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Help and advice for Inquests 1888

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News

[printed in Plymouth.]

1888

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living. .


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Abrams; Acre; Adams; Allin; Amery; Ashton(2); Atherstone; Autton; Avery; Aylen; Badcock; Bailey(2); Baker; Balsdon; Barker; Bealby; Beales; Beedell; Beer; Bennett; Berry; Bird(2); Bishop; Blackett; Blake; Blamey; Bowden; Bray; Brenton; Brightly; Brook; Brooks(3); Burrough; Burt(2); Butland; Caple; Causey; Chamberlain; Cheriton; Chown; Clapperton; Clarke; Clements; Clooke; Coleman; Coles; Connop; Cook(2); Coombes; Costello(2); Coulthard; Crapp; Crawford; Crideford; Crook; Dadd; Dare; Davey(3); Davis(3); Day; Delafeild; Dendle; Dew; Diggins; Donelan; Downing; Dowrick; Drayton; Duckworth; Dustin; Dyer; Easterbrook(2); Edmonds; Edwards(3); England; Eplet; Essery; Eva; Evans; Farley; Favell; Ferrist; Figgins; Fletcher(2); Foot; Ford; Freeman; French; Frost; Giles(2); Gillard; Goad; Goggin; Goodall(2); Gorman; Gray(2); Guscott; Hanniford; Harley; Harrington; Harry; Harvey; Hawkins; Hawton; Heffer; Hendy; Hewitt; Higgins; Hill; Hine; Hodge(2); Hood; Hooper(2); Howard; Hunking; Hutchings(3); Janks; Jennings; Jewell; Joint; Kay; Kent; King(3); Lakey; Lamphee; Lang; Lawrence; Lee(2); Le Grass; Liddon; Litton; Lock; Lucock; Luscombe(2); Maddeford; Maddock; Maddocks; Marcosa; Marks; Marshall; Martin(2); Mathews; Matson; Matthews; McAtamney; McNelty; Meek; Melbourne; Melhuish; Milford; Miller(2); Milton; Mitcham; Mitchell(2); Moore(3); Moreton; Moses; Mugford; Munday; Murch; Murphy; Murray; Neal; Neate; Nelson; Noble; Oak; Olliver; O'Neal; Palk; Parsons; Patton; Pearce; Perkins; Perry; Phillips(2); Pointer; Prin; Quigg; Radcliffe; Rapson; Redmore; Redwood; Reed; Richards(2); Roach; Roberts(2); Rockett; Roskruge; Round; Sanders; Sansam; Saunders(2); Sayer; Scantlebury; Screach; Searle(2); Seavell; Sergeant; Shearme; Shears; Smale; Southern; Spear; Spratt; Stacey; Stephens; Stevens; Stitson; Stone; Strom; Symons; Taylor; Thomas; Thompson; Tilley; Tippett; Tippetts; Toll; Tomlinson; Tonkyn; Toose; Tope(2); Truscott; Tucker; Turner; Twohy; Underhill; Vaughan; Venn; Venning; Wakeham; Walters; Warmington; Warne; Warren; Watts; Webber(2); West; Wheaton; Wilding; Willis; Wood; Woollett; Worth; Yelland; Yeo

Western Morning News, Monday 2 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Of A Lady At Plymouth. - Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon at Rendle's Temperance Hotel, Millbay, relative to the death of MRS AMELIA BRIDGES BILLARD DONELAN, who fell over the stairs at the hotel on the 9th ultimo and died on Friday last. Mr F. Ivey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MR MICHAEL PATRICK DONELAN, an officer of Inland Revenues, husband of the deceased, identified the body, and stated that his wife was 57 years of age. On the 8th they arrived in Plymouth from Birmingham, en route to Falmouth, where they intended spending Christmas. The deceased was perfectly well then. They retired to rest at about eleven o'clock, and she asked witness whether he had noticed in what a dangerous position the w.c. was situated. Just before five o'clock the next morning witness went downstairs, but having no light could not find the place. He went upstairs again, and his wife then went with him. He then found the place and his wife left him. Almost immediately he heard a fall, ran along the passage, and found his wife was not there. He then went down a flight of stairs, the top of which adjoined the door of the w.c., and found his wife in a heap at the bottom. Witness called for assistance, and Mr Rendle came, and deceased was removed upstairs. Mr Whipple being sent for. - In answer to the Foreman, witness said he was not supplied with a candle when he went to bed, but there was gas in the room. The gas was turned off in the morning. - Mr Connell Whipple, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Friday morning, the 9th ultimo, and found her in bed. She was insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the base of the skull, with internal haemorrhage and concussion of the brain. She never regained thorough consciousness; she became partly conscious, but not sufficiently to make any statement. Deceased died from the injuries which he had described, and which might have been caused by a fall over stairs. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - The proprietor, Mr Rendle, was called in, and the Foreman said it was the opinion of the Jury that some guard should be placed over the stairs, as they were extremely dangerous at present, and candles should be supplied to all strangers. A vote of sympathy was passed to MR DONELAN.

DAWLISH - Sudden Death Of A Clergyman At Dawlish. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at 3 Haldon-terrace, Dawlish, before Mr S. Hacker (County Coroner) on the body of the REV. ROBERT DUCKWORTH, who dropped down on the morning of that day in the Strand, Dawlish, and died shortly afterwards. Mr W. H. Discombe was Foreman of the Jury. - ROBERT FAGAN DUCKWORTH, son of the deceased, said his father was head master of St. Peter's School, Weston-super-Mare, and was 59 years of age. He had been ailing for the past six weeks, and his doctor attributed this to weakness of the heart, although the heart was not considered diseased. - Alfred Edward Cunningham stated that he saw deceased, as he was passing him, suddenly fall on the pavement on his face. With assistance he took deceased into Mr Cornelius's shop. He was not dead when taken up. - George Fortescue Webb, Surgeon, stated that he saw deceased about ten minutes to twelve on the morning of the occurrence. Witness considered death had taken place about twenty or thirty minutes previously. The lip and face of deceased were contused in consequence of the fall. Witness attributed death to syncope, deceased having, as had been stated, a feeble heart. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., District Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Bickham, Buckland Monachorum, as to the death of MARY WORTH, seventy years of age. The evidence shewed that on Thursday evening last about six o'clock the deceased complained of being unwell and an hour afterwards she died. Mr H. J. S. Liddell, surgeon, deposed to having made a post-mortem examination and to finding a rupture of an aneurism at the base of the heart, which was the cause of death. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - A singular death of a boy at Plymouth formed the subject of Inquiry by the Coroner at the Crown Inn, Cambridge-street, on Saturday. The deceased was ARTHUR MEEK, aged 12 years, and he died on Wednesday after only a few hours' illness. It appeared from the evidence of the mother that the lad complained of being unwell on Tuesday evening, but on the following morning he seemed quite well. At 9.30 the same evening she came home, having been out since 7 a.m., and found the boy unconscious, and he died in ten minutes. JAMES MEEK, brother of the deceased, stated that he got home at 2 a.m. on Wednesday and went to bed to the deceased, who was asleep. Witness slept until 11.30 a.m., and his brother was still asleep. At 5.30 p.m. his brother appeared not very well, but witness then left the house and at half-past nine he (witness) was sent to fetch a doctor. Mr J. Elliot Square, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination and found no marks of violence; the surface of the brain was congested and the lungs were diseased. Death was caused by failure of the heart's action, the result probably of the condition of the brain, but the state of the lungs and the brain would have been sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - Death From Choking At Plymouth. - The death of an old woman, named EMILY BEALES, also known by the name of COOMBES, living at Victoria-cottages, Plymouth, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquest last evening. - Mary Ann Denning, wife of a stonemason, living in the same house as deceased, identified the body, and stated that deceased was a single woman, 72 years of age, and receiving 3s. a week parish relief. On Sunday evening last, about ten minutes past five, witness was called to deceased's room, and found that she had just sat down to her dinner of baked beef and vegetables, but her body was "twisted" as if she were falling down. Witness saw that she was choking and dying, and immediately sent for Mr Square, who came at once, but she was dead before he arrived. - Mr W. J. Square deposed that he was called to No. 4 Victoria-cottages, about 5.20 on Sunday evening, and on going there he found the deceased in a small room upstairs, lying on the floor, dead. At the request of the Coroner he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, but had found no external marks of violence. On opening the throat he found the entrance to the windpipe entirely closed by a large piece of fat meat. It had blocked the glottis and was resting in the orifice, so that deceased had no power either to breathe or to remove it, and death must have ensued in a very short space of time. The deceased had no teeth, and so did not masticate her food, but bolted it. The case should be a lesson to all to be more careful when eating, especially if their teeth were imperfect, and also careful how and when they spoke during meal times. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from Accidental Choking.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of GEORGE SANDERS, single, aged 34. The evidence shewed that deceased, formerly a farm labourer but latterly out of employment, was very well, with the exception of a slight cold, shortly before his death. On Saturday evening he took a bed at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, and was next morning found lying naked on the bed, dead, and with the water jug by his side, the bedclothes being wet. A witness stated that he had known the deceased fifteen months, and had occasionally seen him drunk. Medical testimony from Dr Bell was to the effect that the deceased was a weak and badly-nourished man. The probability was that the deceased tried to drink the water, but fell back in a fainting fit and died. Failure of the heart's action was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Publican At Plymouth. Improper Sale Of Laudanum. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of EDWARD HARRINGTON NEAL, landlord of the Three crowns Hotel, Parade, who died from laudanum poisoning on Sunday morning under the circumstances detailed in the evidence given below. Mr William Bellamy was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Inspector John Hill was present at the Inquiry. - The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said MR NEAL had kept the hotel for about six months. They would hear how the deceased was found, and he might state, in explanation of evidence which would be given, that an attempt was made to force coffee down the deceased's throat. The widow was greatly distressed, but would attend and give evidence, feeling that it would be equally as painful for her to do so that day week as on the present occasion. The Coroner then called MRS ALICE ANN NEAL, widow of the deceased, who was much affected in giving her evidence. She said her husband's age was 46. He was the landlord of the Three Crowns Hotel, and was not under medical care at the time of his death, having been in good health until recently, when he had complained of internal pains. She saw him alive at twelve o'clock on Saturday night and the next occasion was when he was expiring on Sunday morning. On Saturday night deceased was excited, but was sober, and she did not know that he had drank anything. She was in the business with him during the evening. Miss Martin, witness's daughter by a former marriage, was taken ill on Saturday night, being subject to hysterical attacks. Witness and deceased carried her to their own bedroom after the house was closed, and she slept there with witness during the night. It was arranged that deceased should, in consequence, sleep in the daughter's bedroom. Soon after the daughter was carried to bed witness and her husband parted for the night, and witness heard nothing further of him. Just before seven o'clock on Sunday morning witness awoke. There was a gentleman to be called who was going by train, and she did not think that MR NEAL had called him. She, therefore, went to the bedroom deceased was to have occupied. She saw that the bed had not been slept in, but some of the clothes which he had taken the night before from witness's bedroom was hung on the bed. Witness called the gentleman, and, in company with him, searched the house. They found deceased dressed and lying on the floor in the attic breathing very heavily, and quite insensible. On the mantel piece by the side of the deceased were a half-pint pewter measure and a bottle. There was very little liquid left in either the measure of the bottle. Witness was not aware that deceased had possession of any laudanum, or that he was in the habit of taking laudanum for medicinal purposes. Witness tried to rouse the deceased, but without effect. She sent for Mr Cumming at once, and he arrived within half an hour and endeavoured to restore the deceased. In consequence of some rum being found in the bottle, the spirit-room was searched, and the bottles produced were found. Deceased had appeared quiet, stupid and heavy of late, but had not made observations of an unusual character. Witness did not think deceased had been quite himself since he had had the house and she did not consider that the business agreed with him. She knew of no difficulties whatever in which the deceased was involved, nor had there been any unpleasantness or altercation. Witness believed the business was the deceased's trial, and that the change of life and the confusion were a worry to him. - Mr Charles Henry Cumming, surgeon, said he was called about half-past eight on Sunday morning, and on arriving at the Hotel was taken upstairs to the attic, where he found deceased lying in a corner of the room on his right side, fully dressed. He was breathing slowly, was perfectly insensible, and could not be aroused. He died in from half to three-quarters of an hour after witness's arrival. Emetics had been administered, and he had been kept alive by artificial respiration. There was a third of a teaspoonful of liquid in the measure produced, which smelt of opium and apparently of rum. The bottle smelt of the same. Witness afterwards went to the spirit-room, where he found the large and small bottles produced. The larger one contained the same mixture as the bottle found in the attic, and the smaller bottle a small quantity of liquid opium. this had a liniment label. Witness had made a post-mortem examination of the deceased. There were no external marks, and the organs of the body were all fairly healthy except the stomach, which shewed acute inflammation, such as would arise from the drinking of spirits. He found fluid in the stomach which smelt of coffee, spirit and opium. He attributed death to the taking of liquid opium, deceased having expired under symptoms attributable to that cause. - P.C. William Venton, stationed at the Barbican, said he was sent for at 10.25 on Sunday morning and on arriving at the Three Crowns was shewn up into the attic, where he saw deceased, and afterwards took possession of the bottles and measure produced. - The Coroner said that was all the material evidence which would be laid before the Jury. They had to consider firstly, whether deceased died from taking laudanum; secondly, how it was administered; and thirdly, if he took it himself of his own accord, what state of mind he was in. He felt it right to draw the attention of the Jury to a point which Mr Cumming had only now mentioned to him. It was a matter of very serious consequences, but he would not mention names at the present time. The doctor considered it strange that any man could get the quantity of liquid opium which deceased seemed to have done without having the bottle properly labelled. He accordingly instituted inquiries and it seemed that a shop had been opened lately at which laudanum was sold without being labelled. He had in his hand a bottle containing a couple of teaspoonfuls of good opium which was supplied, without being labelled, to the doctor's own servant, who went as an ordinary customer. Another gentleman's servant was also served with poison unlabelled. He believed, from the presence of Inspector John Hill, that the matter would not be allowed to drop. As it was brought under his (the Coroner's) notice, he felt it his duty to see that the law was enforced, otherwise it was clear that other Inquests might arise from the use of poison sold improperly labelled. In answer to a Juror, the Coroner said that the person who sold the poison had lately come into the town from Devonport. - The Jury found that the deceased committed Suicide by taking laudanum while of Unsound Mind. - The Coroner considered that thanks were due to Mr Cumming for the very prompt way in which he had acted throughout that unhappy business. He resorted to artificial respiration and emetics in order to save, if possible, the poor man's life. He searched the spirit-room, and it was through his instrumentality that the bottles were produced and, further than that, he had investigated and found that laudanum was being sold in the neighbourhood without proper precautions. - The Jury concurred in the remarks of the Coroner. - A Juror raised the question whether deceased might not have taken the laudanum without knowing what it was, or not intending to kill himself? - Mr Cumming said it was quite possible that deceased might have taken more than he intended to. - The Coroner pointed out that deceased went to the attic when he might have gone to his own room. If the Juror were not perfectly satisfied that deceased took the poison intentionally, he need not sign the Inquisition. The Jury said the man might have taken laudanum to put himself to sleep, and have taken too much. The Foreman remarked that the wife had stated that deceased was worried about the business. Ultimately the whole of the Jurors signed the Inquisition.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - The sudden death of MARY LEE, aged 74, of 3 Buckland-street, Plymouth, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry in that town last evening. It appeared from the evidence of Susan Crocker, daughter of the deceased, that her mother had previously suffered from paralysis. On Sunday night last she retired to rest as usual, and seemed quite well. On Monday morning she slept as late as usual. The niece of witness went up at 11 a.m. with her breakfast, but was unable to wake her. witness herself then went up and found her dead in the bed. Dr Wagner, on being called, said she had died from paralysis. Gertrude Wright, niece f the last witness, corroborated. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. A Medicine Taking Family. - The sudden death of JOHN MELBOURNE, aged 46, and living at 16 Moon-street, Plymouth, formed the subject of the Borough Coroner's Inquiry yesterday. It appeared from the evidence of CATHERINE MELBOURNE, widow of the deceased, that he had been subject to sudden violent pains in the heart, but had refused to call a doctor. On Tuesday night he took half a teaspoonful neat, of medicine dispensed by the "Indian doctor;" the witness and her daughter had also taken a full dose of it, but in water. This was at 9.45 p.m. on Tuesday. The deceased having smoked a pipe, went to bed at 10.30. At 11.30 he awoke, but seemed as well as usual, and went to sleep again. About 3.15 the witness was roused by a rattling in the deceased's throat. She shook him, but he was unconscious. She thought he died at that moment. Dr Wagner afterwards pronounced him to be dead. - Police-Sergeant Yabsley produced the bottles of medicine, which he had received from the last witness. Mr Brian remarked that the symptoms and manner of death pointed to heart disease rather than to poisoning, and that the deceased would probably have felt some ill-effects soon after the dose of medicine, had it been harmful. The Jury decided that the deceased died from Natural Causes.

TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Accident At Tavistock. - The District Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) held an Inquest at Tavistock yesterday, relative to the death of a farm labourer named JOHN HARRY, aged 37, which was due to injuries received at a siding at Tavistock Station on the previous day. Mr Thomas Moyse was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who after viewing the body visited the spot at which the accident occurred. Mr Northcutt, chief inspector, Great Western Railway, watched the case on behalf of that company, to whom the siding belongs. - Richard Easterbrook, storekeeper, in the employ of Mr Wm. Pearse, coal merchant, identified the body. For the past three or four years deceased had been in the habit of fetching coals from the Station for his master, Mr Gill, so that he knew the place well. On Monday he took three loads of coal and on Tuesday morning, about nine o'clock, he took away another load. About eleven o'clock he returned for another load. Between the time of his going with the first load and his coming back, witness was engaged in shunting a truck with a horse. He unhitched the horse, and pushed the truck on with his shoulder, so that it should just touch the other trucks. He did not see the deceased, but just as the trucks met Mr Pearse called to him that Mr Gill's man was there, to which witness replied that he would go to the other truck and load him. Mr Pearse then said, "Is he on the line?" and witness went to look for him, finding him on the line between the trucks. He called Mr Pearse, and then lifted him up, deceased muttering, "Let me lie." Witness fancied that deceased must have jumped from the higher bank to look for witness, but he had never seen him there before, as it was the place for himself and no one else. Witness believed the man was in a great hurry, and so jumped down for witness to load his wagon. There was room on either side of the line for the deceased to stand if he saw the trucks coming. If he had looked up the line he must have seen the trucks moving. The trucks were now in the same position as at the time deceased went there in the morning. He had a wagon and two horses, so that the way deceased went was the nearest to his horses. - Mr Wm. Pearse said that about 11.20 a.m. on Tuesday he was sitting in his office when he heard the deceased shout for Easterbrook. Witness told him to go back to his horses and that he was on the bank. Almost immediately the truck struck, and the deceased stopped in the middle of a sentence. Witness then called to Easterbrook, who told him that the man was injured, and together they got him out and laid him beside the rails. Dr Swale was sent for, but deceased died soon after. The deceased had no right to go on the siding, and seven out of every eight men would not have left their horses in the station-yard, where trains were constantly passing. - Dr Harold Swale said he was sent for about 12.5 p.m., on Tuesday, and saw the deceased in the siding where the accident took place. He was not dead, but insensible, so that no conversation passed as to the cause of the accident. It was not more than ten minutes after the deceased was struck that witness saw him, and he remained with him until death, which took place in about a quarter of an hour. The cause of death was shock to the system from a blow which had caused syncope. He was probably caught between the buffers over the top of the abdomen. The blow might have been caused by such a thing as a truck. - In answer to Mr Gill, deceased's employer, Mr Northcutt said there was quite room enough for a man to stand between two trucks inside the buffers, so that deceased must have been caught between the buffers. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow, who is left with three young children and with no provision.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Plymouth yesterday in regard to ALBERT SCREACH, 47, marine pensioner and grocer, of Looe-street, Plymouth, who died the previous day. Deceased had suffered from rheumatism, and had taken some of the "American Doctor's" medicine and used his lotion externally. The last dose was drank on Tuesday at midnight. On Wednesday afternoon his wife found him dead in bed. Eight years ago he had passed through a severe illness.

TORQUAY - The Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at Torquay yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of MR THOMAS WARE GILLARD, a retired inland revenue officer, aged 69, who died on Monday evening from the effects of self-inflicted injuries at his residence, 1 Highbury-villas, Ellacombe. The evidence shewed that the deceased had been living retired seven years, during the last four of which he had been insane. He took his meals in a separate room by himself, and ate soft food with a spoon. On Christmas-day his wife took him in his dinner, and, although she had no remembrance of the fact, she must have taken a knife in at the same time. The deceased ate his dinner, and his wife cleared away the things. She then went upstairs, but she had not been there more than a few minutes when she heard a groan proceeding from her husband's room. She immediately went down, and found the deceased lying on the floor, bleeding from a wound in the throat, six inches long and which was so deep that the windpipe was severed and an entrance had been made into the gullet. By the side of the unfortunate man, stained with blood, was the knife with which he had committed the deed. His wife called for assistance, and her brother, Mr Thomas Edwards, coachbuilder, who with his wife was staying in the house for the day, fetched Dr Cook. Subsequently Dr Gardner was called in, and he attended the deceased until Monday evening last, when he died from exhaustion. It appeared that no information of the occurrence was conveyed to the Police until the morning after the deceased's death, and eight days after he cut his throat, and the Coroner severely commented on this neglect upon the part of Mr Edwards and Dr Gardner, whose reply was that it was the wish of the relatives that the matter should be kept quiet. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 January 1888
BRIXHAM - The Collision Off Brixham. The Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Bolton Hotel, Brixham, on the body of WILLIAM SHEARS, skipper of the fishing ketch Nimble, whose body was picked up on Friday. SAMUEL SHEARS identified the body as that of his son. - George Parnell said he was the skipper of the fishing smack Telegram. On Friday last, the 6th inst., they had their trawl down in the Channel, and on getting it up they found the body of WILLIAM SHEARS in it. Witness recognised it, took it aft, covered it up, and came to land with it. He did not know that a collision had taken place between the steamer and the Nimble. At the time the collision occurred witness was on the deck of his vessel. The moon was shining brightly, and he could have seen a light from a vessel several miles, and a sail without a light could be seen fully a mile an hour before the collision took place. the night was a very bright one, and the moon shone clearly. Thomas Gardiner said he was a fisher boy, and was cook of the ketch Nimble. The left Brixham at noon on Thursday. At about six o'clock on Friday morning they were sailing with the trawl on board. William Hockings was at the helm, the skipper was below, and witness was below with the two other hands. He was preparing for breakfast, herrings, having just left the deck with some fish. Hockings called out "Jump up skipper," and they all jumped up, witness being the last out of the cabin. The steamer struck them on the starboard bow, and passed right over them. She was going eleven or twelve miles an hour - the captain of her told him so on board. Shortly after the vessel struck them witness jumped overboard and was swimming for a quarter of an hour. He was rescued by a boat from the steamer, and taken on board and treated kindly. He was taken to London in her, and sent from there to his home. The Nimble had a white light burning at the masthead when he left the deck at six o'clock. they did not put the side lights up, because the skipper said it would be daylight in half an hour. The wind was westerly, and they hauled their trawl up at four o'clock, and made sail at about half-past five. This being all the evidence forthcoming the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry for the attendance of the officer and others of the crew of the steamer. The adjourned Inquiry will take place on Monday next.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, Inquired yesterday at Plymouth, into the death of JOHN EDWARDS, 43, a native of Hamlick, Anglesea, and seaman of the schooner Holly How, of Barrow-in-Furness, who had been found drowned at Plymouth on the previous day. Richard Williams, master of the vessel, said deceased asked him for money. He gave him 3s. on which he left the schooner, and never returned. He was a man of drinking habits, and would frequently be on shore several days on a "spree". On Friday he reported the sailor's absence to the Police. £2 2s. 6d. in wages was due to him. John Jessop stated that when "creeping" he found the body forty yards off the Commercial Wharf. In the dark, men often fall into the water when trying to reach a vessel by the wharfside. P.C. Setters said nothing was found on the deceased's body. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Suicide At Plymouth. - A most painful sensation was caused n Plymouth yesterday morning when it was made known that the body of MR WILLIAM WARMINGTON - accountant and collector for the Sutton Harbour Improvement Company and residing in Athenaeum-street, Plymouth, had been found under the Hoe with a revolver, shot through the head: the surprise was still greater when it became known that the circumstances pointed to the fatal wound being self-inflicted. MR WARMINGTON had been in the employ of the Sutton Harbour Company for nearly twenty-nine years, entering the office first as clerk, then becoming accountant, and, since the death of Captain Evans, accountant and collector. He had been a director of the Plymouth Conservative Club ever since its formation in May, 1883, and had taken a lively interest in politics. He was also a member of the committees of the Port of Plymouth Royal Regatta, the Plymouth Swimming Association and the Sutton Harbour Regatta. He was highly respected and generally liked, and his loss will be felt by a large circle of friends in Plymouth, who, knowing his cheerful and pleasant disposition were very slow to believe that he could really have committed suicide. MRS WARMINGTON is at present in a very delicate state of health, and the whole surroundings of the suicide are of a most saddening character. - MR WARMINGTON met with an accident some twelve or fifteen months since, whilst performing his duties on the Barbican Quay. He was standing with Captain Short (the harbour-master) when a hawser attached to a trawler gave way, catching the deceased round the leg, and throwing him heavily to the ground. He received a terrible blow on the forehead which completely stunned him, making a wound which disclosed the bone of the skull. He was attended by a doctor for some weeks, but ever since he had periodically complained of pains in his head, and was often depressed as the result. It is thought that he took his life whilst in one of those moods of depression, and the evidence given at the Inquest seems to confirm this opinion. - A Coroner's Inquiry was held yesterday at the Guildhall by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), and a large number of friends of the deceased were present, amongst them being Messrs Dawson Spooner, David Roy, W. H. Sarah, R. T. Stevens, and Captain Short (harbour master). Mr T. Wolferstan, secretary to the Sutton Harbour Company, watched the case on behalf of that company and the family. Mr J. Sydenham was Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, referred to the case as a most melancholy one, and one which he wished them to be very careful in investigating. The poor fellow was found under the Hoe shot through the head, and it would be for them to Inquire how he came to his death. If they found that he shot himself, they would further have to Inquire what state of mind he was in when he did so. - The Jury then proceeded to view the body, which was laid in the Mortuary, not having been removed from the stretcher on which it had been brought from the Hoe. The right side of the face was covered with blood, and blood could be seen on the clothes and right hand, having dropped down after death. A small hole was apparent near the right temple, just over the eye, but there was only one hole, shewing clearly that although three chambers of the revolver found by deceased's side had been discharged, only one bullet had entered his head. - Jessie Issell, domestic servant in the employ of the deceased, and living at 25 Athenaeum-street, identified the body as that of MR WILLIAM WARMINGTON. He was 49 years of age last birthday, and in the employ of the Sutton Harbour Company. She saw him at his house about five minutes to nine the same morning, when he was ready to go out, and witness saw him go through the gate, as she supposed to go to his office. He was dressed in his ordinary manner, but made no remark. About half an hour previously he had requested her to fetch him a ring, which he had left on the dressing-table, and she did so. She saw nothing in his hand when he went out. He had been very much depressed lately - ever since the accident to his head. He seemed to get very worried, and would put his hand to his head, especially when the wound seemed to get more red, which it did at times. She noticed it was so on the previous evening, and deceased put his hand to his head several times during tea. When he did that he seemed bewildered. - John Gill, labourer, stated that about twenty minutes or a quarter to ten he was standing on the pier at the ladies' bating place when he heard a report, but did not take any notice of it, as it was a common thing to hear explosions under the Hoe, and he thought it was from the blasting of the rocks. Witness "loafed" about the rocks for about twenty minutes, and then, instead of going back the way he came, he went round by the bathing place, which brought him on the other side of the wall. He sat down for five minutes, and then left to go in the direction of Millbay, but when he arrived at the next seat, on looking below he saw someone in a sitting posture on the seat a little way down. Witness went over and found the deceased reclining with his hand under his right cheek, his head resting on his hand. Witness went over and saw something coloured with blood on the right sleeve, and at once concluded that the man was dead. He called for assistance, and on turning round again saw a quantity of blood on the side and a pistol lying by the right foot on the ground, but he did not take it up to examine it. Deceased's left hand was on his left thigh. The deceased had a gold watch and chain on at the time, together with a valuable ring. Witness went for assistance, but when he got back he found that a coastguardsman named Crickett had arrived on the spot. Crickett took up the revolver to examine it. It was a six-chambered one, and appeared to have been recently discharged in three chambers. Witness saw three cartridges taken from it, together with the three shells, and P.C. Colton took charge of the body, which was removed to the mortuary. - By the Coroner: When you heard the discharge, did you see anyone about, or did you when you found the body? - Witness: No; there was no one running away. He could not have seen the deceased going towards the spot where he was found. - George Trewin, toll-keeper at the Plymouth Promenade Pier, said that about 9.30 the same morning he was at the pier at the outside entrance. He saw the deceased pass alone in the direction of the ladies' bathing place, and wished him "Good morning," but whether he answered or not witness could not say - if he did it was in a very low tone. He knew the deceased as an all-the-year-round bather, so that it was no unusual thing to see him near the place, although it was unusual to see him properly dressed at that time. He had not seen the deceased bathing since Sunday last. - By the Coroner: He had an umbrella with him. - By the Foreman: Did you speak to him in a loud tone? - Yes, but he did not seem to turn his head as he usually did. - By a Juror: did you hear any report from a gun? - I did not take any notice because gentlemen are often shooting gulls, and the rocks were being blasted at Tinside. It was only about a quarter of an hour after I saw him that I was told he had shot himself. - James Colton, Hoe Constable, deposed that about ten o'clock, in consequence of information he received, he went to the "Reform, Lord Russell" seat near the landing steps under the Hoe. On arriving there he found the body of the deceased on the seat, lying on the back. The hat was off. He saw a fresh gunshot wound in the right temple. The coastguardsman had the revolver at the time, and witness saw the umbrella (produced) placed in an upright position by the side of the seat. He did not notice any exploded cartridges on the ground, but the man handed him three exploded shells, together with three undischarged cartridges. Witness searched the body, and found a gold watch and chain, a gold ring, a cash bag containing £20 in gold, and 3s. 8d. in silver and bronze - £1 1s. was wrapped up in paper, and £2 2s. 3d. was loose in his pocket, as well as a pencil case, a bundle of business papers and other little articles. There were also loose in his pocket five cartridges. There were no other wounds on the body except the one over the temple. Witness had made inquiries, and found that the revolver was bought by the deceased from Mr Smith, pawnbroker, Whimple-street, on Monday week. - Mr Wolferstan: Was there anything to shew where the contents of the two other cartridges went? - I should think the other two cartridges were fired off some time before this one. - Captain Thomas Short, harbour master, said he had known the deceased for a number of years. He saw him three or four times a day - in fact, spent the greater part of the day with him. Witness spoke as to the accident described above, and said he fancied that deceased's head must have been affected by that injury. He had seen him put his hand to his head, especially after any great excitement. - By the Coroner: You have had many years' experience of deceased, and do you think he would have been the man to do any fatal mischief to himself if he had had the full use of his faculties? - No; one of the last men in the world to do such a thing. - By a Juror: He knew nothing of the purchase of a revolver until that morning, when the boy in the office told him that the deceased had taken out one, and had been playing with it in the office on the previous afternoon. - This concluded the evidence. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there were three questions to decide. The first was how the deceased came by his death - they needed no doctor to tell them that he died from the effects of a bullet wound. That wound might have been inflicted by the deceased or any other person. They had plenty of evidence to shew that he did it himself, but not the slightest to shew of it was done by anyone else. The third question was as to the state of deceased's mind. It did not need many words to shew that he was not in his right mind at the time. Mr Wolferstan was there and would like to say a few rods, but he (the Coroner) might anticipate that he would remind them of the possibility of an accident. Deceased, however, did not appear to have been fond of shooting. - Mr Wolferstan said there were two shots to be accounted for, and deceased had also five cartridges in his pocket. They might well suppose that he had fired off the two, and then looked into the barrel to see if the others were all right, and that whilst looking in the next shot went off. - The Court was then cleared for the consideration of the verdict, and after about a quarter of an hour, at the request of Mr Wolferstan, Captain Short was recalled, and said it was the deceased's duty as collector sometimes to board vessels for dues, and often to enforce payment. He did so about a fortnight since, and he told witness that the men had threatened what they would do to him. In consequence of that and many similar threats he said to witness, "Captain Short, I tell you what, I shall have to get a revolver to protect myself." - The Jury found a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." After reading the Inquisition, the Coroner said that the verdict on the Inquisition had been found by the requisite number of Jurors required by law, viz., twelve, and one gentleman, Mr Sercombe, did not agree with the others, he considering that the shot might have been accidental. It was only fair to say that he had manfully argued his point. A vote of condolence with the widow and family in their bereavement was unanimously passed.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 January 1888
ST. MARYCHURCH - The Fatal Accident At Babbacombe. Liability To Fence Quarries. - Yesterday Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Babbacombe to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR SAMUEL DARE, late chief boatman in charge of the coastguard station at Babbacombe, who died on Wednesday from injuries received through falling into a quarry at Wall's Hill on the previous evening. Mr A. Harris was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and amongst those also present during the Inquest was Mr J. G. Nevis, chief officer of the coastguard at Torquay. - The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was 53 years of age, left his house at a quarter to seven on Tuesday evening in company with a coastguard named John Webber, to go on what is known as the "western guard," which extends over Wall's Hill. It was dark at the time, and the fog was so thick that the men could not see ten yards ahead. They walked across Babbacombe Down, and on reaching the second hill they made for the low wall on the opposite side as a guide to them, knowing there was a gap in it which would lead them in the direction in which they desired to go, which was Hope's Nose. It appeared, however, there were several gaps in the wall, and that owing to the fog they got away from the point they intended to go to, and reached instead the spot which is close beside the edge of an unfenced stone quarry, about 80ft. deep. On the two men reaching the gap which they erroneously took to be the right one to go through, the deceased took the lead, his companion being only two steps behind him. As the deceased stepped through the gap he suddenly disappeared. His companion could see nothing on the other side owing to the dense fog, and not knowing what had become of the deceased, he called him by name twice, but received no answer. he then felt the other side of the wall with his stick, and found that it "went down." He again called the deceased, but he received no reply, and just afterwards he heard a groan proceeding, apparently from some distance below. By going to the rear the coastguard ascertained that he was close to the quarry, and on seeing a lamp in the roadway near he felt his way towards it. On reaching there he saw two men, to whom he related what had happened. One of them was a coachman named James Hayter, who had heard just before a noise as of someone falling, succeeded by groaning. Assisted by the two men, the coastguard proceeded to search for the deceased, and at length he found him at the bottom of the quarry at the further end. He must have fallen sheer 60 feet before touching any rock, and then rebounded on to another heap of stones, which were marked with blood. Deceased, who was groaning and unconscious, was lying on his left side, with his head downwards. The coastguard lifted his head up, and remained by him whilst one of the other two men went for a doctor, and the other for a cab. After having been removed to his home and put to bed, deceased was seen by Dr Boreham, who found that he had sustained severe scalp wounds, a broken arm, a severe cut in the right leg, and fracture of the base of his skull. He remained unconscious and died at a quarter to four on Wednesday morning. - Dr Boreham attributed death to the fracture of the skull. He said he thought he fell straight on his head, and it was marvellous he was not instantly killed. Mr W. D. Bowden, surveyor to the St. Mary Church Local Board, stated that the land on Wall's Hill, adjoining the quarry, was a public recreation ground, and was under the regulation and jurisdiction of the Local Board who held it under a lease from Mr Cary, lord of the manor. The land on the other side of the wall, however, together with the quarry, belonged to Lord Haldon, as did also the wall. The Local Board had endeavoured, but unsuccessfully, to get the place rendered less dangerous. - The Coroner mentioned that an Act of Parliament had just come into force by which the Board could compel the owner or lessee of a quarry to properly fence it. - Wm. Henry Drake, son of Mr George Drake, contractor of Torquay, and lessee of the quarry from Lord Haldon, stated that his father was unable to attend, he having been ill for the past ten days. He (witness) did not know why the top of the quarry was not kept properly fenced, but he had no doubt his father would fence it if it was desirable. - The Coroner said it was not only desirable, but his father was bound to fence it, and he had been acting illegally since the beginning of the year in not having done so, inasmuch as on the 1st of January an Act of Parliament came into force which compelled him, as the occupier, to have the quarry fenced. His attention, or that of his foreman, should be drawn to the matter immediately, and if it was not attended to at once he would render himself liable to proceedings being taken against him by the Local Board. - In his summing up, the Coroner explained fully the law on the subject and the duties which devolve upon owners of quarries in regard to fencing. He said that if, by the omission of a duty cast upon any person by the law, the death of anyone was brought about, without doubt the person omitting that duty was guilty of manslaughter. Previously to the beginning of this year the law as to the fencing of quarries was that if a quarry or pit of this description was situate more than twenty-five yards distance from a cartway or roadway, there was no legal liability upon the owner of the quarry to fence it. As in this case it had been stated that the nearest roadway was fifty yards distant, there had been no breach of the law as it formerly existed. Now, however, it had been amended, and the new Quarry (Fencing) Act contained the following section:- Where any quarry dangerous to the public is in open or unenclosed land, within fifty yards of a highway or place of public resort dedicated to the public, and is not separated therefrom by a secure and sufficient fence, it shall be kept reasonably fenced for the prevention of accidents, and unless so kept shall be deemed to be a nuisance liable to be dealt with summarily in manner provided by the Public Health Act, 1875. - A direct duty was thus imposed upon the owner or lessee and if he neglected it he rendered himself liable to the infliction of penalties on magisterial proceedings being taken by the Local Board. Mr Drake, the lessee of this quarry, had been acting illegally in omitting a duty imposed upon him by the law to fence the quarry, but, as he appeared to have been too ill to attend to his business since the 1st of January, the Jury would doubtless regard this as a valid excuse for his omission. - In reply to Mr Jas. Lee, a Juryman, the Coroner said it was the duty of the owner to fence the quarry, and if he neglected to do so he not only rendered himself liable to a penalty, but also to a charge of manslaughter in case of another fatal accident. - The Jury found that the deceased came to his death through injuries received from Accidentally Falling over the Quarry, having missed his path through the darkness and thickness of the fog, and they requested the Coroner to call the attention of the Local Board to the dangerous state of the place, and ask them to enforce the putting up of a fence without delay. - The Coroner promised to communicate this expression to the clerk of the Local Board. -

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 January 1888
PLYMSTOCK - The sad death of an old woman at Hooe formed the subject of an Inquiry by Mr Coroner Rodd yesterday. The deceased SARAH LEE, aged 94 years, was a native of Castle Carey, Somerset. It appeared from the evidence of Kate Osborne and Henry Osborne, that on Thursday morning at 4.30 the deceased was found on the floor by her bedside with her nightdress entirely burnt away. The bedclothes were smouldering. A lighted candle was near, and the room was filled with smoke. The old lady opened her mouth and shook her head and then died. The deceased, who was a spinster, had lived in the house for twelve years. She was last seen at ten o'clock the previous evening. She always kept matches near her to light the candle if necessary in the night. Mr J. B. Jacob, surgeon, stated that death ensued on the shock occasioned by the burns. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 January 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - WILLIAM EVANS, 43 years of age, private in the 2nd Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, died suddenly at Raglan Barracks on Saturday afternoon and the death was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry yesterday. Private John Davis, a comrade, saw the deceased fall off the form on which he was sitting. Davis and others ran to his assistance and sent for a doctor, who came within a few minutes and then pronounced the man dead. Mr Hugh Thurston, of the Medical Staff Corps, who had made a post-mortem examination, found that the deceased had died from rupture of an aneurism of the aorta, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Circumstances attending the death of ANNE SPEAR, aged 80 years, were the subject of an Inquiry held by the Plymouth Coroner last evening. MARY SPEAR, sister-in-law of the deceased, stated that on the evening of December 19th the deceased had retired for the night, and was, as usual, alone. The witness heard her scream, and on entering the room found her sister on the floor at the foot of the bed. The deceased stated that she had fallen whilst crossing the room and had injured herself. Mr May, surgeon, was at once sent for, and had remained in attendance until the deceased's death. Mr May found the deceased in great pain, and that she had broken the shaft of her right thigh. Death was caused by the shock to the nervous system consequent on the fall, inducing extreme exhaustion, from which the old lady never rallied. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DARTMOUTH - The Painful Suicide At Dartmouth. The Inquest. Distressing Details. - Dartmouth Borough Coroner (Mr R. W. Prideaux) held an Inquest at that town yesterday relative to the death of POLICE SERGEANT THOMAS ALLIN, who died the previous day under circumstances reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. Captain Yardley, superintendent of Police, G Division, was present and Mr Percy Hockin, solicitor, represented the friends of deceased. The death had excited the deepest interest in the town, the Court was densely packed and at times there were loud hostile demonstrations against certain persons. The Inquest lasted for upwards of 3 ½ hours. - Mrs Dorothea Annie Fogwell, with whom the deceased lodged, was the first witness called. She said deceased was a native of Holsworthy, and was 44 years of age. He had lodged with her for two years. On Saturday afternoon last, between three and four o'clock, the superintendent of the division (Captain Yardley) called on deceased. After he left witness went to deceased's room and found him in a very despondent mood, with his head resting upon his arms. On asking what was the matter he replied, "Oh, I am degraded." This was all he would tell her at that time, but she subsequently saw Captain Yardley, who told her deceased was reduced for neglect of duty. Shortly before seven o'clock a telegram came for the deceased, which read, "ALLIN will remove to Ilfracombe 16th instant. - Hamilton." When she let him have this telegram he said, "I'm sold like a bullock in Smithfield, and how can I go back where I came from with the stripes taken off my arm?" Shortly afterwards the deceased went out on duty, and returned with a friend. Witness detailed the conversation which she and her husband had with deceased up to the time he went to bed at one o'clock. She thought his manner very strange, and went up to see if he was all right at three o'clock, when he was apparently sound asleep. On the Sunday morning, just before seven o'clock, she was awakened by a loud noise, apparently a knocking proceeding from ALLIN'S bedroom. As she and her husband were going up the stairs to see what it was they heard a fearful shriek, and on reaching the room found deceased throwing his arms about wildly and exclaiming, "It's not my fault." Dr Crossfield was at once sent for, but he could do deceased no good and he expired shortly afterwards. - On behalf of the relatives, Mr Hockin asked - When deceased said he was sold like a bullock at Smithfield, did he mention any name to you? - No; but he said to my husband it was somebody named Jennings - Major Jennings - who had sold him. (Loud and prolonged hisses.) - The Coroner: I think it right to state that Major Jennings - (groans) - is in Court, and in all fairness he should be called as a witness presently. As names have been used it is nothing but right that hose implicated should be heard. - John James Fogwell, husband of the last witness, gave evidence similar to her, and added, in reply to Mr Hockin, that the deceased said to him on Saturday evening, "It's that Jennings who has sold me; he has worked up the super to do this." Subsequently the deceased also told him that if he could have got a situation in Dartmouth he would have left the force and given it up altogether, for her could not go back reduced to the place he came from. - A Juror: Did the deceased tell you why he was reduced? - He said it was because of a fire at Dr Davson's. He was censured for not making an arrest in connection with it. Deceased pointed out to witness that he could not bring a charge against any man about this. - Another Juror intimated that there was another case which SERGEANT ALLIN had in hand at the same time, and it was a physical impossibility for him to be in two places at the same time. (Loud applause.) - Witness, in reply to further questions by Mr Hockin, said deceased told him that Dr Davson, the owner of the house where the fire took place, refused to prosecute the man whom he suspected. The deceased, after inquiry, also stated that he could not gather sufficient proof to justify him in making any arrest. - At the request of Mr Hockin, a borough magistrate, Mr Ed. Tew stated that on the day the fire occurred SERGEANT ALLIN was engaged at the Guildhall on another long case - the case of Heath's assault - and was sent for by the Bench while he was at the fire. The magistrates all thought that the late Sergeant had been most efficient and assiduous in the discharge of his duties. (Loud and continued applause.) - Henry May Hadfield, chemist, Duke-street, said the deceased came to his shop on Saturday evening, a few minutes before eight o'clock, and asked for a little strychnine or other poison, with which he wished to poison the cats at the station, as they were a great nuisance. Another man present, named O'Hara, suggested that he should use prussic acid, but this witness would not sell him. Witness served deceased with a little strychnine, and wrapped it in white paper, labelling it "Strychnine, poison." The paper produced was that to which he referred. Deceased did not sign the register. He (witness) turned to take down the book from the shelf, but deceased picked up the package, and said he was in a hurry, as he had to be at the Station. He added that he would look in and pay for it another time. Witness did not see him again. - Dr A. K. Crossfield, physician, practising at Dartmouth, said he was called on Sunday morning just after seven o'clock to see the deceased, whom he found as if in a fit. He was shewn a piece of paper bearing the last witness's label, "Strychnine poison," and a tumbler with a spoon in it. From the symptoms exhibited by the deceased he at once suspected strychnine poisoning. He gave him an emetic, but without effect. Witness then sent for Dr Soper, and ran home himself to get one or two things he thought he might want. When he returned he found that the convulsive movements had increased and the pulse had become very much weaker. ALLIN died about twenty-five minutes to eight, in witness's presence. He had since made a rough analysis of the contents of the tumbler, and had detected traces of strychnine. - The Coroner (to the Jury): I have not in this case ordered a post-mortem examination, as I thought the evidence of the doctor so very clear that it was unnecessary. - The Foreman intimated that the Jury were of the same opinion. - By permission of the Coroner, Mr Hockin then called P.C. Nancekivell, who said he was first at the fire at Dr Davson's on the 26th ultimo. Sergeant ALLIN arrived about a quarter of an hour afterwards, but was called away to the Guildhall on another case. Witness, by direction of the sergeant, made out a report of the fire, and gave it to him, according to the usual manner of procedure. - By a Juryman: Deceased said at the Station that he was to be removed to Ilfracombe and he was reduced, all on account of the fire at Dr Davson's. - P.C. Bradford said that he was at the fire, and Dr Davson refused to give the man in the house in charge for setting fire to the house. He believed the doctor had given the man a good character. When he met the deceased on Saturday night he said, "I have been reduced, and all through one man - Major Jennings. (Hisses.) - Captain Yardley, in reply to a question, admitted that he had received a letter from Major Jennings on the same day that he got a report from P.C. Nancekivell with reference to the fire. Witness went and made inquiries into the fire. After that he had seen the deceased, who said he had made an error in reference to the matter. Witness believed there was an insurance claim for the fire. In his official capacity he had laid this charge of neglect against the deceased before the chief constable. Deceased had been 24 years in the force, and this was the first time he had been reported. Witness had never had any fault to find with him. - Mr Hockin asked whether any suspicion attached to any man in regard to the letter written by Major Jennings about the fire? - Captain Yardley: It merely stated that there had been a fire at Dr Davson's and if I was coming down he hoped I would look into it. I went to Dartmouth the next day and procured information on the matter from Dr and Mrs Davson. The man had then left, and I did not know where he was. - Mr Hockin: Have you since applied for a warrant against him? Not yet. - Not yet! How long ago was it? On the 26th of December. - Mr Punchard: You said there had been no previous charge made against Sergeant ALLIN, and yet, on the first occasion of only an alleged offence, he is reduced and sent away without the magistrates, Council, or anybody being consulted in the matter? - Captain Yardley: It is nothing to do with me. I don't know what the chief does in matters of this kind. - Mr Hockin: But it was entirely on account of your report that the sergeant was disrated? - Captain Yardley: It was. (Hisses and Groans.) - Mr Hockin further pointed out that it was necessary in the case of the dismissal of a policeman that notice should be given to the Mayor of the borough of the cause of dismissal. (To Captain Yardley): has it been done in this case? - Captain Yardley: I can't say. I have nothing to do with it. - Major Jennings, whose name had been referred to by the deceased, explained his connection with the fire. When Dr Davson was visiting at a friend's house he told witness that there had been an incendiary fire at his house, and at the request of the doctor he wrote to Superintendent Yardley about the matter. But he distinctly stated that he had nothing whatever to do with the deceased being disrated. - A Juryman: If you had gone to Sergeant ALLIN instead of writing to Superintendent Yardley do you not feel now that the Sergeant would not have committed this act? - That I cannot say, but I am very grieved that my name has been in any way mixed up in this affair. - The Coroner, in summing up, said of the deceased that a more efficient and courteous police officer he had never met with during the five years he had been stationed at Dartmouth. - The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide by Strychnine Poisoning, whilst of Unsound Mind; and the attributed the deceased's state of mind to the unjust treatment received at the hands of his superior officers, relative to his conduct on the occasion of the fire at Dr Davson's house, and particularly in sending deceased back to Ilfracombe, where he was formerly in charge, which the Jury considered to be arbitrary, cruel and unjust, and they endorsed the statement of the Coroner as to the deceased's exemplary character and efficiency.

BRIXHAM - The Collision Off The Start. Inquiry At Brixham. Fatal Mistakes. - The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM SHEARS, skipper of the Brixham smack Nimble, which was run down on Friday morning, the 6th inst., by the steamship Swansea, Hamilton Murrell master, when about fourteen miles off the Start, was resumed last evening in the Market Hall at Brixham, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner. On Monday in last week the Inquest was opened at the Bolton Hotel, but so great was the interest evinced in the proceedings yesterday that the Inquiry was held in the Market Hall, which was crowded, chiefly with the fishermen, of whom there were a great number in the town, all the trawling fleet being at their moorings. Capt. Trail was the representative of the Board of Trade present; Mr Butler Aspinall represented the captain of the Swansea and the mate, Hector Adams (the officer in charge at the time of the collision); Mr H. Holman represented the owners of the Swansea; and Mr H. W. Nelson (of Messrs. Lawless, Nelson and Co., solicitors, London) watched the proceedings for MRS ANNIE SHEARS, the widow of the deceased. The evidence taken last week was read over in the presence of the witnesses. - Captain Trail asked George Parnell, skipper of the fishing smack Telegram, the trawl of which picked up the body of deceased, questions relative to the lights, eliciting the information that it took about a minute to burn a red flare-up, and it was customary to use the signals if a steamer's lights were to be seen near. When trawling a white light was shewn at the masthead and when making weigh side lights. - The only survivor, Thomas Gardner, stated that he was quite sure that he saw the steamer after the collision on the starboard side. He was the last but one to come on deck in response to calls, and saw the skipper on the starboard side. The vessel had been going about three or four miles an hour. There was only one man on deck at the time of the collision. - Mr Holman was proceeding to ask a question, when Mr Nelson said he would like to have the Coroner's ruling as to that gentleman's position, as he did not know that the owners had anything to do with the Inquest. He also represented the owners. - Mr Holman held that the owners were most materially involved, and the Coroner said it was his rule to allow persons interested to put questions. - By Mr Aspinall: The pump on board had been broken, and they were putting back to Brixham. - Hamilton Murrell, 211 Newport-road, Cardiff, master of the steamship Swansea, stated that he knew nothing of what led to the collision. At twenty minutes to five on the morning of January 5th he went below. The chart was shewing N.W. by W. The vessel was left in charge of the chief officer, Hector Adams. The night was clear and free from fog. The collision took place just as he came on deck, aroused by the unusual noise. The heading was south-west, the Nimble was struck on the starboard bow with her head to the southward. There was a moderate breeze. The telegraph was at "full speed astern." He took charge, stopped the engines and lowered the starboard boat instantly. His ship carried four boats. The collision took place at six o'clock. The boy was picked up, but no trace of anyone else was seen. The steamer remained on the spot until about 7.30. The boy was not sufficiently recovered to give him up to the Rescue, ketch, when that vessel arrived. The steamer carried the regulation lights, burning brightly, one on the mast and one on each side. Every half-hour the lights were reported. They carried no life lines. - By a Juror: There would have been no chance for the men had there been lines. The trawler sank underneath the steamer's bows in less than two minutes from the time she was struck. - By Mr Nelson: He would not swear that Knight, one of the men on the Rescue, had asked him three times to let him have Gardner. He had not refused to give up the boy at Gravesend when asked, as he knew nothing about that matter until London was reached. - By Mr Aspinall: The mate had been with him since May, and had given every satisfaction. - By Mr Holman: There was no foundation for Mr Nelson's suggestion that witness had tampered with the boy. - Hector Adams, mate of the Swansea, deposed that a little before six a bright light was reported three points on the starboard bow. He was on deck at the time. The light was a white one, and was approaching them. He put the helm a port, intending to go under the stern of the trawler, seeing that she was making weight. If she had exhibited side lights he should have done so before. The engines were put full speed astern. If the trawler had kept her course she would have gone clear. They struck the smack about her starboard rigging, and sank her. They had passed a fleet of trawlers before and had gone along all right. When the master came on board he threw some ropes overboard, and when the boat was lowered went in her for about an hour and a half. No one gave any orders to throw over life buoys, of which there were four on board. There was no flash or noise of any kind on the trawler. When he first saw her she was a mile and a half off. - By a Juryman: If the trawler had kept her course the steamer would have cleared her by some 100 or 150 yards. - By Captain Traill: He thought that the vessel was a trawler from the light. The light was such as to shew a trawler or vessel at anchor. - By Mr Nelson: The steamer was going about a mile in six minutes, or eleven knots an hour. The trawler was on the port tack. He had intended to bring the trawler's light on the port side, but he could not. He did not now believe that the trawler was stationary, from the fact of his having ported his helm with the intention of getting the light on his port side, and not having got it for five or six minutes. - By Mr Aspinall: there were no flare-ups exhibited, as ought to have been the case if the trawler had been stationary. It would be foolish to manoeuvre the steamer unless he knew first what the vessel was doing, and it was his duty to hold on as he had done on this occasion. It was always difficult for steamers to deal with vessels exhibiting no side lights. The course to Brixham would be north, or at any rate north-west. - By Mr Holman: The trawler's mast light got on board the steamer. - Edwin Knight, trawler, Brixham, one of the hands on the ketch Rescue, stated that it was customary for a trawler with her gear up to have side lights. He went to the scene attracted by the noise the steamer was making. The boat he was in was nearing the boy Gardner as the steamer's boat rescued him. He had tried to get the boy, but the captain would not let him come, giving no reason. It would have taken two hours to take the boy into Brixham. - By Mr Nelson: He had seen a white light in the same direction in which he found the steamer when he went to it. He had asked Captain Murrell for the boy three times. It was the custom to carry flarers in the binnacle. - By Mr Aspinall: He saw the white light for a quarter of an hour, but saw no flare-up. - By Mr Holman: He had known the boy Gardner for some time, and knew nothing against him. - Captain Murrell, recalled by the Coroner and asked why he had taken the boy to London when the last witness had asked to be allowed to take him to Brixham, stated that he had done so entirely from principles of humanity. The little fellow was thoroughly chilled and he thought he could do better for him by taking him in his steamer. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it was the sole duty of the Jury to make up their minds as to whether deceased met his death by drowning in consequence of the collision between the vessels, and whether that death was occasioned by the neglect of any person. He called attention to some of the principal points in the evidence, saying there was no doubt that the Nimble had done wrong. - The Jury, after an hour's deliberation, brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death," with the following expression of opinion attached:- "That the Nimble was not exhibiting the proper lights for a vessel under weigh, and that the officer in charge of the Swansea committed an error of judgment by putting his helm to port with the Nimble's masthead light on his starboard bow."

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 January 1888
EXETER - Painful Case At Exeter. Death Of A Mother And Child. - At Exeter yesterday an Inquest was held concerning the death of ELIZABETH SAUNDERS, an infant. - Mrs Baigent, of 1 Marsh-place, Paris-street, said that on Thursday week ELIZA SAUNDERS came to her house and said she wanted two rooms for herself and husband. She gave her name as MRS BALSDON. Witness let her the rooms at 5s. a week, and she came the following morning with her boxes. Her husband, or the man witness was led to believe was her husband, came the first night also, and had slept there almost every night since. She knew SAUNDERS was enciente and had been preparing for her confinement. On Tuesday morning BALSDON got up and requested witness to see his "missus," but did not say for what purpose. When witness got upstairs she found the woman lying on her back, apparently unconscious, and a newly-born babe on the floor. She was frightened and fetched Mrs Hatchet, a midwife, whilst her husband went for Dr Bell. After BALSDON told her to go up and see his "missus" he drank a cup of tea, and went out to his work. The interval between his telling her to go up and her doing so was about three minutes. She had heard no noise during the night. - Dr Bell said he had attended ELIZA SAUNDERS when she lived in service. Upon going to Marsh-place on Tuesday morning he found the woman in bed unconscious. Having attended to her, he was shewn the body of a child, which, post-mortem, exhibited a bruise on the back of head, which was probably inflicted at the time of birth. It was impossible to say whether the child was absolutely separated from the mother when it met with the injury to the head. His impression was that the woman was confined out of bed, and that the child fell on the floor, which would be quite sufficient to cause the fracture. The young man ALFRED BALSDON volunteered evidence, and was cautioned by the Coroner. He said he was a tailor, unmarried and lived in Culverland-road. He had known ELIZA SAUNDERS over four years, and had cohabited with her. On Tuesday morning he dressed in the dark, and while doing so heard a "riddling" in SAUNDERS'S throat. He had no conversation with her, however, and afterwards drank a cup of tea and went to work. He had never quarrelled with the woman; he was aware of her condition. - The Coroner said it was very strange that BALSDON should have been there at the time and yet, as he alleged, known nothing of the confinement. In answer to a Juror, BALSDON said he did not fall over anything as he went out of the room. The blinds were drawn. - At this point a person entered the room and stated that the woman SAUNDERS had just died. The Coroner: It is a very sad case. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 January 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of HENRY STONE. The evidence shewed that the deceased was employed at Messrs. Tremletts' tannery, West Quarter. He was caught by a cogwheel of a bark machine, as already reported and dragged in. Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased when admitted was considerably collapsed. The right side of his chest was broken in and almost all the ribs were broken, some of them in three places. The right lung was wounded. Inspector Bignold was present, and questioned the witnesses as to the relative position of the machinery. He elicited that the cogs were open. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but added a rider (in which they were not quite unanimous) to the effect that there had been some neglect in allowing the cogwheels to go uncovered so many years as they had.

EXETER - At Exeter yesterday Mr Coroner Hooper Inquired into circumstances attending the death of JOHN YELLAND, a clerk, of 45 Parr-street. Deceased was 48 years of age. He was found lying on a sofa which he had used as a bed. He had been dead then some hours. The deceased retired the previous night apparently in pretty good health, after partaking of supper. Mr Perkins, surgeon, said death was probably due to heart disease. Verdict - "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 January 1888
EXETER - The Painful Case At Exeter. Unfeeling Conduct Censured. - At the Exeter Guildhall yesterday afternoon Mr W. H. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA SAUNDERS, aged 31, single, and until recently, in domestic service. The unfortunate woman on Tuesday morning last gave birth to a child, which was afterwards found dead in a bedroom where she lodged, and in another part of the same room the mother was lying unconscious. She never rallied for any length of time and whilst the Coroner was holding an Inquest on Wednesday on the body of the child the information was brought in that the mother had just died. In the case of the infant an Open Verdict was returned. Rumours got abroad that the man with whom SAUNDERS had cohabited had acted unfeelingly towards her in her distress when it assumed an acute form; and having regard to all the circumstances of the case Mr Coroner Hooper felt justified in instituting another Inquiry and ordering an examination of the remains. This Dr Bell conducted yesterday morning. - The first witness called at the Inquiry later in the day was Ann Baigent, married, of 1 Marsh-place, Paris-street, who said she knew the deceased, whose name was ELIZA SAUNDERS, to have been a single woman and a native of Bradninch. She had been in the service of Mr Dawson, of Northbrook, Topsham, as domestic servant. She left there a week before Christmas. Her age was 31. On Thursday, January 5th, about eleven a.m., deceased called at witness's house to ask if she had any rooms to let. Witness said "No," and she left. Deceased returned between two and three o'clock and witness asked her to stay to tea, which she did. Deceased then explained that she wanted two furnished rooms, and witness told her that she could accommodate her; rent, 5s. a week. Witness knew at that time of her condition. She stated that she was married, and that her name was BALSDON, her husband being a tailor. She came into occupation of the rooms next morning, bringing a hand box with her. Two men followed with her large boxes. Deceased told witness that she expected her confinement in about two months, and wanted to get a home to prepare for it. On the night of January 16th deceased had a severe cold and cough and went to bed early. At 7.30 she ate her supper in bed, and then appeared comfortable. there was no fire in the room, as there was no grate. Witness saw nothing of her again until the following morning. About 9.30 the same night (Monday) a man who had visited the deceased before came, and after a few minutes' conversation with witness and her husband, he went to bed with the deceased. Next morning at half-past eight BALSDON - that was the man's name - came downstairs and said: "Will you run up and see my missus; she's got a 'rattling' in her throat." Witness could not go for a moment, and sent her little girl up to say she (witness) "would be there in a moment." The little girl came back apparently alarmed at the "rattling" in deceased's throat, and said, "Run up, mother." Witness entered the bedroom and said, "How are you this morning?" Deceased made no reply. The room was quite dark, the curtains being drawn. Witness pulled he curtains back, and then saw that the deceased had vomited, and that she had also given birth to a baby. Witness went out of the room and shut the door, and called in a midwife. Witness's husband meanwhile came home, was told what had occurred and went for a doctor. BALSDON was also sent for. The latter drank a cup of tea before he went out in the morning, saying he was in a hurry. Witness understood that he had to be at work by half-past eight. It was a quarter of an hour before the midwife came, and they went back to the bedroom together. The midwife attended to the baby, but had nothing to do with the mother before the doctor came, saying that she was very ill. - By the Coroner: BALSDON used to come to the house every night about eight o'clock. He was always sober. - By the Jury: The bedroom was a small one, but a man could walk about freely. It was evident deceased had been out of bed. The baby was near the washstand; could not say whether BALSDON had washed there. Witness took them in as man and wife, and quite believed they were married. - Eliza Mary Hatchet, midwife, said she was called about ten minutes to nine on Tuesday morning. The last witness said, "I have a lodger in my house who has been confined." Witness went at once and found the deceased in bed, "mumbling," and with a noise in her throat. She saw that the deceased was in danger, and told Mrs Baigent to send for a medical man. She said her husband had gone for Dr Bell. Meanwhile witness adopted a necessary process and attended to the infant. She did nothing for the mother, preferring to wait for the doctor. Witness remained at the house until seven in the evening, and left the deceased in charge of Mrs Baigent. BALSDON asked to see the child, and was allowed in the bedroom. - By the Jury: Someone appeared to have washed in the room. Witness thought it possible for a man to get at the washstand without coming in contact with the baby. Could not say from appearances whether the woman got out of bed before or after the man left. She had brief periods of consciousness during the day, but when asked at what time she had the baby, she looked amazed and began to "ramble again. She said it was "very cold," and that she liked the witness's cold hands on her forehead. - Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he saw the deceased in bed. She was very ill, unconscious, and almost pulseless. Witness ordered what was necessary for her, and then saw the body of the child, which was quite cold and had evidently been born some hours. Witness saw the deceased later in the evening; she had then revived a little, and knew witness. He made arrangements for the nursing, and ordered her brandy and beef tea from the parish authorities. About half an hour after this the man BALSDON came to witness's house. He said, "I don't wish my wife to have anything from the parish." Witness told him to arrange with the relieving officer and take the responsibility. Witness saw the deceased the following morning, when she was dying and death took place in the course of the day - Wednesday, the 18th. At the Coroner's request he had that morning made a post-mortem examination. He found no marks of violence upon the body externally and no signs of inflammation within the abdomen. The lungs were acutely inflamed throughout their whole extent, in fact they were almost solid. The heart was healthy. The state of the lungs must have existed for two or three days. The deceased died from exhaustion consequent upon inflammation of the lungs, accelerated by giving birth to a child. By the Coroner: There was no symptom of foul play of any sort whatever. - By the Jury: Do you believe that if she had been properly attended to in her illness her life would have been spared? That is a very difficult question to answer. I think the getting out of bed once or twice on a cold night would do away with any chance of recovery. Attendance ought to have been given two or three days previously. She ought not to have been allowed to get out of bed at all. Do you know whether the things you ordered were provided? I believe so. I do not know that they were not. As far as BALSDON was concerned, he spoke very fairly to me, and seemed anxious to provide what was necessary. I thought that that was a very natural wish on the part of a husband, as I believed him to be at the time. - Don't you think that another person in the room must have heard deceased get out of bed? That would be giving an opinion. It would depend a great deal upon the soundness with which BALSDON slept, because many people sleep much sounder than others. But I should hardly think that a person could be in the same bed without hearing it. The chances would be against it. - Then he had to get over her? If he thought she was asleep in the morning he might have got over her carefully, and she, perhaps, being unconscious, might not have noticed it. - But he said he heard a noise in her throat? You are as well able to form an opinion upon that as I am. - A Juryman: It was a small room, and somebody had washed. I saw it is impossible for a man to have gone through to wash without seeing something. Even with the blind drawn it would have been light enough to see the floor. - Mrs Baigent said the curtains were dark ones. - The Coroner: Do you think the state of the woman was such that she could make a noise? - She was moaning when I got there. - The Coroner: Does anybody know whether this was SAUNDERS'S first child? - Mrs Baigent (after a pause): It was not her first. - The Coroner then asked BALSDON whether he wished to say anything, but cautioned him that whatever he said might at a future time be used as evidence against him. He wished particularly to caution him on this point, but hoped that might be no necessity for such a course. - Balsdon: Very good, sir. - ALFRED BALSDON, tailor, Culverland-road, unmarried, said he had worked for Mr Osborne, Paul-street. He first became acquainted with the deceased four years ago. From that time up to June last, however, he did not see her. She was then in service with Mr Dawson, Northbrook, near Exeter. He had cohabited with her since a week before Christmas, latterly at Mrs Baigent's. On Monday night last he went to bed about nine o'clock. There was a candle in the room, but it was not lighted. He lit the candle, and after undressing, blew it out. Deceased then asked, "Why did you blow it out?" He made no answer, but lit the candle again and left it burning. He woke up once during the night - he could not say at what time - and got out of bed. The deceased was apparently sleeping then. Witness got up at eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, but he would swear that he had heard no noise during the night. The deceased was not restless. He slept inside and had to get over the deceased, but he did so carefully, and she did not wake. He said, "How are you?" but she did not reply. Witness dressed, but did not wash. Whilst doing the former, he heard a "rattling" in deceased's throat, and on coming down asked the landlady to go upstairs, meanwhile drinking a cup of tea himself. He was called back about ten o'clock, and was told his "missus" was "bad." Would swear he did not know what had occurred until he got there. When Mr Bell suggested that he should go to the relieving officer he said he did not like to. He "did not like the thoughts of it," because he had means of his own. - The Coroner: don't you think, having heard this noise in her throat that it would have been very much better if you had remained in the bedroom? I only heard the noise, and she had done that before. She had had a sore throat for a long time. - The Jury: Don't you think it very unfeeling on your part to have left when the woman was in such pain? Well, she had a cold, and I thought it would end there. - Are you in the habit of going away in the morning without washing your face? Not at all. - What was it that hindered you on Tuesday morning? Because I was late. - Do you mean to say you did not touch or stumble against anything in the room? I do. - The Coroner said there was no other person he could examine. Perhaps this was one of the most extraordinary cases that ever came before a Jury. He thought it desirable that this Inquiry should be held, and also a post-mortem examination. The result of that examination had shewn them pretty clearly that the death was a natural one; but he thought it very desirable that the case should be cleared up. The most extraordinary part of the whole case was that this man BALSDON should have been, as he alleged, in the room the whole of that night, sleeping in the same bed and on the inside, and yet have known nothing of the woman'/s confinement and illness. Then there was his getting up in the morning when it was dark. This probably precluded his view, but it was an extraordinary thing that in a small room of that kind where all this was taking place he should not have observed one single thing which led him to believe that all could not be right. All he said was that he awoke in the morning and heard this "riddling" as he called it, in the woman's throat. They had heard from Mr Bell that she was suffering from congestion of the lungs, and that would probably account for the noise BALSDON heard. But there was still a difficulty, and he could scarcely bring his mind to believe that a man could be in the same room as the woman - a small room - and yet hear nothing of what was going on. The poor woman herself had gone, and they had no external evidence - only the evidence of this man. He could not help thinking that BALSDON, living as he did on intimate terms with the deceased, might have shewn more kindliness of heart, to say the least of it, and have paid a little more attention to the woman after she came under his care. (Hear, hear). The Coroner repeated this remark once or twice and added that there was nothing else upon which the Jury could fix. There was, unfortunately, no evidence to bring, either to contradict or support what BALSDON had said. - The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, so far as the death of the woman was concerned; but added this rider: "The Jury consider that BALSDON is highly censurable for his unfeelingness and want of thought." - The Coroner said he quite concurred in the verdict. It exactly expressed his own views. He thought there was great want of sympathy, to say the least of it, and that BALSDON ought to have been far more solicitous for the welfare of the woman with whom he was so intimately connected.

TIVERTON - Distressing Fatality At Tiverton. Singular Evidence. - Last evening Mr Mackenzie, Coroner, held an Inquest at Tiverton relative to the death of MARY COLES, aged 25, whose body was the previous morning found in the leat connected with the lace factory. Deceased was the daughter of a carpenter of Willand, and worked in the factory. In the course of her evidence MRS COLES, mother of deceased, said she last saw her daughter alive on Tuesday, when she said, "I am glad you have come into town. the girls are down upon me in the factory, and I don't think I can undergo it." [Here MRS COLES sobbed bitterly]. Witness replied, "You should, my dear, look up," to which deceased answered, "I do; but I am afraid I shall not be able to stand it." She did not particularly refer to the girls whom she alleged to be down upon her. Witness suggested that she should leave the factory, and return home with her. Deceased promised to see her on Sunday and expressed a hope that she would be helped to bear up. When they parted deceased burst into tears, and repeatedly she said "Mother we will look up." She was very much depressed. - Mrs Elizabeth Ferris, widow, with whom the deceased lodged, said that on Wednesday night she was in a queer mood when she came home. She believed there had been a dispute between some young people at the Wesleyan Chapel, and that evening it was to have been made up. Deceased was excited and would not take any supper. She frequently "threw herself away," and when troubled would commence crying. The next morning she appeared all right when she went out at six o'clock, her usual time of going to work. Deceased was a well-behaved young woman, and a thorough Christian. She had had a quarrel, she believed, with a young woman named Manning, and she had said she did not get on very well with her work. - A Juror: When the girl got so excited did she ever complain of losing any money? - Witness: I know she lost money, as she had it when she left my house. - The Juror: That is where a great deal of the dispute arose. - Charlotte Manning, factory girl, said that on Wednesday night she met the deceased, with whom she had had a quarrel, and at the house of a mutual friend they made it up and shook hands. They were in the habit of meeting at the Wesleyan Chapel. Later in the night witness went to the house of a Mrs Dummett, and on telling her that the quarrel was settled Mrs Dummett said, "But have you paid POLLY COLES the 30s. you borrowed of her?" Witness denied having borrowed it, and by-and-by she fetched deceased, who denied ever having alleged witness to be her debtor. She then went out very excited and slammed the door. - Mr Thomas Dummett, of Lead-street, said he had known the deceased for the last five years, and she was very excitable and impulsive. She became very excited when the money matter was referred to by the last witness was discussed at his house and on his telling her how wrong it was to make a groundless charge against Manning, and that she had acted "in an un-Christian manner, and very un-Christlike," she replied, "I make no profession." She then abruptly left the house. - Evidence was given to the effect that on Thursday morning the deceased was seen about six o'clock walking away from the factory, and about the same time a private gate which led to the leat was heard to slam. The body was picked up 200 yards lower down. The stream was six feet deep, and was walled in on either side. - The Coroner pointed out that inasmuch as there was no direct evidence as to how the deceased got into the water, that point must be left a matter for surmise. On the evidence he advised the Jury to return an open verdict. - The verdict returned was that the deceased had been Found Drowned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 January 1888
CREDITON - An Inquest was yesterday held at Crediton on the body of MR HERMON CHERITON, retired farmer, who committed suicide under circumstances already reported. The for-long fruitless search for the knife with which deceased cut his throat proved at last successful, a knife belonging to the keeper of MR CHERITON, named Daw, being found in a garden some distance off. At the Inquest yesterday the keeper acknowledged the knife was his, and said his fright on seeing what his charge had done induced him to throw it away. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

LONDON - Mysterious Death Of A Young Wife. - MRS PRISCILLA MOORE (Nee KING) was married at Plymouth on Boxing-day; on Saturday she was buried in a village churchyard a few miles from London, her husband and her uncle, Mr Firkins, a tradesman of Union-street, Plymouth, being the only mourners present. The death of the young woman was tragic and mysterious. Her husband, who was employed in London, left home in the morning, and upon returning at nine o'clock at night he found his wife lying on the bed, dead, with her throat cut. In his absence she was the only occupant of a rather large house, MR MOORE'S mother having ceased to live with the newly-married couple only two days before the sad occurrence. An examination led to the belief that deceased cut her throat in the kitchen, and then, holding her apron to the wound, walked upstairs to the bedroom. The mark of a blood-stained hand on the wall shewed that she staggered just before falling on to the bed. Letters received from her at Plymouth leave no doubt that the solitariness of her new home in London - so unlike her previous experience with her relatives at Plymouth - preyed upon her mind and drove her to commit the sad act. Her uncle and aunt were opposed to the marriage, and only gave their consent at last with reluctance. The deceased had lived with her uncle ever since she was a child, and she had been his chief assistant in the shop at Plymouth for some time. The husband was formerly a resident of Plymouth. MISS KING was a young lady of a very happy and cheerful disposition and her sad end has elicited many expressions of sympathy from her former friends for Mr and Mrs Firkins. At the Inquest which was held on Saturday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Mentally Deranged."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 January 1999
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident On Mutley Plain. Painful Death Of An Artist. - An Inquest was held at the Fortescue Arms Hotel, Mutley last evening, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian), as to the circumstances of the death of MR SAMUEL GEORGE MADDOCK. Mr John Bickle was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Rev. James Mitchell watched the case on behalf of the widow, and Detective-Inspector John Hill on behalf of the Police. - The Coroner detailed briefly the sad circumstances of the case, and asked the Jury to be very careful in watching the evidence. They would have the cabman before them; he would tell his own story. - SARAH MADDOCK, widow of deceased, identified the body, and said her husband was an artist, 32 years of age, and living at No. 3 Grosvenor-terrace. Witness left the house about 6.30 p.m. on Wednesday, deceased remaining at home. Soon afterwards she heard that an accident had occurred on Mutley Plain and hastened home to find the deceased in the back parlour dreadfully injured. Mr Edlin attended him, but he died at ten minutes to one on Thursday morning. - This concluded MRS MADDOCK'S evidence, but before she left the room the Coroner said he was sure the Jury, with him, sympathised very deeply with the widow in her terrible loss. (Hear, hear.) - George Phelp, a painter, deposed that about twenty minutes to seven on Wednesday evening he was coming up Belgrave-road, when he heard some vehicle coming at great speed in the direction of Plymouth. He ran to the corner of the Wesleyan Chapel and heard someone scream out "Oh," and then a horse in a four-wheeled cab rushed past him at a furious rate. It passed within twelve or thirteen feet of him, but he could not say whether there was a driver or not - the want of light and the rapidity with which the vehicle passed prevented him from seeing. There was a gaslight about a yard and a half from him. Baskerville's 'bus was coming towards the town, and he noticed it pass the corner a moment or two before witness got there. On looking in the road, he saw the figure of a man kneeling in the road and resting on his hands, with his head drooping between his arms. Witness ran to him and lifted him up, asking him where he was injured, to which deceased replied that his ribs were gone right through him. No one came to his assistance, and witness helped him with great difficulty, "as he was getting very heavy," to his house in Grosvenor-terrace, having sent two boys for Mr Edlin. There was no one in the house, and he placed the deceased on a bed in a back parlour. P.C. James came shortly afterwards and also Mr Edlin. - The Coroner: did you ask him how the accident happened? - Yes; and he said he was trying to catch Baskerville's 'bus when a horse kicked him in the chest. He did not make a complaint against anyone. - Mr Brian said it was very evident that Phelp was deserving of great commendation for the way in which he had stuck to the poor man and helped him home. - The Foreman quite agreed with the Coroner, but the Jury would reserve that until the end. - Henry Baskerville stated that he was conductor of the 'bus leaving Mannamead at 6.30 p.m. When they were just opposite the Wesleyan Chapel he was talking to a lady inside the 'bus when he heard someone shouting. On turning round he saw a horse coming at a great speed, but he could not at first see a cab behind it. Witness shouted to the driver of his 'bus to keep off, or the horse must have dashed straight into the back of the 'bus. As it was it just touched the wheels. Witness saw a gentleman running up Belgrave-road just at the time the cab was coming, and knew it was the deceased, as he had told his (witness's) father that he wanted to catch the 'bus to send an advertisement to the Western Morning News office. The horse was stopped a short distance further on, and there was no one in the cab. The driver came up, and witness asked him how it was the horse was the horse ran away, to which he replied that he was standing outside the Hyde Park Hotel when the horse suddenly turned round and galloped away before he had time to catch him. The driver was perfectly sober. - P.C. James said he was on duty on the Plain when he heard a crash close to Belgrave-road. He then saw a horse and cab rushing along. He made a jump at the horse's head and a young man on the other side catching him at the same time, he was brought to a standstill. Someone from the 'bus then told him that a man had been knocked down further on. Witness met the driver, but did not stay with him. He looked for the man said to be injured, and found that the deceased had been taken to his home. He afterwards saw the cabman, who readily gave his name and all particulars. During the evening the deceased told him he heard the horse coming but before he had time to get out of the way something like a wheel struck him. - The Rev. J. Mitchell spoke of the excellent conduct of the witness during the whole of the time. - The Coroner agreed with him and thought that at Mutley they had the right man in the right place. - William Edwards, the cab-driver, was cautioned by the Coroner, but desired to be sworn. He said he was in the employ of Mr H. Membrey. On Wednesday last he was engaged at Millbay Station to drive a sergeant of artillery to Crownhill Fort. He had been driving the same horse for about two months, and it was a very quiet one, not given to tricks of any kind. It was not, to his knowledge, a horse that had been sold because it was a "runaway." When he got to the Hyde Park Hotel he stopped at the sergeant's request to allow him to have a drink. - The Coroner: Did he not say to you "Come in and have a drink with me?" Yes. - Did you not go in and have threepennyworth of gin? Yes, but I came out again immediately. - Continuing, witness said the horse was standing in the same position then as when he went into the house. The sergeant did not then come out, and witness remained on the pavement just a little in front of the horse's head, but at such a distance as in ordinary circumstances would be near enough to have control of the horse. Suddenly the animal turned his head towards Plymouth and bolted, witness running after him. The reins were over the front of the cab. - Me E. Holbeton Edlin, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased. He was lying in bed dressed and quite conscious. There were two contused wounds over the eye-brows. He was suffering from severe shock to the system, and had evidently sustained serious internal injuries. The symptoms shewed that one or more ribs were broken. The injuries might have been caused by a wheel, but he believed that the deceased was caught by the shaft between the chest and the arm, and that the ribs had seriously injured the lung. The injuries were quite sufficient to cause death. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought a large thoroughfare like Mutley Plain should be better lighted than at present. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated the driver from all blame. They considered that more light was needed on the Plain, and suggested that one or two of Davis's shadowless lights should be placed there. They also wished to express their admiration of the conduct of the young man Phelp and of P.C. James. The Coroner promised that the recommendations should go to the proper quarters. MR SAMUEL MADDOCK, whose deplorable death was the subject of the investigation reported above, was a gentleman of uncommon ability in many directions, but is chiefly known for his skill as an artist. He was a native of Plymouth, and his father is at the present time still carrying on business as a lithographer in Treville-street. After leaving the Corporation Grammar School, then conducted by Dr Weymouth, MR MADDOCK spent a number of years at Messrs. Parker and Smith's pianoforte factory. Twelve years ago, on leaving this business, he married and henceforth relied on his varied abilities for his daily bread. He possessed a fine tenor voice, and, in addition to being able to make a piano or a violin, could also play on either instrument with no mean skill. These accomplishments, added to a genial nature, made him popular and welcome at all festive gatherings. Five years ago he joined the Wesleyan Church at Mutley. MR MADDOCK produced upwards of 300 paintings of local scenes, and his pictures met with a ready sale. His genius found exercise in various kinds of artistic house decoration, and he once received a medal for wood carving. Painting, however, was his favourite pursuit, and though wholly self-taught, his dexterity was very marked. Among other matters he was the originator of some improvement in connection with the piano and the telephone wire. The relations of MR MADDOCK with his class leader (Rev. J. Mitchell) were always of a cordial nature, and on several occasions he testified his affection and esteem by gifts, the product of his brush. On Thursday last he was at class, and gave an earnest address to those present, and a few days later expressed to his wife a wish to die. The desire seemed prophetic, and when the accident happened he expressed his belief that he would not recover from its effects. MR MADDOCK was ever of a cheerful, affectionate disposition, kind-hearted himself, and susceptible to kindness from others, and those who knew him best will miss him most.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 January 1888
DENBURY - The Fatality At Denbury. "Accidental Death." - On Saturday afternoon Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances of the death of P.C. BEER, of Denbury, near Newton, who died from the effects of a gunshot wound, as reported in Saturday's Western Morning News. Captain Barbor, superintendent of police, attended officially. The Jury first viewed the body, the head of which presented a shocking appearance, the features being totally unrecognisable. - MARY ANN BEER, wife of the deceased, said her husband was 24 years of age. He had been at Denbury for nearly two years. On Friday her husband returned home between two and three o'clock and before taking his dinner said he would go out and scare the birds. Witness went into the front room and heard the report of a gun. She took no notice, as it was a usual occurrence. She went out after a minute to ask him what he had killed, and then found him lying on his back in the back pantry, where the gun - the property of their lodger - was kept. Witness called to deceased, but receiving no answer ran for assistance. A Mr Wills was with her in the front kitchen at the time. Deceased had been enjoying very good health, and he had had no troubles that she knew of. He had been on night duty on Thursday. - William Wills, tailor, corroborated portions of the evidence of the last witness. Deceased and his wife lived very comfortably together. - Amelia Ann Thomas, widow, deposed to seeing deceased in his own house just before the occurrence, reading the newspaper. She was talking to him. There appeared to be nothing strange about deceased. - William Hill, slaughterman, said that being called in by MRS BEER he discovered her husband dead on the floor. The gun was lying on the floor nearly at right angles to the body. - John Pearce, under-gamekeeper to Mr Scratton, Ogwell, stated that he lodged in deceased's house. He always kept the gun (a breach-loader) in a corner of the pantry. He had last used it on Wednesday, and was not aware that anyone had used it since. He could state positively that he had unloaded the gun, that being his practice. He kept his cartridges in the pantry. Witness did not know that deceased was in the habit of using his gun in his absence. The trigger was a hard one, harder than the average. Witness was on intimate terms with the deceased and did not know of anything to trouble his mind. He had been with deceased shooting in the garden, and he knew how to handle a gun. Witness had since examined the gun, and it only contained one empty cartridge. Witness was in the habit of filling the cartridges himself. - P.S. Richard Nicholls, Newton Abbot, gave evidence as to the position of the body, and the contents of the pockets. There was a quantity of blood coming from the mouth and the ears when witness arrived at five o'clock. the face was swollen, but was not blackened except on the lips. There was no apparent wound, but the right eye was protruding. The muzzle of the gun was blood-stained. Witness had seen the deceased on Wednesday. He had always performed his duties well and cheerfully, and he had never heard him complain. - George Francis Symons, surgeon, practising at Kingskerswell, said he had examined the body the previous evening. The lips were not hurt in any way, but the upper jaw was completely smashed. The bulk of the shots seemed to have passed inside the upper lip and kept inside the skin until they passed to the eyes, and thence travelled to the brain. the gun seemed to have been discharged upwards, as if the barrel had been parallel with the body. If deceased's head had not been fairly erect the shots would have gone to the back of the head, of which only the front part was damaged. From the state of the lips he was of opinion that the muzzle of the gun must have been inside them. He did not open the brain, and was otherwise unable to find any shots. - MRS BEER, recalled, stated that her husband had more than once filled cartridges with maize, and had shot at birds from the pantry. - The Coroner, having instructed the Jury as to their duties, touched on some of the points raised in the evidence. He said that from the fact of the lips of the deceased being neither damaged nor blackened, it seemed that the muzzle of the gun must have been inside the mouth. but some men were in the habit of leaning on their walking-sticks with their teeth, and deceased might have been leaning against the window resting his head on the gun. - The Jury, having spent some time in discussion, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 January 1888
PLYMOUTH - The Wreck Of The Constance. Inquest On One Of The Bodies. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) relative to the death of EDWARD SEAVELL, one of the men who was drowned by the wreck of the steamship Constance, on the Shagstone Rock on the 21st inst., and whose body was recovered on Saturday. Mr W. H. Webb represented Messrs. T. Nicholson and Sons, the agents of the Bristol General Steam Navigation Company, to whom the vessel belonged. - John Penney, waterman, said he knew the deceased and he identified the body. SEAVELL was a quartermaster on board the steamship Constance. Witness believed deceased was about 40 years of age, and belonged to Bristol. Charles Pascoe, a diver, said he had been engaged on the wreck of the Constance since Monday, the 30th inst. He found the steamer wrecked on a portion of the Shagstone Rock. On Sunday last he was sending up some of the cargo and after removing a portion of it he saw a body. He dislodged it and it was hoisted up. It was taken into Plymouth by a waterman named Wm. Roberts. Witness thought the body had been in the water about a week. - By a Juror: You were out there directly after the vessel was wrecked. Was she broken up then? She was, entirely. - Well, from the position of the body, do you think he was drowned before the vessel was wrecked? The body might have been at the bottom of the sea and washed back again into the wreck after the vessel parted, and so got mixed up with the cargo. - P.C. Venton proved searched the body at the mortuary, but he only found a purse containing twopence. - William Henry Webb, accountant for Messrs. T. Nicholson and Sons, said the Constance was wrecked on the Shagstone Rock on the 21st inst., just after three o'clock. She was due at Plymouth that morning. Three of the crew were drowned, one of them, EDWARD SEAVELL, the quartermaster. There was a dense fog, and a heavy sea was running at the time. The captain and survivors of the crew had left Plymouth and gone to their homes. The captain made the usual deposition at the Custom House, and there was no blame attached to anyone as far as inquiries had gone at present. He was not aware that any inquiry was to be instituted by the Board of Trade or the Receivers of Wrecks. - A Juror said they had nothing to go upon in the evidence to guide them to a verdict and the Coroner said he was quite happy to adjourn the Inquest to any date if the Jury wished it. That was a case in which they ought to adjourn, and he would then be able to bring the captain and one or two of the crew before them to relate the facts. - The Inquiry was then adjourned to Monday next at five o'clock, the Jury requesting that the captain, the chief officer and at least one of the crew should be present.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - The death of the six-weeks' old child of ANNIE TOMLINSON, living in Rendle-street, Plymouth, was Inquired into lat evening by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian). The evidence shewed that the child was suffering from a cold, and was taken to Mr Waterfield, surgeon, on Thursday last. He prescribed for it but did not see it alive afterwards, and the child died suddenly on Sunday morning. Mr Waterfield made a post-mortem examination and found that the lungs exhibited signs of acute bronchitis. Death was attributed to asphyxia resulting from the condition of the lungs. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 February 1888
EXETER - Death During Prayer. - At Exeter yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr Hooper, Coroner, touching the death of SABRINA WEBBER, aged 78. The evidence shewed that the deceased - a single woman, who had been in receipt of parish pay - was found kneeling at one side of her bed, with her head and arms devoted in the attitude of prayer She was dead, and cold and stiff. Dr Bell said he had attended the deceased for the last twelve months. She suffered from a weak heart, and no doubt that was the cause of death. Another witness stated that the deceased lived alone, and was a somewhat jocular woman. She was very active for her age, and did everything for herself. She was unmarried and rented a room in St. Sidwell-street. - Sophia Sayers said she saw the deceased dead by the bedside in a kneeling position. She apparently died whilst praying. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 February 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of FRANCES SERGEANT, the child of EMMA SERGEANT, single woman. A widow of 40 Preston-street, said the mother of the child was her daughter, aged 22. The deceased was born on January 20th, and a midwife was present. Mr Brash, surgeon, said the child had apparently died in a convulsion. There were no marks of violence on the body. Mr Brash added that the room in which he found the child was unfit for human habitation, and ought to be shut up at once. Several Jurymen were of the same opinion. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 February 1888
EXETER - Shocking Suicide At Exeter. - Exeter was startled early yesterday morning by news of a most determined suicide under circumstances of a very distressing character. The deceased was HENRY OLLIVER, the manager of the branch business in Queen-street of Mr Stedall, mantle manufacturer, and he took his life within a few minutes of confessing to his employer that he had again been robbing him. The facts of the tragedy were deposed to at an Inquest held in the afternoon by Mr Coroner Hooper and a Jury, of whom Mr Flynn was Foreman. - MARY ELIZABETH OLLIVER, deceased's daughter, residing at 16 Regent-street, St. Thomas, said her father, who was 39 years of age, had been peculiar in his manner of late. On Thursday evening he appeared to be much worried about business matters. He was temperate in his habits, and went to bed about 10.20. That morning he left home about 8.25. - Alfred Stedall, mantle manufacturer, London, said deceased lived with him a great number of years, chiefly in London. His occupation for the last eighteen months had been that of manager. Deceased came to him as a lad, and had worked his way up. He (Mr Stedall) came up from Plymouth on Thursday afternoon, called at the business house and asked for the deceased, but he was not there. Deceased was not aware of witness's coming. witness called again at the establishment that (Friday) morning, and told deceased he ought to have let him know that he should be absent, as it was very inconvenient for him (witness) to come long journeys and find managers out of their business. Deceased said he was very sorry and it should never occur again. Witness then asked him for the books and the cash, and deceased then, in a very excited manner, said "I've done it again." Witness said "What do you mean?" and deceased said "I've been robbing you again." Witness then said to him "It's a very serious matter; I've forgiven you on one occasion on account of your wife and family and long service with me. You stated at the time that you would never abuse my confidence again." Deceased then said in an excited manner, "I couldn't help it," and witness commenced to examine the books, and found a deficiency of £25 or £25. Witness looked up from the table, and found the deceased had gone whilst he (witness) was examining the books. Witness told the porter to call MR OLLIVER and at the same moment there was the report of a gun in the basement. The porter ran downstairs and returned shouting, "MR OLLIVER has shot himself." Witness at once sent for a policeman and a doctor. - By the Coroner: No firearms were kept on the premises. The deceased salary (including commission) was about £3 a week. The previous defalcation was about six months ago, when witness kept a shop in High-street. Deceased then pleaded that his wife had been very ill from heart disease, and that he had taken the money to get her nourishment and medical attendance. He said he would be a ruined man if witness discharged him, and he was given another trial. Witness came to Exeter on Thursday with the intention of raising the deceased's salary if everything was found satisfactory. - William John Rogers, the porter, said he found the deceased lying on his back in the cellar, his coat off. The gas was burning, and a double-barrelled gun was lying beside deceased, on his left hand. The gun had been in the shop ever since it was opened, and belonged, witness believed, to a Mr Knight. He did not know, however, for what purpose it was kept in the shop. It was not kept loaded. Deceased used to carry the gun before and after business in the summer for shooting. - In reply to a question, Mr Stedall said the deceased was in his shirt-sleeves when he called. He had been dressing the window. - Mr Moon, surgeon, Exeter, said that upon being called to Mr Stedall's establishment, he found the deceased lying on his back in the cellar. The gun was by his left side, and to the trigger was attached a piece of cord in the form of a stirrup. There was a large wound over the heart, and deceased was evidently dead. The string was so arranged that it would pull both triggers at once. - The Coroner said the facts appeared clear and a sad case it was. Mr Stedall had evidently acted very kindly towards the deceased on a previous occasion. There was such a thing as acting too harshly for human nature to bear, and also of being too indulgent. The question for the Jury was whether or not the deceased was in his right mind when he committed the act. - The Jury found that the deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

DARTMOUTH - Relative to the death of MRS BAKER, who was found dead near her home at East Down, near Dartmouth, as previously reported in the Western Morning News, an Inquest was held on Thursday evening by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner. The body was found on the highway by a man named George Norris. Mr R. W. Soper, surgeon, Dartmouth, who made a post-mortem examination, said he had found traces of disease of long standing and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 6 February 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - An inmate of the Devonport Workhouse at ford, named GEORGE SMALE, 81 years of age, died on Friday in the Infirmary of that Institution. About three weeks since, while proceeding to his dormitory, SMALE fell over the stairs at the bottom of which he was found by the industrial trainer, who, with assistance, removed him to the Hospital. His nose was bleeding very freely, and he had received a wound on the head. The house surgeon, Mr F. Everard Row, was sent for, and under his care, SMALE progressed very well for the first six days. Erysipelas, however, set in, and he died. Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held the necessary Inquest on Saturday, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, the Jury adding a rider to their verdict recommending that infirm inmates should have assistance in mounting stairs.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - The Wreck Of The Constance. Resumed Inquest. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday held at Plymouth the adjourned Inquiry in regard to the death of EDWARD SEAVELL, able seaman on board the steamship Constance, which was wrecked on the Shagstone on the 21st ult. Mr William Nicholson (Nicholson and Co., local agent of the Bristol Steam Navigation Company); and Mr E. Gerrish (Fussell and Co., solicitors, Bristol), watched the case for the company; and Mr W. Langlands, managing director, was amongst those present. - Henry F. Holt, master of the steamship Constance, said the vessel was coming down Channel on the 20th ult.; the weather was fine but foggy. They passed a few miles south of the Start at midnight, steaming eight knots an hour. As they neared Plymouth at 2 a.m. he began sounding, stopping the vessel for the purpose. The last depth was nine fathoms. He told the chief officer to stand by the anchor at 3.15, thinking they were near Penlee Point. He had no fair chance of seeing the two boundaries of the harbour. a light was sometimes seen, but only for a moment. There was a man at the wheel, another at the forward look-out, all hands were on deck, and the vessel was going slowly at 3.30, when she struck on what proved to be the Shagstone. He at once ordered out the two lifeboats and the jollyboat. In launching the first of them the steamer rolled heavily, and the boat swung out unexpectedly, followed by four of the five men who were getting her out. Other men came forward and another boat was got ready. It was at this time that witness found deceased was missing. He stayed in the boat near the vessel two hours, after which he steered for Plymouth, having to abandon all the effects on board, a heavy ground swell preventing any attempt at rescue. - By the Jury: There was a light wind. He had carried out the sailing regulations of the Board of Trade. He was unable to hear the Breakwater fog-bell. He thought himself justified in endeavouring to enter at what he thought the west end of the Breakwater. He was going to bring up and anchor just before the ship struck, but seeing a light bearing north on the starboard bow, which he took to be that of the Breakwater, he held on. An attempt had been made to rescue the sailors who fell into the water and the second mate was saved. - By Mr Gerrish: The last sounding coincided with the depth off Penlee. He had been captain twenty-seven years. This was the first accident he had seen in thirty-five years' experience. - James Calloway, chief mate, corroborated. He believed the Captain used every endeavour to reach port in safety. The Breakwater light could be seen for a minute or more at a time. He had a narrow escape from drowning. - By Mr Gerrish: He had been twenty-four years in the Company's service, and held a master's certificate. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, a rider being added expressing confidence in the straightforward nature of Captain Holt's evidence. They exonerated him from all blame and believed he had done all in his power to save the Constance and the lives of the men in his charge. - At the close of the court, Mr May, a Juryman, said he wished the authorities would put some lights on the dangerous parts of the coasts in the locality. Mr Nicholson said that previously to the wreck of the Ajax on the Shagstone not even a buoy had been placed there. If a bell had been attached to the Mewstone buoy its sound would probably have been heard by the captain in passing. Captain Holt said something of the kind was urgently needed - all other ports with which he was acquainted were so provided.

ILSINGTON - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday morning at Ilsington, a village near Newton, into the circumstances of the death of WILLIAM JOHN BAILEY, aged 11 months, the illegitimate child of ELIZA BAILEY, a domestic servant. The evidence shewed that the deceased child was weakly and emaciated, though care was taken of it by Mrs Susan Ann Howard, with whom the mother had put it out to nurse, paying 2s. 6d. a week for its maintenance. The child had been born in Newton Workhouse. Mr H. Goodyn, surgeon, practising at Bovey Tracey, stated that he had attended the child previously to death, and had made a post-mortem examination of the body. The lungs shewed acute pneumonia, the result of syphilis and the liver and kidneys were also affected with the disease. There was a stricture of the gall duct that would render digestion impossible. The actual cause of death was pneumonia. In accordance with this testimony the Jury brought in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening touching the death of an infant named IDA EDITH MURCH. EMMA MURCH, unmarried, mother of the deceased, stated that the child, who was two years and three months old, was of weak constitution, and had been sickening with the measles since Friday, but had not been under medical treatment. MRS ELIZABETH MURCH, mother of first witness, living at 10 Gilwell-cottages, deposed that on Monday, at 8 a.m., she noticed a change in the child and at once went for Mr Webb, surgeon, but he did not attend deceased. The child died about noon. Witness then fetched Mr Harper, surgeon, who said the deceased died from measles. The child had been under the care of its grandmother since a month from infancy. In the same room as deceased was another illegitimate child of the mother, who was also suffering from measles. The Jury, of which Mr Martin was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by want of medical aid," and strongly censured both the mother and grandmother for not giving the child necessary attention.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 February 1888
RACKENFORD - Yesterday afternoon Mr F. Burrow, Tiverton District Coroner, held an Inquest relative to the death of MRS ELIZABETH BEEDELL, of Sydenham Farm, Rackenford, a parish about ten miles from Tiverton. The evidence shewed that since the death of her husband, about two years ago, the deceased had suffered from fits of depression. On Sunday she seemed very low spirited and, sobbing, made occasional reference to her husband's death. On Tuesday morning she was found lying in the farmyard with her throat cut, a rusty razor being beside her. She died in a few minutes. Deceased, who was an elderly woman, had been living with an unmarried son. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, and a Jury, met yesterday to Inquire into the cause of death of CATHERINE O'NEAL, aged 2 months, but when the mother, who alone could give evidence, appeared, she was in such a state of drunkenness that the Inquest was adjourned until 5 p.m. today, Mr Brian severely admonishing MRS O'NEAL to appear sober.

ILFRACOMBE - Killed By a Tow Rope. - An Inquest on the body of GEORGE GILES, boatswain on board the Mooltan, of Liverpool, was held at the Tyrrell Cottage Hospital, Ilfracombe, yesterday. The evidence went to shew that the Mooltan was being towed down Channel on the 19th ult., and when off Lundy Island, the tow rope flew from the head of the anchor and caught deceased leg between it and the ship. GILES was brought into Ilfracombe and taken to the Hospital, where it was found he was suffering from a compound comminuted fracture of the leg. Efforts were made to save the limb, but on Wednesday week it was decided to amputate it. The deceased died on Wednesday. Mr A. S. Copner, surgeon, stated that death was due to exhaustion, consequent on the shock to the system, the result of the accident and the amputation combined. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Dr Slade King was the Coroner and Captain J. T. Harding foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - Death Of A Child At Plymouth. Killed By A Drunken Mother. - The Inquiry into the cause of death of CATHERINE O'NEIL, an infant of two months, which was adjourned by the Plymouth Borough Coroner on Thursday on account of the drunken state of the chief witness, the mother, was resumed last evening. Mr Taylor was elected Foreman of the Jury. - It appeared from the evidence of CATHERINE O'NEIL, mother of the deceased, that she took the child to bed with her on Wednesday last. Witness kept her clothes on and slept until 5.30 a.m. on Thursday. When she awoke her right breast was covering the face of the child, who was dead and cold. She did not send for a doctor as she could see that the child was dead. There were three other women in the room, two of whom had been drinking with her. - Elizabeth Doidge stated that she had gone to the last witness's room on business about five p.m. on Wednesday. O'NEIL was on the bed the worse for drink. Two other women were in the room, but no drink was taken, although a cup containing porter was there, and of this the women tasted. There was also a bottle that seemed to contain spirits. No drink was brought into the room while witness was there. The child was put on its mother's right arm. - Mary Griffin gave corroborative evidence, stating that MRS O'NEIL was the worse for drink, and in an unfit state to have the care of the child. Witness fed the child, as she saw the mother could not do so, and afterwards put it into the latter's arms. - Bridget Regan also corroborated the evidence of the preceding witness. - Dr Joseph Fred. Eyeley stated that the child was well developed and nourished. There were no external marks. The lungs were unoxygenised and much congested. All the other organs were healthy. Death was undoubtedly caused by suffocation. This could be effected in three minutes in so young a child and could well have been caused by the breast of the mother lying across the child's mouth. - Mr Manning, the Coroner's Officer, having given evidence as to MRS O'NEIL'S drunken state at the Inquest, The Coroner briefly summed up the evidence. The case was a serious one. The doctor had stated that death was caused by suffocation, and there was proof that the mother's breast was lying across the child's mouth. It might have been there for hours. The mother was generally acknowledged to have been in an unfit state to care for the child, and she was so voluntarily. The law on this point was that voluntary neglect on the part of a person who was the natural protector of another, thereby causing death, rendered that person guilty of manslaughter at least. It was now for the Jury to decide whether this point applied in the present case. - After a somewhat long deliberation, the Jury decided that "Death was caused by the culpable neglect of the mother, she being drunk, and unfit for maternal duties." - The Coroner said this verdict was too vague. Did the Jury mean manslaughter or not? He wished them to decide the matter, and not leave it to him. On reconsidering their verdict, the Jury substituted the word "Criminal" for "culpable". Mr Brian was now satisfied that manslaughter was meant and he committed the woman to take her trial at the next assizes. The case occupied upwards of four hours.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. A Slippery Floor. - The circumstances attending the death of MARY CRABTREE HOOD, a widow, 42 years of age, employed in the ropery of Devonport Dockyard, was Inquired into yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner. - ANN HOOD, sister-in-law of deceased, with whom she lived at 8 Lambert-street, said the deceased was in good health until last Tuesday week, when she came home and said she had hurt her side by lifting something just before leaving work. She reported the accident at the surgery. She was in pain, but not very bad. About half-past nine the next morning deceased went to the surgery, and continued attending until Thursday. She could walk unassisted, but felt a pain near the heart. About half-past twelve on Thursday she found her in great agony, although in the morning she appeared better and in good spirits, and said she thought the doctor would give her a certificate to return to her work on Monday. She died early that (Friday) morning. About one o'clock on Thursday witness went to the surgery and told the doctor how deceased was suffering, and he followed at once. He was with her about half an hour, and gave her a draught, which seemed to ease the pain a little. He saw her again at nine o'clock, when he said she was in great danger. - Emma Pope, widow, 1 High-street, Stonehouse, working in the Dockyard ropery, said a fortnight or three weeks since deceased fell heavily on her left side against an iron pipe. She did not go to the doctor about it. She worked in the afternoon, but was not able to do very much. She was always complaining after the fall, and witness assisted her in the work. About two or three days after the fall she hurt herself in lifting a spindle which was too heavy for her. She told witness that she had hurt her arm and side by the fall. - The Coroner: Did you not advise her to go to the doctor? - We have so many falls that we do not take any notice. The floor is very slippery, and special shoes are worn for the purpose. The work was very dangerous. Deceased was spinning at the time, and before she got to the machine to stop it she slipped and fell. - The Coroner: Could you suggest anything to make the place safer to work in? - No; all we have to do is to be careful. Deceased was put to heavier work after the fall, but as she had not reported the accident, the authorities could not be blamed in the matter. - Mr Samuel Keays, surgeon, in the Dockyard, first heard of the accident on the 1st February. It occurred the previous day. Deceased complained of pain in the left side. She said she was lifting a heavy weight, when she felt something give way internally. She did not mention anything about a fall previously. He examined her at once to ascertain if there was a fracture of any bone, but could detect none. Deceased could not have done work in the ropery for two or three days, or lifted a heavy weight if she had had broken ribs. She did not appear at first to require any treatment. She was told to keep quiet and present herself again at the surgery, and two or three days afterwards she came. She did not appear worse, but as she still complained of pain a bandage was placed round her chest to ease the pain and quiet the muscles. She had no symptoms of having broken anything internally. He saw her at the surgery on Thursday morning, when she still complained of pain in the side, but appeared to be no worse. She said the strapping had given her a little relief, and except the pain in her side she was in very good health. She was not entitled to hospital treatment. There was no arrangement for the admission of females to the Naval Hospital. - The Coroner thought that it would be a good thing if an arrangement could be made with the Royal Albert Hospital for the treatment of cases which could not be skilfully and carefully attended to in the hurry of a surgery examination. - Continuing, witness said that Mr Lauder, the other medical officer in the Dockyard, saw deceased on Thursday when she was taken worse. Witness was rather surprised to hear yesterday morning that she was dead. If witness had known of the deceased's fall, he might possibly have treated her differently. Deceased might have had an internal injury, which on sounding he could not have discovered. Witness attributed death remotely to an injury of the heart - it might be either of the bag or the valves of the heart. The valves of the heart would be most likely to be affected by the lifting of a heavy weight. The grater pain she had shortly before death might be due to inflammation. The Jury considered that a post-mortem examination would be advisable and the Inquest was adjourned to the Guildhall until Monday evening.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 February 1888
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death Of An Old Lady. - The death of JANE TIPPETT, 57 years of age, formed the subject of the Borough Coroner's Inquiry at Plymouth, on Saturday evening last. Jane Treleaven, Melbourne House, Plymouth, stated that the deceased also lived there as a lodger of Mr Mayells's, to whom the house belonged. On Thursday last the deceased said she had seen Dr Hingston, and had taken his medicine. On Friday morning, the witness knocked at the deceased's door which was locked. She was unanswered. She informed Mr Mayell, who called a policeman. The door was then opened with another key, and the deceased was found lying in bed, undressed and dead. A glass containing brandy was in her hand. The deceased suffered from sciatica, and used liniment. she had a good income, and witness was in constant attendance upon her. Dr Hingston deposed to having seen the deceased last on December 3rd. She was very weak, and he then thought that brain disease was setting in. Only apoplexy could have caused the present appearance of the face. No poison could have done so permanently. She certainly died from apoplexy. - P.C. Brown stated that in addition to the glass in the deceased's hand, there was a bottle containing brandy on a table by the bed. He also found a bottle marked "poison" in the cupboard, but the first witness said that was the liniment. - "Natural Causes" was the verdict unanimously agreed upon.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 February 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Devonport Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an adjourned Inquest at the Guildhall of that town last evening, touching the death of MARY CRABTREE HOOD, aged 42, who was employed in the Dockyard ropery. Detective Miller watched the case on behalf of the Dockyard authorities. Dr Keays stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body and had discovered that deceased had sustained a rupture by lifting heavy weight; this was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 February 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - Deaths Of Infants At Stonehouse. Improper Feeding. - Two Inquests were held by Mr Coroner Rodd at Westaway's Market Hotel, Stonehouse, yesterday, upon the bodies of infants who had died suddenly. In the first case the deceased was CHARLES HY. ESSERY, aged 5 weeks, the illegitimate son of ELIZABETH ESSERY, a domestic servant. The child was placed out to nurse with Mrs Jane Mahoney, living at the Queen's Arms Hotel. At three o'clock on Monday morning it was seized with convulsions, and died in less than two hours. No medical advice was obtained. Mr T. Leah, surgeon, who made a post mortem examination, stated that the body was small and emaciated. All the organs were healthy, but the stomach was empty. The immediate cause of death was not want of food, but the child, in his opinion, had been ill and failing some time, and had probably been fed with improper or badly prepared food. Death, although sudden at last, must have been expected, and the nurse, had she shewn ordinary care, would have obtained advice. The child died from convulsions, caused by irritation of the bowels and its debilitated condition. In reply to the Jury, Mr Leah said he merely conjectured that the child had been improperly fed, but proper dieting, under medical advice, would have saved its life. Ms Mahoney stated that she fed the child on a pint of raw milk, diluted with water, daily. Occasionally she gave it a little corn flour, but the deceased suffered a great deal from sickness and was unable to keep its food down. She did not send for a doctor when the deceased was seized with a fit because no doctor would attend it at that time of the night unless paid half a guinea. Moreover, the amount paid for the child's maintenance did not include medical attendance, and the arrangement was that Mrs James, the midwife, who brought the child to her when it was four days old, should procure a medical man when required. Several of the Jury commented upon Mrs Mahoney's neglect in not obtaining medical advice, the Foreman remarking that she had been guilty of a great deal of inattention. The Inquest was adjourned until Friday for the attendance of the mother, who was stated to be at Inwardleigh, and also of Mrs James, the midwife.

EAST STONEHOUSE - In the second case Inquiry was made concerning the death of FRANCIS JOSIAH TIPPETTS, eight week sold, son of a fish-hawker, living at 14 High-street. Since its birth the child had been delicate, and for a fortnight past had suffered from thrush and diarrhoea. Between four and five o'clock in the morning it was seized with a convulsive fit and died very shortly afterwards. The mother went out selling fish by day, leaving a loaf of bread and sugar for the child, which was cared for by Mrs Ellis, a neighbour, during her absence. Mr T. Leah, surgeon, who was sent for by the parents immediately after the child's death, said the cause of death was convulsions caused by diarrhoea, the result of improper feeding. Mrs Ellis was sent for and stated that she fed the child four or five times a day on bread soaked in water, without milk, but sweetened by sugar. She had also given it a pennyworth of gin, which, in her opinion, would not hurt it. Dr Leah said the child was fairly well nourished and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest last evening as to the death of JOSIAH HAWKINS, for many years captain of the steamtug Triumph. Harry Stutton, stoker, stated that the deceased was about 65 years of age. About half-past two that morning the tug was lying in Sutton Pool and witness was in his berth near the captains. Deceased asked witness to light a lamp and rub his chest, as he felt a great pain there. Witness fetched sixpennyworth of brandy, which deceased drank neat, and witness then went on deck to make some tea. On going down again the captain was, as he thought, asleep. Shortly afterwards tea was ready, and witness went to wake deceased up, but found he was dead. He had never before known him attacked with pains. P.S. Gay deposed to going on board the tug. Dr Harper was there, and in answer to a question by witness said he thought deceased died from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 February 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In Keyham Yard. - The fatal accident to HENRY AUTTON, a labourer, of 10 Clarendon-terrace, Plymouth, working in Keyham Dockyard, under circumstances previously reported, was Inquired into yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner. Richard Mitchell of 33 Alexandra-road, Ford, mason employed in Keyham Yard, said he was working with the deceased on Tuesday morning. Deceased, as a labourer in the yard, was preparing a stage for witness to work on, and in doing so he had to carry up a ladder a distance of about fourteen or sixteen feet from the ground, a plank seven feet long, one foot wide and two inches thick. Witness saw him going up the ladder with the plank on his left shoulder. He had got up as high as he needed to go, had placed one end of the plank on a girder, and was trying to put the other end on the opposite girder. A second or two afterwards witness heard a noise behind him, and he saw AUTTON resting on the engine-driver's stage. He fell a distance of about seven feet from the stave of which his feet had rested. Witness ran to his assistance. His head, one arm, and a part of his shoulder were hanging over the stage. He lifted him on to the stage and called for assistance, and he was then taken on to the ground floor. A doctor arrived not more than ten minutes afterwards. Witness thought at first that deceased was stunned, and he was surprised to hear the doctor, after examining him, pronounce him dead. - By the Jury: The plank fell with the deceased. - William Kaye, 25 Duke-street, Devonport, a fitter, gave corroborative evidence as to finding the body after the accident. He saw the deceased was unconscious, and means were used to restore him. Finding he did not recover, and that he was cold, witness sent for a doctor, and had AUTTON removed on a stretcher. He thought deceased struck himself about the jugular vein on the top platform in his rapid descent to the lower platform. He fell a distance of about twelve feet and witness had no doubt he struck the ironwork in falling. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 February 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - The Death Of An Infant At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., the County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest at Stonehouse yesterday relative to the death of CHARLES HENRY ESSERY. The Inquest was adjourned for the attendance of the mother and midwife, the nurse having alleged that she was told not to send for a doctor. - ELIZABETH ESSRY, the mother of deceased, said it was an illegitimate child and born on January 7th. Witness never told Mrs Mahoney, the nurse, not to send for a doctor, but said that if the child was taken ill at any time she was to send for Mrs James, the midwife, who would get a doctor for it. - In reply to the Foreman, witness said she last saw the deceased on Thursday. She instructed Mrs James to get someone to keep the child for her when it was born, as she, being a domestic servant, would not be able to do so. Mrs Mahoney agreed to keep it for 3s. a week and witness paid her a month in advance. During the time it had been with Mrs Mahoney she saw the child five times, and on the last occasion it seemed a little worse than before. Eliza James, the midwife, said the child was a very fine one and four days after it was born she took it to Mrs Mahoney, and paid her 12s. She told her repeatedly if there was anything the matter with the child to bring it to her. She believed the child had not been properly fed. The Foreman elicited the information that deceased must have been dead two or three hours before Mrs James was sent to. - Dr Leah's evidence was read over, shewing that the child had not been properly fed and died, as the consequence, from convulsions. The Coroner, in summing up, said that although there had been carelessness on the part of Mrs Mahoney, it did not amount to criminal neglect. The Jury had the court cleared and were some time in considering their verdict. They decided that the child died from "Natural Causes" and severely censured Mrs Mahoney for not obtaining medical advice. The Coroner administered the censure, hoping the present case would be a warning to her.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 February 1888
TAVISTOCK - The Fatal Accident At Tavistock. - Inquiry was made by Mr Coroner Rodd at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital on Saturday into the circumstances connected with the death of JOHN MADDEFORD, aged 18, a farm labourer, living with his parents at Whitchurch. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Babbage, farmer, of Whitchurch, who had loaned his services, together with some horses to Mr J. J. Lucas, one of the sub-contractors of the new railway which passes through the district. On the 9th instant deceased was returning in charge of a horse and trolley through a cutting at Springhill, near Tavistock, when he stumbled and fell and the wheels of the vehicle, which was empty, passed over him. Mr Lucas, who witnessed the accident, stated that the deceased fell in the four-foot way, and had he remained there the trolley would have passed without hurting him. But in his eagerness to get up he got his legs across the rails immediately in front of the trolley. Witness had the deceased at once removed to the Hospital. In reply to the Jury witness said the young man had been engaged upon the work for six weeks, and was quite competent to do it. boys of fifteen were often employed upon such work. Mr C. C. Brodrick, surgeon, said MADDEFORD was admitted to the Hospital suffering from a compound fracture of the left thigh. The leg was put into splints but the fractured pieces of bone would not keep in position. On the day of the accident witness saw the deceased's mother, who expressed a hope that he would endeavour to save the limb, and Dr Northey and he consulted afterwards and decided to avoid amputation if possible. MADDEFORD, however got worse, and on Thursday last witness amputated the leg in the presence of two other doctors. Deceased died an hour and a half after the operation, from exhaustion. Had it not been performed he could not have lived three days. His only chance of recovery was for the leg to be amputated directly after the accident, but it was one of those cases in which it was difficult to determine what was best to be done, and it was at the request of the parents that the operation was postponed. The Jury, of whom Mr Vanstone was Foreman, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 February 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter Workhouse yesterday respecting the death of JOHN BOWDEN. The evidence shewed that the deceased was admitted into the Institution on Saturday and died a few hours afterwards. He was stated to be a labourer aged 38, and a native of a village near Torquay (which was not named). The deceased was given a warm bath on entering the House, as is customary, and it was stated that in passing from the bath into the receiving ward the deceased had to go into the open air. Dr Woodman said deceased complained of a pain in the chest whilst in the bath and added that passing from the bath into the cold air was dangerous, and might give a cold. The Jury condemned this arrangement and recommended the Guardians to effect an improvement.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 February 1888
NEWTON ST CYRES - Suspicious Affair At Newton St. Cyres. A Girl Found In A Pit. - Last evening an Inquiry was opened at Newton St. Cyres, near Exeter, before Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, concerning the death of SARAH ANN SANSAM, unmarried, aged 16 years, whose body was discovered the previous day at the mouth of a disused lead mine, in four feet of water. The girl left home on a simple errand about a month ago, and had not since been heard of. Her body was discovered early on Wednesday morning by a man named Langmead. It is improbable that the deceased girl fell into the pit accidentally, as it is surrounded by a fence, and, moreover, there is good standing ground after the fence is climbed before the water can be reached. She either committed suicide or was stunned first and thrown into the water afterwards - and the facts elicited last evening seem to point to the latter occurrence. In view of the evidence given - of wounds on the head, of threats having been made against the deceased from certain quarters, and of the surgeon's observations - Mr Gould, the Coroner, deemed it necessary to adjourn the Inquiry until a thorough examination of the body can be made, and further investigations instituted by the Police. - HANNAH MARIA MILLER, wife of HENRY EDWARD MILLER, farm labourer, of Newton St. Cyres, said: I identify the body as that of my daughter, SARAH ANN SANSAM, a child I had before marriage. She was 16 years of age. I last saw her alive on, I think, the 25th January, when she left home to go to Whiddon - where we previously lived - in search of a favourite cat. She went out about 9 a.m. I identify the hat produced as the one she had on. I also identify the fur collar produced. As she did not return in the evening my husband caused inquiries to be made, and reported her absence to the constable. There was nothing in her demeanour to excite my suspicion as to the cause of her absence. She had not, that I am aware of, kept company with anyone since she left Exwick, where she did so with a young man named Harry Lake, a farm labourer of Exwick. That young man has never been to our place, and I have never seen him since the deceased left Exwick, but I heard from Mrs Langman, through my husband, that he was about the neighbourhood. My husband told me that Mrs Langman had informed him that Lake was about on the previous Sunday. I am quite sure the deceased was not out of the house on the Sunday. There was never any disagreement as to Lake's keeping company with the deceased. She was not on bad terms with anyone save Mrs Langman, within my knowledge. She did not, however, like Mrs Langman - who resided next door to us when we were at Whiddon. The disagreement between Mrs Langman and the deceased arose principally through the former's children coming into my house, to which I also objected, and had a disagreement as well with Mrs Langman. That was the cause of our leaving the cottage. I have heard Mrs Langman call the deceased a "shilling little strumpet" and other names. I also heard her one day threaten to smash the deceased's head. Deceased was treated very kindly by her father. I cannot account for her disappearance at all. I stated to Constable Bidgood that the deceased had gone to Plymouth, because I feared, hearing that Lake was in the neighbourhood, she had gone away with him. Lake is now on a trading vessel belonging to Plymouth. I heard Langman, the husband, once threaten to thrash the deceased with a whip, but he did not do so. Langman has many times threatened to knock my head off. On one occasion he threatened to throw me down the well outside the cottages, and he attempted to carry his threat into execution whilst I was drawing water in July last. He took the chain attached to the well out of my hands, and pushed me towards the mouth of the well. I caught hold of the handle of the draw, and thus saved myself from falling in. I then went out of his way. The next evening, while I was standing at the door of my cottage, I heard Langman, who was in his cottage, say "I tried to throw the ... into the well, and I wish I had done it." A few days after that I heard him say to my husband that he would knock his .... head off. He had a hammer in his hand at the time. I called out to my husband at the time - "Look up, he is coming to strike you," and my husband thereupon went indoors. They were not quarrelling at the time. Langman did not actually strike my husband, but he was going to do so before I called out. I reported these circumstances to the village Constable on more than one occasion. - John Bidgood, of Newton St. Cyres, said that when he went with the husband of the previous witness to look for deceased, amongst other places they visited two fields leading towards Whiddon from West Town, where the deceased resided. There they saw tracks in the mud in the gateway against the road at the Whiddon end. MILLER said he would swear those were his daughter's tracks. They could see the same tracks continuously for forty yards on the road towards Exeter. They then gave up the search. The two fields divided the two roads, which ran parallel with each other, one on the West Town side, the other on the Whiddon side. On Wednesday last, the 22nd, Wm. Langman called him at 8 a.m., and said: "I went looking for a ewe that was expecting to lamb. I went round by the old mine, and there I saw something. I can't tell what it is." Witness then went with him, and at the spot indicated by Langman he found the body of the deceased in water and mud. It was in a pit on Coal Harbour Farm, in the occupation of Mr John Slade, at the mouth of an old silver-lead mine. The deceased was lying with her face downwards. Witness took the body out of the water. She was dead. He did not at the time observe any marks of violence about her. The water in which she was found was about four feet deep. There was a fence all round the pit, and plenty of room to walk around it inside the fence. He had made further search today in the pit, and had found the hat and fur collar produced. - Recalled, MRS MILLER added: I did not see in which direction my daughter went after leaving home. In going to Whiddon she generally went through the two fields spoken of by the last witness, and through which there is a path. - Mr Charles James Vlieland, of St. Thomas, Exeter, surgeon, said he had that day seen the body of the deceased, and found it in an advanced stage of decomposition. there was a contusion on the left hand, and there were certain marks on the head, two large ones on the top of the head and one smaller at the back. Mr Vlieland proceeded: Assuming that those marks were inflicted during lifetime, I should certainly say that they were sufficient to cause insensibility. I should not like to speak more definitely as to the injuries without making a post-mortem examination. - The Coroner, at this stage, remarked that it must be obvious to the Jury that a further Inquiry would be necessary, and he should, therefore, adjourn the Court until Tuesday next at two o'clock. This would enable the surgeon to make a post-mortem examination of the body, and the Police to make further inquiries. - The Inquiry was adjourned accordingly.

TOTNES - At an Inquest at Totnes yesterday as to the death of the infant child of JOSEPH ASHTON, a porter at the Totnes Railway Station, the evidence was to the effect that the child was in bed with its mother, and that it was suffocated by the bedclothes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly of "Accidental Death". Mr Currie, surgeon, said that was the fourth case of the kind he had had, and commented upon the danger of mothers taking infants to bed with them.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday Inquired into the death of WILLIAM JAMES MARKS, 11, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. William Lambert, driver for Mr Brooks, carrier, stated that he was taking 25 cwt. of coal along the Laira-road toward Crabtree on the 16th inst., when deceased asked to be allowed to accompany him and he consented. Presently the lad tried to jump on the trolly, slipped and the front wheel passed over him. Witness sent him to the Hospital in a cab that passed by. James Webb, 12, said the last witness told him and his companion not to get on the wagon. Mr W. C. Woollcombe, surgeon, deposed to seven fractured ribs and abdominal injuries being the cause of the boy's death after six days' illness. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded, the Jury exonerating the driver from blame.

TOTNES - An Inquest was held last evening at the Totnes Workhouse on the body of JAMES HUNKING, an inmate, who was found dead in bed on Wednesday morning. Mr W. A. Grills, master of the Workhouse, said the deceased, who was 42 years of age, was a seaman, and came from Brixham, but he believed he was not a native of this part. He was in the able-bodied part of the House, and had not complained of any illness, but since his death witness had heard that he was subject to fits. Mr L. Hains, surgeon, said he passed deceased into the House on the 5th January. Deceased told him he had been a seaman, but having had a fit was unable to go aloft, and having no work was obliged to go into the Workhouse. He saw him on Saturday when he was suffering from a cough. He again saw him after his death, and considered from the appearance of the body that he died from an epileptic fit. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 February 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - MR EDWIN E. CROOK, 71 years of age, living at 68 Alexandra-road, Ford, died on Saturday. MRS EMMA CROOK, the widow, said deceased before being superannuated was master of the admiral's yacht in the Dockyard and had enjoyed pretty good health. On Friday after tea, as he was sitting at the table with the baby on his lap, he turned pale. She spoke to him but he did not answer, and foamed a little at the mouth. With assistance she helped him on to the sofa, but he never moved afterwards. Dr F. Everard Row said he attended the deceased seven years ago for erysipelas, but from that time he did not see him until Friday evening, when he was dead. By the order of the Coroner he made a post-mortem examination. In the left lung there were signs of old pleurisy and the valves of the heart were turning to bone. The immediate cause of death was syncope. A verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 February 1888
HONITON - Severe censure was passed by a Coroner's Jury at Honiton yesterday upon a Mrs Streat, who had had charge of an illegitimate child entrusted to her by a dairymaid named ELLEN WHEATON. The mother received an anonymous letter informing her that the child was being ill-treated and when she went to see it she found it with a marked forehead, a scalded foot and very thin. She then put the infant under the care of her sister, and further examination a short time afterwards shewed that both is arms were very much swollen. Another witness stated that when she examined the child whilst it was in Streat's care it had a badly scalded foot, a large wound on the leg, and sores on the back. there was a large cut over the eye, and on the forehead the mark of a blow. The witness was led to remark that she believed the child's arm was broken. Medical evidence shewed that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs, but was accelerated by the blows received. Streat explained that the wounds on the foot and leg were caused by the kettle boiling over on the child. The Inquest occupied nearly eight hours.

PLYMOUTH - In the absence from the town of the Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) the Deputy Coroner, (Mr W. Harrison) held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening relative to the death of a child named JOSEPH HENRY JANKS, on the 25th inst., from injuries received at No. 12 Holborn-street, Plymouth, by scalding. The mother stated that on Sunday week the child was in the kitchen and a pan of boiling water, which had just been strained from the greens, was before the fire. Witness was in the room when the child tripped his foot in the canvas on the floor and fell backwards into the pan of water. She immediately took him out and Dr Way was sent for. He advised her to take deceased to the Hospital. The father of the child and another woman were both in the room when the accident occurred. Deceased was three years of age. Mr Walter H. Woollcombe, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital said that the deceased was brought to the Hospital on the 19th suffering from severe scalds about the lower parts of the body, likely to have been caused by a fall into a pan of boiling water. There was a chance of his recovery, and he improved until the morning of the day of his death, when he died, probably from congestion of the lungs, the result of the injuries received. The Jury, of whom Mr John Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EGG BUCKLAND - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday Inquired at Laira into the death of FREDERICK LUSCOMBE, aged three months, who was found dead in bed beside the mother last Sunday morning. Mr F. D. Stamp, surgeon, stated that the lungs of the deceased were much congested. He had died from syncope, which would soon occur in the present cold weather. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 February 1888
NEWTON ST. CYRES - The Death Of A Girl At Newton St. Cyres. Verdict of Wilful Murder. The Mother Arrested. - Immediately, last evening, after the Coroner's Jury had declared that the girl SARAH ANN SANSAM - whose body was last week found, after she had been missing a month, in a pit of water near a disused lead mine at Newton St. Cyres - had come to her death by murder, though at whose hands they were unable upon the evidence to say, Sergeant Fursdon, of Crediton, arrested the mother of the girl, MRS MILLER and by train shortly afterwards took her to Crediton, where she will this morning be charged on suspicion with the Wilful Murder of her illegitimate daughter. MRS MILLER is a dark woman, of short stature, and unpleasant countenance. She smokes and drinks like a man, and after having in a flippant way identified yesterday a skirt which was produced as belonging to the deceased, smiling callously as the constable lifted it dripping wet out of a bucket with a piece of stick, she went below to the taproom of the inn and drank whisky and talked among the company there in a most unbecoming manner, remarking among other things that she "wished she was a mouse in the wall upstairs to hear what the .... were saying about her." Her arrest evidently, however, took her by surprise, for when the officer laid his hand upon her shoulder she screamed and even struggled to get away, first in the inn and then in the street, "I haven't done it. Who said it was me?" "I shan't go." By the time she got to the railway station, a quarter of a mile distant, she somewhat recovered herself, but was still very restless, pacing the waiting room with her hand to her head and repeatedly protesting her innocence of the crime. There was a general feeling, both at Newton St. Cyres and at Exeter last evening, that the police had done a judicious thing in thus acting promptly upon their suspicions. That the poor girl was murdered is now beyond doubt - the medical evidence, detailed below, makes that very clear. The suspicion against the mother is based chiefly upon threats used towards the deceased, among others a wish that she had been "dead long ago, and out of her sight;" the possible motive of pecuniary benefit by the girl's death. How having insured the daughter's life only a week before the murder for £15, and the callous behaviour of MRS MILLER throughout, both at the Inquest and at the funeral of the girl; she has not, in fact, been at all circumspect either in her manner or utterance since the girl was missing. She discountenanced search parties, and just after the funeral was heard to observe that she was "glad it was all over now." One important question was omitted yesterday - the step-father was not asked whether MRS MILLER was out of the house at all on the day of the girl's murder. Another difficult feature of the case is how the woman, if she murdered the girl, could have carried the body from her house to the pool, a distance of half a mile, rising ground. The deceased was, however, of small growth; and, moreover, not of the brightest intellect. The mother's age is about forty. She has resided with her husband, a shoemaker by trade, in the village about two years, having prior to that lived at Blackboy-road, Exeter. - Yesterday afternoon Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, opened the adjourned Inquiry at Newton St. Cyres, near Exeter, concerning the death of SARAH ANN SANSAM, aged 16, single, whose body was found in a disused pit last week under mysterious circumstances. Superintendent Allin watched the case on behalf of the Police, and the public were admitted to the Court. - P.C. Bidgood, in reply to the Coroner, said he did not recognise the object in the pool as a human body until he recovered it; and he added that he wished to correct a statement made at the previous Inquiry. He then said that he found a kid glove on the left hand, but he had since submitted this to the doctor, who had informed him that it was the skin of the hand. - The Coroner then read over all the evidence adduced at the previous Inquiry. - In reply to other questions, the Constable said he made a further search on Monday and found an old skirt about six feet from the place where he picked up the body. The skirt was in the pit, under the mud, next to some white clay. He had found nothing else since the last Inquiry. - By the Jury: The skirt had the appearance of having been pushed down under the water. It was "all of a heap." - The skirt, covered with mud, was produced, and identified as belonging to the deceased. It was identified by MRS MILLER, mother of the deceased. - George Cooper, a boy, living with his father, a market gardener, at Westdown, Newton St. Cyres, said he last saw the deceased on Wednesday morning, the 25th January, about nine o'clock. This was near where she lived, in a road leading to Whiddon, where deceased previously lived. He did not speak to her; she was alone, and he did not observe anyone near MILLER'S house. He kept her in sight as far as a Mrs Jones's. - By Supt. Allin: did not see anybody come out of MILLER'S house or garden gate. MRS MILLER, the girl's mother, was in witness's father's court, which adjourned, when the deceased left the house. - Ellen Challacombe, daughter of Thomas Challacombe, shoemaker, St. Cyres, said she saw the deceased on the morning of her disappearance pass Mr Cooper's gate, which was next to where deceased lived. She was going up the road in the direction of Whiddon. Witness did not speak to her. She saw the mother inside Cooper's gate, but could not tell whether MRS MILLER saw her daughter. She did not hear any conversation. Did not observe how the deceased was dressed; had not seen her since. This was about ten o'clock. - By the Jury: Saw Mrs Cooper inside the gate. - HENRY EDWARD MILLER, farm labourer, St. Cyres, who, on being sworn, repeated the words, "So help me God," said the deceased was a daughter of his wife's before marriage. On the morning of January 25th, about ten minutes to nine o'clock, he saw the deceased pass downstairs to light the fire. He was in bed, but could see the stairs. Witness asked her where she was going, and the deceased said, "I am going to see if I can find the old cat at Whiddon." He did not see her afterwards alive. He got up about half-past eleven, and remained indoors until between four and five, not feeling very well. His wife then became uneasy at the deceased's absence, and asked witness to go towards Whiddon to see if he could find her. He started at once, and went round Clay-hill Cottage, where he used to live, but seeing nothing of her he reported the circumstances to the village constable. He told the constable that he would go to the Railway Inn, but did not do so. Instead he went to a chapel to which deceased had expressed a wish a day or two before to go. The constable advised him to look round the railway station, and he did so. Cooper's boy (a previous witness) went with him to these various places, and returned with him to the constable. They reached the police station again about 9.30, without any tidings whatever of the deceased. After that, in the company of the police constable, they again searched every likely place, but without result. At Clayhill witness thought he saw deceased's footprints leading out of the path fields, from the Whiddon side, into the road. He thought these were her tracks by her boots having sprigs at the sides and no heel plates. He fancied that she had gone to Exeter, and next morning he went to the city and mentioned the matter to the police. He was told to call at the police station again in the evening, and he did so, but was informed that the city police had no information about her. - The Coroner: What made you look in all these old cottages? - We thought she might be frightened to come home. - Was there anything about her to lead you to think she would commit suicide? - No, sir. - Had she any trouble of any sort? - Not that I knew of, but I was only at home night times. - Had she any cause to complain of ill-treatment? - No; she lived with me fourteen years, and I had only occasion once to lift my hand against her, and then I hit her on the shoulder twice with a stick. That was about seven years ago. - Was her mother kind to her? - Yes, sir. - Was she a girl of timid disposition? - No, sir. - By the Jury: Had been near the place where the deceased was found five or six times. The reason he did so was that he knew it was a nasty pit and she might have got in. He had no particular suspicion, however, that she was actually in the pit, and that was perhaps why he did not mention the pit to the police. He did not look at the footprints by daylight, because he did not think of them after the first night of her disappearance. - By the Coroner: he never saw anything in the pit, although he looked there five different times. - A Juror: Was the deceased's life insured? - Yes; I insured all four of us a week or fortnight before she went away. - In what office? - The British Workman. - What was the amount? I could not tell; I insured her at 2d. per week. I believe the benefit would be something between £12 and £13. - Superintendent Allin: Why did you not go to work that day? Because we were stopped from the Tuesday to the Friday. - Are you certain about the time you went to speak to Mrs Langman? No, I could not be certain; it was about dusk. - What made you think the footprints were those of your daughter? Because they were about the size of deceased's foot. - Had you any special reason? - No, I only fancied they were hers. - Did you not say to the constable that you would swear they were hers? No, but I said they were something like hers. - Were not her boots repaired by you lately? - No, sir. - Are you quite certain about that? Have you not made a statement that you clumped those boots yourself? - No, that is a mistake. - You are a shoemaker by trade? - yes, sir. - Having come to the conclusion that the deceased had gone to Exeter, why did you go on searching by yourself subsequently without telling the constable? - I only went looking about like anybody would if they had lost anything. I knew it was no use, because Mrs Langman told me there was a young man named Lake, said I thought she might have gone away with him. - Why did you go on looking round those linhays? I only searched the pits, but I thought she had gone away with Lake. - The Coroner: When did Mrs Langman tell you that? - the very day I went to look for her (the deceased). - Do you know whether there was any ill-feeling existing between the deceased and the Langmans? - She never liked them, because they threatened to horsewhip her two or three times. I never heard the threats personally. - The boy Cooper, recalled, said he was with MILLER about an hour the night they searched for the deceased. They only visited the chapel and railway station together. - William Langman, labourer, Newton St. Cyres, said that on the morning of the 22nd inst. he went to look after the cattle on Coldharbour Farm. There was one sheep missing, and he searched round the fields for it. Told his little boy, who was with him, to go to one corner of a field whilst he went to the "pit" corner. His boy found the sheep and shouted that he had done so, whilst, at the same moment, witness observed an object in the water of the pit, but could not tell what it was. He threw a bit of stick at it, and it rebounded off to the other side, as if the object were a large india-rubber ball. The object was covered with dirt from the slimy water. He then went home to breakfast and thought no more of it until he was taking his wife a cup of tea when a thought came across him and he dropped the tea. He said to his wife "There's nothing in that pond that I am aware of, but I'll be bound that is ANNIE MILLER in there." His wife said "Never; if there is let the policeman know about it." He saddled a horse and rode to the village constable and told him what he had seen in the pit. He had not been near the pit prior to that morning for seventeen days. - The Coroner: Was there any ill-feeling between you and MILLER? No. - Between you and MRS MILLER? No, sir, she was a woman I would not be so low as to speak to. - Was there any ill-feeling between you and the deceased? - No, sir. I often took her in when she was at home. - Have you ever threatened MILLER? No more than once, when I told him, after his wife had been abusing me, that he ought not to allow his wife to carry on as she did, allowing men in his house doing things that ought not to be. - Have you threatened to knock his head off with a hammer? - No Sir. - Have you threatened either of them? - No, sir. - Have you used violence of any kind towards them? No, sir; I was always the other way. I have often brought out a meal of food and given it to them myself. - Is it true that you ever attempted to throw MRS MILLER down a well? It is untrue. - Have you lived by the side of them? Yes, for nine months. - What treatment did the deceased receive? - Very bad at the hands of the mother. She turned her out of doors all day long, and I have heard her wish she (her mother) was dead. - Have you ever observed any unkind treatment by the father? Not the least. I have heard the girl threatened to make away with herself, and her mother then would say, "You ....., I hope you will, and then you'll be out of my sight." - How long ago was this? This was the language going on all the time the MILLERS were living by me even from the time I fetched them from Exeter. I got them a home out here; they told me they were starving at Exeter. - How many times have you seen the deceased turned out of doors? More than fifty times. - Have you ever seen the mother strike her? I have seen her run the deceased out of doors by the scruff of the neck and lock her out. - Did you see the deceased on the day of the disappearance, or MILLER either? No. - Supt. Allin: Have you ever known the deceased without food? yes, two and three days at a stretch; and she has had it in my place. - Was she often in your house? I used to have her to look after my children three or four days a week, and she used to cook the food when my wife was away. - Did she ever wear anything round her neck? The poor girl had scarcely anything to wear. - The Coroner: Do you know whether the father and the mother were in want of food? I don't know that. - Do you mean to say the deceased was purposely deprived of her food? Yes, sir, except when her father was at home, and he used to take her part. - Has the deceased ever mentioned it to you? Yes, scores of times. - What has she said? She has said she was hungry and had had nothing to eat all day. I have often been without my own food at night, and sent it in to her. - Have you seen her since she left Whiddon? Yes; she came up after the cat once. She did not complain then. - Do you know of any man named Lake? - Yes. - When did you see him last? A few days before the girl's disappearance he came knocking at the door where the MILLERS used to live, and I told him they had shifted down the village. - Samuel Harry Langman, a boy, and Mrs Mary Ann Langman, wife of the previous witness also gave evidence. The latter stated that on the evening of the girl's disappearance MILLER, the deceased's stepfather, came to her house and asked her if she had seen anything of his daughter. Witness replied that she had not. MILLER told her that the deceased had left in the morning and had not returned since. She had not seen the deceased in the neighbourhood that day, neither had she seen MILLER. She last saw the deceased alive about two or three months ago. When the MILLERS lived next door to her the deceased lived a very bad life with her mother. The latter used to call her daughter "all sorts of names," but she never saw her strike her. Had often heard her tell the deceased that she wishes she was dead. - By the Jury: Witness was at home the whole of the day on which the body was missed with the exception of about an hour when she went to the village on an errand. Had there been any noise near the pit she could have heard it from her front door. - By Supt. Allin: When the deceased came from service she had good clothes, but whilst at home she was very poorly clad. - Wm. Langman, recalled, said he thought he was ploughing at Whitcross on the day the deceased disappeared. Certainly he was not at home. He left home at seven in the morning and did not return until half-past six at night. His work did not lie near Whiddon. - Mr Charles J. Vlieland, surgeon, St. Thomas, Exeter, said he made a post-mortem examination of the body on Friday last with the assistance of Dr Mortimer, of Exeter. He found the body of the deceased well nourished, and very little discoloured with the exception of a commencing greenish discolouration of the front of the chest, and of the skin of the head, which was of a dark reddish-brown. The face and neck were somewhat tumid (swollen). The legs and feet were white and wrinkled. The skin generally was removed or was easily removable. The hands were open and empty and there were no marks on them of excoriation. The teeth were firmly closed, the tongue lying in close apposition, with the teeth in front, but unwounded; and with the exception of some semi-liquid mud the mouth was empty. There were no marks of violence on the trunk or limbs, with the exception of the right hand, on the back of which was a large reddish-purple bruise. This, on being cut into, shewed extensive effusion of blood into the subcutaneous tissue. There were no fractures of bones anywhere. To produce the effusion of blood there must have been a violent blow. On the scalp were six distinct lacerated wounds, one of which, the most anterior, was just at the edge of the hair in front, nearly in the middle line, but a little to the left. Another of the wounds was at the back of the head, just above the occipital protuberance, and a little to the left (popularly called the back of the head). The other four wounds were on the top of the head. All the wounds extended through the scalp to the bone, one on the top of the head being very large. On opening these wounds were found large extravasations of blood, more or less coagulated. Some of the blood was clotted and some ran away. There were also two very large bruises or rather effusions of blood - one above the ear (temple fossa) and reaching the temple: the other over the right ear and reaching down to the neck, deep into the tissues. There were no wounds of the skin corresponding to these bruises. On removing the skull cap the dura mater (immediate lining of the inside of the skull) was normal. On opening this, he found two large effusions of semi-liquid blood, one covering the surface of the upper part and one of the vertical part of the left temple and occipital lobe, the other more in front on the right side over most of the vertical portion of the frontal and temple lobes. On removing the brain and stripping the dura mater from the base of the skull no fracture was there found. All these injuries must have been inflicted with very great violence indeed. They were all driven through the skull. - Can you say whether they were inflicted during lifetime or after death? - I should certainly say they were inflicted during lifetime. - Were they sufficient to cause death? Decidedly. - What were they inflicted by? They must have been inflicted with a blunt instrument. The skull was broken through, and the periostium was not cut. - Would it have been possible for the deceased to have inflicted them herself? - Quite impossible. - Would it have been possible for them to have been caused by a fall? Not unless from a great distance, and it must then have been several falls to produce the vertical wounds and blood effusion. There would, in case of a fall, have been fracture of the base of the skull and effusion into the neck. A fall could not, in fact, have possibly caused these injuries. The body had apparently been in the water a month. - Mr J. Mortimer, surgeon, Exeter, said he assisted at the post-mortem examination and he entirely agreed with what Mr Vlieland had said. He had nothing to add to it. - The Coroner said this was all the evidence he had to offer, and he suggested that the Jury should retire to consider their verdict, when he would review the evidence. - The Jury then (at 6.30) retired to another room, and after an absence of ten minutes returned with a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown." - The Coroner: I quite agree with your verdict. You have done your duty and have ascertained the cause of death. There is no doubt that this poor girl met her death by murder, and by adopting the course you have the ends of justice will not be defeated. The Police will now be able to make inquiries, and we all hope, I am sure, that the perpetrators of this fearful crime will be brought to justice. Immediately after the verdict was given, Sergeant Fursdon, of Crediton, arrested MRS MILLER, the mother of the deceased, on suspicion, and she will be brought before the magistrates at Crediton this morning.

DARTMOUTH - Mr R. W. Prideaux, Dartmouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday afternoon touching the death of ELIZABETH BLAMEY, aged 46, who was found dead in bed at her house in Lower-street. The evidence shewed that the woman was given to excessive drinking, and had been living apart from her husband (a coal lumper) for eight months. Dr Soper said there was no doubt that death was the result of alcoholic poisoning, and a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 March 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, concerning the death of ETHEL MOORE, 5 weeks old, daughter of MR MOORE, butcher, of Marlborough-street. The infant had slept in bed between its father and mother and about nine o'clock yesterday morning was found dead. Dr F. Everard Row, who was called in shortly afterwards, pronounced life extinct. A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 March 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death By Burning At Devonport. - The death from burning of REBECCA NEATE, widow, 79 years of age, living in an upstairs room at 14 Albany-street, Devonport, was the subject of Inquiry by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday. The evidence confirmed the report already given in the Western Morning News. A few minutes after four on Wednesday afternoon Mrs Willis, greengrocer, who lived in the same house, had her attention drawn to the room occupied by MRS NEATE, which was full of smoke. She went into the room and saw the deceased lying on the floor near the fire. Her clothing was in flames from the waist downwards. Mrs Willis promptly rolled her on the floor and wrapped her in a carpet, by this means completely extinguishing the flames. Deceased was seen in the street about three quarters of an hour before the accident, and in the absence of any direct evidence it is assumed that while sitting before a bright fire in which sticks were burning the lower part of her dress - of woollen material - was set on fire by a spark from the grate, near which several pieces of loose wood were lying. Mrs Willis was of opinion that the sudden opening of the door of the room caused a current of air, which drove the fire on MRS NEATE'S dress to her underclothing. The deceased appeared about to have tea when the accident happened, for the table was overturned, and a cup and saucer and sugar basin were on the floor. The chair on which she was sitting was burnt, as was also the canvas in front of the fireplace. Mr D. Wilson, surgeon, was quickly in attendance, and ordered her removal to the Hospital, where she died about six o'clock, an hour after admission. The deceased was badly burned about the lower part of the body, and from the first it was seen that the case was hopeless. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 March 1888
NEWTON ABBOT - A Coroner's Inquiry was opened at Newton yesterday into the circumstances of the accident causing the death of WILLIAM GEORGE PALK, aged 13, errand boy to Messrs. Baker and Co., grocers. Evidence was given as to the lad being run over by a grocery wagon, on which he was riding with the driver Tope at the time, but from which he fell. The accident occurred close to the quarries near Aller, on the Torquay-road, and the horses, which were being driven tandem fashion, were going at a moderate place. The lad was taken into a neighbouring house - that of Mr Blatchford - and he died within a quarter of an hour. Tope was so prostrated by the shock that he could not speak, and yesterday he was still unable to attend the Inquiry. Mr J. W. Ley, surgeon, Newton, deposed that the cause of death was haemorrhage, resulting from rupture of the liver. The Inquest was adjourned for a week, in order that the driver might attend.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 March 1888
An elderly man named THOMAS FREEMAN was found dead in a cottage in the Dawlish-road yesterday. At the Inquest subsequently held, a verdict of "Death from Apoplexy" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 March 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, before Mr W. H. Hooper, Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS DAVEY, 52, who died from injuries received in falling from a rick at Broadhayes, near, Axminster, on February 20th. The evidence shewed that the deceased, a labourer, was cutting hay from a rick at the time of the accident. He fell, and a ladder fell upon him, breaking his leg. Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon, said the injured leg was not amputated, and the deceased died the day after his admission, rather from heart and lung disease than as a result of the accident. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 March 1888
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In Plymouth Prison. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Plymouth Prison last evening relative to the death of MARY JANE COSTELLO, aged 45, who was brought before the Plymouth Magistrates on Monday last, charged with sleeping in a staircase, and sentenced to seven days' imprisonment. Mr John Martin was Foreman of the Jury. - Mr Wm. Brewer, governor of the prison, stated that the deceased was an inmate of the female portion of the prison. She was received there on the 5th inst., having been sentenced to confinement for seven days for vagrancy. He saw her on Tuesday morning, and knew she was visited by the surgeon (Mr S. Wolferstan) on that day. On Wednesday morning her death was reported to him as having occurred in her cell. He was not aware that she complained of being unwell at the time she was admitted. - Susan Proctor, assistant-warder, said she saw the deceased come into the prison on Monday evening. She was received by the Matron, and witness did not see her again that night. On Tuesday morning about six o'clock witness saw her in bed, and she then complained of being unwell. Witness told her that the doctor would see her during the morning, and at half-past seven she had her breakfast. Witness told her she would have to get up, and after a time she did so. The medical officer saw her about ten o'clock, and she ate a part of her dinner. When witness took in her tea she drank it, and she did not see her again alive, although the matron saw her afterwards. On Wednesday morning about six o'clock, she was found dead in bed. There was a bell by which the deceased could communicate with the officer on duty in the night, but it was not within reach of the bed, and witness knew that she did not ring the bell. - Jane Davidson, the matron, received the deceased on Monday, when she appeared weak and said she felt so, but after drinking some water she was better. She did not ask to see the doctor, and did not eat any of her supper. On the following morning she complained to witness of being unwell. She was in a very dirty condition when received, and looked like a woman who had been only half fed. She was no stranger at the prison, having been there three times during the present year. The deceased was searched and had £1 3s. 8d. about her. - Mr S. Wolferstan, prison surgeon, saw the deceased on Tuesday morning about ten o'clock, when, in reply to a question, she said she was "feeling bad." She was suffering from dropsy and had disease of the heart, which was the cause of the dropsy. She was not in immediate danger, and he gave instructions that she should go to bed at once and remain there until his next visit. The heart disease had probably been of long standing and was the cause of death. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 March 1888
WHITCHURCH - "Death From Heart Disease" was the verdict returned at Whitchurch yesterday at an Inquest held before Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner, into the cause of death of a married woman named JANE GILES, of Stanifordland farm. The deceased was taken ill about half-past ten on Saturday morning and medical assistance was sent for, but she died before Mr Brodrick, surgeon, arrived. Mr Brodrick made a post-mortem examination of the body and on his evidence a verdict was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT - At the Bible Christian school-room, Newton, Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, yesterday held the adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of the boy, WM. GEO. PALK, 13 years of age. The Inquest was adjourned from Monday last to allow a witness to attend. Evidence shewed that the deceased with a waggoner named Albert tope, left Newton on Friday week with a waggon load of goods for Torquay, and when near Aller Cottages, the deceased fell off the waggon and the wheels passed over the body causing death in a few minutes. No cause could be given, how or why the boy fell off, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their sympathy with the parents of the deceased in their bereavement.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 March 1888
KINGSBRIDGE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr Sidney Hacker, at the Anchor Hotel, Kingsbridge, yesterday, relative to the death of MR CHARLES THOMAS HEWITT, who was found in the mill leat on Saturday night under circumstances already reported in these columns. Mr H. E. Lamble was Foreman of the Jury.

TORQUAY - The Peculiar Fatality At Torquay. Adjourned Inquiry. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR CHARLES ABRAMS, of Hollydale, Teignmouth-road, Torquay, who was found dead with his head and shoulders in a barrel of water in a garden, was held last evening at the Torbay Inn, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. It will be remembered that the Inquest was adjourned from Friday evening to allow Mr Karkeek, surgeon, to make a post-mortem examination of the body, he having been refused admission to the house for this purpose on Friday afternoon by the widow, who subsequently said she considered it unnecessary. Mr Karkeek now stated the result of the examination. There were no external signs of injury or of violence. The lungs were such as he would expect to find in a case of drowning. The heart was healthy. On the right side of the brain there was a soft spot indicative of a previous attack of apoplexy. he also found a fresh clot of blood and he inferred from this that the deceased was seized with a slight attack of apoplexy whilst standing near the barrel and that owing to the giddiness which would ensue he accidentally fell in. The gardener and servant were recalled and questioned with regard to the position of the deceased's hat and stick, and it was shewn that the hat was on the opposite side of the cask. MRS ABRAMS, the widow, was also recalled, and asked if there was anything in connection with the affairs of the deceased which might suggest that he was likely to commit suicide, to which she replied, "Certainly not." She was also asked as to his financial affairs being all right, and whether he had any troubles in this respect, and her answer was "Emphatically, No." The Coroner, in summing up, remarked on the value of Mr Karkeek's evidence as tending to clear up any doubt, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 March 1888
NEWTON ABBOT - Yesterday morning Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Newton Railway Station respecting the death of MRS HANNAH MARCOSA, 39 years of age, wife of MR E. M. MARCOSA, diamond merchant, of Russell-square, London, who died on Tuesday in the midday train from Plymouth to London. The evidence shewed that the deceased suffered from weakness of the heart and was subject to fainting fits. She went to Plymouth a few days ago to attend the funeral of her mother, and whilst at Plymouth she was unwell. On Tuesday just before leaving for London she complained of being unwell and soon after the train started she became faint, and Miss Isaacs, a cousin, who was in the train, gave her some stimulants, but she did not rally, and after awhile became unconscious. When the train arrived at Newton Dr Grimbley was called in, and he discovered that she was dead. He made a superficial examination and found no appearances of anything suggesting that deceased had come to her death otherwise than by natural causes - most probably heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 March 1888
PLYMOUTH - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth last night before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, in the case of a working man named JOHN BUTLAND. Deceased, who was in the employ of Messrs. Collier and Co., wine merchants, accidentally broke a pane of glass on the 20th of January last and cut one of his fingers. As the wound did not heal BUTLAND, acting under advice, went to the Hospital for treatment. He was admitted to the Hospital on the 24th February, and Mr Woollcombe, the house surgeon, found that he was suffering from a poisoned wound, and that the wound still contained a piece of glass. On the following day it was found necessary to amputate the finger, and on the 1st instant erysipelas set in. On Friday last, with the man's consent, the arm was amputated above the wrist, but before the operation was completed the deceased got gradually weaker and died yesterday morning. Mr Woollcombe attributed death to exhaustion.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 March 1888
EXETER - The Suicide Of A Girl At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday touching the death of REBECCA MARSHALL, aged 19, domestic servant, who took poison on the previous day. - HELEN MARSHALL said the deceased was her sister, and her home was at Huish, North Devon. She had been in the employ of Mr Edward Steele Perkins, surgeon, about seventeen months. On Sunday evening deceased came to see witness, but did not say anything particular to her. Witness did not know that she was keeping company with anyone, and she never saw her in better spirits than on Sunday. Richard James Gee, bombardier in the Field Artillery stationed at Topsham Barracks, said he had known the deceased for eight months and recently had kept company with her. A fortnight ago he wrote, telling her he did not desire her acquaintance any longer, his reason being that she had disappointed him in failing to keep an engagement. On Sunday night they passed in High-street, without speaking. In reply to a Juror, witness said he was not with three women when he passed the deceased in High-street. - Lucy Radford, domestic servant, in the employ of Dr Perkins, said, when the deceased came home on Sunday night she said Gee had passed her without speaking, but that he should not do so again. She said no more, ate her supper, and seemed in good spirits. Deceased got up with witness next morning about 6.30, and went into the surgery to draw the blinds, as witness thought. In a few minutes she came into the kitchen very sick. Witness asked her if she had a sick headache, and the deceased replied, "No; I have been and drank up some poison."Witness then called Dr Perkins. The deceased did not seem cast down. - Mr E. S. Perkins, surgeon, 20 St. Sidwells, said the deceased was housemaid in his employ, and was a steady girl for all he knew. He never heard anything against her. On Monday morning he found her trying to be sick, and asked her what she had taken. She replied, "Something out of a large black bottle." Witness went into his surgery, and examined all the bottles that contained poison. The only one that was moist was a bottle containing a liniment of aconite. He should think the deceased took a large tablespoonful. He shewed her the bottle, and she said that was the one. He gave her an emetic, and sent for his cousin, Dr Alfred Perkins, who came within a few minutes. The girl was removed to the Hospital, and other emetics were applied, but she died shortly before nine o'clock. She complained of all the symptoms of poisoning by aconite - numbness and tingling. - By the Jury: She could read, and could not have made a mistake. He could not lock up all his poisons. This liniment he was constantly suing. Sixty grains of aconite would destroy life, and the deceased must have taken 180 grains. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, said they had heard from the soldier that they had broken off acquaintance with the girl, and the question was whether there was sufficient cause in that to disturb her mind. - "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was the Jury's verdict.

AVETON GIFFORD - GEORGE HENRY TOLL, of Aveton Gifford, was found dead in a field on Friday morning by a man named Aaron Skinner. An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, by Mr R. Rodd, Coroner, elicited the fact that Walter Cuming was at work with deceased on Thursday, and left him apparently all right on that evening. P.C. Christopher gave evidence as to finding deceased lying on his face, which was imbedded in the mud, and Dr Langworthy being of opinion that death resulted from suffocation, caused by falling in the position by an epileptic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of Death by Suffocation.

PLYMOUTH - Drink And Its Effects. - The Plymouth Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening relative to the death of PRIVATE FRANCIS FIGGINS, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Regiment, who died yesterday morning in the Hospital. Mr Thomas Mills was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Lieut Christian watched the case on behalf of the military authorities. - Private John Benson, of the same regiment, stated that the deceased was a groom for Major Simpson. On Saturday last, at four o'clock, witness went out with the deceased on their master's horses for the purpose of exercising them. They rode out to Mutley-plain, and thence to the Rising sun Inn, at Crabtree, where they dismounted and stayed a quarter of an hour, each of them having two glasses of spirits. On their way home they visited another public-house, and again had two glasses of spirits each. The horse deceased was riding was a quiet one, although rather fresh. They were going at a trot when deceased's horse took fright and reared. Witness went on a little way, and then heard a fall. On looking back he saw deceased lying in the road, and the horse galloped past. He followed the horse, caught it, and led it back to where deceased was lying. By that time a crowd of people had assembled. FIGGINS was removed to the Hospital. A police constable took charge of both horses and brought them to the Citadel, witness accompanying him. The horse would often rear and jump about, but witness never saw it run away before. - Edward Charles Pappin said he saw Benson and the deceased outside the Crabtree Inn on Saturday. Benson was trying to mount, but was very drunk. He did not see the other man mount. After walking on a little distance he heard a scampering behind, and saw the two horses coming up at a stiff gallop. Both men were rolling about in their saddles, and shortly afterwards he saw the deceased thrown from his horse, which had shied at something and reared up. The man was thrown clean out of the saddle, and fell on his head. Witness afterwards accompanied him to the Hospital. - P.C. Honey, stationed at Crabtree, proved seeing the two men on horseback about 6.30. Benson was then forcing on his horse as fast as it could go. About seven o'clock he was called to the scene of an accident at the end of the Laira Embankment, and found the deceased in by the hedge. He was unconscious. Benson was mounted, but was very drunk, and witness dismounted him and took charge of the two horses. He had ascertained that the landlord of the Crabtree Inn refused them the spirits that they asked for, and offered them soda water, which the deceased took, but Benson refused. - Mr Walter Woollcombe, house-surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, said that the deceased was admitted about 7.30 p.m. on Saturday. He was unconscious and had a bruise over the right eye. He smelled strongly of alcohol. On Sunday he rallied partially, but died yesterday morning about half-past four. Witness had made a post-mortem examination, and found an extensive fracture extending from the right temple across the front of the base of the skull and then backwards to the left side. There was also a considerable deposit of blood all over the brain. Deceased died from the injuries sustained probably by a fall. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that he was glad to say accidents to officers' servants were very rare, and he did not remember a similar case for the past twenty years. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 23 March 1888
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death In A Plymouth Hovel. "Worse Than A Dog's Kennel." - Inquiry was made by Mr Coroner Brian at the ]?] Arms Hotel, Exeter-street, Plymouth, yesterday concerning the death of MARY ANN MCNELTY, a widow, 42 years, living at 9 Higher-street. Deceased, when out charing, was apparently well when she retired on Tuesday night, but at three o'clock the next day, Mrs Roberts, a neighbour, living in the same house, heard her groaning and on going into her room found her out of bed kneeling on the floor. With the assistance of Mrs Holmes, another neighbour, Mrs Roberts got her into bed and afterwards endeavoured without success to obtain medical aid. On returning she found that MRS MCNELTY was dead. In reply to Mr ]?], a Juror, Mrs Roberts said she told the doctor that Mrs McNelty was dying, but did not say she was dead, and thought the doctor did say it was no use his going to a dead woman. She was confused at the time, and didn't know what she said. The Coroner remarked that a doctor was under no obligation to go. - Mr May: It was a question of humanity. - Eliza Holmes gave corroborative testimony. - Mr Walter Woollcombe, surgeon, who made the post-mortem examination on the body, stated that the cause of death was kidney disease. A Juror remarked that the deceased had remained out all night, sleeping in passages, and he said, such exposure would aggravate the disease. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and Mr May remarked that the attention of the authorities be called to the disgraceful state of the cottage in which the deceased lived. The house was a mere rabbit hutch, consisting of only two rooms, or rather holes, one over the other. In the deceased's room there was neither door nor fireplace, whilst in the lower room, occupied by the witness, there was no light whatever. Both rooms were dirty, and the stairs were so rotten as to be scarcely able to support a man's weight. Moreover, the occupant of the upper room had to pass through the lower one to get out of the house, so that there must necessarily be a total absence of decency. The Coroner and Jury agreed with Mr May's observations, Mr Brian remarking that deceased's room was not seven feet square and the house was the worst he had been into. I Juror said the premises were [?] than a dog's kennel for human habitation. The Coroner's Officer (Mr Manning) said the deceased slept in the room with a lad of 13 or 14 years of age, a son of Roberts, who were the tenants of the house. She had children of her own, two in an orphan asylum, two in Stonehouse Workhouse , one in Ireland, and one in America. The Jury asked the Press to record the [?] of opinion of the state of the dwelling.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 March 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd at Stonehouse on Saturday relative to the death of the three months old son of PRIVATE BRIGHTLY, R.M.L.I., Mr Nicholson, surgeon, as the result of a post-mortem examination, stated that death was due to inflammation around the heart and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 March 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest concerning the death of MRS MARY MILFORD, aged 64 living at 11 Morley-place, was held by the Borough Coroner, at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth yesterday. WILLIAM MILFORD, husband of the deceased, stated that his wife had been ailing for some time past, and died suddenly. Dr Jackson on Monday morning said that death probably arose from weakness of the heart, for which he had previously treated the deceased. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The fatal accident to the mason, REUBEN E. PHILLIPS, whilst working in the Crescent, at Plymouth, on Monday, formed the subject of Inquiry by the Borough coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital yesterday, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 March 1888
ST MARYCHURCH - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at the Union Hotel, St Marychurch, on Thursday evening respecting the death of ANNIE MAUD CLEMENTS, aged four months, who was discovered by her mother in a dying state on the previous morning. Dr Cook gave evidence to the effect that the child had always been affected in its head. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport by Mr Vaughan on Thursday on the body of MAUDE COLEMAN, 13 months old, daughter of WM. COLEMAN, coachman, living at 19 Tavistock-road, Stoke. Deceased had been suffering for some time from a cold, but on Wednesday appeared to be much better. the mother left it for a few minutes in charge of her little boy, but shortly afterwards found the child in a fit. She sent for Dr Gard, who came quickly, but the child was dead when he arrived. A post-mortem examination shewed that it was well nourished, but that one of its lungs was congested. It had not cut its teeth, and this, together with the congestion of the lung, caused its death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 April 1888
TORQUAY - SAMUEL PERKINS, a fisherman, second coxswain of the Torquay lifeboat, 46 years of age, a widower with four children, spent Good Friday afternoon in oyster fishing in his boat in Babbacombe Bay, with Richard Bishop. Upon returning to Torquay, and when near the Flat Rock, the deceased, who was at the tiller steering, suddenly drew his hands across his stomach, and made a barking noise as he fell forward dead. In about an hour Bishop rowed the boat to Torquay, and a post-mortem examination shewed that deceased had suffered from heart disease of long standing. At an Inquest on Saturday a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Two Inquests were held by Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner on Saturday. The first was concerning the death of LILIAN MUNDAY, whose parents live at 25 Pembroke-street. The mother nursed it at one o'clock that morning and it seemed all right; two hours later she found it was dead. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, was of opinion that death was due to convulsions, the result, probably, of overfeeding. The second Inquest related to the death of PHILIP FROST, Dockyard labourer, aged 59, residing at 59 Charlotte-street. Deceased, who had been treated by the Medical Aid Society for indigestion, was at work on Thursday and died suddenly on Friday. a post mortem examination by Mr Hall, surgeon, revealed heart disease. The verdict in each case was "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 April 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport, yesterday, by Mr J. Vaughan, on the body of FREDERICK HAWTON, retired ropemaker, from the Dockyard, who lived at 9 Ordnance-street. About nine o'clock on Friday evening he went to bed, and about two hours later he was found gasping for breath; he died shortly afterwards. Mr R. W. Long, surgeon, attended the deceased on Thursday, when he had symptoms of indigestion. Mr Long carefully examined his chest and found a weakness of the heart's action, which might have been caused by chronic indigestion, and for which he prescribed. On Saturday morning, about half-past ten, his death was reported to the doctor, who being unable to account for it made a post-mortem examination. There was a large quantity of fat on the surface of the heart and death was caused by syncope which might have been produced by sudden exertion or excitement. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquiry was made yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, by Mr R. Rodd, County Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of EDMUND THOMAS AYLEN, ship's cook's mate, late of H.M.S. Royal Adelaide. William James Cave, nurse in No. 18 ward, said he last saw deceased alive about ten minutes to nine on Friday evening; he was then in bed. Next morning about seven o'clock witness found him hanging in a closet. Round his neck was a bandage, which had been fastened to an overhead pipe. He was dead and cold and his knees were bent. Witness had not observed that deceased was depressed in spirits. Another nurse, named Woodley, deposed to cutting down the deceased, and Surgeon Charles William Sharples to making a post mortem examination of the body. There was no trace of any disorder of the brain, but it was possible that the disease from which deceased had suffered might have preyed on his mind and affected the brain, without witness being able to trace it. He considered the injuries were self-inflicted. Deceased was in the convalescent ward and would have been discharged in a few days. The Jury found that deceased Hanged Himself while of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 April 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquiry was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse yesterday afternoon by the Deputy Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., concerning the death of RICHARD UNDERHILL, aged 72, shoemaker of 2 Admiralty-street, who died suddenly at his residence early on Tuesday morning shortly after going to bed. A post-mortem examination was made by Mr M. H. Bulteel, surgeon, who stated that death was due to syncope, arising from failure of the heart's action. He had never seen so fatty a heart as that of the deceased's The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Western Hotel, York-street, Plymouth, last evening, concerning the death of MARY ANN PRIN, who died suddenly at her residence, 5 York-street, yesterday morning. WILLIAM PRIN, husband of deceased, said his wife complained of feeling unwell when he went to work shortly before six, but did not think it necessary to call in medical aid. When he returned home to breakfast at eight o'clock, he found her dead in bed. Deceased, who was 57, had for some time suffered from a weak heart; and Mr Jackson, surgeon, gave this as the probable cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held last evening at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, on the body of PHILIP TURNER, naval pensioner, who was admitted to the Hospital in an unconscious state on Monday night, and died early yesterday morning. Dr Perks ascertained from a post mortem examination that concussion of the brain had been caused, probably by a fall, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 April 1888
PLYMOUTH - The death of a boy named ALFRED ERNEST BURT, three years of age, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening. REBECCA BURT, the mother stated that on Tuesday afternoon she went in the front room of her house in Castle-street, leaving the deceased in the back room. A kettle, full of boiling water, was on the fire, and hearing a scream, she went into the room and met the deceased. He was wet, and the kettle was upset on the floor. He was severely scalded, and was taken to the Hospital. Mr Walter Woollcombe, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the child had a very severe scald over the back and the arms, and died yesterday morning from shock to the system. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Martin was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ABBOT - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was yesterday returned by a Coroner's Jury at Newton in the case of a single man named JOHN WEBBER, 29 years of age, who was killed on Tuesday night by the up mail train on the Great Western Railway. The deceased had been to Torquay races, and was walking home a near way to Ipplepen, along the railway, and when near Daignton tunnel is supposed to have fallen or lay down close to the rails, and the guard iron of the engine struck him a tremendous blow in the head which killed him instantly.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday into the cause of the death of a newly-born female child. Mr Stanbury was elected Foreman of the Jury. From the evidence of Ellen Mary Radford, of 19 Cheltenham-place, it appeared that MARY CRAPP, the mother of the child, was a domestic servant in her house. On Tuesday CRAPP complained of indisposition and remained in her room the whole day. On the following morning it was discovered that she had been delivered of a child and the child was found dead. Dr Eyeley was called in, and his evidence was to the effect that the child was born alive, but died through inattention on the part of the mother. He was of opinion, however, that the mother was probably not in a fit state to attend to the child, in which case no blame could attach to her. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned, and the Jury acquitted the mother of blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - Alleged concealment Of Birth At Stoke. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner at Devonport, yesterday Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of a male child at 11 Brunswick-place, Stoke. The Inquest was opened at the Haddington Hotel, Benbow-street, after which the Jury proceeded to view the body at the house where it was found. - The depositions of ANNIE MORETON, the mother of the child, were taken in her bedroom. According to her statement the child was born at twelve o'clock on Tuesday night, no one being present to render her assistance. She did not hear the child cry, and put it just inside the bed. Mrs Blackwood Parker, wife of Staff-Commander Parker, R.N., stated that MORETON had been in her service since the 17th November last. She suspected the girl's state, but in answer to witness's question she denied it. She did her work as usual up to six o'clock on Tuesday evening. She complained of feeling ill, but on going to bed at ten o'clock said she felt better. About half-past eight next morning witness went to the girl's bedroom door and asked to be admitted. The girl said she could not open the door, but at length managed to do so. Witness entered the room, and found MORETON lying on the floor. On moving the bedclothes she discovered the dead body of a child, and sent for Mr Rae, who came immediately. Mr Rae, surgeon, said he found the girl in a very prostrate condition, as if she had fallen on the floor from weakness. She was in considerable danger from exhaustion, and he first placed her in a more favourable position for breathing. He next examined the child, and found that it had been dead several hours. A post-mortem examination justified him in saying that he did not think the child had a separate existence. He did not believe there was any intention on the part of the mother to sacrifice its life. She was about to be married to a marine, who was on his way home from sea. The Jury found that the child was Stillborn.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 April 1888
EXETER - The Late MR R. J. GRAY, of Exeter. The Coroner's Function. - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Saturday before Mr W. H. Hooper, Coroner, touching the death of MR R. J. GRAY, secretary to the West of England Fire and Insurance company. Mr Allen was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Before the Jury were sworn Mr H. Michelmore handed a medical certificate of the cause of death to the Coroner, but the latter threw it on one side and said he knew all about it, but he proposed to hold the Inquiry. Mr Michelmore endeavoured to explain, but the Coroner said he did not want any explanation. He had a public duty to perform and he intended to perform it. He was surprised that Mr Michelmore came there under such circumstances and (addressing the Jury) observed that perhaps they had better know what had taken place - that morning he had been grossly insulted. - MR WILLIAM EDWARD GRAY, solicitor, Exeter, said the deceased was an uncle of his, and was 66 years of age. he resided at Newlands, Alphington. Mr R. Cumming, chief clerk and cashier of the West of England Insurance Company, said the deceased did not appear to be very well on Friday, and about two o'clock he came into his office, where witness was waiting for him, with both hands pressed to his heart. Witness said, "Why, what's the matter?" and the deceased replied that he had great pain, which he thought was on his lungs. He added that he thought the cold got down his throat while he was coming in from Alphington. He appeared to be low spirited and witness tried to cheer him. Witness felt his pulse, which appeared to be weak, but regular. He left for home about a quarter to five, and the next thing witness heard was that he was dead. - By the Coroner: The annual meeting had recently been held, and the preparation for this involved extra work and anxiety. - Mr a. J. Cumming, surgeon, said the deceased sent for him on Friday afternoon, and told him that as he came up Fore-street-hill in the morning he felt as if his chest were being "gripped." This was the pain of angina pectoris. Witness found the deceased's heart was weak, but not more so than previously. The lungs were sound, but deceased suffered more or less from indigestion, as he had done for a long while. Witness prescribed for him, but he had taken no physic up to the time of his death. At ten minutes after five witness saw deceased in Mr Trelase's shop in High-street, he having fallen down just outside. Dr McKeith was trying to restore animation by the usual methods, but MR GRAY was dead. He considered that death was due to failure of the heart's action. - By Mr Stocker: Would have been quite prepared to certify as to the cause of death. He had attended the deceased for thirteen or fourteen years. MR GRAY suffered from weak heart and shortness of breath, but had not complained so much of angina. - The Coroner said he was utterly at a loss to understand the position taken up by Mr Michelmore and others that day. His duty was to hold Inquests in cases of sudden deaths or accidents. He was pressed on one side to hold an Inquest and on the other side not to do so, and he used his judgment as well as he could and should continue to do so. When a gentleman came to his office and said it was a question of fees, and he was willing to pay him anything not to hold it - he said this in the presence of Mr Michelmore - he was above that sort of thing, thank God. - Mr Stocker remarked that what had fallen from the Coroner was quite new to him. He would not be dictated to as to his opinions while on the Jury (Hear, hear.) - The Coroner, in reply to questions, said Mr Cummings had left, and he could not therefore alter the depositions, as some of the Jury requested. - Mr J. McKeith of Exeter, said he saw the deceased stagger and fall, and attended to him in Mr Telase's shop. Artificial respiration was persevered in for about twenty minutes, but deceased expired in about ten minutes from the time of the fall. - By the Jury: Angina pectoris was an affection of the heart - a painful neuralgia of the heart, arising from various causes. Over anxiety would bring it on. He had given a certificate as to the cause of death. He coincided with what Dr Cummings had said. - Mr Michelmore: Are you not going to put that down? - The Coroner: No, sir; certainly not. - Mr Michelmore: You promised me you would. - The Coroner: Well, I can override that certificate, as you know. - Mr Michelmore: I don't want to quarrel with you. - The Coroner: I don't want to quarrel with you, but when you come to me and offer me money .... - Mr Michelmore: I deny it. - The Coroner: It was in the presence of Mr Cumming. - The Foreman of the Jury said he did not think it was dignified to have these remarks across the table. - The Coroner: Then why provoke them? - Mr Michelmore retorted that the Coroner himself had provoked them. - Mr F. Thomas: We should get over this altogether if all the questions were put down. - In summing up the Coroner said the case had been very unpleasant, especially to himself, from beginning to end. During the thirty-five years he had been City Coroner he had never had a case more painful than the present one. If ever there was a case of sudden death he thought this was one. (Hear, hear). If they took the certificate of a medial man who came in at the last moment, medical men might as well take over all the duties appertaining to holding the position of clerk of the peace for the county should have offered him a fee for withholding the Inquest. - Mr Thomas said he presumed this was done to spare the relatives unnecessary pain. - The Coroner: It was to avoid an Inquiry. - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict of the Jury and the Coroner retained the certificate from Dr McKeith which Mr Michelmore had handed in.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry into the cause of death of JOHN MARTIN, 58 years of age, butcher and dairyman, of 23 Waterloo-street, Stoke, was made by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, on Saturday. It appeared that on the morning of the 27th February deceased was splitting a piece of wood when the wedge flew out and struck the inner portion of his right foot between the heel and the ankle. He complained to his wife of feeling very faint, and asked for brandy and water, which she gave him. During the night the blow caused him great pain, and his leg got worse, but no medical man was consulted until March 5th, when Mr Everard Row was called in. Abscesses formed, and as there seemed to be no improvement in the case, a consultation was held by Mr Bulteel, Mr Row and Mr Perks as to the advisability of amputating the leg. It was decided, however, not to amputate the limb, the strength of the patient not being considered sufficient to justify the operation. The patient lived four or five days after this and died at half-past three on Friday afternoon. Mr Row was subjected to a lengthy examination by a gentleman representing an accidental insurance company with whom the deceased was insured, the object of the examination being to shew that had medical aid been summoned immediately after the accident, death would not have resulted. Mr Row, however, said that in all probability a fatal result would have followed if a medical man had been at once called in. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 April 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The sudden death of EVA FLORENCE DAY, aged seven weeks, the child of MR DAY, army caterer, of 20 Palmerston-street, Stoke, was the subject of Inquiry by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at Devonport yesterday. The child suffered from convulsions and after hearing the evidence of Mr Gard, surgeon, the Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - "Death from Heart Disease" was the verdict returned at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, at an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of THOMAS EPLET, a carpenter, aged sixty-four years, residing in St. Andrew-street. The deceased had suffered from asthma for some time past, but had not been medically treated. He was in his usual health on Sunday, and went to bed about nine o'clock that evening. During the night his son heard him breathing heavily several times, and subsequently found that he was dead. There being no doubt as to the cause of death, it was not deemed necessary to order a medical examination.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 April 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday, before Mr W. H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JAMES WILLIS, labourer, aged 62. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was found in the Exeter canal with his legs tied together, had been in the Workhouse for some time owing to slackness of work. According to the statement of his son, the deceased had been a very heavy drinker and was at times very "light headed" and childish. He had not been heard to threaten suicide. To his brother, however, on Saturday morning he said "good-bye" and added that he should never be able to repay him for his kindness at different times. "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 April 1888
EXETER - Burnt To Death At Exeter. - Yesterday afternoon at Exeter Guildhall an Inquest was held on the body of CHARLES PARSONS, for many years verger at the Exeter Cathedral, who died from burns received the previous evening. - CHARLES LIME PARSONS, architect's assistant, residing at No. 1 Deanery-place, The Close, with his late father, identified the body. His father had been senior verger at the Cathedral for nearly thirty years. He was 67 years of age. The previous evening deceased went to bed about half-past five. Some twelve months since he had a seizure since which time he had been gradually getting weaker. Witness visited him several times after he went to bed, between six and nine o'clock, when he appeared the same as usual, being very tired and sleepy. Witness went out about nine o'clock and on returning about half-past ten he saw his mother just opening deceased's bedroom door, when he noticed a very strong smell of smoke. He immediately went to deceased's bedroom and he there saw him on the floor, the room being full of smoke, and the bed burning. He was undressed and witness spoke to him, and said, "How is this?" at the same time pulling him out of the room, the smoke being suffocating. Deceased made no answer to his question. His nightdress was burnt and deceased was burnt in various parts of the body. When he left him he was quite sober. There was a fire in the room, from which the bed stood about five feet off. On pulling deceased out of the room he was placed on some pillows. Witness could not exactly tell how the accident happened. Witness immediately sent for Mr Caird. - By a Juror: Deceased sometimes had a candle in the bedroom, and sometimes he would light it himself. - By the Coroner: The candle stood on the table by the bedside. - Inspector Wreford said so far as he cold judge the candle caught the curtain. - Mr Caird, surgeon, said he knew deceased, having attended him for a great many years. His health had been much impaired, deceased having had a seizure two years ago. He was called between ten and eleven; found the deceased on the floor inside the door, the house being in a great confusion. He was badly burnt nearly all over his body, and was partially conscious. He dressed the wounds, with the assistance of Mr Moon, and left the deceased alive in charge of a nurse, but deceased died on Wednesday morning. MRS PARSONS was in a state of great prostration, mentally and bodily, and quite unable to give evidence. - The Coroner: Do you think it arose from the fire or the candle? - Witness: From the candle. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was nothing to shew how the death occurred. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of JAMES BROOKS, aged 13, who died at that Institution. From the evidence of ALFRED BROOKS, father of the deceased, it appeared that he was driving a cart laden with a ton of coals along Sutton-road, Coxside. His son was riding on the right shaft of the cart. A jerk, caused by the slipping of the horse on a grating in the middle of the road, threw the deceased between the horse's legs and the wheel passed over his neck. Witness dismounted from the cart, put the deceased into a cab and drove him to the Hospital. He bled copiously from the mouth and left ear. Walter Woollcombe, house surgeon, deposed to examining the deceased who was dead when he arrived at the Hospital. He had expired from the injuries sustained in the accident. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," desired the Coroner to represent to the Borough Surveyor (Mr Bellamy) the dangerous condition of the grating in Sutton-road, and to request that it might be altered.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 April 1888
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Manager At Plymouth. - A painful sensation was caused in the neighbourhood of the Octagon, Plymouth, yesterday morning on it becoming known that a suicide had been committed at Messrs. James and Rosewall's stores in Octagon-street. It seems that shortly after ten o'clock the body of MR JOHN GAYLARD CLOOKE, the chief clerk in the employ of Messrs. James and Rosewell, was discovered with his throat cut. The body when found in one of the glass stores, presented a sickening appearance, the poor man having evidently with both hands cut first on one side and then on the other. The windpipe and everything to the backbone had been cut, the head being nearly severed from the body, so that death must have been instantaneous. Deceased had been about 30 years in the employ of the firm, and was held in the highest estimation and respect, both by his employers and fellow workmen. He was also well known in the town, being a prominent Oddfellow and Forester, and he leaves a widow and nine children, four of whom are, however, grown up. - Subsequently, an Inquest was held at the Tandem Inn, by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian). Mr John Taylor was chosen Foreman of the Jury. After viewing the body in the same position as it was found, the following evidence was called. - Mr John Bright James said he was a member of the firm of James and Rosewell, lead merchants. The deceased was in their employ, having been so for a very long period. He was in his fiftieth year and had been at work that day. There had lately been a change in the constitution of the firm, Mr E. James, sen., having retired. About three weeks since deceased gave three months' notice to leave, and they thought he had another engagement in view. On Saturday last however, he asked witness's brother if that notice could be withdrawn. In the afternoon they met him by arrangement and agreed between all parties that the notice should be withdrawn. There were certain conditions drawn up in writing and agreed to by deceased. His salary was £300 a year, with bonuses in addition, continuous as long as he was in their employ, and a pension should he have to leave it through illness. He was well pleased with the conditions, and the meeting was an amicable one. About ten minutes to ten that morning Richard Andrewartha came to witness and informed him that someone had committed suicide in one of the glass stores on the premises. He went there and found the deceased lying on the floor in a pool of blood, to all appearances dead. Medical aid was procured and two doctors came. - The Coroner: Do you know of anything at all that could lead deceased to commit such an act as this? - Witness said that, speaking from his own knowledge of him for many years past, he had been subject to severe nervous depression and despondency on many occasions, but more especially since the death of his first wife, about ten years ago. At that time they were so much alarmed at his state that they recommended him to go on the moors for a change, which he did. Witness then met him once at Horrabridge, and he told witness that if he stayed at Princetown another day he would cut his throat. he went under Dr Prance for depression and despondency, and was under his treatment for a very long time. Since then he had never been the man he was before. For the last fifteen months witness had noticed a general condition of depression which had increased very much, so much so that they had decided that he should travel in the country for some time to come, so that he might have change of scenery and air. - By the Coroner: He had not the slightest doubt but that deceased committed the act whilst in a state of temporary insanity. He was generally liked by all who knew him, and respected at the office. - The Coroner remarked that certain papers which appeared to be the conditions drawn up were found on deceased, but, as far as he saw, they were of the most ordinary character, such as would be prepared by a wise and thoughtful man of business. - Wm. Peter Morris, in the employ of the same firm, said he knew the deceased very well. About nine o'clock he saw him the petroleum stores, when he asked witness if he had any orders that day, and handed deceased a number of labels. About five minutes afterwards witness again saw him coming down from the glass stores. He was as usual, having during the past few weeks been rather reserved. Witness thought he had been very low and depressed in his manner for sometime past. He then left and went upstairs again, that being the last time he was seen alive. - Richard Andrewwartha said he had occasion to go to the glass room about ten minutes to ten that morning to select some glass. He noticed a hat on the top of one of the cases, and looked around. Behind one of the cases he saw a body lying in a pool of blood. He did not for a moment notice who it was, and rushed off to inform Mr James. P.C. Wyatt was sent for and searched the body. - P.C. Wyatt stated that about 10.15 that morning he went to the glass stores and thee saw the deceased lying on his back with his throat very badly cut, and quite dead. He lifted the head and should think the throat was cut both right and left. It was cut to the bone and nearly severed from the body. The razor (produced) was open on the ground, lying about three feet from the body which was warm. He searched deceased and found various articles. - The Coroner having summed up the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity." Mr Woods, the son-in-law of deceased, said he wished to convey to Messrs. James and Rosewall the thanks of the widow for the very kind feeling they had shewn towards her.

PLYMPTON - The Fatal Accident At Underwood. - Last evening at the Union Inn, Underwood, Plympton, Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES BRAY, aged 57, who for twenty years had been a carpenter on the Saltram Estate. The following evidence was given:- Henry Battershill stated that on Wednesday about four o'clock he went into the yard and assisted the deceased and another workman in putting a load of deals out of the way. The timber was generally stacked along the side of the sawpit, and BRAY having placed two deals on the bit to slide the other son, they began their work. Witness, after receiving the deals from the other man, pushed them over the pit to the deceased, who, taking hold at one end, swung them into their place. After moving fifteen, witness turned to take another, and, hearing a noise coming from BRAY, he glanced round and saw him falling headlong into the pit, which was barely six feet deep. He was with deceased in a moment. He spoke to him several times, but he never answered. In his opinion the deceased slipped off or caught his heel in something. - The Coroner pointed out that as the deceased had worked on the spot so long, and was in charge on the occasion, no blame could be attached to anyone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They expressed sympathy with the widow and family of ten children and handed their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 April 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at Devonport, yesterday Inquired into the sudden death of ABRAHAM FORD, 73 years of age, sub-postmaster at Ford. Deceased had been in failing health for a considerable time past. He retired to rest on Thursday night and yesterday morning his wife found him dead by her side. A post-mortem examination made by Dr J. Rolston shewed that deceased suffered from dropsy of the heart and a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER - At Mary Pole Villa, Pennsylvania, Exeter, yesterday, Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of EDWARD BROOK, aged 67, butler in the employ of Mrs Arden. The deceased had not complained of feeling ill, but whilst carrying a dish he had a violent attack of coughing, and shortly afterwards died. Mr Edward Gough McCullum, of Plymouth, now staying at Exeter, deposed to being with the deceased at the time of his death. Dr Harris stated that death arose from an apoplectic fit, and the Jury found that death occurred from "Natural Causes."

EXETER - Fatal Tram Accident At Exeter. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Exeter Hospital, before Mr W. H. Hooper, (Coroner) touching the death of a young child named ADA CLAPPERTON. - SARAH CLAPPERTON, wife of a coalyardsman, living in Cheeke-street, said the deceased was her daughter. On Wednesday afternoon last witness was nursing the child, and after that she left it in charge of her son and four other children, while she went to an adjacent house for some water. When she returned with the first bucket the child was there, but while she was gone for another deceased got out, and on her return the boy told her the tram had run over her. Witness asked him why he had let the baby out and he replied that his other little brother had opened the door. Witness found the child in the hands of Mrs Stepney, who with witness took the child to the Hospital, but life was extinct before they reached there. - William Rowe, horse keeper, said the draw-board side of the tram caught the child and drew her under the wheels. The car was being driven steadily. - Paltridge, the driver of the tram, said he was driving his tram up Paris-street at about four miles an hour. When passing Morgan's-square a child suddenly ran out from the kerb; the horses had passed and the child was knocked down by the draughts. Witness pulled up immediately and assisted to extricate the child. It was a very common thing to have to pull up the tram through the children getting in the way. They made a practice of standing on the metals to see how long they could stay before they were obliged to move. The Coroner said the case was a sad one, and being the second accident at Exeter of the same nature within so short a time, made it the more painful. Children ran about the streets in a most extraordinary way and the wonder was that there were not more accidents. He had noticed that the generality of the men employed on the trams were very careful in their driving. People could not help their children running across the roads, and it certainly did not appear to him that MRS CLAPPERTON was negligent in the matter. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that they did not consider any blame was attached to the driver.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 April 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, concerning the death of MRS ELIZABETH SOUTHERN, wife of MR W. G. SOUTHERN, saddler, of Treville-street, Plymouth. The deceased lady died suddenly in her bedroom that morning. Dr Harper pronounced death to have arisen from heart disease. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," offered their sympathy with the bereaved husband, their condolence being endorsed by the Coroner.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 April 1888
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fall Of A Child At Plymouth. The Danger Of Stone Throwing. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on Saturday, concerning the death of HELEN LOUIE MILLER, aged seven. - CHARLES ROBERT MILLER, 25 Westwell-street, stated that there was a lead flat at the rear of his dwelling used for drying clothes, whereon his children often played. On the previous afternoon the deceased fell from the flat and received, in the doctor's opinion, concussion of the brain. Several hours after the occurrence the child was seized with convulsions, which Dr Prance feared would prove fatal. His daughter died at two o'clock that morning, eight hours after the accident. - Catherine Griffin, servant, said that hearing a disturbance on the leads at half-past five the previous day, she went out and found three small boys of St Andrews' School were throwing stones at deceased and her little sister. She asked them to desist, but they were saucy to her, and continued to throw stones. Witness then told the two girls to go indoors. Deceased moved away to get out of reach of the stones, and reaching the edge of the flat fell into Mr Hearder's premises below. Henry P. Hearder, chemist, deposed that 14 feet below the flat was the roof of a coal cellar with a tank upon it. When the alarm was raised her went to the spot where the child fell, and found her lying on her side unconscious. - Mr Whipple, surgeon, and Dr Prance was shortly after in attendance. Witness thought the whole flat should be better protected. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and in so doing expressed sympathy with MR MILLER in the loss of his child, a feeling that was joined in by the Coroner. The Jury recommended that wire netting should be put round the top of the leads, and requested Mr Brian to complain to the schoolmaster of St. Andrews's of the boys' practice of throwing stones from the playground. - Catherine Griffin, who gave evidence at the above Inquiry, sat up with LOUIE MILLER during the night of the accident until she died. Consequently on Saturday she was tired and sleepy, and in yawning dislocated her jaw. This prevented her attending the Inquest at the hour appointed and another witness was therefore first examined. Griffin's condition occasioned some alarm, and Mr Louis Pilkington Jackson, surgeon, was summoned. He at once put the jaw right and the young woman was then able to go to the Inquest and give her evidence.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 April 1888
DAWLISH - Death From Excessive Drinking At Dawlish. - At Dawlish Townhall on Tuesday an Inquest was held before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, relative to the death of RHODA VALANCE HUTCHINGS, aged 32, who resided at Queen-street, Dawlish. Mr R. Border was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JOHN HUTCHINGS, butcher, husband of the deceased, stated that his wife died on Saturday night. She had been failing for months through her drinking habits, and this had been going on more or less for the past six years. Two years ago he tried to put her into an Institution, but her brothers did not like the idea and it was abandoned. Deceased always had money and she would send anyone who came into the shop for drink. For this propensity he had struck deceased, but had not done so recently nor had an angry word with her. Deceased had been in bed since Tuesday, April 17th, on which occasion witness carried her upstairs. On Wednesday he took his wife some beef tea, but she did not take it, as she had no appetite and ate very little. A doctor was sent for on Friday. - Elizabeth Arscott, domestic servant, stated that her mistress was in the habit of drinking, but witness was not aware that she had been ill-treated in consequence. She had often fetched drink for deceased at her request, and was asked not to tell her master. Deceased used to drink upstairs. - Mr A. de Winter Baker, surgeon, said he had attended deceased, but not very recently. Some time ago deceased's husband consulted him about placing her into a home for dipsomaniacs. At that time deceased did not appear to be in bad health, only killing herself with drink. When spoken to about the habit she stoutly denied it, and he could not make any impression on her. Since the autumn he had not seen deceased, but was called on Friday evening last when she was in bed. She was unable to take food, and he understood was always more or less intoxicated. Witness had made a post-mortem examination and found all the organs typical to those of a drunkard. The immediate cause of death was syncope, failure of the heart's action consequent on the excessive indulgence in alcohol. The verdict of the Jury was that death resulted from disease produced by the excessive drinking of alcohol.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 April 1888
PAIGNTON - The Boating Fatality In Torbay. The Inquest. - Mr G. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Police-station, Paignton, upon the bodies of ALICE KAY, ladies' maid, and HELEN HOLMAN MUGFORD, of Torquay, who were drowned through the capsizing of a boat off Paignton on the previous afternoon. Captain Thomas Twynham was Foreman of the Jury. After the Jury had viewed the bodies which were lying in the mortuary, evidence was taken. - HENRY LEAR MUGFORD, tailor of 14 Bath-terrace, Torquay, identified the body of HELEN HOLMAN MUGFORD as that of his eldest daughter. She was 19 years of age. After suffering from rheumatism, she had been staying three weeks with Miss Hill at Glenfinnan, Torquay, and the last time he saw her alive was on Monday evening He thought boatmen ought not to be allowed to let out their boats on hire in a rough sea. - William Murray Greaves Bagshawe, residing temporarily at Glenfinnan, Torquay, identified the body of ALICE KAY, who was a ladies' maid in the service of Mr J. G. Silkenstadt, of Manchester. She was staying with her mistress at Glenfinnan, and had relatives in the north of England. Deceased was about 40 years of age. - Albert Hill, one of the survivors, who was in such a weak state that he had to be assisted into the room and accommodated with a seat, was the next witness. He said he lived at Glenfinnan, Torquay, and was a lodging-house keeper. The deceased, MISS MUGFORD, was a second cousin of his. The ladies wanted to go for a row to Paignton on Thursday afternoon, there being with him besides MISS MUGFORD, and MISS KAY, his sister, Ellen. He hired an ordinary light rowing boat in the harbour from young Elliott, and did not say where they were going. They started about half-past three. There was an ordinary lop on the water, with a north-east wind. No caution was given him, and he did not think any was required. He rowed and MISS MUGFORD and MISS KAY sat in the stern. He was much accustomed to boats, going out nearly every day in the summer time. they went along very comfortably and got to Paignton, and then turned back to go home. He supposed that, after having been looking at land, the ladies got frightened at seeing the breakers. The two in the stern stood up and the boat capsized. He supposed they lost their presence of mind. He intended to have gone back to Torquay when they got outside the breakers. The waves were nothing alarming for a person accustomed to boating, but they might be for girls. They were about 50 yards off the pier-head at the time, and there was no water in the boat when he turned. He attributed the accident to the deceased getting up, and he had no time to caution them to sit down before the boat turned over. Had they sat still, he believed they would have gone on all right. He was rowing at the time. He had been out in as rough a sea and rougher many times. He knew how rough it was when he started, but he did not consider it dangerous to take out three girls in such a sea when the person rowing knew how to manage the boat. His sister, who was sitting on the next seat, did not get up. When the boat capsized, witness caught hold of his sister and MISS MUGFORD. He could not reach MISS KAY, but he told her to lie on her back and put her arms out. She did this and floated. He got hold of the boat and held on to it upside down by treading water. He also held on to his sister and MISS MUGFORD, and shouted for help. Although several waves broke over them, he retained his hold during the ten minutes or quarter of an hour which elapsed before assistance came. He had hold of the boat by placing his arm around it. He did not believe that MISS MUGFORD was drowned, but that she died through fright. MISS KAY remained on her back floating until assistance arrived, and she spoke to witness quite collectedly only two minutes before they were rescued. In reply to the Jury, witness said he could not account for the bruise on MISS KAY'S forehead. He did not think, when he turned the boat to go back, that there was the least danger. - Major John Harlowe-Turner, of Cliff House, Paignton, who saw the accident from his house, said the boat was rowed into a breaker close to the pier. As the coastguard could see nothing from their watch-house he went at once to them, but they already knew of the occurrence. He ought to have sent before, as he felt certain there was going to be an accident, from the uneven way in which the boat was being rowed, one oar going after the other. The boat was 16 feet long, 3 feet 7 inches beam, and 16 inches deep - a river skiff, in which he should be sorry to take out ladies in a bay with a rough sea. During his evidence, in reply to Captain Twynham, witness stated that there was a sandbank just off the pier-head, which, ever since the erection of the pier, had become so pronounced that at half spring tides it was a frequent occurrence, in comparatively smooth seas, for an occasional immense breaker to come up and rush off this bank. - Captain Twynham said he was of opinion that it was an exceptional breaker of this description which engulfed the boat on this occasion. - George Elliott, boatman of 3 Clifton-terrace, Torquay, said he let the boat to Mr Hill. Her name was the Mystery, and it was a rowing boat. He had had it eighteen months or two years, and it was built by Mr Albert Borlase of Turnchapel, Plymouth. Her dimensions were 16 feet long, 3 feet 8 inches beam, and 18 or 20 inches deep. Mr Hill did not say where he was going. Some other young men wanted a boat to go to Paignton at the same time, but as the sea was rough and it was dangerous to go in that direction, he refused to let them have a boat to go there, telling them they would never come back again if they did. This was said in the hearing of Mr Hill and the ladies. The other young men went out and came back safely in three-quarters of an hour. He did not ask Mr Hill where he was going, as the latter knew the bay well from going out so often. Mr Hill was formerly a member of the Leander Rowing Club. Although he was accompanied by ladies, witness did not think he required a special caution. He started in very good form, and rowed properly out of the harbour. Witness noticed no larking. The general length of the rowing boats let out was from 14ft. to 18ft. There were no licensed boatmen at Torquay. No licences were required there for boats, and there was no one to inspect or supervise them. Consequently there was nothing to prevent boatmen sending out as many persons as they liked in a boat. In ordinary weather they sent out four or five persons in a boat like the Mystery. If he had thought Mr Hill was going to Paignton he should have warned him not to go, but he had sufficient confidence in him to think he would not go there. - Albert Hill recalled, said he did not hear Elliott caution the other persons who wanted to go to Paignton; if he had he should certainly not have gone there. He was aware if was dangerous on the leeward side of the bay when a north-east wind was blowing. he had been out in a similar boat in a rougher sea, and he had never been cautioned. He supposedl this was because he was careful; he had never met with an accident before. - John Baker, boatman, proved going out with three other men in a boat to the scene of the accident. They found the gentleman (Mr Hill) and one of the ladies (Miss Hill() hanging on to the keel of the boat. Another lady (MISS MUGFORD) was floating near, and by the time they got her into their boat another boat came out and picked up the fourth body. There was a nasty roll on at the time and they had great difficulty in getting the bodies in. but for the anchor steadying the boat, it would have been washed ashore. - Charles Davis, boatman, of Paignton, proved recovering the body of the fourth lady (MISS KAY) who was floating with her head downward. She was not quite dead then, as she vomited over his leg. There was also a dog on the boat. The bodies were removed to the coastguard station at the old pier. - Mr C. W. Vickers, M.R.C.S., of Paignton described the efforts made by himself and Drs. Alexander, Mudge and Goodridge to restore animation, adding that, although they kept up their efforts for three-quarters of an hour, they were of no avail. He believed that MISS KAY was dead when she was brought in, and he never saw any sign of life in either her or MISS MUGFORD. The bruise on MISS KAY'S forehead was, he thought, caused when she was taken into the boat. He believed that both ladies died from suffocation caused by drowning. He heard the screams at the time of the accident and considered the deceased were in twelve or thirteen feet of water for about ten minutes. - Mr R. Light, retired naval officer, stated that the boat was 16ft. 3 in. deep and 3ft. 6in. beam. he did not consider the boat was suitable to allow four persons to go out in if they ,moved about. The boat was only fitted for river work, with three persons in her. He considered that a boat to be safe, and let out for rowing outside Torquay pier, should be 17ft. long, 5ft. 10in. beam, and 22in. deep. He suggested that the coastguard should be supplied with a foghorn for use in calling each other in case of accident. - The Coroner, after remarking that there seemed to have been no delay, assistance having arrived as quickly as possible, referred to the fact of a similar accident having happened on this side of Torbay just two years ago, when the son of Mr Lavis was drowned. Commenting upon the evidence, he pointed out that no caution was given to Mr Hill by the boatman, and it was for the Jury to say whether they were satisfied with the boatman's explanation. They must also consider whether Mr Hill should be exonerated from blame or otherwise. - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met their deaths by Drowning in Torbay by the Accidental upsetting of a boat. They expressed their sympathy with the bereaved in their great affliction and their admiration of the rapidity with which boats went to the rescue and the prompt attendance of Dr Vickers. They attached no blame to Mr Hill or the boatman, but recommended that all boats let out for hire should be under the supervision of the Torquay and Paignton Local Boards. - The Coroner concurred in the suggestion of the Jury as to the supervision of boats, saying it was a very useful one, and he hoped it would be mentioned at the Torquay Local Board and bear some fruit.

GREAT TORRINGTON - At an adjourned Inquest concerning the death of WILLIAM HUTCHINGS, held at Great Torrington before Mr Bromham, County Coroner, yesterday afternoon, the Jury added to their verdict of "Accidental Death," a rider to the effect that the deceased did not receive proper medical attendance from the parish doctor, Mr Lait, and that his conduct deserved the strongest censure.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 May 1888
CHULMLEIGH - Fatal Gun Accident At Chulmleigh. - Yesterday an Inquest was held at Chulmleigh on the body of WILLIAM BURGESS CONNOP, son of MR NEWELL CONNOP, a well-known sportsman of Collaton Barton, whose body had been found in a wood with a gun lying near. Mr J. A. Bridgett, of Bridge Farm, deposed to finding the body when in company with deceased's father. There was a fearful gunshot wound in the head. He was familiar with the deceased, who was a most unlikely person to commit suicide. The latter statement was corroborated by Dr Pollard and Capt. Pinkett. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

WHITCHURCH - Poisoned By Eating Toadstools. - Mr R. Robinson Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr John W. Willcock was Foreman, yesterday investigated the circumstances attending the death of SIDNEY, aged three years and eight months, the son of SAMUEL HENRY LAMPHEE, quarry labourer, living at Moortown, in the parish of Whitchurch. The father deposed that the child died on Tuesday, and that another son, aged five years, told him that deceased had eaten toadstools whilst out at play. - Evidence was given shewing that the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died of Congestion of the Lungs caused by having eaten fungi containing an irritant poison.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 May 1888
TORQUAY - Singular Fatality At Torquay. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, on Saturday, on the body of JOHN BADCOCK, aged about 50, an army pensioner, who died in the Institution that morning from injuries sustained through falling over a rockery a distance of six feet and pitching on a stone, in the grounds of Devonia, a villa residence in Vane Hill-road, on Wednesday night. The deceased, who had been living a precarious life of late, alarmed the occupants of the villa by looking in at one of the windows at a late hour. It being feared that a burglary was about to be committed, an alarm was given, and on the Police arriving they found the deceased lying in the roadway near in a semi-conscious condition, he having, in the endeavour to get away, fallen and received severe injuries. He was removed at one o'clock on Thursday morning to the Torbay Hospital, where it was found by the house surgeon (Mr G. Y. Eales) that deceased had sustained a wound at the top of the head extending to the bone, a small contused wound just over the right eye, and a lacerated wound below the same eye. Several hours after his admission deceased regained consciousness, but towards the evening relapsed into insensibility and continued in this state until his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Satisfaction was expressed at the improved accommodation provided for holding Inquests at the Hospital, and a portion of the fees was handed by the Coroner and several of the Jurors to P.S. Bright for the Institution.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 May 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday relative to the death of SAMUEL DUSTIN, aged 47, who met with a fatal accident at the Great Western Docks on Monday. MRS LOUISA DUSTIN stated that her husband left home on Monday morning about half past eight, in search of work. Before leaving he told her he felt giddy, and complained of a sick headache. Edward Lindsey, master rigger, deposed that he employed deceased on Monday about 10.30 a.m. DUSTIN was working on the maintopmast crosstrees, and by some means slipped his foot and fell to the deck, a distance of about fifty feet. Witness at once sent for a doctor, but deceased died before his arrival. Dr C. Bulteel said deceased had fractured the base of his skull, which was probably the immediate cause of death. The Jury, of whom Mr William Huntley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with MRS DUSTIN in her bereavement, in which the Coroner also joined.

PLYMOUTH - The Romantic Suicide At Plymouth. - An Inquiry into the circumstances - reported in yesterday's Western Morning News - attending the death of a young shipwright, named JOHN ANTHONY MARTIN, of 8 Clifton-street, Plymouth, who committed suicide on Sunday by taking poison, was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Wellington Inn. - ANDREW MARTIN, father of the deceased and a shipwright in the Devonport Dockyard, identified the body. Of late his son had seemed very much depressed and strange. He knew that he had been engaged to a young lady, and that her life had been despaired of. Two or three years ago, he met with an accident in the yard, but witness did not know that that had affected his mind at all. - Kate Holloway, daughter of Mr Holloway, baker, Nelson-street, said the deceased was engaged to her sister Annie, who was ill of consumption. MARTIN used to come to see her almsot every day. He came on Sunday, when he seemed very strange. He inquired for witness's sister, saying he wished to see her. Witness informed her father, who said that she had a headache, and that he should see her on the following day. - He gave her some flowers for her sister, and she took them upstairs. On returning, witness saw the deceased drink something from a bottle. Witness said, "JACK, don't do it," and he replied, "Don't Kate." She then ran for her brother and came back just in time to see him fall. He seemed insensible, and was foaming at the mouth. - Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon, deposed that just after three p.m. on Sunday he was called to 1 Nelson-street, and saw the deceased lying on a sofa, insensible and retching. He was vomiting matter, and smelling very strongly of carbolic acid. With the assistance of his father, the stomach pump was applied. A bottle was shewn to witness which contained a very strong preparation of carbolic acid. The doctor attended him until the time of his death, which occurred on Monday morning just after nine. The deceased partially recovered consciousness on Sunday evening. - William Charles Holloway stated that the deceased had been engaged to his daughter for many years. She had been ill for two years, but deceased, on calling, had never gone from the house without seeing her until Sunday last. He had of late seemed very quiet, and if he had had full possession of his senses he would not have committed the act. He was one of the best conducted young men in Plymouth. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Wood was foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity," and passed a vote of condolence and sympathy with the father.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 May 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquest at Plymouth, yesterday, concerning the death of a fisherman named THOMAS SEARLE, aged 70. From the evidence of his two daughters, JESSIE LOVE and EMMA RENDLE, it appeared that the deceased had lain in bed since Christmas with a bad cough, but Dr Cummings had not seen him since September, and he died without medical attendance. On the day of his death deceased had been left alone for a couple of hours, and when one of his daughters returned he was speechless. The Coroner said that had medical advice been obtained possibly deceased's life might have been prolonged. In returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the Jury endorsed this opinion, and considered that blame rested with deceased's children for their negligence.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 May 1888
PLYMOUTH - Death Of The Vicar-General of Plymouth Cathedral. - Very deep sorrow was generally felt yesterday in the roman Catholic community at Plymouth on its becoming known that the Very Rev. HERBERT AUBREY WOOLLETT, D.D. Canon and Vicar-General of the Cathedral in Cecil-street, had died suddenly in the Bishop's house. CANON WOLLETT was present on Monday at the opening of a new establishment of the Passionist Fathers at Wareham, Dorset, from whence he returned on Wednesday afternoon to Plymouth. Yesterday morning he was missed and on search being instituted was found dead, having apparently expired in a fit. Beloved by all who knew him, genial of heart, kindly and good-natured in manner, the late Vicar-General was yet strict in the performance of his sacred duties. By his brother ecclesiastics his loss is deeply felt, nor is his death less deplored by those to whom he ministered. - CANON WOLLETT was the son of DR WOOLLETT, and was born at Monmouth, in November 1817. He studied at Prior Park, Bath, and was ordained priest by Bishop Baines in 1842. He was retained, however, as professor, and became later on vice-president of St. Paul's College, Bath. In 1846 he commenced mission work in succession to Dr Costello at Tiverton, but soon after was transferred to Poole by Bishop Ullathorne. In this town the deceased laboured for ten years, and during that time built a school and a new presbytery. On the formation of the Plymouth Chapter in 1853 he was made a canon penitentiary by Dr Errington, first Bishop of Plymouth. He became secretary to the present bishop (Dr Vaughan) in 1856 and soon after was appointed the first Roman Catholic naval chaplain for Devonport. In the next year he retired from the post of Bishop's secretary and from 1858 has held the position of Vicar-General. CANON WOLLETT undertook the duties of chaplain to the nuns of Notre Dame on the establishment of the order at Plymouth in 1864. He was Diocesan Inspector of Schools for several years, but he relinquished the office soon after the appointment above-mentioned. Pope Pius IX. conferred upon him the degree of D.D. in 1872. Last November he retired from the post of naval chaplain. - An Inquest was held before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, in the library of the Bishop's house yesterday, Mr Higman being the Foreman of the Jury. In opening the Inquiry the Coroner referred to the deceased as an ecclesiastic honoured and highly respected for his estimable character and quiet demeanour. - The Very Rev. Canon Graham, the first witness called, stated that he had known the deceased for forty-four years. He had been in good health up to the time of his death and able to perform all his duties. He went away on Monday and returned on Wednesday afternoon. That morning he missed him, and at half-past seven a door was forced open and CANON WOLLETT found lying on the floor fully dressed as if just returned from a journey. The Rev. Thomas Kent, naval chaplain, stated that he saw deceased enter the front door at 4.40 the previous afternoon. Dr M. D. Keily deposed that the late Canon's health had been fairly good. From the appearance of the body he believed that deceased died in a fit. He had been dead probably more than twelve hours when discovered. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. - The funeral is fixed to take place on Tuesday at eleven o'clock.

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 May 1888
ERMINGTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Robert Hillson was Foreman, at Westlake, Ermington, yesterday, investigated the circumstances attending the death of SAM JOINT, an agricultural labourer, aged 25 years. Samuel Penwill said he was working with deceased in Ivybridge Wood on Wednesday. JOINT went up a tree to cut off a limb. Before he could pull up his saw he fell, first to the bank and then on to the boulders in the bed of the river, and was picked up insensible. A rotten limb of the tree came down with deceased. Mr J. M. Randle, surgeon, deposed to being called to deceased, who was insensible, never regained consciousness and died shortly after, having received a fracture at the base of the skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Scuffle At Devonport. Coroner's Inquest. - At Devonport Guildhall, yesterday, Mr. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, and a Jury were engaged for several hours Inquiring into the cause of the death of JOHN GEORGE SCANTLEBURY, a naval pensioner, 63 years of age, who died on Thursday from injuries received on Tuesday, under circumstances already reported. - George Huers, boatswain's mate of the Defiance, who rented apartments at 93 James-street, where SCANTLEBURY received the injuries, described the scuffle which took place in the passage of the house between the deceased and the landlord, Mr Gerry, the disturbance arising from the fact that deceased, while intoxicated, appeared in the passage without any trousers on. Gerry remonstrated with him for his conduct, whereupon deceased struck him on the left cheek. Gerry then went to the kitchen, followed by the deceased, and Huers saw deceased struck over the head and shoulder with a broomstick. Directly afterwards Gerry came out of the kitchen with the stick in his hand, and deceased closed with him. Gerry walked towards the front door, having held off deceased. At the doorway the latter caught his foot in the doormat and his head went through one of the panes of glass in the upper part of the door. They then separated. Witness afterwards heard a noise, and saw deceased on the floor of the passage. Deceased's daughter, Mrs Walke, had in the meanwhile come down from the upper part of the house carrying in her arms a child between three and four years of age, and when the witness saw the deceased lying in the passage Mrs Walke, holding the child, was lying on top of her father. Witness took the child from the woman, who then got up from the floor unassisted. Three policemen came to the house shortly afterwards and they carried deceased up to his daughter's room. Shortly afterwards witness, hearing deceased groaning very much, went to Mrs Walke's room in company with Gerry. Deceased was then on his knees on the floor and complained of great pain. By the Jury: He could not say that Mrs Walke was sober at the time - far from it. - Mrs Walke, daughter of the deceased, said her father came up from Falmouth on Monday and visited her on Tuesday morning. He came to Devonport for the purpose of going to the Naval Hospital with the view of getting more money added to his pension. He was rather fond of drink, and had he been sober on Tuesday evening he would not have left her room without having on his trousers. She seriously remonstrated with him, but to no purpose. She followed him downstairs and there saw Gerry with a stick in his hand. Gerry said to her father "If you don't go upstairs I'll shove you up." Her father persisted in going towards the back part of the house and Gerry struck him across the face and head. Witness, who had a baby in her arms, rushed between the men, who were struggling, and received a blow from Gerry across her chin. She screamed and fell between her father and Gerry outside the back parlour door. She was positive that she did not fall upon her father at all. Her father fell because Gerry threw him down. While she was on the ground her father and Gerry were still fighting. She denied that anyone took the baby from her arms and maintained that it was four months old. After witness got up the fighting still continued, and in the struggle a pane of glass was broken. Gerry threw deceased to the ground, and then kicked him in the bowels. She sent for Mr Row, surgeon. Witness, replying to the Coroner, denied that she was drunk, and said that only small quantities of drink had been consumed by her father and friends. - Alice Gerry, daughter of the landlord of the house, said deceased fell in consequence of Mrs Walke trying to part the deceased and her father while they were struggling. Mrs Walke did not come downstairs until after the glass was broken. Mrs Walke was not sober at the time. - Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon , said he found deceased suffering from partial collapse and intense pain in the abdomen. Death arose from inflammation of the bowels, which must have been caused by direct violence of some kind. - P.C. Colwill who was called to the house, deposed that Mrs Walke was not sober and that deceased was very drunk. In answer to his inquiries as to the nature of deceased's injuries, complaint was made that he had been ill-used, but nothing was said about his having been kicked. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that it was quite likely that Mrs Walke accidentally caused the rupture described by the doctor by falling upon the deceased with the child in her arms. Mrs Walke's evidence was not reliable and no Jury would convict anyone of manslaughter on it. - Mrs Walke, while the Jury were considering their verdict, wished to call her sister-in-law to disprove the statement that she was drink. The Coroner, however, did not call the witness. The Jury found that deceased died from Inflammation of the Bowels caused by a fall, and did not inculpate anyone.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 May 1888
BRIXHAM - Suicide At Brixham. - WILLIAM FARLEY, aged 46, a colourman at the Torbay Print Works, New-road, Brixham, committed suicide on Friday afternoon at his residence, at Dashper. Deceased lost his wife about eighteen months ago, and this seems to have preyed upon his mind, and induced a melancholy condition. About three weeks ago he was discharged from the print works, and this, too, it is considered, contributed to his lowness of spirits. On Friday afternoon about three o'clock he complained of being unwell and asked his mother (with whom he lived) to make him a cup of tea whilst he went upstairs to lay down on the bed. As soon as the tea was ready she called him to come down, and not receiving any response, went up and found him stretched across the bed, suspended by his scarf from the top of the bedpost. She immediately obtained assistance, and he was got down still alive. Dr Aubrey was soon in attendance and used every effort to restore the deceased, but without avail, and he died shortly afterwards. Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday night at the Lord Nelson Inn, and, after hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 May 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Gun Accident At Morice Town. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr Albert Gard, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, touching the death of CATHERINE COSTELLO, 16 years of age, a native of Swansea, who was accidentally shot at Morice Town, under circumstances already reported. - Isabella Henderson, one of the party travelling with Hancock's shooting gallery, said on Thursday afternoon she heard a gun drop, and turning round saw Helen Barber taking it from the deceased by the butt end of the rifle, the muzzle of which was pointing towards the deceased. The guns were being taken from a van in which they were always kept. The girl Barber put her thumb on the hammer of the gun, and then witness heard a report. The deceased was standing on the van at the time. Witness ran round to deceased, who said, "Oh, I am shot!" she took her on her lap, and a cab having been fetched deceased was removed to the Hospital. It was COSTELLO'S duty to see that the guns were fired off every night before being put away in the van. Deceased had for the past four years been travelling with Sophia Hancock, of Bristol, one of the proprietors of the shooting gallery. Deceased was quite sensible after the accident. The gun was a breech-loader, No. 2, and was used for firing at bottles and glass balls. - By a Juryman: the ammunition was placed in one locker, of which Sophia Hancock kept the key. - A Juryman: I hope you will in future see those guns are unloaded before they are put away. - Witness: You may be sure we shall. - Sophia Hancock said the night before the accident the deceased was in charge of the "shooter," and, in answer to her question, told witness the guns had been "blown off." She then put them up on the hook, where they were hung when not in use. She was a very good respectable girl, and quick at her business. The ammunition was kept in a locker, which was not as a rule kept locked. her brother and his wife slept in the same van. - By the Jury: The girl must have forgotten that this rifle was not fired off. There were twelve guns in the rack, though only four were in use. They had never had a similar accident before. The girl to whom the gun was handed was not one of the party. - Helen Barber, 11 years of age, living at 20 John-street, who was previously cautioned, said about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon she was on Newpassage quay looking at the shows, when COSTELLO asked her to hold the guns as she handed them out of the caravan. The first one witness took went off in her hand. How it went off she did not know. The muzzle of the gun was pointed at the deceased, who said "You have shot me." - Dr R. Howell Peeks, house-surgeon of the Royal Albert Hospital, described deceased's injuries. She had a wound in the lower part of the body, which had the appearance of having been caused by a saloon rifle. She lived about forty-eight hours after admission. From the position of the wound, it was deemed inexpedient after a consultation to attempt to remove the ball. A post-mortem examination shewed that the shot had entered the lower part of the walls of the abdomen, passing through the folds of the bowels six or seven times. The bullet produced was imbedded about half an inch in the spine, and caused a fatal injury. - The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed a hope that the proprietors of the gallery would be more careful in the future with regard to the handling of these guns. - Mr Gard was of the Jury's opinion, and remarked that it was quite a matter for the officials of Devonport to consider whether the land ought to be let for these purposes, and whether shooting should be allowed so near to the town.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 May 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, respecting the death of MR JOHN PERRY, builder, of Stonehouse Mr John Northcott was Foreman of the Jury. John Wills, brother-in-law, stated that deceased was 69 years of age, and had lately complained of being unwell; he died at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday at his own house. Jane Jones stated that she worked at a house in Cremyll-street, of which MR PERRY was the landlord. About 3.45 p.m. on Tuesday, the deceased came into the house to see a stove. Witness remarked that he did not look well, and he said he felt very ill indeed. Mrs Emily Martin deposed to finding the deceased lying face downwards in the road of Cremyll-street about half-past four on Tuesday, just outside the premises mentioned by the last witness. He was foaming at the mouth and bleeding from the nose, and was quite unconscious. Witness raised him in her arms, called for help, and he was carried to his house. Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that death resulted from heart disease from which deceased had probably suffered for three or four years, a sudden attack causing the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease." On the motion of the Foreman, seconded by Mr G. Morgan, a vote of condolence was passed with MRS PERRY. The Coroner heartily supported the vote, and undertook to deliver the message. The Jury handed their fees to the Plymouth Philanthropic Society.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 May 1888
TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd at the Duke of York Inn, Tavistock, on the body of CHARLES RAPSON, aged 20 years, a miner, who on the 5th of the month was crushed between two trucks near the top of Creber Mine. The Inquiry was adjourned until Wednesday, in order that the inspector of mines may attend.

SAMPFORD SPINEY - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Lee Down Farm, in the parish of Sandford Spiney, near Horrabridge, on the body of GEORGE WARNE, aged nine years. Deceased attended school on Wednesday, became ill, and was carried home in a trap, dying on Friday night. Mr Liddle, surgeon, stated that the boy died from meningitis probably caused by overwork, due to the system of teaching, not to the schoolmaster.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 May 1888
PLYMOUTH - The Suicide At Plymouth. - The death of JOHN MURPHY, mason's labourer, 118 King-street, Plymouth, was yesterday the subject of an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the Octagon Spirit Vaults. MARY MURPHY, wife of the deceased, said her husband was fifty years old, he had been worried of late, and his manner was unusual. He worked on Saturday. On Sunday morning he was well, but while getting his son's dinner he remarked that it would be long before he should do so again. About three o'clock in the afternoon he entered the sitting-room, and was talking to himself and witness did not see him alive again. At half-past three her daughter called, saying that her father was asleep in the closet. Witness went to him and saws that he was hanging. She called her nephew, who, with a friend, took down the body. - P.C. Richard Wyatt stated that deceased was in the habit of drinking, and when drunk "was like a crazy man." The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Hanging while Temporarily Insane."

PLYMOUTH - The Fatality At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest relative to the death of FRED E. C. PHILLIPS, aged 1 year and 10 months, at the South Devon Hospital. John roan stated that on Saturday afternoon he was in Ebrington-street and saw two little girls wheeling a perambulator containing a child, up the street. He next saw that a carriage and pair were coming down the street, and also that the perambulator was descending the incline alone. The fore-wheel of the carriage caught it, and overturned it. The driver at once pulled up and witness with others picked up the child, whose mouth was swollen and nose injured. Witness did not know what became of the two girls. - HANNAH C. PHILLIPS, aged 10 years stated that she often took out the baby in the perambulator. On Saturday she, with a friend, was going to the market. Her companion had a dog which ran away, and witness watched her go after it. She was within three feet of the perambulator, and did not think it would "take charge." - Thomas Tregillis, coachman, having deposed to the circumstances which led to the accident, Phillip Henry Whiston, assistant house-surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the child died on Sunday morning, having sustained a fracture of the base of the skull, which, together with an extra rush of blood to the brain, caused death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury exonerated the coachman from blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Burning Fatality At Devonport. Coroner's Inquiry. - Mr Albert Gard, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, into the circumstances attending the death of ALBERT BRENTON, of 40 Granby-street, a painter's apprentice, who was injured on Saturday week through the explosion of a patent machine charged with benzoline oil, and used by painters for burning paint off woodwork. Dr Robert Howell Perks, surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted on Saturday week suffering from extensive burns on the head, face, neck , a great portion of the back, one thigh and both arms. He died on Sunday morning. A post-mortem examination shewed that the immediate cause of death was faintness, due to the formation of a clot of blood on the heart, consequent on the extensive inflammation of the skin. The evening before he died BRENTON was doing remarkably well, and they had hopes of his recovery, as he appeared to have escaped the usual dangers which followed severe burns. - Edward Dart, of 114 Charlotte-street, a plumber, who was at work on the roof of Wycliffe chapel at the time of the accident, stated that looking up Albert-road he saw the deceased in flames, and with a mason named Hobden went to his assistance and endeavoured to extinguish the flames by wrapping their coats round him and throwing him to the ground. His clothes were one mass of fire, and their efforts were unsuccessful. Mrs Baker brought out a blanket and with this the flames were extinguished. Deceased was conscious at the time, but did not give any account of the accident. - Samuel Toby, a boy of ten years, living at 18 Benbow-street, said he saw BRENTON using a machine for burning paint off a door. He heard the explosion and saw the oil go over the deceased, who was then covered in flames. - John Cooper, of 23 Clowance-street, who was working at the house with the deceased, produced the torch which BRENTON had been using and which he found after the explosion outside the house. The torch was lying on its side and was in two pieces, the bottom being about a foot away from the other part. He saw deceased using the torch on the Thursday previous to the accident, and he seemed to understand it's working. - Thomas William Earl, painter and decorator, 11 Marlborough-street, to whom deceased was apprenticed, said BRENTON was accustomed to the use of the torch and was one who could be trusted with it. The torch was automatic and the fire was produced from benzoline, which was placed in a cylinder. The cylinder having been three-parts filled with benzoline the tap was screwed down tightly. The torch could not be used until the tap communicating with it at the top of the machine was turned on. At the bottom of the machine is a species of air pump, which was used for charging the torch and increasing the force of the flame. As a practical man witness could not give any explanation of the accident. Some time since an accident occurred with another torch like the present one. This occurred entirely through the carelessness of a boy who was shewing it to another. He returned the machine to the maker, and received the one used by BRENTON. It had been in use many months and ought to last for years. Witness had used it himself several times and there had never been an accident with it before. The torch was in general use among painters and plumbers, and was considered to be the best machine for burning off paint, and had superseded the old charcoal burners. - MR BRENTON, father of the deceased, asked Mr Earl several questions with the object of shewing that the torch was not a safe machine to use. Mr Earl denied that it had been repaired. It had leaked, through the suction pipe being dry. By leaking he meant that air and not benzoline escaped. This was remedied by the valve being oiled. MR BRENTON said he and his wife were almost heart-broken at the loss of their son, and he hoped this Inquiry would be the means of preventing any further accidents from the use of these torches in future. - The Jury found that death was purely Accidental, and expressed their deep sympathy with the parents of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 May 1888
EGG BUCKLAND - Drowned In The River Laira. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Laira Inn, Laira, on the body of a man found yesterday morning in the River Laira by P.C. James. The body was disfigured beyond identification, being in an advanced stage of decomposition. It was dressed in a blue jersey and trousers, and flannel drawers, marked "G.D." - Mr Robert Brooks was elected Foreman of the Jury. - David Jenkins, master of the schooner Eurania, now lying in Cattewater, stated that he had, on the communication of P.C. James, inspected the body. From the height, clothes and initials, he believed the body was that of GRIFFITHS DAVIS, a boy whom he had taken on his ship while near Liverpool, about six months ago. The deceased was in the habit of sculling about in the ship's boat for pleasure, and often stood on the thwarts while so doing - a practice against which witness had often warned him. On Sunday evening, the 13th inst., witness heard screams, and coming on deck saw someone struggling in the water. Seeing that his boat was gone, he called to an adjacent ship, but before they could reach the person from whom the screams came he had sunk. The boy was soon missed and the boat was found some way off. A lad in the adjacent ship subsequently told witness that he had seen DAVIS standing in the boat "skylarking." - P.C. James deposed to finding the body floating near the Laira Bridge and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 May 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr W. Harrison, Deputy Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Plymouth Workhouse as to the cause of death of MINNIE TWOHY, a widow, aged 42 years, who died in the House yesterday morning. Mr E. G. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, said that deceased had been an inmate for over two years, and Mr Aubrey Thomas, medical officer at the House, stated that for some time the deceased had suffered from pains in the heart, and heart disease certainly caused her death, though he had not expected so sudden an attack. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DARTMOUTH - Yesterday morning the body of GEORGE HOOPER MOSES, master mariner, who had been missing since the evening of the 5th inst., was found at Warfleet Creek, near the mouth of the river Dart, by Samuel Widdicombe, son-in-law of the deceased. It was taken to the Dartmouth mortuary, and in the afternoon an Inquest was held before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner. It was stated in evidence that deceased went across the river from Kingswear (where he resided) with some friends in his own boat, and after visiting one or two relations, he was last seen on the embankment shortly after ten o'clock proceeding towards the place where his boat was moored. On the following morning about eight o'clock the boat was found unmoored near the pontoon, while his hat was picked up in a boat adjoining. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 May 1888
TORQUAY - At an Inquest held last evening at Upton Vale Hotel, Torquay, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned in the case of a lad named FRANK MORRICE HANNIFORD, aged nine years, son of a quarryman, living at 20 Davion-cottages, Upton. The lad, who died of consumption, had received no medical assistance for the past three months.

EXETER - A Coroner's Jury at Exeter yesterday Inquired into circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH SPRATT. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was 74 years of age and the wife of a retired tailor, died on Tuesday from injuries received by a fall sustained two months ago. Deceased was then found lying in the drawing-room, and had apparently fallen from a chair. Dr Domville said the deceased had suffered a good deal from rheumatism. She stated that she was sitting asleep in the armchair, and on getting up to change her position her foot caught in the carpet and she fell on her face. The thigh was broken high up; a bed-sore formed and increased in size, producing hectic fever, from which the deceased gradually sank and died. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - An Inquest was held at the Lamb Inn, Exwick, yesterday, touching the death of a little girl named DEW, five years of age, whose body was found in a mill leat as already reported. ANNIE DEW, wife of a labourer at Exwick, said the deceased, who was her daughter, left home on Monday afternoon about four o'clock, saying she would be back in a few minutes. She saw nothing of her alive after that. A postman named Stone said he saw the child near the stream with some flowers in her hand. Evidence was also given as to the finding of the body, but nobody appeared to have seen the deceased fall into the water. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, said there were no marks of violence on the body; he believed death resulted from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." It was mentioned that there was nothing to save anyone who slipped at the spot where the child was last seen, and that the depth of the water was six feet. The Jury added a rider to the effect that protection should be afforded.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fall At Plymouth. Censure By A Coroner's Jury. - Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, and a double Jury at the Harvest Home Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday, into the circumstances connected with the death of GRACE STEPHENS, a married woman living at 1 Pound-street, who died from a fall through a wooden bridge at her residence. Mr P. T. Pearce appeared for Mr R. S. Rowe, the owner of the property, and Mr F. R. Stanbury for MR STEPHENS, the husband of the deceased, and tenant of the house. Mr H. H. Whipple was chosen Foreman and asked permission to affirm instead of taking the oath. - The Coroner regretted that he was unable to accede to the request. If the Oaths Bill had been passed he should have been able to do so. Mr Whipple then consented to be sworn. - The Jury afterwards viewed the body and inspected the bridge from which the deceased fell. It was seen that the courtlage of the house was only a few feet square, enclosed by high walls, and the bridge extended from the third storey window to a dead wall opposite, its sole purpose being to enable the tenants to hang clothes on wire lines stretching across the court parallel to it. - JOHN STEPHENS, market gardener, residing at 1 Pound-street, stated that on the previous day his wife was engaged in washing clothes when he left the house at 1.30 o'clock. Shortly after five o'clock he was summoned home, and returned to find that his wife had fallen from the bridge and was dead. He rented the house from Mr Richard Samuel Rowe, of Lockyer-street. He had rented the entire house only six months, but had lived in it for three years, renting a portion of the premises direct from Mr Rowe, to whom he paid rent weekly. After washing the clothes his wife was in the habit of hanging them on the rails of the bridge, which was reached through a window on the third storey. He had been on the bridge occasionally, the last time being a month ago, when he put up a wire line. He thought the bridge was shaky, but he did not know it was as bad as it had proved to be. He had not examined the woodwork, but about three weeks ago part of one of the side rails fell down, and was not replaced. That portion of the rail fell from the end opposite the window. He himself had never spoken or written to Mr Rowe about the state of the bridge, but he had requested his wife to do so, and on the day that the rail fell down his wife told him she had spoken to Mr Rowe about the condition of the bridge. Mr Rowe told his wife that he had plenty of wood and he (witness) could repair it himself. Since the rail fell down no repairs had been executed to the bridge. - In reply to Mr May, a Juror, witness said he had three sub-tenants in the house. - Then if it had been one of the sub-tenants who had fallen through, you would have been responsible? - I had nothing to do with outside repairs. The tenants had frequently complained to him about the condition of the bridge. He called at Mr Rowe's house a week ago to pay the rent and speak about the bridge, but Mr Rowe was not at home. He paid the rent to Mr Rowe's daughter, but did not mention the subject of the bridge to her. He had known for two or three months that the bridge was in a defective state. - A Juror: Did you not think it your duty to make a complaint to the landlord? - I told my wife to do so, and I thought that was quite sufficient. - Answering further questions, witness said Mr Rowe admitted to him on the previous evening that his wife had told him of the condition of the bridge. - By Mr Pearce: His under-tenants as well as his own family had access to the bridge and the same right to use it for drying clothes. He occupied the ground floor and the under-tenants occupied the upper part of the house. Complaint was first made by the sub-tenants about the bridge two months ago. Beyond desiring his wife to mention it to Mr Rowe, he took no steps to convey the complaint to Mr Rowe. At different times his son had done repairs in the house for Mr Rowe who had paid him. - By Mr Stanbury: All the time he was in the house as a sub-tenant Mr Rowe did all the repairs, internal and external. Since he had rented the entire house he had removed the partition and Mr Rowe repaired the roof. The bridge was made entirely of wood, and had not been repaired during the time he had lived on the premises. The bridge led to a dead wall and its sole purpose was to dry clothes. More than once Mr Rowe had been over the premises to see what repairs were required, the last occasion to his knowledge being prior to the last six months. Mr Rowe had never supplied him with wood to repair the bridge. - Ellen Pepperel, one of the sub-tenants, deposed that at about half-past five o'clock on the previous afternoon she was coming out of her room, when she heard a dreadful crash coming from the bridge. Witness was on the same storey, and looking out of the window she saw the deceased lying on the paving of the court in a pool of blood. She called for assistance and several persons went to the deceased's aid. She had been on the bridge only once, and did not use it for drying purposes because it was dangerous. She had lived in the house two years. She had frequently spoken about the bridge to MRS STEPHENS, who told her that she had spoken to Mr Rowe about it and that he had promised to repair it. During the time she had been in the house the bridge had not been repaired. - Henry Kerswill, a plasterer, living at 19 Cobourg-street, stated that when passing down Pound-street on the previous evening he heard the last witness call for assistance, and going into the courtlage he found the deceased lying on the pavement with her face in a pool of blood. She was alive, and witness raided her into a sitting posture. blood was issuing from her mouth, nose and eyes. Witness placed her on a chair which was procured, and she died almost immediately. One examining the bridge he found the timber in a very rotten state. On either side of the bridge were rails, which were very rotten and quite unfit for any person to lean against. Every part of the structure, in fact, was rotten. On the pavement below he found pieces of wood lying immediately below the gap in the bridge and about two feet from where the deceased fell. The pieces of wood had, beyond doubt, formed part of the bridge from which they had broken away. Most of the wood was rotten. (The wood was here produced for the inspection of the Jury.) - P.C. Hutchings deposed to assisting the last witness to remove the body of the deceased into the house, and to taking charge of the pieces of broken wood which he found in the courtlage underneath the hole in the bridge. Witness also produced another piece of wood, similar in character, which he had taken from the bridge. - Edwin H. Stumbles, builder, described the condition of the bridge, which he had that day seen. The wood was very much decayed. He did not get on the bridge, because it was not safe for anyone to stand on it. Its dilapidated appearance must have been apparent to any casual observer for some time. Beyond the gap the flooring was not so decayed. The wood which had fallen from the bridge was rotten. - By Mr Pearce: The timber of which the bridge was constructed might stand exposure for five years before decaying. The bearings which were embedded in the wall were decayed most, and would be partly covered by the flooring which had given way. - By the Jury: the bridge was properly constructed and of suitable wood, though better timer might have been used. - Dr Cash Reed stated that as the result of an examination of the body of the deceased he found that the skull was extensively smashed, and one of her legs was broken. - Mr Percy Pearce, in addressing the Jury, remarked that all would concur in tendering sympathy to the family of the deceased. He did not for a moment deny that the bridge through which the poor woman fell was rotten, but the Jury had to Inquire whether her death was attributable to any omission of duty on the part of anyone. After briefly detailing the evidence which the witnesses he intended to call would give, he said if Mr Rowe knew that the structure was dangerous and wilfully omitted to repair it, he was deserving of the severest censure. But nothing had been adduced to shew that Mr Rowe knew that the structure was not safe, and MRS STEPHENS herself, the only person who mentioned the subject of the bridge to him, evidently did not regard it as insecure, or she would not have ventured upon it. No one more deeply regretted the accident that Mr Rowe, and he felt confident that after hearing the further evidence which he would produce, the Jury would arrive at the conclusion that there was no reflection to be cast on any individual. He called Richard S. Rowe, who, before giving evidence, was cautioned by the Coroner. He stated that he was the owner of No. 1 Pound-street. Three weeks since was the first time he heard anything about the condition of the bridge. On that occasion he called to collect the rent, and MRS STEPHENS, after paying him, told him that one of the rails of the bridge had fallen into the court, and added that if he would give the wood, JOHN, her husband, would mend it. Witness replied that he had wood at home, and if that would not do she could sent to Mr Hambly in his name and get what was required. That was the whole of the conversation. On the previous day, a few hours before the accident, he visited the house and saw MRS STEPHENS, who paid him the rent, but said nothing about the bridge. MR STEPHENS and his son had done repairs for him, and on those occasions MR STEPHENS had fetched the wood from his house. The whole of the platform of the bridge had been repaired within the last two years. When he was informed that the rail of the bridge had fallen he did not think it was of sufficient consequence to inspect the bridge. A rail was essential to the bridge, and he quite understood from MRS STEPHENS that it would have been replaced. When he saw MRS STEPHENS on the previous day he did not remind her that the wood for the repair of the bridge had not been sent for. No conversation at all took place with regard to it. Prior to the accident he had not seen the bridge for at least six months. - By Mr Stanbury: He had never received any complaint that the bridge was unsafe. He had been in the habit of doing the whole of the repairs, both outside and inside. The existing bridge was erected ten or twelve years ago. It took the place of an older structure. - Wm. Thomas Jenkin, builder, deposed to erecting the bridge on August 4th, 1887. Since then it had been entirely re-floored once and once partly. Three and a half years ago it was re-floored entirely with red deal. - By the Coroner: He last saw the bridge at Christmas last, but did not notice its condition. - Reminded by a Juror that august 4th, 1887 was a Bank Holiday, and asked if his men worked on Bank Holidays, witness replied that he took the entry from his books. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the point which the Jury had to decide was whether anyone was legally responsible for the calamity that had occurred, and in considering that he asked them to remember the immense number of rotten staircases and floors that existed in the back streets and slums of the town. Explaining the law of manslaughter, he pointed out that if any person upon whom the law imposed a duty neglected to perform it and thereby caused the death of another he was guilty of manslaughter, and that it was no defence in such a case to say that the deceased was guilty of contributory negligence. - The Court was cleared for the Jury to consult in private, the Coroner retiring with the witnesses and others. On its re-opening the Foreman said nineteen of the twenty-three Jurors had agreed to the following verdict:- "That the death of MRS STEPHENS was cause by a fall from a bridge over a courtlage at the back of No. 1 Pound-street, and we consider that such death was induced by the decayed condition of the wood of the bridge, and that much blame is attributable to the culpable negligence of the landlord, Mr Richard Rowe, in omitting to repair the same" - The Coroner: You mean a verdict of "Manslaughter?" - The Foreman: We give it to you as it is. - The Coroner said he could not accept the verdict in that form. He asked what the Jury meant by culpable negligence. Did they mean that the landlord was merely guilty of inattention and deserved censure or that he was guilty of criminal negligence, and, therefore, of manslaughter? (Cries of "Yes.") He reminded the Jury that it was only necessary that twelve of their number should agree, and suggested that they should again consult together to determine whether, by their verdict, they really meant manslaughter. - The Court was again cleared, the Coroner this time, however, remaining at the request of the Jury. At the close of the second deliberation the Coroner read the verdict of the Jury, which was one of "Accidental Death," with the following rider appended:- "The Jury consider that the death of the deceased was accidental, but at the same time they request the Coroner to severely censure Mr R. S. Rowe, the landlord of the premises in question, for not having kept the bridge in question in a better state of repair." - The Inquiry terminated at a quarter-past eleven, having lasted over five hours.

Western Morning News, Thursday 7 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - In his evidence given at the Inquest held at Plymouth on Tuesday evening into the cause of death of GRACE STEPHENS, Mr W. T. Jinkin, builder, said he erected the bridge from which the deceased fell in August 1877 - not 1887 as was stated yesterday. Mr Jinkin added that three years and a half ago the bridge was entirely re-floored with red deal.

Western Morning News, Monday 11 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Sea. - Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening into the cause of death of CORNELIUS NIELSEN STROM, who was killed at sea on the 2nd inst. John Fagerland, master of the ship Hangesund, stated that they were bound from Hangesund for Hamburg, with a cargo of rine. On the 2nd inst., when sighting the Azores, he gave orders to the crew to loosen the mizzen, and deceased, who was an able seaman, climbed up the mizen-mast instead of going up the rigging. He lost his hold and fell to the deck, and was at once carried into the forecastle, and about half-an-hour afterwards recovered consciousness. He complained of pain in his head and vomited a great deal. He received every attention, but died about four hours afterwards. Halvor Kandeen, second mate, said deceased had got about 18 feet up the mast when he fell, his head striking the deck. There was a moderate sea at the time and the ship was not rolling. The Jury, of whom Mr Richard Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that no blame attached to anyone on board.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 June 1888
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe yesterday, before Dr E. J. Slade-King (Deputy Coroner) touching the death of FRANK DENDLE, five years of age, whose body was found in a pond on Saturday afternoon. The evidence of the deceased's mother and brother, and of Mr P. Price shewed that the lad went out with other boys on Saturday morning, and eventually left them, and, it was supposed, went to the pond near his parents' home at Larkstone. During the afternoon the brother went to look for him and found his hat and bag on the side of the pond. Mr Gibbs and Mr Price then searched the pond and found the body. There were no signs of violence on the body nor of a scuffle on the banks. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and gave their fees, as an expression of sympathy, to the parents.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Plymouth Citadel. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - An Enquiry was held at Plymouth Guildhall last night, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of a child four years old, named WILLIAM ALFRED DELAFEILD, who was killed on Saturday by a fall at the Plymouth Citadel, under circumstances already reported. CHARLES BAWDEN DELAFEILD, boot and shoemaker of Frankfurt-street, said the deceased was his son, and he last saw him alive about nine o'clock on Saturday morning. About noon of the same day his wife informed him that the child was missing, and a search was at once made. While the search was proceeding they received information from the Police of the child's death. - Edward Thomas Deegan, lance-corporal in the Royal Irish Regiment, stated that about twenty minutes after ten on Saturday morning he was standing on the bridge just outside the Citadel entrance when he heard a scream, and at the same moment he saw the body of a child come through the embrasure and fall to the ground. He ran to its assistance and found it insensible, and it was carried to the quarters of Mr Plunkett, bandsman, where it was seen by the medical officer of the regiment. Shortly before the accident occurred witness saw the child enter the citadel in company with a girl apparently about 13 years of age, and subsequently he saw her standing at the Citadel gate. He met Quartermaster Sergeant Swinburne and the latter carried the child into Mrs Plunkett's house. About three or four minutes later he went out to get his stick and cap, and then discovered that the girl had disappeared. - Mrs Plunkett, the next witness, stated that when the child was brought to her room it had no trousers and several of its other garments were missing. - Detective Mutton, of the Plymouth Police Force, said he had made every inquiry with the view of finding the girl, but up to this time he had been unable to trace her. He added that the child fell from the embrasure on to a heap of stones, a distance of about 25 feet. - The Inquiry lasted about four hours, and the Jury eventually returned as their verdict "That the deceased died from the effects of the fall from the ramparts of the Citadel caused by some person or persons unknown placing deceased in a dangerous position on an embrasure for an illegal purpose, whereby the child lost is life." - The Coroner and Jury expressed their deep sympathy with MR and MRS DELAFEILD in their bereavement. [NOTE: There are later reports in the newspaper of the arrest and trial of Mary Griffin, aged 12, for the murder of WILLIAM ALFRED DELAFEILD, by pushing him off the Citadel.]

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 June 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Under Chloroform At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, on the body of MARY FAVELL, who died in the Hospital on Sunday while under the influence of chloroform. - ELI FAVELL, husband of the deceased, living at Sennen-terrace, Morice Town, said his wife had been in the Hospital eleven weeks. She suffered from cancer in her left breast. She had never any serious illness during the nine years he had been married to her, but was of a very weak constitution. She was 44 years of age. His consent had been asked for the first operation which took place about eleven weeks ago. He did not know the last operation was going to take place, and was not consulted about it. By the Jury: The first operation was performed under chloroform. - Mr Henry James Bailey, assistant house surgeon, said he was in the Hospital when deceased was admitted on the 28th March for the purpose of having a cancer in her left breast removed. The following day the operation was performed under chloroform by Mr Bulteel. The cancer was freely removed and the incision extended towards the axilla, which was cleared out of some infected glands. She bore the chloroform well and was under its influence for three-quarters of an hour. About five weeks ago it was noticed that an abscess was forming. This abscess would have subsequently broken into the lung, and would eventually, probably, have caused her death by weakening her system. She underwent two operations of a minor character after the first and before the last one. The last was also a minor operation, but involved the use of a knife, which the two previous ones did not. The last operation was absolutely necessary owing to the collection of fluid in the chest cavity arising from the abscess. If the operation had not been performed deceased would not have lived many days. It was done with her consent. The lung and the heart had been both carefully examined nearly every day for the last five weeks. There was nothing in the condition of the heart to make him hesitate in giving chloroform. They had just begun to administer chloroform when, before half a teaspoonful had been administered, witness noticed her suddenly change colour, the pupils dilated and the breathing stopped. He ceased at once to give it to her, and the usual methods in such cases for restoring animation were resorted to and continued for about an hour. For the first half hour they had hope that she might rally. Scarcely half a teaspoonful of chloroform was administered. She took quite four teaspoonfuls, if not more, for the first operation. In the minor operations chloroform was not administered. - Dr R. H. Perks, house surgeon of the Hospital, gave corroborative evidence. The first operation was successfully performed on the deceased the day after her admission. Subsequently an abscess formed on the chest and for the relief of this, a second operation became necessary, and was to have been performed on Sunday. The administration of chloroform was commenced by Mr Bailey, and had not proceeded far in witness's and Dr Bulteel's presence, when a change such as Mr Bailey had described was noticed in the patient. Every means were taken to restore her, but without success. She had often been examined during the past five weeks; witness examined her on the previous day, and found her in such a state that he would not hesitate to give her chloroform. He attributed the death of the patient under so small a quantity of chloroform to the enfeebled condition of her heart and the state of her left lung, but this condition rendered her unfit without the administration of chloroform to stand the shock of the operation which was necessary to her continued existence. - Mr Christopher Bulteel, surgeon, also described the operations performed on deceased which were successful. She went on fairly well for three or four weeks. She was very thin and delicate. Two deep-seated abscesses formed, one of which opened into the bag, containing the left lung, and it became necessary to open the pleura from time to time to let out the fluid of the abscess. This had been done twice with a needle, but it then became necessary to make a freer opening with a knife. As this would involve pain he requested Mr Bailey to give deceased chloroform. The use of the needle was attended with comparatively little pain. He examined her before the chloroform was administered and did not hesitate to give it, as she had borne it so well before. She was, however, much weaker, but he had successfully given chloroform to many patients weaker than she was. The Hospital had been opened for twenty-seven years, and chloroform administered many thousands of times but this was the first fatal case that had occurred on the civil side. The chloroform was administered by Junker's apparatus, in which air was pumped through chloroform which prevented the patient from getting the concentrated vapour. They could judge to a nicety by this system the quantity of chloroform used. Witness was greatly shocked at the result; the change in the condition of the patient was perfectly sudden. He remained by her for an hour, and with the house surgeons used the most vigorous efforts to restore her. - The Coroner thought the Jury would be satisfied that every care had been exercised in the performance of the operation. It was more than he had expected to hear such an authority as Mr Bulteel say that no such accident had occurred on the civil side of the Hospital during the 27 years the Institution had been opened. He thought the death was purely accidental and that no blame attached to anyone. - The Jury, of whom Mr. Sampson was Foreman, found "That the deceased died under the influence of a small quantity of Chloroform necessarily and medically administered to her, in order to the performance of a surgical operation." They added a rider thanking the medical gentlemen for the care they had exercised in the case.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Workhouse yesterday, by Mr Coroner Brian as to the cause of death of ROBERT WEST, a carpenter aged 72, and an inmate of the House since 1870. Mr E. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, stated that on the 19th March last, the deceased fell whilst fixing some shelves. He was in bad health previously, and had been in bed ever since. Mr F. Aubrey Thomas, medical officer of the House, stated that the deceased died from shock, combined with an injury to the left lung, caused by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, into the cause of death of CHARLES ACRE, a gentleman who committed suicide on the previous day. Hannah Mill stated that the deceased, who was 64 years of age, was an eccentric, reserved man, and had been depressed of late. At one time he was kept secluded on account of the state of his mind. Witness last saw him alive on Saturday afternoon. He went out and returned at ten in the evening. On Sunday she heard him talking, as if to a person in the room, in accordance with his habits. On Monday afternoon she became anxious at his non-appearance, and with others tried to enter his room. - P.C. James said that he forced the door and found deceased hanging from the door-peg. On Saturday deceased had told him he was ill, and had been unwell for some days with lumbago. - A verdict of "Suicide during a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned. Mr T. Wolferstan attended on behalf of the family. Condolence with the brother of the deceased, the REV. J. ACRE, of Weston-super-Mare, was expressed by the Coroner and Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 June 1888
EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of JAMES WILDING, three years of age, son of a labourer living in Mary Arches-street. The child, after he was put to bed, obtained a box of matches by some means and set fire to his shirt, receiving burns on the chest and arms. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury, who added a rider expressing disapproval of the parents' practice of keeping matches near the bed.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquiry was held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, as to the cause of death of MICHAEL CAUSEY, aged 16 years, second class ship's boy, on H.M.S. Lion. It was stated in evidence that Frederick Crane, also a ship's boy, and the deceased and two others were amusing themselves in the mess-room of the ship on Wednesday when CAUSEY turned pale and fell to the ground unconscious. He was immediately removed to the sick berth, where he was seen by Mr. W. G. Axford, surgeon of the ship, who found that life was extinct. The body was removed to the Royal Naval Hospital, and Mr E. J. Biden, surgeon at the Hospital, made a post-mortem examination, as the result of which he now stated that death was due to an effusion of blood to the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr Edwin Scott was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Goldsmith, of the firm of Venning and Goldsmith, solicitors, of Devonport, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 June 1888
BROADHEMBURY - An Inquest was held at Broadhembury yesterday touching the death of WILLIAM BURROUGH, 55, farmer, of Broadhembury. The deceased's wife stated that her husband had recently been troubled about a lawsuit. He left the house on Monday, and was afterwards found dead in the garden. he used to complain of pain in the side upon exertion. The medical evidence shewed that death was due to heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

LIFTON - The Tiverton Murder. Sudden Death of DAVEY The Gamekeeper. - An Inquest was held at Underwood, Lifton Park, on Wednesday by Mr W. Burd, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr John Bullen was Foreman, on the body of GEORGE DAVEY. ELIZABETH DAVEY, the widow, Eli Lavers, George Gunner and Dr Doidge gave evidence. Deceased arrived at Lifton on Monday last by the midday train, on entering the service of Mr F. Bradshaw, at Lifton Park, as underkeeper. Next morning DAVEY, with assistance, went to the railway station for his furniture and later in the day went with Eli Lavers, whom he succeeded ,and who shewed him his beat. After walking about seven miles and when within half a mile of home, deceased was walking behind Lavers in a narrow path through a furze brake. Lavers not hearing DAVEY following, looked around and saw him on the ground. Returning he asked what was the matter, but got no reply. Lavers raised him up, and called for Gunner, who was working close by, and with other assistance took him to the cottage at Waterspout, on the Lifton Park Estate, where deceased was to reside. Deceased never spoke after he fell to the ground, and died in a few minutes. The medical evidence was to the effect that deceased died from weakness of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes". Deceased during his walk with Lavers remarked that had he known it was so far "they would not have caught George here," adding that he should not stay more than a month.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 June 1888
TIVERTON - The Fatal Gun Accident At Tiverton. - An Inquest on MR J. S. SAYER, of the firm of Knowiman and Sayer, auctioneers, of Tiverton and Culmstock, who was found dead with his brains blown out, was held on Saturday before Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner. The evidence of MISS SAYER, sister of deceased, and Elizabeth Gould, domestic servant, was to the effect that on hearing a gun discharge they entered the kitchen, where they had previously left deceased cleaning the weapon. They found him dead on the ground, bleeding profusely from the head, part of which had been completely blown away. Although they did not see the gun actually discharge, they were of opinion that it was the result of an accident. Mr W. T. Watkin, solicitor, representing the Scottish Accidental Insurance Association, in which deceased was insured in £1,000, closely questioned the witnesses with a view of eliciting whether there was any probability of suicide. Deceased's father admitted that some members of his family had been of weak mind, but deceased had never shewn any such tendency. Mr J. Reddropp, surgeon, was also questioned as to whether he considered the position of the wound was discoloured, apparently by powder, thus shewing that the muzzle of the gun was close to the head, yet the back o the head was an extremely unlikely part for an intending suicide to aim at. Mr Watkin further pointed to the peculiar colour of the exploded cartridge found in the gun. It bore signs of having been exploded by means other than by the gun hammer. Moreover, the process of cleaning a breech-loading gun did not render necessary the presence in the breech of a cartridge, and it was equally obvious that in cleaning a breech-loader the muzzle would of necessity be pointing away, and not towards the head. These facts, he argued, rendered the accidental discharge of the gun an improbability. Among the other witnesses called was Miss H. F. Ellis, of Morebath, a lady of considerable means, who stated that the relations between deceased and herself as an engaged couple, had never in the slightest degree been disturbed, and in all probability they would have been married in September. The day on which MR SAYER'S death occurred she expected him on a visit to her at Morebath. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 19 June 1888
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - The Trap Accident At Yelverton. A Fatal Result. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Rock Hotel, Yelverton, last evening, into the cause of death of MARY TEAGUE DOWNING, 25, daughter of MRS DOWNING, of Folly House, Penzance, who, it will be remembered, met with serious injuries on Thursday last in jumping from a carriage drawn by a runaway horse. Mr Cuddiford having been appointed Foreman, the Jury visited the body, which was lying at Penmoor, the house of Mr J. S. Liddell, the surgeon who, with Mr Northey, of Tavistock, had attended the young lady since the casualty. When the Jury had re-assembled, Mr Rodd called as the first witness Mr George L. Bradshaw, of Penzance, who stated that with Mrs Bradshaw he went to Yelverton to spend some time with MRS DOWNING and her daughter at Beechfield. On Thursday last they went to Princetown in a low four-wheel pony carriage to inspect the convict prison and on the return journey the accident occurred. Mr Bradshaw drove, his mother sitting next to him, MRS and MISS DOWNING, occupying the opposite seats. The pony was a steady one, and Mr Job, the owner of Beechfield, habitually lent it to his lodgers. when they reached Yannadon-hill, a mile or two from Dousland Barn, witness saw that a large school party was holding its treat in an adjoining field. Presently they got into a steep part of the hill where a lane ran at right angles to the road. suddenly two girls dressed in white appeared round the corner of the lane, the pony became frightened, and, being rather fresh, bolted with great rapidity down the slope. Witness held the reins tightly and endeavoured to guide the animal, but the speed at which they were travelling so alarmed MRS and MISS DOWNING that they both wished to jump from the vehicle. Witness endeavoured to dissuade them from this, but he was unable to do so, and first the deceased (MISS DOWNING) and then her mother jumped into the road. The dress of the former became entangled in the carriage and the young lady was dragged along for forty yards before she was released. Both ladies struck their heads in falling and became unconscious. Witness was unable to pull in the pony, but when half a mile from Dousland, the carriage was dashed against a bank and smashed, the animal rushing on with the shafts and front wheels. - P.C. Holwill, of Walkhampton, stated that the pony was stopped at the Old Manor Inn by a cabman named Bates, in the employ of Mr H. Membrey. Seeing something was wrong witness joined Mr Charles Job, jun., and hurried back in a trap in the direction from which the pony had come. Mrs Bradshaw was found with her son, who was unable to leave her on account of the shock she had received. MRS DOWNING was doubled up against a bank, and MISS DOWNING further away, lay in the road. Both were insensible and bleeding freely from head and face wounds. Witness thought MISS DOWNING was dead. She was conveyed at once to Mr Liddells's at Penmoor.. - Mr J. S. Liddell, surgeon, Penmoor, Yelverton, said he found on examination that MISS DOWNING had received severe cuts, and was suffering from concussion of the brain. He telegraphed at once to Tavistock for Mr Northey, and that gentleman arrived soon afterwards and tendered his advice in the case. The young lady, however, never became conscious and died on Sunday night at 11.30 from pressure on the brain. - This concluded the evidence, and after a brief consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Condolence was expressed by the Jury with the family of MISS DOWNING.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth Guildhall last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner into the cause of death of TIMOTHY HARRINGTON, who committed suicide yesterday morning. - JOHN HARRINGTON, a labourer, residing at 109 King-street, stated that the deceased, who was 33 years of age, was his brother and was a rag and bone gatherer. About three weeks ago he went to the Workhouse Hospital, and while there was placed in the asylum. The last time witness saw him alive was on Friday evening about six o'clock. He was of intemperate habits, and had no fixed residence. - Catherine Rowe said deceased came to her house about half-past nine on the previous night and asked for some matches, which she gave him. He seemed very low spirited, and said he felt bad and was unable to work. Richard Rowe stated that about twenty minutes to seven yesterday morning he went to the w.c. and found the door barred. He asked if there was anyone there, and receiving no reply he looked in over (part of the roof being gone), and saw deceased hanging. Witness at once went to the Octagon Police Station and reported the case. - Police Sergeant Gay at once proceeded to the place and cut down deceased, who was quite cold and stiff, and had evidently been dead several hours. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide during a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 June 1888
TOPSHAM - Scandalised To Death At Topsham. - An Inquest was held at Topsham (near Exeter) last evening touching the death of HARRIET FINCH PEARCE, aged 33, single, whose body was found in the River Exe on Monday afternoon. The deceased's brother stated that she lived with her father, a market gardener, at Topsham. There had been some scandal in the town with reference to her and this had preyed upon her mind. The statements were quite without foundation. On Monday morning the deceased came to witness's bedside and said she would go to Devonport to see some friends until the "scandal" had passed over, and that she would telegraph to her sister at Southampton to come home and do the housework meanwhile. He did not see her alive afterwards. Evidence was next given as to the recovery of the body from the river, and the finding of two letters in the deceased's bedroom. One letter was addressed to her brother TOM, and in this she said she could not bear the scandal current about her any longer. The other letter was addressed to her betrothed, Lewis Wear, in similar terms. Wear said he had had conversations with the deceased about the "scandals" and had advised her to "cheer up" and take no notice of what people said. He called for her on Sunday morning, but she said she was too ill to come out. - The Coroner (Mr Gould) said if people could not speak well of their neighbours they should at all events refrain from speaking ill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane." The specific character of the alleged "scandals" did not transpire.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 June 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident To A Farm Labourer. - Mr Vaughan, Borough coroner for Devonport, yesterday held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital into the cause of death of JOHN MARTIN TONKYN, farm labourer, aged 22 years, of Upton Cross, Cornwall. - JOHN TONKYN, police-constable, and father of the deceased, stated that his son worked for Mr Sobey, farmer, at St. Keyne. He had been used to horses for eight years. On the 13th inst. he drove a wagonload of hay to Liskeard. As he was returning the harness broke, and the horse bolted, throwing TONKYN out. His elbow struck against a stone wall and he was so injured that Mr Nettle, surgeon of Liskeard, was called to see him. That gentleman ordered his removal to the Royal Albert Hospital. Witness was written to and on his arrival his son explained to him how the accident occurred. On Tuesday last Mr R. H. Perks, medical officer at the Hospital, wrote saying that erysipelas of the elbow had set in, rendering life in danger. The Coroner said that with the note produced there was no necessity to call the doctor at present. Since that letter was written gangrene had supervened and death resulted. The deceased's master and his son were in Cornwall and as their evidence in the case would be important he should adjourn the Inquest until Tuesday next for their appearance.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the New London Inn, Fore-street, yesterday, as to the cause of death of RICHARD REDMORE, a shipwright, aged 52, who died on Tuesday under circumstances already reported. Mary Jane Bishop, 4 St. Levans-road, Morice Town, daughter of deceased, stated that her father, when near the grave of his son, whose funeral he had just witnessed, fell back into the arms of witness's husband. He did not speak afterwards. Mr G. T. Rolston, surgeon, said he examined the deceased on his return from the cemetery and found him dead. He died from syncope, caused by the effort in ascending the hill to the cemetery. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 June 1888
DODBROOKE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest on Saturday, touching the death of MR W. D. CHAMBERLAIN, of the London Brewery, Dodbrooke, who died from the result of an accident on Thursday by falling from his horse. Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, conducted the Inquiry.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday respecting the death of SARAH BARKER, 39, wife of RICHARD BARKER, a stableman, living in Bath-street. Deceased was the mother of eleven children, the youngest of whom was three weeks old. On Friday she complained of pains in the head. Next morning, at four o'clock her husband spoke to her, but received no answer, and an hour later found her to be dead. Deceased had once suffered from rheumatic fever and Mr W. Pearse, surgeon, had said she had heart disease. The Jury, of whom Mr J. N. Barter, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and, with the Coroner, expressed sympathy with the bereaved father, who is left with so large a family, and gave him a small sum of money.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 June 1888
PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held by Mr Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday, on the body of IOLINE RICHARDS, fourteen months old, the child of an army pensioner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes." The child, born in India, was delicate and died in convulsions.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - Sad Suicide At Plymouth. - Inquiry was held by Mr T. C. Brian, at the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday, into the cause of death of JAMES CRAWFORD, aged 39 years, butler to General Jago Trelawny, and an army pensioner, who was that morning found in the back garden of No. 6 Athenaeum-terrace, occupied by General Trelawny, with his throat cut. - CATHERINE CRAWFORD, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband had served for seventeen years in the same regiment with General Jago Trelawny at Singapore, Hong-kong, and in the Egyptian campaign. For the last six months he had been very despondent, saying that the general was not friendly, and that someone was "running him down" to him. On Thursday evening he was lying on the bed, when witness asked him what was the matter. He would not tell, only saying that if she knew she would pity him. Early on Saturday morning he awoke witness, exclaiming that Merryfield - an old friend of his - had been speaking ill of him to the general. When witness awoke at 7.30 deceased was not in bed, but as he had risen early for several mornings previously she felt no anxiety about him. She, however, rose and called him, but receiving no answer she went for a neighbour, and with him proceeded to the back garden, where, under a large tree near the gate, they found her husband lying in a pool of blood. The deceased had chatted pleasantly with Merryfield on the previous Sunday, and she did not think there was the slightest ground for his suspicions. On the contrary she believed the idea was entirely a delusion. Her husband and Merryfield had served together, and had always been warm friends. - P.C. Putt stated that when called on Saturday he removed the body of the deceased into the house. Under him, on the ground, was a razor covered with blood. Witness searched the body, and found the three letters, one of which, addressed to General Trelawny, ran thus:- "Maryfeald, What you've done and said you have a great sin to answer for. I forgive you and may God do so. As I, JAS CRAWFORD, freely forgive all his enemies, and may ~God bless you all." A second letter, addressed to a Mr Stevens, said:- "Mr Maryfeld, the Lord have mercy on your sole for the wrong you have done me, J.C. and wife. Also you have tryed, but thanks be to God that MRS CRAWFORD is enicent of all. JAMES CRAWFORD rather would die a brave royal man than disroyal; death before disroyalty. - JAMES CRAWFORD" There was also an affecting letter to his wife, commending her and her son to the care of God, and protesting loyalty to his country and Queen. - At the request of the Jury, Mr John Merryfield was sent for. He said he had not noticed the deceased's despondency. They had been friends for four years. Witness rarely spoke to the general, and would certainly have spoken well of the deceased on any occasion. - The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that the deceased was evidently insane at the time of his death. The letters were plain proofs of this, the one to General Jago having nothing to do with that gentleman. - The Jury, of whom Mr S. Roberts was foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane," and, with the Coroner, they expressed their sincere sympathy with MRS CRAWFORD.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 July 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday, into the cause of death of JOHN FOOT, a naval pensioner, 40 years of age, living at 117 Albert- road, who died on Saturday morning. The evidence shewed that deceased enjoyed fairly good health up to within a short time of his death. He, however, complained occasionally of violent pains in the head and it was stated by the widow that this was since he met with an accident in the Dockyard some time since, when a heavy block of iron fell and struck him over the left eye. He was in his usual health on Friday, ate heartily of his meals, and went to bed about ten o'clock. shortly afterwards he was seized with convulsions and died about one o'clock in the morning. The medical man called in (Mr John Henry Garrett, 4 York-place, Bow-road, London, who was doing duty for Mr Rae, surgeon, of Devonport), was unable to certify the cause of death, and made a post-mortem examination. This shewed that the heart and other organs of the body were in a fairly healthy state. The result of an examination of the brain, however, shewed that a large blood clot filled the left ventricle, and in his opinion death was due to abscess and consequent haemorrhage on the brain. Mr Garrett thought it was quite possible that the blow on the head caused the abscess, and the Jury, of whom Mr Willis was Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from an abscess on the brain, the result of a blow received whilst at work on one of her Majesty's ships.

IVYBRIDGE - The Accident Near Ivybridge. - An Inquiry was held yesterday at the Sportsman's Arms, Ivybridge, before Mr J. Fraser, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WM. SALTER BIRD, who died through a fall in Pithill woods, near Ivybridge, on Sunday, the 24th ult., as already reported in the Western Morning News. Mr Wm. Clarke was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Francis W. Blackmore, who was with the deceased at the time of the accident, said there were three or four lads together, and they had some cider both before and after dinner, but all were perfectly sober. After dinner they went in the woods, and deceased, who was behind witness, ran forward and caught him around the waist. Both of them stumbled, and deceased rolled down the bank a few feet against a rock, where he was found unconscious. A doctor was sent for, and deceased was removed to his home. - Joseph Goff, another of the lads, having corroborated the statement of the last witness, Mr James Mayne Rendle, surgeon, said he found the deceased insensible, with a scalp wound on the back of his head, and blood oozing from one ear. He attended him up to the time of his death on Saturday. The boy remained unconscious up to Thursday after the accident, when he regained consciousness and at times helped himself to food. He died on Saturday. Witness suspected from the first that deceased had sustained a fracture at the base of the skull, and since his death he had made a post-mortem, and found this was the case. He also found a clot of blood inside the head about as large as half an orange. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the cousin of deceased (with whom he lived) towards the funeral expenses.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Plymouth Builder. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner for Plymouth, last evening held an Inquiry at the Sherwell Building Yard, into the cause of the death of THOMAS HENRY HARLEY, aged 43 years, builder, who was found yesterday morning in his bedroom, shot through the neck. - MARIA MARSHALL HARLEY, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband had been greatly worried of late with business affairs, and had become low in spirits. Since Christmas he had suffered from pains in his head and had sought medical advice. On Monday evening he was particularly depressed. Yesterday morning witness awoke early and missed her husband. As she looked round the room she heard a gun go off in the room, and springing out of bed, saw the deceased in a pool of blood. She raised his head, when he uttered one sound and lay still at her feet. - HARRIET HARLEY, mother of the deceased, said she had never seen her son so worried as he had been of late. On Monday he saw a solicitor and when he came back he did not seem to be at all relieved. He said, "I don't know how I shall get through the difficulty; I don't know how to face it." He often put his hand to his head, saying he was in great agony. Witness was sure he would not have destroyed himself if he had been in his right mind. - P.C. Baines stated that yesterday morning, at 5.40 he heard cries at MR HARLEY'S house, and rang the bell. MISS HARLEY told him her father had just shot himself. He went to the bedroom and found the deceased in his nightshirt, lying on his back on the floor. there was a large wound in the left side of the neck, and the doorposts and the deceased's shirt were covered with blood. Witness found a double-barrelled breech-loading gun in the hanging press. One barrel of the gun was warm, and had been very recently discharged. In the press were also some cartridge wadding and several shots. There were shot marks in the ceiling of the room. The gun was lying within reach of the deceased and it seemed as if he had discharged it with his toes and had dropped it as he fell. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence to the Jury, said the carotid artery and the jugular vein were shot through and no man could live many seconds in that condition. He knew that the deceased was largely involved monetarily, and he had been told authoritatively that on Monday he filed a petition in bankruptcy. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane," and with the Coroner expressed their sincere sympathy with MRS HARLEY.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 July 1888
DAWLISH - At Dawlish last evening an Inquest was held before Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of THOMAS CRIDEFORD, labourer, who died suddenly at the Newhay Gate on Monday afternoon. Deceased, who was 63 years of age, had only recently come out of the Newton Workhouse, and had been working at haymaking. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence that death resulted from apoplexy.

DAWLISH - A second Inquest was held at Pitt Farm, Dawlish Water, into the cause of death of JOHN EDWARDS, a farm labourer, aged 54, who died suddenly whilst ploughing in a field on the Ashcombe-road, on Tuesday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BUCKFASTLEIGH - Dr Frazer, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at Bera Farm, Buckfastleigh, on Tuesday evening, concerning the death of MRS SUSAN DAVIS TOPE, of Colston Farm. On the 22nd ult. MR TOPE was driving his wife and children to Buckfastleigh when the end of MR TOPE'S whip struck the deceased just below the left eye causing a slight wound which bled freely for a few minutes. The injury was so trivial, however, that the party continued their journey and little or no notice was taken of it until a few days afterwards when MRS TOPE'S face began to swell and subsequently a small knot of the cord of the whip was removed from the wound. After this the wound became more painful and Mr Johnson, surgeon, was called in, but no alarming symptoms were noticed until Friday, when tetanus set in, and despite every attention the deceased died on Sunday afternoon. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Symons was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their deep sympathy with MR TOPE and his family in their bereavement.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 July 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of SAMUEL FLETCHER, who met with a fatal accident at Keyham Dockyard on the 2nd instant. Mr J. E. E. Venning, solicitor, Devonport, watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty, and Inspector James represented the police. - Henry Bate, painter, stated that on Monday afternoon, between two and three o'clock, deceased was working on a stage by the side of H.M.S. Thames. About half-past two he went to get some more paint and on returning witness saw him coming down the dock steps. When he reached the fourth step he slipped and fell on to a landing stage, a distance of about ten feet. Witness ran to his assistance and deceased was taken to the surgery, and subsequently to the Hospital. Mr w. G. C. Smith, surgeon, R.N., stated that when deceased was admitted to the Naval Hospital he was insensible, and remained under treatment until Tuesday afternoon about two o'clock, when he died. The cause of death was injury to the brain. Several ribs were also broken. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 July 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of ALBERT WILLIAM FRANCIS HIGGINS, an infant, whose parents live at 23 Canterbury-street. From the evidence of the mother and Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, the child appeared to have been accidentally suffocated through being overlaid in bed, both lungs being very much congested. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident happened on the new railway at Hocklake Cutting, near Tavistock, yesterday morning, to a man named CHARLES STEVENS, while blasting a hole. When picked up he was alive, but had received shocking injuries. He was conveyed to the Cottage Hospital, but died on the way. Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, opened an Inquest later in the day, Mr Clifton being Foreman of the Jury. From the evidence of James Moore, it appears that he and deceased had two holes to blast. Moore's exploded all right and STEVENS then went forward for the purpose of arranging his fuse, when the hole exploded, caused, without doubt, by fire blowing from the other hole which had just been exploded. the Inquest was adjourned until the 17th inst., in order that the Home-office might be communicated with.

TAVISTOCK - At the Tavistock Cottage Hospital yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, opened an Inquest on the body of LINDEN DAVIS, alias "Bristol Jack," who died on Thursday from injuries received on the new line a short time since. Mr Clifton was Foreman of the Jury. James Hulford stated that on the 25th ult. he sent deceased for some powder, but instead deceased went to a box where cartridges were kept. Witness heard an explosion and on going to see the cause, found DAVIS severely injured; deceased said his candle had fallen into the box. - The Inquest was adjourned until the 17th inst. in order that the coroner might communicate with the Home-office.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at the Olive Branch Inn, Plymouth, into the cause of death of WM. BISHOP, aged 68 years, a labourer pensioned from the Royal William Victualling Yard. Mr Thos. Higgins was elected Foreman of the Jury. It was proved that the deceased had been in bad health for some time and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 July 1888
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, yesterday, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the illegitimate child of SARAH ANN THOMPSON, a domestic servant, who gave birth to twins at 30 Coombe-road, on Saturday last. After hearing the evidence of Dr G. A. Thomas, a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth yesterday before the Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, into the cause of death of SERGEANT FRANCIS WATTS, late of the 76th Regiment. The evidence of the widow shewed that deceased had had no medical attendance for several weeks, though he had been very unwell. He was found dead in bed on Sunday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Some comment was made on the widow's destitute condition, consequent on the death of her husband, and the Coroner said he would communicate with Canon Graham on the subject.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 July 1888
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accidents At Tavistock. - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, yesterday held an adjourned Inquiry at the Cottage Hospital Tavistock, relative to the death of LANGDON DAVIS, a navvy, who met with a fatal accident whilst at work on the new railway works at Tavistock. James Hulford stated that on 25th June he was working with deceased in the heading of Crown Dale farm cutting, Tavistock. About five o'clock deceased was sent to get a "bottle" of powder, and took a lighted candle with him. A bottle contained between ten and fifteen pounds of powder. Shortly afterwards he heard an explosion, and proceeded to the mouth of the heading, where he found deceased, who, in reply to his inquiry, said, "I let the candle fall into the powder box." William Lavers, a ganger, stated that he had examined the box (which contained between three and four dozen compressed cartridges), and found the whole of them had exploded. Deceased had no business to go to the box. The bottle of powder was about six yards away from the box, and it was not necessary for him to take a candle as a shute about three feet from the box afforded him sufficient light. The box was not locked. - Mr C. C. Brodrick, surgeon, said deceased was brought to the Tavistock Cottage Hospital on the day of the accident suffering from severe burns on the face, chest, arms and legs. He was subsequently delirious and lingered until the 5th July, when he died, death being due to the injuries he received. The Jury, of whom Mr Clifton was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added as a rider "That sufficient supervision had not been exercised over the explosives, as they were left without lock or key or anyone in charge and that a proper lantern should be provided in cases of fetching powder."

TAVISTOCK - An adjourned Inquiry was also held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Cottage Hospital, Tavistock touching the death of CHARLES STEVENS. Deceased was a navvy employed on the new railway at Tavistock, and James Moore stated that on the morning of the 6th instant, about half-past nine, he was at work with deceased. Two holes were bored and the fuses in each were charged with powder. Witness's charge exploded, but as deceased's did not explode he thought it was not lit properly, and returned to light it a second time, and whilst in the act of doing so it went off right in his face. The holes were nine feet apart. - William Baker gave corroborative evidence. Deceased was conveyed to the Cottage Hospital, but died before reaching there. - Mr C. C. Brodrick, surgeon, stated that when deceased was admitted he had been dead about ten minutes. He had received extensive injuries about the head and face and a compound fracture of the skull and jaw. Death was caused by the explosion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and the Jury added "That more time should have been allowed to elapse before the man returned to the hole in the case of mis-fire."

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 July 1888
BLACKAWTON - At Blackawton, Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday evening touching the death of JOHN HUTCHINGS WAKEHAM, 83 years of age, shoemaker and farm labourer, who was found in a field on the farm of West Hartley on Sunday morning with his neck broken. The deceased on Saturday went to assist in the hay harvest, selecting to lead a horse and wain, and was thus engaged all day. About half-past nine in the evening, those engaged in the field heard the horse and wagon, of which deceased had charge, come trotting along the top part of the field and all at once the horse stopped. A labourer named George Rewe went to ascertain the cause and found the horse and wain standing by the gate, the reins being tied up to the breeching. The old man was not there, but it was thought he had gone home, as it was a common thing for him to do. He was afterwards found, however, lying in a field on his back, dead. Dr John Henry Harris of Dartmouth, examined the body, and found the neck of deceased broken, as if he had fallen off the wain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

PLYMOUTH - Death From Convulsions. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the First and Last Inn, Plymouth, yesterday into the cause of death of LILIAN GERTRUDE JANE CAPLE, an infant of nine weeks. From the evidence of the mother it appeared that a fortnight ago the child was vaccinated by Mr Harper, the public vaccinator. The arm becoming greatly inflamed, witness again took the child to Mr Harper, who said the arm was too far advanced for the extraction of lymph. On Tuesday evening witness put the child to bed and left the room. On her return shortly afterwards she found it lying on the inflamed arm, and the back of its head was cold. Witness called her mother who put deceased into a warm bath. Witness sent for a doctor, but the child died before he arrived. Christina Hawken, mother of the last witness, said when called by her daughter she saw that the child was in convulsions. Its hands were clenched and its feet were drawn. It died almost immediately on immersion. - Mr Thomas Harper, surgeon and public vaccinator, stated that the lymph inserted into the arm of the deceased was from the arm of a healthy child, whom he could name. When he saw the child the second time he thought the inflammation of the arm was the usual outcome of vaccination, which he considered had acted in the ordinary way. He was sure the child died from convulsions, and that the vaccination had nothing to do with those convulsions. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 23 July 1888
Inquiry was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, coroner at Bull Point on Saturday, into the cause of death of WILLIAM TRUSCOTT, who was that morning found hanging to the ceiling of his kitchen. Evidence was given to shew that deceased had been strange in his manner for some time, and had complained of pains in his head. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr J. Cuddeford was the Foreman.

EAST STONEHOUSE - MARY SARAH TOOSE having been found dead in bed at 2 High-street, Stonehouse, where she had been living, an Inquest was held by Mr Rodd, sen., on Saturday. It was stated that the deceased (who was 57 years of age) had been very depressed of late, her husband having poisoned himself at Devonport a short time ago. Death, however, in the case of MRS TOOSE was shewn to be due to syncope, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - Supposed Suicide At Plymouth. A Mystery Cleared Up. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of a woman found floating outside the Plymouth Breakwater on the 17th instant, was opened by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday. The Coroner remarked that all suspicion surrounding the case had been dispensed, the body having been identified by the employer of the woman. Mr William Parsons, living at 36 Headland-park said the body was that of his servant, REBECCA NELSON, who had been in his employ two months. He did not know that she was married. On the 16th inst., at six p.m., she went out, and did not return. Witness informed the Police on Tuesday that she was missing, and he saw and recognised the body found that morning. All the time that she was in his service she acted as if some trouble was on her mind. - MARY ANN NELSON, sister-in-law of the deceased, said that the woman was 29 years of age, and was married to JOHN NOBLE of Sunderland, but she did not live with him. She had three children. She was always in low spirits. She did not write to her husband, and he allowed her nothing. The children lived with their father. - Harriet Jones, 108 Union-street, said deceased was always worrying about her children, saying she wanted to see them. On the 16th inst., she came to see the witness, who tried to cheer her. At 8.45 they walked down Union-street together and among other things deceased said, "I have nothing to live for in this world." Witness left her at 9.15 at Derry's Clock and saw her turn up George-street. - Annie Wakeham, 7 High-street, Stonehouse, said that on Tuesday morning she, with two others, were on the rocks at the Devil's Point and picked up the umbrella and gloves produced. They were lying near the water's edge, as if they had been dropped there. To get them the witness had to climb down the rocks a considerable distance. - Detective Dart said that all suspicion regarding a certain soldier had been removed. - The Coroner reminded the Jury that the Devil's Point was the place whence the fishermen who found the body said it seemed to have been washed. The Jury, through their Foreman, Mr Wm. Rowe, returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane", and with the Coroner expressed thanks to Mr Parsons for attending the Inquiry and giving evidence; and their appreciation of the excellent way in which Detective Dart had investigated the case.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 July 1888
PLYMOUTH - Starvation Of A Child At Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Inquiry was held by Mr Coroner Brian and a double Jury at the Plymouth Workhouse yesterday into the cause of the death of STANLEY MARTIN WARREN, the illegitimate son of SUSAN WARREN, a married woman, living at 38 Octagon-cottages, Rendle-street. Mr W. Adams, clerk to the Guardians, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Board. - The Coroner explained that the child was brought into the Workhouse in a state of starvation and died soon afterwards. The principal witness, the mother, was not present, having before the child's death, been charged before the Magistrates with neglecting it, and been remanded in custody until Tuesday next. Other witnesses would, however, be called. - The Jury having viewed the body, which was a mere skeleton without a particle of flesh. - Mr E. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, deposed to the admission of the child on the previous Friday. It was brought in a cab by Mr Mayell, relieving officer, at four o'clock in the afternoon. It age was given as 16 months, but his impression was that it was older. The child was in a very emaciated and starved condition, and was sent at once to the children's hospital, where it was placed in charge of a nurse and received every care and attention. Deceased lingered until Wednesday, when it expired. He did not send for the doctor on the arrival of the child, because he considered the treatment adopted by the nurse would be sufficient until the following morning, when the doctor paid his daily visit. - Bessie Badcock, nurse of the children's hospital, stated that the child when received into the House was very slightly clad in a shirt and frock without any covering on its feet. It was very weak and in a starving condition. After washing it in tepid water and placing it in bed, witness gave the child milk, which it drank ravenously. Food was administered every half hour, but the child was unable to retain it. Constant attention was bestowed upon the child, night and day, until its death but it never rallied. It groaned a great deal, but was unable to speak. Throughout her experience she had never seen a child in so emaciated a condition before. - Elizabeth Frost, wife of a labourer, living at 24 Rendle-cottages, stated that SUSAN WARREN, the mother of the deceased, though a married woman, lived with a man named Martin in the same street. Deceased was born on April 12th last year, and was then a fine baby and perfectly healthy. For six months the mother attended very well to the child, which at the end of that time was robust and plump, and able to stand up by the side of a chair unaided. Afterwards it was neglected and declined in strength until it became unable to move. Its mother was in the habit of leaving it without anyone in charge of it for hours daily. She drank heavily and daily came home drunk, and fell across the floor. Witness had several times fetched her from the public-house and remonstrated with her about her neglect of the child. On those occasions MRS WARREN would curse and swear and resent her interference. Witness did not often see the man Martin, who was out at work during the day. Latterly the mother's drunkenness and neglect grew worse. the child became fearfully emaciated through having scarcely any food and no care or attention. The mother, in fact, utterly neglected it. On several occasions witness had purchased milk for the child and fed it. Six weeks ago she took it to a dispensary in Francis-street. The child was then in a very filthy state, and the doctor ordered her to give it a warm bath, and prescribed some medicine, which witness afterwards administered. The doctor told her the child was in a dying state and witness told the mother, when she was sober, what he had said. MRS WARREN abused her for taking the child to the dispensary and said she wished it was dead. For a few days the child improved, but the mother's neglect continued and during the past fortnight she drank worse than ever. On Friday last witness with Mr Mayell, removed the child to the Workhouse. The mother did not want it to go and tried to pull it out of her arms. Previous to its removal witness washed the child, because it was in a filthy condition. In its home it lay on some shavings in a box with a piece of waterproof over it, but no clothes on it. there were no clothes in the room belonging to the child, and witness borrowed a shirt and frock from a neighbour and a piece of sheeting in which to remove it to the Workhouse. Later that day MRS WARREN was apprehended for being drunk and disorderly in the street. Except a teaspoonful of brandy which the mother gave the child on Thursday morning, witness had not seen her give it anything for a long time. When the brandy was administered, witness remarked that it was too strong, and the mother replied that it would do it good, as it had not had anything for some time. MRS WARREN had two other children with her at home, and they were neglected also, but were given food by the man Martin. - By the Jury: The mother was in the habit of leaving the house about six o'clock and was often drunk before breakfast-time. As a rule she did not return until the public-houses closed. She had heard Martin complain to MRS WARREN of her neglect of the child. - By Mr Adams: She considered that Martin provided sufficient food for the children. He was accustomed to bring home food each evening. The other children were about five or six years old; too young to take care of the baby. MRS WARREN had three other children, who had been sent away to charitable institutions. - Mary Palmer, a tailoress, 35 Octagon-cottages, gave corroborative testimony. MRS WARREN was addicted to habits of intemperance and was away from home continually during the day. The child was in a box without sufficient clothes and suffered greatly from want of food, and in the winter from cold. It was, in fact, neglected in every way. On Thursday last, hearing the child's groans, witness with her mother went into the house and took the baby out of the box in which it lay in a filthy condition, with only a shirt on. MRS WARREN was fetched from a public-house where she was drinking and witness told her the child was dying. The mother replied that she did not care whether it was or not. She was in a state of intoxication and was violent and abusive because the people had collected round the door. Witness procured some milk and gave to the child who drank it as if it was dying from thirst. - In answer to a Juror, witness said MRS WARREN had lived in Octagon-cottages with the man MARTIN four or five years. - Charles J. Mayell, relieving officer, deposed to visiting MRS WARREN'S house on the previous Friday afternoon. In the room he found Mrs Frost and the child's mother, the latter of whom was drunk, noisy and abusive. The child was lying almost naked in a small box filled with shavings. It looked like a living skeleton, and appeared to be dying. It was too weak to cry. The room was in a filthy condition. He had the child removed to the Workhouse. - By the Jury: the box in which the child lay was about 1 ½ feet square - not long enough for it to lie straight. MRS WARREN refused to let him take the child away, even after he told her he could not let it stay there to die. She was so much under the influence of drink that she did not apparently realise the state of things. When he told her the condition of the child she expressed no regret. - P.C. Wyatt said he had cautioned MRS WARREN against ill-using another of her children, whom she struck across the head with a knife. He visited her rooms on Friday, and gave similar testimony to Mr Mayell's. After the removal of the child MRS WARREN's conduct was so bad that he had to take her into custody. - Dr T. Parse stated that the deceased was brought to him a fortnight since by a woman whom he did not know. The child was very much wasted, and the woman said it had fits. He prescribed for it on that statement. It was in a starved condition, arising from want of food. - By the Jury: He gave the woman instructions as to diet and the medicine he prescribed was to improve the child's appetite and digestion, and give tone to the system. - Dr F. A. Thomas, medical officer of the Workhouse, said he saw the deceased in the children's Hospital about noon on Saturday last. It was in a comatose and exhausted condition, very emaciated and past all hope of recovery. He ordered the treatment adopted by the nurse to be continued, with the addition of a few drops of brandy in the milk. The child continued under his care until its death on Wednesday. He had since made a post mortem examination of the body. There were no symptoms of disease, and sold cause of death being starvation. The child weighed only 9lbs. 4oz. A healthy robust child of the deceased's age would weight 18lbs or 20lbs. - The Coroner, in summing up, regretted that the mother was not present, but her absence was unavoidable. The evidence clearly shewed that the child had died from starvation and neglect. All the food brought into the house was taken by the man Martin, who was engaged at work during the day, and the entire responsibility consequently rested with the mother, who, it was clearly proved was habitually drunk and utterly neglected the child. - The Jury, of whom Mr Lang was foreman, after consulting in private, unanimously returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the mother, SUSAN WARREN, and the Coroner issued a warrant for her commitment on that charge. - The Inquiry lasted over four hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 July 1888
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Bentley's Commercial Hotel, Teignmouth, before Mr Hacker, Coroner, on Saturday, into the cause of WILLIAM REED, a journeyman brewer, whose death, it had been reported, was the result of a kick received during a fight. Evidence was given by MARY ANN REED, the widow, Frederick Bailey, W. White, and Thos. Newberry, to the effect that the deceased had told them that on the night of the 21st instant, whilst near the station gate, he saw two sailors fighting, that one of them was knocked down, and that deceased, on going to pick him up, was kicked in a dangerous part by the other sailor. He became ill and was medically treated by Dr Piggott, who made but little of the blow, but was of opinion that the man was suffering from delirium tremens and this was supported by the fact that the wife had said the deceased was continually saying he saw things crawling about the wall. Dr Warren Thomas made a post-mortem examination and deposed that there were symptoms of alcoholism; that one kidney was three times the size of the other; and that there was catarrh of the stomach and intestines. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from Delirium Tremens, accelerated by a blow given by a person or persons unknown.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 31 July 1888
LYDFORD - The Suicide Near Princetown. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr Burd, county Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday into the cause of death of CAPTAIN DE BURGHE EDWARD HODGE, of Exeter, under circumstances reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. The court was first opened at the Sarson's Head, Two Bridges, about two miles from Princetown; and a Double Jury was empanelled, of which Mr Brummell was chosen Foreman. The body having been viewed, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until four o'clock, when it was re-opened at the Duchy Hotel, Princetown. Mr J. J. E. Venning appeared for the relatives of the deceased. - The Coroner said the Jury had been summoned to Inquire into the circumstances attendant upon the death of a gentleman who was a friend to most of those present, and to himself personally, and was beloved by everybody who knew him. He purposed to call before them evidence as to the finding of deceased's body, and the circumstances previous, and subsequent to his death. He did not know that he need make any particular remarks at present but simply call the witnesses in their regular order. - Mr William Simpson Frew, surgeon at the Princetown Prisons, said at a quarter to eight on Sunday morning he received notice to go to Two Bridges without delay, which he accordingly did. On entering the bedroom occupied by the deceased he found him lying on his back on the floor. Judging from the condition of the body, it was his opinion that life had been extinct for several hours. There was a large quantity of blood underneath and around where the head was resting. On making an external examination he found a bullet wound behind the right ear, the surrounding skin being charred. The wound was about an inch and a half long. There was also a cut at the back of the head about an inch long. This seemed to have been caused through deceased falling against the washstand. Death was, in his opinion, caused by the bullet wound. On turning over the body witness found a pistol beneath it. In firing the pistol it probably dropped out of deceased's hand and fell behind. He thought that the bullet was still in the head, as he found no aperture of exit. - P.C. Cardew, Devon County Constabulary, stationed at Princetown, said on Sunday morning about eight o'clock he was called to Two Bridges, and went there in company with Mr Frew. In a bedroom at the Saracen's Head he there saw the deceased. He was undressed, lying on his back, his head resting in a pool of blood near the washstand. He looked down over him and under the left shoulder he found the pistol (produced) and on the bed a box containing cartridges. The pistol contained the shell of a cartridge which had been discharged. On moving the body with Mr Frew he saw there was a wound behind the right ear, and a cut at the back of the head. He searched the place, but could find nothing tending to shew why deceased should have taken his life. The jug had fallen from the washstand, but nothing else appeared to be out of its place, and there were no signs of any struggle. By the Jury: The bed had not been disturbed. There was a glass containing whisky and water on the corner of the washstand, and a flask containing spirit and water on the drawers. - Mr John Soltau, of Little Efford, said he went to the Saracen's Head, Two Bridges, with his son on Monday last, and there met the deceased. On Tuesday they spent the day fishing. On Wednesday he went to Plymouth, and on returning on Thursday night he found deceased had gone to Plymouth. On Tuesday deceased complained of a very violent pain at the back of his head. He said he was often subject to pains of this kind. At times he appeared to be in low spirits and irritable. On Wednesday witness spent the day at Plymouth, and on returning to the Hotel found him there. On Thursday witness went to Plymouth again. On returning the same evening he found deceased had gone to Plymouth. He did not see him again until Saturday evening at seven o'clock when he drove up in his pony trap. They spent the evening together. Witness found fault with him for having left them. He did not appear to like it and seemed annoyed. He came over and patted witness on the shoulder and said "You are not angry, old fellow?" or words to that effect. Witness replied, "Oh, no it's all right if you were obliged to go to Plymouth that night." During the evening witness noticed that deceased appeared to be very restive and he was constantly getting up and going into the passage. He took up a concertina, played half a tune, and then banged it down on the table. Looking back at it now, witness thought his manner was altogether strange. He did not seem to be able to make up his mind as to where he was going, and studied the time-table a good deal. One minute he said he would go to Exeter and fish, and the next minute he would change his mind and say he would fish in the Taw. Many times during the week he appeared very miserable, and said he did not care what became of him. He constantly talked about money matters and said he did not know the value of money when he was young, and now he had none. Once he said he thought of going to Central Africa to shoot. Witness told him "not to make a fool of himself; things were never so bad that they might not be worse." - The Coroner: Had he ever before that said anything to you about his money troubles? - Witness: Yes; but I never knew what affairs they were as deceased never went into details. Witness was with him on Saturday night. He parted from him about half-past eleven. During the evening he had drunk several glasses of gin and water. He had certainly drunk more that evening than he usually did. Witness went to bed about half-past eleven, leaving deceased with witness's son. The next morning (Tuesday) witness and his son breakfasted about half-past seven. It was usual for him to go to the door of the deceased's bedroom, and give him a call, but as it was early he did not disturb him that morning. While witness and his son were sitting at breakfast he noticed some stains on the ceiling. The door was open, and he called to the maid, "What are those stains on the ceiling?" She said, "I don't know; they were not there last night." Miss Smith, the landlady came in, and said, "Good gracious, it is blood. Do you go up, sir?" Witness went up to the bedroom overhead, occupied by deceased. He tried to open the door, and to his surprise found it locked - a circumstance he had never known before. Witness knocked and called, and getting no reply he burst the door open. Deceased was stretched flat on his back on the floor, with nothing on but his shirt. Witness ascertained that he was dead, and looked about the room, and saw a box of bullets on the bed, which had not been slept in. Mrs Smith and the rest of the family were on the stairs, and he told them what had occurred, and asked them to send for a medical man and for the superintendent of police. Directly he saw the marks on the ceiling he had a presentiment that something of the sort had occurred, as he had heard that deceased had threatened to blow his brains out on previous occasions. The carriage was at the door, and witness thought best to at once communicate with the members of the family. When he entered deceased's room in the morning he noticed that the room smelt of whisky. the window was shut and the blind was down. He did not hear a sound during the night, although he slept on the same floor. - In reply to the Jury witness said he had not seen the deceased for five or six months previous to the week before last. Looking back he recalled several incidents in his behaviour which were not consistent with the action of a rational man. On Friday evening he was very peculiar. Witness's son told him that deceased on two or three occasions produced a pistol and rifle and said he was going to destroy himself, that he had nothing to live for, and that nobody cared for him. Witness told his son that he need have nothing to fear from such remarks, as persons who talked that way did not mean what they said. Deceased met with a serious accident some years since by falling from his horse onto the back of his head. He had also had his jaw and his nose broken, and the back of his head had been kicked. He was not a man who usually drank heavily, and witness had never before seen him the worse for liquor. Did not think he was intoxicated, but he had had several glasses. He found two letters on the dressing-table in deceased's room. He took possession of them and now produced them. He did not know their contents. - The Coroner, after perusing the letters for some time very carefully, said they were principally of a private nature. there was a sentence in one of them addressed to his wife, in which he said, "This is the last time I shall ever write to you." The letters principally dealt with private family matters. They were hastily written and a word or two was omitted here and there, but they did not appear to be written by an insane man. - A Juror: do you think there is anything in these letters which need be brought forward to shew why he committed this rash act? - The Coroner: No, I think not. - A Juror: Were they left open? - Mr Soltau: Yes, they were left open on the table. I was the first person who saw them, and I thought it right to take charge of them, intending to forward them to whom they were addressed. - A Juror: Are these letters addressed to members of his family? - The Coroner: One is addressed to his wife, the other to Mrs Sparks. - Mr Soltau, in answer to a question, said he did not know if this was a member of the family. - The Coroner thought it would be a pity if these letters were made public. He should leave the letters for a time, and if the Jury desired to see them they could do so in private. - this course was agreed to. - Mr Vincent Soltau said he was the last person in CAPT. HODGE'S company on Saturday evening. He left him about ten minutes to twelve. Deceased seemed then in pretty good spirits, and said to witness, " I don't know what I am saying." On Thursday deceased shewed witness a pistol, and remarked that he had nearly blown out his brains with it once, and he put it to his forehead at the time he shewed it to him. By a Juror: He smiled when he said this, and the remark was made in such a way that witness treated it as a joke. He thought deceased had taken an unusually large quantity of drink that night, and that this accounted for his strange manner. He went up with the deceased to his bedroom. Deceased shook hand with him, and said "Be a friend," and wished him good night. He did not hear any noise during the night. - A Juror: Was there anyone else about with him during the week? - Witness: There was one person. - Another Juror: Was it a female? - Witness: There was a female out with him one day fishing. - The Juror: Was it any relation of his? - Witness: I cannot say. - Mr Frew, recalled, said the wound was such as might have been self-inflicted, and might have been done with the right hand. The window was shut. - Mr William Henry Shillabeer, clerk to Messrs. Venning and Goldsmith, solicitors, of Devonport, said on Saturday evening about 5.30 he was walking from Yelverton Station to the Rock Hotel. About 200 yards after leaving the station he was overtaken by the deceased, who was driving. Witness said, "Good evening, sir," and deceased answered "Put your bag in. I will take it up for you." Witness thanked him and declined and walked on by the side of the trap talking until they reached the Down. Deceased then drove on. When witness reached the Rock Hotel, he found the deceased in the bar with a cup of tea before him. He was waiting for change of a £5 note, and after paying his bill for stabling, he left. After he had left the servant said "There is something wrong with CAPTAIN HODGE tonight. He wanted to pay twice. He tendered a shilling for his cup of tea, and received the change, and then tendered a shilling a second time." He appeared to be irritable all the time he was waiting for his change and was unlike himself. He went away without saying good night to anyone. He did not appear to be under the influence of drink at the time. - The Coroner said there could be no doubt that deceased died from a gunshot wound, and he did not think there was any reasonable doubt that that gunshot wound was self-inflicted. But what they had to Inquire was whether deceased was in his proper senses. The evidence shewed that he had been drinking, and they must Inquire whether he was in a state of mind which led him to be guilty of such a rash act which he would not have committed if he had been in a proper state of mind. They had evidence shewing that he was not in his usual state of mind, and some of the remarks he made previous to the Saturday would lead one to suppose that perhaps he was not quite as sane as he should be. The Coroner remarked that he was particularly desirous that the Jury should read the letters. - The Jury then considered the letters in private for some time. On the Court being re-opened to the public both the Messrs. Soltau were questioned at some length with regard to certain references in the letters. - After again considering their verdict in private, the Jury found that deceased took his life whilst in an Unsound State of Mind. The Inquiry did not close until half-past seven.

PLYMSTOCK - At Hooe, near Plymouth, yesterday, an Inquest was opened touching the death of JAMES BROOKS, the shipwright killed on board the steamer Despatch on Saturday, under circumstances related in yesterday's Western Morning News. A little evidence was adduced and then the Inquiry was adjourned until Thursday, when Mr J. T. Bond will appear on behalf of the relatives of the deceased, and Mr F. Stanbury will defend the skipper of the vessel.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 August 1888
PLYMSTOCK - An adjourned Enquiry was held yesterday at Hooe, before Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, into the cause of death of JAMES BROOK, who was killed on board the steamboat Despatch in Cattewater on Saturday last, under circumstances already reported. Several witnesses having been examined the Jury found as their verdict that the deceased came by his death "Through an error of judgment on the part of the captain in not giving more scope in rounding the quarter of the yacht so as to clear the end of the boom, and when he found the engine stopped he did not alter his helm in order to try, if possible, to steer clear of the yacht." The Jury added a rider "That the steamboat company be advised to put direct means of communication from the captain to the engine-room so that his orders may be conveyed direct and not through any second person."

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 August 1888
EXETER - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday afternoon Mr W. H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of JOHN LIDDON, 44, fisherman, of Lympstone. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was unmarried, and resided with his father and mother, a week ago fell downstairs and fractured the base of his skull. He had been drinking, but a witness averred that he was not intoxicated. The stairs were steep, and he was going to bed at the time without a light. Death was due to compression of the brain and the Jury found that the occurrence was Accidental.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - An Inquiry was held at Devonport last evening by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, into the cause of death of SAMUEL TILLEY, a retired warrant officer. - P.C. Best stated that about a quarter-past eleven that morning he was called to 28 Catherine-street, and there he saw the deceased hanging by a clothes line, and his feet were four or five inches from the ground. There was a stool within a foot of his feet. Witness cut him down and laid him on the bed. He was quite cold. He searched him but found nothing. - Charles Twitchings, residing in Catherine-street, said earlier that morning he saw the deceased in bed, and in reply to witness's question, deceased said he was unwell. During the time witness was there deceased began to vomit, and coughed very much. - The Coroner's Officer said that on the table he saw a glass, which smelt strongly of medicine, and he found a bottle, which had contained chloroform. Deceased owed the witness Twitchings money, but said his daughter would pay him. He also said that he had had a sunstroke when abroad some years ago. Deceased's daughter told him that she had no money belonging to her father. - ALBERT JAMES TILLEY, son of the deceased, said he believed his father had been short of money. He was hot-tempered, and he thought just the man to do an injury to himself or anyone else. Since his wife's death he had been very depressed, and on several occasions had illusions and had been very strange. The Coroner said it was probable deceased had taken chloroform and finding it did not act determined to put an end to his existence by hanging himself. The Jury, of whom Mr. Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide during a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 August 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide On The Thalia. - Inquiry was made by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, and a double Jury yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of PRIVATE DAVID JESSE MATTHEWS, 29 years of age, Plymouth Division, R.M.L.I., who took his life on board the Thalia, in Devonport Dockyard on Saturday evening. In the absence of Mr J. J. E. Venning, Admiralty law agent, Mr J. P. Goldsmith watched the proceedings on behalf of the Admiralty. Ship's Corporal J. Horn, of the Thalia, deposed to finding the deceased on the lower troop deck, lying on his right hand, a Martini-Henry rifle being between his legs and the muzzle close to his mouth. In the rifle was a discharged blank cartridge. Blood was rushing from the deceased's mouth and ears. By the Jury: Deceased who had been absent fifty-eight hours, was brought on board by two of the metropolitan police early on Saturday evening. - John Mundell, ordinary seaman said deceased was on Saturday evening subjected to a good deal of "chaff," the Marines saying that they might have the pleasure of escorting him to the Dockyard gates, their meaning being that punishment might be awarded him for breaking his leave. Deceased replied "that they would have to dirty their rifles over him before they did that." Witness inferred from this that the deceased meant they would have to fire over his grave. Between six and seven o'clock deceased gave him several letters that he had received, and asked him to burn them, and afterwards brought several other letters and burnt them himself. - Private William Robertson, R.M.L.I., said on Saturday evening deceased shook him warmly by the hand and kissed him saying, "Good night." He had been with deceased on the Australian station four years and deceased after leave, generally came on board rather "jolly." He believed there was a woman at the bottom of it. This woman did him no credit, and twice came on board the ship while they were at Devonport. - James Henry Davis, master-at-arms , deposed that deceased was rather addicted to intemperate habits. Prior to joining the marines he was in the army for thirteen years, and witness had heard him say that he received a sunstroke while in India. - Lieutenant Frederick Owen Pike, of the Thalia, said deceased bore a good character, was of good ability, and in possession of a good conduct badge. Witness had heard from good authority that while at St. Helena two years ago deceased fell over the rocks and sustained a severe injury to the skull. He did not believe the man was in his right mind. A verdict "That deceased committed Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 August 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening into the cause of death of GEORGINA ANN KING, an infant, whose parents live at 31 Cumberland-street. The evidence shewed that deceased was in good health on Sunday night when it was placed in bed with its mother and aunt. Yesterday morning it was found dead in bed. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, who was called in, considered that death was caused by suffocation, as if a heavy weight had been lying on the child, the skin of the hands, face and arms being indented with marks of a shawl or woollen material in which its head had been wrapped. The Jury found that death was caused by Suffocation through the child being Overlaid in Bed.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening touching the death of JOSEPH MATHEWS, who committed suicide on Saturday. MARTHA MATHEWS, residing at 25 Neswick-street, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband, who was about 57 years of age, was a pensioner from the marines and kept a grocer's shop. About half-past five on Saturday evening deceased brought her a cup of tea in the shop, and about half an hour afterwards she sent a little boy named Moore into the court to get some milk. He returned saying there was someone hanging in the wash-house and witness immediately ran out and found it to be her husband. He had suffered occasionally from pains in the head. Other evidence having been given the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 August 1888
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, into the cause of death of WILLIAM KENT, aged about 70 years, of 10 Camden-street, who was found dead in his bed yesterday morning. Mr William Spurr was Foreman of the Jury. William Thomas Hoskins, who lived with the deceased, stated that about midnight he found KENT sitting outside his bedroom door groaning. When questioned he did not reply. Witness put him to bed, gave him tea, and left him. He did not send for a doctor, as the man was often in a similar state. All his money was spent in drink, and he had not the necessaries of life. About seven o'clock yesterday morning witness found him dead in bed. The Coroner and some of the Jury expressed a strong opinion that there was a great want of attention to the deceased. Had he been sent to the Workhouse or had a doctor been called, he (the Coroner) might not have been sitting there. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 10 August 1888
PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at Turnchapel, yesterday, touching the death of GEORGE HENRY BEALBY, who was found drowned. - JAMES BEALBY, plough and implement maker, residing at Nottingham, said deceased, who was his son, was 28 years of age. He was a schoolmaster, and about April last left his home. William J. Pascoe, Oreston, gave evidence that on Tuesday morning, about half-past eleven, he found the body of deceased at the bottom of the Hooe lake. He was under the water on the mud, with his face downwards. - Mr E. J. Dutton, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that death was due to drowning. He had also examined the marks upon the body, but they had nothing to do with the cause of death. He did not think there was any reason to suspect foul play. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 August 1888
SIDMOUTH - "Suicide While Suffering From Temporary Insanity" was the verdict returned by the Coroner's Jury at Sidmouth on Thursday evening, after hearing evidence in the case of ALICE FLETCHER or BROOKS, who took poison while sitting in a seat on the Esplanade on Tuesday evening.

EGG BUCKLAND - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at Laira, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM THOMAS FERRIST, aged 17, a farm labourer. George Stoneman, of Laira, a packer on the railway, said on Wednesday evening the deceased and himself went to bathe in the Laira river. Witness could not swim, and upon getting out of his depth, deceased, who could swim, came to his assistance. Before, however, reaching witness he sank, and was drowned. Deceased had suffered from a weak heart. Witness was rescued by the occupant of a passing boat. - Charles Langdon, about two hours after the occurrence, found the body on the mud about twenty yards from the bridge. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Fuse was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner of Plymouth, and a Jury, of whom Mr L. Brock was Foreman, at the Melbourne Inn, Plymouth, yesterday, investigated the circumstances attending the death of BEATRICE STACEY, an infant of seven weeks. WILLIAM STACEY, father of the child, said early that morning the child awoke, drank milk and fell asleep. Two hours afterwards he found it dead in its cot. It always had plenty of milk. JANE STACEY, mother of the deceased, said that shortly before the birth of the child she was frightened by a monkey. The child was prematurely born, and was very thin and small. "It could have been put in a quart pot." Stephen Manning, Coroner's Officer, said that the child was abnormally small, and its hands were clenched. The Coroner remarked that the child was small almost to deformity. It had evidently been too weak to assimilate much nourishment. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 August 1888
TOPSHAM - Alleged Starvation Of A Child AT Topsham. - Yesterday Mr H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at Topsham concerning the death of ELIZA MARY OAK, aged six months. GEORGE OAK, fisherman, of Topsham, said he was father of the child, whom he last saw alive on Friday. Mr Bothwell, surgeon, said the mother of the deceased called at his house on Friday last and said her "man" had sent her, "as the child was dying, and if he would come it would save any bother." He went to the house immediately, and from what he saw he thought the child was wasting away, either from want of proper food or disease. He did not think she was then dying; but the eyes were sunken, the face drawn, and the skin dry and parched. He told the mother to give her only milk and water. In the afternoon he heard that the child was dead. The mother told him she had fed the infant on biscuits and milk and biscuits and water. He had since made a post-mortem examination. The body was in a very emaciated condition, weighing only 5 ¾ lbs. (the average weight of a child at birth was 7lbs.) Without disease there would be a decided increase of weight at six months old. The stomach was much dilated and contained only half an ounce of what appeared to be biscuit and very weak tea. There was no fat anywhere about the body, and most of the organs, though structurally sound, were more or less shrivelled up. His opinion was that the child undoubtedly died from starvation. He saw no evidence of the child having been sick. - Mary Lee, a midwife, said the child was a very fine baby when born, and it seemed to get on nicely. A fortnight later she saw it, and the child had then fallen off considerably. Other evidence was given as to the healthy appearance of the child when born. The witnesses added that each time subsequently she saw the child it was thinner. - Elizabeth Veysey, a sailor's wife, said the child died in a convulsion. The mother did not seem to realise that the child was dying. - EMMA OAK, the mother, who carried in her arms a child about two years of age, expressed her willingness to give evidence, after being cautioned by the Coroner. The deceased, she said, was healthy and hearty up to three months of age, but after that became sick and could not retain food. Witness gave her bread and milk and sugar three times a day, also biscuits and milk occasionally. She had enough money to feed her children properly. Her husband's wages were uncertain, but he gave her what he earned. None of her children were insured. The Coroner said he should issue a warrant for the arrest of the mother, but would admit her to bail in £10. The Inquiry was adjourned until tomorrow (Thursday) to enable the Police to investigate the matter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 August 1888
PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening, touching the death of CHARLES EDWIN HUTCHINGS, aged four months. ELIZABETH ANN HUTCHINGS, mother of the child, stated that until Tuesday it had been very well, but on that day it was taken ill. A neighbour named Martin procured medicine for it, but yesterday morning, about half-past seven, the child got worse and witness sent for a doctor, but he did not arrive until ten o'clock, about two hours after the child's death. Mr W. A. Buchan, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination, and found that the child was fairly well nourished; the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs. The other organs of the body were healthy, and, in his opinion, the child died from natural causes. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Death Of A Lady Whilst Bathing At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening relative to the death of MRS F. B. C. CLARKE, who died suddenly while bathing at the ladies' bathing-place under the Hoe on Tuesday, and the circumstances of which were detailed in yesterday's Western Morning News. - Mary Parker, a nurse, residing at Hartington-street, Derby, stated that deceased, who was 32 years of age and an invalid, had recently been staying at Plymouth for the benefit of her health. She had been under medical advice at Derby, as she suffered from weakness of the heart. She had not bathed in the open sea until Tuesday, when witness accompanied her to the ladies' bathing-place under the Hoe and saw her enter the water. She had not been there more than three minutes, when witness observed that she was under the water with her face downwards. She immediately called for assistance and a lady came to her aid, and deceased was brought ashore as quickly as possible. Every effort was made to revive her, but a medical man, who had been sent for, said she must have died in the water. She was the wife of MR J. H. CLARKE, engineer, of Derby, and the fourth daughter of the Rev. FRANCIS BARNES, of Plymouth. - Miss Lilian H. Webb stated that on Tuesday, about noon, she was at the ladies' bathing-place and about to enter the water, when she heard screams, and Madame Gent asked her to go to the assistance of a lady who was in the water. Witness immediately proceeded to the spot, and took the deceased ashore. She was in about three feet of water, and the water would only have reached her waist had she been standing. She shewed no signs of life when brought on shore. - Mr Colton (the Hoe Constable) said he proceeded to the bathing-place on hearing of what had occurred, and found deceased lying on the concrete flat at the bottom of the steps. Mr Fox and Mr Pilkington Jackson, surgeons, were in attendance, and made every effort to restore animation for about an hour, but without avail. A telegram was received from Dr Taylor, of Derby, who had attended deceased when she was in that town, and it said that in his opinion death was due to syncope. - The Jury, of whom Mr. G. Southern was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by exposure to the cold water whilst bathing." They added an expression of condolence with the husband and the father of the deceased in their sad bereavement, and also tendered their thanks to Miss Webb for the courageous manner in which she had acted in her efforts to save the deceased.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 August 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - EDWARD ROCKETT, a shoemaker, who, on Wednesday, cut his throat in his shop, at Morice Town, died at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday morning. Mr J. Vaughan held an Inquest at the Hospital in the evening, when evidence supporting the facts already published was given by Mr Fowler and P.C. Lethbridge, who found ROCKETT with his throat cut and by his brother, FREDERICK, who stated that deceased at times was very strange in his conduct. He further stated that deceased had a wife and six children, that the children had been removed to the Workhouse and that deceased was depressed in spirits through not having sufficient work, his earnings for the last three or four months not averaging more than 4s. or 5s. a week. Dr Perks, the house-surgeon at the Hospital, described the nature of the wound in the throat which was of so extensive a nature that he was unable to sew it up. The Jury found that death resulted from injuries which were self-inflicted, whilst deceased was in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 August 1888
SINGAPORE - An Inquest was held at Singapore on Thursday, June 21st, relative to the sudden death of MRS EMMA J. GOODALL, late of Plymouth, and wife of J. W. GOODALL, a private in the 82nd Regiment, stationed in the Tanglin Barracks. It appears that deceased had been ailing for some little time, and some four or five days before her death had been attended by Surgeon H. E. Smith, who prescribed bismuth and hydric acid. By some means, however, a dose of prussic acid was administered, from which deceased died. After a lengthy Inquiry and examination of witnesses, the Jury found that MRS EMMA J. GOODALL met her death through poisoning by prussic acid, and that Sergeant-Major Evans, A.M.S., and Corporal Jolin, A.M.S., were guilty of gross negligence in carrying out their duty, and were guilty of Manslaughter. Evans and Jolin were immediately afterwards taken into custody.

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 August 1888
CORNWOOD - A child named MILLIE ADELAINE POINTER, residing at Sutton, Cornwood, was on Monday playing with another child in the kitchen of the house, and while walking backwards fell into a bucket containing boiling water, and was so severely scalded that it died next day. Yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - JAMES THOMAS, aged 48, a naval pensioner, of Morice Town, was found dead in bed on Tuesday, and an Inquest as to the cause of death was held by Mr Vaughan at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday. It appeared that the deceased had had much difficulty in breathing, and, though he had been growing worse lately, he would not see a doctor. A post-mortem examination made by Mr J. Harrison, surgeon, shewed that the deceased had been labouring under chronic bronchitis, that his heart was flabby and weak; and, indeed, that he had suffered from a complication of diseases, and could not in any case have lived long. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Death Of A Child At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an adjourned Inquiry at the Guildhall yesterday touching the death of JAMES JOHN LANG, an infant six months old, who died late on Sunday night. At the previous Inquiry the evidence shewed that the child enjoyed good health until Thursday, when it seemed unwell. The mother on Sunday evening went to Mr White, chemist, in Marlborough-street, and on explaining the symptoms was supplied with two powders. The child took one of the powders, and appearing sleepy about ten minutes afterwards, was put to bed. The mother then noticed that it opened its eyes and breathed differently to what it had done before. It got worse and died a few minutes before midnight without having been seen by a medical man. - Mr Hall, surgeon, saw the child about ten minutes afterwards, and not being able to certify the cause of death, made a post-mortem examination. But he was not then in a position to say from what cause the child died, and the Inquest was adjourned in order that the remaining powder might be analysed. This was done by Mr Francis Codd, chemist, who found it to weigh six grains, and to contain gr. 4 of camomile and gr. 5.6 of powdered white sugar. - Mr Hall was recalled and in reply to the Coroner said he thought it would be quite safe to prescribe that quantity of camomile without seeing the child. There was, he considered, nothing in the appearance of the child which, if Mr White had seen it, would have led him not to have given it the powder. The child died from inward convulsions, and, excluding the powder, the cause of the convulsions was probably teething. The Jury found a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, and considered that the powder sold by Mr White and administered to the child had had no injurious effect.

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 August 1888
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was held by Mr Coroner Brian at Plymouth last evening into the cause of death of ETHEL MOORE, the infant daughter of RHODA MOORE, living at 16 Camden-street. Deceased some weeks since fell over a bassinette striking its head severely, and afterwards had several convulsive fits. Evidence was given by Mr Henderson, surgeon, that the child died from concussion of the brain, caused by the fall, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 August 1888
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury at an Inquest held yesterday at Melwellham before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, into the cause of death of JOSEPH ADAMS. The facts, as they appeared in our columns yesterday, were deposed to by William Hobbs, master of the barge Success and Mr Leaman, surgeon. It was shewn that while deceased was towing the barge down the river from the bank he fell face downwards into the dyke, where the water and mud were about a foot deep. He was speedily taken out by Hobbs, but was then unconscious and was removed to his home at Morwellham, where he died shortly after the arrival of the medical man.

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 September 1888
DOUSLAND - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Manor Hotel, Dousland, yesterday concerning the death of ELIZABETH EVA, a widow, 77 years of age, of Rundlestone, near Princetown. Deceased, with her daughter-in-law, on the previous day drove to Dousland to sell some poultry, and was getting into the trap to return when she fell forward and died shortly afterwards. She had previously been under medical treatment for heart disease, and a post-mortem examination made by Mr Liddell, surgeon, shewed the cause of death to be syncope. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 September 1888
PLYMPTON - A Coroner's Jury at Plympton on Saturday returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" in the case of a woman named ELIZABETH JEWELL, 52 years of age, and residing at 74 Cecil-street, Plymouth. The Inquest was held at the Workhouse, Plympton, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and JOSEPH JEWELL, the husband of the deceased, said she left home on Wednesday morning, but he could ascribe no reason for her doing so. About nine years ago she was insane, and then on one occasion she wandered away. Emmanuel Rich said he assisted to remove the body from the river Plym, in which it was found on Friday, but no evidence whatever could be obtained as to how the deceased got into the water, hence the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 September 1888
PLYMOUTH - Drowned In Sutton Harbour. A Source Of Danger. - The circumstances attending the death of GEORGE GRAY, fireman on board the steam trawler Remus, in Sutton Harbour, on Saturday night, were investigated at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner. Mr John Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. - William Gilbert, of Sholing (Hants), fireman on board the Remus, said deceased and he were firemen on the Remus, which arrived at Plymouth on Saturday morning. She was anchored at the New Quay. About 8.20 on Saturday evening witness, with the deceased and a boy, left the boat and went into the town, where they had a glass of ale, subsequently returning to the Shakespere Inn. They remained there about 1 ¼ hours and witness and deceased had five or six glasses of age each. they then left the public-house. Witness parted with the deceased just outside, and went into the town again. He did not see deceased again until he saw him in the mortuary. When he left the deceased the latter was not drunk, although it could be seen that he had been drinking. He was a stranger to Plymouth. - James Bunts said he was standing on Smart's Quay about 11.30 on Saturday night and heard a splash in the water apparently near Guy's Quay, on the opposite side. He and another man who was with him ran round the Parade, and on reaching a dark and dangerous place on Guy's Quay, they looked into the water and observed the body of deceased floating. They got a boat and took the body out. It was apparently lifeless. P.C. Venton was quickly on the spot, and resorted to the usual modes of restoring life, but without avail. - In reply to questions witness said the spot where deceased fell was very dangerous. A chain was usually placed along the edge of the quay there, but this was not fixed on Saturday night. It was quite dark, and the spot was not lighted by any lamp. A stranger who did not know the quay might fall into the water at any time so far as the protection there was concerned. - P.C. Venton gave corroborative evidence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - On the suggestion of the Foreman the Jury asked the Coroner to make representations to the Mayor concerning the dangers surrounding that part of the quay where deceased was drowned, with a view to getting lamps fixed there, and the edge of the quay properly protected. - The Master of the Remus asked the permission of the Coroner to correct a report that had got abroad that deceased was drunk when he fell into the water. This was untrue, and for the sake of the parents of the young man he hoped the press would note the fact. He wished also to add that deceased had always borne an excellent character. he held no less than twenty-seven discharge certificates for good character from one master.

PLYMSTOCK - The Fatal Gun Accident At Bovisand. The Inquest. - The Coroner's Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of HENRY QUIGG and WILLIAM MCATAMNEY, gunners of the 9th Battery North Irish Division R.A., quartered at the Mount Wise Barracks, Devonport, who were killed through the blowing out of a breech-block of an Armstrong siege gun at Bovisand Fort on August 22nd, was resumed by Mr R. R. Rodd yesterday at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel. Lieutenant Donohue, inspector of the ordnance machinery Western District, was present at the request of Colonel Betty, commanding the Royal Artillery Western District, he having examined the gun after the accident. - The Coroner informed the Jury that immediately after the opening of the Inquest he wrote to the Home Secretary asking for an inspector of explosives to be sent down to attend the Inquiry, and read the reply he had received stating that the matter was one which concerned the War-office and not the Home-office. He consequently communicated with the War-office authorities, who wrote, in reply, that they had issued instructions for the attendance of all witnesses whom the Coroner might desire to call. - The first witness called was Surgeon Frederick J. Morgan, who stated that he was present at the big gun practice at Bovisand Fort on August 22nd. After the accident he examined the deceased. QUIGG was dead, having received very extensive injuries, the whole of his left side and arm being blown away. MCATAMNEY lived for half an hour after the accident when he expired, having sustained a fracture of the left thigh and other injuries. - Major William Payne Georges, R.A., said on August 22nd last a battery of artillery under his command went to Bovisand for gun practice at the practice battery of the fort. Practice was to have commenced with a 40-pounder, side-closing, Armstrong gun, which was manned by nine gunners. Captain Russell and Lieutenant Parry were also present. He produced the regulations which described the duty of each man in connection with the firing of the gun. Previous to loading, No. 1 gunner reported that he was ready, and the gun was then loaded by No. 3. He was not watching the operation of loading himself, but saw the cartridge put into the gun. The gunners were all picked men, and well up to their work. The week previous they were drilled at that gun, and he gave orders to the sergeant-major to take down their names and write opposite how they performed their work, so that they were all picked and efficient men. After the gun was loaded on August 22nd, Captain Russell and himself looked over it. He saw that the gun was laid at the flag instead of at the barrel and as it was for competitive practice, and it was consequently necessary to get the exact range, he directed the gun to be laid at the barrel in order to get the true range. Attached to the gun was an indicator ring to shew whether the breech-block was in position. If the breech-block had been screwed home properly the brass on the indicator ring would be a little to the left of the brass mark in the gun. It was the duty of No. 1 to see that the breech-block was screwed home, and he did not himself examine it. He gave the order to fire, and on the gun being fired there was a great cloud of smoke. Something touched him on the left leg, and he heard groans. As soon as the smoke cleared away he saw the body of GUNNER QUIGG and a piece of a man's arm lying close to him. He called to the doctor, and rushed off for assistance. On his return he saw MCATAMNEY, who was very badly wounded, and who died half an hour afterwards. QUIGG was dead when he returned. The gun was loaded with a charge of 5lbs. of powder, and the breech-block was blown from the side of the gun, and was picked up at a distance of 18 yards. The copper had come off the breech-block, and the lubricator was in the gun. It was the duty of Nos. 4 and 5 to screw up the breech-block and for No. 1 to inspect it afterwards. If Nos. 1, 4 and 5 all did their duty the accident could not have happened, but which of them was responsible for the occurrence he could not say. GUNNER QUIGG was acting as No. 1. MCATAMNEY was acting as signalman, and had nothing to do with working the gun. - By the Jury: GUNNER QUIGG superintended the loading of the gun. The firing was competitive, ten batteries having each to fire four rounds. To get the exact range of the target three trial shots were allowed at the commencement of the practice. GUNNER QUIGG was selected to fire the trial shots and the first was being fired when the breech-block blew out. He did not notice the exact time taken to load the gun, but there was no hurry in loading, and no occasion for hurrying. - Gunner Michael Tierney, of the North Irish division, stated that he was No. 4 gunner at the gun practice at Bovisand Fort on August 22nd. After the gun was loaded he placed the tin cup in the breech and pushed home the breech-block. He could see by the gun whether the block was properly screwed up, and was certain it was screwed home. No. 5 assisted him to screw up the breech-block, and he afterwards, as directed in the regulations, put his hand on the lever and gave it two smart taps. No. 1 afterwards inspected the indicator ring and everything else on the gun. Before the gun was loaded he also examined the breech-block. - Questioned by the Jury, witness reaffirmed his belief that the breech-block was properly screwed up. The brass marks on the indicator and the gun were in line, shewing that the breech-block was screwed up properly. He had previously worked at the gun, which seemed to work all right. Could not tell what was the cause of the accident. Afterwards he saw some of the officers round the gun, but they did not touch it. - Gunner Thomas Murphy deposed to being engaged as No. 5 on the gun. Gunner Tierney put in the tin cup and pushed home the breech and witness assisted him in crewing it up. Tierney afterwards gave the lever two taps. He did not notice No. 1 examine the indicator ring. - By the Jury: The block was unscrewed and screwed up again in five complete turns. - Captain William Melbourne Russell deposed to being present at Bovisand Fort when the accident occurred. As far as he could see from his position at the left of the gun Nos. 1, 4 and 5 did their duty. He saw No. 4 put in the tin cup, and, assisted by No. 5, screw the block up and give the lever two taps. he did not see No. 1 inspect the indicator ring. After having seen the men do their duty properly, and knowing they were picked men, he was surprised at the result. Did not think there was any fault or defect in the gun. Witness had given evidence before the court of inquiry which had been held. - The Coroner remarked that he did not think it would be fair to the witness to ask him any questions as to the evidence he had given before the court of inquiry. If necessary he could get a copy of the proceedings of that court. - Battery-Sergeant Major Thomas Thompson stated that as far as he could judge Nos. 1, 4 and 5 did their duties properly. He was at the time standing ten paces to the right rear of the gun. He could not account for the accident, which greatly surprised him. Could not find any fault with the gun. Any air space in the breech of the gun would cause an accident. If the breech had not been screwed up properly by an eighth of an inch the only means of detecting it were by the raised projections on the indicator and breech. Even if the breech-block were properly screwed up, the accident might have happened if there were no copper ring on the block. The copper ring was fastened on the breech-block to make it fit closer to the gun, and prevent any air space. No. 4 would be responsible for seeing that the copper ring was on the block. He could not say whether any examination was made of the gun after the accident. He did not notice No. 1 inspect the indicator ring, but he might have done so without his seeing him. To all appearances the breech-block was properly in position. - Gunner Tierney, recalled, stated that he saw the copper ring on the breech-block before he put it into the gun. Did not count the number of turns he gave the screw either in unscrewing the block or in screwing it up again, but was certain he screwed the block home. - Major George, recalled, said the copper round the breech-block was not too small. - The Coroner remarked that he did not think it advisable for the Jury to arrive at a hasty conclusion, and suggested whether it would not be advisable to adjourn the Inquiry to obtain, if possible, the evidence produced before the court of inquiry. He would apply for a copy of the proceedings of that court, and if he found in it any evidence of importance, he would summon the witnesses examined there, and have them sworn. - The Jury, after a short consultation in private, approved of the Coroner's suggestion to adjourn the Inquest and asked that Colonel Barker, the president of the court of inquiry and the firm of the Armstrong Company should be communicated with, with the view to their being represented. - The Inquest was then adjourned for a week.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 September 1888
EXETER - Improper Feeding Of Infants. - At Exeter yesterday Mr Hooper Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of FRED. GEORGE GUSCOTT, a little boy, the son of a single woman. The mother, aged 24, living in Coombe-street, said she had fed the child twice a day on tea biscuits soaked in water. its life was not insured. - Mr Brash, surgeon, said the child was a "Small, miserable thing" when born. He believed it suffered from a wasting disease. It was, however, very improper to feed children on biscuits. The Coroner also strongly deprecated this practice, which he said appeared to be very generally pursued. The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but the Coroner said he was of opinion that the child was not taken proper care of. He did not know how the prevalent practice of improperly feeding infants was to be put down unless they could, in a very bad case, make an example. Cases of this sort had been frequently referred to, and something ought to be done to stop them.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 September 1888
PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquiry held yesterday at Plymouth, before Mr T. C. Brian, into the cause of death of BEATRICE ELIZABETH DAVIS, the child of ELIZABETH JANE DAVIS, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was proved in evidence that on the 27th ult., the child, who was seventeen months old, was sitting in a high chair in the kitchen near the table on which was a large cup of hot coffee. The mother heard a scream and then saw that the deceased had upset the cup of coffee and severely scalded itself on the chest and chin. Flour and linseed oil were immediately applied to the injuries, Messrs. Pullen and Jackson, surgeons were sent for, and Mr Jackson attended the child until its death on Wednesday. The Jury, of whom Mr Murton was Foreman, exonerated the mother from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 September 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of MARY JANE ROSKRUGE, wife of a writer in the Dockyard, who died suddenly on Friday night. Deceased, who was stated to have been of full habit and to have complained for some time of shortness of breath and dizziness in the head, spent an hour with her sister on Friday evening at the house of the latter in Duke-street. After she came to the house she was noticed to be very pale. Dr Laity was sent for, but she died before he came. Dr Laity now stated that he attributed death to syncope, and a verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 September 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Death Of A Dockyard Labourer At Devonport. The Treatment Of Dockyard Surgery Cases. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Morice Town last evening, concerning the death of WILLIAM COOK, 42 years of age, a labourer in Keyham Dockyard. LOUISA COOK, the widow, 17 Warren-street, said the deceased enjoyed good health until the 13th of August, and was at work that day. When he came home at six o'clock he was delirious. There were two pieces of plaister on his head. He went to bed, and was moaning all night, complaining of pains in his head. He told her that he was knocked down and hit the back of his head on the beam of a ship. They were taking in ballast, he said, for the ship, for which work he and eleven others were engaged. He was working in the bottom of the ship, when a piece of iron struck him on the back of the head and knocked him down. The men who were working with him brought him into the open air, where they left him. He found that blood was on his head and went to the surgery, and the sick-bay man put the two pieces of plaister on his head, after which he returned home. Two days afterwards witness helped to dress deceased, and then accompanied him to the surgery, but did not go in. The doctor there took off the plaster, and sent him to the Hospital. - The Coroner thought that witness, knowing her husband was delirious, should have gone to the surgery and explained to the authorities what had occurred. - Continuing, witness said they told him at the Hospital that he must go to his own doctor. On Thursday witness went to the Keyham surgery and explained to the doctor word by word what had happened. He replied "Your husband did not explain about the injury at the back of the head." He asked witness if she had her own doctor, and she replied yes; she had sent for Mr Hall on the previous evening after her husband returned from the Hospital. He then replied that witness must let her own doctor attend him. The doctor at Keyham came on Friday and examined him. He told her she must report him at the surgery at half-past nine. She went every morning except Sunday and reported his progress at the surgery and Mr Hall continued to attend him. - The Coroner inquired of his offer (Inspector Bryant) if he had tried to get a witness at the Inquest who witnessed the accident. - Mr Bryant replied that he had, but the witness would not attend unless he was properly summoned. There seemed to be a controversy between the authorities whether deceased belonged to Keyham or the other Dockyard. - In reply to a further question, witness said she had had a fortnight's half-pay since the accident. She received this on Friday. - A Juror: It is plain then that the surgeon of the Dockyard recognised that deceased was under his care. - George Rowe Hall, surgeon, said he saw the deceased at noon on the 15th. Deceased had just then returned from the Hospital. He found a wound over his right eye. His symptoms were those of a man recovering from concussion of the brain. He could answer questions when asked, but not at all clearly, and seemed very stupid and heavy. He was in that state in which witness would expect a man to be who had received a blow of some force on the head. The wound over the eye would not account for his death, except that such a blow would send him with force against anything near the back of his head. The more serious injury was the concussion caused by the blow at the back of the head by his being knocked forcibly backwards. Deceased went on very well until the 23rd August, ten days after the accident, when symptoms presented themselves, from which witness inferred that abscess or some other irritation had set in. He had made a post-mortem examination of the brain, and found there was no wound of the scalp except that above the eye, and no fracture of the skull anywhere. On taking off the skull-cap and raising the covering of the brain, he found some bloody fluid present, shewing recent inflammation. On the very top of the head, and from there towards the back, he found some inflammatory adhesions of quite recent formation. About some of these adhesions the brain substance looked bruised. There had been inflammation of the part of the brain which he found bruised. There were no blood clots in the brain, or in the cavities, and no signs of abscess. This inflammation and the adhesions were caused by the blow. He had no doubt deceased died from injuries received at the back of the head by its having struck against some hard substance. Witness added that he had questioned the deceased, who gave him to understand that he was struck by some iron ballast which was swinging while being lowered down to him. - A Juror: Do you think if the deceased had been attended directly after the accident it would have made any difference? - Witness: I think not. The man at the surgery thought it was merely a superficial cut. - The Coroner thought this was a lesson to every doctor not to accept every patient's explanation of the accident but to search further. - Witness, continuing, said to the best of his belief on Saturday, the 25th, he saw at the man's bedside the surgeon who acted for the Admiralty in cases of injury in the yard, and consulted with him upon the case. They both came to the conclusion that if the case were not then critical it would soon become so. The doctor coincided with witness's past treatment of the case. - The Coroner said this was a very important case, and they ought to have an eye-witness of the accident. He thought it would be also advisable that the doctor at Keyham should attend and give some information of his conduct. (Hear, hear, from the Jury). He was not inclined to blame him very much for his conduct. He thought the doctor was deceived by merely seeing a superficial wound and by not being told of the injury at the back of the man's head. He thought, however, that the doctor might have examined deceased a little more closely, and he should be asked to explain in his own way, and as far as he could, why he did not make a closer examination. He thought also the doctor should be asked some questions as to the mode in which men were sent to the Hospital; whether they were sent there, as this man appeared to be, without any credentials. - A Juryman: Don't you think he should be also asked how many cases are sent to private practitioners? - The Coroner said that would be for the Jury to consider. - The Inquiry was then adjourned until eleven o'clock tomorrow morning at the Guildhall.

EAST STONEHOUSE - A death from a fall from a chair when lighting the gas was investigated yesterday at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, before Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Sloggett was Foreman. The deceased was MRS ELIZABETH DRAYTON, widow of MR ROBERT DRAYTON, late a butcher of Yeovil, and lived with her daughter, Mrs Chapman, of 8 Hobart-street, Stonehouse. On the 12th ult, the deceased, who was 78 years of age, got on a chair to light the gas in the kitchen when she fell and fractured her hip. She became insensible, and lingered on until last Friday when she died. Mrs Chapman and her daughter, Miss Florence Chapman and Mr M. H. Bulteel, surgeon, gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

WHITCHURCH - THOMAS SHEPHERD EDWARDS, a child of four years, residing at No. 1 Cornwallis-terrace, Pennycomequick, accidentally set himself on fire with a lighted candle during his mother's absence from the house on Saturday evening. Mr W. Creber, of St. Michael's-terrace, who saw the child standing at the door with its clothes on fire, extinguished the flames with his hands, and sent for medical assistance. Before the arrival of a medical man, Mr Macdonald, grocer, of Wake-street, did all he could to alleviate the sufferings of the child, who was, however, very badly burnt about the body, and although the deceased afterwards received every care and attention from Mr Rees, surgeon, he died on Sunday evening. In the course of the Inquest it was stated that both Mr Creber and Mr Macdonald were most attentive to the child after the accident. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

PLYMSTOCK - The Gun Accident At Bovisand. Inquest And Verdict. - The adjourned inquest concerning the death of HENRY QUIGG and WILLIAM MCATAMNEY, gunners in the A Battery 1st Brigade North Irish Division R.A., who were killed through the blowing out of the breech-block of an Armstrong gun at Bovisand on August 22nd was resumed by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday, at the Boringdon Arms, Turnchapel. [Two columns of technical evidence, resulting in the conclusion:] The Coroner, in summing up, said there could be no doubt in his own mind that the accident by which the two men lost their lives was caused by the neglect of the deceased, QUIGG, who was primarily responsible for seeing that the breech-block was properly screwed home. If QUIGG had been alive he should not have advised them that his neglect was criminal or amounted to manslaughter, but it was an oversight on his part in not examining the indicator ring. He thanked the Jury for the patience and care they had evinced throughout the Inquiry, which had been very full and exhaustive, and he was sure would be satisfactory to the public. - The Jury, after consultation in private, returned the following verdict:- "The Jury are of the unanimous opinion that the deceased gunners QUIGG and MCATAMNEY were Accidentally Killed by the blowing out of a breech-block of a 40-pounder Armstrong gun owing to the breech-block being improperly secured. The Jury are further of opinion, after careful consideration, that there was a lack of proper supervision on the part of the officers present on the practice battery. The Jury express the hope that the suggestion contained in General Lyon's letter to Lord Wolseley, as follows:- 'It appears to me that it would be an additional precaution if none of the detachment working a similar gun stood on the side of the gun on which the breech-block is inserted,' will not be lost sight of by the authorities. The Jury desire, further, to record their high appreciation of the way in which the Coroner has conducted these lengthy and exhaustive proceedings."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 September 1888
MORTHOE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquiry conducted by Dr Slade-King of Ilfracombe, into the cause of death of GEORGE MITCHELL, who was killed by the falling in of a trench at Black Pitt field, Morthoe, on Saturday, under circumstances reported in Monday's Western Morning News.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 September 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - The Death Of A Dockyard Labourer At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, resumed the Inquiry at the Guildhall yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM COOK, a labourer in the Dockyard, from injuries to the head received on the 13th August while loading ballast on board H.M.S. Pheasant. The Inquiry was adjourned from Monday in order that further evidence might be produced. Mr Goldsmith (Venning and Goldsmith, Admiralty solicitors) and Inspector James, of the metropolitan police, were present. The widow was re-examined and added that her husband was taken to the Hospital in a cab, accompanied by a surgery assistant. She did not know whether he had any note or not. - George Johns, a labourer in the dockyard, said the deceased and himself were employed on board the Pheasant on the 13th of August. Witness was alone with him in the store-room in the ship, and as the ballast was lowered their duty was to remove it from under the hatchway, and store one peg on the top of another. One peg was lowered at once to them in an uncovered state, held by a rope fixed by a hook at the end of the ballast. The hook which deceased was holding suddenly rose up, struck him in the forehead, and knocked him backwards, and striking the back of his head against the locker of the store-room. Witness asked him if he were much hurt, and he said "Yes, I have received a heavy blow, and my head aches very badly." Witness advised him to go to the surgery at once, and he believed he did so. He went up the steps unassisted. A little later on he returned, and said, "I am going out on a hurt note." He appeared to be perfectly sensible after he recovered from the effects of the blow and also when he came back and reported that he was going out on a sick note. - Thomas Lethbridge, 22 Stuart-terrace, surgery-attendant at Devonport Dockyard, deposed to attending deceased at the surgery on the 13th August for a superficial cut over the right eye. The wound was about five-eighths of an inch long, and not at all deep. Deceased appeared to be quite sensible, and said his head was struck with a peg of ballast. He never mentioned any injury except the wound which witness dressed. Had he complained of pains in his head witness would have sent for the surgeon. He was in the surgery the following day when COOK again presented himself. Witness thinking he looked bad sent for Dr Lauder, fleet-surgeon, and was present when he examined the man. He told the doctor his head was very bad. The doctor took his temperature, which witness thought was about 102. Witness did not recollect that deceased told Dr Lauder he had received a blow on the back of his head, or struck it against anything. On the second day he came to the surgery he seemed rather dull and heavy, but was able to answer questions put to him. - Frederick William Collingwood, surgeon in the navy, and on temporary duty in Keyham Yard, said he saw deceased on the 15th at the surgery. Witness asked him what he complained of, and he replied, "I am very seedy,"£ and complained of headache. He added that he had met with an accident in the Devonport upper yard two days before. He was then feverish with a pulse of 101 and he also complained of a very sore throat. Witness examined him, and on passing his hand over his head generally, deceased complained of a slight tenderness at the back and right side of the head. He there found a swelling about the size of half-a-crown, which he would not, perhaps have noticed if deceased had not complained of soreness. Witness then noticed that his pupils were contracted, though they reacted slightly to light. This symptom was consistent with his having had a blow, but this physical sign was not very marked. Witness sent deceased in a cab to the Hospital, accompanied by a surgery attendant, and gave to the attendant a report of his condition, which report was not put in evidence. The case, however, was not regarded as one requiring treatment at the Hospital. - The report, addressed to the Inspector-General Royal Naval Hospital, stated that the man was struck on the forehead by a peg of ballast while on duty on board the Pheasant at Devonport. "Presents himself at the surgery of Keyham Yard complaining of headache, of great thirst, with soreness of throat. Pupils contracted; they react slightly by light. Seems vacant and strange in his looks, and seems unable to grasp what is said to him. This patient resides in Warren-street, Morice Town." - The Coroner: Then you thought it a case for Hospital treatment, and as such you sent it there. It was treating your judgment rather cavalierly not to accept the case when you had made investigations and considered it one for Hospital treatment. - Witness replied that he thought the reason why the case was not admitted at the Hospital was because the authorities thought it would not be safe to do so knowing the man came from a neighbourhood in which diphtheria was prevalent. They thought the best place was to send him to his home rather than have a doubtful case which might infect the whole Hospital. There was another point which should not be overlooked. Dockyard cases were not entitled to Hospital treatment unless they were surgical cases. - The Coroner: If that man had been a rich and a private patient, don't you think you would have said to him, "Go home, sir, and go to bed; I will attend you there?" (Hear, hear, from the Jury.) - Witness (indignantly): I never make any distinction in the treatment of a rich and a poor man. You insinuate that I would have treated a rich man very differently from what I would a poor man. - The Coroner disclaimed any insinuation of the kind. With all the deference to the witness as a medical man he said that a man who could afford to pay had a better chance of regaining his health than a poor man. The Coroner added that he thought witness had done his duty, that he had made a careful examination of the man, and that the report was worthy of attention from the authorities. He was not misjudging the hospital authorities. He quite saw their point that diphtheria being prevalent in Morice Town, where the man resided, and the man having a sore throat, it might not be safe to admit him to the Hospital. - Mr Goldsmith (to witness): Was not the doctor at the Hospital superior in rank and experience to yourself? Witness: Yes. He is a man of superior rank to me. I cannot dispute his word. You well know that in large Government establishments people have to do as they are told. We have to act as our superiors direct us. - Mr Goldsmith: This gentleman at the Hospital receives the report from a junior surgeon, and he might say "I am not bound by his report." - The Coroner: I should have been much better satisfied if the doctor at the Hospital had examined the man's head. - Continuing, witness said as the man was not accepted at the Hospital he was bound to put him on the medical list, and in consequence a civil doctor attended him. Witness still continued to see the patient about twice a week to ascertain the progress of the case, and the wife reported to him daily. As the case progressed he was confirmed by Dr Hall - and any doubt which might have existed was dissipated - in his first opinion that it was a surgical case, and therefore injustice to the man and his wife witness applied to the Admiralty Secretary to have his case transferred from the medical to the surgical list. It then became his duty to see him and MRS COOK might have claimed his assistance. As MRS COOK was pleased with Dr Hall, witness assented, as a matter of courtesy, to his continuing the care of the case; but witness also saw the patient and supervised the case. He also saw Dr Hall in consultations upon the case when it began to assume a serious aspect. Witness went on to say that this was probably a very serious accident. Deceased was suffering from chronic rheumal condition, and it was quite possible that a man in sound health would not die from a blow such as deceased received; whereas a man who received a blow in the state of health he had described might die. He was certainly of opinion that deceased died from the effects of the blow at the back of the head. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he certainly believed the surgeon had carefully performed his duty and that he did everything that could be expected of him. He thought when a case was sub-judice it was bad practice for newspapers to put sensational headlines to their reports of proceedings, as it gave a sting to the rest. He had promised Dr Collingwood to make that explanation. He thought they could do no other than acquit the medical authorities of all blame in this case, and that a word of praise was due to Dr Collingwood for the care and attention he had shewn to the widow. He could only wish that such a man was permanently stationed there. The Jury would no doubt find that the man died from the effects of injuries he received on board her Majesty's ship Pheasant whilst in the execution of his duty. - A verdict in accordance with the Coroner's summing up was returned, the Foreman stating that the Jury exonerated Dr Collingwood from all blame and considered he had done everything in his power for the deceased and the widow.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 September 1888
ST MARYCHURCH - The Cliff Accident At Babbacombe. The Inquest. - Dr Fraser, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner for the district, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Roughwood Hotel, Babbacombe, concerning the death of MAJOR THOMAS DURELL POWELL BLAKE, aged 53, who was killed by falling over a cliff, a distance of 200 feet into Long Quarry, Wall's-Hill, near Torquay, under circumstances detailed in the Western Morning News of yesterday. - The Deputy Coroner alluded briefly to the terrible occurrence, adding that on the occasion of the last fall over the cliffs at Babbacombe, when a coastguard officer was killed, the Jury added to their verdict a rider recommending the fencing of all dangerous places of this description. - Dr R. Hamilton Ramsay, of Duncan House, Torquay, gave evidence of identification of the deceased, who, he said, had been staying with him for fifteen months for the benefit of his health, in which there had been an improvement. He had suffered from a mental affection which interfered with his bodily health, but he had never had any dangerous tendency, either suicidal or homicidal. On Thursday the deceased breakfasted with witness, and he was then very cheerful and was looking forward with great pleasure to an excursion on Dartmoor, which had been suggested by the visitor who saw him at regular intervals. The deceased afterwards went out alone for a walk as usual, leaving Duncan House shortly before eleven. His favourite walk was to Babbacombe Downs and back, and around Ilsham and the New Cut. Deceased had been in the West Kent Regiment and had travelled much abroad, but he had never had sunstroke. He was fond of scenery and would walk on the edge of a cliff and on being remonstrated with by witness on one occasion at Berry Head, he said it was of no consequence, as he never felt giddy. Deceased had a habit of talking to himself, but when spoken to he replied quite coherently. - Elijah Hearn, chief officer of the coastguard station, Babbacombe, stated that he was the last person who spoke to the deceased. He passed the time of day with him at quarter-past eleven near the entrance to Wall's-hill. Witness knew, from previous conversations that the deceased's mind was affected, but not to any extent. He had known the deceased to look over the cliffs. Long Quarry, where he fell over, was fenced with a couple of wires, but the lower wire was broken and the fencing was not sufficient to prevent children falling over. Since the death of Mr Samuel Dare, coastguard officer, the quarries around Babbacombe had been protected by fencing. - Francis Eales, quarryman, stated that there were four other men at work with him in Long Quarry on Thursday. At a quarter to twelve his attention was attracted by hearing stones falling, and on looking up he saw a body falling. After striking a ledge of rock 70 feet from the top, the body fell a further distance of 130 feet to the bottom of the quarry, the head first striking the ground. On going to the body, and finding it was that of a dead man, he sent for a policeman. - William Eales, quarryman, son of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence. He said the body of the deceased struck against the side of the cliff a third of the way down, and, bounding off, it fell to the bottom among a heap of stones. At the top of the cliff, about six inches from the edge, witness found a walking stick (produced) marked "D.B." The handle was outwards, towards the edge of the quarry, and this, together with the appearance of the edge itself, shewed that the deceased apparently slipped whilst standing on the top. - P.C. Symmons stated that in going to the scene of the accident he found the deceased lying on his stomach, with his left leg doubled up under him. He had the body conveyed to the Roughwood Hotel. Of the double-wire fencing at the edge of the cliff, the higher wire was 4 feet 2 inches from the ground, and intact, but the lower wire had been damaged and broken by sheep. The wire was 3/8ths of an inch thick, and the fence was from six or seven feet from the edge of the cliff. - Mr Samuel Horner Craig, surgeon, temporarily practising at Babbacombe, in the absence of Dr Steele, stated that he examined the body of the deceased at the Roughwood Hotel, at twenty minutes past one on Thursday. There were two wounds on the head but the skull was not fractured. The left leg was broken and the right eye blackened, and these, with other injuries, were sufficient to cause death, which resulted chiefly from the shock of the fall. - The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that, although the deceased was mentally affected, he had never shewn any dangerous tendencies, his habit of talking to himself being a very common one. The cliff over which he fell was properly protected in so far that it was fenced and with ordinary precaution persons ought not to fall over it. It was simply a question for the Jury to say whether it was a case of accidental death or otherwise. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", but added a recommendation that the present fencing was an insufficient protection and that it required to be made more substantial. The quarry in question is leased to Mr Hooper of Exmouth

Western Morning News, Monday 17 September 1888
LODDISWELL - Dr D. A. Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Loddiswell on Saturday on the body of a little boy named SAMUEL LUSCOMBE, son of MR S. LUSCOMBE, of Knap Mill. The unfortunate little fellow went with his mother to feed ducks. She suddenly missed him and his body was afterwards found in a mill pond near by. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 September 1888
PLYMSTOCK - The Fatality To An Officer At Fort Bovisand. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at Fort Bovisand relative to the death of LIEUTENANT ARTHUR WILLIAM EDMONDS, of the 6th Battery 1st Brigade Northern Division Royal Artillery, who was found shot dead on Sunday evening in his room at the fort. The deceased officer had been stationed at Fort Bovisand for rather more than nine months, and from his genial disposition was held in the highest esteem by both officers and men. He was born on the 8th March, 1866, and was, therefore, in his twenty-third year. He received his commission as lieutenant April 29th 1885. It will be remembered that he was a member of the recent court of inquiry into the fatal explosion of an Armstrong gun at Fort Bovisand when he shewed, from the part he took in it, that he was a young officer of considerable promise. His family reside in London, and his father arrived at Plymouth and proceeded to the Fort shortly after the Inquest closed. The family was represented at the Inquest by Mr R. R. Johns. Mr D. H. Brinsley was appointed Foreman of the Jury, and the first witness called was Major William Rowley, R.A., in command of the troops at Fort Bovisand who said that deceased was a lieutenant of the Royal Artillery, and had been in the battery since the 17th December last. Witness last saw him alive before going to church the previous day. Deceased took the church parade, and witness saw him going down to it. He returned from half-past twelve to a quarter to one o'clock. He then appeared cheerful and witness noticed nothing unusual in his demeanour. Witness came into the fort at seven o'clock in the evening and was informed of what had occurred. He went into the room of the deceased with the hospital orderly. They found the body lying at the left hand side of the bed just below the edge, and on the ground. There had been someone there before and the door had been locked, but nothing in the room was disturbed and there were no signs of any struggle. The revolver was found at the foot of the bed on the ground, 59 inches from the body. The weapon contained three discharged cartridges, and three chambers were empty. Deceased's pipe which had been recently filled and lit, was lying close by the side of his chest. - By the Foreman: There were no signs of discharged cartridges or bullet marks about the room. I cannot help thinking that deceased was under the impression that he had fired all the cartridges in the revolver, and was handling it as if it were an empty weapon. There were two blank chambers on either side and two discharged cartridges in the revolver. - Mr Johns asked whether deceased was depressed at any time? - Witness: He was one of those men you hardly ever see depressed; he was a particularly cheerful person. I have seldom seen him the least put out. - Gunner Joseph Handley Drake said he was deceased's servant. he last saw his master alive just before church parade on Sunday morning, and did not see him afterwards. Witness went into the deceased's room at twenty minutes to seven to light the lamp and prepare deceased's uniform for the mess. He found the door open, and deceased lying on his face on the floor beside the bed dead. Witness did not see the revolver, and went immediately and reported the discovery to the quartermaster-sergeant (Monteith). In company with witness he came upstairs to see the deceased. Finding that LIEUT. EDMONDS was dead, he closed the door and locked it, and sent an orderly to report the occurrence to Major Rowley, who sent for the doctor. Witness did not hear any shot fired during the afternoon. - By the Jury: Did not know at what time the deceased went to his room. Was certain that deceased laid on his face when found, but the body was moved by a gunner, who thought deceased was in a fit; this was before Major Rowley saw it. - Battery-Sergeant Major William White said he last saw deceased alive at a quarter-past ten on Sunday at church parade. He was called to see the deceased by Quarter-master Sergeant Monteith, who told him that Lieutenant EDMONDS had shot himself and witness sent orderlies for the commanding officer and medical officer at once. Witness went to deceased's quarters and found him lying on the floor partly doubled up, on his right side, with his head thrown back. - Major Rowley explained that deceased was turned over after he was first found to see whether he was alive. - Witness continued that he noticed no disturbance in the room, and the pipe was lying close to deceased's hand. His plain clothes were laid out on the table ready for him to put on and go to the town. On Friday evening last, between five and six, he saw Lieutenant EDMONDS practising with a revolver at a bottle in the sea. He was on the beach close to Bovisand Pier. When he had finished his practice, having fired only a very few rounds, he came up and spoke to witness, who was on the pier. He told witness that the revolver was out of order and asked him if he could tell him anyone who could mend it for him. He said the cleaning and safety rod was out of order. The thumb piece was up an eighth of an inch. It had an unusually long pull off, and it was jammed. He shewed witness the weapon, placing the muzzle against his left side to give leverage while he raised the hammer. Witness said that the ordnance artificers would have been over on Monday, and he would get the weapon repaired for him. Deceased said "All right." Witness then handed him the revolver and went away. The weapon was not in the same state now as it was when shewed to witness by the deceased. Deceased, he was told, had fired the revolver while bathing on Sunday afternoon. Deceased told him on Friday that he had had twelve miss fires out of fifty rounds. - The Jury examined the revolver minutely, and several of them expressed the opinion that the weapon was defective. - Battery Quartermaster-Sergeant Joseph Monteith was called, and in answer to a questions aid he saw deceased lying on his right side doubled up with his head thrown back. Witness was not the first person to enter the room. - Charles White, commission boatman in the coastguard stationed at Bovisand said that between half-past six and twenty-five minutes to seven the previous evening he heard a gunshot from the fort underneath him, but he could not see anyone about. Between five and ten minutes afterwards a man came out to say that an accident had occurred and that Lieutenant EDMONDS had shot himself. - Patrick Lane, another coastguardsman, said he saw deceased coming from church the previous day about half-past one. About three o'clock witness heard several shots fired on the beach, which he knew to be revolver shots. He inquired of a corporal, and was told that it was the deceased who was firing. - Private Michael Coyle, mess waiter, said that at a quarter-past four deceased was in the mess room, and asked for a cup of tea. Witness supplied him with it, placing it on a chair close to a sofa on which he was sitting. Deceased also asked for a sheet of note paper, which witness gave him and he wrote on it as he was lying on the couch. Deceased was dressed in flannels at the time, and appeared very cheerful. Witness did not see what became of the paper; he did not give witness any letter to post. - Major Rowley said there were no papers found on the deceased. - Witness continuing said that deceased told him that he did not want him until eight o'clock and witness then left the room. - The Coroner said this was very important evidence, as it shewed that deceased intended to return to dinner. - Drake, recalled, said his master, the deceased, did not give him a letter to post on Sunday, nor did he see any piece of note paper with pencil writing on it. - In the course of conversation it transpired that the clothing of the deceased had not been searched and some of the Jurors expressed the opinion that the Coroner's Officer should have followed the invariable practice in such cases. - Gunner Walter Balderstone said at twenty-five minutes to six on Sunday evening he was standing against the deceased's window and saw the deceased put his arm out of the door and give something to his dog, which he thought to be a biscuit. Witness went to his kitchen and had his tea and at five minutes to six he went to Major Rowley's quarters. At half-past six when he was in the kitchen Lieutenant EDMOND'S servant came down to Quartermaster-Sergeant Monteith and told him that his master was dead. Witness ran upstairs in front of Drake to Lieutenant EDMOND'S quarters and saw deceased lying by the side of the bed on his face. Witness went close and turned him over on his side to see if he were dead. Deceased was still warm. Witness saw some blood on deceased's flannel clothing, but did not see the revolver, and then came out and locked the door. - Surgeon Morgan said he was called to the Fort the previous evening, and as he did not know whether deceased was alive or dead he hurried over, arriving just before half-past seven. Deceased had apparently been dead about an hour. Witness examined the body and found a wound in front of the chest, the bullet having probably penetrated the chest. It was apparently a wound produced by a revolver shot, and fired so near the body as to char the flannel shirt and skin. There was also a hole through the flannel shirt. Witness probed the wound and found that it went in the direction of the heart, backwards, slightly upwards and outwards. In all probability the heart was wounded and the injury was such as would cause almost instantaneous death. To the best of witness's belief the wound was accidental. The bullet had not passed out of the body. Witness saw deceased on Saturday morning and, from having known him intimately before, he could say positively that he was in his usual state of mind. Deceased mentioned to him that he had been practising with a revolver lately, and pointed out a grain of powder embedded in his left thumb, remarking that the revolver was slightly out of order. He afterwards invited witness to practise shooting with the revolver with him, but witness did not accept his invitation. - By the Jury: Witness heard that letters had been sent to post by deceased on that day. He did not see any letters or writing about. The body had not been searched. - Several Jurors expressed a desire that the body of the deceased should be searched and P.C. Fleming was despatched by the Coroner to the deceased's quarters for that purpose. On returning the officer gave evidence to the effect that he found nothing on the deceased or in the room which would throw any light on the occurrence. - The Coroner, in briefly summing up, said that after the evidence they had heard in this very painful case they could have little hesitation in saying that the occurrence was accidental. He did not consider it necessary to put the other issue before them. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 September 1888
PLYMOUTH - As the result of an Inquiry held at Plymouth yesterday before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, into the cause of death of an infant child named JAMES LUCOCK, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. MATILDA LUCOCK, mother of the child, stated that the deceased slept with her and noticing yesterday morning that it was unwell she called in a neighbour and they bathed it in warm water. Mr Cumming, surgeon, was also sent for, but the child did not recover. Evidence given by Mr S. G. Moores, surgeon, shewed that the deceased was Accidentally Suffocated while in the bed.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 September 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - At St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury investigated the cause of death of ARTHUR JENNINGS, a child, 5 years old, who fell into a quarry on the previous day, and was taken up dead. In returning a verdict of "Accidental Death", the Jury, of whom Mr Goss was Foreman, expressed the opinion that the place from which the child fell over into the quarry was dangerous to life and should be fenced off.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 September 1888
JOHN SEARLE, a labourer, was employed in breaking stones outside the Plymouth cemetery yesterday, when Thomas Shepheard, another stonebreaker, heard him fall and ran to his assistance. SEARLE, however, was already dead. Later in the day Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the cemetery, when it was stated that the deceased, who was 68 years of age, left his home about seven o'clock in the morning in his usual health, Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, certified that death was due to syncope, and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Fatal Accident On A Railway. - The light railway belonging to the Marland Clay Company, which runs between Torrington and their works at Peter's Marland, was the scene of an accident on Thursday, which resulted in the death of JAMES HEFFER, who had been in the company's employ for many years. Deceased, with several others, was proceeding along the line on a trolley, when the mineral train came in an opposite direction. The engine driver turned off the steam, but the trolley was running down an incline and could not be stopped. The other men managed to jump off, but HEFFER was unable to do so, was thrown off, and fell over the viaduct along which the train was travelling, and was killed. An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon before Mr Bromham, Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased was 52 years of old, and a very steady workman.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 September 1888
TOPSHAM - The Supposed Suicide At Topsham. - On Saturday morning, at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, Mr Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ARTHUR BENJAMIN MITCHAM, which, as reported, was taken from the River Exe on Friday last. The evidence shewed that the deceased was about 17 years of age, the son of a labourer living in Trinity-street, Exeter, and that he had been employed as assistant-grocer at the Star Tea Company, Exeter. He left home on Monday morning and did not return. The father said he knew of nothing likely to trouble the deceased; he had been in his situation about three years. Charles Mottram, manager at the establishment where deceased was lately employed, said he discharged young MITCHAM on Monday morning last for dishonesty. He first discovered that the deceased was dishonest about three weeks ago, and he had met with deficiencies in his accounts since then. He had missed about 10s. a week since July last. When spoken to on the subject the deceased began to cry. Witness told him that he would do his best for him, and try to get him another place. - The Coroner: Did you ever find anything wrong before? - yes, about two and a half years ago; but his mother came to me with him and said it should never occur again. The deceased was very quiet and obliging, and of an excellent disposition. Witness was not sure whether deceased took away cash or goods. His cash always appeared right. - P.C. Leyman said he found nothing on the body. It was fully dressed with the exception of the hat. - Dr Bothwell said there were no marks of violence on the body. - Mr D. Wannell informed the Jury that the river was very deep at the place where the body was found; some of the pits were 7ft., others 14ft. deep. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 September 1888
NEWTON ABBOT - A Coroner's Jury at Newton yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of FREDERICK THOMAS STITSON, 5 ½ years of age, who on Saturday fell into the Stover Canal and was drowned. A rider was added recommending that police constables should be taught to restore persons in whom animation was suspended owing to immersion in water.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 September 1888
LYMPSTONE - The Fatality On The Exmouth Railway. - Yesterday afternoon Mr Cox, Coroner, held an Inquest at Lympstone touching the death of THOS. LITTON, 82, fisherman of that village. A daughter of the deceased said he was very deaf and could not see well. On Tuesday, according to the evidence of another witness, deceased was knocked down by the 2.45 train at Lympstone. The engine driver observed LITTON in the four-feet way and whistled three times. He also applied the brake, but could not stop the train before the buffer struck the deceased and knocked him off the line. There was a curve in the line about twenty yards from where the deceased was standing. The rain was going about fifteen miles an hour. Dr Barton said death was due to shock. Three ribs were broken, and the face was contused. The Jury found that death was Accidental, but added a rider to the effect that the whistle should be blown at the curve in question.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 October 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, before Mr Coroner Brian, on the body of JOHN BENNETT, aged 45 years, who was found dead in Sutton Pool on Thursday night, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr J. Bickle was Foreman of the Jury. The Jury expressed an opinion that the Quay was greatly in need of better lighting.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 October 1888
PLYMOUTH - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at the Albert Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday before Mr Brian, Coroner, touching the death of CLARA KING, aged eight months. Louisa Hannaford stated that she had had the nursing of the child, and she had fed it on soaked bread, milk and Dr Ridge's food. It died on Monday morning. Mr F. Pullen, surgeon, said the cause of death was congestion of the lungs. He condemned the system of feeding that had been adopted.

PLYMOUTH - A Coroner's Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Guildhall yesterday by Mr Brian concerning the death of HENRY TUCKER, aged about 35 years, who was found drowned yesterday morning. On Monday afternoon the deceased went ashore from the Sea Belle, a Brixham trawler, in company with another fisherman named William Preston. They were together all the evening and returned about midnight. After getting on board the deceased was observed to be sitting on the gunwale aft, his head resting on his hand, as if he were in deep thought. Next morning he was missing. James Lambridge, a fisherman, assisted the skipper in dragging the harbour, and they found the body of the deceased a short distance south of the ship. P.C. Venton took charge of the body and had it conveyed to the Guildhall mortuary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and expressed their sympathy with the widow and family of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 October 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, Inquired yesterday into the cause of death of an infant 13 months old, the daughter of P.C. AVERY. The child had convulsions, caused by teething, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 October 1888
MODBURY - At Davis's Hotel, Modbury, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, investigated the circumstances attending the death of JOHN ROBERTS, carpenter, aged 57. Mr George Tiddy, who was with deceased on the scaffold, at Ermington Church, said deceased tripped in a stool and fell over. The scaffold was a substantial one, three to four feet wide. The foreman of the works said deceased was a well-conducted man, always found at his post. Mr W. F. Langworthy, surgeon, deposed that death resulted from compression of the brain. The Jury of whom Mr E. W. Bickford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that no one was to blame. The Coroner remarked that he had visited the church that morning, and could confirm all that had been said as to the substantial character of the scaffold. he had also received a letter from the vicar, the Rev. E. Pinnill, in which he said he visited the works every day, and could testify to the admirable arrangements made by the contractor.

STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Death At Morice Town. Sad Result Of Hard Drinking. - An Inquiry was held last evening by Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of MARY ANN ROACH, 53, found dead in her room at 18 Garden-street, Morice Town, on Saturday evening. Mr Akaster, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the relatives of the deceased. - JOHN ROACH, the husband, said he had been married 19 years, and had two children. He last saw his wife alive at home at six o'clock on Friday evening. He left the house for a short time, and came back about half-past seven to take her to church, but found the door of her room locked. He went to church, but did not find her there. He returned to the house about eight o'clock and found the door still locked. he called to his wife but could get no answer. - The Coroner: What objection was there to break into your own room? - Witness: I did not like to disturb the neighbours. - The Coroner: It might have been easily forced open without disturbing the neighbours. - Continuing, witness said at 11 o'clock he took lodgings for the night. - The Coroner: Had deceased locked herself in before? - Witness: Once or twice. - The Coroner: Did you not think it your duty to go into the room. - Witness admitted that he ought to have done so. He went there again at half-past six the next morning and found the door still fastened. At half-past five on Saturday evening he caused the door to be opened and found his wife sitting on the floor. He put his hands to her face and discovered that she was dead. His wife and he had never had any quarrel. - By a Juryman: The deceased was a temperate woman. - The coroner: Did not she take a little too much at times? - Witness (hesitatingly): She took a little too much now and then. - Samuel Rogers said between seven and eight on Thursday evening deceased asked his wife to go to the church with him to get a paper signed. She appeared in good health, and made no complaint. On Saturday afternoon, when he returned from his work, his wife mentioned to him that MR ROACH had been unable to get into his room and she thought his wife was in the room. Witness corroborated MR ROACH'S statement as to the forcing of the door, and the position in which deceased was found. - Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, said he found deceased on the floor with her right leg doubled up beneath her and her left leg extended behind her. The right side of her neck and face was resting against the sharp edge of the mattress, and the palms of both hands appeared to be pushing against the side of the mattress. He thought she had been dead at least twenty-four hours. He had made a post-mortem examination, and found on the right eye a severe bruise three or four days old, and a scratch two inches long on the back of the left hand, apparently from about the same time. He found evidence of pleurisy and old consumption. The heart was small and fatty, the kidneys and liver were very extensively diseased, and bore indications that she had drunk to excess. He attributed death to failure of the heart's action and acute congestion of the bowels. - The husband, recalled, said that his wife's blackened eye was caused by her falling against a table two or three days before her death. - The Coroner said this was one of those unfortunate cases where a woman shortened her days by taking intoxicants to excess. He wished the case could be a warning to those who took too much. The Jury found that deceased "Died from Natural Causes, accelerated by Drinking Habits."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 October 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth yesterday, before Mr T. C. Brian, touching the death of WM. HENRY GORMAN, aged one year and eight months, resulted in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." From the evidence of the mother it appeared that the child had suffered from teething and other infantile complaints and it was the opinion of Mr A. H. Rees, surgeon, that the child had become weak and died from syncope.

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 October 1888
COTLEIGH - A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned by a Coroner's Jury at Cotleigh, near Honiton, on Monday, at an Inquiry into the cause of death of MR HENRY WRIGHT VENN, a gentleman who had committed suicide by hanging himself on Sunday. He left the house on Sunday and did not return, and on a search being made he was found hanging to a beam in a linhay near the farmhouse.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 October 1888
PLYMOUTH - At the Robin Hood Inn, Plymouth, last evening Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, Inquired into the cause of death of JAMES ARTHUR MARTIN ROUND, aged 3 months, which was found dead by its mother's side on Tuesday morning. The Jury, of whom Mr Eddy was Foreman, adopted the view of Mr J. S. May, surgeon, who, as the result of a post-mortem examination, said the child's death was due to Suffocation.

IPSWICH, SUFFOLK - A Plymouth Lady Found Drowned. - The death of a Plymouth young lady, MISS MARIAN SHEARME, occurred near Ipswich last week under mysterious circumstances. MISS SHEARME had for about eighteen months been staying with her cousin, Mr Packard, at Crane Hall, near Ipswich, and appeared to be very comfortable and happy. On Sunday week she left the house after tea, and was not seen afterwards until her body was found in a pond in Chantry Park, about a mile from Crane Hall. At the Inquest on the body evidence was given shewing that deceased always possessed a cheerful disposition. As far as could be ascertained, she had no cause for taking her life. - Mr Packard explained that deceased was twenty-seven years of age. On the Sunday morning she was in her usual good health and spirits, and accompanied witness and his wife to Sproughton Church. During the afternoon she left the house unobserved and as she had not returned at 8.30 a search was made for her. This was continued during most of the night, but it was not until daylight the next morning that the body was found floating in a pond in Chantry Park. She had no bonnet or hat on at the time. - Cross-examined: Witness stated that as far as could be observed deceased had no cause for depression of spirits. - Hannah Aitkins, housemaid at Mr Packard's, also stated that MISS SHEARM appeared quite well on the Sunday afternoon and did not seem in the least depressed. - Mrs Packard stated that deceased was a very high-spirited girl, and on the Sunday afternoon joined in some joking remarks. She had no pecuniary embarrassment and was very comfortable at home. She once said during conversation that she was subject to periods of depressed spirits, but had not experienced any of these feelings during her stay with witness. She evidently had not contemplated suicide from the fact that she had made many prospective engagements. Deceased frequently wrote letters in her room on Sunday evenings, and, therefore, her absence from the house did not excite suspicion at first. - Mr G. S. Elliston, surgeon, who examined the body, could not suggest any cause for deceased taking her life. There was not the least reason for this so far as her health was concerned. - The Coroner, in summing up, suggested, in the absence o any evidence shewing motive for self-destruction, that the Jury should return an open verdict. - The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was Found Drowned, but that there is not sufficient evidence to shew how the body came in the water." - The Foreman (Mr J. A. Haskell) added an expression of the Jury's great sympathy with Mr and Mrs Packard, the sister and members of the family, and the household generally, in the great trouble that had come upon them.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 October 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident On Board The Lion. Gallant Conduct Of Boys. - A fatal accident occurred on board the Lion, training ship for boys, Commander Morrison, in the Hamoaze, about half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. In consequence of the storm a signal was made from the flagship, Royal Adelaide, for all vessels in harbour to strike top-gallantmasts and yards. To do this on board the Lion, WILLIAM MATSON, aged 35, captain of the foretop, first class petty officer and boys' instructor, went aloft to unreeve the running gear. In coming down over the futtock rigging from the top he missed his hold and fell on to the ridge rope, then to the hammock netting, and into the water. John Pepperell, a boy, who was on the swinging boom, immediately jumped in and secured the deceased, and Thomas Hindley also plunged in and assisted in holding him up until the arrival of a boat. MATSON was brought on board in an unconscious condition and taken to the sickbay, where artificial respiration was resorted to, but without avail, the unfortunate man dying at half-past four. Staff-Surgeon C. W. Magrane and Surgeon Morley, of the Lion, found that deceased had sustained terrible injuries in his fall. There were two scalp wounds, each about five inches long, severe bodily injuries and a very bad compound fracture of the left leg. Yesterday morning the body was conveyed to the mortuary of the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse and in the afternoon Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest, the witnesses called being Mr James Wilson, boatswain, and Mr E. J. Morley, surgeon, of the Lion. - The Coroner said the courageous conduct of Pepperell and Hindley was deserving of great praise and suggested that it should be brought before the Admiralty, so that they might reap the benefit in the future. The Jury, of whom Mr James Taylor, was Foreman, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," heartily endorsed the Coroner's remarks. - Mr Jameson, from the office of Messrs. Venning and Goldsmith, solicitors to the Admiralty, said the Admiralty should be informed of the conduct of Pepperell and Hindley.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 November 1888
EXETER - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned at an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday afternoon concerning the death of WILLIAM RICHARDS, carpenter, of Stoke Canon, whose body was found in the River Exe on the previous day. The evidence shewed that the deceased was 56 years of age and married, but that he had for some time lived apart from his wife. He had not had much work lately, and had often been ill. He was last seen alive on Wednesday night, the 24th, outside the Papermarkers' Arms in Exe-street.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 November 1888
PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr Coroner Brian at Plymouth yesterday into the cause of death of the illegitimate child of JANE GOGGIN, of 20 Rendle-street. The child was six weeks old, and had been healthy since birth. Early yesterday morning the mother found it dead and gave information to P.C. Wyatt. Mr W. A. Buchan, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination, and found that death was due to convulsions. Mr W. Rowe was Foreman of the Jury, and Inspector H. Hill watched the case on behalf of the police.

Western Morning News, Saturday 3 November 1888
PLYMSTOCK - The Fatal Shooting Accident Near Bovisand. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquiry at Staddiscombe Court farm yesterday concerning the death of SYDNEY HINE, aged 16, who was shot near Bovisand on Wednesday. The lad formed a party of four who went out to shoot rabbits. Whilst three of the number were watching for a rabbit in a field, Mr G. Roseveare fired from the other side of the hedge, about twelve feet distant, and the charge, which apparently "scattered," struck Messrs. R. Durant, G. HINE, and SYDNEY HINE, in the face and head. A cart was obtained and young HINE was conveyed to his home at Staddiscombe Court farm, where he died about eleven o'clock on the same evening. Mr Pearce, of Langdon farm, was Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner said the circumstances of the case were sadly distressing, and the father of the boy was so prostrated as to be unable to come before them. He therefore proposed to take evidence of identification from Dr Jacob. - Dr J. B. Jacob then stated that he met the boy being conveyed home in a cart from Bovisand and at once saw there was no hope of recovery. The direct cause of death was compression of the brain, brought about by the shots having penetrated the brain. The shots had pierced the eyes, one of which had protruded owing to the force of the blood. - Dr Jacob, who also attended MR G. HINE, of Mount Batten, one of the injured men, and uncle to the deceased, said it was impossible for MR HINE to attend, although he was out of danger. - The Coroner, who said the evidence of this witness was important, adjourned the Inquest until Monday, the 12th inst., at the Church House Inn, Plymstock, at three o'clock in the afternoon. - Before adjourning the Jury passed a vote of condolence with the family in their sad bereavement, which the Coroner conveyed to the relatives. - The accident occurred near the residence of Mr Rodney, of Bovisand Lodge, who rendered valuable service by supplying bandages and restoratives.

PLYMOUTH - A Recent Death At Plymouth. Allegations Of Tardiness. - On the morning of October 15th a man was found dead on Plymouth Hoe, nearly in front of the Grand Hotel. during the day a post-mortem examination of the body was made by Mr George Jackson, and in the evening an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by drink and exposure." The Newark Herald of Saturday (October 27th) publishes an identification of the deceased, and throws blame upon the Plymouth authorities. It heads a long article, "Mysterious Disappearance from Balderton - Death of the Hospital Dispenser," and states that the disappearance of MR HENRY MELHUISH, dispenser at New Balderton, had caused considerable consternation in that town and district. He had been known in the neighbourhood for several years, formerly as an assistant to two chemist firms, in the town, and for the past few months as dispenser at the Hospital. "He was a Northumberland man, of a generous disposition, fond of company and easily controlled." He has left a widow, who for a week after his disappearance was ignorant of where he had gone. Some friends interested themselves in her case and made inquiries. Why he left Newark was not discovered; but it was ascertained that on October 13th he had visited two or three public-houses with some of his companions. In the evening he let them, went to the Great Northern Railway Station, arrived there about an hour before the midnight train for London was due and by that train proceeded to the King's-Cross Station. Why he left London for Plymouth was not apparent, and it was not known that he had any friends there. The police at Plymouth, the paper says, appeared to have taken very little trouble in endeavouring to identify the body, and it was not until late on Friday evening, October the 19th, that they telegraphed to Mr Rawson, one of the parties enquiring, as to whether he had obtained any information respecting the missing man. Mr Rawson had made MELHUISH'S acquaintance at the dispensary and the deceased had lent him a book, which was the cause of Rawson's address being found on the body. The paper adds, "It is an extraordinary thing that the police at Plymouth should have allowed so many days to transpire before trying to obtain tidings of the deceased, and five days to elapse before they attempted to identify the deceased. " Mr Rawson, who was at Nottingham when communicated with, visited Newark the following day with the information. The neckerchief found on the body, marked "J. A. Page,"£ was from the stock of Mr Page, hosier, of Newark, and the handkerchief marked "Oliver" was from the stock of Mr Joseph Oliver, also of Newark. MRS MELHUISH has since identified other articles of clothing found on the body.

ST. MARYCHURCH - Mysterious Drowning Case Near Torquay. - Yesterday afternoon Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, concerning the death of JOHN AMERY, aged 65, market gardener, late of Paignton, whose body was found floating in the sea off Babbacombe, near Torquay, on the previous afternoon. - P.C. Pope, of Paignton, identified the body. He said he had known the deceased three years. He formerly kept a grocer's shop, but on the death of his wife, five months ago, he gave it up, and had since lodged in Winner-street. he was missed on Friday, October 26th. He saw the deceased two days previously, when he noticed nothing unusual in his manner. - Francis Morrish, farmer, of Blagdon, a relative of the deceased, said he saw him on the same day as the constable. He had been depressed since the death of his wife, and he was rather strange in his manner. He had mentioned that, in the event of his being missed, they were to send to Clayhidon, North Devon, his native place. Deceased had received £5 in October from some friends in London towards the maintenance of his nephew, who is of weak intellect, and of whom he had charge. The deceased had been drinking rather freely of late. - Jonathan Thomas, mason, deposed to finding the body of the deceased between Babbacombe and Teignmouth on Thursday afternoon. With the exception of a pair of stockings, the body was naked. He took it into his boat, conveyed it ashore, and handed it over to the custody of P.C. Elliott, who took it to the Royal Hotel. Dr J. R. Richardson, who had examined the body, said it presented the appearance of a person who had come to his death by drowning. - A question was asked by a Juryman of one of the witnesses (P.C. Pope) as to whether a boat had not lately been missed from Paignton, and he gave an affirmative reply, but added that he was not in a position to give further information on the subject. - The Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Thursday to allow of further inquiries being made.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 November 1888
KENTON - The cause of death, at Starcross, of a widow lady named RADCLIFFE, was the subject of investigation on Saturday evening before Mr Gould, the Deputy Coroner. It transpired in evidence that the deceased had swallowed a quantity of carbolic acid, and the Jury, while finding that this was the cause of death, were unable to determine whether the poison was accidentally or intentionally taken. Deceased's brother, who was present at the Inquest, stated that he knew of nothing that should have led her to commit suicide. She was in receipt of a fair income and always seemed to be cheerful.

STOKE DAMEREL - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Devonport on Saturday touching the death of ELLEN BERRY, a widow, 62 years of age, of 122 Alexandra-road, Ford. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who had been in delicate health for the past eighteen months, had lost £200 by the bankruptcy of Mr Hutchings about twelve months ago, and had since then been in low spirits. There was nothing in her condition, however, that excited alarm until Friday morning, when her daughter found her cold and evidently in pain. She sent for a doctor, but the deceased died before he arrived. Mr G. F. Rolston, surgeon, who had attended the deceased, having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 November 1888
PLYMOUTH - A singular case of sudden death was investigated at the Plymouth Guildhall before Mr Coroner Brian yesterday. The deceased, SAMUEL BIRD, 58 years of age, lodged at 9 Lansdown-place, Plymouth. On Saturday morning he took a cold bath and at night he came home late from his club. On Sunday morning he complained, while in bed, of pain in his right side. Some tea was given him, and it was thought he went to sleep, but at 11.30 his landlady found that he had died. Dr W. H. Pearse stated that on examination he found in the deceased remains of former pleurisy of the left lung. The right valves of the heart were diseased and there was some amount of fatty degeneration, which would have at times impeded the action of the heart. The liver was much enlarged. The disease was a long standing one, and had doubtless been made fatal by the cold bath. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 November 1888
ST MARYCHURCH - The Mysterious Drowning Case Near Torquay. - At the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, last evening, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, resumed the Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of JOHN AMERY, 65, late a market gardener of Paignton, whose body was found in the sea between Babbacombe and Teignmouth on Thursday week. Additional evidence was adduced. Mrs Sherwill, Winner-street, Paignton, with whom deceased lodged for the last five months, since the death of his wife, spoke of his doings up to a day or two within the time of his mysterious disappearance on Friday, October 26th, and P.C. Pope deposed to finding a portion of the deceased's clothing under Roundham Head below high water mark. This was stated to be the deceased's favourite bathing place by Mrs Morrish, who added that he was in great trouble at the time of his wife's death, when he gave her an address to which he said she was to send in the event of his being missing. Dr Richardson stated the result of his post-mortem examination, which contained nothing material, and Mr J. Taylor, chemist, who had analysed the contents of the stomach, said he found it to be salt water, with no indication of poison. concerning the boat that was cut adrift from its moorings in Paignton harbour, it was shewn that it had no connection with the mysterious disappearance of the deceased. The Jury found a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 November 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at Devonport, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the sudden death of ELIZABETH YEO, aged 71. Deceased lived with her daughter, Mrs Fowell, at 16 William-street, and on Thursday she fell down suddenly in her room and died before medical assistance could be obtained. Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, stated that deceased had suffered from heart disease and a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 November 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Drowning Of A Seaman At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Ferry Hotel, Morice Town, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD COOK, late of the Plucky, tender to the Cambridge, whose body was found floating in Hamoaze yesterday morning. Mr J. Herbert Jameson attended on behalf of Mr J. J. E. Venning, Admiralty law agent. - William Branch, gunner on board the Plucky, said the deceased called for duty at four o'clock on the morning of the 31st October, came on deck and relieved the quartermaster of the middle watch. At quarter to six witness found the galley fire out and other indications that deceased was not on deck. Witness immediately turned out all hands and had the ship searched without result. The commanding officer of the Cambridge, on receiving the report that deceased was missing, immediately sent down divers, who dived for two days, but without success. Deceased was in good health, but rather of a morose disposition, never speaking to anyone unless spoken to. - James Henry Bunker, able seaman of the Cambridge, said he was on duty on board the Plucky on the morning of the 31st October, acting as quartermaster of the middle watch. When he was relieved by deceased, whom he "roused" out of his hammock, he seemed fit for duty, and spoke pleasantly. He did not appear to have had anything on his mind. He was a very sober and quiet man. He had been in bed six or seven hours when witness relieved him. - Hubert Moiest, gunnery instructor of the Lion, said about half-past eight that morning he found the body floating up the harbour. - Charles Hamlyn, signalman, of the Cambridge, ship-mate of the deceased for three years, identified the body. On the body was the night clothing which deceased would have had on when he went on duty. His features were past identification. Witness knew of no cause why he should jump overboard. it was possible that deceased might have been drawing water from the sea, or that he might have been sitting on the gunwale, and have fallen over by accident. - P.C. Horn, of the borough Police, who received the body, desired to acknowledge the kind assistance he received from Inspector James, Sergeant Kavanagh, and other members of the Metropolitan Police in recovering the body. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Armstrong was Foreman, found a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 November 1888
UFFCULME - Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner held Inquests in the Culm Valley yesterday relative to the death of two men who have been drowned in the River Culm - one at Uffculme and the other at Hemyock. The subject of the first Inquiry was JAMES REDWOOD, basket-maker of Wellington, Somerset. He was seen on his rounds on the previous Wednesday, and it was noticed that he had been drinking. At eleven o'clock in the night he was, with his horse and cart, at Uffculme, and conversed with some men; a listener overheard one of the men remark, "I'll give you Jack the Ripper,' but this was considered to be merely chaff. Afterwards the deceased was missed, and on Saturday his body was recovered from the Culm. The stream was in a big flood. It was surmised that the deceased missed his way, and getting upon a dangerous road had driven into the river. An Open Verdict was returned; and the Jury suggested that the attention of the waywardens should be directed to the state of the road.

HEMYOCK - The Inquiry at Hemyock had reference to the death of WILLIAM HOOPER, farm labourer. On Thursday night (which was stormy) deceased left Culmstock to go home; he was missed; and after a search his body was found in the water on Saturday morning. He was noticed to have been drinking on Thursday, but it was stated he was able to take care of himself. It was considered that he took a short cut to Combe Davey which would have necessitated his crossing the river by a small bridge. his neck was broken when the body was found. The verdict was "Accidental Death By Drowning." The Coroner commented in each case upon the lamentable fact that the deceased had been drinking before meeting with his death.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 November 1888
PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was made by the Plymouth Borough Coroner last evening into the cause of death of JOHN ALEXANDER LE GRASS, the four year old son of a quay porter, living at 21 Lower-street. Deceased, who had been delicate from birth, suffered from a cold, and died on the previous morning in a fit of coughing. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TOTNES - The Fatal Accident To A Child At Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Dartmouth Inn, Totnes, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, and a Jury, on the body of ARUNDEL PINHEY WOOD, aged 5 years, who was killed on Tuesday afternoon by being run over by a truck near the Totnes quay, as already reported. - Mr Higginson, of the Great Western Railway, Totnes Station, and Inspector Hockaday, watched the proceedings on behalf of the company. - Elizabeth Brown identified the body, and stated that the father and mother of the deceased were ill and unable to attend. - Susan Farley, a little girl, 9 years of age, said she was playing with the deceased near Mr Holman's store. Some trucks were on the tramway, and deceased tried to pass under them, but they moved directly he got under them. Witness told him, on seeing the trucks move, to lie down, but he tried to get out, and the wheel of one of the trucks knocked him down, and both wheels passed over his chest. Before the trucks were moved, Mr Blight, who had charge of the horses, called to the children to get out of the way. As the truck went over deceased she called out "murder." William Farley, father of the last witness, said he saw Mr Blight come down with his horses and hook them on to three of the trucks. Mr Blight before starting the horse said, "Look there, you boys, out of the way." As the trucks started he heard his daughter call out, and he saw the deceased lying on his back across the tram rails quite dead. - David Blight, who works for his father, a hauler, stated that before starting the trucks he called out to the children to get out of the way. There were about a score of children there after apples, which were being unloaded at the stores. When he saw the children go back from the first truck he thought they were all clear. - Dr Raby said he considered death was caused by the walls of the chest being crushed, and internal rupture. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 November 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest held at Plymouth yesterday, before Mr Brian, into the cause of the death of GEO. EDWARD MITCHELL, aged 16 months, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death". It appeared from the evidence of the child's mother, that she let a can of soup on the kitchen table, near which was a chair. The child was in the room, but the witness thought he could not reach the soup. She left the room, and on returning, found deceased screaming on the floor. The soup had been upset and the child's neck and chest were badly scalded. Deceased was taken to the South Devon Hospital and the burns were dressed, but he died soon after returning home. Sympathy was expressed with the mother.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 November 1888
SHALDON - The Supposed Suicide At Shaldon. The Inquest: Singular Evidence. - Yesterday afternoon Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Shipwright's Arms, Shaldon, into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL WALKER ATHERSTONE, aged 59 , a widower, and a man of independent means, residing at Hill View, Ringmore, Shaldon, near Teignmouth, who was found dead at his house on the previous day, having come to his death by a gun-shot wound. General Lambert was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - ELIZA ATHERSTONE, aged 21, eldest daughter of the deceased, stated that she had two younger sisters and a brother, and they lived together in the house. They had no servant. They formerly lived at Topsham, and had been residing in Shaldon three or four years. Her father had his breakfast in bed on Monday morning, about ten o'clock. She took him up a cup of milk, which he said he would have, and which he drank. He appeared to be in his usual health. She afterwards saw him sitting in the bed, partly dressed, with his trousers, socks and shirt on, but no collar. Subsequently, whilst she was in her sister's bedroom, she heard the report of a gun in the kitchen. She did not then know that her father had left his bedroom, but on hearing the report, she at once went down to the kitchen, followed by one of her sisters. In the corner she saw the deceased lying face downwards, with the gun by his side, resting partly against his body and partly against a pail. She touched the body and saw her father was quite dead. She also saw a wound in what she thought was the back of the head. Her father was dressed in his trousers, vest and socks, and he had no coat on. After discovering the body she went upstairs and told her sister of what had happened. She also went out and called her brother in from the front garden. The next thing they did was to clear away the breakfast things and tidy up the kitchen and they left the deceased lying where he was and never touched him. They tidied up the kitchen. - The Coroner: What made you do that? - Because it was in an untidy state. - Was there much blood about the kitchen? - There was no blood about the kitchen, except where his head lay. - Did you touch that? - No; I never touched that. - What do you mean, then, by tidying up? - Simply washing and cleaning up the plates and cups and things we had used in the kitchen. - Were your brother and sisters helping you in the kitchen? - Yes. - Well, after that, what did you do? - We went to the Orsmans', who lived near the church. - What did you go there for? - To ask for their advice what to do. - Who lives next door to you? - Mr Pengelly and Mr Seymour. I left my two sisters in the house whilst I went to Mr Orsman's . - After you had seen the Orsman's what did you do? - What do you mean? - Did you stay there? - Only whilst they told us what was the best to do. Then Dr Corbould came. - Did you sent for him? - No; the Orsman's did. - Did any of you lift the deceased or change the position of the body before Dr Corbould came? - No. - Where was your father the night before his death? - He remained in his bedroom the greater part of the evening. - Did he suffer from any ailment? - Not that I know of. - What was his profession or occupation? - Since he has been in Shaldon he has had no occupation whatever. I think he was formerly a clerk in connection with the Coal Exchange in London. - How did he occupy his time here? - I can't tell you; he occupied it in various ways. He was very fond of fishing and shooting. I don't know that there was anything the matter with him, physically or mentally. - At this stage the gun with which the deceased was shot was produced. It is a double-barrelled weapon, with the barrels cut off short. Witness identified the gun as her father's, and said it was kept in the corner of the kitchen. Some of the cartridges were kept in the kitchen, some in the parlour, some in the deceased's bedroom, and others in the lumber-room, in fact generally about the place. - The Coroner: Can you tell the Jury anything which might enable them to form an opinion as to how the wound was inflicted? - No. - The Foreman: When you cleaned up the kitchen did you put away the gun? - No. - Who put it away then? - I can't say for certain. - By a Juror: The doctor was not sent for until after the kitchen had been cleaned up and she had gone to the Orsmans. Her father had complained of not feeling quite so strong, but the day before his death his appetite was very good. - The Coroner: Do you know anything about your father's money matters? - I know his income was either £250 a year or under £250. - Was your father in any difficulty as to money matters? - Not that I know of. - Were the bills all paid? - that I don't know. - HARRY FARMER ATHERSTONE, aged about nineteen, son of the deceased, of no occupation, said his father was in bed the best part of Sunday. He complained of being weak. He went over to the Teignmouth Constitutional Club early in October, and he never seemed to have been right since. He was weak bodily, but witness did not perceive any mental weakness in him. On Monday morning after breakfast, witness was out in the front garden, and he had just finished tying up some chrysanthemums when his sister called him and told him that his father had shot himself. This was from twelve o'clock to half-past. He then went into the kitchen and saw the body in the corner. All the inside of the head was blown out. His sister tidied up the kitchen and it was about one o'clock when they went to Orsmans. - The Coroner: What made you do that? - We didn't know where to go else; I knew them and Mr Orsman sent me down for Dr Corbould. My father used to keep the gun in the corner where his body was lying. I examined the gun afterwards and found an empty cartridge in the right-hand barrel. There was no cartridge in the other barrel. - Have you looked to see if your father left any note? - I have hunted the place all over to see if he has left a note, and I can't find any. - Was he in monetary difficulties? - I don't know anything about his money matters. - Did your father indulge at all in drink? - He used to have it, you know. - What used he to drink? - Well, he has been drinking brandy mostly lately. - The Foreman: Heavily? - I cannot tell how much he drank. - The Coroner: Was he affected by it in any way? - Not that I could perceive. - How long had he been in the habit of drinking brandy? - Oh, for a long, long time. - Have you any reason to suppose that he had any thought of doing harm to himself? - No, I never once dreamed of it. He always seemed right when I spoke to him, and when he came down on Sunday evening he seemed a little bit lively. - Has he ever said anything which would lead you to suppose that he meant to hurt himself? - No, he never said a word. Last Wednesday I fired off the gun, and left the barrels perfectly empty. - The Foreman: Have you any idea why he should harm himself? - Not the slightest. - Mr Henry Francis Corbould, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased at twenty-five minutes past one on the previous day. He went at once and found him lying in the corner of the kitchen in the position described. He made a cursory examination, and found that the deceased's head was fearfully mangled by the explosion of the shot. The gun had been apparently placed under his chin, and the shot took away the left side of the face and skull-cap. From the way in which the head was mangled he presumed that the deceased held the gun under his chin, pulled the trigger with his thumb and then fell forward, all the appearances being consistent with such an explanation. The walls and ceiling were bespattered with blood and particles of brain. There could be little doubt that the wound was self-inflicted; no one else could have fired the gun in that position. Death must have been instantaneous. It would be impossible for him to say how long the deceased had been dead when he was called, but death had taken place quite recently. It appeared, however, that there was some delay before he (witness) was sent for. - A Juror: Do you think the gun had slipped off the table? - I think it was hardly possible. - Henry Stiles, gardener, deposed to seeing the deceased and passing him on the embankment at twenty minutes to eight on Monday morning. He was sure it was the deceased, but he was not near enough to speak to him. - Frederick Woodfin, a youth, in the employ as gardener and groom of Mr Seymour, of Bellevue, next door to the house of the deceased, said he heard the report of a gun between a quarter and twenty minutes to eleven while he was in the garden, and a minute or two afterwards MISS ATHERSTONE came out and called to her brother. - Mr Thomas Longcroft, an elderly gentleman, residing at Topsham, said he had known the deceased forty years. He last saw him six or seven weeks ago. His health was very good and his habits were singularly retired. He did not think he drank much. He might at times have taken more than was good for him, but he was by no means a drunkard. He (deceased) retired from the Corporation of London, where he held a very onerous position on a pension. He (witness) had inquired that morning as to his financial affairs, and he did not find that he was embarrassed at all. It appeared rather that he had money coming to him, which he might have drawn. - The Coroner: On what terms did the deceased live with his family? - Well, they lived very retired, but very happily. The children were very affectionate, and the father was very fond of them. He used to amuse himself with shooting. He was very clever as an amateur with guns, and I have often said to him, "You must be careful what you are about, as amateurs are very often likely to come to grief it they don't mind what they are doing?" In disposition the deceased was quiet, but cheerful. - The Foreman: Why did he retire from his appointment? - Witness: There was some alteration made in the Corporation. - It was not owing to failing powers? - No; I should say not. His office was amalgamated with another, and he was offered a retiring pension. - The Coroner: Have you any idea that he was likely to commit suicide? - From what I have seen of him for many years I should not have supposed he would have done so. He was a man of fair mind, and never took up any crochets. I know he was a little anxious about his children and their future. - You don't know of any other subject of anxiety or trouble? - Certainly not, and I know the source from which his income came, and that it was certain. - A Juror: Was there a will left? - yes, he has left a will, appointing MISS ATHERSTONE his executrix, and also a gentleman in London, a former colleague - Mr William Wright - executor. The will was drawn in London, and was handed to me by MISS ATHERSTONE. - At this stage the Coroner asked MISS ATHERSTONE and her brother to leave the room, which they did. - Continuing his question to Mr Longcroft, the Coroner asked him: Do you know anything about the deceased's children? Are they weak-minded? - Witness: A few years ago, when the son was a boy of 13, he had a very heavy fall on his head, and for some years he could not continue his studies to the satisfaction of his schoolmaster, and I don't think he has thoroughly outgrown it now. He is not so sharp as some young fellows. - And the daughter? - I think she has better abilities than most young people. - Who benefits under the will? - The children equally. I returned the will to MISS ATHERSTONE, as the proper holder of it. - A Juror: Did the son or daughter tell you that their father had been for a walk early yesterday morning? - No, they did not tell me, because they did not know. - The Coroner: Were you told he had been out that morning? - Witness: I heard so. - Who from? - Stiles. - Not from his children? - No. I questioned the daughter about it, and she said she did not notice her father go in or out. - A Juror: Was his life insured? - Yes, and the premium was paid in the ordinary way. - The Coroner: Where was the policy found? - Witness: With the other papers by the daughter, who shewed it to me. He added that the deceased did not seem to have made the smallest arrangement for leaving this world. - The Foreman asked if the daughter was in great trouble when witness arrived at the house. - She did not shew it much, but that is very much according to temperament. She was always a most affectionate daughter, and most attentive to her father. He added that the family lived without any domestic servant, and that the deceased's will was drafted since the death of his wife. - A Juryman (Mr Pedley): Was any explanation offered by the son and daughter why so long time was allowed to elapse before they went for assistance. It was quarter-past eleven when the shot was fired, and half-past one when the doctor arrived? - It is extraordinary that this should have been so, but the kitchen was in such a mess that they thought they must clean it up before he came. - Mr Pedley: It is most extraordinary. I wonder they didn't also polish the furniture. - MISS ATHERSTONE was recalled, and the Coroner said: Your father was seen out yesterday morning walking along the embankment. When did he come in? - Witness: I don't know. I didn't know he went out. - Are you sure his clothes were off when you took him up the cup of milk? - Do you mean that he was undressed? - Yes. - That I can't say. The bedclothes were over him. - Are you sure of that? - Yes, perfectly. - Do you mean to say, if he had been out, that he must have come back and gone to bed again? - Yes, but I never knew he was out. - A Juror (Mr Madge): What time were you down yesterday morning? - When I first took notice of the time, it was about half-past eight. - Was your father in the house then? - Yes, I know he was then; no I don't know it. When I went down first I did not think of looking into his room, but when I went up to ask him what he would have for breakfast he was in bed underneath the clothes. I have known my father get up early, go out for a walk, and then come back to bed and go to sleep again. - A Juryman (Mr Pedley): When did your father first speak to you about the will? - When we lived at Topsham. When I looked for it after his death I found it with some other papers in a box. - The Coroner: How was it you did not tell me about the will before? - You never asked me; you omitted that question altogether. - Mr Pedley: You were distinctly asked the question. - My brother was asked about the will, and not me. He knew nothing about the will. - The Foreman said the question was put to the brother and not MISS ATHERSTONE. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the Jury would have no doubt that the deceased came to his death as the effect of a gunshot wound, and the question for them was whether this was the result of suicide or accident. One or two curious points had come out in the evidence, and a careful examination of the witnesses had been necessary to understand the circumstances attending the death of the deceased. It was, however, for the Jury to say whether they were satisfied with the explanation which had been given, and to say whether they could come to any other conclusion than that the deceased shot himself, intending to do so. - The fact that deceased had for some time been in the habit of drinking brandy would enable them to form an opinion. The surgeon had said there was little doubt that the wound was self-inflicted, and it appeared that the deceased must have held the gun, because the shot went through his chin and up to the ceiling. - The Jury were half an hour in considering their verdict. Of the fourteen Jurymen, at first ten were in favour of a verdict of Accidental Death, and afterwards two more joined them, making twelve who were unanimous in arriving at this decision. Of the two dissentient Jurymen, who declined to subscribe to the verdict of Accidental Death, one was the Foreman, General Lambert.

Western Morning News, Thursday 22 November 1888
DUNKESWELL - At an Inquest held at Dunkesweel, near Honiton, yesterday, by Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) on the body of MR ELI HOOPER, whose death was caused on Monday by having his skull cut off by the wheel of a mill as reported, a verdict of Accidental Death was recorded. The Coroner, on behalf of the Jury, expressed sympathy with the widow of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 November 1888
STOKE GABRIEL - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Waddeton Court Farm, Stoke Gabriel, on the body of WILLIAM DYER, 76, labourer, who hanged himself on Thursday morning. The evidence disclosed that deceased lived with his nephew. Mr Wm. Andrews, of [?] Mews, Paignton, and wandered away from home on Wednesday afternoon. Search proved unavailing, and he was discovered by Mr A. Searle hanging to an ash tree in the hedge, by a piece of rope only 18 inches long. Dr Alexander, who proved the death by hanging, and said on attending deceased some months ago he saw signs of insanity. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall, Plymouth, last evening, concerning the death of HENRY BLACKETT, aged 32, whose body was found in Cattewater on Thursday under circumstances already reported. Mrs Jane Hodge said the deceased had lodged with her at 15 Commercial-road, for about ten months and he was a sober, industrious man. She thought he seemed a little depressed on Wednesday last, but when he went out at half-past nine in the evening he spoke cheerfully and said he would not be long. Further evidence was tendered by Thomas Cape and George Read. The Coroner said the deceased wrote two letters on Wednesday, but nobody knew to whom they were sent; they were probably business communications. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned". Messrs. Cohen and Co., London, for whom the deceased was employed as [?] at Plymouth, telegraphed yesterday undertaking that the funeral arrangements should be carried out at their expense.

Western Morning News, Monday 26 November 1888
PLYMSTOCK - Inquiry was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner at Elburton, near Plymouth, on Saturday, into the circumstances attending the death of PRISCILLA HENDY, a widow, aged 50. On the 21st inst. the woman attempted to commit suicide by hanging herself in a cellar. She was, however, cut down before life was extinct, but she did not recover the injury she had received. Mr J. B. Jacob, surgeon, who had attended the deceased, said, in his opinion, the death, which occurred on the 23rd, was due to apoplexy brought on by hanging. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

KINGSTEIGNTON - Deaths Of Infants From Unsuitable Food. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Lindridge Hill, Kingsteignton, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, concerning the death of ROSIE DAVEY, aged 15 weeks. The deceased was the daughter of MARK and ELIZABETH DAVEY, and had up to the 17th inst. been in the charge of a Mrs Simmons, of Exeter, who had charge of another child also and three children of her own. When fetched home deceased was in a weak state and on Thursday died in convulsions before medical assistance had been procured. The evidence of the mother shewed that the child, whom she had constantly visited, had been fed on biscuit food. - Mr H. A. B. Davies, surgeon, Newton Abbot, said that a post-mortem examination shewed the child to be in a very poor condition and though there was nothing to indicate want of care, yet the food that had been given to the child was very unsuitable and had failed to nourish the body. Want of nourishment occasioned infusion on the brain, which produced the convulsions from which the child died. It was a very common practice to give young children biscuit and other farinaceous food, but this practice could not be too strongly condemned, as infants could not digest such food. - The Coroner said that at first it appeared desirable to adjourn the Inquiry for the attendance of Mrs Simmons, who appeared to farm children; but from the doctor's evidence it seemed that the child had not been subject to any wilful neglect, but had died from natural causes. The Jury (of whom Mr Thomas Butland was Foreman) returned a verdict accordingly.

HOLSWORTHY - An Inquest was held by Mr Wm. Burd, Coroner, at Ugworthy Moor, Holsworthy, on an illegitimate child named ELLEN BAILEY, left in the charge of Amelia Jane Heddon, and concerning whose death some suspicions of neglect attached. - MARY ANN BAILEY, the mother, identified the body as that of her child, aged about 18 months. She placed this child and another older one with Mrs Heddon to keep, for an agreed price of 4s. per week. Deceased was always weakly from birth. Witness had had four illegitimate children, and three were still alive. - Thomas Oliver, relieving officer, deposed that on the 19th inst. he was passing Ugworthy Cottage when Heddon and his wife called him in to see the child and asked for an order for the doctor. - Amelia Jane Heddon, wife of James Heddon, deposed to having the children from their mother straight from the Workhouse, and had then ever since. the child had always been hearty, but did not thrive. The doctor came on Tuesday to see the child. He asked her why she kept these children and had so many of her own. He said the child was dying and that he should decline to certify as to the cause of death. - Thomas Linnington Ash, surgeon, of Holsworthy, deposed that by order of the relieving officer he visited the child. He noticed that deceased was extremely emaciated and breathing with difficulty. He considered the child was dying and told Mrs Heddon so. If the child had rallied he had taken steps for its removal to the Workhouse when it would have been properly nursed and nourished, and only chance for its recovery. She died, however, before this could be done. The body was a mere frame of skin and bones, but there were no bruises or marks of violence. The weight was not more than one half the average. He was of opinion that the child had been improperly fed either with insufficient or unsuitable food and that the immediate cause of death was inflammation of the lungs. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," in accordance with the medical testimony, was given, the Foreman (Mr Thomas Jones) stating that the Jury considered that there had been great neglect in not calling in a medical man to see the child. - The Coroner severely reprimanded both the mother and Heddon, the former for the small concern she had shown as to the care of her children, and the latter for the improper food supplied to the child, having regard to the pay she received for it.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 November 1888
PLYMSTOCK - The Recent Fatality In Plymouth Sound. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Mount Batten, near Plymouth yesterday, relative to the death of a fisherman named EDWARD VAUGHAN, who was drowned with another man during the recent gale under circumstances already related. - Before opening the Inquiry the Coroner remarked, as he had done at a previous Inquest, held in the district, that it was advisable to have a mortuary erected there so that in case of any epidemic or of drowning the bodies could be removed to it. He thanked Mr Hine for allowing the body to remain in his house, but at the same time informed the Jury that no publican was bound to admit a corpse on his premises. - The following evidence was then given: Thomas Toms, merchant seaman, said in consequence of information received he with some other men on Tuesday afternoon proceeded in a boat to Dunstone Bay. Close to the rocks he found deceased entangled in a herring net. The deceased with another man left Plymouth about half-past four on Monday afternoon in a boat called the Gartnoll, and remained out all night. It was a squally night, the wind being S.S.W. The boat, which was close to the rocks, was full of water, and had a plank stove in on the starboard side. The net was attached to the boat. They brought the deceased ashore, and he was subsequently removed to the Castle Inn. - CHARLOTTE VAUGHAN, residing in Stillman-street, Plymouth, identified the body as that of her husband, who was 48 years of age. He was in the employ of James Toms, and knew fishing well. He left his home on Monday afternoon to go fishing. - The Jury (of whom Mr G. Hine was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and their fees were shared between the two widows. The wife of the man Chowen, whose body is not yet recovered, is left with five children.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan held an Inquest at Ford yesterday concerning the death of JOHN GEORGE GOAD, five weeks old. The child was put to bed between eight and nine on the previous night, and appeared then to be perfectly well. The child was nursed by its mother at three o'clock the following morning and at 5.45 a.m., when the father got up, it was found to be dead. Mr F. Everard Row, who made a post-mortem examination, said the child was no doubt Accidentally Suffocated, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 December 1888
TORQUAY - A singular death of a child formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at Torquay on Saturday. SUSAN EASTERBROOK, the mother of the deceased of No. 1 Pimlico, found the child dead by her side at seven o'clock on the previous morning. Dr Cook, who had made a post-mortem examination, was of opinion that the deceased had died partly through suffocation, caused in a great measure by the great quantity of wind in the stomach, which had forced the lungs from their place. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The melancholy end of GEORGE TAYLOR, 57, landlord of the Duke of Cornwall Inn, Cornwall-street, Plymouth, formed the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry on Saturday. The deceased (as already stated in the Western Morning News) committed suicide in the backyard on the previous evening by cutting his throat with a penknife. Dr C. R. Prance, who had attended the deceased for gout and bronchitis, said MR TAYLOR had of late been somewhat better in health, but remained in a desponding condition, being apprehensive - though without any grounds - that the bailiffs were coming to his house. His wife had a struggle with him on one occasion to get a razor from him, and Dr Prance had ordered the removal of all sharp instruments with which the deceased might do himself harm. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," and expressed sympathy with the unfortunate man's widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 December 1888
HONITON - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held yesterday at Crook's Dairy, near Honiton, by Mr Cox, District Coroner, into the cause of death of WILLIAM MADDOCKS, who was killed on Saturday as he was thrown from his trap while driving home from Honiton market.

BERE FERRERS - Mr R. R. Rodd, District Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Edgcumbe Arms, Beeralston, into the cause of the death of HENRY ENGLAND, navvy, aged 46, who was killed on Saturday on the new railway works at [?]. Mr J. Toll was chosen Foreman of the Jury. From the evidence of a ganger named Baker, and another navvy, it appeared that the deceased, while at work, [?] his death by a fall of ground, caused by the digging, which buried him, and when taken out he was found to be dead. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 December 1888
EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquiry concerning the death of GEORGE MURRAY, aged 52, late shipwright in Devonport Dockyard, and who died at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Saturday, was held by Mr R. R. Rodd (County Coroner), yesterday at the Hospital. Mr J. J. E. Venning, was present as the Admiralty law agent. The evidence shewed that the deceased was stepping on to a stage on board the Sharpshooter on November 13th, when the stage gave way, and he fell a distance of six feet, upon a log of wood. Alfred Lakeman, shipwright's apprentice, J. Crepe, Inspector, and P. Wright, foreman of shipwrights, gave evidence, the latter explaining that the stage was only a plank and was not intended for working purposes. Fleet-Surgeon Robert H. More, stated that the cause of death was peritonitis, resulting from the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - Singular Death Of A Fisherman. - At Plymouth Guildhall last evening Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, held an Inquiry relative to the death of a fisherman named FREDERICK BURT, aged 44. James Jute, skipper of the hooker Perseverance, said deceased and himself comprised the crew. On Wednesday night witness left BURT on the hooker as he generally slept in the cuddy on board. He had a paraffin lamp and sometimes kept a fire in all night. On Thursday morning he found the cuddy door closed. Receiving no reply to his call he burst the door open. At first he could not see anyone owing to a very suffocating smoke. A few minutes afterwards he found deceased kneeling down, with his head resting on his arms on the locker, quite dead. he was only partly dressed and it was a habit of his to lie on the locker as he was found. - Andrew Glinn, fisherman, said about quarter-past five on Thursday morning he went on board the Perseverance. BURT was then alive. The cuddy door was half open and he pulled it back, but could not see anyone owing to the dense smoke. Witness said, "What a lot of smoke you have in here," and BURT replied "It's the heady wind of the funnel." Deceased then turned on the light and witness left him there. - Mr W. A. Buchan, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said the body was fairly nourished. There was a bruise over the right temple and a small lacerated wound on the left eyebrow. There was extensive fatty degeneration of the heart and the lungs and most of the internal organs were congested. Death was due to suffocation, accelerated by the diseased heart. The Jury of whom Mr G. Southern was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation, caused by sleeping in a closed cuddy, full of the fumes of a paraffin lamp, and accelerated by a diseased heart."

STOKE DAMEREL - Shameful Neglect Of A Child At Devonport. Severe Censure. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Pengelly's Distillery House, Fore-street, Devonport, yesterday, on the body of BEATRICE MAUD VENNING, aged two months, daughter of a sailor in the Royal Navy. - Mr Sampson was Foreman of the Jury. - Annie Hobbs, wife of a seaman, residing at 39 King-street, stated that about three weeks since the child looked all right. On Saturday, when she took charge of it, it was so emaciated and in such pain that it could not bear to be touched. It drank the milk she gave ravenously, and from the vomiting which followed it appeared as though it had been given porter to drink. The baby was also in a very dirty state. On Sunday the baby improved in health, but on Tuesday evening it refused to take the bottle. She then sent for Mr J. Wilson, surgeon. On Thursday morning the child died. The child's mother was her sister-in-law, and of very intemperate habits. She took the child for its own sake, and to save the mother from getting into trouble through neglecting it. - Ann Bean, landlady of the house where the child was born, deposed that the baby was a very small one, and she did not think it would live. For the first three weeks it was nursed by its aunt. After she left, however, the mother, who was often tipsy, began to neglect it. Witness frequently went up to the room and made the mother nurse the child. The husband occasionally stayed up at night and washed the child's clothes. When the husband was absent the children had improper food and the room was often very dirty. She had known MRS VENNING often come home after eleven o'clock at night drunk, and on one or two occasions the mother had the baby with her, when utterly unfit to take care of it. - Sarah Butler, living at 38 Cornwall-street, Devonport, stated that on Saturday morning last a woman named Gladby took the child away for the purpose of shewing it to a lady at Stoke, from whom Gladby stated she could obtain some clothes; but instead of that she went begging with the child, and did not bring it back until seven o'clock in the evening. - RICHARD VENNING, a petty officer on board of H.M.S. Cambridge, and the father of deceased, said the child, small from its birth, was well looked after by the nurse. After that at times he had to find fault with his wife respecting her treatment of it. On the night of the 28th of last month, he was so convinced that the mother was not in a fit state to take care of the child, that he wrapped it in a flannel petticoat and intended taking it to the police-station. On the way he met P.C. Mutton, who persuaded him to take the deceased home again. He had had to tell the mother to feed the child, and on one occasion he sat up between twelve and one o'clock at night attending to it and washing its clothes. He had seen his wife drunk on several occasions. Witness was informed that Dr May said the child had been neglected, and should hold the mother responsible if anything happened to it. His wife had practically broken up the home by her drinking habits. - P.C. Mutton deposed that after midnight on the 28th November he met the father of the deceased carrying it wrapped in an old petticoat and an ordinary nightdress. It was raining hard. VENNING said he was carrying it to the police station, as his wife was drunk. He persuaded him to return home, witness going with him, and there he saw the woman lying in bed - which was in a dirty condition - drunk. The room smelt very bad. The mother took the child and he warned her and her husband that they would be held responsible if anything happened. The father was also drunk and very excited. - Elizabeth Gladby, residing at the back of 91 King-street, Plymouth, said on SAturday morning last she asked the mother of deceased to be allowed to take the child to a lady, from whom she thought she could obtain some clothes for it. She did not see the lady, however, and it was untrue that she went begging with it. - In answer to the Coroner, she admitted having kept the child from ten in the morning until seven in the evening without giving it any food. She did not take the child for the purpose of begging, but she gave the mother a pint of porter. - The Coroner remarked that he did not believe a word the witness had said, and thought she had taken the child for her own purposes. - Mr J. Wilson, surgeon, said when called to see the child on Tuesday evening he found it extremely emaciated, and there was also a wound in each heel. The child was breathing rather hard, the result of its catching cold. The child weighed 4 ¾lbs., whereas the average weight of a well-nourished child of that size and the age of deceased would be about 7lbs, or 8lbs. There was no disease to account for the loss of weight. He did not know whether the child had suffered from gastric derangement, as he had only seen it on one occasion. The child had been insufficiently fed and nursed. The child was undoubtedly delicate. - The Coroner said it was a very painful case. The child, although small, appeared to be fairly healthy until the mother got about. Then she shamefully neglected it to go drinking in public-houses. It was a disgraceful act to allow a strange woman to take the child, apparently to go begging with. There was no doubt the child had been shamefully neglected. It was, however, possible that the child suffered from some gastric disease, and it might, therefore, be difficult to sustain at the Assizes a charge of manslaughter. Unfortunately, there was a lack of evidence as to the amount of food given to the child. It was, at any rate, a case for very strong censure. - The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the child died from Natural Causes, accelerated by the gross misconduct of the mother, who was unfit to have the care of the child." - In censuring VENNING, the Coroner said the Jury had taken a merciful view of the case, but she would remain a disgraced person in her own eyes, and in those of her neighbours. He hoped she would sign the pledge, which VENNING promised to do. - Reprimanding Gladby, the Coroner said the Jury were unanimously of opinion that she borrowed the child to go begging with, adopting widow's weeds for the purpose. How far the child's death was due to the exposure and neglect on Saturday he could not say; but if the child had died in her arms she would have been in a very awkward position.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Saturday before Mr Coroner Brian, on the body of a newly-born female child, resulted in a verdict of "Found Dead." Julia Bowden, of Desborough-road, said that her niece, ELIZABETH WALTERS, was confined on Thursday last, and when witness saw the child it was dead. Mr Alfred Cox Wey, surgeon, said the child had not breathed, and there was no evidence of foul play. Coroner and Jury expressed sympathy with the aunt and uncle of the mother.

PLYMOUTH - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth on Saturday, by Mr Coroner Brian on the body of EDWARD JAS. LAWRENCE, aged 6 years. A sister of the deceased, aged 9 years, stated that on the 30th ult. she heard her brother scream, and on entering the room found that he had burnt his neck with a poker, which witness had left hanging by the fire-place. Mr L. Pilkington Jackson, surgeon, said that the wound, much inflamed, was about three inches in diameter, and just below the collar-bone. When first called in he feared death would result. Sympathy was expressed with the mother of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 December 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of AARON HODGE, a boilermaker, in Keyham Yard, yesterday morning. Deceased visited his son at Honicknowle on Sunday morning and slept there during the night. He left yesterday morning in time for his work, and when near the Ring of Bells inn fell on the kerb and cut his face and hands. He was assisted by a man named Bickle. Passing down Tavistock-road he again fell and was here attended by Mr Frank Bowers Langdon, manager for Messrs. Balkwill and Co., chemists, and by a naval surgeon. Restoratives were applied but he died in the street. A post-mortem examination by Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, shewed that there was disease of the large arteries of the brain and of the arteries leading from the heart. It was Mr Row's opinion that death was due to the failure of circulation of blood in the brain, owing to the diseased arteries, and he thought the man's death was hastened by hurrying to his work. The Jury, of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth last evening by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of GERTRUDE ANNIE GOODALL, aged 12 months. Mary Jane Palk, residing at 12 Wyndham-street, said she had care of the child for six weeks. About three or four months ago she met the mother, ANNIE GOODALL, in Lockyer-street, and was asked by her to take charge of the child. She did not decide then, but subsequently agreed to take it for 5s. per week. The mother then went as cook at Melingey House, near Truro. Witness, since she had charge of the child, had no occasion to send for a doctor until about two o'clock on the previous afternoon, when she found it in convulsions. She lifted it from the cradle and it died in her arms. A medical man was immediately sent for. Mr A. H. Rees, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination and found that the child was fairly well nourished and all the organs were healthy. Death, which was almost instantaneous, was due to convulsions. The Inquest was adjourned until this evening, in order that the mother of deceased, who is at Truro, might attend.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 December 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Another sudden death at Stoke came under the notice of Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday. The deceased was a widow named MARY DAVIS TOPE, 72 years of age, who lived at 6 Wellington-street. Susannah Powell, who had known the deceased for eighteen years, said that during that time she had never had a doctor. That morning she found her lying across her bed. Mr J. May, surgeon, was called in, and pronounced her dead. Mr May thought that death was due to syncope, due to over exertion, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Sudden Death Of A Child At Plymouth. - At the Melbourne Arms Inn, last evening, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr T. C. Brian, resumed the Inquiry into the death of GERTRUDE ANNIE DOWRICK, alias GOODALL, who died suddenly, under circumstances already reported. Medical testimony that the child's death was due to convulsions was given on the previous day, but the Inquest was adjourned for the evidence of the mother, who was then at Truro, as to its illegitimacy. The mother, who gave her name as CLARA ANNIE GOODALL, stated that she was the wife of a gunner in the Royal Artillery stationed at Halifax, Nova Scotia. She was married last February twelve months at Frome, in Somerset, and the deceased was born in the following December in Cecil-street, where she was living in service under her maiden name of DOWRICK. She went under that name because her friends did not know of her marriage. Her husband lived in another part of Plymouth at the time, and though he frequently visited her he never went into the house, always seeing her at the door. He left England in September, previous to the birth of the child, which she placed out to nurse first with Mrs Bennett, and about six weeks ago with Mrs Palk. She was perfectly satisfied with the care taken of it. The child was registered in the name of GOODALL. Her mother did not know of her marriage until September, when her husband left England. She concealed the fact from her because her mother was opposed to it. The Coroner reproved the witness for the evasive, and almost defiant manner in which she was giving her evidence, and remarked that her statement was not satisfactory, and he should make inquiries into its truthfulness. - In answer to a Juror witness admitted that she had no marriage certificate and declined an offer of the Coroner to adjourn the Inquest in order that she might obtain a copy of it from Chard. On being pressed further she admitted that she was not a married woman. The Coroner expressed satisfaction of her having at last elected to tell the truth, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 December 1888
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - "Death from Apoplexy" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Sloucombe Farm, Moretonhampstead, on Tuesday evening, before Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, into the cause of death of a labourer named GEORGE DIGGENS. Deceased was found dead in bed on Monday morning and Mr C. Collyns, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, gave the evidence which resulted in the verdict at which the Jury arrived.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - At the Plymouth Sailors' Home yesterday, an Inquiry into the cause of death of SAMUEL CHOWN, a fisherman, aged 30 years, was held before Mr Brian, Borough Coroner. The widow of the deceased said her husband went out fishing on the 26th ult., and did not return. John Bunt, a fisherman, found the body of the deceased on Wednesday afternoon floating in the Sound under Jenny Cliff. He took it to the North Quay, where P.C. Setters took charge of it. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The circumstances attending the death of MARY MILTON, 62 years of age, living apart from her husband at 13 Fort-street, Devonport, was Inquired into yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner. Deceased had complained of pains in the head and spasms for many years past. About half-past eight on Wednesday evening she was seen alive by her son, who administered ten or eleven drops of red lavender on sugar to relieve her of the pain in her side. About half-past nine P.C. Tozer was called in and found her on the floor in a sitting posture by the side of the bed. Life was then extinct. Mr J. T. Rolston stated that Mr F. Everard Row attended the deceased several years ago for heart disease. Red lavender would relieve the pain in the heart for a time. He had made a superficial examination of the body, and found that deceased had dropsy of the lower extremities, which would be consequent on long-standing heart disease. Death was due to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr Sampson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease."

NEWTON ABBOT - At the Newton Townhall yesterday, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest relative to the death of a little boy, four years of age, named ERNEST HOWARD, whose parents reside at Chudleigh Knighton. Three weeks ago the boy fell into the river Teign from a bridge near Bellamarsh, one of the rails being gone. The river was high at the time and the body was washed down past Newton and was only recovered on Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider that the bridge ought to be repaired.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 December 1888
DODBROOKE - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on Saturday evening on the body of JOHN FORD LAKEY, found dead under circumstances already reported, at his house in Church-street, Dodbrooke. Evidence was given shewing deceased to have recently suffered from pains in the head and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth on Saturday relative to the death of ELIZABETH LOCK, aged 75. On the 30th October deceased fell over a flight of stairs, and Mr E. J. Square, surgeon, who was called in, found she had sustained a compound fracture of the left thigh. Congestion of the lungs supervened, and the deceased died on Saturday morning. Mr H. Hepper was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth lat evening, by Mr Coroner Brian, relative to the death of ROBERT FRENCH, aged 52. About nine o'clock on Monday night deceased had finished his supper and a few minutes afterwards was found on his knees in the backyard bleeding from the mouth. A doctor was sent for, but death occurred before his arrival. On Monday morning deceased appeared in his usual health, but he had suffered for some time past from a severe cough. Mr Oram was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - "Suicide Whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Plymouth yesterday, before Mr Coroner Brian, relative to the death of ELIZABETH PATTON, aged 34, who cut her throat that morning with a razor. Deceased had suffered from pains in her head for the past three weeks, and her husband, on returning home on Thursday night, was surprised to find the bedroom door locked. On P.C. Pill gaining admission he found the deceased lying on the floor with her throat cut from ear to rear. Close to her side was an open razor covered with blood and on a box in the room were two razors, one of which was also covered with blood. The Coroner and Jury expressed their condolence with the husband. Mr G. Southern was Foreman of the Jury.

PLYMOUTH - A Fatal Challenge. Sad Result Of Drinking. - An Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Guildhall last evening, before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of JOHN CRISPIN HILL, aged 45, the circumstances relating to which appeared in the Western Morning News of yesterday. - ELLEN HILL, wife of the deceased, and residing at 3 Castle-street, Plymouth, said she had not lived with her husband for eleven years. He was a market-porter, but was previously an engine-room artificer in the navy, and was addicted to habits of intemperance for some years. She had not seen him for over twelve months. - Sydney Hearle, a carrier between Plymouth and Plympton, stated that about six o'clock on the previous evening he was preparing to leave the Boot Inn, East-street, and a man named Nicholls and himself went into the stable of the inn, where they saw HILL. In the stable was a bottle of rum which belonged to Nicholls, and witness said to HILL in a joke, "JACK, here's a drink. You won't drink this off in one draught." HILL replied, "I'll try if you'll pay for it." Witness then paid 2s. to Nicholls, and handed the bottle to HILL, who took out the cork, and said, "Here goes." He then swallowed the contents of the bottle right off. Witness said, "Now, JACK, you are drunk," and deceased, who replied that he was not drunk, left the yard about ten minutes afterwards, but before doing so said he would drink another bottle if witness would pay for it. He was quite sober before he had the rum. - Thomas Nicholls, carrier, said between five and six o'clock on the previous evening he was in the yard of the Boot Inn. There was a bottle of rum belonging to him in a basket in the stable, and HILL remarked, "That'll just do for me. It'll warm me up." He heard Hearle say to HILL "You won't drink that off in one draught," and deceased replied "I bet I will." Witness said "Understand that's my rum, and I must be paid for it." Before they could stop him HILL drew the cork and drank the contents of the bottle. A few minutes afterwards he went out. He had been drinking but was not the worse for liquor. - By a Juror: He always knew that deceased had a craving for liquor. - P.C. Collings said about quarter-past six on the previous evening he saw a crowd outside the Boot Inn, in East-street. On going there he found a man lying on the footpath in a helpless condition, and smelling very strongly of rum. He conveyed him to the Police Station on a stretcher and charged him with being "drunk and incapable." (Laugher.) - P.C. Pill stated that about nine o'clock on Thursday evening he was asked by Inspector Gasking to go for Mr Cuming, surgeon, who returned with him to the Station. Witness remained with deceased until quarter-past ten, when he died without recovering consciousness. - Mr C. H. Cuming, surgeon, deposed to being called to the Police Station, where he saw deceased lying on a stretcher. His face was flushed and his eyes were closed, and when opened the pupils were dilated. He was breathing slowly, and witness seeing he was in a serious condition went for an emetic and a stomach pump. Artificial respiration was tried, but without avail, and deceased expired within three quarters of an hour. He considered death was due to alcoholic poisoning. - The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that fortunately such cases were rare in Plymouth. The last case he recollected was one in which his predecessor, Mr R. Edmonds, held an Inquest on a man, who, knowing that a cask of gin had been left outside the bonded stores, went down one day and introduced a quill into the barrel and drank until he became unconscious and from the effects of which he died. He was subsequently discovered with the gin pouring out over him. - After a short deliberation the Jury, of whom Mr G. Southern was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Alcoholic Poisoning, through drinking rum." They censured the two carriers for tempting the deceased to drink. They also passed a vote of condolence with the widow in her sad bereavement.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 December 1888
KINGSKERSWELL - The Fatal Accident To DR SYMONS. Coroner's Inquest. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of DR GEORGE FRANCIS SYMONS, of Kingskerswell, who died from the effects of being thrown out of his trap near Newton on Friday afternoon, was held at Pen-y-Craig, Kingskerswell, the late residence of the deceased, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on Monday, the vicar (Rev. A. H. Walker) being chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence shewed that about half past three the deceased was driving home from Coombe in a two-wheeled dog trap, to which was attached a young horse. Sitting with the deceased in the trap was a lad named Edward Willand Luxton, his page, who, to keep off the rain, was holding up an umbrella. When the trap reached the top of the hill, after leaving Netherton, the wind caught the umbrella and caused it to flap. This frightened the horse and it set off down the hill at a gallop. DR SYMONS told the page-boy to throw the umbrella away, which was done, and he tried his utmost to pull up the horse, but without success. On the animal galloping down the steep hill until a spot was reached just outside Penn Inn Gate, and a short distance before the turn into the Torquay-road. Here the trap, which had been swaying considerably, turned completely over and its occupants were thrown violently out. The page boy went first and DR SYMONS was pitched over him near the hedge. The boy, who alighted on some soft earth, escaped uninjured, but DR SYMONS had fallen on his head against some sharp stones, which had caused two wounds on the left side. Mr W. Tupplin, who lives at Penn Inn, and who had run out directly he saw the horse and trap coming at such a terrific pace - he said it was about 25 miles an hour - picked up DR SYMONS, who was bleeding very much but was perfectly conscious. Mr Tupplin wished a doctor to be sent for, but DR SYMONS did not seem to think it necessary, remarking, "I shall be all right; it is only a few flesh wounds." he also asked after his page-boy, and if he was hurt. Mr Tupplin assisted DR SYMONS into his house and whilst bathing his head he prevailed upon him to allow him to send for a doctor. This he did, and soon afterwards Dr Davis of Newton, arrived in a cab. He found DR SYMONS sitting in a chair, and on examining his head he found he had sustained two scalp wounds, not extensive and not in themselves serious. The deceased was quite conscious and spoke. Dr Davis advised that he should go home as quickly as possible, and he walked to the cab with his assistance. Deceased had also bruised his hip, but not to any extent. Whilst driving to Kingskerswell, Dr Davis asked the deceased how the accident happened, and he attributed the horse's starting off to its being frightened by the flapping of the umbrella at the top of the hill. When they reached his residence at Kingskerswell, the deceased walked into the consulting room, took off his coat and undressed himself. Dr Davis pulling off his boots. Deceased then went to bed and he was still able to talk a little. Dr Davis attended to his wounds, and some time afterwards he gave him a little milk to drink. Shortly after the deceased was sick, and within a few minutes urgent symptoms began to be manifested of compression of the brain. Dr Davis thereupon immediately fetched his partner, Dr Ley, of Newton. Dr Scott, also of Newton and Dr Chamberlain, of Broadhempston, were also in attendance, and they did all they possibly could for the deceased. In addition to the scalp wounds, there was an extensive fracture of the skull from the upper part of the left side down to the base, and there had also been a rupture of a small blood-vessel. This injury had not been obvious until a small portion of the skull was removed by the medial men, in order, if possible, to relieve the brain from the haemorrhage. This effort was, however, of no avail. The deceased, who had relapsed into unconsciousness between seven and eight o'clock, was in a hopeless condition when Dr Davis left the house at midnight, and he died in the presence of Dr Chamberlain at five o'clock on Saturday morning of compression of the brain due to internal haemorrhage, the result of the fall on his head. - After a brief summing up by the Coroner, who commented on the sad and shocking nature of the occurrence, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. - The funeral is arranged to take place tomorrow (Thursday) morning at Kingskerswell churchyard. - The lamented deceased had arranged, with his usual generosity, to give a dinner to the poor on Christmas-day. It is somewhat singular fact that on the previous Tuesday he gave evidence before Mr Hacker, the County Coroner, at the Inquest held on the late Dr Pitts, of Denbury, whose death was also caused by a carriage accident. - Reference to the fatal accident to DR SYMONS was made in Kingskerswell Church on Sunday by the vicar (Rev. A. H. Walker) who bore testimony to the deceased's kindly and self-sacrificing nature and devotion to his work, and spoke of his sudden death as an irreparable loss to the parish.

EXETER - Evidence taken at an Inquest held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday, concerning the death of JOHN EASTERBROOK, labourer, of Thorverton, shewed that the deceased was employed by Mrs Cook, of Cann's Farm, Thorverton, and was 33 years of age. Whilst driving a wagon and horses from Exeter on Friday, he hitched his leg in the reins in getting off the shaft and the wheels went over him. He did not speak afterwards. Internal haemorrhage was the cause of death. The Jury found that the occurrence was Accidental.

EXETER - Inquiry was made on Monday evening, at Exeter, into the circumstances attending the death of DENNIS DADD, who was killed near St. David's Station, Exeter on the Great Western Railway, as reported. The evidence shewed that the deceased was 61 years of age, had been in the employ of the company 41 years, and was regularly at work at Duryard signal-box. He got there, as a rule, by riding from St. Thomas's to St. David's Station, but on Saturday night he walked on the line, in company with two other employees, and was knocked down by a shunting engine. Mr A. J. Campfield said the deceased and the men Needs and Harle, who were with him, knew they were trespassing by walking up the line. There were lights on the engine at the time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the railway officials from blame.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 December 1888
STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at Devonport yesterday into the death of MATILDA ROBERTS, a widow, who was found dead in bed on the previous morning at her residence, 15 Granby-street. On Christmas-day deceased ate a very hearty dinner, and was not afterwards seen alive. She was heard coughing, however, at half-past eight o'clock the next morning by Henry Scrase, a petty officer of H.M.S. Cambridge, who occupies the adjoining room. Two hours later a neighbour named Mary Dyer, on going to MRS ROBERTS' room found her lying across the side of the bed with her legs resting on the floor, partly dressed. Life was extinct. In a basket on the bed was an empty gin bottle. Mr J. G. C. Wilson, surgeon, who was called in, made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found the liver very much enlarged and other indications of the deceased having been accustomed to take intoxicating liquor in considerable quantities. Death was, however, due to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 December 1888
BARNSTAPLE - THOMAS WILLIAM ASHTON, aged 12, residing at Pilton, Barnstaple, has died from lock-jaw, the result of a slight cut in the hand. The circumstances were investigated at an Inquest held yesterday.

BARNSTAPLE - MR WALTER COULTHARD, auctioneer, of Barnstaple, died suddenly on Thursday night. he was the S.D. of the local lodge of Freemasons, and responded to a toast at the Masonic dinner held at the Lion Hotel on Thursday evening. He left the hotel about eleven o'clock, accompanied by Mr O. J. Sloley. On reaching his home he was taken ill, and before the doctor could arrive he expired. The deceased was a local preacher and was the superintendent of the Bickington Congregational Sunday-school. The Inquest was held yesterday, when a verdict of "Death from Syncope" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 December 1888
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Explosion At Plymouth. The Dangers Of Benzoline Lamps. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday relative to the death of WILLIAM HARVEY, aged four years. - JOHN HARVEY, residing at 79 King-street West, said about half-past four on the afternoon of November 29th he lit a lamp which he had only had a week. He took off the top and poured in a halfpennyworth of benzoline. He then screwed on the top and replaced the lamp on the table, and himself, wife and three children sat down to tea. About five minutes afterwards the lamp suddenly burst, and the deceased's clothing was set on fire. Two young men ran in, and the flames were put out. Deceased was burnt about the face and wrist, and he at once carried him to a chemist who dressed the wounds, and the child was put to bed. A day or two afterwards Mr Cuming, surgeon, saw the child and after that Mr Bean, surgeon, attended him until his death on Thursday morning. - In reply to a Juror, witness said the lamp had a screw burner. He did not take the precaution to see that the sponge had absorbed all the benzoline before he lit it. - Mr W. N. Elliott, ironmonger, said the lamps mostly in use now were paraffin, as the benzoline lamps were on the decline, though they were still used. Benzoline gave off an inflammable vapour at less than 100 degrees Fahrenheit, but paraffin did not do so, except at over 100 degrees. The sale of benzoline was surrounded by strict regulations. The lamp produced was of inferior make, originally, and was very old and out of repair. It had been patched up, and he considered it was not in a fit condition to be used. It was minus the greater portion of its sponge and what was there was useless, as it had lost its absorbing properties. The screw of the collar in which the burner was fitted was partly destroyed, and the remainder was "stripped." In his judgment there was too large a quantity of benzoline thrown into the lamp before trimming. The condition of the screw, to which he had referred, after the lamp had been burning a short time, allowed the inflammable vapour arising from the benzoline to pass up outside the burner and this coming into contact with the flame, caused the explosion. If the screw had been perfect and the explosion had arisen from the internal construction of the burner, the lamp would have been blown to pieces. In his experience, he found it was a very general practice for persons to fill the lamps with benzoline, instead of pouring in only sufficient to charge the sponge. - Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, stated that on the 1st. instant he found the child suffering from severe burns on the forehead, right side of the face and right wrist. He attended the child and it progressed favourably until the 26th instant when [?]tanic convulsions set in. The convulsions were due to the burns, and he connected the death with the accident. Every care was taken of the child by its mother and friends. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Oram was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A Juror said he thought the use of second-hand common lamps was a source of great danger.