. The evidence shewed that on the previous morning deceased complained of a pain in her chest. She got better, but some hours later seemed worse, and her husband gave her brandy and water. Soon afterwards he noticed a change in her appearance as she lay in bed, and found that she had expired. Medical testimony shewed that death was due to internal haemorrhage.

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 October 1887
TIVERTON - A verdict of " Accidental Death" was returned at Tiverton at the Coroner's Inquest yesterday, in regard to the decease of MRS ANN EWINGS, 68, wife of a dairyman. MRS EWINGS, who had been subject to giddiness, fell down stairs and fractured her skull.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 October 1887
SOUTH HUISH - The Shocking Accident At Galmpton. - Yesterday morning Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Galmpton, near Brixham, relative to the death of THOMAS LOCKE, a labourer, which took place on Tuesday under painful circumstances. The evidence given shewed that the deceased was employed on Manor Farm, of which Mr Dobell was tenant, and had worked there a fortnight. On Tuesday he was in charge of a pair of horses, working a corn crusher, and in the afternoon went into a barn and got an oil can from a man named George Hocking, saying he wanted to oil the cog wheels. Sometime afterwards Hocking thought the machinery was working very slowly, and on going to see the cause found LOCKE lying on the ground quite dead, with the top part of his head cut completely off just above the ears, he having apparently been caught between the shaft of the big wheel and a beam. He was quite clear from the horses, and Mr Dobell stated that the machinery should have been oiled before the horses set it in motion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 October 1887
PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner held an Inquiry at the Workhouse on Saturday relative to the death of JOHN BONNY, 51, an inmate of the House. Mr Dyke, the Master, stated that deceased was admitted on September 27th, he was very ill then, and was at once placed in the Hospital under the care of Dr Thomas, who afterwards stated that deceased had died from blood-poisoning, consequent on contact with a sister suffering from erysipelas. Mr Manning, Coroner's Officer, stated that he had visited deceased's home, and found six people living in one room, and typhoid fever in the house. He had not, therefore, called the mother to give evidence. A verdict in accord with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 October 1887
GEORGEHAM - "Accidentally Drowned" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Georgeham yesterday on the body of WILLIAM LEY, fisherman. The deceased was fishing with a man named Shapland, when he stepped into a pit and was carried off his feet into the sea. Shapland had a narrow escape, being unconscious for some time after he was rescued.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 October 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday into the cause of death of ROBERT CORKER SIMMONS, shipbuilder, 83 years of age, 11 Clowance-street, who died suddenly between twelve and one o'clock on Friday. According to the evidence of MRS SIMMONS, deceased, who enjoyed excellent health, went for a walk on Friday morning. He was brought home in a cab about one o'clock, apparently dead. Joseph Smerdon, 20 Prospect-row, a painter, said he was passing by Raglan Barracks when he observed deceased fall. He went to his assistance and deceased died in his arms. Dr Harrison, who was sent for, considered that deceased had been dead a few minutes, and attributed death to the sudden failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the cold north-easterly wind. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 October 1887
PLYMOUTH - Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital yesterday relative to the death of FLORENCE COCKWELL, of Shaftesbury-cottages, aged 3 years, who died on the previous day. SARAH JANE COCKWELL, mother of the deceased sated that on Sunday, about half-past one, she was in the kitchen. The child was thee with several others playing round the table, and fell into a pan of boiling water which witness had previously strained from a saucepan. The child screamed, and witness went to her and found her clothes drenched and steaming. She was taken to the Hospital. Amelia Dew, nurse in the Children's Ward in the Hospital, stated that the child was brought in at two p.m. on Sunday and was examined by the house-surgeon. On Monday at eleven a.m. violent convulsions set in and at twelve o'clock the child died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News Thursday 20 October 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death Of A Diver At Devonport. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, touching the death of ALBERT JOSEPH COOK, aged 24, who resided in Hobart-street, Stonehouse and who met with his death early on Monday afternoon last whilst diving in the Hamoaze off the gunnery ship Cambridge, to which he belonged. Besides being an able-bodied seaman, deceased was trained and thoroughly competent diver. - Louis Barber, instructing gunner, stated that he was in charge of a diving party on Monday afternoon last. Deceased received orders from him to go to the bottom, search for a sword bayonet, and clear the descending line which had fouled. Deceased went to the bottom, the water being about nine fathoms deep, and signalled "all right." Deceased had been down about ten minutes and then signalled to come up. When he had been drawn up five fathoms, witness signalled to him, but received no answer. The deceased was immediately pulled up the remainder of the distance. This was a very unusual way for deceased to come up, his habit being to pull himself up hand over hand, when the duty of those in charge of the apparatus was merely to take in the slack rope. When witness found that they had to pull deceased up he immediately suspected that something was wrong with him. The glass from deceased's helmet was at once undone on his coming to the surface, and immediately blood came from his mouth. The fleet surgeon was at once sent for, and was in attendance almost directly. He found that the man was quite dead. The body was taken to the Hospital, and at the direction of the Coroner, a post-mortem examination was made. The medical evidence shewed that death had resulted from asphyxia. Barber, being questioned, added that the apparatus was tested in the presence of deceased, who, before he descended, expressed himself perfectly satisfied that everything was all right. Witness could not account for the fatality except that deceased might have over- exerted himself, a very easy thing to do under such great pressure as exists under water; or he might have stooped too much and his blood rushed into his head. There was nothing unusual in divers bleeding from the mouth and being faint when they were pulled up. "Death from Natural Causes" was the finding of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 October 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Alleged Starvation At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr Potter was Foreman, were engaged for four hours yesterday afternoon in investigating the cause of death on Thursday of a girl named ELLEN BORLASE, 10 years of age, living with her father, and stepmother at 7 St Levan's-road, Ford. - Mr Vaughan, in opening the Inquiry, said the case was a somewhat peculiar one, and it had exercised his judgment to some considerable degree. It appeared that a letter from Dr George Budd, of Stonehouse, was sent to the Mayor (Mr J. W. W. Ryder), addressed "Ker-street, Devonport," and marked "immediate - very urgent." The Mayor being in London, it was sent to the office of the Deputy Mayor (Mr A. Brickwood Hutchings.) Mr Hutchings being also away, his chief clerk opened the letter, and on seeing the nature of its contents sent it to him (the Coroner). Dr Budd, writing on Thursday from 1 Durnford-street, Stonehouse said:- The little girl BORLASE, concerning whom I wrote you some weeks ago, is, I regret to say, dead. She died this morning at No. 7 St. Levan's-road, Morice Town. You may remember that when the child was brought to me for examination I found a degree of emaciation altogether out of proportion to the amount of disease present. A few questions from me elicited from the aunt of the child herself a history of step-mother starvation. Whether the statements then made to me were true I know not. I, of course, have only to deal with the medical aspect of the case. The child's condition resembled that of starvation in all respects, and the amount of disease which I was able to detect so inadequately corresponded with the emaciation of the patient that I at once announced my inability to furnish a certificate of death in case the sad eventuality, which I apprehended, and which has since supervened, should occur. You have, sir, I understand, already taken some steps in the matter, and I believe I am acting rightly in placing the whole case in your hands. I have advisedly not myself communicated with the Coroner. The relatives sent, this morning, for a certificate of death, which I, of course, refused." - Continuing, the Coroner said he had no alternative, after reading the letter, but to summon a Jury and hold an Inquiry. He knew nothing further of the case. He had never seen Dr Budd in his life, although he knew him by repute to be eminent in his profession. As he said before, such a letter as he had received he was bound to act upon. He did not at that time know that either Dr Meeres or Mr Hall was concerned in the case and he requested Dr Budd to make a post-mortem examination. His officer had seen Mr Lynn (the head constable) who said that at the request of the Mayor he (Mr Lynn) with one of the relieving officers, saw the child at her home and Mr Lynn was satisfied that there was no starvation. Mr Vaughan further mentioned that his officer told him that Dr Meeres had given a certificate for the burial of the child and he thought, therefore, he would not be discharging his duty, where doctors differed, if the case were not decided by a Jury. - Jessie Amelia Horsham, residing in the same house as deceased, stated that she first saw her about three years since, when she looked "the very picture of health." In June last she was taken to her grandfather's house. She was very ill indeed, and was treated by Dr Rolston. She afterwards got much better. Subsequently deceased was taken to Mr Hall, of the Medical Aid Institution, in compliance with a wish on the part of the father. Mr Hall's medicine not agreeing with her, she was not taken to him again, but the grandfather gave her every nourishment. About five weeks ago she was taken to Dr Budd. Dr Meeres was called in to see the child three weeks since; he did not say what she was suffering from, but that he must communicate first with Dr Budd, and he would let them know. Witness went to Dr Budd for a certificate, but he said he could not give one. - By Dr Budd: She mentioned to him on one occasion that a lady said she saw the child go out into the lane and pick up some bread and eat it. Dr Budd also said it was quite right that the rumours which were about should be laid before the medical men who had been called in. The father wanted to have a doctor who did not know anything about the case. - By the Coroner: The rumour afloat was to the effect that the child had been starved. The deceased had been with the stepmother about four years, and she heard that the stepmother behaved very unkindly towards her. Witness had heard the father say he was at work and could not attend to the child. When the child came to the grandfather's house she had a nasty mark on the neck, where she said her stepmother had pinched her. There was another mark on her shoulder, where she said she had been beaten with a stick by her father. - Dr Edward Evan Meeres, of Plymouth, stated that the father of the deceased child called upon him on the 29th September, and asked him to visit the child, observing at the same time that Dr Budd was attending her. Witness saw the child the same evening. She was extremely thin and emaciated, the bowels were very large and hard and the legs dropsical. He had carefully examined the child and found no evidence of disease in the heart, liver, or kidneys. He had said in a letter to Dr Budd that there was disease of the mesenteric glands of the bowels. - By the Coroner: If the glands got enlarged the child would waste away. The appearances of the child were consistent with its having been starved, but these enlargements of the glands might arise from another cause. The father came to him for a certificate, and as he had no knowledge of the child having been ill-used he was bound to give it. - The Coroner: What is your opinion as to the cause of death? - Witness: Death occurred from starvation, caused by the state of the glands of the bowels, and lately independently of the food the child had taken. - The coroner said he did not blame witness for giving the certificate, as he was acting within the scope of his duty. - Ada Horsham, aunt to the deceased, stated that the child told her that her stepmother never gave her sufficient to eat, and very often if she did not finish her work by nine o'clock she was sent to school without breakfast. Sometimes the child felt too ill to do anything, and then she was locked up in a cupboard and kept on bread and water. Witness took the child to Dr Budd about five weeks ago. He examined her, and after asking witness questions said the child had been starved. During the last three weeks the father visited his child often, but previously to that only occasionally. The father was a boiler-maker and was in receipt of 32s. a week. There were two other children. - Mr G. R. Hall, surgeon, stated that the deceased came to the Medial Aid Institution in March last. She was suffering from slight bronchitis, and there were symptoms of indigestion and diarrhoea. After examination he came to the conclusion that the child had consumption of the bowels, which would produce symptoms of starvation. About a month since the father of the child came to him, and said he did not think she would recover, and that "it would come to an Inquest." On the recommendation of witness the father sent for Dr Meeres, of Plymouth. - Dr George Budd, of Stonehouse, said the deceased was in a state of extreme emaciation. The skin was livid, the extremities were cold, and the child was in a critical state. On examination he found slight dullness over the right lung, and enlargement of the mesenteric glands. There was undoubtedly disease of those glands, a disease known as tabes mesenterica, but the amount of disease present did not, in his opinion, adequately account for the extreme waste and emaciation of the patient's body. Witness told the aunt that in case the worst should happen he should not be able to give a certificate of death. As the result of the post-mortem examination he found that the heart was sound. He found slight tubercle in the right lung, with pleuritic adhesions around. The mesenteric glands were tubercular and had undergone caseous degeneration. All the cavities of the body what he examined were dropsical. The body was entirely fatless. His opinion was that the deceased died from consumption of the bowels, accelerated by want and inanition, if, indeed, it did not result from inanition or starvation. - The Coroner: According to the medical aspect of the case, and according to the evidence laid before me, the child has been starved. Now, if the child has been starved, sent out of doors in cold weather insufficiently clothed, and otherwise neglected, do you not think that that would be very likely indeed to bring about the disease you have been describing? - Witness: I do, sir. - The Coroner asked witness his reason for communicating with the Mayor, when this was a case for the Coroner. - Dr Budd said he thought the Mayor might think it right to employ some medical man to make enquiries. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he had no doubt, if it was thought desirable to adjourn this case, his officer would be able to get additional evidence. The Jury might have a strong conviction, and they were entitled to express it by their verdict. But the question was whether the evidence would justify a conviction for manslaughter. He did not believe it would. If the Jury wished to have the opinion of an independent medical man they could have it, but he did not think it was any use, as Dr Budd, Dr Meeres, and in the main, Mr Hall, were agreed upon the disease which caused the child's death. Having pointed out the difficulty of getting evidence which would satisfy a Jury of assize, and the discredit that would attach to a Coroner if a case were sent for trial on insufficient evidence, the Coroner said he wished he could suggest to them a verdict which might punish those who were possibly guilty. Apart from the legal aspect, he thought the stepmother should at least be very severely censured. (Loud cries of hear, hear, from the Jury.) - A Juryman thought a verdict of wilful murder should be returned against the stepmother. - The Coroner said no such verdict could be returned on the evidence submitted. - The Foreman thought they might return a verdict of manslaughter against both the father and stepmother, and about ten hands were held up in support of that view. - The Coroner pointed out that they were not unanimous. If the Jury thought of passing a verdict of manslaughter he should ask them to adjourn the case for more evidence. - The Jury consulted in private for a few minutes and eventually the Inquiry was adjourned until eleven a.m. on Wednesday next at the Guildhall, the Coroner saying he wished the father to have time to get a solicitor to represent him at the adjourned Inquiry.

EGG BUCKLAND - The Shooting Accident At Saltram. The Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon into the facts attending the death of MR PERCY LEIGHT-HAY CLARK, of Paignton, who was accidentally shot on the Saltram estate while out sporting with a party of gentlemen on Thursday, under circumstances fully described in yesterday's Western Morning News. The Jury met at the Earl of Morley's lodge, Longbridge, whither the unfortunate gentleman was conveyed just after the accident, and where he died. Mr W. P. Vosper was chosen Foreman and after viewing the body the Inquest was adjourned to the Rising Sun Inn, Crabtree. - MR ARCHIBALD CLARK, brother of the deceased, identified the body. He said his brother, who was 36 years of age, was a captain in the militia and a funded proprietor. He left his home at Paignton on Wednesday to join a shooting party at Sir Thomas Freake's, Saltram. He understood guns, and was a fairly good sportsman. - John Stanbury, of Ridgway, said he went out with the shooting party on Wednesday as a brusher. They started at 11.30 a.m., and by 4.30 they arrived within a short distance of Marsh Mills Railway Station. Here he was asked by Mr Lockyer, Sir Thomas Freake's head game-keeper, to go back to MR CLARK, who was about twenty yards behind, and take that gentleman's gun. He did so, and just after he took hold of the gun it exploded, and MR CLARK immediately fell to the ground about a foot from witness. The gun was handed to him sideways, the triggers of both barrels being up, but how the gun went off he could not explain, except that the trigger caught in a bush near by. After handing witness the gun, MR CLARK moved a little, which placed him before the muzzle. Cross-examined: Witness stated he had full charge of the gun at the time it exploded. He took hold of it just behind the stock, close by the trigger-guard, but did not in any way meddle with the triggers. - Thomas Lockyer, gamekeeper, said he had been out shooting with the deceased previously. MR CLARK was a fairly good sportsman, and was extremely fond of shooting, but was one who would not think he was running great risk by passing a gun to another with the triggers cocked. And in this he was not alone; for he (witness) had seen many gentlemen do the same thing while out shooting. Immediately the report of the gun reached him he looked round and saw MR CLARK first crouch down in a sitting posture and then fall over on his back. He ran to him and supported his head, when deceased looked up and said, "It is a pure accident." Witness explained that just before the accident it was decided to finish the day's sport, and the guns had all been collected and the cartridges removed, when one of the dogs appeared to have found scent a little way off, and MR CLARK caught his gun, reloading it, and rushed to the spot thinking he might get another shot. This accounted for his being a short distance behind the others, and offering the opportunity for Stanbury to go back to fetch the gun. At the time the gun exploded the deceased was quite clear of the wood. - Mr W. D. Stamp, surgeon, of Plympton, said he was on the scene of the accident a few minutes after it occurred. Immediately he saw MR CLARK he knew by his face that the accident was dangerous. He had him at once removed to the Saltram lodge, where he examined the wound. The charge entered the body on the left side just above the hip-bone, making a hole, about the size of a five shilling-piece, through which a large quantity of the bowels protruded. The immediate cause of death was shock to the system caused by the injury and the loss of blood. Witness remained with him up to the time he died. Deceased was conscious to within a few moments of his death. Witness was quite convinced that the explosion of the gun was the result of an accident, or the wound would have been in another part of the body. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the facts before them were extremely painful, but they were very simple, and he did not think the Jury would experience any difficulty in coming to a decision. He therefore would not trouble them with his opinion on the case, but would at once submit the evidence to their consideration. - Without any hesitation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Coroner said this was quite in accordance with his own view of the case. He would ask them before they parted to empower him to convey their sympathy and condolence to deceased's widow and family in the sad loss under such distressing circumstances. The Jury having concurred with this suggestion, Capt. Dick, R.M.L.I., who was present on behalf of the friends, said that although no relation of the deceased he had known him from a boy, and he could vouch for the fact that MRS CLARK and all her family and friends would greatly appreciate the expression of sympathy with them in their sad bereavement.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 October 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - On Saturday Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Stoke bon the body of CATHERINE HOLLYWOOD, 49, living at 67 Tavistock-road, who died suddenly at five o'clock on Friday morning. ISAAC HOLLYWOOD, the deceased's husband, said his wife had lately complained of debility, but had not had a doctor for over twelve months. Shortly before three o'clock on Friday morning she complained of feeling very unwell. Witness applied a mustard plaster to her chest, as she was taken with a wheezing in her throat. Nothing seemed to relieve her, and a cup of coffee prepared she was unable to swallow. Dr Rae was sent for, but deceased expired before he came. As a result of a post-mortem examination, Dr Rae found that deceased suffered from weakness of the heart, and his opinion was that the cause of death was syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - The sudden death of General HENRY JOHN TEMPLER, at his residence at Mannamead on Thursday, was the subject of Inquiry by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) at Fern Hill, Hartley, on Saturday morning. Mr Veal was Foreman of the Jury. Deceased was sixty years of age, and had been a general in the Indian Army. Louisa Ellis, housemaid at Fern Hill, stated that he went to the bathroom about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon. At 5.30 she went to the door, but receiving no answer to her knocks, she called the gardener, Francis Spurr, who stated that he fetched Mr Lake's dairyman. They went into the bathroom and found the deceased in the bath, the water up to his arm-pits. He was lying against one end of the bath. Spurr fetched the doctor. Mr Aldous, surgeon, stated that the deceased's heart was very badly diseased, as well as both lungs - it was remarkable that he had lived so long. He undoubtedly died of heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Lady Leeds, sister of the deceased, has expressed her thanks to Mr H. Baskerville, the 'bus-conductor, who telegraphed for her. Had he not done so her ladyship would have been delayed one day.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 October 1887
PETER TAVY - Yesterday afternoon at Beardon Farm, Petertavy, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, an Inquest was held relative to the death of THOMAS JORDAN, aged 14. Deceased was working in the fields on Saturday last, driving a cart. He was riding on the shaft, and, as he was going through a gateway, the cart upset. Deceased fell under the vehicle and was crushed to death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The sudden death at Plymouth of a Royal Marine pensioner named JOHN PHILPOTT, aged 57, who lodged at No. 2, Bath-street, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry yesterday. Mrs Eliza Marsh, keeper of the Freemason's Arms beerhouse, No 2 Bath-street, deposed that the deceased had lodged at her house for two years, and, as far as she knew, he had no relatives in the district. He had been an invalid most of the time, and had frequently attended the Royal Naval Hospital. He had only been confined to his bed for a week previous to his death, and until half an hour before the time of death she saw no alteration in his state. Then she sent for Dr Pearce, who, however, did not come. Deceased was insured in the Prudential-office, the policy being granted in favour of witness. It was effected about 12 months past and now £24 was payable to her. Witness paid the premium and all expenses connected with the insurance. Eliza Lewis, a servant of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence, and said the deceased had every attention apart from having a medical man. Dr Thomas Pearce stated that he was called in to see deceased the 27th ult. He was suffering from chronic lung disease, and in an advanced stage of consumption. Witness prescribed for him and intended to call again, but understood that he was dead. He had no doubt that deceased died from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 October 1887
EXETER - Alleged Manslaughter At Exeter. - At Exeter yesterday the City Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquiry concerning the death of the female infant of MARY JANE HUNT, a domestic servant in the employ of the Rev. E. A. Firth, 19 Peamore-terrace, Pennsylvania. - Mr Firth said on Sunday his servant appeared unwell, and on Monday morning he was awakened by a noise in the room over his head. Mrs Firth went up and found that the girl had been confined. Dr Harris said he found the skull of the child fractured. The girl said this was caused by the child falling on the floor, but he did not believe that. The Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the mother of the child.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 October 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Alleged Starvation At Devonport. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - The adjourned Inquest as to the death of HELEN BORLASE, 11, child of WILLIAM JAMES BORLASE, was held at Devonport Guildhall yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner. Mr Percy t. Pearce appeared for the father. The evidence of Jessie Amelia Horsham, Ann Horsham, Dr Meeres, Mary Linton and George R. Hall was read over, and additional questions were asked. - Jessie A. Horsham said that when she saw her niece in January 1884 - soon after the death of her mother - she was plump and healthy. Three years afterwards she saw that she had been ill-used and there were marks on her body. She had not grown at all since she saw her previously, and she wore the same clothes as then. - Dr Meeres said that when the mesenteric glands were enlarged - as in the present case - whatever food was taken, the person would starve. She would always be hungry; whatever she ate she would continue to get thin. Tabes mesenterica (consumption of the bowels) occurred in persons who were healthy and well fed, but in such a case the patient might live longer. The disease might be initiated by bad or insufficient food. He had given a certificate giving the cause of death as consumption of the bowels and the child had all the appearance of starvation as the cause of it. - George R. Hall said there were causes of the disease independent of starvation. - Dr Budd said the amount of disease in the child was not sufficient to account for her condition. The degeneration of the glands of the bowels would prevent the assimilation of food in a certain degree, but he had never seen a case of the kind in which so much waste was apparent. If the disease progressed the child would starve, but he did not think it would ever become so fatless as was the case from the disease itself - the patient generally died before all the fat was gone. Deficiency of nourishment might be the cause of the disease. He saw the girl five weeks before death, but did not visit her again. He examined her and considered her case hopeless. He was kept apprised of her state and prescribed for her treatment. He could not tell the cause of the disease, but its growth would be favoured by bad food or the lack of any, bad air, and hereditary tendencies. It would be brought on by any of the causes which gave rise to scrofulous diseases, but she would be unlikely to take the disease from a nurse suffering from that disease. Had he not seen the child before death, on examination he should have stated the cause of death to have arisen from consumption of the bowels, adding his surprise at the extraordinary absence of fat. - John Richard Williams said that MR BORLASE lodged in his house two years ago. He often heard the sound of blows in the morning before breakfast, applied, he supposed, to some part of the girl's body, as she screamed. At last he threatened to acquaint the magistrates with the facts. BORLASE then told him that the child stole things from them. The stepmother said further that she had stolen some cold stew that had been put away for the next days' dinner. Witness said she must be very hungry, or she would not have done such a thing. He had seen her washing potatoes in the winter with her hands covered with chilblains. She was scantily clothed, and was made to carry loads too heavy for her strength. - William Down deposed that BORLASE lived in his house sixteen months ago. His child was delicate and over-worked. He never saw her ill-treated otherwise, though he had watched. - Phoebe Williams stated that she had often seen the child go to school with tears in her eyes. She had picked up crumbs to eat that had been thrown out for the fowls. Her hands were often bleeding when washing the potatoes in the yard, and her feet were also very bad. - Caroline Furneaux said she had given the child two meals a day for three months. She was very hungry, but she soon grew fatter. Her father asked witness not to give her anything, as she was a thief, and a liar. The stepmother brought the girl into her house soon afterwards, and told witness not to give her food, as she had enough at home. When the mother appealed to the child for a confirmation of that statement, the girl replied "No!" - Mr Pearce then addressed the Jury. He said they must decide whether the child died from the disease sworn to by three medical men - consumption of the bowels - or whether death was caused directly or indirectly by some human being. Dr Meeres had stated that consumption of the bowels - from which the child died - would carry with it symptoms of starvation. Mr Hall corroborated this, and he felt that the Jury would hesitate before they contradicted those statements, and still longer before they attributed death to human agency. What evidence had they to shew that consumption of the bowels had been brought on by neglect? From June last the child had been with her grandfather, and it was admitted, well fed. Five weeks before death Dr Budd saw it in the commencing stage of consumption - that was some weeks after it had left its father's house, where it was alleged to have been improperly cared for and ill-fed. He submitted, however, that there was no evidence that indirectly or directly the disease had been occasioned by this alleged treatment. Dr Budd, indeed, said that the state of emaciation in which the child was found must have been due to causes other than consumption of the bowels, but against this there was the evidence of Dr Meeres and Mr Hall which was that the appearance of the child after the post-mortem examination was such as to justify their opinion that she died from consumption of the bowels. Dr Meeres saw the child last - three weeks before death - and was satisfied that she suffered from the disease and when asked, gave a certificate to that effect. Mr Williams's evidence referred to so distant a period that it was impossible the cause of a disease could have arisen then, when it was only in its commencing stages five weeks before death. He contended that consumption of the bowels was undoubtedly the cause of death - medical evidence proved that beyond doubt. They might consider the conduct of the parents reprehensible, but they had heard one side of the case only. Their evidence, if he brought it forward, might put another light on the matter. He asked them to consider dispassionately the evidence brought before them, and give a verdict according to the facts of the case. - The Coroner, in summing up, went through the deposition papers and quoted the substance of the evidence of each witness. He dwelt on the extreme emaciation referred to by Dr Budd, and the various bits of evidence on the cruelty and privation to which the child was alleged to have been subjected. There had been a little conflict in the medical evidence. BORLASE, when taxed with beating his child, did not deny the charge, but justified it. The fact of the child stealing the stew seemed to shew that it was driven by hunger to do so. There was no direct evidence, however, to convict the parents, and if there were a doubt they should give the parents the benefit of it. If they censured the parents they knew not how to apportion that censure - whether the father or the stepmother was the most to blame. - Having retired for ten minutes, Mr N. J. Potter, Foreman of the Jury, said they unanimously agreed that the child died from consumption of the bowels, brought on by starvation and continuous neglect on the part of those who should have nourished her, and they therefore returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against the father and stepmother." - WILLIAM JAMES BORLASE and ANN SOPHIA BORLASE were then committed to take their trial at the next Assizes at Exeter. Bail was allowed. The Inquiry did not conclude until after seven o'clock, having began at eleven. The greatest interest was manifested throughout the Inquiry by the neighbours of MR and MRS BORLASE, the father and stepmother of the deceased child. Many females were in court during the whole of the Inquest, and when the verdict of manslaughter was announced there was loud applause, which the Coroner immediately suppressed, threatening that the court should at once be cleared if there were any further manifestations. Outside the Guildhall there had been a crowd of persons nearly the whole day, and about six o'clock it was with difficulty that access could be got to the court. When the verdict of the Jury was known the crowd became so threatening in their manner that the Police deemed it inadvisable to allow MR and MRS BORLASE to leave for their home at Pym-street, Morice Town. They were accordingly kept at the Guildhall until nine o'clock, when the night section of the Police came on duty. A cab was then obtained, and, escorted by a number of constables, MR and MRS BORLASE were driven through the town, the mob following and indulging in hostile demonstrations against the occupants of the vehicle. When Pym-street was reached, the Police had a most difficult and trying task to protect the parents of the deceased girl from being mal-treated by the mob which surrounded the house. Stones were flung at the cab, and one passed through one window and out at the other, without, however, doing any injury to those inside. Under these circumstances, Sergeant Clarke, who was in charge of the escort, ordered the Police to draw their staves. This had the desired effect of frightening the job, who were at last dispersed, but not before they had vented their indignation in howls and groans.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 October 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of JOHN PUGSLEY, aged six years, son of a joiner living at 4 Summerland-crescent. The evidence shewed that the deceased's elder brother (aged 18) was playing with him on Tuesday week. He put the deceased on his shoulder and the little boy slipped out of his grasp, falling the other side and itching on his head. The deceased cried, and said "O, my head." Dr Mortimer stated that the deceased died of inflammation of the brain. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 November 1887
PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest at Plymouth yesterday on ELIZABETH NETHERTON, who had suffered from asthma. The Coroner thought the husband deserved censure for not having obtained medical advice.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Plymouth yesterday on the death of HENRY VARCOE, 71, a superannuated dockyardsman. Deceased's daughter, Mrs Neil, and Mary Coombe deposed to his having fallen backward when going upstairs, and then becoming unconscious. Dr Keilly stated that VERCOE died from concussion of the brain nine days afterwards. "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 November 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Excessive Drinking At Devonport. - The sudden death of a widow named BETSY MCEWEN, 54 years of age, formed the subject of Inquiry by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, at the Ferry House Inn, Morice Town, yesterday. Ellen Harris, of 6 William-street, wife of a seaman, said the deceased was her aunt. She had had very good health until this week, when she felt the effects of a drinking bout. She was drinking for about three weeks until Thursday last. She had these drinking bouts very often. Sometimes she would go for a fortnight, sometimes for a month or two without drink, but when she started drinking, "She did drink." - The Coroner: Did not anyone tell her she was killing herself? - Witness: Yes, but she did not take any notice. The Coroner: I wish there was a law to compel them to take notice. - Continuing, witness said that the deceased, who was at the Steam Reserve public-house in William-street, was taken ill in the street on the previous day, and was with assistance removed to her home, 36 Moon-street. Deceased was the widow of a naval pensioner. - Eliza Channon, wife of a pensioner, deposed that she assisted the deceased to dress, and helped to bring her home. They had got her about three doors from the Steam Reserve public-house when a chair was procured and deceased was carried towards her home, but died in William-street before reaching it. She was very much given to drink. Witness did not expect that deceased would die so suddenly, as she appeared very cheerful when witness dressed her. - John Marks, Police Constable, proved assisting deceased to her home and communicating by telephone with Dr Row, who was in attendance a few minutes afterwards. Mr F. Everard Row deposed to making a post-mortem examination of the body. There was old disease of the right lung, acute inflammation of the left lung, with pleurisy, and inflammation of the bag of the heart, which contained a large amount of fluid. The liver, kidneys and stomach were diseased, due to alcohol. The immediate cause of death was syncope, from a large accumulation of water in the bag of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 4 November 1887
BIDEFORD - The Fatal Accident At Bideford. - Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquest at the Bideford infirmary touching the death of JOHN WALL, truck carman in the employ of the London and South Western Railway at Bideford Station, who suffered injuries from the effects of which he died within a few hours on Wednesday. Deceased, who had been for many years in the service of the company, and was a steady and esteemed man, was engaged in his usual work at the goods department of the Bideford Station when he fell under some trucks which he was shunting, and from which he had just detached the horses. One of his legs was almost severed from the body, and he was at once conveyed to the Infirmary, where he succumbed to the injuries he had received. Evidence shewing how the misfortune occurred was given by men engaged in the yard at the time, and who witnessed the occurrence. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased, who was a widower, leaves a family of several children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 November 1887
TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner held two Inquests at Torquay yesterday. The first, at the Torbay Hospital, was on the body of JOHN HARVEY, aged 21, who met with very serious injuries by a quantity of clay falling upon him, whilst he was at work in Webber and Stedham's brickyard, in Newton-road, three weeks ago. He sustained a fracture of the skull, from the effects of which he died in the Hospital on Monday night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased had been married only six months. The second Inquest was held at the Clarence Hotel, Torr, on the body of VICTOR REGINALD SNOW, aged four months, the son of ALBERT SNOW, manager of a boot and shoe establishment. The child, which had been weakly from its birth, was put out to nurse with Mr and Mrs Webber, of 3 Avenue-villas, Torre, owing to there not being sufficient accommodation at the parents' house. the child was put to sleep in a separate room, and it was found dead by Mrs Webber early on Monday morning. Mr T. Taylor, Foreman of the Jury, remarked upon it as a somewhat unnatural practice to have put a child of such tender age to sleep in a room by itself, but Mr Webber, whilst expressing dissent from this, stated that the child received every care. Dr Richardson suggested that death was due to inflammation of the lungs, and a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 November 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Exeter workhouse yesterday concerning the death of a man named JAMES BAKER, an inmate of the House. Deceased was 57 years of age, was admitted in 1879 and was an idiot. He was apparently in good health on Wednesday morning, but was afterwards found lying on his back in a fit. He seemed to be in a dying condition, and brandy was administered, but he succumbed. Dr Woodman said death was due to apoplexy or syncope. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 November 1887
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Near Plymouth. - Shortly after eleven o'clock yesterday morning an old man named JOHN SINGLETON, formerly a chemist, was found dead at Prince Rock, Cattedown, with a large wound in the side of his head, caused apparently by a shot from a pistol. An old-fashioned percussion lock pistol, with screw barrels was found under his body, and with this, it is supposed, a terrible wound about four inches in diameter was inflicted on the right side of the head, and death must have been instantaneous. - Subsequently an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner. - George Oldridge, labourer, living at No. 39 Clare-buildings, identified the body. Deceased was between 709 and 80 years of age, and witness believed he had at one time kept a druggist's shop at Newpassage., but for six months he had been lodging at the house of witness and had one room, living by himself. As far as witness knew he had no relatives, although Mr Hearder, chemist, Westwell-street, was kind to him. On the previous day deceased said he had been to Mr Hearder's and had received some money. Deceased was a sober man, and witness had never seen him drunk. He was out in witness's room on that evening and seemed much as usual, but complained of being unwell. Periodically he had fits of depression, but did not grieve over his having failed in business at Newpassage. Witness wished him good night and he went into his own room. At a quarter-past seven yesterday morning he asked witness to make him a cup of tea, which he had, with some bread and butter. He seemed all right then, and asked witness to cook him some herrings for his breakfast. Between half-past ten and eleven deceased said he was going into Plymouth, but witness did not notice anything in his hand. He went out, but shortly returned and asked witness to trim his whiskers, remarking that he should want his hair cut another time. He then went out and that was the last time witness saw him alive. He had paid up his rent regularly and on the previous day had paid the last instalment. witness knew that he had a pistol, but had never seen it. He fired off the pistol in the house some time ago, and the people wondered what was the matter, but nothing further came of it. He never said anything to lead witness to think he contemplated suicide. - George Rogers stated that yesterday morning, about half-past eleven, he was on the bank at Cattedown close to Prince Rock. He saw a body lying on the rubble bank about seven or eight yards off, and he called out. He went a little closer, and then saw the deceased lying in a pool of blood. He got the assistance of two men, who said he was dead. In about half-an-hour P.C. Coombes arrived and took charge of the body. There was no sign of the ground being town up or of a struggle having taken place. Witness had seen the deceased before, but not in the same place. - By the Foreman: About ten minutes before witness found the body he heard one discharge from a fire-arm, but could not tell whether it was from a pistol or gun. He saw no smoke, nor anyone about, as he was working in his garden. - P.C. Coombes, stationed at Harbour-avenue, said that about 12.35 p.m. he reached the rubble bank at Cattedown, and found the last witness and about a score of quarrymen, and in the midst saw the body lying on the ground. Deceased was lying on his right side, and witness turned him over and recognised him. He saw the pistol (Produced) on the ground. It was unloaded, but there was an exploded cap on the nipple. The weapon was lying quite close to the body, and near his right hand. The body was placed on a stretcher and removed to the mortuary. Witness found that deceased had a small bag, in which was a bottle marked "Laudanum; poison," but quite empty. There were also a Bible, a packet of large sized shot, a small packet of powder, some percussion caps, and a tobacco pipe. In his pocket there was 4 ½d. in coppers. - By the Foreman: Witness had not made inquiries where the ammunition was bought. The shot was wild goose, or buckshot. - This concluded the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said there were three questions for the Jury to decide. The first would be how the deceased came to his death. Beyond doubt he died from the effects of the gunshot wound, as the unusually large hole in the head proved. The next question was whether the man did it himself, but that, he thought, was fully proved by the position in which the pistol was found. It being directly under the body and close to his hand, it was probable that it fell out of his hand and the deceased fell on it. The last question to decide was the state of deceased's mind at the time. Unfortunately they had very little evidence on that point, although the first witness told them that deceased got depressed at times. He should, however, leave that question to the Jury, but he could not help thinking that the man premeditated the fatal act, and probably, he having been a chemist, and knowing the nature of drugs, took a quantity of laudanum to deaden the nerves and allow him to shoot himself in such a determined manner. - The Jury, of whom Mr Samuel Leach, was Foreman, returned a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 November 1887
BIDEFORD - Mysterious Death At Bideford. - "Found Dead" was the verdict returned by the Jury at Bideford on Saturday evening, at an Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of MRS ELLIS, of Powe Refreshment Rooms, near the market. Evidence was given by a charwoman as to deceased's general state of health, by the daughter and husband of deceased, and by Mr Duncan, surgeon. Deceased was found dead in her bedroom on Saturday morning, lying on the floor with her clothes on, and having been dead, according to the medical evidence, from eight to twelve hours. There was nothing to indicate the cause of death, no external marks of violence, and nothing to determine which of various causes produced death. Deceased had of late given away to excessive drinking, and had also been addicted to the use of cholorodyne and similar drugs. An empty bottle was found in her bed, but it is not known what the contents were. Deceased occupied a bedroom by herself. She was widely known and was formerly highly respected by a wide circle of farmers, market people and others. Her husband, on Friday, at the Bankruptcy Court at Barnstaple, assigned his wife's drinking habits as the cause of his unfortunate position in business matters. Some of the Jury at the Inquest were in favour of an adjournment for the purpose of a post-mortem examination, but on the room being cleared, and after a discussion among themselves, they came to the verdict stated above.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, held an Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday in reference to the sudden death of JOHN PARSONS, aged 65, marine pensioner, which occurred on Saturday evening last at No. 7 St. Paul-street. Mr Henry Bulteel, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of deceased's body, and had found haemorrhage resulting from rupture of a diseased blood vessel at the base of the brain, which he considered to be the immediate cause of death. The condition of the liver and kidneys was such as to predispose to death. The Jury found a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. Mr Rodd, addressing the Jury, said he had had personally to superintend the removal of the body on Saturday night to the mortuary, a step which Mr Bulteel had ordered and which the widow had opposed, and he asked the Jury to confirm his action. The Jury thought that the compulsory removal was quite justifiable under the circumstances, as it would have been quite unsafe to conduct a post-mortem examination in a room in which persons lived.

STOKE DAMEREL - The sudden death of CHARLES JOHNS, 34 years of age of 11 Milne-street, Devonport, was the subject of Inquiry by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, yesterday. According to the testimony of deceased's wife, JOHNS enjoyed pretty good health, and she did not observe that he suffered much from shortness of breath. He went out on Saturday afternoon to see the funeral of a volunteer. On returning home he complained of being unwell, and asked for a cup of tea. Shortly afterwards his wife noticed his head fall on one side, and before medical assistance could be obtained he expired. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Wilson, surgeon, who deposed that the heart was much diseased. Verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 November 1887
PLYMOUTH - A woman named ANN WATTS, aged 62, who resided at 8 Quarry-street, Stonehouse, died suddenly yesterday morning while engaged in her vocation as nurse at 43 New-street, Plymouth. She was sitting before the fire about six o'clock in the morning, when she suddenly fell off the chair. Medical assistance was sent for, and on Mr Cumming, surgeon, arriving soon afterwards he found that MRS WATTS was dead, and that heart disease was the cause of death. These facts were deposed to at an Inquest held last evening before Mr Coroner Brian, at the Three Crowns Hotel, and a verdict to the effect that Heart Disease was the cause of death was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 November 1887
PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Young Lady At Plymouth. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of FLORENCE MARGARET WEBB, daughter of MR F. J. WEBB, headmaster of Portland Grammar School, who died on the previous day. Mr George Moon was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The evidence shewed that the deceased was the third daughter of MR WEBB, and was 19 years of age. On October 6th, about 7.30 a.m., MR WEBB was called to the courtlage of the house and found his daughter lying prostrate on the flags. She was in great pain, unconscious and unable to get up. Drs. May and Jago were called in, and the deceased had lingered for six weeks. She slept in the top back room, the window of which was immediately over the place where she was found and about 25 feet high. MR WEBB visited the room shortly afterwards and found the window open, the lower sash being up. The window was a large one, and the upper sash not very accessible. He stood in front of the window and found that the sill was below his knee, and the bottom of the upper sash above his head, so that if a person had been standing with her back to the window there was nothing to save her from falling out. The deceased made a statement to her mother, in which she said that she was trying to open the upper sash of the window from the inside and found it stiff. She then threw up the lower sash and leaning backwards put her head out of the window to pull down the window from the outside, her face being towards the room. Deceased did not remember anything more until being examined two hours later by the doctors. She said she had been suffering from a severe headache that morning, but had done the same thing scores of times. From the evidence of Dr Jago it appeared that he, in conjunction with Dr May, made an examination of the deceased under the influence of methylene. They found that the right half of the pelvis was broken in two parts on the left side. The last bone of the spine was crushed, and deceased had, of course, lost all power in her legs, and as time went on the paralysis increased and she completely lost control of the lower parts of the body. Death resulted from those injuries which might have been caused by the fall. - Mr May (a Juror) asked the doctor whether he had the slightest doubt that the death was caused by the accidental fall from the window. - Dr Jago replied that he had not the least doubt. - Mr May: Then why could not the doctors have given a certificate of death? - The Coroner: It would have been of no use. The case must have come under my notice, and where the death has been caused by violence I am bound to hold an Inquest. - Mr May: But the doctor has been attending her daily for six weeks. Surely he would have been able to give a certificate? - The Coroner: It does not matter what number of weeks elapse between the accident and the death. I have power to hold an Inquest if the death took place one year and two days after the accident. - The Foreman (Mr G. Moon) would like to know whether the Coroner had any power with regard to the Press. It seemed to him that a case like the present did not need to be reported. - The Coroner replied that he had not. The greatest facilities were given to the Press in Plymouth. Both the Press and legal gentlemen were allowed to be present at all Inquiries, and he thought most properly, as it was a free court. There was, he believed, an endeavour in another part of the country, on the part of a Coroner, to exclude the reporters from an Inquest, but he would never hold an Inquiry if the Press, which meant the public, were to be excluded from the Court. He certainly should not attempt to interfere with representatives of the Press, and he found from experience that if they tried to muzzle the Press they always made it ten times worse. Besides, he thought that if there were any rumours about with respect to the death of any person - and there nearly always were false rumours floating about, and he was sorry to say there were in the present case - that they were generally dissipated by the newspaper reports. - Mr T. Gray (another Juror) asked what objection there was in keeping it from the public. Why should they have any Inquest at all? If the doctor had given a certificate of death, he (Mr Gray) would have been quite satisfied that death resulted in a legitimate manner. - The Coroner could not agree with Mr Gray. Sometimes they had a case where persons had thrown themselves out of windows, so that if the doctors had given certificates the cases would have been passed over with the same. - The Foreman said that, knowing the deceased as well as he did, he might say that she was the very brightest of girls, and not in the least likely to attempt anything of the kind. He thought he ought to say that, as the Coroner had alluded to the subject. - The Coroner had thought that matter beneath their consideration altogether, or he would have spoken to them fully on the subject. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Foreman said that everyone of them felt that the least they could do was to tender their sincere sympathy and condolence with the family in their very sad bereavement and that the Jury did most willingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 November 1887
NEWTON ABBOT - Mr Hacker, County Coroner, last evening opened an Inquest at the Newton Cottage Hospital as to the cause of the death of JOHN HOBBS, a clay miner, 45 years of age, who died that morning from injuries received through a quantity of clay falling on him in a mine at Kingsteignton on the previous day. Evidence of identity was given, and the Inquiry was then adjourned until Thursday next to allow Mr Pinching, the district inspector of mines, an opportunity of attending. Another man, named Partridge, is still in the Hospital suffering from injuries received at the same time.

PLYMOUTH - The death of a seaman named PATRICK BURKE, aged 26, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at Plymouth last evening. The evidence shewed that the deceased landed from the vessel Chinsorah on Sunday evening last and went to the Sailors' Home. On Tuesday he was paid off, and gave Captain Phillips 30s. to pay his passage to Dublin, besides 12s., the cost of his board and lodging until yesterday. He appeared in excellent health and on Wednesday evening went to bed as usual at eleven o'clock. On the following morning he went downstairs at half-past six and obtained a glass of water and at ten o'clock he was found in his room dead. Dr Lucy made a post-mortem examination and found that there were both valvular disease and fatty degeneration of the left side of the heart. Death was attributable to failure of the heart's action, which was a comparatively slow death, and not sudden, the heart having probably been labouring for several hours. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 November 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Burns At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, Inquired with a Jury yesterday into the cause of death of an infant named ANNIE LOUISA KNOWLES, who was admitted to the Royal Albert Hospital on Sunday morning suffering from serious burns. - MARY ANN KNOWLES, 18 Cherry Garden-street, the mother, said that the child died that morning in the Hospital about half-past eight. It was seven months old. On Sunday morning, about ten o'clock, witness left it sitting in a low chair, about two yards from the fire, whilst she went into the yard. she was not away two minutes when her little boy, who had been left with deceased, came running out and called her. Witness ran in and found the child in flames. There was no one else in the room but the little boy and witness could not explain how the accident occurred, unless the little boy did it; she felt confident no one but herself went into the room. Witness asked the boy how it happened, but he could not say anything. The child, when witness saw it on fire, was still sitting in the chair in the position in which witness had left it. It was on fire all over, and the flames rose above its head. The fire in the grate was a low one, and there was no paper about the room. When witness left the room her little boy was playing with his sister, running about the room. Witness had never known the boy to play with fire. The child could not get at any matches, which were kept in a cupboard. Something dropped off the child on to the rug as witness ran out of the room with it; it might have been paper. The child was burnt all over the body, and on one side of its face. Witness heard the deceased cry from the court. She took the chair and child into the street all burning as it was, as she was frightened, and did not know what to do. Witness was not much burnt herself. Her husband was across the road at the time of the accident, and came to her assistance, when he heard what had happened. - JOHN KNOWLES, father of the deceased, deposed to taking the child to the Hospital. Richard Rook, 66 St Aubyn-street, wood and coal dealer, deposed that he saw the child in flames, which he helped to extinguish by taking off his coat and wrapping round the child. The Jury found that the child was Accidentally Burned to Death, the Foreman, Mr Murch, expressing their sympathy with the parents.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 November 1887
TAVISTOCK - Gored To Death By A Bull. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Mutley Cottage, near Tavistock, yesterday, concerning the death of JAMES STEVENS, an agricultural labourer, 56 years of age, who died on the previous day from injuries inflicted upon him by a bull belonging to his employer, Mr T. Roskilly, of Mutley Farm. Evidence was given by William Smale, a youth, that on Monday afternoon the deceased was directed by Mr Roskilly to remove two bulls from one of his fields into a shippen. On STEVENS entering the field one of the bulls suddenly turned upon him and charging him violently, knocked him to the ground, where he lay helpless. Smale ran off for assistance, and, returning with Mr Roskilly and others, the attention of the bull was diverted by a couple of dogs being set at it, whilst the unfortunate man was removed to his home, where he subsequently died. Mr Roskilly stated that the bull was not wicked or considered dangerous, and that the deceased, who had been in his employ since April, had had its management for months past. He added that the animal was now chained up, and would be slaughtered. Mr Theed, surgeon, of Tavistock, who attended STEVENS, stated that his chest was smashed in, most of his ribs being broken. Mr H. Legassick, the Foreman of the Jury, mentioned that a few days since he crossed the field in which the animal was grazing and it then shewed no desire to attack him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 25 November 1887
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held last evening at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, Plymouth, before Mr T. C. Brian, touching the death of ANNE KITTLE, aged 78, at 24 Looe-street, the circumstances of whose sudden death on Wednesday were reported yesterday. Mr C. H. Cuming, medical officer for the southern district of Plymouth, who visited deceased after death, and who had professionally attended her some ten or twelve months previously, said he was satisfied that death had been from natural causes - probably apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

NEWTON ABBOT - At the Newton Townhall yesterday afternoon, Mr S. Hacker, county Coroner, resumed the Inquiry into the death of JOHN HOBBS, a clay miner, who died on Friday last at the Newton Cottage Hospital from injuries received whilst at work in a clay mine at Kingsteignton on the 17th inst. A man named Partridge was also injured at the same time, and is not yet able to leave the Hospital to give an account of how the accident happened. Consequently the Inquiry was again adjourned for a week to allow of his attendance. Mr Pinching, district inspector of mines, was present yesterday. The deceased man sustained a dislocation of the left thigh and severe bruises on his chest (the latter being pinched together) and several ribs were broken.

STOKE DAMEREL - The death of an infant named RICHARD JEWELL was the subject of an Inquiry at Devonport yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner. MARY ANN JEWELL said deceased was the second child of hers which an Inquest had been held. The first child died at the age of seven weeks from inflammation of the lungs and overfeeding. The deceased in the present instance was three months old. She had fed it on biscuits from its birth. It was in its usual health on the previous day and about half-past six yesterday morning was found dead in bed. The husband having given corroborative evidence, Mr J. R. Rolston, jun., surgeon, said he had examined the child and found that it was very poorly nourished, and had an enlarged abdomen. In his opinion death was caused by convulsions due to intestinal irritation, brought on by badly-chosen food. The Coroner commented on the circumstance of two children of the same parents dying from the same cause, and reminded the mother that on the previous occasion he had warned her on the subject of feeding infants. He thought it was a popular delusion that there was more nutriment in bread or biscuits than in milk. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 November 1887
ILFRACOMBE - The Ilfracombe Boat Accident. - An Inquest on the body of WILLIAM THOMAS LOCK, who was drowned on Friday with Richard Lovering, by the capsizing of a fishing boat, was held by Dr J. Slade-Kind, Deputy Coroner, at Ilfracombe on Saturday evening. The body was identified by WILLIAM LOCK, the father. Deceased was 26 years of age. - Nicholas Lovering, fisherman, stated, that he was by the "buggy" pits under Hele when his mate heard something, and they saw a man floating on some nets. They hauled in their net and made in the direction of the man, who was about thirty fathoms off. They shouted to him to keep his heart up, as they were coming. When within ten fathoms of the man they lost sight of him. They pulled to the spot, put the paddle down and turned him up, entangled in the nets. John Comer, another boatman, then came up to assist, and eventually they got the man into Comer's boat. Witness's man went in the boat to help, and they pulled off to Ilfracombe. He believed LOCK was dead when he was put into the boat. John Comer, boatman, corroborated and Dr Copner proved death to have been caused by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of " Death by Drowning," but said they had no evidence to shew how deceased got into the water. The Jury gave their fees to the widow of the deceased. The boat in which he went to sea has not been seen, nor has the body of Lovering, the other boatman, been found.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 November 1887
SALCOMBE - Important Inquiry At Salcombe. - Within the past few weeks two deaths of young children have occurred at Salcombe without either of the cases being attended by a medical man until later than he should have been called in. In the first case the Coroner decided to hold no Inquiry on a special report being submitted to him by a medical man, but in the second case, which occurred on Thursday, the Coroner decided to hold an Inquiry, which took place on Saturday afternoon before Dr Donald Fraser, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr W. S. Hannaford was Foreman. The child was named ROSALINE SYMONS, was 3 ½ years old, and was the daughter of a shipwright in Devonport Dockyard. The mother of the child, LAURA SYMONS, said it had never been very strong, but was taken ill last Thursday week. She went to Mr Balkwill, chemist, of Salcombe, and got a powder for the child from the assistant. About an hour after taking the powder she appeared better, and passed a comfortable night. On Friday she complained of her eyes feeling as if dust was in them, and witness again went to the chemist and asked him to visit the child, which he did. He said she was very tight in her breath. He did not feel her pulse or examine her chest, and merely said witness was to apply poultices, for the child had a touch of bronchitis and a little inflammation. On the following Sunday measles appeared, and witness administered some brandy and water and saffron tea. On Tuesday the measles seemed to die away and the child appeared better, but still had a cough, with a rattle in the throat. She had difficulty in breathing, but witness did not think it anything dangerous. She was satisfied with Mr Balkwill's attendance. She did not see any danger until Wednesday night, when she did not like the look of the child, and sent for Mr Balkwill's assistant. On his arrival he advised her to send for a doctor, which she did, but the child died at half-past three on Thursday morning. - The Deputy Coroner informed the mother that it was a very serious thing not to send for a medical man in a case of the kind, for it was absolutely incumbent upon a person having charge of a child under 14 years to send for a doctor on its becoming ill. - Margaret Friend, nurse, gave evidence as to the child's illness. On Wednesday night she was foaming at the mouth and crying. She told the mother she ought to have had a doctor before. - Alfred Twining, surgeon, said he was sent for about a few minutes before eleven on Wednesday night to see the child. It was evidently very ill, having a severe attack of bronchitis. He told the mother the child could not live many hours, but promised to do what he could for it. He also told her that should the child die during the night he would be unable to give her a certificate. He gave instructions as to treatment, but the next morning he was informed the child was dead, and he refused to give a certificate, saying that the Coroner must be communicated with. - Arthur Thomas said he had been an assistant with Mr Balkwill, chemist, for eight years. He had never passed any examination. He had not been in the habit of going out to see patients. The first time he attended the child was on the previous Tuesday evening, but Mr Balkwill had been attending it before. From what he saw he considered the child was suffering from bronchitis but he made no examination. The first time he went he prescribed for the child, but on his second visit she had not taken the medicine, and he then told the mother to have a doctor. - The Deputy Coroner told witness that it was against the law for a chemist to prescribe, and he had no right to visit the sick child. - One of the Jury asked witness whether he followed Mr Balkwill's prescription or his own in the mixture he sent. - Witness replied that he did the same as he had been doing for others suffering from measles attended with a cough. He described this prescription. - The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, said the cause of death was quite clear, but he warned the public against the error of thinking that if it was only measles children were suffering from it they kept them warm it would be all right. It often happened that other effects followed the measles. In this case the mother had trusted in the chemist's advice, and had done for the child according to his prescription. The mother was much to blame in not sending for a doctor earlier when she saw how ill the child was. He drew attention to the responsibility resting on parents and guardians of young children, for they were bound to send for a doctor on a child becoming ill. Mr Balkwill was a chemist and he had no right to prescribe and by his presence in the house of the parents had taken upon himself a responsibility he had no right to do. He should decidedly be cautioned for taking upon himself functions he ought not to. If the chemist had refused to attend the child when sent for, the mother would have had to send for a doctor. It was reasonable to suppose that if the mother had been advised soon enough the ailment from which the child died might have been averted. Clearly the case was left too long without medical advice. - The Foreman of the Jury asked Mr Twining whether he found fault with the prescription of Mr Balkwill. - Mr Twining said he did not. but it was a prevailing opinion in that district that if the doctor saw a patient alive he was bound to grant a certificate. That, however, was a delusion, for if a doctor saw a patient only in the last hours of illness, it was questionable whether he had any right to give a certificate. - The Jury returned a verdict that the child died from "Natural Causes." - The Deputy Coroner asked the Jury whether they desired to add any caution to their verdict: - The Jury thought the publicity given to the case would serve the purpose. - The Deputy Coroner hoped it would be a warning to others, for it was a great error to consider measles a trivial thing.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 December 1887
BRIXHAM - A singular death of a child at Brixham occupied the attention of Mr Coroner Hacker and a Jury at Brixham yesterday. The deceased, IDA DIZNEY, who was 14 days old and a healthy child, was the daughter of WILLIAM DIZNEY, a fisherman. On Saturday evening the mother went out to buy meat, leaving the infant asleep on the bed in the room in which her husband was sitting. She was away only a few minutes, and when she returned she found her husband lying on the bed asleep, with his little girl in his arms. On taking up the baby she found it was dead. A doctor was sought, and he pronounced that the child had died from suffocation. It would seem that the husband rolled over in his sleep and so caused the sad event which called the Jury together. The mother, in her evidence, said emphatically that her husband was sober, adding that he was tired after a hard day's work. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated." At the same time they expressed the opinion that the father ought to have been a little more careful.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 December 1887
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To A Horse-Breaker. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening relative to the death of PETER BUNKER, who was injured whilst riding a horse near Knackersknowle on the previous day, as already reported in the Western Morning News. Mr Martin was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - MARY EMMA BUNKER, widow of deceased, identified the body. Her husband was about 39 years of age, was a horse-breaker, and had been accustomed to horses from a lad. He left home on the previous day just before six o'clock in the morning, taking his dinner with him. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon she heard that he had met with an accident, and shortly afterwards he was brought home, but removed from thence to the Hospital. - Joseph Cox said that about a quarter-past two on the previous day he was at Mr Gloyn's stables at Efford. He saw the deceased, who was just mounting a horse for the purpose of going to Knackersknowle to meet Mr Gloyn. He was quite sober, and the saddle was fastened on all right. Deceased only said that he had plenty of time, and would walk up steadily. In about a quarter of an hour a Mr Gullett came to the stables riding the horse on which the deceased had gone away, and said that BUNKER had met with an accident. The horse was muddy on the left side. Witness got the trap ready and took the deceased to Plymouth. The horse was about five or six years old and properly broken. It was used by Mr Gloyn every day, and the deceased was in the habit of riding it. He had never known it trip. The saddle and bridle were not broken when Mr Gullett brought the horse back. - John Feyer, an artilleryman, stationed at Fort Efford, deposed that at 2.30 p.m. he was walking up a hill leading towards Egg Buckland, when he heard a horse coming along behind him at a walk. Suddenly, when the horse must have been close behind him he heard a fall, and then a groan. He at once ran back and saw the horse lying across the road, and the deceased was underneath. He got the animal up very quietly, and saw that the man was very much injured. He was bleeding from the head, nose and mouth and was unconscious. Witness fetched Mr Gullett, and eventually the man was taken in a trap to Plymouth. - The Coroner complimented Fryer on the way in which he had acted. - Reginald Lucy, House Surgeon at the Hospital, deposed that the deceased was received about half-past three. Witness examined him, and found him completely unconscious. He had a bruised wound on his left temple, a graze over the right knee, and two black eyes. From the symptoms witness would think there was a fracture at the base of the skull. He apparently had some injury of the spine, as he had no power over his arms and legs. He died the previous morning from injuries such as might have been caused by a fall from a horse. - In reply to the Coroner, Feyer said he did not know how the horse fell, but perhaps the deceased found himself slipping caught hold of the rein on one side and pulled the horse round. - The Coroner, in summing up, suggested that perhaps the deceased was seized with a fit and fell, the horse falling on him. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added a vote of sympathy with the widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 December 1887
DAWLISH - At Dawlish an Inquest was held before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on Monday evening, on the body of HERBERT CHARLES DART, the infant child of WILLIAM DART, a labourer. The evidence was that the child died from convulsions on Saturday evening. Mr A. de W. Baker, surgeon, stated that the child suffered from imperfect digestion, which he ascribed to biscuits being mixed with milk food, and the child not being naturally strong, its digestive organs were so impaired that it grew daily weaker, and pneumonia of one lung setting in was the immediate cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and intimated that it should be known that mixing biscuits with milk in the case of delicate children was injurious.

NEWTON ABBOT - Yesterday afternoon Mr Hacker, County Coroner, resumed the Inquest at the Newton Townhall, respecting the death of JOHN HOBBS, a clay miner, 45 years of age, who died from injuries received at a clay mine at Kingsteignton. Mr Pinching, inspector of mines, was unable to attend on account of illness, but Mr Foster, another inspector of mines was present. On the previous occasion the Inquiry was adjourned because a statement was made that the doctors were not prompt in their attendance on the deceased at the Hospital. Yesterday, however, evidence was given by Drs. Haydon, Grimbly and Davies, that everything was done that possibly could be; and the reason that the dislocated thigh was not set was that the man had not sufficiently recovered from the shock to the system to be given the anaesthetics which were necessary in the case. Mr Foster said that Mr Pinching greatly regretted that anything he had said should have been construed into a slur on the medical men of Newton. The Jury returned the verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider expressing the opinion that the Home Secretary should be asked to pass special rules under the Mines Regulations Act for the mines in the district, in regard to their timbering and general supervision.

PLYMOUTH - Death Of An Infant From Burns. - An Inquest was held yesterday evening at Mutley, Plymouth, before the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, relative to the death of BLANCHE MAY MACEY, aged one year and seven months, the daughter of the REV. T. S. MACEY, Cheltenham-place. - The father said that the family were at dinner on Friday, when the child got down from the table and went out of the room, walking alone for the first time in her life. He asked whether anyone was in the kitchen adjoining, but before he could be answered heard the child cry. He ran into the kitchen and saw deceased alone, leaning with the palms of her hands on the plate of the kitchen stove, in which there was a moderate fire. The child did not seem to have sufficient power to push itself away. He snatched it away, and saw that the hands were slightly burned. Lotion was applied and Dr Cash Reed soon arrived and did what he thought was necessary. On Saturday the child seemed easy and in no pain. Under the doctor's orders it was taken out for an airing. On Sunday afternoon there was slight vomiting, and Dr Reed prescribed. Yesterday morning at seven o'clock he found the child dead; he had twice in the night been to see that it was quite comfortable. Dr Cash Reed stated that the superficial skin of both hands were scorched. He had never before known death to ensue from such slight shock. During the summer he had attended the child for whooping cough and congestion of the lungs; from the latter complaint it was not free at the time of its death. Shock to the system, consequent on the burns, coming upon debilitation from former illness, was the cause of death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and joined with the Coroner in a vote of condolence to MR and MRS MACEY in the very painful circumstances.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 December 1887
REWE - Death Through Fall Of A Wall. - At Up-Exe, near Exeter, yesterday an Inquest was held concerning the death of WILLIAM TAYLOR, aged 75, a retired farmer of the village. The evidence shewed that on Saturday last the deceased was engaged in pulling down a cob wall in the garden adjoining his residence. The wall suddenly fell and partially buried him. He was missed by his wife some time later, and she found him almost covered with debris. She screamed and a neighbour came to her assistance. Deceased was extricated and Dr Puddicombe, of Silverton, was sent for. He found several ribs broken and the spine of the deceased fractured. TAYLOR was dead at the time of the examination. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

EXETER HEAVITREE - Death From An Overdose Of Chlorodyne. - At Wonford, near Exeter, yesterday, Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry concerning the death of a child named ROSALINE FLORENCE BOLT. - MRS BOLT, wife of a gardener, said the deceased was born on September 23rd. When a fortnight old the baby suffered from vesicles on the skin, and afterwards she got a cold. Witness gave the baby two drops of chlorodyne in a bottle of milk, but she was still troubled with cough after taking it. On Sunday the child suddenly turned pale, made a noise in its throat and died within a few minutes. Dr A. Kempe said the deceased was apparently a healthy baby. The brain was slightly congested. The deceased, in his opinion, was suffering from bronchitis. With a child in that condition chlorodyne would prevent its coughing and relieving itself of the secretion attendant on the affection, and the lungs gradually collapsed. He did not think the bronchitis was of itself sufficient to cause death, and he believed the fatal result was due to the chlorodyne. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death" from an overdose of Chlorodyne, and condemned in strong terms the practice of administering chlorodyne to children.

THROWLEIGH - The Deputy Coroner (Mr G. L. Fulford) held an Inquest yesterday at Leigh Cottage, Throwleigh, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY MAY, infant son of JAMES MAY, farm labourer. The evidence shewed that the child, about 2 years old, being left alone in the kitchen for a few minutes, took a can of benzoline, which was kept on the floor, and threw it on the fire. The resulting flame caught the child's clothes and burned it severely before the sister returned (the mother being away at work). Dr Hunt stated that death resulted from shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of an infant named VIOLET EVEYLYN HUXHAM was the cause of an Inquest held at Plymouth yesterday by the Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian). The child, which had been delicate from birth, died suddenly in its mother's arms. Mr J. H. S. May, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that water on the brain had been the cause of the convulsions in which the child died. The child's emaciation was owing to its being unable to assimilate food in consequence of this disease. Medical advice should have been sought and directions obtained concerning feeding. The Jury added to the verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" a rider blaming the mother (SUSAN HUXHAM) for not having obtained the assistance of a doctor.

PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - "Internal Strangulation" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, at Compton Gifford. The deceased was LAVINIA HORTOP, aged 38, wife of JOHN HORTOP, of Vinstone Farm, Compton Gifford. The husband stated that his wife was taken ill on Friday last. He called Dr Wolferstan, who prescribed for her. She took no food and was very sick, and he afterwards had Mr Aldous, surgeon, to see her, but she died on Sunday night. Selina Hatherleigh, 11 Woolster-street, Plymouth, said the deceased took much gin while she was ill. Mr Aldous stated that the deceased was in an utterly collapsed state when he saw her, and her pulse was very feeble. Her drinking habits had nothing to do with her death. She undoubtedly died of internal strangulation.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 December 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan held an Inquest at the Naval Barracks, Keyham, yesterday on the body of DENNIS QUINLISH, 30, a private in the R.M.L.I., who had died on the previous morning. Mr Damerell (for Messrs. Venning and Goldsmith) represented the Admiralty. Private B. Chiplin stated that deceased fell to the ground whilst in the act of lifting a stool and died. Mr John H. Thomas, surgeon, as the result of a post-mortem examination, said that death was due to heart disease. QUINLISH had served twelve years in his regiment, and bore an exemplary character. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 December 1887
MILTON ABBOT - The Fatal Accident At Wheal Emma. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Milton Abbot relative to the death of WILLIAM CROOTE, 30, miner, at Wheal Emma Mine, near Tavistock, who was accidentally killed on Monday by falling down the shaft while at work at the 112 level. Dr Foster was present as inspector of mines (for Mr Pinching, inspector of the district, who was ill)(. Richard John Rice, miner, of Gunnislake, said that on the day of the accident he was working with deceased. They had filled a skip and sent it up. Shortly afterwards the rope broke. They heard the skip coming down the shaft again. both went to look for it, and found it between the 124 and 137 levels, caught across the shaft. Returning to the 112 level, deceased said they would go and see Capt. Willcock. Before that they went to examine the road, and whilst deceased was so doing the sollar gave way, and he fell into the shaft - 78 fathoms. Witness and Richard Hoare went and found him dead. He considered that as the skip passed down it shook the sollar. They were standing on the top of the plate when the sollar gave way. The skip made some noise in coming down the shaft, and might have struck the sollar without their noticing it. There had been plenty of rope attached to the skip. He could not say what caused the rope; it was of wire. - William Clemor, captain of the mine, said that no complaint had been made to him by the lander of any defect in the rope. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 December 1887
BARNSTAPLE - Two weeks since HENRY HARVEY, plasterer, of New Buildings, Barnstaple, fell from the roof of a house on the Vicarage Lawn estate, and sustained injuries to which he succumbed late on Sunday night. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of JOHN BYE, of Duryard, gardener, aged 53. The deceased was out rabbiting at night when he suddenly said, "I am blind," and fell down and died. In falling he scratched his face and the wound bled freely. The Jury found "That death was from Natural Causes," and it was remarked as fortunate that the deceased was with another gentleman, or when his body was found foul play might, under the circumstances, have been suspected.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 December 1887
EAST STONEHOUSE - Death Under Chloroform At Stonehouse. - A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned at an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday. The deceased was JOHN KELLY, a stoker on board H.M.S. Royal Adelaide, late of the Dreadnought, who died whilst under the influence of chloroform. Mr J. Lamble was Foreman of the Jury. The deceased was admitted to the Hospital on the 6th inst., and died on the 12th. - Edward J. Biden, Naval Surgeon, stationed at the Hospital, stated that the deceased was suffering from a large tumour in the back. On the 12th inst. an operation was to have been performed for its removal, and it was necessary to put the deceased under the influence of chloroform. Witness examined him and considered him healthy and in a safe condition to receive the drug. It was given him, and just as he fell back, apparently under its influence, the witness saw his colour change, and suspected that he was dying. All possible means of restoration were resorted to, but without effect and he died. Daniel J. P. McNabb, Surgeon in the Royal Navy, deposed to making a post-mortem examination of the deceased. The right lung shewed signs of pleurisy, and its base was much gorged. The disease was evidently of long standing. The left lung was fairly healthy. The heart was much enlarged and dilated and also slightly diseased. Death was certainly due to syncope, caused by failure of the heart's action, increased by the old disease in the right lung. There was no doubt that the chloroform had been properly administered, though witness was not present at the time.

NEWTON ABBOT - A man named GEORGE DYMOND, 34 years of age, employed by Mr Hill, a farmer, of Staverton, was on Thursday last cleaning a horse in the stable, when the animal kicked him severely, causing great pain. He was taken to his home, and on the following day removed to the Newton Workhouse Infirmary, where he died on Saturday night from inflammation of the bowels caused by the kick. An Inquest on the body was held yesterday morning by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, and a Jury, of which Mr S. Kelland was Foreman, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

YEALMPTON - A woman named ELLEN NETHERTON, wife of a labourer living at Torr, in the parish of Newton Ferrers, was severely censured by a Coroner's Jury at Yealmpton yesterday. The child of NETHERTON had died, and rumours were circulated that it had been starved. The other children of the family, however, appeared well cared for, and the husband said the child had had plenty of food in the form of biscuits, gruel &c. It had suffered severely from late teething. Mr G. Adkins, surgeon, who made the post-mortem examination, said that both he and his father had had to caution MRS NETHERTON about her treatment of her children. All the internal organs of this child were healthy, but the condition of the body was one of extreme emaciation. There was a marked absence of fat, and the intestines were shrunken and empty. The appearances he noticed might have been due to starvation or the use of improper food. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but censured the mother for neglect and for not calling in a doctor as it was stated in evidence she was advised to do. Mr R. R. Rodd, the Coroner, in conveying this sentiment to MRS NETHERTON, said she had only just escaped a verdict of manslaughter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 December 1887
MILTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at Milton Abbott yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, touching the death of GEORGE SIMMONS, a labourer of that village, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning. Deceased, who was 65 years old, had been subject to epilepsy, and about five o'clock on Tuesday morning he was seized with a fit when in bed. From this, however, he recovered in a short time and proceeded to milk his cows, and at nine o'clock he was found dead in the cowshed by Elizabeth Ham, the servant. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 December 1887 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On Board A Mail Boat. - On the arrival of the Union steamship Tartar in Plymouth Sound yesterday morning, the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) was informed that one of the crew, FREDERICK LANGLEY, aged 17, had died on the previous day from the effects of a fall from the topmast. The body was removed ashore, and an Inquest subsequently held at the Great Western Docks. Mr A. Ward, of the firm of H. J. Waring and Co. (the agents), watched the case on behalf of the Company. - Captain Horace D. Travers, of the Tartar, identified the body of deceased, and stated that the vessel left Southampton on the previous day for the Cape. The deceased was a ship's boy, and joined the vessel at Southampton; he had made several voyages under the company. He was a native of the village of Bittern, Hants. - William Mills, able seaman, said that about four o'clock on the previous afternoon, when the ship was coming into the Channel from Southampton Water, he was standing on the forecastle-head. He saw the deceased up at the royal truck clearing the house flag, which appeared to have fouled. He cleared the flag and was descending when his cap flew off about halfway down. Witness saw nothing more of him until he saw him falling legs foremost about a foot off the topmast-head, and trying to catch hold of something, but failing. Witness ran aft, and between the engine-room skylights saw the deceased lying doubled up. He was living then, but unconscious. The doctor was sent for, and attended to him immediately. - By the Coroner: there was no one near at the time he fell. - By a Juror: At the time deceased was clearing the flat was he sitting in a whip, or was he holding on by his hands? - Witness: He had his foot on a rung of the ladder, and was catching hold with one hand and clearing the flat with the other. - Fitzmaurice Phillips, surgeon of the Tartar, stated that he was summoned to the deck and ordered the removal of deceased to the ship's hospital. Deceased was in a state of collapse and on examination witness found a compound fracture of the right leg, and the left leg was also fractured. The left arm was broken and LANGLEY died within an hour from shock to the system. There were probably internal injuries. - The Coroner summed up and the Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated from blame all concerned.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 December 1887
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest on the body of RICHARD LOVERING, which was picked up near Ilfracombe on Friday, was held by the Deputy Coroner, Dr E. Slade-King, on Friday evening. The evidence shewed that the body was found jammed between the rocks and half buried in sand, having been missing since the boat accident three weeks ago. The body was in a mutilated condition. After long deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Drowning." The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 December 1887
WHITCHURCH - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Pennycomequick yesterday on the body of THOMAS FELL, 65 years of age, a retired Customs-house collector, living at Norfolk Villa. Deceased retired to rest on Saturday night apparently in good health. The next morning he was found dead in bed. He was lying on his left side and a small quantity of blood from the mouth was on the pillow. Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination, and found that all the organs of the body were healthy with the exception of the left lung, which was gorged with blood and which, in the opinion of witness, caused suffocation. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 December 1887
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of JOSHUA RHODES, 51, a naval pensioner, who was knocked down in Pembroke-street on Saturday by a horse, and died the following morning. Mr Albert Gard, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of Frederick Cornelius, the rider of the horse which caused the accident. Mr W. Gard, the owner of the horse, and to whom Cornelius is coachman, was also present. - The Coroner said they had to Inquire into what had proved to be a very lamentable accident. Dr Harrison wrote to him first and then called upon him. He said, "I am not quite clear that the man died from the effects of the accident, and I shall require, I think, to make a post-mortem examination." It would be their duty to Inquire carefully into the character of the man who was riding the horse - whether at the time he was quite sober, or whether he was in any way intoxicated, or whether the horse mastered him; and, if the man died from the accident, whether anyone was to blame. - From the evidence of John Cockayne, who witnessed the accident from the window of his shop in Pembroke-street, it appeared that the deceased attempted to cross the road at the time that a horse was being ridden in the direction of George-street. The horse was prancing a little and the deceased tried to make for the rear. The horse raised its fore legs, and kicking out with its hind legs, caught the deceased with its right hind foot on the back of the head. Witness considered that the rider did all in his power to avoid the deceased, and had witness been in the position of the rider should have said it was an accident. The deceased was picked up in the centre of the road. He was moved on to the pavement, and after a doctor had been sent for he was removed to his home. - Mrs Squires, wife of a musician, said the horse was very restive. When the horse had passed Quarry-street the deceased stepped off the pavement, and, without looking one way or the other, he walked into the middle of the road. The horse struck him down with, she believed, its fore feet, and kicked him with its hind feet. - John Scott, a labourer, who assisted in removing deceased to the Hospital in a hansom, deposed that on the way thither he maintained that there was nothing the matter with him, and tried to get out of the cab. After the deceased's wounds had been dressed the house-surgeon asked him if he would stop in the Hospital, but he said he would not. Witness then brought him home in the same cab, which had waited outside the Hospital. - Frederick Cornelius, Mr Gard's coachman, said having been given a holiday by his master he took the horse out from the stable thinking the exercise would do it good. He called on Mr Jope, a coachbuilder, to see if his master's carriage was finished, and with him went to a public-house where, at Mr Jope's invitation, he had a pint of porter. This was all he had had that day. He was perfectly sober. He mounted the horse in Pembroke-street and rode towards George-street. When near the corner of Quarry-street he saw the deceased leave the pavement. Deceased held up his hand and said "Whoa!" He pulled to the right thinking to get clear of him, but deceased went in the same direction and came in contact with the horse. The horse was going along quietly at the rate of about six or seven miles an hour. - Mr Jope gave testimony to the effect that Cornelius was perfectly sober. He added that after hearing of the accident he went to the scene and saw Cornelius set upon by several soldiers and sailors, who behaved towards him in the most disgraceful way. - Dr Harrison deposed to being called on Saturday to the house of the deceased and ordering his removal to the hospital… He was sent for the following morning and found the deceased in bed at his house, dead. He had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that the deceased had a fracture on the right side of the back of the head corresponding to the marks of the wounds on the outside. The interior of the brain was covered with blood. Deceased had ruptured a blood vessel of the brain, which had caused haemorrhage. Death was due to the breaking of the blood-vessel, which he believed took place at the time of, and not after, the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury exonerating Cornelius from all blame.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 December 1887
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Fatal Fall From A Tree. - An Inquest was held at Plympton St. Mary yesterday afternoon by the County Coroner(Mr R. R. Rodd) relative to the death of a lad named WILLIAM FRANCIS CHAPPLE, aged 12, son of a clay labourer. From the evidence of Maria Bawden, it appeared that she went to Furzeacre Wood about noon on Monday for the purpose of picking up some sticks, when the deceased came into the wood and said he was going to climb a tree for some ivy. Witness warned him not to go, but he persisted and climbed the tree. He had got nearly to the top when he fell to the ground, a distance of about 18 feet, but witness did not know whether he slipped or whether a branch broke. Deceased was picked up by Mrs Williams, and was sensible, saying that if they left him alone for a minute or two, he would be all right. He was taken home and attended by a doctor, but died at half-past eleven the same night. Witness did not hear him say that he was sent up the tree by anyone. - George Roland Williams, Surgeon, deposed to seeing the deceased on Monday at his home. He was utterly unconscious and in a state of collapse. he had been a delicate boy and suffered from heart disease, so that witness at once examined the heart and found it abnormal. There was a bruise on the left side of the head, and from the symptoms he concluded that there was a fracture of the skull. The immediate cause of death was the fracture at the base of the skull with concussion of the brain, and this might have been caused by a fall from a tree. The Jury, of whom Mr F. Phillips was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 December 1887
SHALDON - Yesterday afternoon Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Brookvale Cottage, Ringmore, Shaldon, on the body of WM. ARTHUR BRENT WILLS, an infant of 13 months old, son of MR W. S. WILLS, retired draper. MR WILLS, the father, said the child was taken very sick on Friday last, and it was given some infant food, mixed with milk as usual. The child continued poorly until the following Monday, when it died, but previously to its death witness called in the aid of a medical man. MRS WILLS gave similar evidence. James Bowden, dairyman, said the milk supplied to MR WILLS was from a cow which had calved three days previously. After the evidence of Dr Vawdrey, who stated that it was a dangerous practice to give a child milk from such a cow, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that it was well the public should know that milk was not wholesome until seven days after a cow had calved.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 December 1887
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Cattedown, respecting the sudden death of LOUISA AUGUSTA JARVIS, the infant daughter of MR JARVIS, a plumber, of Morice Town. It transpired from the evidence of MR JARVIS that on Christmas-day he took the deceased, who was about six months old, and apparently quite well, in a perambulator to his father's house at Messrs. Norrington's works at Cattedown. About two o'clock, whilst the child was quietly lying in its grandmother's lap, it was suddenly seized and expired immediately as if in convulsions. The grandmother's evidence having been taken, the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes, and both the Coroner and the Jury sympathised with the parents in the loss of this, their first child.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquest in the evening touching the death of MRS CLARA CRITCHELL, who was found dead in bed at her lodgings, No. 11, The Crescent, on Monday morning. Ellen Eathorne, lady's maid, deposed that she had lived with deceased for the last eighteen months; that the deceased was about 55 years of age, and apparently in good health; that she had attended church twice on Sunday, and awoke on Monday at eight o'clock, seemingly well and in good spirits. The witness added that she left deceased for a few minutes to procure a can of water, and on her return found her quite dead. Dr Buchan deposed that at the Coroner's request he had made a post-mortem examination of deceased, and found that she had died from syncope arising from extensive fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

OKEHAMPTON - MR ARTHUR WELLINGTON, son of the postmaster at Okehampton, died at the railway station there yesterday immediately after depositing the mail bags in the 9.8 train. He had hurried up the hill to the station. At the Inquest subsequently held before Mr W. Burd, Dr Young stated that heart disease was the cause of death, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned. Deceased was 22 years of age, and had never been attended for heart complaint, nor was it known by his friends that he suffered from any cardiac affection.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 December 1887
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Plymouth yesterday relative to the death of BEATRICE MABEL BROWN, aged two months. Both the father and the mother of the deceased, who live in Willow-street, are deaf mutes and the child, which was well cared for, died suddenly on the previous morning, probably from convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Death Of An Infant From Injudicious Feeding. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Stonehouse concerning the death of an infant, eight weeks old, named ETHEL BEST, found dead in bed the previous morning. Deceased was the daughter of a painter named HENRY BEST. Some weeks ago her mother died in the Royal Albert Hospital and the child was taken charge of by Mrs Crocker, the wife of a private in the Royal Marines, living at 58 George-street. Mrs Crocker stated that she had the child from November 22nd to the time of death. Deceased had been fed on corn flour and milk, varied with boiled bread and sugar. She did not, however, take her food well and was sick. A neighbour testified to Mrs Crocker's careful treatment of the deceased. Mr T. Leah, surgeon, said that as the result of a post-mortem examination, he felt deceased was a delicate child and death arose from general debility and congestion of the lungs. This state had to a great extent been brought on by injudicious feeding. Milk was the proper food for children, and bread, corn flour and so forth was very seldom assimilated by them. The nourishment in corn flour was almost nothing, and it was not at all easy of digestion; bread was, perhaps, worse. He believed that Mrs Crocker had done the very best she could for the child, but had erred through ignorance. It could not be too often stated that for infants brought up by hand milk was the food and nothing else, in the proportions of half raw milk and half water. A delicate child had not a chance with the diet deceased had had. The Jury, of whom Mr Westaway was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that they considered there was no blame due to the nurse. The Coroner said he entirely concurred with the Jury.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Excessive Drinking At Devonport. - Inquiry was held by Mr Coroner Vaughan at Morice Town yesterday, into the circumstances connected with the death of WILLIAM H. MAXWELL BOYLAND, aged 56, a beer-house-keeper and pensioned naval bandmaster, of 27 Martin-terrace, Morice Town. Evidence was given by MARY BOYLAND, wife of the deceased, that her husband had for some time past suffered from pains in the head and during the last few days had been worse. On Monday morning he complained of giddiness and fell into a bath, though without hurting himself much. In the evening, however, he became worse and medical aid was obtained, but death ensued early the following morning. In reply to the Coroner, witness said her husband did not drink spirits, and though he did not abstain from taking ale he did not drink an unusual quantity during the Christmas. Mr Gard, surgeon, deposed to having attended the deceased twelve months ago for delirium tremens. On Monday morning MRS BOYLAND came to him and told him her husband had been keeping up the Christmas. She gave him to understand that he had been drinking heavily again, and asked for a bottle of medicine similar to what he had given before. He prescribed accordingly. Later in the day he was sent for, and found MR BOYLAND suffering from the tremors of drink, and talking rather wildly. When sent for again on the following morning, he found the deceased was dead. On careful examination of the body he could find no external mark of injury. Death, in his opinion, was clearly due to a serious effusion on the brain, caused by excessive drinking acting on a weakened constitution. The Coroner, in summing up, said MRS BOYLAND had clearly told an untruth, and he was sorry that she should, even when stricken with affliction, have endeavoured to screen her husband at the expense of the oath she had taken. From the medical testimony there could be no doubt that death was caused by excessive drinking. A Juror of twenty years' acquaintance with the deceased, spoke of him as a hard drinker, and related that on one occasion when suffering from the effects of drink in the service he had to be watched by two men for a whole week. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes accelerated by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Friday 30 December 1887
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of JOHN WESTAWAY, late a mason, 72 years of age. The evidence shewed that the deceased on Monday evening went for a short walk with his wife. Both entered the London Ale House, Bartholomew-street, and had a glass of warm beer. The deceased suddenly became faint and died in a few minutes. Dr Moon said heart disease was most probably the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - The death of THOMAS HAWKEN, of 41 Exeter-street, a naval pensioner, was Inquired into at Plymouth, yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner. From the evidence of Laura Browning, a niece, it appeared that Mr Waterfield had treated the deceased for weakness of the coat of the stomach. On Tuesday he returned home at midnight, was taken with a cough, and brought up much blood. Soon after he went to bed he began again to cough. A doctor was sent for, but he died in a few minutes. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BERE FERRERS - Drowned In A Well. - The District Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., held an Inquest at Beeralston last evening relative to the death of GRACE HODGE, aged 54, wife of a farm labourer, who was found dead in a well on Monday evening. EMMA HODGE, the daughter of deceased, identified the body, and stated that about seven o'clock on Monday evening she left her mother sitting by the fire in her uncle's house. About nine o'clock she went to her own house, and found that deceased had not come home. She returned to her uncle's, and on finding that her mother was not there became alarmed. She called her mother at the back doors of each house, and on looking into one of the two wells at her uncle's saw something there, which on looking again she recognised as her mother's clothing. With the assistance of her uncle, deceased was got out, but was quite dead, having been found head downwards. A broken jug belonging to the deceased was found in the well afterwards. In answer to the Foreman, witness said her mother was very weak, often complaining of giddiness and lightness in the head, and had frequently fallen on the floor whilst dressing; witness did not think she was likely to commit suicide. The well in which she was found was the one from which all the drinking water was taken. There was no one else in the room when witness left, and deceased had not latterly been in the habit of going to the well. - Richard Rule, brother of deceased, said that on the evening in question he left his sister sitting in his room at about half-past seven, and apparently very comfortable. He went out for some time, and when he returned found she was not there. He did not trouble, thinking she had gone into her own house. Some time afterwards his niece told him that deceased was in the well, and together they pulled her out. - JOHN HODGE, the husband, deposed that between eight and nine o'clock deceased came home and remarked what a nice fire was burning. In a few minutes she went out again with an old teapot belonging to her brother which she took into his house. She appeared to be very weak then, and he thought that, if she overbalanced herself in the least she would have no power to save herself. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that the Jury must decide how the woman got into the well - whether wilfully or accidentally. - The Jury, of whom Mr R. Maddeford was Foreman, thought there was no direct evidence as to how deceased got into the well, and returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 December 1887
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest yesterday at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, concerning the death of a man at the Sugar Refinery in Mill-lane. Mr Thomas R. Ogilvie, manager of the works, represented the company. - John Black, foreman, stated that GEORGE GODDARD, aged 23, had been employed at the refinery for three weeks. On Monday evening witness entered the works at 6.30., and hearing that a man had been sent to the top storey to see the depth of syrup in the cistern and had not returned, he went to look for him. He then saw deceased lying on the floor, whereas he should have been on a platform nearly eleven feet above. The man was covered from head to foot with sugar syrup, and when witness touched him cried out as if in pain. Assistance was obtained and his clothes exchanged for others, during which time he became insensible, though witness only saw a bruise on one temple. He believed that GODDARD had somehow got into the syrup tank before he fell to the ground below. He would be standing on two planks eighteen inches wide, and having fallen into the tank it was probable that he slipped from the planks in getting out again. His lamp had been found extinguished in the syrup. In response to questions, witness said he thought there was no need of handrails; a man might take hold of the delivery pipe and the top of the tank during the minute he needed to remain on the planks. The top of the tank was 2 feet 9 inches above the planks. - Thomas Abbott stated that he considered the deceased sober when he sent him to the top storey. - Walter Ley Woollcombe, resident surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased died from laceration of the brain consequent on a fracture of the skull, which was probably caused by a fall. He smelled of spirit when admitted to the Hospital. In summing up, the Coroner said it was clear deceased had been drinking and was in an unfit state for work. The manager told him, however, that he and the foreman had watched the night gang enter the gate and had noticed nothing amiss, and so no blame could be attached to them. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned.