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Help and advice for Inquests 1889

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News and Western Daily Mercury

[printed in Plymouth.]

1889

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living. .


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Ackland; Adams; Aggett(2); Angove; Armstrong; Arscott(2); Atwill; Axe; Baker; Ball; Barker; Barnett; Bartlett; Barwick(2); Bassett; Bate; Batten; Bawden; Bazley; Beavil; Beck; Bent; Berrey; Berry; Best; Bickford; Bidgood; Bird; Bishop; Blackler; Blaxland; Blight(2); Bond(2); Boundy(2); Bounsell; Bowden; Braund; Brimacombe; Brooks; Broom; Brown; Bryant; Bulleid; Cann; Cape; Carey; Castles; Chaff; Challice; Channon; Cheriton; Chipling; Chiswell; Churchward; Clare; Cloutte; Cockram; Cockrem; Cole; Collacott; Collings; Collins; Comerford; Congdon; Coombstock; Couch; Court; Cox; Criddle; Crossman; Dacie; Dahl; Dally; Damerell; Daniell; Dannan; Danson; Dart(2); Davey; Davies; Daw(2); Dawson; Daymond; Dendle; Dennis; Dobson; Dodd; Dodridge; Doherty; Domvile; Drake(2); Dukes; Dyer(2); Easterbrook; Eastlake; Ebden; Edgcombe; Edwards(2); Elliott; Ellis(4); Elston; Endacott; Evans(3); Facey; Farnham; Ferris; Finch; Fleet; Foale; Fogwill; Foley; Ford(3); Forester; Foster(2); Fudge; Gard; Gardener; Gibbs; Gidley; Gigg; Giles; Gill(2); Gist; Greenslade; Greet; Guise; Hall(2); Hambly; Hamden; Hammett; Hannaford(2); Harding; Harris; Hart; Hawke; Hawkes; Hawksley; Haynes; Hayward; Head; Hexter; Hill; Hitchcock; Hole; Holland; Holmes; Hooper; Howe; Hutchings; Inglebreeksen; Isaacs; Jackson; Johns; Joslin; Keely; Kellow; Kelly; Kerswill; Key; Kift; Kneebone; Lake; Lamble; Landray; Lane; Langdon; Langmaid; Lark; Leadbitter; Lee(3); Legassick; Lethbridge; Lewis(2); Ley; Lillicrap; Lines; Low; Luscombe; Luxton; Lyons; March; Marshall(3); Martin(2); May; McDonald; McKenzie; Melvin; Michelmore; Miller; Mills; Milsom; Milward; Mintoe; Monk; Moorshead; Morrish; Mudge; Muirhead; Mumford; Nabsuqets; Neame; Nelder; Newell; Norgrove; Northmore; Ogle; Ord; Osborne; Osmond; Ould; Ousley; Parker; Parr; Parsons; Patten; Patter; Pawley; Pearce; Peckham; Pengelly; Percy; Perkins(2); Petherbridge; Petherick; Phipps; Pomeroy; Ponsonby; Pook; Potham; Potter; Powell; Price; Prout; Pryor; Pullyblank; Pyatt; Raddon; Randles; Redstone; Redway; Reed; Reeves; Rice; Rich; Rickard; Riddells; Riddles; Roberts; Robertson; Rodgers; Rogers; Rook(2); Roper(2); Ross; Rossiter; Row; Rowe; Rowland(2); Russell(2); Sanders; Saxby; Scoble(2); Selwood; Sergeant; Shaddick; Shapland; Shaw; Shepherd; Sheriff; Sherren; Simmons(2); Skinner(2); Skoines; Smale(2); Smith(4); Smyth; Snook; Southern; Spring; Squires; Stanbury; Steer; Stenner; Stephens; Stoneman; Stoyles; Strong; Subbock; Sullivan; Sweeney(2); Symons; Taverner; Taylor(2); Teed; Thomas; Tickell; Tinney; Titherley; Tolchard; Tomkins; Tope; Tottenham; Tout; Towell; Towning; Toye; Train; Treffrey; Truscott; Tucker(3); Underhill; Vallance; Verren; Vincent; Vogwill; Wadling; Wakeham; Wallace; Warne; Warner; Warren(2); Webber; Wedlake; Westcott; Whear; White(2); Wilkins; Williams; Willcocks(2); Wills(2); Wilson(2); Witheridge(2); Wonnacott; Wood(2); Woon; Worth; Wotton; Yelland; Youldon.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 1 January 1889 EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, touching the death of ROBERT WILKINS, aged thirty-three, a transfer porter, employed at St. David's Station, and who slipped while shunting on the 13th December and hurted his arm. The evidence adduced was to the effect that a truck was being shunted and the deceased was putting on the break when he slipped and caused a wound on the inner side of his left arm. He was admitted to the Hospital, that peritonitis set in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Castle and Keys Inn, Prospect-row, last evening, touching the death of CHARLOTTE RADDEN, who died suddenly between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night. It appeared from the evidence of the husband that the deceased was sixty five years of age. On Saturday evening she ate a hearty supper and later on complained of acute pain in her stomach. Witness procured some medicine from a chemist near, and used other means to relieve the pain, but they were of no avail. Deceased would not consent to a doctor being called in, but her condition became so critical between eleven and twelve that witness went for Mr G.. Rolston, junr., surgeon, but before the medical man arrived at the house the deceased had expired. - The step-daughter, ELIZABETH RADDON, and a neighbour named Lavinia Daily, gave evidence, and Mr Rolston stated, as the result of a post-mortem examination, that the heart was exceedingly fatty. The immediate cause of death was the extreme fatty condition of the intestines. The Jury of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 January 1889 Mr Gould, Deputy Coroner, held two Inquests yesterday afternoon, one at Newton St. Cyres and the other at Crediton. Each Inquiry was relative to the death of a person of great age. At Newton it was shewn that MRS ROSSITER, 94 years of age, met her death by falling down a flight of stairs; whilst the death of MRS MARY BLIGHT, aged 84, at Crediton, was caused by her falling into the fire. In each case "Accidental Death" was the verdict.

Western Daily Mercury, 2 January 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian held an Inquiry last evening at the Octagon Wine and Spirit Vaults respecting the death of ERNEST FOLEY, the illegitimate child of JOHANNA FOLEY. From the evidence of the mother, it appeared that the child had been subject to severe colds, was taken ill on Monday and before medical assistance arrived had died. Dr C. Bean stated the cause of death to be an acute attack of pneumonia on the lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr E. Lilicrap was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 3 January 1889 PLYMOUTH - Yesterday, before the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) an Inquiry was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, concerning the death of JAMES BOUNDY, aged fifty-nine years, whose demise was due to a wound inflicted in his head when he was knocked down by a horse and cab in North-road on the evening of November 30th. - WILLIAM HENRY EDWARD BOUNDY, son of the deceased, stated that his father told him the facts of the case whilst at the Hospital. He further added that his father did not know whose cab it was, because by being knocked down he was rendered unconscious. - Mr W. L. Woollcombe, house surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death was due to the wound inflicted by the accident. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Rowe was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 January 1889 EXETER - At an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday, concerning the death of an infant named ALICE PEARCE it was elicited that the mother was accustomed to feed the child with tea and biscuits three times a day. Dr Belt said that death was due to convulsions, which might have been caused by indigestible food. The Coroner (Mr Hooper) said this opinion was too general, misleading and dangerous to bring the matter home to the parents. It was high time, however, that improper feeding in infants should be stopped and he would make an example of the first case he could. If a child could not be nursed from the breast, it should be brought up on diluted cow's milk and not fed with starchy food which it was unable to digest.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 5 January 1889 THORVERTON - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Dolphin Hotel, Thorverton, into the circumstances of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HOWE, a single man, aged twenty-seven, who resided with his mother at East Anstey, and who mysteriously disappeared a short time since from that place. MARY ANN HOWE, mother of deceased, identified the body and said she last saw him alive on Thursday, November 29th, when he attended a stock sale in the neighbourhood of East Anstey. Evidence was given by John Burrows, stationmaster at Dulverton, who proved seeing the deceased at the Carnarvon Arms, Dulverton, when he inquired the last train to East Anstey. Frederick Pyke, a railway carter, deposed to finding the body of deceased in the Exe, under the railway bridge. Dr King Lewis, surgeon, said he examined the body, but could not give the direct cause of death, as the body had been in the water for some time. There were no marks of violence on the body with the exception of a bruise on the left cheek, which might have been caused whilst floating in the river. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Dead." The reward of £5 offered for the recovery of the body, was given to Frederick Pyke after the Inquest.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 8 January 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Accidentally Suffocated At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Town Hall last evening touching the death of ARCHIBALD CHARLES OWEN SAXBY, ten weeks old. - BESSIE SAXBY, the mother, residing at 10 Duncan-street, said the deceased slept between her and its father. She nursed it at five o'clock that morning, and about half-past seven discovered that it was lying on the pillow dead and cold. - Edwin Hinvest, surgeon, said he had attended the child on several occasions for trifling complaints. He was called to see it that morning just after eight o'clock, and found it dead. He made a careful external examination and discovered symptoms which would point to suffocation. He concluded that the child had been overlaid. The Coroner said he had frequently cautioned people about allowing children to sleep between the father and the mother, it being a most dangerous practice. The Jury, of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death through being Overlaid."

NORTH TAWTON - The South Tawton Tragedy. Inquest On The Murdered Wife. Verdict of "Wilful Murder." Condition Of The Would-Be Suicide. - Down to a late hour last evening THOMAS ARSCOTT, the South Tawton wife murderer, still survived the effects of the wounds he inflicted upon himself after the commission of the terrible deed, the news of which sent such a thrill of horror through the county. He was in a most precarious state, however, and if he should recover it will only be by virtue of an unusually vigorous constitution. The excitement caused by the horrible crime has somewhat abated, but there is no diminution in the popular feeling of indignation against the murderer, even on the part of the members of his own family, in spite of the fact that he himself is almost at death's door. The facts of the case, which lie within a small compass, are substantially as reported yesterday. Owing to the absence of Mr Burd, the Coroner for the District, the duty of holding the Inquest on the body of MRS ARSCOTT devolved on his Deputy, Mr G. Fulford, of North Tawton, son of Mr Burd's predecessor in the office. The Deputy Coroner, as soon as he became officially acquainted with the murder, put himself in communication with Mr Burd in order to take that gentleman's advice as to whether or not he would be able to return in time to conduct the Inquiry in person. Mr Burd, in reply, requested Mr Fulford to undertake the duty, and the Inquest was accordingly held yesterday afternoon. Tor Mill Farm, where the tragedy was enacted, is within the parish of South Tawton, but it is much nearer the town of North Tawton than to the village which gives its name to the parish. The farm, in fact, is about two and a half miles from North Tawton town, and only a mile from the railway station. Owing to the district being but sparsely populated it was necessary to draw the majority of Jurors from North Tawton, and it was therefore a matter of obvious convenience to hold the Inquest there. The Jurors assembled at the Gostwyck Arms between one and two o'clock; and, after having been sworn, were driven in breaks to Tor Mill, for the purpose of "viewing" the body of MRS ARSCOTT. They then returned to the Gostwyck, where the evidence was taken of ROBERT ARSCOTT, a son of the deceased, who identified the body; of Mrs Powlesland, the married daughter who witnessed the affair and who fought so stoutly to protect her mother from her assailant; and of a few other witnesses, including Police Sergeant Kemble and Mr Hawkins, the surgeon. The medical evidence showed that the wound inflicted by the jealous husband on his wife was of so fearful a character that death must have been almost instantaneous. Mr Fulford refrained from examining the witnesses in detail as to the supposed cause of quarrel between ARSCOTT and his wife, but it was shown clearly that there had been a good deal of bad feeling between them of late, and that jealousy - however groundless and absurd it may have been - was at the root of it. The Inquest resulted in a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against THOMAS ARSCOTT. Details of the proceedings are given below. - The ARSCOTTS had resided at Tor Mill nearly fifteen years and had been married for thirty-five years, the husband being sixty-five years of age and the wife fifty-four. There were, it is said, no less than fourteen children, of whom three were residing at home with their parents - ELIZABETH, aged ten years; MARY JANE, aged eight years; and CHARLEY, a bright little fellow of six or seven. Most of the elder children were married or living in service in the district. ARSCOTT was not a renting tenant of the farm; but was a sort of caretaker for Mr W. Hern, the owner, who resides at Jacobstowe, about five miles away. He is said to have been a sober and hard-working man, but of morose temper, much inclined to be jealous of his wife, and quarrelsome in consequence. As to the deceased, she appears to have been an exemplary woman for a person in her station of life. If her husband worked hard, she was even more industrious till, and, in spite of the scanty means at her disposal, managed to bring up her numerous family of children respectably. The elder daughters were liked very much in the farm-houses where they took service; and the fact that three of them were "married away" from one place shows that they were steady and honest young women. The sons seem to have inherited a little of the father's quarrelsome disposition, but only in one case has anything very much to their discredit occurred. MRS ARSCOTT was always kept rather short of money by her husband, and had at times to go "on the books" of the shopkeepers with whom she dealt at North Tawton for months together. But she always managed to pay in the end, partly with the little money with which her husband was able to supply her, partly with the proceeds of the poultry which she reared. At the time of her death she owed a small sum to a baker at North Tawton, and it was only two days prior to the murder that she called at the shop and stated that she hoped to be able to clear off the score very soon. The shopkeeper states that the poor woman was scrupulously honest and she would have trusted her to any extent. - MRS ARSCOTT had to bear a great deal of harsh treatment from her husband in consequence of his bad temper and foolish jealousy. She kept her troubles to herself as much as possible, but it was no secret amongst the children and neighbours that the life which she passed was a very unhappy one, and now that the sad end has come it seems that the quarrels between husband and wife were notorious. That he has more than once threatened violence is very clear. The cause of the quarrel which precipitated the tragic occurrence of Saturday last has been already reported. A young man named Thomas Hern, nephew of the owner of Tor Mill, had occasionally been sent to help ARSCOTT in the work of the farm, and he had once or twice passed the night there in order to save the long journey to and fro. ARSCOTT conceived the astounding idea that Hern was paying some attention to his wife, though she was old enough to be his mother. Hern himself asserts that he had never given the slightest shadow of a reason to justify such an idea; and all who knew MRS ARSCOTT protest that, to say nothing of the improbability of the thing, they do not believe she was capable of doing anything that would have given colour to the suspicion. ARSCOTT, however, had nursed the idea until it took possession of him; and on Thursday last, meeting young Hern in the courtyard, he accused him. Hern denied the charge, challenged ARSCOTT for proof, and a violent scene ensued between the men, ARSCOTT threatening to run the other through with a dung fork, and Hern defending himself as best he could with a stout stick. Some neighbours eventually parted the men, but ARSCOTT remained in a furious passion for some time. Mr Hern, sen., who happened to arrive while the quarrel was in progress, sought in vain to pacify the old man, and asked if he was "mazed." "No," ARSCOTT replied, adding "It's not finished yet", while to another neighbour who asked whether he was "maxed or mad," he said "I'm neither the one nor the other - not yet!" Young Hern resumed his work for a time, but gave it up on finding that ARSCOTT was still fretting and fuming about what had passed and before dusk went away with his uncle. MRS ARSCOTT on Thursday had gone to North Tawton market, taking one or two of the young children with her. She was quite aware of what had occurred during the afternoon, however, and it so excited her fears that on returning in the evening and finding that her husband had gone to bed "something possessed her (as she expressed it) to go and see where his razor was." ARSCOTT was in the habit of keeping his razor wrapped in paper on a "dresser" in the room next the kitchen (described by the witness at the Inquest as the "parlour"). On looking for it she found that the razor had been removed from its accustomed place. Fearing that her husband had concealed the weapon in bed, and that he meant to do her an injury with it, MRS ARSCOTT put on her things and, taking her children with her, went away to her daughter's, at Treecott, a mile off, and there passed the night. She returned to Tor Mill on Friday and attended to some of her duties, but finding that her husband was still very morose and inclined to quarrel she was afraid to pass the night at home and took refuge with another married sister (Mrs Powlesland) who lives at Yendacott. MRS ARSCOTT carried with her some food to supply the wants of herself and children. Early on the Saturday morning ROBERT ARSCOTT of North Tawton, a son of the deceased, who works at some distance from Tor Mill, went out of his way to go over to the farm to see how his father was getting on. He found the old man, as he states, in a very "low" condition, although he pretended to be "all right." ARSCOTT told his son that his wife had taken away "all the meat," and ROBERT offered to bring in some from North Tawton; but that he declined, telling the young man that he only wanted a loaf of bread and a "bit of bacey," which he could send over on the Sunday. Later in the morning MRS ARSCOTT returned to Tor Mill with her children, accompanied by Mrs Powlesland. What occurred on her arrival will be found described in detail in the evidence given at the Inquest. It appears to be certain that ARSCOTT had brooded over his supper and injuries during the absence of his wife until he had worked himself up to a determination to avenge them upon the poor woman. He took very little notice of her for some time after her arrival, but stood warming his hands by the kitchen fire. He then went into the "parlour," as the woman thought, to fetch a pipe of tobacco. He came back, however, with the open razor in his right hand; and going over to his wife laid his left hand upon her neck, saying coolly "Now your time has come," at the same time attempting to cut her throat. MRS ARSCOTT screamed for help and her daughter (Mrs Powlesland) seized the would be murderer by the hand which held the razor and pulled it away. Released for the moment, MRS ARSCOTT ran out the passage, pursued by her husband, who overtook her and threw her down. Mrs Powlesland ran to the help of her mother, and bravely endeavoured to take away the razor with which the infuriated man was attempting to hack the prostrate creature. In doing so she cut her own fingers severely by seizing the blade of the razor. A second time the wife escaped from her husband's grasp. She then ran into the yard, but was again overtaken and thrown down by him and before Mrs Powlesland could offer any further resistance to his murderous design she was horrified to see him cut a tremendous gash in his victim's throat, the blood from which spurted over his hand. Mrs Powlesland ran away screaming for help to the nearest neighbour's (Mr Anstey's) but when Mr Anstey and others came to the spot the poor woman was quite dead. Her assailant was nowhere to be seen. Eventually ARSCOTT was found by P.S. Kemble, who had been fetched from North Tawton, lying on the floor of the parlour. He had cut his own throat with the razor, which lay on the floor near his extended right hand. ARSCOTT had bled profusely from his self-inflicted wounds but he was not dead, and, indeed, was quite conscious of what was being said and done by the bystanders. To Sergeant Kemble, who asked what was the matter, he said: "I can't get it to bleed fast enough." Kemble then noticed that the injured wretch had the fingers of his left hand inserted in the gaping wound and was trying to tear it open still more. The Sergeant prevented him from doing further violence to himself and with the help of the neighbours, turned him over on his back, propped him with pillows and tried to staunch the bleeding until the arrival of Dr Hawkins from North Tawton. That gentleman was on the spot within an hour after the occurrence. Finding that MRS ARSCOTT was beyond human aid he first turned his attention to her murderer. He found that ARSCOTT had inflicted a terrible wound on himself, cutting through the windpipe and laying open an orifice through which he could see to the root of the tongue. ARSCOTT had bled profusely - there were two large pools of blood on the floor, but none of the larger vessels had been severed, and to that circumstance alone is to be attributed the fact that he was found alive at all. After doing what he could for the patient, Dr Hawkins had the deceased brought in and laid upon a table in the same room. MRS ARSCOTT'S wound was one that must have been inflicted with savage violence. Beginning at a point just below the left ear it extended right across the throat to within an inch or two of the opposite ear, severing all the large vessels, the windpipe and the gullet and laying bare the vertebra. Death must have been instantaneous. Mr Hawkins caused telegrams to be sent in two or three different directions for other medical assistance, and later in the day Dr Burd, of Okehampton, came over and helped to perform the delicate operation of sewing up the wounds in THOMAS ARSCOTT'S throat. It was impossible to remove the injured man and there was no alternative but to let him lie in the same room with his victim the whole of Saturday night and Sunday. Constables Cousins (of Exbourne) and Mogridge (of Sampford Courtney) took alternate turns of duty in watching the injured man and keeping curious intruders out of the house. Several of the members of the family were present for several hours on Saturday and Sunday and bitter were the reproaches which some of the younger of them hurled at their mother's murderer. It was evident that the deceased was very much loved by the whole of the children, and that they had very little affection for their father. It is stated that ARSCOTT when asked whether or not he was sorry for his wife's death replied in the negative, adding "I'm only sorry I'm not gone myself." He has made numerous references to such common-place matters as feeding the stock on the farm and so on, but never once expressed any contrition for the awful crime. - Dr Hawkins drove out to Tor Mill in company with Superintendent Roberts, of Bow, shortly before noon yesterday. He found the patient in a very critical condition, but not worse than on Sunday evening; and the woman in attendance upon him reported that he had taken some little nourishment in the form of brandy and egg. Dr Hawkins informed our reporter that the injured man had in his opinion just a chance of recovery, but a very slight one. His constitution must have been very robust to stand the terrible shock and the loss of such a quantity of blood. When in health he was a strong, hardy and powerful man and the temperate life he is reported to have led was also very much in his favour. Later in the day, when the patient was again visited he seemed to have rallied a little. There had been no further haemorrhage, and there seemed to be some little prospect of his ultimate recovery. The latest advices from North Tawton are to the same effect. - It is believed that the funeral of the murdered woman will take place on Thursday, but the thing has not been definitely arranged. The Inquest. - An Inquest on the body of the deceased woman was held yesterday afternoon at the Gostwyck Arms, North Tawton, before Mr G. L. Fulford, Deputy Coroner, whose chief (Mr W. Burd) is absent. Mr Thomas Stoneman was elected Foreman of the Jury. Mr Superintendent Roberts of the Bow Division, watched the case for the Police. - In opening the Inquiry the Deputy Coroner said the Jury had been summoned to investigate a very serious and important case and he trusted they would give it their careful and earnest attention. It was an Inquiry into the cause of the death of MARIA ARSCOTT, wife of THOMAS ARSCOTT, of Tor Mill Farm, in the parish of South Tawton, a labourer. Their duty would be two-fold. In the first place they would have to Inquire as to the cause of death, and in the second place it would be their duty to say by whom the act was committed which caused death. Several witnesses would be brought before them, and the evidence in the matter would be very complete, especially that of the deceased's daughter, Mrs Elizabeth Powlesland, who accompanied her mother to Tor Mill on Saturday morning and witnessed the whole occurrence. With regard to the motive of the act, whatever that may have been, it would not be within the province of the Jury to consider. That, possibly, would be a matter to be dealt with by another tribunal hereafter. He would now ask them to proceed with him to Tor Mill Farm, to view the body. They would be accompanied by ROBERT ARSCOTT, a son of the deceased, who would identify the body and he proposed that after the view of the body they should return to the Gostwyck Arms and take the evidence. - The Jurors were then driven in a pair of breaks (supplied by Mr Currie, of the Gostwyck Arms) to the scene of the murder, a distance of between two and three miles, the Coroner accompanying them. Only a few moments were spent in performing the melancholy and repulsive duty of viewing the body. The spectacle which met the gaze of the Jurors as they filed into the room was a sickening one. The body of the murdered woman lay on the table in the ill-furnished room known as the "parlour," where it had been placed by the Police on the arrival of the medical man. It was still clothed in the garments she wore when her husband made his savage and determined attack upon her; and the fearful wound, extending from ear to ear was but too plainly visible. Several of the Jurors averred that a more fearful sight had never been seen by them, and they were only too glad to escape from it as soon as possible. The murderer and would-be suicide had been removed to the adjoining room, where he lay in charge of a police-constable and a couple of neighbours, who were doing duty as nurses. He was seen by the Deputy Coroner, who found him still in a most precarious state, but showing some signs of returning strength. The injured man is visited at short intervals by Dr Hawkins, who states that it is just possible he may survive, as none of the larger blood-vessels have been severed; but, humanly speaking, his chances are of the smallest. Several of the older members of the family were in the house at the time of the visit of the Jury. The "viewing" over, the party returned at once to the Gostwyck Arms; and, the roll of Jurors having been called over to ascertain that all were present, the Deputy Coroner proceeded to take evidence. - The first witness in the case was ROBERT ARSCOTT, a labourer living at North Tawton, who stated that he was a son of the deceased MARIA ARSCOTT, whose body he had that day seen at Tor Mill. Her age was 54. He gave formal evidence of identification; and the Deputy Coroner asked the witness to stand back, as he would prefer to ask him any further questions at a later stage of the Inquiry. - The next and most important witness was Mrs Elizabeth Powlesland, a daughter of the deceased, who witnessed the murder and who was herself injured in the attempts which she made to rescue the poor woman from the hands of her assailant. - Mrs Powlesland said: I am the wife of James Powlesland, a labourer, living at Yandicott Farm, South Tawton and a daughter of the deceased, MARIA ARSCOTT. - The Coroner: Take your memory back to Friday last, and tell the Jury what happened on that day. - Witness: My mother came to our house at Yandicott with the three younger children. It was about mid-day. She said that she was come to know if I could let her sleep there that night. I told her I would. - Did you ask her any questions? - I asked her what was the matter, meaning what was the matter at home. - What was her answer? - She stated that ELLEN, my eldest sister, and my brother ROBERT, were there to take away the things, and she could not stay in the house to see the things taken away. Mother stayed the night with me at Yandicott. - did you have any other conversation? - Yes, but I can't say exactly what was said. - Did she make any further reference to her leaving Tor Mill Farm? Did she give any more reason? - I don't know that she did. She only said that the things were going to be taken away. - You are quite sure of that? - Yes. - You say that she slept at your home during Friday night? - Yes. - Now come to the Saturday morning and tell us what took place then. - On Saturday morning mother said that she must go home. - Did she state any reason why she wanted to go back? - She said that she had a few things that she wanted to do, and she wanted me to go home with her. I did so. - At what time did you get to Tor Mill Farm? - At half-past eight. - Did you see any person when you came into the court? - I saw my father. - Where was he? - He was going out of the yard with a horse and cart. - Was he coming towards you or going in the opposite direction? - He was going the other way with his back towards us. I did not see him look around so that I cannot say whether he saw us or not. - What did you do then? - Mother and me went into the house and sat down by the side of the fire. - Did your mother say anything to you after you got to the house? - I don't know that she said anything particular. We sat by the fire a little while and had a cup of tea together. Then I said I should go home. She said I was to stay until I had seen father and spoken to him, and then she said "hear what sort of a temper he was in." - Did you stay? - Yes. - What did your mother then do? - She went sewing for a little while and after that she went up into what they call the parlour to see if the razor was in its place. - Did she stay long in the parlour? - No. - What did she say when she came out? - She brought out the razor and showed it to me. She remarked to me that it was wrapped up and in the place where it was always kept, on the top of the dresser. She then carried it back again, saying that she would not hid it away until father had shaved for the Sunday. - What happened next - did your father come in? - I was in the house an hour before father came in. - Where were you both when he came in? - I was standing by the side of the fire, and mother was standing at the bottom of the stairs. - Did your father say anything? - No. - He didn't say anything to either of you? - Not before I spoke to him. I said, "Father, how are you this morning? - He said he was "all right." - Did you say anything more to him? - Father went over to the fire and warmed his hands. - How long did he stay there? did he remain in the kitchen with you? - Yes, he stayed in front of the fire two or three minutes. - did you notice anything unusual in his manner when he came in? - No, not at all. - Where did he go then? - He went into the parlour. - Did he state any reason for going there? - No. - And you had no idea, I suppose? - I thought he was going into the parlour to get some tobacco. - Did he stay long in the parlour? - No. - Where did he go then? - He came out into the kitchen. - Did you notice anything then that you had not noticed before? - Yes, I saw that he had the razor in his hand. - Was the razor closed? - No, it was open. - Was your mother still in the kitchen? - Yes, she was standing at the end of the table. - How near would that be from the door of the parlour? - It was close by. - So that he would meet her first? - Yes. - What did your father say or do when he came out with the razor in his hand? - He went fore to mother and put his arm around her neck or shoulder - I can't say which, and said "Your time has come." - Where were you when this was taking place? - I was sitting by the fire. - What did you do? - I rose up and went fore to where they were standing. I said, "Oh! father, what are you going to do?" - Did he make you any reply? - No. - Did you do anything? - I caught hold of the arm that he had around mother's neck and tried to pull it away. - Did you notice at this time if he had anything in the other hand? - He had one arm around her neck and the razor was in the other hand. - Did your mother get free of him? - Yes. I pulled away his arm and she ran into the passage. Father pushed me away and said: "Let me alone." - Did he succeed in pushing you off? - Yes. - Where did he go then? - He followed mother into the passage. - In what position was your mother in the passage? - I don't know whether she fell or whether father threw her down, but I saw her on the ground in the passage. Father rushed in upon her. I believe he was trying to keep her down with one hand. He still had the razor in the other. - Did your mother say anything? - She cried, "Oh! LIZZIE, hold him back." - What did you do? - I caught hold of the hand in which he had the razor and tried to take it away from him. - Did you succeed? - No; I couldn't take away the razor. - What did you do then? - I kept hold of his arm and tried to pull him off. - Did you pull him off? - Yes. - Could your mother then get free? - Yes, she did get away from him. She got up and ran into the yard. - Which way did she go? Did you see her in the yard? - Yes. - How far did she go? - Not very far, she kept on falling. I saw her fall two or three times. - Had you got hold of your father by the arm all this while? - No, he pushed me away and followed her across the yard. - Did you go after them? - Yes. - As you were going across the yard did you notice your mother fall again? - Yes, she fell upon some dung that was lying upon the ground. - Had your father overtaken her then? - yes. I saw him take hold of her. I believe that he knelt down by the side of her and caught hold of her neck. - In what position was his hands? - He had one of his arms right around her neck. - How near were you? - I was close to him. - Did you make any further effort to save your mother? - I tried to pull him away, but could not. - What happened next? - I saw him cut her throat with the razor. - Had he still got his arm around her neck? - Yes. - What did you notice next? - I saw that the blood from the wound in mother's neck was flowing over his hand. Then I ran away, leaving father in the same position - kneeling down by my mother's side. - Did you hear your mother speak? - I never heard her utter a sound after she fell down upon the heap of manure. - Where did you go? - I went down to Mr Anstey's to call for help. - What time was it when you got back to Tarr Mill Farm? - I don't know what time it was. - Where was your mother when you came back? In what position was she lying? - She was on her face and hands, as if she had rolled over. - Was she quite dead? - Yes. - By a Juror: Did your mother state any reason for asking you to return with her and the three children on the Saturday morning? - Yes, she said she didn't care about going by herself. - She didn't say why? - No. - Did you hear your mother say she was in bodily fear of her husband? - yes, on the Friday when she came up to my house. She said she hadn't been afraid until Thursday night. - The Coroner: I asked you very particularly just now as to whether any conversation took place on the Friday. You now say that this did take place on the Friday? - We had a conversation, but I couldn't tell you word for word. I know that she said she was afraid. - But did she say that she was in bodily fear? - No. - Did she say anything further? - No. - By the Jury: Did anyone return with you and your mother on Saturday morning? - Yes, the three little children. - Who went back with you to the house after your mother had been murdered? - An elder sister. - Where did you find your father then? - I didn't see him at all. - Did your mother sleep with you on Thursday? - No, but with my elder sister. - Ernest Call: I live in High-street, North Tawton, and am a son-in-law of the deceased. About ten o'clock on Saturday morning I was called by someone who said that TOM ARSCOTT had killed his wife. I went to Tor Mill Farm, and on going into the yard, I saw MRS ARSCOTT lying at the foot of the dung-heap, face downwards, with her throat cut. The arms were partially folded under the breast. I asked the people in the yard where ARSCOTT was; they said they didn't know. Mr Anstey, Mr Vicary and others were in the yard. I asked if they could trace him across the fields or whether they would go into the house with me, but they refused to do so. I waited there until Police-Sergeant Kemble came and examined the body. I asked him whether the woman was dead and he said "Yes." Sergeant Kemble asked me where ARSCOTT was. I replied "I don't know." He then went into the house and I followed. We found ARSCOTT lying on the floor of the parlour with his face downwards, his left hand at his throat, and his right on the ground. There was a razor close by the right hand. - Police-Sergeant William Kemble: On Saturday last, about quarter to eleven, I received information that THOMAS ARSCOTT had attacked his wife at Tor Mill Farm. I immediately went there, arriving at the house at 11.20. When I got into the yard I saw Ernest Call, the lat witness. I said, "What's the matter here?" Call pointed to the body of the deceased and said, "There it is, Sergeant." I went over and saw MRS ARSCOTT lying near or upon some dung. There were two distinct pools of blood, nearer to the stable door than where the body was lying. I touched the right arm, and found that it was quite cold. The body was dead. I asked Call and the rest where "the man" was. Their reply was "We don't know where he is." I then went into the house. Both doors were open. I went through the kitchen into what they call the parlour, and I there saw THOMAS ARSCOTT lying on his face and hands. There was blood on the floor where he lay, and also at two other places in large quantities. The back of his right hand was covered with blood, and a razor, which I now produce, was on the floor close to his hand. I noticed that his throat was badly cut, and that he was "working" at the wound with the fingers of his left hand. I asked him, "What is the matter?" and he replied, "I can't get it to bleed fast enough." Ernest Call, Penwarden (the signalman) and several others came in. We turned the man over, lifted him back against the wall, and propped up his head with pillows. I sent for a doctor and remained until he arrived. I allowed the body of MARIA ARSCOTT to remain in the yard as I found it until the doctor came, and after he had examined it I assisted in removing it to the room where it now lies. - By a Juror: I put no question to ARSCOTT. He passed remarks now and then to people who were talking. If they said anything he thought wrong he would contradict it. - Mr Frank Sydney Hawkins, M.R.C.S., of North Tawton, said: I was sent for at 11.30 on the morning of Saturday to go to Tor Mill, South Tawton. I arrived there about twelve noon. I found a woman lying dead in the courtyard, and I was informed that there was a man in the house with his throat cut. I went into the house and saw a man lying on the ground on his back, close to the door which opened into the yard. His head was bent forward, his chin resting on his chest. He appeared to be very prostrated. There were stains of blood on his face and hands. After I had attended to the man, I went into the courtyard and examined the woman. She was lying on her left side, with her face downward, her hands being between her face and the ground. The legs were drawn up. I noticed blood stains on her face and hands. There was a pool of blood on the dung-heap, about three yards from where the deceased was lying; and a second pool of blood about one yard. The throat was cut. On the body being removed to the house, I made a detailed examination of the deceased's injuries. She had an incised and lacerated wound, six or seven inches in length, extending from a point just beneath the left ear obliquely downwards, and terminating about two inches to the right of the middle line of the neck, dividing on the left side all the deep vessels, and in the middle line the windpipe and gullet, and exposing the vertebrae. There were also an incised wound two inches long on the right side of the chin and two small cuts on the left thumb. These were the whole of the external injuries. Death was undoubtedly caused by the haemorrhage from the wound in the throat. I am of opinion that the razor produced by Sergeant Kemble could have produced such wounds as I have described. - ROBERT ARSCOTT, recalled, said: I have never heard of disputes between my father and mother before last week. - But during the past week you have become aware of these disputes? - Yes. - Did you go to Tor Mill in consequence of these disputes? - Yes. - When did you go there last? - On Saturday. - For what purposes did you go there? - To see if my father was all right. - Did you see him? - Yes, I saw him in the stable. I said, "Good morning, father," and he said "Good morning." - Did he say anything further? - He asked me where I was going. I said I was going to Mr Dodd's to work. He asked me what I came that way for, and I replied, "I have come to see if you are all right." - Did he make any reply to that? - He said he was all right enough. - Did he say anything more? - He said that mother had carried away all the meat with her on the Friday. - What did you say to that? - I asked him whether I should bring out any more meat, and he told me that I was not to bring anything except a loaf of bread and an ounce of tobacco, which I was to bring on Sunday morning. I asked him how he was going to live without any meat, but he made no answer. - Did he say anything more? - As I was going away up the court, he said, "It will come to a bad end, out it's all her fault." I then went to my work. - Did you see your mother alive again? - Yes. - By a Juror: There were quarrels between father and mother during the week, but not on Saturday. - What was the cause of the quarrels? - Jealousy. - When you saw your father on the Saturday morning what was his manner? - He seemed very low and weak, and he cried a good bit. - He did not seem angry and passionate, then? - Oh, no, he was very quiet and low-spirited. - Was he cool and collected? - Yes. - This was the whole of the evidence. - The Deputy Coroner, addressing the Jury, said: You have heard the evidence in this case, which, from beginning to end, has been particularly clear in every detail. In Elizabeth Powlesland you have an eye-witness of the whole transaction, and actually saw her father, THOMAS ARSCOTT, commit the fatal deed. This, I may point out, does not appear to have been an act committed by a man giving away to great passion. He seems to have been perfectly calm and quiet at the time. It is not stated whether or not he noticed his wife and daughter enter the house; but when he came in it was not with any threatening attitude - and apparently for this reason, that by doing so he would have given the alarm when he had not in his possession the instrument with which he intended to commit the murder. This, I think, clearly shows that the crime was premeditated. He then quietly stood in front of the fire and warmed his hands, and when he left to go into the next room the woman naturally thought that according to custom he had gone there to get some tobacco to fill his pipe. That, however, was not his real reason. He had gone into the room to fetch his razor and he returned with the weapon in his hand. His manner even then had not very much changed from what it was before. He came forward in a deliberate way and quietly said to his wife, "Now your time is come," and with the same put his hand upon her neck; and we have had the shocking occurrence minutely detailed from that moment to the time when the witness saw him cut the poor woman's throat. It seems to me that the case is perfectly clear. You have but one duty to perform - one verdict only can be returned, and I am sure you will all agree with me that the verdict must be one of Wilful Murder against THOMAS ARSCOTT. Consider your verdict, and if that is your opinion be good enough to say so. - One of the Jurors suggested that they should withdraw, but the majority intimated that they were perfectly agreed. - The Juror who had proposed a withdrawal said he thought something might be said as to the cause or motive for the murder. - The Coroner: That, as I have already stated, does not come within the province of this Court. It will be dealt with, if dealt with at all, by another tribunal.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 11 January 1889 NORTH TAWTON - The South Tawton Tragedy. Inquest On The Murderer. - Yesterday afternoon, at the Gostwyck Arms, North Tawton, Mr Fulford, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of THOMAS ARSCOTT, who murdered his wife at Tor Mill Farm, South Tawton, on Saturday morning last, and who died from self-inflicted injuries on Wednesday last. The Rev. H. Rattenbury was selected Foreman of the Jury and Superintendent Roberts, of the Bow Division, represented the Police. The Coroner having addressed the Jury, the latter were conveyed in breaks to the scene of the tragedy. On their return evidence was taken. ROBERT ARSCOTT identified the body of the deceased as that of his father, who was a labourer, 65 years of age. Witness was present at his death, which took place on Wednesday morning. Witness repeated the statements made previously, and which had been published, about his father being unhappy, and accusing his wife of being unfaithful to him. Witness never saw anything wrong between his mother and young Mr Hearn. - P.S. William Kemble repeated the evidence he gave on Monday at the Inquest upon the body of MRS ARSCOTT, when he proved finding ARSCOTT in his house, with his throat cut and trying to open the wound in his neck with his fingers. - Ernest Call also repeated the evidence he gave at Monday's Inquest, as also did Elizabeth Powlesland, of Yondacott, daughter of the deceased. The last-named witness added that when her father complained of his wife's conduct she (witness) said to him: "It's all nonsense for an old man like you to fill up your head with such things as that." On Sunday last when her brothers and sisters were speaking in whispers in the presence of the deceased, the latter said: "Why don't you speak loud? Whispering is the cause of all this." - Frank Francis Penwarden said he was at Tor Mill on Saturday, and assisted the Constable. While he was in the parlour with the deceased someone said, "He could not have cut himself more than ten minutes ago, because we looked in the window." ARSCOTT immediately contradicted that statement and said he cut his throat immediately upon returning to the house. He added that "They had both sworn false, and he ought to be punished." Witness said to him, "TOM, whatever made you do such a dreadful thing," and he replied, "I was drove to it. I have had forty years of it." When anyone suggested that deceased should be eased in his suffering he would say, "Better by half put me out of it as well." Witness considered that he was in his right mind. - Mr Frank Sidney Hawkins, surgeon, repeated the evidence he gave on Monday, and said that ARSCOTT died from exhaustion in consequence of loss of blood and inability to take sufficient nourishment. Deceased was perfectly sane when he saw him. - Dr Burd corroborated as to the cause of death. - Mr William Hearn, the owner of Tor Mill, said the deceased had been in his employ for twelve or thirteen years as a farm labourer. He was a very honest and willing man, but witness did not consider he had been in a sound state of mind for years. He would talk to himself whilst at work, and would sometimes wave his hands in the air like a madman. There was a great strangeness about him at times, but he had not noticed any increase of unaccountable behaviour of late. On Thursday last week he saw him having a dispute with his (witness's) nephew, Thomas Hearn, whom he accused of undue familiarity with his wife. ARSCOTT was in an awfully excited state. Witness quieted him and asked him about the cattle. In answer to a question he said, "You will have to get some other body to do the work here. I am not going to do it very much longer." Witness replied, "Very well TOM, you had better look out for another place." - Thomas Hearn, nephew of the last witness, spoke to the deceased's accusing him of undue familiarity with his wife, and said that he on Thursday in last week attempted to stab him with a stable fork. He defended himself with a stick and his uncle then came upon the scene. He struck ARSCOTT with his open hand, as he irritated him so much with his accusations, which were without the slightest foundation. - Eliza Peach, nurse, who had been with the deceased from Saturday to the time of his death said his mind had been quite clear. He told witness that he was drove to do what he had done, and when asked if he was sorry he answered, "No; I am only sorry I am here like this." She heard deceased use very vile language towards his wife on several occasions. - This was all the evidence, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 January 1889 BUCKFASTLEIGH - The Inquiry held by Mr Hacker, Coroner, at the Sun Inn, Buckfastleigh, on Saturday relative to the death of ROBERT ROPER, who was killed at the factory of Messrs. Hamlyn Brothers on the previous day, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death". Mr J. Hoare was Foreman of the Jury.

ST BUDEAUX - At St. Budeaux, on Saturday, Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquiry relative to the death of WILLIAM HUGH DENNIS, aged 23. The witnesses called were CHRISTINA DENNIS, his mother; Josephine Willis, North Prospect, his sister; P.C. Bradfield, Devonport; and Mr J. W. Belcher, surgeon. Deceased on Thursday morning left St. Budeaux in a pony and trap for Devonport. In the afternoon he was driving down Newpassage-hill steadily, when a pin came out, causing the shaft to fall. The pony bolted and at the bottom of the hill one of the wheels of the trap run against the kerbstone and deceased was thrown out, pitching on a bag of greens. When the constable picked him up he said he was not hurt. Deceased returned home in the afternoon, calling at his sister's on the way, and telling how the accident happened. At home he became sick, and his mother helped him to bed. Sometime afterwards he frothed at the mouth and died about eight o'clock the same evening, before the doctor arrived. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Stephens was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and handed their fees to deceased's mother.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 January 1889 LOXHORE - The Fatal Coach Accident Near Barnstaple. - Additional particulars were forthcoming yesterday with regard to the overturning of the Lynton passenger and mail coach on Wednesday evening, by which a gentleman lost his life. The deceased was MR ALFRED LOW, of the firm of Taylor and Low Bros., timber merchants, Bristol. He, together with Mr Harris (also a timber merchant of Bristol), occupied a seat on the box, and when the coach commenced to tilt he jumped into the roadway. He did not, however, jump far enough, and he was crushed by the falling vehicle, death being instantaneous. Mr Harris and the driver (Moon) were thrown into the hedge, but escaped with slight injuries. There were three other passengers, but they were not in the coach at the time, having alighted in order to walk up Loxhore-hill, at the top of which the accident occurred. The coach was not much damaged and subsequently proceeded to Lynton. The body of MR LOW was conveyed to Loxhore Inn (a mile distant) where an Inquest was held last evening before Mr J. F. Bromham, County Coroner. The deceased, who was 27 years of age, was well known throughout North Devon, as he regularly visited the district on behalf of his firm. Mr Taylor, the senior member of the firm, arrived at Barnstaple yesterday afternoon and attended the Inquest at Loxhore. The accident occurred at a sharp turning and was caused by one of the wheels coming into contact with a large stone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 18 January 1889 KINGSTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dolphin Inn, Kingston, on the body of GEORGE SOUTHERN, labourer, aged twenty-seven years, who was killed at the bottom of Westaway Hill, Modbury on Monday last. Mr James Triggs was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Albert Edgcumbe, a young man who was in company with the deceased at the time of the accident, gave evidence corroborative of that which has already appeared. The Jury after examining the breeching of the horse, the breaking of which was the cause of the accident, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 19 January 1889 TOTNES - An Inquest was held at the Seymour Hotel, Totnes, yesterday, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of ALBERT HEWETT LUSCOMBE, aged forty-one, who died on Thursday morning last, under circumstances already reported in the Western Daily Mercury, through blood-poisoning. Mr T. W. Windeatt, Solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the relatives. Mr G. Mitchell was Foreman of the Jury. - EDWIN LUSCOMBE, brother of the deceased, deposed that he saw him last on Wednesday about midnight. His brother was conscious and in the morning deceased told witness that he had pricked his arm with a bone on the previous Wednesday in his shop. - Percival Henry Edwards, apprentice to the deceased, deposed that the latter told him that he scratched his arm when unhanging a hind quarter of meat. It was a little swollen, but on the Sunday deceased was about as usual, but on the following day he took to his bed. Dr Fraser, of Bridgetown, stated that on Monday morning last he was called to see the deceased and found him in bed. He complained of his left arm. Witness examined it, and found it swollen excessively right up to the elbow. On pressing it, it proved to be very sensitive, and witness made up his mind that the blood had been poisoned. witness looked at the arm and saw an abrasion of the skin and two or three pimples He could not discover any local cause which had set on the inflammation. He consulted his partner, Dr Hains, who also examined MR LUSCOMBE, and arrived at the same conclusion as he had. MRS LUSCOMBE was informed of the result of their consultation and they telegraphed to Plymouth for Dr Paul Swain, who came to Totnes by the 5.2 train on Tuesday. Witness went with him to see MR LUSCOMBE, and having consulted together they decided to make six long incisions in the arm, which greatly relieved him. Dr Swain said it was a very serious case, but was not absolutely without hope. On the Wednesday, however, deceased grew much worse and vomited continually, which could not be controlled. He gradually sank, and died about ten minutes past two on Thursday morning. MR LUSCOMBE was perfectly well before he met with the accident. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury, through their Foreman, expressed their deep sympathy with the widow and family in their sad affliction. The funeral of the deceased takes place at Bridgetown on Monday next, at three o'clock.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Clarendon Inn, Henry Street, touching the death of WILLIAM DAW, aged 12 months. ALICE MAUD MARY DAW, mother of the deceased, stated that she resided at 157 King Street East and the infant had been weakly from birth. Dr E. May visited it some months back and stated that in his opinion the child would not live. He told her that the child was suffering from consumption of the bowels and would eventually succumb to that disease. Witness found the child dead by her side in bed early that morning. - The Jury, of whom Mr F. Waldron was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Burning Fatality At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening touching the demise of WILLIAM JAMES LUXTON, aged three years and six months, and son of a labourer residing at Baker's-place, Richmond-walk. It appeared from the evidence that the mother went out on Thursday afternoon and left the deceased at home with his sister, who is about six years of age. Whilst the mother was absent the children played with the fire, and by some means the little boy's clothes were ignited. His screams attracted the attention of the neighbours, and on their trying to enter the room they found the door bolted. After some time they succeeded in effecting an entrance but not before the deceased was severely burnt about the body. He was promptly conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where everything was done to save his life, but he died at nine o'clock the same evening from the shock to the system. After hearing the evidence the Jury, of whom Mr E. Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict "That the deceased died from the shock to the system caused by the injuries inflicted through the burns whilst in the house alone with his sister," and exonerated everyone from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 21 January 1889 PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Fatality At Plymouth. - The Coroner for Plymouth (Mr T. C. Brian) held an Inquest at the Robin Hood public-house, New-street, on Saturday evening, touching the death of a little boy named WILLIAM HENRY LANGDON, aged three years and four months, of 4 Stoke's-lane, and who was found drowned in Sutton Pool on Friday evening. - BELLA LANGDON, mother of the deceased, stated that she last saw her child alive at quarter to five o'clock on Friday evening, when he returned from school She gave him some bread and butter and he then went out to play. Witness went into the street to look for him at six o'clock, but he was nowhere to be found. She made inquiries at the Plymouth and Stonehouse Police-stations, but about quarter-past ten she heard that he had been picked up drowned and shortly afterwards the body was brought to her house. - Charles George Balkwill, a fisherman, said that at ten o'clock he noticed in the water what appeared to be a body. He picked it up and thought it was dead. The boy had his clothes on and witness handed him to a man called Lane, who landed it at the Barbican steps. - P.C. Setters stated that he went to the Barbican steps and immediately put into execution the Sylvester mode of restoring life, but the child was apparently lifeless. He continued the process for twenty minutes when it was evident that the child was dead and he took it to the parents' residence. The Jury, of whom Mr John Davis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 21 January 1889 TEIGNMOUTH - The Fatal Carriage Accident At Shaldon. - An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, at West Cliff, Teignmouth, into the circumstances attending the death of MRS CLARA PRICE, a lady resident, who died on the previous night under circumstances already reported. Mr Pedley, of Shaldon, was chosen Foreman. The Jury, after being sworn, were requested to visit the spot at Shaldon, where the accident occurred and on their return, Mrs Elms, deceased's maid, stated that MRS PRICE was 63 years of age, and was in the best of spirits on Friday night when she left in a cab to attend the "at home" given at Ness House by Colonel and Mrs Brine. - Edward White Baker, the cab driver, described the occurrence, stating that he left West Cliff with the three ladies - the deceased, Mrs Preston Cooke, and Miss Ley. After crossing the bridge, and when he was driving down the main road, the light from his carriage lamp reflected on a basket of white clothes on a barrow in a recess by the side of the road, between Ellerslie House and Undercliff. The sight of this made his horse swerve round, with the result that the carriage was over-turned on to the beach. The road was 13ft. wide, and he was driving in the middle of it. There was no possibility of his controlling the horse as the fright was sudden. The animal made on spring from the road to the beach. Witness held the horse to prevent its kicking, and he saw the coastguardsman come, with others, to the assistance of the ladies. The horse was a remarkably quiet animal, and he had never known that it had shied before. There was no protecting wall at this spot, neither was the public lamp lighted at the time. Questioned by the Foreman, witness said he considered if there had been a wall along the edge of the roadway, or even if the lamp had been lighted the accident might have been prevented. - James Leslie, coastguardman, stationed at Shaldon, said he witnessed the accident. It was about a quarter-past eight and the moon was rising. He distinctly saw the horse make a spring from the road to the beach, and the vehicle capsized. The carriage was being driven at an ordinary pace. He heard the ladies inside the carriage, but could not open the door to get them out, it having become jammed. With the help of John Mole, he opened the top of the landau, and got them through the opening. Deceased was the last to be got out. She was put on a chair, when she asked for her slipper, which Mole found and gave to her. She then asked him to put it on, after which she fainted. Witness helped her into Mr Wills's house. John Mole corroborated. - John Austin, house surgeon at Teignmouth Infirmary, stated that he was being driven in a cab to Ness House, and when near the ferry landing-stage his driver pulled up and he saw a cab had fallen off the wall. He ran up and found deceased sitting on a chair. She was taken into Ellerslie House and laid on the couch. She did not speak, and her pulse was beating feebly. A few minutes afterwards she died in his opinion from syncope, the result of the shock. There were no wounds or serious fracture. He saw the driver, and he was perfectly sober. Witness did not consider any blame could be attached to the driver or to the boy in charge of the barrow, as it was placed in the safest part of the road. He was of opinion that if the dwarf wall ran the whole length of the road it might have prevented the horse jumping off; or if the public lamp had been lighted the horse might not have noticed the white clothes. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury added as a rider "That the proper authorities be communicated with, urging the necessity for the extension of the dwarf wall at that part of the road where the accident happened, and also to the necessity of lighting the public lamp at this particular spot. - The Foreman said the Jury wished to express their deepest sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, and they exonerated the driver from all blame. They considered Leslie and Mole deserved the highest commendation for their prompt assistance. In these remarks the coroner concurred.

EXETER - At an Inquest held at Exeter on Saturday touching the death of EDWIN THOMAS AXE, aged eight months, son of a railway porter of Red Cow village, it was stated that the child's life was insured five weeks ago for 15s. The Coroner (Mr Hooper) said it was a most improper thing to insure a child of such tender age. The matter had been before Parliament and he hoped some action would be taken. The Jury found that death was due to a Natural cause.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 23 January 1889 EXETER - An Inquest was held at the New Police-courts yesterday afternoon on the body of RICHARD LYONS, aged 57, a labourer. - HENRIETTA LYONS identified the body as that of her late husband, who left his home about half-past seven yesterday morning to go cracking stones. She did not hear anything more of him until nine o'clock, when one of the men with whom deceased had been working told her that he had dropped on the stones. The man went away and she proceeded to look for her husband, whom she met by St. Sidwell's Church. She helped him home and gave him some brandy and water, and with the assistance of a neighbour got him to bed. He then complained of his feet being cold and asked her to get some warm water. Witness went downstairs to get it, and on entering the bedroom again she found deceased had expired. Dr Bell said death was due to heart disease and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 24 January 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at the Guildhall yesterday touching the death of ELISHA KELLOW, a labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Rolf and Pethick, contractors for the construction of the new railway from Devonport to Lidford. Mr Geaton was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and evidence was given by Samuel John Penrose, foreman of works, George Jones, labourer, and Thomas Jeffery, from which it appeared that the deceased was employed in the construction of the tunnel under the Devonport Park. About quarter-past four on Tuesday the men were preparing to remove one of the "bars" which are used in the work. Three men, including the deceased, were supposed to be at one end to pull, whilst the last witness, Jeffery, was at the other end to push when the signal was given. Jones was working on the opposite side of the deceased, and on passing over to him for the purpose of ascertaining the time he found that his head was jammed between the bar and a plank. The witness spoke to him, but could not get any answer, and he then called his mates and released the deceased. A medical man was sent for and Mr Gard, surgeon, was soon on the spot, but life was extinct. Neither of the witnesses could understand how the deceased got into the position in which he was found, and he had no business there. Instead of being at the end of the bar deceased was in the middle and the witnesses could only account for the accident by the deceased having by some means displaced the bar, which caused his head to come into contact with it and a plank. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 25 January 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Another Fatal Accident At Devonport. The Dangers Of Tunnel Work. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening relative to the circumstances attending the death of JAMES SWEENEY, who died on Wednesday morning from injuries received in an accident on Monday night. - Evidence was given by Jeremiah Gauge, a miner; Richard Dawe, horse driver; Edward Finnemore, foreman of works; and Sister Constance, nurse at the Hospital, from which it appeared that the deceased was employed by Messrs. Relf and Pethick, contractors for the new railway from Devonport to Lidford. Deceased was one of the night corps men, and was engaged in the construction of the tunnel under the Exmouth Gardens. The men, numbering about forty, had been to supper on Monday night and were returning to their work about quarter-past ten. They had proceeded into the tunnel a short distance, when a loaded waggon, which was being drawn by a horse, became by some means detached and ran back on the metals. Gauge, who was ahead, caught hold of the waggon and tried to stop it but could not, and then shouted to those behind to look out. Shortly after he heard a man's clothes tear, and on going towards the spot saw the deceased leaning against the side of the tunnel. The place was only wide enough to allow the waggon to pass, and the deceased was crushed against the side of the tunnel. Dawe, the driver of the horse which was attached to the waggon, was stationed in the tunnel under Pasley-street, but on the night in question went with his horse to fetch a waggon of rubbish, which another horse refused to start. Under ordinary circumstances the loaded waggons would have been out and the empty ones taken in before the men had returned from supper, and the tunnel clear had it not been for the delay. It also appeared that it is the custom for the brakesman to follow the waggons, so that if one should become detached from the horse at any time - which it occasionally does - he would be at hand with a "sprag" to put into the wheel and thus stop it before any accident occurred. Dawe was under the impression that a brakesman was following him on that occasion, but he was not. He had "put a little speed" on, when the horse made a false jump, and the waggon became unloosed. He shouted out to "hold him up,"£ and Gauge endeavoured to stop it, but could not. The deceased walked with assistance a short distance along the tunnel, and was then conveyed to the Hospital on a stretcher. It was considered to be a hopeless case from the beginning, as several ribs on both sides were broken, as also was his collar bone, and there were other internal injuries. It was elicited from the foreman that it was the duty of the "brakesman" to follow waggons in order to apply the "sprag" in case of necessity, and he could not understand why he omitted to carry out that duty. The Coroner summed up at great length and pointed out that he would adjourn the Inquiry for the attendance of the brakesman if the Jury desired it, but at the same time he did not think anything would e gained by so doing, as he would not be compelled to say anything that would incriminate himself. - The Jury, of whom Mr Vere was Foreman, held a short consultation, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," to which was added the rider "That the Jury express their opinion that no waggon with a horse attached to it should be removed from the tunnel without a brakesman following at the end of it with a "sprag" in order to be prepared to stop it should the waggon become detached from the horse, and the Jury regret that the brakesman was not attending the waggon which caused the fatal injuries to the deceased.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 January 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Plymouth last evening relative to the death of EMMA GRACE STOYLES, aged 3 ½ years. On Tuesday the child had a slight cold and was kept home from school. Next day it seemed all right. throughout the night, however, it was restless, and in the morning about half-past nine the father, WILLIAM HENRY STOYLES, sent to Mr Harper, surgeon, who said he would come presently. As he had not arrived by a quarter to eleven he went to him again. About eleven o'clock the child was seized with choking and died almost instantly before Mr Harper attended. In returning a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the Jury expressed sympathy with the parents (Mr Brian, the Coroner, joining in the expression), and agreed that Mr Harper was blameworthy in not attending when called.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 28 January 1889 PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon in the Board room of the Plymouth and Devonport Cemetery Company into the alleged suspicious circumstances connected with the death of the infant female child of JAMES DOHERTY, a sugar boiler, residing at 32 Looe-street, Plymouth. The evidence of the mother (ANN DOHERTY) showed that she gave birth to the child on Wednesday week last and that it died on the following Saturday morning. Neither she nor the child was attended by a medical man either at the birth or at the death. It was a prematurely-born baby and was very delicate. She had had eighteen children. by her instruction the deceased was conveyed to the cemetery for burial by her sister, but the Cemetery Company refused to inter the body without a certificate from the registrar of births, deaths and marriages. At the time she was very ill, and neglected to have the birth or death registered though it was baptised at the Roman Catholic Cathedral. Mr William Henry Waterfield, surgeon, stated that by the Coroner's request he made a post mortem examination of the deceased and found it to be well nourished with no marks of violence on its body. It appeared to have been properly attended to and in his opinion the cause of death was due to the weak constitution of the deceased. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Hoskings was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the Coroner informing the Jury that they were not concerned in the negligence of the mother in not having the birth and death of the child registered, as it in no way affected the cause of death. Mr Burd, the registrar, took every precaution in this matter and reported it very properly to the Coroner.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian held an Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on Saturday afternoon respecting the death of HENRY ELLIS, aged nine years, and whose death was caused by serious injuries he received through being knocked down by a horse and cart. GEORGE ELLIS identified the body of the deceased as that of his brother. On the day of the accident he accompanied him to the Hospital, where he died shortly after admission. Mr W. A. Lang stated that he took the unfortunate lad into his arms and carried him as far as the bottom of Woodland-terrace, where a cab was procured, and the deceased was conveyed to the Hospital. Thomas Penwill, a cartman in the employ of Mr Willcocks, deposed that between four and five o'clock on Friday afternoon he was going to Cattedown, when he noticed some boys chasing one another. One of them fell and the wheels of the cart went over him. The boy was conveyed to the Hospital by Mr Lang. Dr Woollcombe stated he had made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death was caused by the wounds inflicted by the wheel of the cart. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the driver of the cart from all blame. The Coroner and Jury passed a vote of condolence with the parents of the deceased.

EXETER - Death In An Almshouse. - The Exeter Coroner held an Inquiry on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES TOUT, seventy-eight, a gardener, living in Wynard's Almshouses. It transpired that deceased had lived alone in the almshouses for eighteen or twenty years and was described as eccentric. He would not allow anyone to go into his house, which was usually very dirty, although it was visited every year by the city aldermen. On Friday, deceased not having been seen for a day or two, his bedroom was entered by the window, and the old man found dead on the bed. The rooms which he occupied were in an extremely filthy state. Death was due to syncope and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 31 January 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquiry at the Sportsman's Arms, Keyham, last evening relative to the death of ELIZABETH WONNACOTT, who was found dead early on the same morning. From the evidence produced it appeared that the deceased was about fifty-eight years of age, and the wife of a naval pensioner. On the previous night she entered the room with a bundle of clothes, which she had taken off the line, and threw them on a chair, saying "That is what I have done today." The husband saw she was under the influence of drink, went into an adjoining room and at half-past eight in the evening went to bed, seeing nothing more of her until about six o'clock yesterday morning, when he found her lying by the side of the bed, quite cold. A neighbour and Dr Gard were called, and the medical man pronounced life to be extinct. It appeared that on the previous day deceased sent a little girl named Shawcroft for half a pint of rum. The result of a post-mortem examination showed that the immediate cause of death was syncope, and a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

COMPTON - Sudden Death At Compton. - The Deputy County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, jun.) held an Inquiry at the Rising Sun, Compton, last evening, respecting the death of SARAH ANN ATWILL, aged fifty-one years, who died suddenly on Tuesday. JOHN ATWILL, husband of the deceased, stated that his wife had been very unwell for the last few days, complaining of pains in her sides and on the evening of the 29th inst., between eight and nine o'clock, she suddenly expired. Mr George Frederick Aldous, surgeon, deposed that he made a post-mortem examination, and was of opinion that death was due to syncope. The Jury (of whom Mr George Hoskin was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 February 1889 TORQUAY - The Suicide Of A Lady At Torquay. The Coroner And The Medical Men. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Moncoffer, a lodging-house in Kent's-road, Wellswood, Torquay, concerning the death of MISS SYBILLA CATHERINE PECKHAM, aged 56, who died on Wednesday evening from self-inflicted injuries to her throat. The deceased lady's home was near Guildford in Surrey, but she had been a winter visitor to Torquay during the last three years. She had been staying at Moncoffer on this occasion for three months, during which time, and for a long period previously, she had been an invalid from chest disease. She had also suffered from epileptic attacks, and she had one of these about a month ago, which left her in a more than usually weak, emaciated and despondent state. About half-past twelve on Sunday, at mid-day, whilst MISS MARY PERKINS, the sister of the deceased, who had been looking after her, was looking at a picture in the sitting-room, with her back temporarily turned to the deceased, she turned round and saw her sister in the act of cutting her throat with a table knife. She immediately seized hold of her wrist, pulled the knife out of her hand, and threw it down, at the same time calling loudly for assistance. The parlour-maid came and held the deceased's hand on her lap until Dr Boreham, who had been sent for, arrived. He found the deceased lying on the floor on her back, with two severe wounds in the throat, which was bleeding profusely. She appeared quite unconscious and he was unable to get her to speak. On tying the blood-vessels he found that one of the cuts had gone partially through the wind-pipe. They had evidently been produced by drawing the knife from left to right, one cut being in the centre, and the other on the right side. After he had stitched up the wounds and tied the blood-vessels, Mr Gordon Cuming, surgeon, and the usual medical attendant, arrived, and with the help of a servant, the deceased was taken upstairs. The knife, covered with blood, was found lying by the side of the deceased. The unfortunate lady lingered on until Wednesday evening, when she died from the effects of the wounds. During the three days preceding her death she had been unable to speak, the wind-pipe being severed, and she wrote what she wished to express on a slate. On this she wrote words to the effect that she desired forgiveness and that no one could ever know what she had suffered from depression. - Two rather unusual incidents happened during the Inquiry. After the Coroner had taken the evidence of the deceased's sister and of Mr Cumming, the latter having testified to the cause of death, he called Rose Jeffery, a nurse, upon which Mr R. Smerdon, a Juryman, suggested that Dr Boreham (who was present), who sewed up the deceased's throat, should be called first. The Coroner said he preferred to arrange the evidence, which the Jury would consider as it was placed before them. After the nurse had made a brief statement, the Coroner said this was all the evidence which it had been arranged the Jury should deal with, but if they wished for any further testimony it should be called if the majority thought it necessary. The usual practice in these cases, however, was to call one medical opinion only unless there was any obscurity or doubt about it, and in that case they could call two or three medical witnesses if they pleased. He should not call another medical man in this instance without an expression of opinion to that effect on the part of the Jury, as he did not wish to saddle the county with the additional expense unless the Jury desired it, and because it was not the usual practice. - Mr W. Crocker, the Foreman, consulted his brother Jurymen, and they were unanimously of opinion that, as Dr Boreham was in the room some time before the arrival of Mr Cumming, he should be called as a witness and this was accordingly done. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind. they gave their fees to the Torbay Hospital.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 February 1889 BISHOPSTEIGNTON - An Inquest was held at Bishopsteignton on Saturday afternoon before Mr Hacker, County Coroner, concerning the death of MR JOHN LAKE, farmer, of Radway, who died on Friday night from injuries received by falling from a spirited young colt. The evidence shewed that whilst passing a field the animal attempted to bolt through the open gateway. At that moment one of the stirrup leathers broke and deceased fell off, pitching on his head. He never regained consciousness and it is supposed that he received injuries to his brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 4 February 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday evening at the Navy and Army Inn, Lambhay Hill, touching the death of FLORENCE JANE FOSTER, aged sixteen months. From the evidence of the step-mother it appeared that the infant, which had been weakly from its birth, died suddenly that morning in witness's arms from convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Gill was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 5 February 1889 WHITCHURCH - Inquest At Pennycomequick. - Last evening the Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at Pennycomequick relative to the death of EVELYN MARY DODRIDGE, aged 17 months, who died suddenly on the previous day at the residence of its parents, 1 Stewart- place. From the evidence of Mr Jackson, surgeon, who was called at the time of death, it appeared that the child died from convulsions caused by teething, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 6 February 1889 ST. MARYCHURCH - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Havelock Arms, St. Marychurch, yesterday morning, respecting the death of JOHN HILL, tailor, 63 years old, who was found dead in his bed the previous morning by a fellow-lodger named Mark Webber. After hearing the evidence of Dr Finch the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Cobourg Inn, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of SARAH GILL, aged about seventy years, and who died suddenly early yesterday morning. Rosina Westlake identified the deceased as her aunt. Sarah Menhinnick deposed that the deceased was always by herself and never associated with any of the neighbours. Therefore, they could not tell if she was ill or not. Witness further stated that on account of not seeing or hearing of the deceased for the last two days an alarm was raised, and unfortunately she was discovered dead on the floor. The Jury, after a few minutes' consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner, (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Town Hall, Devonport, yesterday afternoon on the body of a three months' old child named BEATRICE ELIZABETH POMEROY, of 89 Pembroke-street, and who died suddenly during Sunday night. The mother of the deceased stated that the child had had very good health. On Sunday night she put it to bed, and gave it nourishment at four o'clock the next morning. At half-past seven, when she awoke, she found the child dead. Amelia Andrew deposed to sending for Mr Hinvest, who pronounced life to be extinct. The mother, on being recalled said the child was kicking out its legs on Sunday afternoon through having a pain in the stomach. Mr Edwin Hinvest, surgeon, said he made a careful external examination of the body. He could not find any symptoms of the child having been suffocated, but the fact of its throwing about its legs on the previous day showed that it had had convulsions and irritation of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr Row was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 February 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Death Of An Opium Eater At Devonport. Coroner's Inquest. - The death of THOMAS HITCHCOCK, 66 years of age, of 45 James-street, Devonport, from the effects of opium poisoning formed the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner yesterday. - Cecilia Mason stated that deceased came to lodge at her house on the 15th January. He gave the name of THOMAS HITCHCOCK, and described himself as a sick bay assistant-steward, and said he had a pension of £36 10s. a year. Deceased was very singular in his habits. He boarded with witness, but although he sat at the table he scarcely ever ate any meat. He was continually shewing something, but she did not know what it was. He often seemed to be labouring under excitement, and talked to himself a great deal. Last Monday week he said he wanted to borrow a shilling a week to buy opium, and witness refused to lend it. She had not received any money from the deceased. She did not expect to get any money until April. He told her he expected the old-age money, and he would pay her when he received it. She told the parish authorities that she wanted him removed, as his noisy conduct at times made her think that he ought to be carefully looked after by persons who were able to give him more attention than she could. He was so ill on Sunday as not to be able to leave his room. She applied to the parish authorities the following morning, who gave her an order for the doctor. Mr Wilson came a short time afterwards and told her the man was too ill to be removed. She found a piece of opium in the room. Deceased died about one o'clock the previous afternoon in the presence of Mr Wilson. Deceased once told her that he could not live without opium. He said he began with half a grain and had now got to three or four. - Mr J. Wilson, surgeon, said he saw deceased about noon on the previous day. He was in an insensible state; his face white and blanched. His pulse was like a thread and very fast. His pupils were very much contracted, his breathing short and hurried. After going into the history of the case with the previous witness he inferred that deceased was suffering from an overdose of opium, so he immediately injected nitro-glycerine, which, if he had not taken too much opium, might have aroused him. Witness asked the people of the house to try and arouse him and give him coffee or brandy if he could take it, but they could not. He left to get a stomach pump, and on his return a few minutes afterwards he found life extinct. Witness found 6 ½ grains of opium in deceased's snuff-box, which would be more than sufficient to cause death. Four grains would be the least fatal dose for an adult. For a shilling he could purchase 30 grains. If he had failed to take the opium regularly and then took the original dose, it might have a fatal effect. - The Jury found that deceased died from the effects of an Overdose of Opium, which was Self-Administered.

Western Morning News, Friday 8 February 1889 CHULMLEIGH - At Chulmleigh yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of ROBERT CANN, miller, aged 60, whose body had been found by the police in a stream. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned. It transpired that on two occasions deceased had been sent to a lunatic asylum.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 8 February 1889 EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of ROSE ELIZA PATTER, aged seven months, and who was found dead in bed on Wednesday morning. Dr Harris said death was due to convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAVISTOCK - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital, before R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr William [?], Foreman, touching the death of WILLIAM ROOK, aged 30, who met his death in the Broadway Cutting of the new railway on Tuesday last. The Coroner, on opening the Inquiry, thanked the Cottage Hospital authorities for allowing the corpse to be brought to the Hospital, and suggested that a mortuary should be provided by the town authorities. George Ives stated that he worked with the deceased in the Broadwell cutting. On Tuesday at a quarter-past one the deceased charged a hole with powder, and lighted the fuse, which, however, failed to ignite the powder. After waiting about ten minutes he returned to the spot and charged two other holes near the former one, and these exploded in due course. At five minutes after two o'clock the deceased went to the unexploded hole and proceeded to pick out the charge, when it exploded and blew the deceased three or four feet into the cutting. The witness was standing close by at the time of the explosion. In reply to the Foreman, he said he never knew a fuse to hang fire more than five minutes, and it was three quarters of an hour before the deceased went to the hole after it missed fire. Mr William hart, the sub-contractor, said the deceased was an experienced man, and had been with him more than twelve months. Witness also explained that in attempting to pick out the charge the deceased did not therefore carry out his instructions. - Dr Brodrick said that the deceased's brains were blown out. - Mr John Pethick, of Plymouth, the contractor, said that if there was any suggestion which the Jury could make as to the giving additional instructions to the sub contractors or workmen he would be very glad to carry it out. They were most desirous that every care should be taken to prevent accidents. This unfortunate circumstance had pained him very much and also Mr Hart, who valued very much the services of the deceased. Everything possible was done to ensure the safety of the men, and it was only recently that a sub-contractor gave up his work because he (Mr Pethick) insisted upon is taking away some of the top earth for fear of its falling and injuring the men below, the sub-contractor stating that unless he could work his own way he would have nothing to do with it. - The Coroner thanked Mr Pethick for his attendance and remarks and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 February 1889 WITHYCOMBE RALEIGH - At an Inquest held at Withycombe, near Exmouth, yesterday, touching the death of JAMES MARSHALL, carter, evidence was given to the effect that the deceased was sent to Exmouth on Tuesday last with his wagon for coke. He had no reins and had no command over the horses. Going down a hill he appeared to have fallen off the shafts and the skull was fractured, death being probably instantaneous. No drag was used on the wheels, and the Coroner told Robert Farrant, manager on Mr Heath's farm, where the deceased was employed, that he should give instructions for a drag to be kept on the wagons. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 February 1889 PLYMOUTH - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of HENRY SILAS PERKINS, aged two months. Deceased was a fine child at birth, but had been pining away ever since. It was always very hearty, but did not seem to thrive. MARY EMMA PERKINS, the mother, stated that about seven o'clock that morning the child was lying on her right arm, and when she awoke about half-past eight she found it in the same position, dead. The Jury, of whom Mr A. Adams was foreman, passed a vote of sympathy with the parents.

PLYMSTOCK - As a man named Drake, of Turnchapel, was walking along the shore at Jennycliff Bay yesterday morning he discovered among the rocks a boy, which was afterwards identified as that of GEORGE PHIPPS, aged 19, formerly residing at 18 Lambhay-street, Plymouth. Deceased was third hand of the trawler Kingfisher of Plymouth and about five weeks ago was drowned in the Sound. Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, yesterday afternoon opened an Inquest at the Castle Inn, Mount Batten. Although the body was minus the head and hands, John Lucock, by a belt and other clothing, identified the remains as those of his grandson. As the Kingfisher was at sea no evidence as to how deceased got into the water could be given, and the Inquiry was adjourned until Saturday 23rd inst.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 February 1889 PLYMOUTH - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at Plymouth, last evening, relative to the death of MARIA SYMONS, aged 48 years. Deceased on the previous day was hanging clothes out of the bedroom window when she was observed leaning over the window-ledge. Some neighbours went to her assistance and she was placed in bed. Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, was called in, but life was then extinct. Mr J. P. Norris was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 14 February 1889 DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Guildhall, before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of an illegitimate child, aged four months, and named ELSIE FLORENCE MAY FLEET. Deceased, according to the evidence of HENRIETTA FLEET, the mother, was quite well on the 11th inst., although a little drowsy. At an early hour next morning, the mother, however, after hearing the child gurgle found it dead by her side. Dr Crossfield said death resulted from Natural Causes, probably from suppressed measles or convulsions, which had been prevalent in the town. A verdict to this effect was returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 February 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned by a Coroner's Jury, which assembled yesterday at Devonport, before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough coroner, to investigate the cause of death of EDWARD THOMAS PATTEN, a naval pensioner, sixty-four years of age. It was stated in evidence that the deceased got up from bed shortly after five o'clock yesterday morning, in accordance with his usual practice, to take a promenade along Richmond Walk. Later in the morning his body was found floating in the water near the bathing place at Mount Wise, and his hat was pressed over his head as if he had fallen forward. The body bore no marks of violence and there was no reason to doubt that he accidentally fell into the water.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 18 February 1889 ASHBURTON - On Saturday Mr Sydney Hacker, the District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the infant child of ELIZABETH FORD, residing in North-street, and which the mother found dead by her side on Thursday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 19 February 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Burning Accident At Stonehouse. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening touching the death of a little girl named ANNIE MILLER, five years of age, who on Sunday afternoon succumbed to injuries received from a burning accident at her residence, 9 George-street, Stonehouse, on the 6th instant. Mary Jane Andoe stated that she heard screams on the day of the accident and ran into the deceased's room, where she discovered her in flames in bed. she put a mat around her and lifted her from the bed on to the floor, by which time the flames were extinguished. - Rosina Curley said she took the child to Mr Bulteel, jun., who dressed its wounds and ordered it to be removed to the Hospital. ELIZABETH MILLER, mother of the deceased, said she could not tell how the fire occurred. There was a spirit lamp in the room all the night, but it had burnt out. She did not know if there were any matches in the room. - Kate Barcoe, nurse, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on the 6th with extensive burns. Everything that was possible was done for the child, but there was never much hope of its living long. The child died from the shock to the system. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said it was a somewhat curious case, nothing being assigned as the cause of the accident. The Jury, of whom Mr Harris was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from, Burning."

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 February 1889 ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at Hele, near Ilfracombe, yesterday, on the body of the child of MR GIBBS, of her Majesty's Navy. The child, 16 months old, was missed for a few minutes, and then found rolling over in the stream, which was much swollen with the rain. When taken up it was past restoration. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended the Local Board to widen and repair the footpath which is close by the stream, and to fence it, several children having fallen into the stream of late. The path is also dilapidated and unsafe.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident In Devonport Dockyard. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of JOHN PROUT, a caulker, about 51 years of age, who met with a fatal accident at Devonport Dockyard on the 5th inst. Mr Gameson represented Mr J. J. E. Venning, the Admiralty law agent. Mr T. G. Clark, foreman of caulkers, who identified the body, said deceased knew his work well and was one of his best men. John Rogers, shipwright, said on the 5th instant he was working with deceased on board H.M.S. Spanker, now in course of construction at Devonport Dockyard. Deceased was kneeling on the deck and on getting up stepped back into the man-hole and on trying to regain his footing fell backwards, striking his head on a bracket. He was at once taken to the surgery and was unconscious for about twenty minutes. His head having been dressed, he was removed to his home in Pembroke-street. Mr Clark, recalled, stated that the day after the accident deceased came to work, and on being asked how he was, replied that he was all right. He, however, was taken ill on the following Sunday and on Wednesday last was admitted to the Hospital. Mr M. O'Brien, surgeon, said deceased was suffering from injuries to the head. He died on the 19th inst., the immediate cause of death being inflammation of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident On The New Railway At Devonport. The Coroner And Medical Evidence. - The death of WILLIAM DAW, mason, of 2 Newport-street, Stonehouse, from injuries at the new railway works near Devonport Brickfields, was the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, at the Royal Albert Hospital yesterday. The accident was described by John Tall, mason. He and deceased took the work on which they were engaged as partners at a contract price from Mr Higman. They had to remove two ribs, used in the construction of the tunnel, from an embankment on to two trucks. Deceased, who had charge of the work, witness and three others were engaged about it. The ribs, in four halves, were put one on top of another in a sling, which was lowered by a steam crane on to two trucks standing end to end on the line, and attached to each other by a chain. Deceased and three labourers adjusted the ribs on the trucks, so that they might be carried into the tunnel with safety. The deceased then jumped on to one of the trucks for the purpose of unhooking the sling chain from the crane. Having done that, he sang out "All right." The truck, with the timber, immediately went over on one side, and he being topmost, was the first to go, and fell under the timber. Witness, who was on the bank, went to his assistance, and found that one rib was resting on his head and another over his chest and on his shoulder. He was bleeding very much. Deceased was placed in Messrs. Popham and Radford's covered van and removed to the Royal Albert Hospital. - The Coroner: What caused the accident? - I cannot tell exactly. I think the deceased got on the side of the truck where the most weight was, and so caused it to upset. - A Juryman: Do you think the truck was upset by the ribs not being placed in the centre of the truck? - I was on the bank, and I cannot tell. When deceased said "All right" the timber was not in any way connected with the crane. The timber was placed upon the trucks which rested on trolleys. They had usually placed these ribs on trolleys without trucks, but deceased had the ordering of the matter, and he ordered the timber to be placed on the trucks while upon the trolleys. If any blame was attached to anyone for the way in which the work was done, and the ordering of it, it was the deceased only. - William Wright, a labourer employed under deceased, gave corroborative evidence. The sling chain was swung away from the trolley before the accident happened and no movement of the chain or crane had anything to do with the accident. - Michael Dunn, driver of the steam crane, employed by Messrs. Relf and Pethick, the contractor for the line, said he hoisted the wood and lowered it on to the truck. The crane was unhooked. He heard deceased sing out "All right," and before he got back to his engine he heard a crash. - The Coroner's Officer (Inspector Webber) who had been instructed by the Coroner to summon the nurse at the Hospital to give evidence as to the man's injuries, said the assistant house surgeon at the Hospital said he ought to be called and that he was entitled to the fee. - The Coroner said the surgeon could give evidence if he liked, but he would not receive any fee, as deceased died in the Hospital, and the doctor was not, therefore, entitled to it. If a person refused to give evidence because it was a question of fee, he had his own opinion upon the matter. He summoned the nurse because he was in a position to pay her, and he did not wish to take away the surgeon from his duties. If the man had died on his way to the Hospital, and the doctor had been summoned to him, he would be clearly entitled to the fee. - Mr T. H. Ward, the assistant house surgeon, said the man died in the waiting-room and not the ward of the Hospital, and claimed that he was entitled to the fee. It had been the practice in other hospitals where he had served for the house surgeon to be called and receive the fee. The Coroner said he was perfectly clear that the law did not allow a hospital surgeon to receive a fee if the patient died in the Hospital. The waiting-room was a portion of the Hospital building. - The witness was then sworn and deposed that deceased was admitted to the Hospital in a dying state, and died five minutes afterwards. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the engine driver and all connected with the work from blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 21 February 1889 TAVISTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital yesterday touching the death of WILLIAM HART, alias BRYANT, aged twenty-four, who was injured in the Wringworthy cutting of the new railway on the 9th instant and died at the Hospital on Monday. Mr William Northcott was Foreman of the Jury. Francis Maunder, farmer's son, of Marytavy employed on the railway works managing a pair of horses belonging to his father and hired by the railway contractors, said that on Saturday week he was engaged hauling four trucks laden with earth from Wringworthy cutting. When he reached the incline leading to the tip the deceased came forward and offered to uncouple the horses, which it was the witness's work to do. Maunder went to the head of the leading horse and deceased gave the horses two cuts with his whip, at the same time calling out to witness to pull them off the road. He immediately did as directed, but owing to the force on the chain the deceased was unable to uncouple it. The waggons shot ahead, flinging the horses against some empty trucks which stood near, and the deceased being on the wrong side was caught by the chain and jammed against the leading truck. The chain broke and liberated the horses and the deceased, the latter of whom immediately fell down in front of the moving waggons. The first one passed over without injuring him, but the flang of the second waggon caught his left foot crushing it, and the deceased beginning to struggle his right foot got across the rails and the third waggon went over it. Meanwhile, the brakesman had applied the brake and the waggons were brought to a standstill. Deceased crawled out between the third and fourth trucks, and the witness with the brakesman went to his assistance and procured his removal to the Tavistock Cottage Hospital. Thomas Stephens, the brakesman, gave corroborative evidence, and added that it was not the work of the deceased to uncouple the horses. His usual work was to empty the waggons on the bank. If the deceased had been on the right side of the chain he could have got out all right. Dr Brodrick, who had attended the sufferer at the Cottage Hospital, said that by the Coroner's order he had made a post mortem examination that day, and without this the cause of death could not have been so readily defined. He found that the deceased had received injuries to the bowels caused by the chain squeezing him across the body, and there was also a good deal of congestion of the vessels. This and the shock to the system were the cause of death. Had it not been for the internal injuries the deceased would in all probability have lived, for although he had undergone three amputations and had lost both legs the stumps were doing very well. There was also an internal haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 February 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - The circumstances attending the death of JOHN, the illegitimate child of FANNY ROWLAND, was the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at Stonehouse yesterday. Deceased, aged three years, had been delicate from birth and on Monday evening it was taken ill. Lavinia King, by whom it was kept, sent for Mr Pearse, surgeon, Plymouth. A message was brought back that he would call the following morning. He however, did not call until the afternoon, and then the child was dead. Mr M. H. Bulteel who had made a post-mortem examination said death resulted from convulsions due to a generally bad state of health. The Jury, of whom Mr Foster was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 25 February 1889 EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the new Police-court, Exeter, touching the death of JAMES STEPHENS, aged six years, son of a labourer, of 8 Mary Arches-street. The evidence showed that the child was attacked with measles on Monday afternoon. On Friday he seemed worse and vomited blood. A doctor was sent for, but the child died before his arrival. The cause of death according to the medical testimony, was haemorrhage of the lungs. A verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 25 February 1889 PLYMSTOCK - An adjourned inquiry into the cause of death of GEORGE PHIPPS, a fisherman, who was drowned in Plymouth Sound on January 7th, was resumed on Saturday at Mount Batten by Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner. Wm. Henry Robinson, master of the trawler Kingfisher of Plymouth, stated that about quarter to two on the morning of January 7th, whilst in the Sound, deceased, who was third hand of the vessel, was placing the anchor on the bow, and pushed it too far aft, when it over-balanced and deceased was dragged overboard by the chain. For upwards of three-quarters of an hour they sailed round the spot, but could find no trace of him. Samuel Glanville, a fisherman, gave corroborative evidence, and the Jury of whom Mr R. Frood was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 26 February 1889 NEWTON ABBOT - Sudden Death At Newton. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry at the Town Hall, Newton Abbot, concerning the death of MR JOHN BAWDON, seventy-one, retired farmer, of Newton, who dropped dead whilst walking from Newton to Aller on Saturday. The medical evidence showed that death was due to failure of the heart's action induced by inward congestion. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 27 February 1889 TAVISTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital yesterday on the body of RICHARD COX, who died there on Sunday afternoon. Mr W. T. B. Winter was Foreman of the Jury. George Sloggett said he was foreman in the employ of Messrs. Relf and Pethick, the contractors for the new railway, and was working at the Shillamill Viaduct, about two miles from Tavistock. The deceased, who was thirty years of age, and a mason, was engaged on Saturday last in turning an arch at the viaduct. There was a travelling steam crane at work there, and the deceased inadvertently placed his left hand on the rail and the crane, which was in motion, passed over his fingers. COX was alone at the time, there being no one at work with him, but he had no reason whatever to place his hand on the rail. The injury to the hand was so severe that he was at once taken to the Hospital. Dr Brodrick who saw the deceased about six o'clock on Saturday evening, said he found him suffering from compound fracture of the first two fingers of the left hand and a lacerated wound on the third finger. On the following day, after consultation with Dr Swale, they decided to amputate the two fingers and possibly the third. Dr Swale administered chloroform, to which the man did not object, the witness being at the other end of the ward at the time, and when he returned to where the deceased lay he was fairly under the influence of the chloroform. Dr Swale asked if there was any pulse at the wrist but there was none. They examined the deceased's chest before giving the narcotic. When they found no pulse at the wrist they applied restoratives for half-an-hour, but to no effect, the patient having expired. A post-mortem examination had been made, and on opening the chest they found the heart slightly enlarged and very flabby with fluid within the heart cavity. There were signs of old mischief about the heart, and the deceased died from the effects of the chloroform acting upon a weak heart, but not one in a hundred would be from the administration of chloroform. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 February 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - "Death From Blood Poisoning" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Stonehouse yesterday, respecting the death of JAMES PENGELLY, 52, late a skilled carpenter in Devonport Dockyard. The deceased went down through a man-hole at the bottom of the Ringdove, now being built, for the purpose of riveting a plate, and on turning around to get out he became jammed in the aperture and was with difficulty pulled out. The manhole was circular and about 14 inches in diameter. Deceased complained of pains in his arm, and was confined to his bed. Dr Hinvest said the deceased was suffering from abscesses and blood-poisoning and he gave up the case from the first.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 March 1889 TAVISTOCK - Inquiry was made by Mr Coroner Rodd, at Wormwood, near Tavistock yesterday, into the cause of death of MR JOHN ROBERT MAY, corn merchant, who died from injuries received under singular circumstances. Whilst riding over the Wormwood Estate on Saturday last, deceased turned his horse round for the purpose of seeing that a gate through which he had just passed was closed. As he did so the horse, a spirited animal, reared sharply, and fell back upon its rider. MR MAY soon disentangled himself and mounting a pony ridden by a man in his employ, named Elworthy, who accompanied him, rode through three fields to his home. Mr G. Northey, surgeon of Tavistock, who was sent for, found that the deceased had sustained severe internal injuries, to which he succumbed on Wednesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Much sympathy is felt with the family of MR MAY, who was very popular in the neighbourhood.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 2 March 1889 YEALMPTON - Accidental Death Of A Child At Yealmpton. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest concerning the death of the illegitimate child of AMELIA ANN FOSTER. Deceased, who was named FLORENCE ANNIE, and was a finely grown child, aged one year and eleven months, had been seated on her grandmother's lap by the fire, but was placed on the floor while the latter proceeded to get some fuel. Alongside the fire was a pan of hot water, and the child, who had picked up the shovel and was going with her grandmother, over-balanced herself, fell into the pan of hot water and was severely scalded. This was about five o'clock on the evening of the 26th ult. Dr Adkins attended the child, but it died the next evening. These facts were borne out by Dr Adkins and the grandmother in evidence at the Inquest, which was held at the Yealmpton Hotel. The former explained that the nature of the injuries was scalding of the second degree, the parts affected being the back, thighs and the abdomen. Death was the result of shock occasioned by the scalds. The Jury, of whom Mr Edwin Hodges was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 5 March 1889 TOTNES - Fatal Fall Downstairs At Totnes. - Upon MR H. MICHELMORE, builder, Collings-row, High-street, Totnes, going home shortly after ten o'clock on Sunday night, he found lying at the foot of the stairs dead his sister, MISS HARRIET MICHELMORE, aged 69, who had lived with him for about seventeen years. He left her about six o'clock quite well; she attended service at church afterwards, and on her way home, just after nine, she spoke to Mr John Edwards, landlord of the Plymouth Inn. At the Inquest held yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, MR MICHELMORE said he found the house was in its usual state. Mr Edwards stated that when MR MICHELMORE called him to his sister, she was lying on her back with her arms stretched out. She was dead, but still warm. The two books she had with her when returning from church and her bonnet were on the bed. A lamp was on the table but not lighted. Dr James Thompsons aid deceased had received a severe blow at the back of the head, the skull being fractured. He believed the neck was also dislocated and death, he thought, was instantaneous. - James Cole, living next door to deceased, said about a quarter to nine on Sunday evening he heard a noise like a 56lb weight falling on the passage of the adjoining house. He listened at the plaster partition, but heard nothing more. Mr Edwards, recalled, said he was sure it was a quarter past nine when deceased spoke to him on her way home. - The Coroner remarked that it was easy to make a mistake in the time, and probably the noise heard was that made by deceased in falling over the stairs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday, respecting the death of ELIZA WOON, 30 years of age, wife of WH. H. F. WOON, 82 James-street. Deceased was apparently in good health until Friday last, when she complained of shortness of breath. A linseed meal poultice was applied to her chest and this relieved her. On Saturday night, however, she was taken very ill and died in the arms of a neighbour during the absence of her husband, who had gone for a doctor. A post-mortem examination made by Mr C. J. Cook, surgeon, revealed a large amount of fluid in the membrane round the left lung, the result of chronic pleurisy and that pressing on the heart was the cause of death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes " was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 5 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Clarence Arms last evening respecting the death of WILLIAM CHAFF, aged seventy-nine years, and who died suddenly on Saturday, the 2nd instant. The widow having given evidence, Dr Square stated that the deceased had been a patient of his for a number of years, and he suffered greatly from bronchitis. The Jury, of whom Mr Lashbrook was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - A Fisherman Drowned At Plymouth. - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held before Mr Coroner Brian, at Plymouth Guildhall, last evening, relative to the death of WILLIAM SUBBOCK, a fisherman, aged 35 years, who was drowned in Sutton Pool on the previous night, as stated in our issue of yesterday. Fredk. Weymouth, a fisherman, said deceased, who belonged to Yarmouth, came on shore with him about five o'clock on the previous afternoon. They came a little way up the Barbican, when deceased left him and witness did not see him again until shortly before eleven o'clock. He was then standing at the Barbican Pier steps, and was the worse for liquor. Once he got near the edge of the pier and witness pulled him back. On his going to look for their boat, deceased again got close to the pier edge and fell over. A boat was immediately put out and, with some assistance, deceased was removed to the Custom-house passage. Witness did everything he could to restore life, and on the arrival of P.C. Bennett they continued their efforts for more than half an hour, but without effect. In answer to the Foreman, witness said ten minutes elapsed before they got deceased to the surface of the water. P.C. Bennett deposed to being called to the spot, and to trying Dr Sylvester's method of restoration without effect. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Southern was Foreman, considered that much praise was due to the witnesses, Weymouth and Bennett, for the manner in which they had acted.

Western Daily Mercury Thursday 7 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening touching the death of THOMAS ROW, aged eighty-one, and who died from the effects of a fall. THOMAS ROW, son of the deceased, deposed that he lived at 32 St. Andrew's Street, the residence of his father, whom he had supported for several years. Deceased had been a waterman and on Saturday the 2nd of February last, whilst going up stairs, he fell. Witness who was in the kitchen at the time, ran out and with assistance conveyed his father to a back room placing him on a sofa. On the following Monday Dr Webb was called in and attended deceased up to time of his death. Dr C. L. Webb stated that he visited deceased on the 4th ultimo, and found him suffering from shock to the system occasioned by the fall. It was his opinion that the internal bone of the left thigh was broken, and that death resulted from the shock to the system and a very bad bed-sore. The Jury of whom Mr Richard Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 8 March 1889 TORQUAY - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry at the Half Moon Hotel, Torquay yesterday morning on the body of JAMES ROOK, 50, cabman, who was found dead in his bed the previous morning. He retired to rest as usual, and, failing to get up, Dr Thistle was sent for, but could do nothing as life was extinct. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Burnt To Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry at the S.D. and E.C. Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday respecting the death of FLORENCE BEATRICE REED, aged five years, who died from wounds caused by fire. CLARA REED, mother of the deceased, stated that on the morning of March 6th, between eight and nine o'clock, she had occasion to go into the back yard and whilst proceeding downstairs she heard a scream, and at once went to the room, where she found the deceased in flames. The child was then wrapped in blankets and conveyed to the Hospital where it expired a few hours after admission. Dr Woollcombe stated that he attended the deceased up to the time of its demise, and he was of opinion that death was due to the injuries caused by the fire. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Rowe was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the mother from all blame. The Coroner and Jury passed a vote of condolence with the bereaved parents.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 9 March 1889 TAVISTOCK - Inquest at Tavistock. - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at the Union Inn, yesterday, respecting the death of GEORGE S. BARNETT, aged eighteen months, son of WILLIAM BARNETT, a labourer, residing at 40 Bannawell Street. Mr E. Richards was Foreman of the Jury. It appeared that between seven and eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, the deceased's sister took him from the bedroom to the kitchen and placed him in the cradle. The deceased almost immediately had a fit, and the mother, who was upstairs, heard one child remark to the other, "Don't say anything to mother; she will be frightened." and upon her coming at once into the kitchen she found the baby dead. Dr Brodrick, for whom the mother sent at the time, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination, and found that the child died from congestion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - The Suicide By Shooting At Exeter. - Yesterday Mr Deputy Coroner Gould held an Inquest on the body of JEFFRY GOODRIDGE COLE, aged 28, a commercial traveller, who committed suicide by shooting himself at his residence, Ebrington Road, St. Thomas, on Wednesday afternoon. The evidence showed that the deceased had got into difficulties, and this weighed considerably on his mind. On Tuesday night he was left alone in his house and on Wednesday afternoon P.S. Egan went to the house with a warrant for deceased's arrest for forging and uttering three promissory notes of £50 each on the Tiverton branch of the Devon and Cornwall Bank. He was unable to obtain an answer to his knocks, and thinking the deceased was inside as the door was unlocked, but bolted on the inside, he procured a ladder and entered the house by one of the windows. In deceased's bedroom he found his clothes, boots, socks &c. and the bed was quite warm. Deceased was not, however, in the room, and the officer proceeded to search other parts of the house. On arriving at one of the room she found the door to be locked on the inside and getting no answer to his knocks, he looked in through a chink in the door and saw the deceased lying on the floor in a pool of blood. He then called another constable, whom he requested to enter the room by the window with the aid of a ladder and on this being done it was found that deceased was dead, and that there was a revolver lying near with a discharged cartridge in it. Dr Vlieland was sent for, and on examining the body he found a small wound in the mouth leading towards the skull, and this would be caused with a bullet. Dr Vlieland stated that this wound must have been self-inflicted. Some papers were found in deceased's clothes, but none bearing on the occurrence. The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that the question for the Jury to consider was whether deceased at the time he committed the act - which there could be no doubt that he did - was insane or not. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 12 March 1889 ST BUDEAUX - Sudden Death At Honicknowle. - Mr R. R. Rodd (Deputy County Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Woodland Fort Inn yesterday, respecting the death of CHARLES EDWARD DYER, aged ten weeks, who was found dead by its mother's side early on Friday morning. SARAH JANE DYER, mother of the deceased, deposed that when she woke about six o'clock on Friday morning she found, to her surprise, that her infant was dead. She further added that previously the deceased had suffered from a cold, but before its death it was quite well. The Coroner questioned the mother as to whether the child's life was insured, and she replied that she had insured it in the Pearl Life Assurance Company, but owing to her not having been a member for three months no benefit would be derived. Dr Belcher, of Saltash Passage, stated that he made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs. The Jury, after a few minutes' consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - The Jury gave their fees to the parents, who are not in too good a position.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) presided over two Inquests held at the Town Hall, Devonport, last evening - the first case touching the death of a woman aged seventy-nine years, and the other that of an infant, aged forty-four hours. In the former case it appears that JANE SHERIFF, residing at 44 Ker-street, broke her thigh on the 14th January and died at her residence on Sunday afternoon. Mr Everard Row, surgeon, stated that the deceased expired from exhaustion caused by lying on her back some considerable time, which brought about large wounds. Every possible attention was given to the patient, but the old age of the deceased rendered her recovery impossible. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by the accident to deceased's thigh." From the evidence given in the other case, concerning the death of FREDERICK WARREN, it appeared that the father of the child, about quarter to six yesterday morning, inquired of his wife whether she had had a restless night and she replied in the affirmative. He then lifted the bedclothes and found the child dead. Mr Row stated that he had examined the deceased and arrived at the conclusion that the child had been suffocated. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - JANE LANGMAID, who for more than 26 years had lived with Mr J. Walton at 6 Endsleigh-cottage, Plymouth, was seized with illness on getting out of bed yesterday morning, and died within ten minutes. Mr Walton, who was the only witness at the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Brian, last evening, stated that she had lately consulted Mr Spurin, chemist, who said she had diseased heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

NEWTON ST. CYRES - An Inquest was held at Newton St. Cyres yesterday by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN POOK, found in the river Creedy, near Newton St. Cyres Railway Station on Sunday. THOMAS POOK, of Dawlish, identified the body as that of his father, aged 68, a jobbing gardener. Deceased never complained of any trouble. Ann Sims, wife of Robert Sims, Hookway, said deceased had lodged with her six months and never heard him threaten to take his life. Elizabeth Haydon, of Hookway, sister-in-law of deceased, said he left her house on Friday morning saying he was going to catch the train. At times he fretted about the loss of his wife and son. Wm. Pethybridge deposed to seeing deceased the same morning going down a lane leading to the railway crossing at Dunscombe. Charles Frost, a railway employee, Crediton, found deceased's pipe, tobacco and box of matches near the crossing in the afternoon, and P.C. Kemp on Sunday found his hat near St. Cyres station and 400 yards below discovered the body. A pocket handkerchief and a comb were the only things in the pockets. Mr J. A. Edwards, surgeon, Crediton, said deceased died from drowning. there were no marks of violence on the body. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

EGG BUCKLAND - MRS ANN TAVERNER, aged 91, residing at Laira, complained on Saturday last of headache, and by the advice of her daughter, Mary Bray, went upstairs. Sometime afterwards she fell downstairs and died in a few minutes from the shock. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner, at the Old Laira Inn, yesterday, Dr Slade of Plympton, who was sent for when the accident happened, said deceased had suffered from a weak heart and had no doubt she had fainted. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 13 March 1889 EXETER - The Fate Of A Cornish Convict. A Juror Fined £5. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) on the body of JOHN HAWKE, whose death took place in the County Prison at Exeter on Sunday last. One of the Jurors (Mr H. Bailey) did not attend and the Coroner fined him £5, but said the fine would not be enforced until the Juror had had the opportunity of explaining. The evidence adduced showed that the deceased was fifty-six years of age and was a farm labourer. He was convicted at the Bodmin Assizes on the 18th July 1888, for a criminal assault on a little girl, and was sentenced to eighteen years' penal servitude. He was transferred to Exeter Gaol on the 14th August of the same year. Until about eight days ago he enjoyed good health. He then complained of illness and was seen by the medical officer who ordered his removal to the Hospital, where he died on Sunday morning. He was a well-conducted, industrious man while in prison and was never reported for any misconduct or breach of the rules. Mr Caird, the prison doctor, stated that in his opinion the cause of death was a chill, following upon disease of the kidneys. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 March 1889 BOVEY TRACEY - At the Dolphin Inn, Bovey Tracey, Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on Tuesday evening held an Inquest on the body of a newly-born child, found early on the previous morning by Charles Lear on a sandbank between the river and a stream from Bovey Mills. P.C. Slee deposed that in consequence of information received, he questioned CHARLOTTE WARREN, aged 25, a servant, who had been nine months in the employ of Mr Leaker, baker, whose premises adjoin the mill stream. She denied the child was hers. Dr Goodwyn had no doubt that the child had had a separate existence and that it had died from drowning. WARREN had recently been confined. Dr A. Nesbit, of Newton, who assisted at the post-mortem examination, corroborated. After an hour's consultation the Jury, of whom Mr H. Baker was Foreman, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against CHARLOTTE WARREN. The Inquest lasted four hours.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At St. James's Hall, Plymouth. A Marine Falling Downstairs. - An accident with a fatal termination occurred at St. James's Hall, Union-street, Plymouth on Tuesday evening. A young man named THOMAS MATTHEW KELLY, a private of the Royal Marines, was on that evening an occupant of the gallery of that place of amusement. He had been drinking, and shortly before ten, in the company of a civilian, he went out and got some drink. Returning, he lost his balance when about half-way up the stairs to the gallery, fell backwards, and sustained such injuries that he died a few hours after being removed to the Royal Naval Hospital. There are no suspicions of foul play and at the Inquest last evening the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, but the entrance to the gallery at St James's Hall is undoubtedly steep and narrow. There is no reason to believe that it had anything to do with the present accident, for as one of the Jury observed, the only safe way to get a drunken man upstairs is to carry him, but it would certainly be advisable that the company now in possession of the hall should do something to reduce the steepness of the stairs. - The Inquest was held at the Royal Naval Hospital last evening, before Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr T. G. Taylor was foreman. Mr J. P. Goldsmith, solicitor, Devonport, attended to watch the case on the part of the Admiralty; Mr Duff, the secretary, represented the St. James's Hall Company. - Colour Sergeant Hore, Royal Marines, said he knew the deceased, who was about 22, and had been in the service two years and a half. He was wearing one conduct badge at the time of the accident. - Mr John Paul, of 2 Hayston-terrace, Plymouth, marble mason, and ticket collector at St. James's Hall, said he was at James's Hall on the previous evening taking tickets at the gallery entrance. About a quarter to ten he saw the deceased leave the gallery and go out of the building, and about ten o'clock he returned in company of a civilian. As deceased was coming up the stairs and had ascended about nine steps he fell. How he fell witness could not say. Some people from the street came to his assistance. At the time deceased fell he was alone and witness thought he might have looked back to see where his friend was, when he tripped and fell. Deceased was not sober. He had had a little to drink, but nothing to speak of. - The Foreman: Was he rolling? - No. - Is there any railing to the stairs? - Yes, on both sides. - Were the stairs in proper condition? - Yes. - None of the steps broken? - No. - There was nothing in the staircase that would cause him to trip? - Nothing. - Charles Samuel John Roan of 34 Cambridge-street, Plymouth, labourer, deposed that as he was at the entrance to St James's Hall on the previous evening he saw the deceased come across the road from the Castle public-house. When he had got up sixteen or seventeen stairs he turned round, apparently to speak to a civilian who was following him, when he reeled and fell to the right, and, failing to catch the handrail, he fell backwards down the stairs. His head fell on the floor. Witness ran to his assistance, but deceased never spoke. He had been drinking. - Did the civilian interfere with him, or do anything to cause him to fall? - No. - The were not "skylarking" in any way? - Not at all. - To a Juror: The civilian was three or four steps behind, on the other side of the stairs, and deceased fell past him. I consider the civilian acted a very cowardly part; he did not even come down to see what had happened to his friend. - The Ticket Collector: No; he came up and went in the Hall again. - P.C. Reed, on being appealed to, said he had not been able to find out who the deceased's civilian friend was. - Thomas Davey, (labourer ) now serving in the Militia, Royal Engineers), corroborated what the last witness had said. - The Ticket Collector, recalled, said that during the times he had occupied the post - since last September - he had seen several men fall over the stairs. They would be seamen and marines, who, when they had a little drink in them, jumped about there "like bees." - The Coroner: What do you mean by their falling over the stairs? - Witness: I have not seen them fall, but I have seen them jump about on the stairs, larking with one another. - But you have never seen anyone fall over the stairs through any defect in the stairs? - Oh, no; they only jump about the stairs. - The Foreman: But you said just now they fell over stairs? - Witness: You may call it falling over stairs the way in which they jump downstairs. - Mr William Hayes, surgeon of the Royal Naval Hospital, said deceased was admitted to that Hospital at 10.20 p.m., suffering from a contused wound of scalp in shape like a leech bite, about two inches horizontally and one inch vertically, just over the occipital protuberance. The wound was dressed. Deceased smelt strongly of drink, and remained unconscious until he died, at 6.20 a.m. that day. Witness made the post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to fracture of the base of the skull and haemorrhage on the surface of the brain. They were injuries likely to occur from the fall other witnesses had described. - Mr Samuel Hugh Duff, of 3 Hyde Park-road, Plymouth, the secretary of the St. James's Hall Company said the staircase to the gallery was straight up from the street. At the bottom there was about four or five fee square, and the stairs ascended with an iron hand rail on each side to the top, there being twenty-three stairs in all. The stairs were of wood, and without iron or brass hosings. This was the first accident that had happened since St James's Hall had been in the hands of the company - now two years. - The Coroner said he thought the Jury would see from the evidence that there was nobody to blame but the poor fellow himself. There appeared no doubt that in consequence of his being under the influence of drink he lost control of himself, fell backwards, and received the injuries which caused his death. There seemed to be no reason to suppose that the construction of the staircase had anything whatever to do with the accident. - The Foreman thought perhaps the Jury would consider that the staircase was not wide enough, and that in its present state there might be other accidents there. - The Coroner observed that there was no evidence against the construction of the staircase, and a Juror suggested that a wider staircase would be still more dangerous. The only way to get a drunken man upstairs safely was to carry him up. - The Jury then agreed to a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 16 March 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Recent Fatality At Devonport Railway Station. - An Inquiry was held at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday morning, by the Borough Coroner (Mr Vaughan) respecting the death of THOMAS RUSSELL, aged thirty-two years, and of No. 4 Bloomfield Terrace, Exeter, who died at the Hospital on Thursday afternoon. Mr H. J. Foster, detective inspector of the railway police, and Mr R. Sampson, stationmaster, Devonport, attended on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company. Alice Eliza Cole, nurse, in the service of Mr Besant, naval store keeper, in the dockyard, Devonport, stated that whilst she was walking over the stone bridge near Valletort Place, Stoke, about twelve o'clock on Thursday morning, she observed a man fall from the side of the engine and the train pass over him. - William Powell, who resides at Exeter, stated that he was an engine driver in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company. About twelve o'clock on Thursday morning he was engaged on his engine with RUSSELL shunting carriages. Deceased walked around the side of the engine to see whether the "glands" were blowing or not. He would have to stoop to examine them. The plank on which he stood was about a foot wide, and there was a rail around the engine to prevent anyone being thrown off by the motion of the train. The deceased, as far as he (Powell) could judge, must have fallen off the buffer beam and been crushed by the ash box, which was very low under the engine. He was of opinion that if deceased had grasped the rail he would not have been jerked off. RUSSELL did not state to him that he was going to look at the "glands." Witness had to pay particular attention to the pointsman, who was signalling for the train to be brought into the station. The space between the road and the ash box was only about twelve inches. Deceased had been working with witness for fourteen months and he had never heard him complain of being light headed. - Henry Lewis, residing at No. 23 Catherine ope, Devonport, stated that he was a pointsman at the London and South Western Railway Station, Devonport. About twelve o'clock on the morning in question he was shunting the 1.50 p.m. train from Devonport, which was about to be brought into the station. He saw the driver (Powell) leaning over the side of his engine attending to the signals to bring in the train. The driver put the train in motion, and when it had traversed a short distance he (witness) noticed something move between the lines over which the engine had passed. A signal was given, and the driver immediately stopped the engine. When he reached the spot he found to his surprise that what he saw moving was the body of THOMAS RUSSELL. The body of the unfortunate fellow was placed in the train and taken to the station, and afterwards conveyed to the Royal Albert Hospital. Miss Constance, nurse at the Hospital, deposed that deceased was admitted shortly after twelve on Thursday morning and died about an hour after admission. Everything possible was provided, but deceased was in great agony when admitted. He was conscious all the time, but did not make any statement about the misfortune. The Coroner made a few brief remarks respecting the case, which he considered a pitiful one. The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the driver from all blame. A Juryman made a suggestion that the railway company ought to provide an ambulance for various stations. Mr Sampson replied that he would endeavour to get an ambulance, which should be kept at the station, for the purpose of accidents. The deceased leaves a wife and one child.

EXETER - Infant Mortality And Life Assurance. - At the new Police Court, Exeter, yesterday, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM ALBERT SKOINES, aged four and a half months. The mother of the child stated that the infant was insured in the Prudential Office in a penny a week, and she was to receive 30s. at death, but she had not kept up the payment since her husband's illness. She had three other children, aged seven, five and three, and they were all insured at the same rate as deceased. The medical evidence went to show that the child, a well-nourished one, died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 19 March 1889 EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - The Drowning Fatality At Exeter. - Mr Deputy Coroner H. W. Gould held an Inquest yesterday at the Turk's Head Inn, St Thomas, Exeter, on the body of a lad aged five years and named CHARLES EDWARD HOLLAND, son of a compositor, residing in Cleveland Street, St. Thomas, who met his death by drowning on Friday. It appeared from the evidence that on Friday afternoon, subsequent to leaving school, the deceased with other lads went to a field in St. Thomas, belonging to Mr Cummings, builder, where they began to play. There is a gravel pit in the field, and this, owing to the recent rains, had become filled. Deceased was stated to have gone to the side of the pit, and in endeavouring to reach a stick fell in, and was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a recommendation that the pit be fenced. The Coroner pointed out that the field was private property and the lads had no right there.

WHITCHURCH - Death From Starvation Near Tavistock. - An Inquiry was held at the Whitchurch Inn, Whitchurch, near Tavistock, yesterday afternoon, by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of ANDREW MINTOE, a military pensioner, aged 77 years who was discovered lying in his cottage in an unconscious condition on Friday afternoon and died about nine o'clock the same evening. Mr J. W. Willcock was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Elizabeth Davey, wife of an employee on the new railway, deposed that deceased told her he had had a fall on his back indoors. During the past fortnight witness had been doing little things for him, as he was unable to get about himself. On Sunday he was worse and she advised him to see a doctor, but he declined to do so, saying no medical man could do him any good. On Tuesday evening when she left the deceased, she asked him not to lock his door, and he promised to comply with her request. She went to the cottage twice on Wednesday and twice on Thursday and on each occasion the door was locked, but the deceased called out and told her that he did not require anything. Between two and three o'clock on Friday afternoon she knocked, but received no reply. She then gave an alarm and on entering the cottage the deceased was found lying on the bed partially dressed and in an unconscious state. She gave him some brandy and sent for a doctor. Anna Maria Pearce corroborated. Dr Brodrick, Tavistock, stated that, assisted by Dr Spencer, of Horrabridge, he made a post-mortem examination of the body and found a large blood clot and an effusion of blood on the left side just below the surface of the skin, which showed that the deceased had had a heavy fall. The intestines were perfectly empty, there was only a little brandy in the stomach, which had been administered to him by Mrs Davey, and the body was greatly emaciated. There was a kind of scurvy all over the skin, produced by want of food. Death was due to starvation and old age, but starvation was the primary cause. The sum of £1 5s. was found on the deceased. - The Deputy Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased died from want of food, but that no person was responsible."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 21 March 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest at Stoke, Devonport. - Last evening the Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at the Railway Inn, Stoke, relative to the death of ELLEN ELIZABETH VOGWILL, a domestic servant in the employ of Captain Eylen, R.N., 21 Victoria Place. It appeared from the evidence of Mrs Eylen that about noon on the previous day she heard the deceased coughing very badly, and on going upstairs found her in a very distressing state, with blood issuing from her mouth. With assistance they put her to bed and sent for medical assistance, but before Messrs. Rae and Thom arrived, the deceased died. Dr Thom stated that from what he had gathered from the mother, the deceased had been suffering from a chronic cough, and he considered she was in consumption; and a slight strain of coughing would have broken a blood vessel in the lungs. He was of opinion that she had died from syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr Vere was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

PLYMPTON - Inquest At Noss. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Noss, near Plympton, last evening, touching the death of ARTHUR LEWIS, aged seven years, and who met with a fatal accident on February 5th. On that day deceased was coming out of school and Eliza Wilks, who preceded him, thought she closed the school door, but the wind blew it open, knocking him down. For some time afterwards deceased complained of pains in his head, and Dr Adkins was called in, and attended him until his death on the 19th inst. Dr Adkins, who made a post mortem examination considered death due to inflammation of the brain. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

EXETER - An Inquest on the body of JOHN PROWSE BOWDEN was held yesterday at the Police-court, Exeter, by Mr H. W. Hooper. MISS ROSE BOWDEN, daughter of the deceased stated that he was sixty-two years of age and a plumber and gasfitter of Parr Street, Exeter. On Thursday he came home from work and complained of feeling unwell, having fallen from a ladder a distance of eight feet while at work at Poltimore House. The next day Dr Barston was called in. The medical evidence showed that death was due to contusion of the brain, consequent on a fall, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 March 1889 BISHOPSTEIGNTON - MISS L. E. HALL died somewhat suddenly at Bishopsteignton on Tuesday evening and a post-mortem examination by Drs. Broughton and Little revealed the fact that death was due to exhaustion arising from an internal cancer. At an Inquest yesterday, a Jury, of whom, Mr John Pook was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 23 March 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Fever Den At Devonport. A Young Man Starved To Death. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Borough Coroner, presided over an Inquest held at the Town Hall, Devonport, last evening, respecting the death of RICHARD MARSHALL, twenty-two years of age, and who resided at 38 Cornwall-street. SAMUEL MARSHALL, brother of the deceased, first gave evidence, and Inspector Matters stated that he had been to the deceased's house in Cornwall Street. He noticed that the windows were covered with dirt and that very little light could be admitted to the room, which was in a most filthy condition. There was a small fire in the grate, around which the father and mother were crouched. They appeared to be starving, the woman (who was seventy years of age) being the most emaciated. There were two beds in the room, both of which were filthy, and that on which the deceased was lying was in a most wretched state. A lot of rags covered with vermin were lying about, and the stench arising therefrom was almost unbearable. The people had frequently been asked to go to the Union, and a cab had been sent to the house to convey them, but they had refused to go. Mr J. T. Rolston, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination and found the deceased to have had slight congestion of the right lung, which, however, was not the direct cause of death. Considering the extreme emaciation of the body, and also the filthy state, he attributed death to want of sufficient and proper food and cleanliness. The parents had objected to the removal of the deceased to an asylum. He found no food in the stomach of the deceased, and the bad air had undoubtedly caused blood poisoning and congestion of the lungs. The Coroner in summing up the evidence said he thought it was a fact that the man had been starved to death. - A Juryman declared that in such a case as they had before them relief should have been given. The Coroner replied that someone ought to compel them to purify the place. Another Juryman remarked that on the introduction of the Local Government Bill twenty years ago it was stated that all such things similar to those which had been brought to their notice would no longer exist, but he was surprised to hear that such fever dens existed in the town that day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Starvation" and requested the Coroner to communicate with Messrs. Venning and Goldsmith, solicitors, the result of their verdict and the existing state of affairs in connection with the case.

TORQUAY - A Classic Death At Torquay. Extraordinary Disclosures: The Sale Of Poisons. - Yesterday afternoon at the Torquay Police Station Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS CARTER TOMKINS, aged fifty-six, a retired auctioneer, of 17 Carleton Terrace, Ellacombe, who was found dead in his bed on Wednesday evening last under circumstances detailed in the Western Daily Mercury. Mr H. Jerry was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - EUGENE TOMKINS, son of the deceased, and station master at Middleton St. George, Durham, identified the body as that of his father. Witness was not in correspondence with the deceased, nor had he seen him for three years. Jane Warne, wife of a coal hawker, stated that deceased had lodged with her since a fortnight before Christmas. he occupied one bedroom, for which he agreed to pay his rent weekly, but she never received any money from him. He said he had plenty of money coming to him, and frequently received letters with money orders from a club. He never did any work, and always complained of being ill. He used to consume a large amount of spirits, but he never had his meals in the house. On Tuesday night he came home at 11.20 and complained of his circumstances, but said he expected some money the next day. He never had any medical man to visit him, but he used to take physic regularly. On Monday night he complained of sleeplessness and cough and said he should get something for it. When he returned he brought with him a bottle which was full of a sweet liquid. When he went to bed he took about an eighth part. During the day of Tuesday he took no medicine, but at night he took the bottle to his room with him. On Wednesday morning she sent her son to deceased's bedroom at 9.30 with a cup of tea as usual. Seeing that deceased did not come down during the day she carried up a cup of tea about 6 p.m. He would frequently lay in bed two or three days together, and would have a cup of tea at intervals, but seldom anything to eat. She knocked to the door, and as deceased did not answer she called her son and husband and went into the room. They found that he was lying in bed dead and the candle which he had taken to bed with him was burnt out. The bottle (produced) was found on the table quite empty. She sent for a doctor at once, and information was given to the police. There were numerous bottles containing medicine in his room, but she did not know what the contents were used for. - (Many of these were produced, and the majority bore "poison" labels.) When she saw deceased take his medicine on Monday night he drank it out of the bottle. - Ernest Warne, son of the last witness, corroborated and William John Rawling, assistant in the branch establishment of Mr Bathe, chemist, of Abbey Road, in Lower Union Street, said he knew the deceased by sight but not by name. Deceased first came to him on Monday afternoon for medicine. He asked for chloral to induce sleep, saying he was greatly troubled with rheumatics. He said a friend of his in London had advised him to take chloral. Witness told him it was dangerous to get into the habit of using such medicine, but he persisted in being served with it. Witness prepared an ounce of syrup of chloral, which was one-sixth the strength of chloral, and contained eighty grains of pure chloral. This he told deceased to take the eighth part of each night at bedtime, but not to use it unless he felt the necessity of it. - At this point the Coroner produced the bottle and asked witness how it was it was not labelled "poison." - Witness said the Act of Parliament did not require it when the medicine was put up in the form of that supplied to the deceased. The Coroner said the Pharmacy Act required that all medicines containing poison should be labelled as such. - Witness produced a paper which he said was the Act and laid down that poisons could only be supplied to persons on certain conditions, but did not apply to a medicine made up with poison in it. - The Coroner said all physic containing poison should be so labelled. The Act was passed to safeguard the public who did not know what was or was not dangerous. - Witness said if this was the case he misunderstood the Act. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said he qualified in 1883. - In reply to the Foreman, witness said the whole of the contents of the bottle would be fatal to a weak man but not to a healthy one. - Mr F. E. Cave, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said he had made a post-mortem examination and found that there was extensive disease of the heart and lungs. The other organs were all healthy. There was a certain amount of fluid in the stomach, but there was no chloral in it, as it had probably evaporated into the blood. He was of opinion that deceased had been dead for twelve or sixteen hours. He believed death was caused indirectly by the chloral narcotic having affected the disease of the heart and lungs. - P.C. Coles proved finding several letters. Amongst others the following:- "I have parted with everything I value. I am sick, weary, in pain and disheartened. At least I die a classic death, and this rock is a grand tomb stone. - T. C. TOMKINS. " - MR EUGENE TOMKINS said the card appeared to have been written some time. His father did not write so firmly as that recently. - The Coroner produced another letter, which ran as follows: - " Dear Jennie, - My love for you has been my ruin. Your unkindness has been my death. Yes, and killed me; and my death lies at your door. See me buried. The £10 funeral money from the Oddfellows' Lodge is payable only to you. My love has lasted to the end. Good bye. My riches now consist not in the greatest of my possessions but in the fewness of my wants." This letter was addressed to Mrs J. Harris, 64 Lower Union Street. - MR EUGENE TOMKINS said he wished to make an observation, and on being given permission by the Coroner, said, "It was a pity that a decent person should be injured by the ravings of a madman." His father had frequently made use of the expressions used in the letters. In fact, he had been drinking so heavily that he was not really accountable for his actions. - The Coroner said the Jury must be left to decide whether or not the deceased was insane. - Mrs Jane Harris stated that she was a widow residing at 64 Lower Union Street. She had known the deceased for many years. He came on a visit to her about eighteen months ago, but his conduct was such that she had to turn him out of the house about a fortnight before Christmas last. He drank very heavily and she had repeatedly asked him to leave her house before. She had not seen the deceased for fourteen weeks, but she received a note from him which she sent back unopened. She knew nothing whatever respecting the cause of his death. - The Coroner in summing up, said the question to be decided by the Jury was whether the deceased met his death from an overdose of chloral or whether he committed suicide. The medical evidence went to show that 70 grains of chloral would kill a man in a weak state of health like the deceased, but on the other hand the letters produced pointed to suicide. The Jury then retired to consider their verdict, and the Foreman returned shortly after, when Mrs Harris was asked, as she had received several letters from deceased, and returned them, whether she had seen any of the papers already produced in Court, and she replied in the negative. - After an absence of nearly half-an-hour, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity," and added a rider to the effect that they wished to bring under the notice of the authorities the fact that, in their opinion, the law had been violated in the not affixing of any "poison" label to the bottle of chloral. - The Coroner said the Police would, no doubt, take notice of it, and if they thought it necessary to take steps in the matter, which would now be made public. Although the absence of the label in this case made no difference, as suicide was contemplated, it was right that all precautions provided by the law in the sale of poisons should be carefully attended to - (Hear). - P.S. Osborne watched the case on behalf of the Police. The proceedings lasted over three hours.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 25 March 1889 EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital touching the death of MARY ANN TICKELL, aged 66, a widow, who resided at 6 Church Place, Heavitree. It appeared that the deceased was going from one room of her house to another on the 23rd January last, when she fell over a step and broke her left thigh. She died on Friday last in the Exeter Hospital. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 March 1889 KINGSWEAR - CHARLES WILSON, a Swede, lately residing at South Shields, one of the crew of the steamer Kingmoor, whilst putting on the hatches of the vessel as she was lying alongside Kingswear jetty late on Saturday night, fell into the hold. He was carried to the Dartmouth Cottage Hospital in an unconscious condition and he died on Sunday evening. At an Inquest held yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Dr J. H. Harris stated that deceased fractured the base of his skull and brain fluid was escaping.

STOKE DAMEREL - The sudden death of ELIZA COLLINGS, aged 70, who lived with a Miss Kemp at Morice Town, formed the subject of an Inquiry by the Devonport Borough Coroner yesterday. On Friday night deceased, after saying good night to Miss Kemp, went to her bedroom. Next morning Miss Kemp found her lying on the floor dead. She was in her night clothes, but the bedclothes were not disarranged. Mr Gard, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination and found that deceased suffered from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death Of A Lad At Plymouth. - Mr Brian, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening, relative to the death of WILLIAM THOMAS RICH, aged 15 years, of Stillman-street, Plymouth. The parents of the deceased were in very poor circumstances, the father, who is a timber hauler in the employ of Messrs. Turpin and Company, stating that he earned only three or four shillings per week. Father and mother and four children (including the deceased) lived in one room. For sometime past the lad had seemed to be in a decline, and three weeks ago he became worse and took to his bed. On Friday, the 15th inst., the mother got a dispensary "paper," and Dr Vawdrey saw the deceased, but he, finding the child required nourishing food quite as much as medicine, told the woman it was her duty to see the parish doctor and himself refused to take any further responsibility in the matter. He heard no more of the case until Saturday when the woman applied to him for a certificate of death which, of course, he refused to give. The mother never got any other medical assistance. Mr C. E. Bean, who had made a post-mortem examination, found no marks of violence. The body was extremely emaciated, being almost a skeleton and was in a shocking state. Deceased weighed only 39lbs., whereas a lad of his age should weigh about 100lbs. The stomach was absolutely devoid of food. In the medical witness's opinion death was due to consumption, and he considered it was accelerated by the want of medical attention. The Jury, of whom Mr Samuel Rowe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and severely censured the parents for gross neglect in not having medical advice when advised to do so.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 26 March 1889 BOVEY TRACEY - Sudden Death At Bovey Tracey. - A woman named ANN DAYMOND, aged sixty years, died suddenly while at Bovey Tracey parish church on Sunday evening. After deceased had knelt for a time she resumed her seat, and was observed to throw back her head as if she were faint. Someone went to her assistance and Dr Goodwyn arrived within a few minutes, but he pronounced life to be extinct. The deceased had walked to the church, and on the way stated to a friend that she was in good health. The Rev. Mr Langmoor, in the course of the service which followed, made some touching allusions to the sad occurrence. Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body at the Union Hotel, Bovey Tracey, last evening, when it was stated that deceased was sixty-eight years old. Johanna Windsor deposed that she saw the deceased in her seat, and remarked to her that she was early. Almost immediately after her attention was called to the deceased, who seemed in a fainting condition, and directly afterwards she expired in her arms. Dr Goodwyn stated that he was of opinion that death was due to an epileptic fit. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 27 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held before Mr T. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening relative to the death of JOHN MCKENZIE, aged 47 years, residing at 7 Richmond-street. Between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday evening deceased was cutting some tobacco on a rickety table, and it tilted, overturning a lamp which was on it and setting fire to deceased's clothes. Mr Duncan, surgeon, was called in, and ordered MCKENZIE'S removal to the Hospital, where he died on Monday morning. Mr w. L. Woollcombe, house surgeon at the Hospital, attended deceased, who was suffering from severe burns. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Chilcott was Foreman, commended deceased's wife and a Mrs Reed for their endeavours to extinguish the flames.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 28 March 1889 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Prospect Inn, Millbay Road, Plymouth, yesterday respecting the demise of JESSIE BLANCH MUMFORD, aged five weeks, and who was found dead by its mother's side early on Tuesday morning. Evidence was given by the mother, who deposed that her infant was in good health when it retired to bed the previous evening, but when she awoke the following morning she discovered that it was dead. Mr Manning, Coroner's Officer, stated that he examined the body and found no external marks of violence. He particularly noticed that the thumbs of the deceased were clenched between the hands, which was the sign of convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Lillicrap was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 29 March 1889 NEWTON ABBOT - Mr Hacker held an Inquest at the Queen's Hotel, Newton, yesterday, relative to the death of MR JOHN BERRY, woollen manufacturer of Ashburton. Evidence shewed that MR BERRY, after failing to catch the train on Wednesday afternoon, returned to the Hotel in a very exhausted state and had some brandy. As he was breathing with difficulty, a medical man was sent for, but before he arrived MR BERRY had expired. Dr Davies gave his opinion that death was due to failure of the heart's action, brought about by over-exertion. A verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned. Deceased was 59 years of age, and leaves a widow and family.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 March 1889 TORQUAY - At an Inquest held at Torquay yesterday by the County Coroner, Mr S. Hacker, respecting the sudden death on Thursday morning of the eight months' old child of JOHN RICE, grocer, of Daison-cottages, Upton, it was shewn that the child did in a convulsive fit whilst teething.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Devonport Police Constable. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday relative to the sudden death that morning of WILLIAM LANDRAY, 46 years of age, a constable in the Devonport police force. Elizabeth Gloyne, of 11 Ordnance-street, sister of the deceased, said her brother had enjoyed very good health excepting a rather bad cough during the winter. He went on duty the previous night, and came off about six o'clock the next morning, soon afterwards and while undressing he complained of a pain across his chest. He went to bed and about a quarter to seven said the pain was much worse. About half-past seven witness sent for the police surgeon, Mr Row, but as he did not come a second message was sent. Mr Row came at ten minutes to nine, when deceased had been dead about half-an-hour. Mr F. Everard Row, Police surgeon, said about a few minutes past eight that morning he received a message to go to 11 Ordnance-street. He had received no previous message. He hurriedly dressed and went as quickly as he could, and on arriving found the deceased lying in bed dead. By the order of the Coroner he made a post-mortem examination. Deceased was a tall, sparely built man. The internal organs were fairly healthy with the exception of the lungs, which were gorged with blood and water proceeding from acute congestion. He might not have suffered from it for more than twenty-four hours. In the lungs there was old evidence of disease from colds. Deceased must have been acutely suffocated, as the blood could not get through the lungs to the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 April 1889 PLYMOUTH - ANNIE MULLIS WILLIAMS, aged 13 days, the illegitimate child of EMMA WILLIAMS, living at 15 Morley-lane, Plymouth, was found dead in its mother's arms on Saturday morning. The mother on Wednesday took the child to Dr Pullin, because of its having a slight eruption, and had some ointment to use in consequence. The child was all right up to midnight on Friday, when the mother fell asleep with it on her arm, and on walking at one o'clock found it dead. At the Inquest on Saturday, Dr Pullin, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that both lungs were congested, the right one especially, and he considered death was due to that. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Torquay Police Court, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of JOSEPH R. BISHOP, aged 31, who died from injuries received through throwing himself out of his bedroom window the previous evening at his parent's house, 3 Hazelwood-terrace, Ellacombe. The deceased, formerly a teacher at Torre National School, has for the last two years he has been an invalid from consumption. Despairing of recovering, he threatened to destroy himself, and a strict watch had been kept over him in consequence. On Friday evening his father, who is the captain of the brigantine Nina, had been sitting by the bedside of his son, and during his brief temporary absence the deceased left his bed and threw himself out of the window, sustaining such terrible injuries to his head as to cause speedy death. A verdict of Suicide through Insanity was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 2 April 1889 TEIGNMOUTH - Sudden Death At Teignmouth. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of ELIZABETH ISAACS, a cook in the employ of the Misses Langley, of Shute-hill House, Teignmouth, and who was found dead in the kitchen early on Saturday morning. Mr J. P. Tothill was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The cause of death was stated by Dr Johnson to be syncope, induced by the failure of the heart's action, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 8 April 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Lamp Accident At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan (Borough Coroner for Devonport) presided over an Inquest held at the Royal Albert Hospital on Saturday evening, touching the death of MARY DAWSON, who on the previous day succumbed to severe burns caused by a lamp accident a short time ago. JOHN DAWSON, husband of the deceased, and a corporal in the Army Service Corps, stated that on the night of the accident he returned home about ten minutes to eleven o'clock. He was not drunk, and had taken only two pints of beer during the evening. He went straight to bed and did not know anything about the accident until he saw his wife in flames. Witness said he was very much burnt about the hands in endeavouring to extinguish the fire. John Adams said that on hearing screams in the house he burst open the door and discovered the woman in flames. He quickly got a cloth and threw it right over her. She was then put in a cab and conveyed to the Hospital. Police-Inspector Webber deposed that he saw the deceased before she went into Hospital and questioned her as to the cause of the accident. She replied that she got out of bed to attend to her child, who was crying, and on lighting the lamp it caught fire. She said it was purely an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquiry on Saturday at the Union Inn, Tavistock, concerning the death of the infant daughter of DAVID HOLE, of Bannawell-street, Tavistock. Mr R. Warren was Foreman of the Jury. It appeared that the child, who was only twenty-four hours old, was taken ill at two o'clock on Friday morning, and died an hour afterwards. Dr Brodrick, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to suffocation, due to disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 April 1889 PLYMOUTH - "Accidentally Suffocated" was the verdict returned at the Inquest held by Mr Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday, at the First and Las Inn, Plymouth, relating to the death of the male child of EMILY SMITH, aged three weeks. The child was very healthy, but on Friday had a slight cold. On Sunday morning, the mother woke up and found it discoloured and dead. Mr May, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination suggested that the child was suffocated by the bedclothes falling over it, or the mother rolling against it in her sleep.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 11 April 1889 MODBURY - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at Modbury on Monday respecting the circumstances attendant upon the death of JAMES CRIDDLE, aged sixty-two, a barber and pensioner, resident in that village. On the 21st of February last deceased attempted to cut his throat. Mr Langworthy, surgeon, was called in to attend him and found that he was much weakened from loss of blood. Death ensued on the 8th inst., but Mr Langworthy at the Inquest deposed that death was in no way due to the attempt that deceased had made upon his life, but to heart disease and dropsy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 13 April 1889 BARNSTAPLE - The Shocking Accident At Barnstaple. - Mr Bencraft and a Jury of whom Mr J. Cummings was Foreman, held an Inquiry on the body of BILL BRAUND yesterday morning at the Mermaid Inn. The deceased met with his death at Messrs. Smyth Brothers' tan-yard on Thursday. From the evidence it transpired that deceased had been in the habit after he had stopped his machine to throw off the belt from the pulley and hitching it up to a nail in a beam above the pulley, and it is supposed that he was in the act of doing this while the pulley was still going around the shaft, and got entangled in the belt with one foot in between the spokes of the pulley. He lived only half-an-hour after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 15 April 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Workhouse on Saturday afternoon respecting the death of the illegitimate male child of BESSIE FARNHAM, an inmate. Mr E. Dyke, Master of the House, having been called deposed that the woman was admitted on March 13th last with two other children and the deceased infant was born on Thursday. Dr F. Aubrey Thomas, medical officer, stated he made a post-mortem examination and ascertained that the deceased had died from suffocation. The internal organs were gorged with venous blood, which indicated that as the cause of death. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Stanley was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 16 April 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Injudicious Feeding - A Warning To Mothers. - An Inquest presided over by the Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) was held at the Distillery Arms, Fore-street, last evening, touching the death of ROBERT ARTHUR DUKES, fifteen months old, and residing at 43 King-street. - ELIZABETH DUKES, the mother, stated that the child had enjoyed good health since its birth. She gave him a powder about a quarter to nine on Sunday night for his teeth, as he was rather troublesome, and he did not live five minutes afterwards. The child had a fit of convulsions while on its father's knee. The powder was purchased from Mr White, chemist. - Mr J. T. Rolston, jun., surgeon, stated that he was called to see the child about half-past nine on Sunday evening, and found it dead. He did not think it necessary to make a post-mortem examination and he had no doubt the child died from irritation of the brain. The Coroner: Are these powders dangerous? - Witness: I think this identical one was a very innocent powder, but he would not say that all powders made for children were. Irritation of the brain was produced by teething, but aggravated by injudicious feeding. He could safely say that perhaps if the child had been properly fed all along the irritation would have been less severe and the child might have lived. Almost from birth it had been fed with artificial food and was not weaned. The Coroner proceeded to caution the mother about feeding children, but she said she had brought up five in the same way, and they were all healthy. - The Coroner: You have been fortunate in not having a Coroner's Inquest before. You ought to know that young children have no digestive organs and ought not to have such food as potatoes and pork. - Mr Rolston said he was not finding fault with the parents, because they were ignorant of the result, but he mentioned it as a warning to other people. - The Coroner said that if the mother had another child's death in the same way he would have to deal in a different manner with her. He hoped it would be a warning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 17 April 1889 DARTMOUTH - The Suicide At Dartmouth. - The Borough Coroner, Mr W. R. Prideaux, held an Inquest at the Guildhall yesterday on the body of WILLIAM SCOBLE, a pork butcher, aged about forty years, and who was found hanging to the rails in the staircase at the London Inn, Dartmouth, on Monday evening. Evidence was given by Mr S. C. Widdicombe, a baker, and lessee of the Dartmouth market, that he last saw SCOBLE alive about half-past ten o'clock on Saturday evening. He was of intemperate habits and seemed to be in trouble about his half-brother, who recently attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat and had been committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions. On Monday at noon, wishing to see SCOBLE, he made inquiries, but could find no one who had seen him since Saturday, and a marine store dealer named John Henry Reynolds looked into the keyhole of SCOBLE'S door at the London Inn and saw that the key was inside. - Reynolds, who also gave evidence in support of this statement, then thought something was wrong, and the landlady of the inn said she had heard or seen nothing of the deceased since Saturday night. Reynolds accordingly obtained an entrance to SCOBLE'S staircase, and just as he got around the bend of the stairs he saw a man's hand catching hold of the rails. On going up farther he found the deceased hanging by the neck by a piece of cord, which was fastened around the railing. His feet were touching the ground and his knees were bent. Reynolds said he did not touch him, but went straight for the police-sergeant. - The Coroner said in cases of this kind it was always best to cut the man down at once, as it might be possible to get him round. - Reynolds, continuing, said it was evident the deceased had been dead for hours. - P.S. Stentiford said he cut the deceased down about six o'clock on Monday evening. From the state of the body he inclined to the opinion that deceased must have hanged himself on Sunday, as he had evidently been dead a great many hours. On the previous Friday deceased seemed in some trouble as to whether his brother would be all right. He had another brother in the Asylum. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned by the Jury without hesitation.

EXETER - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital touching the death of GEORGE STEER, labourer, of Neopardy, in the parish of Crediton. The evidence showed that the deceased was at work tilling potatoes on the 6th inst. and went to ride home on the shafts of a waggon pulled by one horse. He had to go down a hilly field and when he got to the road at the bottom he must have fallen off. He told a fellow-labourer that he went to jump for the waggon, when the vehicle knocked him along and he was "torn all to pieces." He was admitted to the Hospital suffering from a compound fracture of the left thigh and shock, to which he succumbed on Sunday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DARTMOUTH - Drowning Fatality At Dartmouth. - Mr R. W. Prideaux, the Dartmouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances touching the death of a boy aged four years and named ISAAC BALL, who was found in the river at eleven o'clock on the previous evening, dead. Evidence was given by the father, GEORGE BALL, a blacksmith, residing at Silver-street, Dartmouth, that the deceased came home to dinner as usual between twelve and one o'clock, after which he went off to school. They did not hear anything of him after until he was picked up. - Mrs Hannaford said she saw the deceased upon the New Ground at half-past five on Monday evening. He was playing by himself. - Henry Russell, a boatman, said that just before eleven o'clock he was told the child was drowned, and was asked to look for it. He accordingly pushed off his boat and put the boat-hook down and after a minute or two he caught hold the deceased's leg and picked him up. He was dead. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead in the Water," but that there was no evidence to show how he got there, although it was probably by misadventure.

NEWTON ABBOT - How The Poor Live At Newton. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Ship Inn, Newton Abbot, concerning the death of MARY ANN ROPER, aged about sixty years, a watercress and flower seller. The evidence given showed that until within the past few weeks ROPER, who was a widow, had been living for many years at Pimlico, Torquay. Then she came to reside at Newton, staying first at the Jolly Sailor Inn, and going on Sunday week last to a house in No. 10 Court, Wolborough-street, occupied by a man named Jones and his wife, pedlars. Whilst at Torquay she regularly received 2s. a week as parish pay. The Jones family stated that they gave her a bed of straw and the use of a quilt and a sheet in their own bedroom, allowing her to share the little food that they had for themselves. she merely had a penny postage stamp when she came with them, and on Monday and Tuesday she went out and sold a few flowers and a little moss for a few pence, which she expended in the purchase of food. The next day she was too ill to go out and evidently became worse. Late on Saturday night the man Jones went to Mr Webber, the Newton relieving officer, and he on going to the house in which the woman was lying, found ROPER on the bed of straw and covered with a mass of dirty rags. Her whole surroundings were of the most miserable and distressing character, and seeing how ill she was Mr Webber called in Mr H. A. B. Davies, the parochial doctor. Meanwhile deceased had, so Mr Webber said, been supplied with a sheet and quilt. Dr Davies ordered her to be supplied with brandy and milk. On the following day ROPER expired, the cause of death being bronchial pneumonia. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and the Coroner severely censured Jones for not having applied to the relieving officer sooner.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 April 1889 HARTLAND - An Inquest was held at Hartland yesterday, before Mr Coroner Bromham, on the body of MRS EMILY SHAPLAND, wife of one of the senior members of the firm of Messrs. Shapland and Pefter, of the Bridge Wharf Cabinet Works, Barnstaple. Deceased died from concussion of the brain, the result of injuries sustained through the overturning of a carriage in which she was driving, at Hartland. Mrs Sellick, who was also injured, is still very ill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 18 April 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, respecting the demise of GEORGE BARKER, aged about sixty years, who died under circumstances reported in the columns of the Western Daily Mercury yesterday. Evidence having been given by Dr Waterfield, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BUCKFASTLEIGH - An Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, at the Golden Lion on Tuesday evening concerning the death of the child of MR TOM REEVES. Deceased was born on Sunday and died on the Monday morning. MR T. REEVES and Mrs Milton and Dr Wyncott gave evidence. The latter made a post mortem examination and found that it was the body of a male child fully formed. It was of average weight and bore no signs of injury. The Coroner summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". Mr S. Bartle was the Foreman of the Jury.

TOTNES - Suicide At Totnes. - About half-past six yesterday morning great excitement was caused in the town when it became known that the body of JOSEPH SKINNER had been discovered in the mill leat and removed to the Dartmouth Inn, where an Inquest was held in the evening before Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner. A. P. Norsworthy, shoemaker, son-in-law of deceased, said he last saw him alive on Tuesday evening, when he appeared to be all right. He had resided with deceased since September last and thought him very strange at times, but he never appeared violent. Deceased lost his wife about twelve months since. - G. Stabb stated that he saw the deceased just before six o'clock near the Town Quay, and he appeared to be examining some casks. - William Syms, cooper, having given evidence, A. Hannaford deposed that about ten minutes to seven on learning of the discovery of the hat and stick he went to the mill and got the drags. After about one and a half hour's work the body was recovered a few yards from where the hat and stick were found. - P.S. Nott also gave evidence. - Dr Harris said he examined the body and found no marks of violence whatever, and from the general appearance of the body he concluded death had resulted from drowning. Mr Thomas Heath, postmaster, said deceased had been in the employ of the Post-office nearly thirty years, and there was nothing in his manner to make one think he was of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased had committed Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 22 April 1889 TEIGNMOUTH - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, concerning the death of a child of MR LEE, a cab driver, of Teignmouth, the little one having been found dead in bed. Medical evidence having been given, the Jury returned a verdict that the child Died from Convulsions.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident At Newton. - Dr Fraser, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquiry on Saturday at Newton Abbot concerning the death of WILLIAM GEORGE HAMMETT, aged ten years, the son of a Newton policeman. While playing in the National school ground on Thursday afternoon with Frank Hamley, a lad of his own age, he caught his toe in a piece of cord over which he was trying to jump, and was thrown to the ground, evidently falling on his head. Blood flowed from a wound of the size of a pea on the left side of his head about three inches above the ear. The boys subsequently went to Courtenay Park together, but after a time deceased felt unwell and got his playmate to take him home. He was then put to bed and Dr Ley was called in. The doctor, whilst finding the wound referred to, saw no evidence of fracture, but calling again two hours afterwards he found that the lad was suffering from compression of the brain, and a short time afterwards the boy died. Dr Ley saying that death was undoubtedly due to rupture of a blood vessel caused by a fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerated deceased's playmate from all blame, and expressed their sympathy with the parents of the deceased, P.C. HAMMETT being greatly respected in the town.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday respecting the death of SAMUEL GIST, aged seventy-seven, who died somewhat suddenly at his residence early on Saturday morning. On Good Friday he complained of a pain in the region of the heart and went to bed. On his wife going up soon after she found him lying on the floor dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian subsequently held an Inquiry at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, respecting the death of a French sailor named LOUIS MARIE FRANCAIS NABSUQETS, aged twenty-eight years. Mr W. Perriton was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr J. A. Bellamy, representing the French Consulate, and residing at 1 Hoe Park-terrace, Plymouth, deposed that deceased had been a seaman on board the French brig Amelie, which was engaged in the Newfoundland fisheries, hailing from St. Malo, and commanded by A. Simon. The brig, which left St. Malo with a cargo of salt on the 25th ultimo, subsequently fell in with very bad weather and the whole of the crew were rescued by the Belgian steamer Lys just as the water reached the decks. The steamer arrived at Plymouth on the 14th inst. and landed the men, who were admitted to the Sailors' Home. The captain had signed a document containing an account of the whole occurrence, which he (witness) was in possession of. Dr G. H. Eccles stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. On examining the scalp he ascertained that deceased had received a blow some fourteen days before he first saw him. This brought on inflammation of the brain, from which he died on Thursday night last. Witness also spoke to the kind attention shown deceased by Mrs Phillips, the mistress of the House, and also by the Consul. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Inflammation of the Brain," adding that there was not sufficient evidence to show how deceased received the blow.

PLYMOUTH - Later in the evening Mr Brian held another Inquiry at the London Mail Inn, Richmond-street, respecting the death of a labourer named RICHARD HENRY WADLING, aged fifty years. ELIZABETH WADLING, wife of the deceased deposed that she lived at 1 William-street, Plymouth. Her husband was brought home on the 30th March suffering from an injury to his left foot. He was advised to go to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, but he preferred to remain at home, where he died on Friday morning. George Milden, labourer, stated that he was at work at a quarry in a field adjoining the Royal Yacht Club on the date mentioned. Deceased and witness had lifted a stone weighing a hundred weight and a half to the stage above, where it was placed in a barrow in charge of James Maloney. Immediately after Maloney shouted out "Stand clear," and with the same the stone fell upon the deceased, striking his left foot. J. Maloney corroborated. Dr T. H. Williams stated that he had attended deceased for the past fortnight. At the beginning of the week lock-jaw set in and from this deceased died. The Jury, of whom Mr E. R. Hilson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A vote of condolence with the widow was passed.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 24 April 1889 BRIXHAM - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Maritime Inn yesterday morning, touching the death of MR PETER BARTLETT, who hanged himself at noon on Sunday in a wash-house at the back of his house as reported in Monday's issue of the Western Daily Mercury. Mr William Lovell said he saw BARTLETT on Saturday evening and considered him strange in his manner. About half-past nine he left and told him that he would come and see him the following afternoon, whereupon deceased remarked that it might then be too late. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

BRIXHAM - Sudden Death At Brixham. - MR GEORGE FUDGE, fish merchant, aged seventy-one, died very suddenly at his residence on the quay yesterday morning. MR FUDGE retired the previous night in his usual health, and five in the morning, dressed himself and went to the [?], which was on the same landing at his bedroom, and in which he was discovered dead. He was a steady, industrious man and a teetotaler, had not complained of any illness, attended to his business on Monday in the usual way, and had not had medical attendance for some time. Dr Fraser held an Inquest at two o'clock in the afternoon, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 25 April 1889 PLYMOUTH - Shocking Death Of A Lad At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Kessell was Foreman, held an Inquest at the Octagon Wine and Spirit Vaults, yesterday afternoon respecting the death of JOHN ALFRED WILLIAM DAVIES, a finely-developed lad of 15. The body presented a sickening sight, being in precisely the same state in which it was when brought home the previous afternoon, after the unfortunate lad had been instantaneously killed in the street by being knocked down by a runaway pony and trap. The head on the left side was cut open as with a hatchet, from the crown to the jaw, and the ear was almost completely gone. The father of deceased stated that his son had worked for him for upwards of four years in the coal dealing business, and was well accustomed to the horse and cart he went out with on Tuesday afternoon. - P.C. Rule deposed that he was on duty in Anstis-street, when he saw a pony in a trap bolt at the top of the street and rush down the hill unattended. Deceased, who was coming up with his horse and cart, was struck on the side of the head with great violence by the wheel of the pony-trap. Running to him he found him quite dead. - Samuel Smith a greengrocer, owner of the runaway pony and trap, said he left them outside a house in Anstis-street whilst he fetched his macintosh. He was not away half a minute and just as he came out the pony bolted without any apparent cause. He shouted as hard as he could and ran after the pony, but failed to stop it. - In answer to several questions put by the Coroner and Jury, the witness stated that he bought the pony of Mr Fry, of Lutton, about three months ago. It was five years old; he gave £12 15s. for it, receiving a very good character with it. Except on one occasion, when it was frightened by some boys, he never knew it run away before. During the whole of Tuesday he left it several times whilst he served customers with goods. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and strongly cautioned Mr Smith against leaving the pony in the streets again without someone at its head. Much sympathy was expressed with the parents, who were in a state of great anguish.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 25 April 1889 BERE FERRERS - Inquest At Beeralston. - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquiry yesterday at the Victoria Inn, Beeralston, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM GREENSLADE, 34, a mason, which occurred on Monday. Mr R. Maddaford was Foreman of the Jury. It appeared that the deceased had been working on the new railway for the past three months and that on Saturday last he went to Dr Reed, who found the poor fellow in a dying state, suffering from acute pneumonia, accelerated by alcohol, the disease being of fourteen days' duration. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Farmer's Home Hotel, Plymouth, respecting the death of JAMES BLAXLAND, aged seventy-two years, and from the evidence of the widow, SARAH BLAXLAND, living at 10 Rowe-street, it appears that deceased had at times been a lunatic and just before eight that morning he died from old age. The Jury of whom Mr W. Lavers was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 27 April 1889 PLYMPTON - An Inquest was held yesterday at the George Hotel, Ridgway, touching the death of CATHERINE ROBERTS, aged forty-one years, of Baytree-cottage, Plympton St Maurice, widow of JOSEPH ROBERTS, by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner. Mr John Emery was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Emma Baskerville stated that on Wednesday last she was employed by the deceased as charwoman. MRS ROBERTS came downstairs about eleven o'clock, and that was the last time she saw her alive, as she returned to bed shortly after. She was not again seen until about two o'clock, when witness, on going to her room, found her lying across the bed partly dressed, but dead and cold, with her face in her hands. Dr Stamp deposed that he had made a post-mortem examination and gave his opinion that death was caused by syncope. Both lungs and stomach were greatly congested, the result of want of proper food and care and an excessive use of alcohol. Deceased was a native of Cornwall and was fairly well-to-do, but had given away to drink. She had been in the parish about nine months. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence and expressed their sympathy for the children on their bereavement. The funeral takes place today.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 April 1889 DARTMOUTH - Suicide On Board A Steamer At Dartmouth. - As the Hartlepool steamer Henry Green, 1,208 tons net, from Akyab, with rice, for a German port, was entering Dartmouth Harbour to coal yesterday morning, RICHARD J. SHERREN, her chief engineer, aged 32, of Southsea, committed suicide. Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an inquest in the evening. David Blacklaw, master of the Henry Green, said deceased had been with him about a year. He had complained of a cold and giddiness and on the previous night witness gave him some brandy and water. When that morning he gave the order to stop the engines to take the pilot on board just off the Castle, deceased attended to it himself. Very shortly afterwards the engine-room boy came up and said deceased had shot himself. Going below, he found him in his cabin in a sitting position quite dead, a bullet having gone through his head. There had been no quarrelling. Deceased, a sober man, had been in the company's employ several years, and had just been promoted from second to first engineer. He was in no pecuniary difficulties, having a balance at his bankers, and £45 pay due. He had seen deceased in two fits, and he was not a robust man. - Alfred Sherwin, second engineer, said deceased had complained of pains in the head, and that morning said he was feeling light-headed. He was happy throughout the voyage and there had been no trouble with the engines. That morning deceased wrote out his store list. Three minutes after he left him he heard the report of a pistol. - Thomas Ray, mess-room steward, hearing the report of a pistol, went to deceased's berth, and found him on the floor, his head leaning on the hand which held the pistol. Dr Robert Wills Soper, surgeon, who went on board the steamer upon its arrival, said death must have been instantaneous, and deceased probably suffered from melancholia. Mr W. L. Massey, Superintendent of Customs, who had taken charge of deceased's letters and effects, said he had found nothing in the letters bearing on the subject of the Inquiry. They were most affectionate letters from his family from 1884 to February last. William Ironside, chief officer, said although deceased complained of his health, he took his watches in proper order. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - MRS ELIZABETH VERREN, wife of the late MR N. K. VERREN, builder, was found dead in bed at 5 Kirkby-place, Plymouth, on Sunday morning. At the Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, yesterday, Caroline Fleming, who had lived with her for three years, said on Saturday evening MRS VERREN complained of pains in her chest. Mr Elliot Square, who attended her on 3rd inst. for indigestion, said she had a very weak heart, and evidently died from syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr John Everett was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

JAMES MELVIN, chief steward of the steamship Iron Prince, of North Shields, unloading barley at the West Wharf, Millbay Docks, late on Saturday night whilst attempting to get on board fell between the wharf and the vessel and lost his life, his body not being recovered until Sunday evening. At the Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, Michael Armstrong stated that deceased in his fall struck his head against the side of the vessel, leaving a blood stain and receiving a wound sufficient in itself to cause death. There was a plank between the vessel and the wharf, with a rope in the place of a handrail, and any sober person would have had no difficulty in getting on board. Deceased slipped under the rope. Edward H. McCoy, second mate, having corroborated, the Jury, of whom Mr Larway was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 May 1889 KINGSBRIDGE - At the Inquest held at Kingsbridge Workhouse yesterday on the body of HENRY SCOBLE, John Congdon, sleeping in the same room, stated that, seeing deceased reach out of bed and take a knife from a bag, he asked him what he was going to do. "Cut my throat," he replied, and at once thrust the blade into his neck. Dr Elliot deposed that deceased had latterly been clamorous for spirits and a few days before told him if he did not give him stimulants he should end his life. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 May 1889 SHAUGH PRIOR - JOHN TOPE, aged 38, clayworker at the Lee Moor Clay Works, hung himself on Monday last to a beam in the roof of his pantry. Mr R. R. Rodd, coroner, held an Inquest in Lee Moor Schoolroom yesterday, when Charles Gully and James Sellick, fellow workers with deceased, who found the body, gave evidence. Mr C. H. Stevens, surgeon, said that for two months he had been attending deceased for colic and nervousness. TOPE once told him that he should destroy himself. There was no trace of hereditary insanity in the family. The Jury found that deceased committed Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 3 May 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Sad End Of One of Hutchings's Victims. - Many of our readers will remember that ELIZA SIMMONS, aged fifty-three years, one of the many victims of the frauds committed by Arthur Brockwood Hutchings, made a determined attempt to commit suicide on the 27th February at her residence, 11 Clowance-street, Devonport. She was found by a neighbour sitting in the closet with a large gash in her throat, whilst on her lap was a large table knife with which she had evidently intended to put an end to her existence. She was then in an unconscious state, and Mr Edward Row, surgeon, who was quickly called, dressed the wound. The only person who lived with her was her daughter of fourteen, who stated that her mother had been in a depressed state since the loss of her husband about twelve months ago. She lived in an underground kitchen at Clowance-street, and since her husband's death had had to eke out an existence as a laundress. It appears that she had put by a large sum of money, the result of hard-earned savings, but by placing it in the hands of Hutchings with the object of its being profitably invested she had been defrauded of the whole amount and was consequently left destitute. The gravest fears were entertained as to her recovery, and owing to the adverse circumstances to which she had fallen through the frauds of her solicitor she was unable to receive such attention at her home as should be devoted to so critical a case. It was therefore deemed advisable to remove her t the union at Ford, where on Wednesday she succumbed to the effects of her rash conduct. The Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) was communicated with and an Inquest was held at the Workhouse last evening. From the evidence of Mr E. Row it appeared that the deceased had been kept alive by means of artificial food and was making satisfactory progress. Latterly, however, a pipe leading to the throat had closed over and she was told that she would have to undergo a surgical operation. This she declined to submit to and the consequence was that she expired on Wednesday. Ellen Elizabeth Evel, who resided in the deceased's house at the time of the unfortunate occurrence, related the circumstances which she witnessed on finding the woman in the closet, and declared that if it had not been for Hutchings she would have been at her home sitting in her arm chair. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes" and thanked Mr Row for his kind attention during the deceased's illness.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 May 1889 TORQUAY - At Torbay Hospital, Torquay, yesterday, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of EDWIN ROWLAND, aged 65, for many years driver of the Queen's Hotel omnibus, who died in the Hospital on Monday afternoon whilst under the influence of ether vapour, when he was about to undergo an operation for an internal disease. The anaesthetic was administered by Dr Cave, the junior house surgeon, in the presence of Dr Eales, the senior house surgeon, and also of Dr Finch, who was about to commence the operation, when the deceased, after vomiting once or twice, died almost immediately. A post-mortem examination by Dr Richardson revealed the fact that death was due to syncope, caused by the disease and that there were no symptoms of ether poisoning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - A sad case of poisoning by absinthe was investigated by Mr T. C. Brian, Plymouth Coroner, yesterday. Deceased was EIGAL INGEBREEKEN, 21, one of the crew of the Norwegian barque Dacapo. Whilst at the French port of Andierson he drank large quantities of absinthe, and generally returned on board the worse for liquor. On Saturday he was taken ill, complaining of pain in his throat, and that he could scarcely swallow. On Wednesday afternoon he was admitted to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, and died the same evening. After hearing the evidence of the captain and one of the crew of the barque, their evidence being interpreted by Mr Soderberg, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until this evening, in order that a post-mortem investigation might be made.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 May 1889 PLYMOUTH - "Poisoned by Excessive Drinking of Absinthe" was the verdict returned at the adjourned Inquest held before Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday, touching the death of EIGAL INGLEBREEKSEN, a seaman of the Norwegian barque Dacapo. Mr Aldous, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, found the gullet and larynx much inflamed, evidently by the introduction of some irritant poison, and having learned from the evidence that deceased had drunk a considerable quantity of absinthe whilst at a French port, he had no doubt that absinthe, which contains oil of wormwood, was the cause of the inflammation and consequently of death.

PLYMOUTH - At the Inquest held by Mr Brian yesterday, concerning the death of ELIZABETH MOORSHEAD, 44, of 20 Higher-street, Plymouth, it was shewn that on Thursday afternoon she went to her child's grave at the cemetery, and finding it had been interfered with, became distressed, and fainted. Returning home, she went early to bed, and about an hour afterwards was found dead by her daughter. She was subject to attacks of giddiness. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 8 May 1889 EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter on Monday afternoon before Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of ELIZABETH ARABELLA MARSHALL, who was found dead in her bedroom on Friday last. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes, in accordance with the medical testimony.

EXETER - The Fatal Fire At Exeter - An Open Verdict. - An Inquest was held at the new Police-court yesterday evening by Mr Coroner Hooper upon the body of SUSAN BECK, a widow, of about seventy years, who was found dead in her lodgings at 11 King-street, on Sunday evening. The facts, as elicited from the witnesses, were similar to those already published. The woman used to sell oranges in the market and acted as housekeeper to a man named William Quicke. On Sunday morning Quicke sent a messenger for her to come and prepare his dinner, but the deceased was not seen, and in the evening he himself went to the room, and open opening the door found that the place was full of smoke, whereupon he ran downstairs again called "Fire" and "Murder," and told P.S. Guppy that the deceased was upstairs burnt to death. This proved to be only too true, and it appeared to those who first entered the room that the place must have been on fire for some hours, though neither of the seven persons who occupy the six-roomed tenement house appear to have noticed any smell of smoke either upon Saturday night or Sunday. The medical evidence showed that death was due to burning and the body was still warm when taken to the mortuary. After a brief deliberation the Jury found that death was due to burning, but whether accidental or otherwise there was no evidence to show.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, presided over an Inquest held at the Town Hall last evening touching the death of JOHN LUCAS FACEY, who expired suddenly at the new buildings of the Sailors' Rest on the previous day. WILLIAM RADFORD FACEY, eldest son of the deceased and a mason, stated that his father, who was sixty-two years of age, had often complained of a bad cough. He saw him alive last Sunday morning and he did not then entertain any fear of his death. - Frederick Jewell, plasterer, said the deceased had been in the habit of tending him with material. Deceased was making cement concrete in the cellar and on witness going down to speak to him he found him lying in a pool of water with his face downwards. Witness called another man, and together they placed him in a sitting position. He groaned twice and then expired. Just five minutes before he appeared very cheerful. - John Partridge, builder, said the deceased had been in his employ about seven years, and had always been a steady and industrious man. He took a hod of concrete to witness about ten feet up from the basement just before he was called to where deceased was lying. - Charles Edwards, surgeon, said he had known the deceased three years and saw him last about six week since, when he was suffering from bronchitis. He recovered from that complaint. About eighteen months ago he was suffering from a severe attack of bronchitis. Witness was of opinion that he died from rupture of a blood vessel in connection with the heart, caused by a sudden jerk. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 May 1889 PLYMOUTH - THOMAS ANGOVE, aged six, residing at 1 Prince Rock-terrace, Laira, met with a sad death on Monday. Shortly after noon deceased and his three brothers went to Prince Rock to get some lettuce. On their way back they met four china clay trucks from Lee Moor. The driver, Wm. Sellick, saw them pass round the end of the last truck, and when he had got forty or fifty yards further the truck at the back "jumped", and at the same time he heard a loud scream. He immediately stopped, ran back, and found deceased lying between the rails. Blood was flowing freely from one of his legs. The poor little fellow, however, was conscious and able to tell his name and address. He was at once removed to the S.D. and E.C. Hospital, where he died in about six hours. At an Inquest held by Mr T. C. Brian, at the Hospital last evening, Sellick said deceased must have tried to get between the third and fourth truck, and in so doing slipped and was rode over. Mr L. Jowers, assistant house-surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased's left leg was smashed. Mr Woollcombe, the house surgeon, thought deceased was too weak to undergo amputation, and decided to leave it until later in the evening, to see if he would rally. He, however, died at half-past seven. The Jury, of whom Mr E. Stombles was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 May 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, yesterday held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN LEE, retired fleet engineer, of 4 Victoria-place, Stoke. Deceased, 61 years of age, was apparently in the best of health and spirits on Thursday, and, while out for a walk with his wife, fell down and immediately expired. Mr G. T. Rolston, surgeon, who had known deceased for many years, had attended him occasionally, but not for any ailment which was likely to shorten life. As the result of a post-mortem examination, he found that deceased died from fatty degeneration of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, upon the body of WILLIAM WILLS, aged 58, late a cabdriver, in the employ of Mr F. U. Webb, of Lansdowne Mews, Torre, who died in the Hospital on Thursday. The deceased had driven a far up the steep hill to Braddon-street a week before, and as he was turning around to come down again, the cab turned over and the deceased fell off the box underneath the vehicle. In this position he was dragged along over the rough roadway fifteen or twenty feet. On being taken to the Hospital it was found that the deceased had his left leg fractured in two places and also a scalp wound six inches long, a part of the scalp having been torn away. Inflammation set in two or three days afterwards, and deceased died from exhaustion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury (of whom Mr T. Taylor was foreman) added a rider calling the attention of the Local Board to the state of the roadway in Braddon-street.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 14 May 1889 WEST ALVINGTON - Biscuit Food Dangerous For Infants. - The death of an illegitimate child named ELIZABETH ELLEN FOALE was the subject of a Coroner's Inquest at the Ring of Bells Inn, West Alvington, yesterday. Mr Sydney Hacker was the Coroner and Mr Luskey was Foreman of the Jury. From the evidence adduced it was shown that the child, which was six weeks old, had during the past three weeks been subject to convulsive fits, especially after parking of biscuit food. Dr Twining deposed to making a post-mortem examination of the body, assisted by Dr Webb. He found the organs healthy and was of opinion that the child died from natural consequences. He expressed his disapproval of feeding children on biscuit food while so young and advised that children under the age of four months should be given cow's milk sweetened with sugar, or specially-prepared food, in the absence of mother's milk. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr T. C. Brian) respecting the demise of JOHN TRAIN, aged about seventy years, who was taken out of the water at Vauxhall Quay on Sunday morning last by an able seaman named Isaac Brett. - Mary Ann French, a married woman, deposed that she resided in the same house as the deceased. On Saturday evening about ten o'clock, witness stated that as she was about to retire to bed she heard a sudden fall, which appeared to have come from the adjoining room which the deceased formerly occupied. As noises frequently occurred in that room witness had no suspicion that anything was wrong. - Isaac Brett, alias Oliver, an able seaman, stated that he was a native of Norwich and formerly belonged to H.M.S. Royal Adelaide. About eleven o'clock on Saturday evening witness went on board a Plymouth trawler to sleep. About four o'clock on the Sunday morning he woke up and went ashore, and whilst proceeding along the quay he noticed a hat floating in the water, and subsequently discovered the body of a man floating face downwards between two fishing smacks lying near the quay. Being unable to get the body ashore he proceeded towards the police station, but on his way he met P.C. Brown and with his and other assistance the body after great difficulty was got ashore. - P.C. Brown corroborated, adding that on placing the body on a stretcher they noticed a wound which extended from one ear to the other; it was not bleeding. When he searched the body he found in the coat pocket the key of the room where deceased resided, together with eight pawn tickets. - Inspector Wood deposed that on entering deceased's room he noticed several spots of blood, especially by the side of the bed, where a large pool of blood and a razor were found. The razor (which was produced) was besmeared with blood, and traces of blood, were also discovered on the way to the quay. Dr Wolferstan stated that he had made a post-mortem. On examining the body externally he noticed a large gash in the throat, but it was not sufficient to account for death, he being of opinion that death was caused by drowning. After a short deliberation the Jury, of whom Mr Smith was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."#

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 15 May 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Sailors' Home respecting the circumstances touching the death of JOHN TRUSCOTT, dockyardsman, aged about fifty-five years. Fanny Harris, residing at 1 Alfred-road, Ford, stated that the deceased, who was her father, left his home on April 1st apparently in the best of spirits. ~She did not see him again until the previous day, when she identified the body lying in the mortuary as that of her parent. - John Bunce deposed that on Monday afternoon he was in a boat off the ladies' bathing place, where he saw the body floating. He took it in tow, and subsequently P.C. Setters took charge of it. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Rowe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 17 May 1889 BARNSTAPLE - Alleged Murder At Barnstaple. - A distressing occurrence took place at Barnstaple yesterday. Ten days' since MRS F. SMYTH, daughter of Mr John Pulsford, a well-known tradesman of the borough, returned from the Cape, where she had resided for some years with her husband, a coachbuilder. She was accompanied by her only child, aged about six months. During her residence at her father's house in Bear-street, she has suffered from melancholia. Early yesterday morning she told her father that the child was at rest and "so quiet" and the infant was shortly afterwards found drowned in a bath. - An Inquest on the body of the child, named FREDERICK PULSFORD SMYTH, was held in the evening, before Mr R. Incledon Bencraft, Coroner. Mr H. A. Roberts appeared on behalf of Mr Pulsford and family. - Mr John Pulsford, statuary mason, deposed that just before six o'clock that morning his daughter ADA came to his room and told him that "FREDDIE is at rest - in Heaven." He asked where the child was and she answered, "In the bath." He found the child in 15 inches of water, quite dead. He went for Dr Harper. His daughter seemed to think she had put the child to bed. There was no doubt her mind was wandering and that she did not know what she was doing. MRS SMYTH was dotingly fond of the child. - Mr J. Harper and Mr J. W. Cooke, surgeons, also gave evidence. The latter said he had attended MRS SMYTH since her return from the Cape. She suffered from sleeplessness and melancholia, and was in a despondent condition. He was called to see her that morning and he found she was quite insane. She seemed to think she had done her duty, and remarked that the child was gone to Jesus and was happy. - Inspector Eddy deposed that he saw MRS SMYTH about nine o'clock. She said, "My God!" What have I done? I have not killed my baby, have I? I don't believe I have; I am sure I have not"; and then begged her sister and the nurse to try and wake the baby. He afterwards charged her with murdering her child, and she replied, "If I have I hope God will forgive me. I know God is merciful and I do not know why He allowed me to do such a thing." She subsequently said the child could not sleep for several nights and that she thought she had sent him to sleep with Jesus. She appeared to be insane. - A somewhat warm discussion took place between the Coroner and Mr Roberts with regard to the duty of the Jury, the Coroner insisting that the Jury had no power to take into consideration the state of mind of MRS SMYTH. That was a matter for another tribunal to decide. - Mr Roberts addressed the Jury contending that a verdict of "Misadventure" should be returned. - After a private consultation of three hours' duration the Coroner reopened the Court to the public and remarked that he regretted to say that although the Jury had been consulting nearly three hours they were unable to come to any verdict, and, therefore, he adjourned the Inquiry to the next Assizes, when he should report to the judge what had taken place. It would then be for the judge to deal with the matter. He (the Coroner) had no power to discharge the Jury himself, but the judge would have such power, and would be able to take any other steps. Therefore, they must consider the Inquiry adjourned to the next Assizes, of which the Jury would have due notice. - The Foreman moved a vote of condolence and sympathy with Mr Pulsford and his family and the Jury unanimously adopted it. - It is understood that the Jury were unanimous in not returning a verdict of Wilful Murder, but differed as to whether the verdict should be one of "Misadventure" or "Found Drowned in a Bath." The Jury were equally divided on the point. The discussion was at times of a heated character, and more than one Juryman questioned the right of the Coroner to remain in the room during the deliberations. The Coroner asserted that it was his own Court, in which he had a perfect right to remain. It is expected that MRS SMYTH will be brought before the magistrates today at the police court on a charge of wilful murder.

ERMINGTON - The Fatal Accident Near Ivybridge. Coroner's Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Julian Arms, Cadleigh Park, Ermington, on the body of JAMES STONEMAN, labourer, who was fatally injured whilst working in a cutting at the new Plymouth Borough Asylum works, Blackadon, Bittaford, (about three miles from Ivybridge), on the 7th of May, and who died from his injuries on the 14th inst. Mr Henwood was chosen Foreman of the Jury. A fellow labourer with deceased named Samuel Mea, stated that he was working with him in a cutting, which was about 10 feet high and 2 feet thick, when the earth broke away at a change of strata, and caught deceased before he had time to escape. Witness also stated that the men were cutting out the ground on each side of the portion that fell. - John Crimp, watchman, said he was on the top of the cutting, when he noticed that some of the earth was ready to fall and called the men away. They all came away, but deceased did not go away far enough and the earth caught him, the weight being about 3 cwt. It crushed him severely. On being extricated deceased complained of severe pains in the abdomen and was conveyed to his home at Cadleigh Park. - ANN STONEMAN, wife of deceased, deposed that he did not complain of anything or blame anyone. - Dr Randle, who saw deceased, found that he was suffering from severe internal ruptures of the intestines. He had no hope of saving deceased's life from the beginning. Deceased, however, lived a week, but he did not know of a case of that kind that was ever cured. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" adding a rider recommending Messrs. Pethick Brothers in cases of that kind to send at once for the police and have the working in the division stopped until some responsible person had seen and examined it, in order to give evidence at the Inquest.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 18 May 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest at Morice Town, Devonport. - The Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) presided over an Inquest held at the Forester's Arms, Morice Town, last evening, touching the death of an infant named ELSIE KNEEBONE, aged one year and ten months and residing at the back of 63 Albert-road. It appeared from the evidence of the mother that the child had enjoyed good health down to Monday last, when being unwell some medicine was procured for it. On Thursday morning she noticed that the deceased was turning blue, and thereupon took it out of bed and put its feet in mustard and water. She immediately sent for a doctor, but before the messenger got out of the house the child was dead. - Mr J. May, jun., surgeon, deposed that he made a post-mortem examination and found that there were appearances indicating recent congestion of both lungs, death being caused by a sudden spasm of the windpipe. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 21 May 1889 EXETER - Supposed Manslaughter Of An Exeter Butcher. - The Exeter coroner (Mr Henry W. Hooper) held an Inquiry at the Guildhall, Exeter, yesterday, relative to the death of a butcher named WILLIAM CHANNON, carrying on business and residing at 29 Bridge-street, Exeter, who died somewhat suddenly on Friday. Inspector Short was in attendance to watch the proceedings on behalf of the City Police, Sergeant Egan of St. Thomas, was the representative of the County Constabulary, and Mr Friend (Messrs. Friend and Beal, solicitors), and Mr Bell, surgeon, were present on behalf of the Railway Passengers' Accidental Insurance Company, in which deceased's life was insured. - Evidence showed that the deceased was forty-seven years of age and on Monday last attended an income-tax distraint sale at Mr McLaren's, baker, of Alphington, St. Thomas. The proceedings there were rather disorderly, bags of flour being thrown at the auctioneer. A mangold - probably meant, one of the witnesses stated, for the auctioneer, struck the deceased in the back of the head. He treated the matter lightly at first, but subsequently made complaints with regard to the pain he suffered in his head where the mangold struck him, and on Friday morning was taken ill with diarrhoea and vomiting, dying a few hours afterwards. Deceased was stated to have been concerned in the placing of some flour in a garden adjoining the yard in which the sale was held for the purpose of throwing at the auctioneer, and that he proposed that some rotten eggs should be mixed with it, but this proposition was not carried into effect. - Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, who was called in, and who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, stated that having heard the evidence as to the injury and after carefully considering the condition of the brain as ascertained by the post-mortem examination, he was of opinion that the deceased died from cerebral effusion following acute inflammation of the membrane of the brain, and that such condition might be the effect of concussion, the result of the blow. - The Coroner said this was a matter of serious consequence to somebody, because these people throwing things at each other were engaged in an unlawful act, and if the deceased had come by his death as had been stated it amounted to manslaughter. He should adjourn the Inquest in order that further inquiries might be made. The Inquest was then adjourned until Monday morning next.

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough coroner, held an Inquiry at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, Camden-street, last evening, touching the death of JOHN ROBERT ELLIS, aged forty-eight, a rigger in H.M.'s Dockyard, and who committed suicide under circumstances already reported in the Western Daily Mercury. Mr W. Jiles was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - ELIZABETH ELLIS, the widow, stated that she resided at 27 Plym-street, Plymouth, and deceased who for some time had been low spirited, told her on Saturday night that his time had come and that he must do away with himself. He also stated that she would know the truth by-and-bye, and she subsequently learnt that he was troubled about some money matters, which greatly depressed him. She last saw him in the wash-house about a quarter past nine the previous morning and afterwards learnt what had taken place. - William Kelland, residing in the same house, gave evidence corroborative of the information which we published yesterday and added that for some time he had observed something strange in the manner of deceased. In answer to a Juryman witness stated that deceased had always been on friendly terms with those in the house, especially his wife. - P.C. Luckham stated that on examining the body he found the razor (produced) smeared with blood in the right-hand trousers pocket. It was carefully closed and put away, the broad end downwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," and joined with the Coroner in passing a vote of condolence with the widow.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 22 May 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of MRS JANE BULLEID, aged sixty-two years and the wife of MR J. BULLEID, builder, 13 Cobourg-street. - LUCAS HENRY BULLEID deposed that on Monday morning his mother got a pail of water for the purpose of cleaning the steps. Shortly afterwards a knock at the front door was heard, and on going out he saw deceased at the bottom of the steps, being assisted by two men. She had a large bruise on her left temple and having seen her taken into the house he fetched Dr Elliot Square. The accident occurred about quarter-past seven and she died at nine o'clock the same morning. On Friday night deceased had an attack of spasms of the heart, from which she was an habitual sufferer. - Albert Bradford stated that he was in the house on Monday morning about seven o'clock, when he heard a heavy thud, and looking around he saw deceased lying on her hands and face. - Dr J. Elliot Square deposed that he was called and on examining deceased found her unconscious. There was a very large bruise over the left eyebrow, but no other injuries. During the past five years he had prescribed for the deceased for spasms of the heart. He attributed death to concussion of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr R. J. Nicholson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The Drowning Fatality At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Sailors' Home respecting the death of ROBERT RANDLES, a fisherman, who was drowned under circumstances reported in the Western Daily Mercury of Monday's issue. William Wigg, skipper of the mackerel boat Olive Branch, hailing from Lowestoft, deposed that deceased was a member of her crew. On Sunday evening he went ashore with deceased and two others and after they had had some drink in the town they proceeded to the Sutton Wharf about half-past ten. Being unable to find their own boat they got another and his companions got aboard. As he stepped on the gunwale the punt capsized throwing all the occupants into the water. Witness saved himself by catching hold of a rope, as did one of the others. Frederick Eastaugh, one of the crew of the Olive Branch, gave evidence corroborating the captain's statement. The captain was under the influence of liquor, and walked unsteady from the inn. - Edwin turner, labourer, stated that shortly after the occurrence he with another man recovered the body of deceased with grappling irons and towed it to the steps. - P.C. J. Somers stated that he took charge of the body and searched it, finding a small sum of money and a few articles. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Folland was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 22 May 1889 HALWILL - At an Inquest held by Mr Burd, District coroner, yesterday at Halwill Junction Hotel, the Jury found that the infant child of JAMES MARTIN, found dead in bed on Sunday morning, had been overlain by its mother.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 23 May 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest at the Town Hall last evening respecting the demise of ADA FLORENCE HANNAFORD, aged fourteen months, who was killed through falling over a balcony in Mount-street on Monday last. - BESSIE HANNAFORD, mother of the deceased, stated that the child was sitting in a chair on the balcony in the care of another little boy, six years of age, when by some means or other the chair toppled over, and owing to the dilapidated condition of the balcony, fell through an opening in the rails. Medical aid was at once procured and it was found that the child was suffering from concussion of the brain, from the effects of which it died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and recommended that the balcony be thoroughly renovated.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 24 May 1889 EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Mr Gould held an Inquest at St. Thomas Union, Exeter, yesterday, on the body of JAMES YOULDON, aged eighty-six, who died on Sunday last. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was allowed to go in and out when he pleased, and that on Sunday week last a wardsman, hearing a noise, went to see from where it proceeded, and found the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs. He was attended to, but he lingered on for a week and then died. The medical testimony went to show that the accident and shock to the system wee the cause of death and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 25 May 1889 EXETER - Mr W. Gould held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday upon the body of CHARLES BERREY, aged sixty-six, who committed suicide in the Exeter Canal on Wednesday. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 27 May 1889 BRENTOR - Mr Coroner Rodd formally opened an Inquiry on Saturday night at the Schoolroom, Brentor, respecting the death of MR WILLIAM BATTEN, a shopkeeper of that place, who was killed on the railway between Lidford and Marytavy on the previous afternoon by a passing London and South Western train, under circumstances reported in the Western Daily Mercury on Saturday. The Rev. R. J. French-Smith was Foreman of the Jury, and after the body of the deceased had been viewed, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until quarter-past four on Thursday afternoon, and gave the necessary order for the interment of the body.

Western Morning News, Monday 27 May 1889 EXETER - Death Of An Officer At Exeter From Shock. - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Saturday touching the death of MAJOR WM. DOMVILE, a visitor to the city. REV. CHARLES COMPTON DOMVILE, rector of Chickerell, near Weymouth, said the deceased was his brother. He was 74 years of age, and a retired major of the 21st Scotch Fusiliers. He had been in Exeter about a fortnight and witness last saw him alive on the 18th inst. at the Clarence Hotel, where he was staying. He was then in bed, suffering from severe burns, the result of an accident. Deceased became better, and witness returned to Chickerell. Deceased was a bachelor. - Annie Street, a chamber-maid at the Clarence Hotel, said there was a guard before the fire when she took the deceased some water on the morning of the 10th inst. When she next entered the room he told her he had met with a very severe accident and shewed her his hands, which were much burnt. He said he had caught his shirt (a flannel one, extra long) on fire whilst standing with his back towards the fire. Pengelly, a waiter at the hotel, said when he ran to the deceased and asked what was the matter, the latter said "Save the house." There was a little fire on the floor, and deceased appeared much frightened and was shaking. Witness noticed that his shirt was burning a little and he put the fire out. Mr E. J. Domville, surgeon, said deceased was extensively burned at the back of both thighs, the whole of the back of the trunk, a little on the right side of his chest and on both hands. Deceased went on very well for the first ten or twelve days, but on Friday he lost consciousness and died from shock, the effect of burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed sympathy with the REV. C. C. DOMVILE, who, in return, thanked all who had assisted his late brother.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 28 May 1889 EXETER - The Death Of An Exeter Butcher. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the late MR WILLIAM CHANNON, butcher, of Bridge-street, Exeter, who died on Friday week from injuries sustained by a blow received at an income tax sale in St. Thomas, Exeter, on the 13th inst., was held yesterday morning at the Guildhall, Exeter by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper. Evidence was called showing that flour was thrown by several persons and that the deceased was struck with some hard substance, but there was no evidence to show who threw the latter. The Jury, after retiring, returned a verdict that death was Accidental, that the missile which struck the deceased was meant for the auctioneer, and that it accidentally struck the deceased.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Sudden Death At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquiry at the Crown Hotel, last evening, relative to the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ANN WEBBER, who died suddenly the previous morning. From the evidence of Inspector WEBBER, husband of the deceased, it appeared that he came home from night duty shortly after six, and his wife was then sleeping. Shortly after seven he was awoke by the deceased, who complained of severe pains and before he had time to procure medical assistance she expired. He called in Mr Hinvest, who happened to be passing the house about half-past seven, and he pronounced her dead. Mr Hinvest stated that he had known MRS WEBBER for some nine years and had attended her for indigestion at one time. He did not consider it necessary to make a post-mortem, and his opinion was that the deceased died from syncope. A verdict that deceased died from "Heart Disease" was returned. A unanimous vote of sympathy was accorded MR WEBBER in his bereavement.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 29 May 1889 NEWTON ABBOT - The Sudden Death In A Train. - Early yesterday morning Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Newton Railway Station concerning the death of MISS MARIAN MUIRHEAD, aged seventy-seven, formerly of 6 Westbourne Park-road, London, who died suddenly in a train between Teignmouth and Newton on the previous day. Deceased, who was on her way from Bath - where she had been on a short visit - to Stoke, Devonport, was travelling with her niece, Miss Jane Bankier. She was consumptive and was subject to attacks of bronchitis and chronic dyspepsia. She had only lately had an attack of that description and started for Devonport because she generally found relief in change. Dr Scott, of Newton, the medical man called in to see deceased when she was taken out of the railway carriage dead, gave it as his opinion that death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury, of which Mr A. Reeve was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 30 May 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest last evening respecting the death of ANNIE WEDLAKE, aged twenty-seven and residing at No. 8 Archer-terrace. DANIEL WEDLAKE, husband of the deceased, stated that he was an engine-driver on the Great Western Railway, and last saw her alive on Monday night before he went on duty. On his return at quarter-past eight on Wednesday morning he went to her room and knocked to wake her up. He did not hear her answer, but heard the two children in the room playing. He then proceeded downstairs, but about half-past eight went up again and receiving no answer burst open the door and found his wife lying on the bed dead. Mr Brenton, surgeon, was at once called and declared life to be extinct. - Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post-mortem examination and found that the heart was large, fatty and degenerated; the liver was of enormous size and congested. He was of opinion that deceased died whilst in a fainting fit. The Jury (Mr J. W. Pearce, Foreman) returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes" and passed a vote of condolence with the husband in his sad bereavement.

Western Morning News, Thursday 30 May 1889 NORTHAM - JOHN BICTON HUTCHINGS, 47, carpenter, Northam, near Bideford, was found drowned on Monday night in the "Holy Well" adjoining the village. He had been under medical care for some time and his brain was somewhat weak. He left home at about 6.30 p.m., and visited a Mrs Braunton, who lives close to the well. He chatted to her for about a quarter of an hour and then said he must go and measure the entrance to the well to make a door for it. Almost immediately afterwards his daughter arrived at Mrs Braunton's in search of her father. A child told her that there were a hat and stick near the well. Mr Thomas Wilkey, a friend, found deceased in the well floating face downwards. At an Inquest held on Tuesday a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned. Deceased worked for Mr A. B. Wren, of Northam. He was secretary of the Northam Club and was formerly a member of the Bideford Volunteer band.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 31 May 1889 MALBOROUGH - Inquest At Salcombe. - An Inquest was held at the Union Inn, Salcombe, yesterday, by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner and a Jury, of whom Mr W. S. Hannaford was chosen Foreman, touching the death of CAPTAIN EDWIN HAMDEN, jun., whose body was found floating in mid-stream on Tuesday last in Salcombe Harbour. Mr John Chant, boat-builder, was rowing in the harbour about five o'clock on Tuesday morning, when he saw the body floating. He called to the coastguard for assistance, and they took the body ashore. - Mr Arthur Pearce, surgeon, stated that he examined the body, which was cut about the face, and found that death had resulted from a fractured skull. P.C. Grant detailed the result of his visit to the spot where the deceased was found. - Sidney Cook, gardener, deposed to seeing CAPTAIN HAMDEN at quarter-past ten the previous night, when he was perfectly sober, and was passing through Fore-street. He was then on his way home. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt that death was accidental, but the path being private property they had no power to order anything to be done. They could only recommend. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with the following rider:- "That the unprotected state of the path around Victoria-place is dangerous to the public, and recommend that the Local Board take some steps by lighting or otherwise to render it less dangerous."

BRENTOR - The Recent Fatality On The Tavistock Railway. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR WILLIAM BATTEN, shopkeeper and farmer, of Brentor, who was killed on the railway between Lidford and Marytavy by a passing train on Friday last, was held before Mr Coroner Rodd at the Schoolroom at Brentor yesterday. The Rev. R. J. French-Smith was Foreman of the Jury. Chief Inspector J. Northcott, of Plymouth, was present as representing the Great Western Railway Company, and Police-Inspector H. J. Foster, of Exeter, watched the proceedings on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company. The following evidence was taken:- William Henry Gill said he was an engine driver and son-in-law of the deceased, who was fifty-nine years of age. The deceased was in the habit of crossing the line, but not stopping. Witness saw the 3.20 London and South Western train from Exeter coming down the line. He did not see MR BATTEN struck down, but after the train had passed he saw that he had been knocked down by it. When he went up to where the deceased lay he found him dead. An arm and a leg were severed from the body, his skull was smashed in and his ribs broken. There was a curve some distance up the line, and he did not think the engine driver could have seen the deceased in time to pull up. - George Styles, an engine driver on the new railway, deposed that he saw the deceased putting tobacco into his pipe as he stood on the Great Western line. He did not think the driver of the train could have pulled up if he had seen him. He thought the noise of the engine drawing their waggons close by prevented the deceased from hearing the approach of the train, which witness did not hear himself until it had passed. - Walter Bennett said he had been in the employ of the London and South Western Company twenty-six years, and was the driver of the Alexandra train on the day of the accident. Between Lidford and Marytavy they were travelling at the usual speed, when he heard a rattling of stones at the sharp curve near where the accident occurred. He was under the impression at the time that they had run over a farmer's dog. He looked back round the curve and saw something in the four footway, and shortly afterwards the fireman called his attention to a man's hat on the left hand lamp iron in front of the engine. He could not have seen deceased from the position in which he stood on the engine in rounding the curve. Witness communicated to the railway authorities at Marytavy and Tavistock what had happened. On arriving at Devonport he examined the engine and found blood and particles of clothing upon the front part of it. - Thomas Holt, the fireman, gave corroborative evidence. - The Coroner briefly summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they did not consider that blame was attached to anyone for what had occurred. - The Foreman said that it was the general feeling of the Jury that what had taken place should be a warning to all people, in that parish especially, not to trespass on the line in future. Chief-Inspector Northcott thanked the Foreman for the observation he had made, and said he was about to make the same remark himself.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 3 June 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At The Devonport Workhouse. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) presided over an Inquest held at the Ford Workhouse on Saturday, touching the death of an inmate named THOMAS CHISWELL, aged seventy-four years. It appeared from the evidence of one of the boys that the deceased last Monday night jumped out of the window at his quarters, presumably with the intention of committing suicide. He was found lying on the ground of the courtyard, having sustained serious injuries in the head. Mr Everard Row, surgeon, was called and dressed the wound, but on Thursday erysipelas set in and CHISWELL succumbed thereto on the following day. It was stated that the deceased had been known to have had suicidal inclinations and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

EXETER - Want And Starvation. Sad Death Of A Plymothian. - On Friday last two little boys named Heron and Godfrey, belonging to Topsham, were on their way from their homes to attend school at Exeter. Near Countess Weir, which is about mid distance between the two places, they went into a lane, known as Glass House-lane, where there is a linhay. This they entered, out of boyish curiosity, and were not long in climbing to the loft above, where, as they stated, they heard mice running about. In the loft they saw the body of a man, lying on his back. He appeared to be dead; his hat was on the floor, partly beneath him. They at once proceeded to the house of the Countess Weir constable, and P.C. Potter returned with them. He found by the side of the deceased his boots and hat, and near his feet a spectacle case containing a pedlar's license. In his pocket was a small packet of tea, a pipe, and a purse containing a key. No money was found upon him. The license led to his identification. - John Taylor Brooking of No. 2 Dudley-terrace, Saltash, told the Jury at the Inquest held on Saturday that the deceased was his brother-in-law, FRANCIS LETHBRIDGE, aged 59, who up to six week since had been residing at Plymouth. He was in delicate health, and had followed various employments. Recently he took out a pedlar's license, and travelled the country hawking tea, a stock of which witness purchased for him. - Dr Bothwell of Topsham, who examined he body, stated that death must have taken place at least a week before the remains were found. There were no signs of foul play, no indications of poison. The stomach was entirely empty and in his opinion deceased died from want and starvation. - The Deputy Coroner, (Mr Gould) having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Starvation."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 June 1889 PLYMOUTH - At Plymouth FREDERICK JOHN GARDINER, an infant, was found dead in bed with its parents on Sunday morning, having died during the night from convulsions. At an Inquest held at the First and Last Inn by Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner, last evening, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Results Of Heavy Drinking At Plymouth. - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Plymouth Guildhall last evening relative to the death of MARY KEELY, aged 65 years. - Thomas Couch, residing at 30 Rendle-street, said he had known deceased for a number of years. On Saturday his son, Thomas, who came home in the Orontes, went out and returned about seven o'clock in the evening in company with deceased. There were five or six people present, and some whisky was fetched in a half-pint bottle and deceased had some. Witness left shortly afterwards and returned in about an hour, and deceased was then sitting in a chair. He went out again, and on returning an hour later deceased was dead. In reply to a Juror witness said deceased was a very intemperate woman. - Bessie Meeham, residing at 28 Rendle-street, deposed that she visited the house about half-past nine on Saturday evening. Couch, his wife, and their son were there, and witness saw some ale on the chest of drawers and also a half-pint bottle of whiskey about three parts full. In about ten minutes she noticed deceased lying on the floor fully dressed with a shawl on, and asked what was the matter with her. Couch replied that she had gone to sleep. Witness went to raise her and found she was dead and quite cold. Deceased's husband was sent for, as also was Dr Pearse, but the latter was not at home. Dr Pullin, who was passing, was called in, and he considered deceased had been dead some time. There was a mark on the left side of deceased's head, but it did not look "fresh." With the exception of Couch, sen., all present had had a drop of drink. - P.C. Michell said he was sent for shortly after ten o'clock on Saturday night, and on going into the back-room he saw Couch, his wife, and a sailor. They were all drunk and deceased was lying on the sailor's bag. He found a bottle containing whisky (produced) and was told it had not been replenished after it was brought in. He made inquiries on Sunday morning, and found that a young man named Yabsley had fetched a pint of whiskey previously. - Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, considered death due to syncope, and that deceased had taken too much spirits. The Jury, of whom Mr Stabb was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by drink."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 5 June 1889 TAVISTOCK - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at the White Hart Hotel, Tavistock yesterday, on the body of the infant daughter of W. EASTERBROOK, a labourer of Exeter-street. It appeared that the child was only twenty-four hours old, and that the mother gave it the breast at two o'clock on Monday morning and an hour after the father found the infant dead. Mr Pedlar from Messrs. Northey and Theed's surgery, said the child, which was not fully developed, died from exhaustion. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 6 June 1889 EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of MARK EBDEN, a bricklayer, of Exeter, who met with a fatal accident at the New Theatre on Tuesday. The body was identified by his wife and Nathaniel Hannaford deposed that he was working on the same scaffold as deceased, who was lightening an arch. The part of the arch where deceased was suddenly collapsed and deceased, who was leaning against the brickwork, went with it. Hannaford immediately proceeded to his assistance and took him to the Hospital, where he died. Mr Russel Coombes, house surgeon at the Hospital, said that deceased died from a fracture of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 7 June 1889 PLYMOUTH - In the case of JAMES THOMAS, 27, quay porter, Plymouth, who died suddenly on Wednesday, the Coroner's Jury, at the Sailors' Home yesterday, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

ST BUDEAUX - WILLIAM PETHERICK, aged 10, son of MR BENJAMIN B. PETHERICK, a market gardener, Weston Mills, went with Henry Tracy and three other lads about the same age to bathe in Weston Lake on Wednesday evening. PETHERICK, the first to undress, got on one of three floating planks, and asked the others to push him off. As they did so he fell off in deep water, and sank. Coming to the surface, he shouted out "Save me," but his comrades being like him unable to swim, could render him no help. Tracy partly dressed and raised an alarm. An elder brother of PETHERICK recovered the body within ten minutes of its sinking last time, but life was then extinct. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, yesterday, evidence was given by the father, Tracy, and Robert Charwill, who assisted in landing the body and went for a doctor, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

HOLSWORTHY - Suicide At Holsworthy. - JOHN COLLINS, a labourer, of Holsworthy, has committed suicide under singular circumstances. For eighteen months he had been very ill, and was in a very weak state. On Wednesday morning he rose about five o'clock, and, as usual, left for a walk before breakfast, telling his wife that he was going to his garden. As he had not returned by midday, a search was made, chiefly in the neighbourhood of the Windmill. That was in an opposite direction to COLLINS'S garden, but a man named Gliddon saw him near the Windmill about an hour after he left home. Although the search was kept up until one o'clock on Thursday morning, nothing was seen of deceased, but when the search was resumed three hours later, his body was found upright in the reservoir, near the Windmill, which feed the supply tanks at Holsworthy railway station; and it was certain that he had not been in the water more than two hours. It was also subsequently ascertained that COLLINS had slept in a linhay near the reservoir, and in all probability heard the search parties. He was, however, neither in the linhay nor the reservoir at midnight. COLLINS took no food with him on leaving his home, and in order to get into the reservoir, which is 20 feet deep, he had to climb a fence. At an Inquest held by Mr Burd, Coroner, yesterday, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 7 June 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident in Devonport Dockyard. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday afternoon held an Inquiry at Pengelly's London Inn, Fore-street, Devonport, into the circumstances attendant upon the death of JAMES GUISE and ERNEST JOHN STRONG, able seaman, of H.M.S. Ajax, battleship, Captain Boyle, reserve ship at Greenock, at present in dock at Devonport, who were killed on Wednesday afternoon by falling into the dock in which the ship lay, under circumstances already recorded in the Western Daily Mercury. - Mr J. P. Goldsmith, Admiralty law agent, watched the proceedings and Inspector Kellock represented the Metropolitan Police. Mr Pengelly was Foreman of the Jury. - The cause of the death of GUISE was first taken. - Commander George Huntingford, of H.M.S. Ajax, deposed that at 1.45 on Wednesday they were engaged transporting the cable trough from the starboard bow on the ship to the port. The ship end of the trough was suspended by a chain, which was hooked on one side, and on the other there was a slip, the ring of which to all appearances was properly secured and "moused." He had never seen pins supplied for cable hangers for the purpose of raising chain cables. It was quite usual to fasten the slip in the same way as the one produced. if he had known there had been a hole in the cable hangers in use at the time of the accident he should have used a pin, but for the work that was being done he should not consider it negligence on the part of his subordinate officer who had charge of the working party in not inserting a pin. The weight of the trough was about a ton, and the strain on the chain produced would be about half a ton. The slip had been at work about half an hour before the accident, and he entertained not the slightest anxiety about it. His observations were mainly directed to the men who were working on the edge of the dock, on which the other end of the trough rested, to see that there was no carelessness on the part of the men, as the railings running around the dock had been temporarily removed. - By Mr Golding: He regarded "mousing" as an extra precautionary measure, and had seen slips frequently used without it. - Witness, proceeding, said, in answer to the Coroner, there was nothing which could cause any friction to the "mousing" but it was apparent from the "mousing" produced that there had been some friction. It did seem that the front of the slip was rather too straight and that it should be more curved. He did not think he should ever use a slip again without a "forelock." After the accident he found the slip lying quite open. The effect of the "mousing" giving way caused the tongue of the slip to open, and the end of the trough then fell into the dock. The man GUISE was standing on the edge of the dock between that and the tackle for transporting the shute. He should not have been where he was, but on the other side of the tackle. When the ship end of the trough dropped into the dock the tackle caught one of his legs and swept him into the dock. GUISE was immediately brought up and taken into the sick bay on board the Ajax, where he was attended by Surgeon Spencer. He died, however, within a quarter of an hour, having fractured his skull by the fall. - By the Foreman: The work was proceeded with in the usual way and in accordance with the regulations of the service. - Mr Martin Jackson, boatswain of the Ajax, stated that he superintended the actual work of transporting the trough in which GUISE was engaged a few seconds before the accident. GUISE with others was using an iron bar for the purpose of clearing the trough of a shute in the side of the dock. When he had cleared the trough GUISE laid the lever on one side and clapped on to the tackle attached to the shute. A few seconds after the slip became detached, and the ship end of the trough went into the dock, and in so doing canted the shore end of the trough, whereby the deceased was caught by his legs by the tackle and thrown to the bottom of the dock, a distance of about fifty feet. He inspected carefully the "mousing" of the slip which gave way the same day before dinner and was perfectly satisfied that it was safe. He had on many occasions seen slips used without forelocks. The "mousing" could not have chafed against anything in his opinion, and he could offer no explanation as to why it parted. he should recommend the use of forelocks. - Daniel Winsor, the master-at-arms of the Ajax, formally identified the body. Deceased was 23 years of age, and a native of Birmingham. - The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and that every reasonable precaution was taken, and, therefore, exonerated all concerned from blame. - The cause of the death of the man STRONG, who attempted to save GUISE and met with his own death, was next proceeded with. - Corporal W. F. George, Royal Marine Light Infantry, serving on board the Neptune, stated that the deceased was one of the working party who were moving the trough, and was an eye witness of GUISE being carried into the dock. Immediately STRONG saw GUISE disappear he jumped down the steps of the side of the dock, which were each about 2ft. high. This particular part of the dock he should say was not to be used in such a way, but it was safe enough if a man went down cautiously, and quietly. STRONG, however, went down rapidly in trying to save the fall of GUISE. He went down safely for about five steps, and then slipped and fell to the bottom of the dock. Witness, after seeing STRONG fall, ran for the doctor, and Surgeon Spencer immediately went to his assistance. Deceased fell a distance of twenty-five feet and fractured his skull. - By a Juror: STRONG'S idea evidently was to render all possible assistance to his comrade. - Mr Jackson, the boatswain of the ship, recalled, said that the deceased man GUISE had nearly reached the bottom of the dock when STRONG commenced to come down. He got to the fifth step all right, but he stumbled and his thigh caught on to the sixth step of the dock, and he fell. In his fall he caught on to a hook rope hanging slack, and several men held on to the head of this rope at the top of the dock, but STRONG could not retain his hold. Subsequently he rolled down on to the platform, and disappeared from his (witness's) sight. - The Master-at-Arms of the Ajax was called, and formally identified the body. STRONG, he said, was 22 years of age, and a native of Bristol. - The Coroner said that the deceased met his death accidentally by imprudently attempting in a hurry to go down into the dock by an improper mode of descent. It was, however, very heroic of him to go to the succour of his comrade, and it was very unfortunate that he met his death in going to GUISE'S assistance. - Commander Hungerford: It was a very praiseworthy attempt. - The Jury returned a verdict that STRONG died from injuries Accidentally received, "whilst in the execution of his duty."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 8 June 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall last evening, touching the death of JAMES FINCH, aged forty-eight years, a fisherman, whose body was recovered under circumstances reported in the Western Daily Mercury. SARAH JANE FINCH, widow, residing at 11 Peacock-lane, Plymouth, deposed that her husband had been the skipper of a trawling sloop, the Water Lily. He left home about half-past ten on Wednesday morning to go on board his vessel, but witness did not see him again alive. There was a slight estrangement between them, but it was not of much consequence and deceased was apparently in good spirits. The same evening she went away to Mary Tavy with the children, but did not leave any message to that effect for her husband. She came back to Plymouth on Thursday evening and learned that her husband was drowned. - Samuel Slogett Mitchell, waterman, stated that just before ten o'clock on Wednesday night he conveyed deceased on board the Water Lily. He was perfectly sober and in very good spirits. WILLIAM HENRY FINCH, brother of deceased, deposed that after several hours' creeping the body was recovered between Deadman's Bay and Marshall's breaking-up yard. P.C. Walters stated that he took charge of the body, which was minus hat, coat and boots. The Coroner remarked that the position of the body led one to believe that deceased did not attempt to use his arms whilst in the water. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Weekes was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquest at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, Camden-street, touching the death of LOUISA COCKRAM, aged forty-eight. GEORGE COCKRAM, a brushmaker, residing at 15 Gibbons-street, deposed that deceased had been failing in health for some time, and on Wednesday she was taken very ill and died the same night. Mr R. Burke, surgeon, attributed death to apoplexy. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Wright was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 12 June 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Recent Fatality In Hamoaze. - An Inquiry was held at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) respecting the demise of THOMAS DANSON, aged twenty years, formerly an ordinary seaman on H.M.S. Defiance, and who was drowned under circumstances reported in Monday's Western Daily Mercury. Mr Goldsmith, Admiralty Law Agent, attended the Inquest on behalf of the Admiralty. - Michael Dunn, ship's corporal, having identified the body, William C. M. Nicholson, lieutenant, serving on board the Defiance, stated that the men were permitted to bathe if they wished. On the evening that deceased was drowned he went with a number of other seamen to bathe, and every precaution was taken to avoid accident. After the deceased had been in the water about five minutes a cry was raised that deceased had sunk, and in consequence the ship's boat, which was manned by two seamen, was kept close to the spot. After a few minutes, deceased not having been seen, a diver was ordered to go down in search of the body. About an hour afterwards the diver brought the lifeless body of DANSON to the surface. The deceased was taken on board his ship and after being examined by Staff Surgeon Anderson, the body was subsequently removed to the mortuary of the Royal Naval Hospital. - Frederick Reed, an able seaman, serving on board the Defiance, stated that when deceased jumped into the water he struck himself violently, and after swimming a few yards he held up his arms and sank without making any nose. - Staff Sergeant Anderson stated that he had made a post mortem examination by request and was of opinion that the immediate cause of death was syncope, which was accelerated by asphyxia. - The Coroner, in summing up, stated that the case, although simple, was a pitiful one, and he had every reason to believe that they would coincide with him in passing a vote of condolence with the bereaved parents, who had travelled a long distance to be present at the Inquiry and funeral. - The Jury, of whom Mr Towell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning," and exonerated the ship's crew from blame. - At the conclusion of the Inquiry the deceased was buried in the naval burial ground, Eldad. Full naval honours were accorded the remains and there were present the officers of the ship, together with a large number of sympathising friends. A large wreath representing an anchor was sent by the officers and a magnificent wreath was also sent by the messmates of the Defiance. The burial service was read by the naval chaplain (the Rev. Mr Mullen).

PLYMOUTH - Mr T. C. Brian (Borough Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Tandem Inn yesterday respecting the death of an infant named WM. BOND, aged five months. THURZA BOND, mother, deposed that she went to bed at eleven o'clock on Saturday night and in the morning when she awoke she found it dead. The appearances pointed to convulsions, and the Jury, of whom Mr C. Parkin was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Brian also held an Inquest at the Seymour Arms concerning the death of ELIZABETH ROSS, aged fifty-three years. Elizabeth Cole, the mother of the deceased, stated that on Monday evening she went with her daughter to the Freedom Fields. they got separated and shortly afterwards she learnt that her daughter had been taken very ill. Deceased was removed to her residence in Seymour-street, where she died. For some time she had been suffering from tightness of the chest, but was under no medical care. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Martin was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 June 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - At the Inquest held yesterday, it was shewn that Lance-Sergeant GEORGE SKINNER, of the Essex Regiment, aged 28, who shot himself in Raglan Barracks, Devonport, on Tuesday, had obtained permission to get married, but the parents of Kate Brooks, his sweetheart, a servant in the employ of Quartermaster Kelly, thought she was too young to marry, and she also turned against him, she said, because he was jealous. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 June 1889 EXETER - MR W. J. SMITH-HOOPER, 74, formerly an accountant in the West of England Insurance Office, residing at Barnfield-crescent, Exeter, made a better breakfast than usual yesterday morning and shortly afterwards was found dead. At the Inquest last evening Dr Shapter gave his opinion that death was due to the sudden failure of the heart's action.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 19 June 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide In Keyham Yard. An Intemperate Wife. - A distressing case of suicide took place at Keyham Dockyard yesterday morning. WILLIAM COLLACOTT aged fifty-nine, residing at 33 Charlotte-street, Morice Town, and employed as an engine driver in the erecting shop of Keyham Factory, where he has been engaged for the past thirty years, was found dead shortly after eight o'clock yesterday morning in the stoke-hole, having hanged himself. Deceased, who was a respectable, steady man, went to work at the proper time, but shortly after eight o'clock was missed, and on his stoker, Henry Gloyn, going down into the stoke-hole, which is below the engine-room, he saw the deceased looking upwards, and for the moment thought he was standing on the ladder. There seemed something strange about deceased, however, and on Gloyn making closer investigation he found he had hanged himself with the guide rope used by the side of the ladder. Deceased had taken two half-hitches with the rope around his neck and apparently had then jumped off one of the bars of the ladder, with the result that he dislocated his neck. Deceased's feet were only six or seven inches from the ground. The body was immediately cut down, whilst one of the surgeons of H.M.S. Indus, steam reserve ship, was quickly in attendance, but he could only pronounced the man to be dead. The body was subsequently removed to the mortuary. - In the afternoon Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest touching the circumstance and Mr May was elected Foreman of the Jury. - Gloyn, the stoker, detailed how the body was found, as also did a labourer named Parnell, who helped to cut it down. Both witnesses spoke as to the deceased having been very depressed of late. - JANE COLLACOTT, aged fifty-six, the wife of the deceased was also called, and she at once gave the impression that she had been drinking. She deposed that her husband had been in very low spirits, and that in consequence he had very recently had a week's holiday. Taxed by the Coroner, MRS COLLACOTT admitted that she had given way to drink of late, and that there had been differences between her and her husband as to the way in which she had been spending his money. - John Ball, residing in the same house as the deceased, also stated that COLLACOTT had been much depressed of late. Deceased was a quiet and sober man. On the other hand, MRS COLLACOTT was, he was afraid, often what he should call drunk. - Police-Sergeant Lane of the Metropolitan Police, stated that as soon as he became aware of the circumstances he took charge of the body and searched it, but found nothing except the key of the locker where deceased kept his clothes. In the locker he found £4 10s. in gold, 13s. in silver and some bronze. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a Temporary State of Insanity."

EXETER HEAVITREE - The Improper Feeding Of Infants. - Mr H. Gould, Deputy borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Horse and Groom Hotel, Heavitree, Exeter, yesterday, on the body of the infant daughter of ANN RODGERS. After hearing the depositions of the mother, who said that she fed the child on biscuit food and also suckled it, Sarah Hooper and Dr Andrews, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner remarked that no doubt improper feeding had been the cause of death and he hoped that the mother would take warning, as she had previously had a child die in the same manner.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 June 1889 TAVISTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital last evening on the body of WM. TREFFREY, aged 50, a farm labourer in the employ of Mr Glanville, of Calstock. Mr Clifton was Foreman of the Jury. Joel Harris, a farmer of Calstock, deposed that on Monday he and deceased were each in charge of a wagon with two horses, drawing mundic from Wheal Crebor Mine, each load consisting of about 3 ½ tons. Deceased had passed over Newbridge to the Gunnislake side of the river, and turned down the road to the river bank, putting on the drag, but not the safety chain. It was not a dangerous place, and at times they went down without using the shoe. In crossing a gutter a link of the shoe chain gave way, causing the wheel to run over the shoe. The horses then started into a trot, and in trying to hold the wheeler, deceased fell, and the wheels passed over his legs. Dr Bowhay stated that he directed deceased's removal to Tavistock, and after consultation with three other surgeons, they considered the only chance of saving life was to amputate both legs. One was smashed into eight pieces, and the other was even worse. Amputation was performed immediately. Deceased never rallied from the shock. HARRY TREFFREY, a son of the deceased, considered that the link was not strong enough for the work it had to do. The Coroner replied that it was possible for a link to go at any time, but seeing that deceased did not use the safety chain, he did not consider there was any need to adjourn the Inquiry. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury being of opinion that no blame was attached to anyone.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 June 1889 SOUTH MOLTON - In a lime pit at South Aller Farm, near Southmolton, on Friday evening, Mr John Hill, the occupier of the farm, found the body of a young woman, which was subsequently identified as that of ELIZABETH STENNER, about 20 years of age. She had been living for a month on trial at Mr Webber's, Castle Hotel, Barnstaple, and left there more than a week since. After she left a pair of boots belonging to Mrs Webber was missed and they were found in Deceased's box, which had been removed to the Angel Inn, where she had obtained a place. She had been missing about a week. STENNER was familiar with Aller, having lived there once. At an Inquest on Saturday a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 24 June 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Burning Fatality At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital on Saturday relative to the death of FRANCIS JAMES WHITE aged two years and five months, and who died from burns received on the previous day. From the evidence of the mother, who resides at 43 Monument-street, it appeared that about nine o'clock in the morning of the previous day she went downstairs leaving her child in the room. On returning witness found the deceased all ablaze. He had procured a chair and reached a box of matches with which he set himself on fire. She took him to Dr Row, who ordered his immediate removal to the Hospital. The nurse, who gave evidence, said the burns were so bad that but very little hope was entertained of its recovery. The child died about seven o'clock in the evening of the same day. - The Jury, of whom Mr Sampson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 June 1889 TAMERTON FOLIOT - THOMAS SMITH, a navvy, who arrived from Saltash on Tuesday to work on the railway work at Tamerton, was on Sunday morning found dead in bed at his lodgings, Seven Stars-lane. He had complained of pains in his side, but did not think a doctor necessary. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday, Mr E. Doudney, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said deceased had been suffering from pneumonia in both lungs, and that no doubt was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Fall At Devonport. - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Crooner, last evening held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD JAMES LILLICRAP, a little boy, who sustained fatal injuries through falling into a quarry under Mount Wise. According to the evidence of P.C. Payne and John Dalton several children were picking flowers near the edge of the quarry, which is slightly protected by a wire fence. Payne, who was in Baker's-place, shouted to the children, who ran up to the top of the ramparts, where they were out of danger. Directly the constable's back was turned they again went near the brink, deceased climbing through the wires of the fence. While in a sitting position on the edge of the quarry he leaned forward to get some flowers out of his reach, and losing his balance rolled over into the quarry below, a distance of about 50 feet. The Coroner, in summing up, suggested that Major-General Sir Howard Elphinstone, commanding Western District, should be waited upon with the view of the top of the rampart being fenced with unclimbable railings, so as to prevent the public from trespassing there. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and Mr Willis, the Foreman of the Jury, and Mr Sampson were nominated to wait upon the major-general, in company with the Coroner, at the first opportunity.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 June 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death Of A Woman At Plymouth. - Shortly before seven o'clock yesterday morning Mr T. Lillicrap, residing at 7 Bath-street, Plymouth observed from a staircase window the body of a woman lying in the courtyard of No. 19 Bath-lane, directly facing his house and only separated by a narrow lane. He at once proceeded to arouse the inmates of the house and after knocking some time a man named Eke appeared in his night dress. With him Lillicrap went to the court and there found quite dead ANNIE RIDDLES, a woman of ill-fame, aged 33. She was lying on her back in a small pool of blood, parallel with the leads above. The feet were pointed towards the back door, and the deceased's clothes were not in the slightest degree disarranged. Inhabitants of the house at once recognised the body as that of RIDDLES, who frequented a brothel at No. 18 Bath-lane, kept by Mrs Roseveare, and stated that she was a married woman deserted by her husband six years ago. Lillicrap communicated with the Police, and the body was removed to the mortuary at the Guildhall. In the neighbourhood and throughout the town the news quickly spread that a foul murder had been committed, and although the rumours were greatly exaggerated much mystery surrounds the case. The position of the body alone was sufficient to provoke suspicion. Deceased had frequented the house adjoining for the last two years, and on Monday evening entered it in a state of intoxication. She had been drinking with a sailor named Taylor. He is a "friend" of RIDDLES, but is stated to have slept with his wife in the same house on Monday night. RIDDLES was seen after she left Taylor lying on the bed intoxicated. Mrs Dennithorne, residing in the house, later on heard RIDDLES by herself on the leads using bad language and Mrs Goulding, residing at 20 Bath-lane, saw her at half-past two in the morning at the end of the leads overlooking the lane, and resting on her elbow and vomiting. Had the deceased over-balanced herself from that position she must have fallen either into the narrow lane or into Mr Lillicrap's court. The body from its position, however, must have fallen - if it fell at all - from further back where the parapet is between three and four feet high and the leads nearly thirty feet from the ground. If deceased fell it is regarded as remarkable that four clothes lines stretched across the court remained unbroken and that a tub and bucket on the ground were undisturbed. The body, too, looked as if it had been placed where it was found, quite parallel with the leads. Mr C. F. Bean, surgeon, Athenaeum-terrace, who has made a post-mortem examination, may at the adjourned Inquest throw some light upon the mystery. Mr Bean found a circular fracture of the skull caused by a fall, and he is of opinion that death must have been instantaneous. It is quite possible that the deceased in endeavouring to recover her balance turned parallel with the leads, and that the lines "gave" with the weight of the body, but even then the mystery remains how the deceased's clothes, after a fall of thirty feet, should be not disarranged. Detective-Inspector John Hill, Detective-Sergeant Thomas and Detective Crabb, yesterday examined both Nos. 18 and 19 Bath-lane for traces of a struggle, but found none. - The inmates of both houses were subpoenaed as witnesses at the Inquest. At an early hour the state of some of them was so disgusting that the Police conveyed several to the Guildhall in order to ensure their being sober at the Inquest. Hundreds of persons all day yesterday visited Bath-street and neighbourhood and many felt confident that the body could not have fallen or been thrown in the peculiar position where it was found. The Police, however, are not inclined to think there was "foul play." - In Bath-lane and the immediate neighbourhood a most shocking state of things exists from both a moral and a sanitary point of view. A few months ago the attention of the Guardians was called to a house in the district where no less than sixteen women were found sleeping in one room. - The Inquest. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for Plymouth, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon respecting the death of ANNIE RIDDELLS, whose body had been found early in the morning in the court of No. 19 Bath-lane, with the back of the head badly smashed and a portion of the brain protruding. Mr Limpenny was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Superintendent Wreford and Detective-Inspector Hill watched the case for the Police. - The Coroner, in opening the Inquiry, remarked that the case was at present shrouded in mystery. One fact was evident - the woman met her death by violent means. It would be the duty of the Jury to carefully consider the evidence given, especially that of the medical officer. The Police were doing everything possible to get at the bottom of the matter. - Francis E. Tyrell of 4 Radford-road, West Hoe, identified the corpse as that of his sister-in-law. She was a married woman, 33 years of age and had two children. She had been parted from her husband five or six years. He was in America or dead. Latterly deceased had had no fixed abode and had been living on the streets. - Jane Goulding, married, of 20 Bath-lane, said she knew deceased by sight and last saw her alive about half-past two that morning, when standing on the leads of her own house. Deceased was leaning over the parapet of the leads of No. 19 Bath-lane, urging. There was no one near her at the time and she appeared sober. - By the Foreman: Deceased could not have fallen from where witness last saw her standing to the place in the court where her body was found. It was quite possible, however, for her to have moved to another part of the leads and then have over-balanced herself and fallen to the court below. - Annie Mitchell, who said she had no home, but had slept for the last two nights at No. 18 Bath-lane, deposed that she saw deceased on Monday night in her own room. She was then lying on the bed fully dressed in an intoxicated state. Deceased got up and commenced swearing and at a quarter to twelve she (the witness) left the room with a man who remained with her during the night. She had never heard anyone threaten deceased, though she was told that Mr Roseveare, the landlord, had turned her out of the house, as she was bringing in a jug of coffee, he being under the impression that it contained intoxicating liquor. - By the Chief Constable: Samuel Taylor, a sailor in the Royal Navy, who occasionally stayed with deceased, was with her all the first part of Monday evening, but was not in the room when witness last saw her. he was then at the top of the house in a room by himself. - Lydia Denithorne, living with her husband at 20 Bath-lane, stated that she last saw deceased between twelve and one o'clock on Monday night. She was then the worse for drink, and inclined to be noisy. Later on deceased was scolding someone, and appeared to be on the tenement leads. Believed she was scolding the man Taylor, but did not hear him answer, nor did she hear anything of him until her husband called him at five o'clock in the morning to go on board his ship. - By the Coroner: Taylor's room was only nine feet from the place where deceased must have stood before she fell over and anyone could quickly go from the room to the leads, and back, without being seen. - Samuel Taylor, the man-of-war's man, who occasionally stopped with deceased, was next called, but before he gave evidence, the Coroner conferred with Supt. Wreford, and then addressing the Jury, said: There are a great many more witnesses to call, and especially there is the medical evidence. Remembering that this occurrence only took place this morning, I think it would be in the interests of justice if we adjourned until Thursday or Friday. It is quite clear we must not endeavour to push the case. The Police are making every Inquiry and I hope they may get some further information. A great deal of the evidence is very vague, and does not help us to any important conclusion. I, therefore, propose to adjourn until Thursday or Friday, so that the Police may have time to work up the case. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Friday afternoon at four o'clock, when the Jury will inspect the premises where deceased met with her death.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 26 June 1889 ST BUDEAUX - The Fatal Accident At Saltash Passage. - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen. (County Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Bridge Inn, Saltash Passage, last evening touching the death of ROBERT LEY, aged thirty-five years, a groom in the employ of Mr J. Godfrey, of Plymouth, and who died under circumstances reported in the Western Daily Mercury. Mr J. Cuddeford was elected Foreman of the Jury. - John Budge, a labourer residing at Milehouse, deposed that about five o'clock on the previous evening he left Milehouse in company with the deceased, both being on horseback. Whilst passing the Skerne railway bridge on the Saltash-road, a train came along and the horses immediately bolted. Clouds of dust were blowing at the time, and the next thing he saw was the horse which deceased had been riding galloping off without a rider. Witness ultimately found deceased lying unconscious in the road and with assistance he was conveyed to the residence of some friends. - Mr R. T. Maddowes, surgeon, of Saltash, stated that he visited the deceased about half-past eight, and found him conscious. He examined his head, but could not discover any injuries with the exception of a black eye. It was his opinion that death was the result of a shock caused by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". - On the proposition of the Foreman, the Jury unanimously expressed their sympathy with the widow, to whom they also handed over their fees.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 June 1889 AVETON GIFFORD - JOHN EDGCOMBE, aged 10, was at Aveton Gifford on Monday, bathing in the river Avon, with several other lads, when he slipped into deep water, and was drowned before assistance could be obtained. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide Of A Discharged Dockyardsman. - Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner, held an inquest last evening at the Golden Lion Inn, Devonport, respecting the death of THOMAS WAKEHAM, aged 62. GRACE WAKEHAM, his widow, stated that they resided at 4 Marlborough-road, Devonport. For 30 years he was a labourer in the Dockyard and in October was discharged, receiving a gratuity of £32 9s. He felt being discharged very much and wasted away. He had only worked three or four days since his discharge and had been very low-spirited. She last saw him alive about eleven o'clock on Tuesday evening when she went to bed. On waking up in the morning she missed him. Going down to the kitchen she found the fire had been lit, but had gone out again. She re-lit it, and went out into the court to fetch some water, and turning around saw deceased apparently standing against the copper. She asked him what he was doing out there without his shoes on, and getting no reply she noticed for the first time the rope around his neck and tied to the rafter. She screamed, and her son came and cut him down. - ALFRED RICHARD WAKEHAM, son of deceased, said he heard his mother scream, and on going down he met her running into the house. She said, "Oh! my poor boy, your father's hung himself." She then pointed to a knife on the mangle and said, "Cut him down." Deceased had a drop of about 3 feet. - P.C. Lethbridge having given evidence, the Coroner mentioned that deceased had a brother in a lunatic asylum, and a sister died insane. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Stribley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 27 June 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - Bathing Fatality In Barn Pool. - An Inquiry was held at the St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, by the Deputy County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, jun.) respecting the death of GEORGE R. LEADBITTER, a native of Newcastle, who was drowned in Barn Pool early yesterday morning whilst bathing in company with a few of his pupils. - George Amger Buckle, head-master of Exmouth House School, Stoke, stated that the deceased had been residing with him for the past six weeks, and he was the assistant-master. Allen Robert McDowell, residing at Exmouth House School, Stoke, stated that the deceased left home about six o'clock that morning in company with witness and three pupils for the purpose of bathing. They hired a boat at Mount Wise and pulled across to Barn Pool, which is only a short distance and went into the water. After the deceased had swam a short distance from the beach he got into the boat, which was rowed by one of the pupils and afterwards dived off, intending to swim to the shore. Witness further stated that in consequence of not seeing the deceased his suspicions were aroused and subsequently they found him lying under water, a depth of five feet. - Ernest Buckle, brother of the first witness, corroborated the evidence of McDowall. Lieutenant Stanhope, of H.M.S. Penguin, now lying in Barnpool, stated that in consequence of receiving a report from the last witness he proceeded at once to render assistance. After he had been searching about for ten minutes he noticed the body under water, lying in a curved manner and after great difficulty it was taken out of the water, placed in the boat and conveyed to H.M.S. Penguin. John McAdam, Staff-Surgeon of the Penguin, stated that he used every possible means to restore animation when the body was brought on board, but his efforts were of no avail. After a short deliberation, the Jury of whom Mr Towell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 29 June 1889 PLYMOUTH - The Mysterious Death At Plymouth. Murder Or Accident. Conclusion Of The Coroner's Inquest. Riotous Proceedings. Attack On The Roseveare's House. - Mr T. C. Brian, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, resumed last evening his Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ANNIE RIDDLE, whose body was found on Tuesday morning in a court at the rear of No. 19 Bath-lane. The deceased had a frightful scalp wound, extending down the right side of the face, and on a post-mortem being made it was found that the skull had been badly fractured. There was very little blood, and the clothes were not disordered. These circumstances, together with rumours set afloat among the neighbours, gave rise to suspicions of foul play, and great interest, therefore, attached to the proceedings in the Coroner's Court. A protracted Inquiry, during which every scrap of available evidence was thoroughly sifted, resulted in what is practically an Open Verdict of "Found Dead." - The Jury assembled in the Coroner's room; but after visiting the premises in Bath-lane, adjourned to the Quarter Sessions Court, which was crowded with spectators. Mr Wreford, the chief constable and detective-inspector Hill were present to watch the case. - Samuel Robert Taylor, a man-of-war's man who had been cohabiting with the deceased, was the first witness. - The Coroner reminded Taylor that if he considered anything he might have to say would incriminate him, he could decline to give evidence; but he assured the Court that he had nothing to conceal. On being sworn, Taylor said: - I am a stoker on board the Indus, and reside when ashore at 18 Bath-lane. The house is kept by Mrs Roseveare. I knew the deceased. I first became acquainted with her about six months ago when I came home on leave from Ireland. I lived with her at Mrs Roseveare's. We occupied the front room at the top of the house. Mr Derrythorne's room is between my room and the [?]. I had not quarrelled with the deceased before Tuesday last. On Monday evening, at about half-past six, I met her in Bath-lane, about two doors from where I lived and we went together to the Dock Hotel tap. We had two glasses of ale each. I left her there, telling her that I would "come back again" later on. She did not complain of my going away. I saw her again at the Dock Hotel at nine o'clock, and we both had two glasses of ale more. She was not sober at that time. She had been in the public-house all the time I was away, and she had been drinking. There was a glass of beer before her when I came. She was not a quarrelsome woman when in drink. I left and went to the South Devon Inn and afterwards went back again to the Dock Hotel with Mr Derrythorne. I gave deceased another glass of ale. We left together at turn-out time, and went home to No. 18 Bath-lane. We went into the front room downstairs for a candle. Mrs Roseveare is my sister. Having got the candle I went upstairs. The next time I saw the deceased was about five minutes later. I went down to see if she was all right. - The Coroner: Why? - Because she was so much in liquor. She was drunk. I saw her in a back room next the landing, sitting on a bed. I told her to go to bed and wished her "Good night," and she said "Good night" in reply. She was not vomiting then. I went up to my room and shut the door. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock, nearer twelve. I never saw ANNIE RIDDLE alive after that. - The Coroner: Be careful of your answers. Did you hear anything of her voice? - Yes, I heard her cursing and swearing. I can't say whether she was down on the bed or out on the leads. The door leading to the leads was open. It is usually kept open. I don't know what she was swearing at. I can't say whether she was swearing at me or not. When I closed the door I did not bolt it, but placed a chair against it so that it could not be opened from the outside. - The Coroner: Didn't you hear her trying the door? - No. - Why did you object to her coming to your room that night? - Because my missus had come up. - "Your missus?" Are you a married man, then? - Yes. She was downstairs, and I heard her say "You won't go in there tonight." - Did your wife tell ANNIE RIDDLE that she shouldn't go in with you that night? - Yes. - And you made up your mind that neither one of them should go in? - Yes. - You would serve them both alike? - Yes. - Now, was not your wife very angry because you would not let her go in? - No. - ANNIE RIDDLE knew that your wife was there? - I don't know. - I suppose if your wife had not been there RIDDLE would have gone in with you? - She might have. - Where were you when you told her she should not come in? - Upstairs. - Did she come to the door and try to get in? - No. - Where were you when you told her not to come in? - In Mr Derrythorne's room. - That was before you went to bed? - Yes. - You say that you heard ANNIE RIDDLE cursing and swearing. Wasn't that because she couldn't get into your room? - It might have been; I can't say. - The Coroner: Did you hear the deceased vomiting at all during that night? - Yes. - Where was that - was it on the leads or in the back room? - I don't know. - When was it? About twelve o'clock. I fell asleep then. I didn't say anything to her before I went to sleep as to her condition. I did not ask her where she would pass the night. I heard no more of her. - Are you sure? - Yes. - Are you a pretty fast sleeper? - Yes. - Did you hear any noise as of a body falling? - No. - Did you hear screaming, or quarrelling in any part of the house after twelve o'clock? - No. I left about six o'clock on Tuesday morning to go aboard my ship. I did not then know what had happened. I had occasion to go into the court of No. 18, but it is not possible to see from one yard to the other. I did not go on the leads. Mr Derrythorne called me at five o'clock. He said nothing to me, and I heard nothing about what had happened to the deceased until the detective came on board my ship. - Were you on the leads when that woman fell into the court below? - No, I was in my room. - Did you know anything at all about it? - I did not. - And that you swear positively? - Yes, I never knew anything about it. - You are not bound to answer, and if you choose to do so it is your own look out. What I am driving at is this, whether anybody pushed her over, and you tried to save her, if anything of the kind occurred. Now, do you know whether anybody else pushed her over? - I do not. - Have you any suspicion? - None whatever. - Where was your wife? Had she gone out of the house? - She went out of the house, but it appears that while I was asleep she came back again; but I knew nothing of that until the morning. She was in bed in the back room when I went downstairs. Her two children were in bed with her. - Do you know whether your wife and the deceased got together after you went to bed? - I know nothing about that. - By the Chief Constable: The room my wife slept in was the back room downstairs. The two women were not acquainted with each other. They never fell out that I know of. - Thomas Lillicrap: I live at No. 7 Bath-street. The back part of my premises abuts on Bath-lane, opposite 18 and 19. On Tuesday morning last I rose at half-past six. On opening my staircase window I saw the body of a woman lying in the court of No. 19. It was lying in a position parallel to the leads. I only saw the head and bust. To all appearance the body was dead. I immediately went down the lane and raised an alarm. I tried the back door and knocked several times, but could not open it, and then I went round to the front. After several knockings Mr Eke came to the door. I said "There's a woman dead or murdered in your court." He said "Nonsense!" I pushed my way past him and unbolted the passage door which opens into the court. That is the court the Jury visited today. It is not more than eight or nine feet square. I saw the body of the deceased. She was lying on her back; one arm a little over the body, and the other across the chest. I took the hand and felt that the body was cold. I did not notice any bruises on the hands. The clothes were not disarranged in the slightest. The legs were perfectly straight; she had no shoes on. - The Coroner: Then I may take it from you that the body was not "all of a heap," as one would expect to find if it had fallen from a height? - No, it was perfectly straight. - I am going to ask you as a matter of opinion. If you had been brought close to the body, and had been asked whether you thought it had been brought and laid there, or had fallen there from a height, what should you have said? - I should certainly say that it had been brought and laid there. I should say it was impossible that it could have fallen from the leads. - Did you notice that the head was greatly injured? - I saw a scar or cut across the forehead. - Did you see a scar eight or nine inches long on the side of the face? - No, I only saw the scar I have described. - What length do you say it was? - Half the length of the forehead. It ran down by the side of the right eye. - Was it bleeding? - There were no signs of it. The only blood I saw was dry blood on the nostrils. - Did you look on the ground? - I did, but I could see no vestiges of blood at all. - Were the clothes torn? - Not the slightest. - In answer to further questions, witness stated that when he raised the alarm several people came. He did not see Mrs Roseveare. Saw several females, but did not notice who they were. Nothing was said about the leads. Witness repeated that it seemed to him impossible that the body could have fallen from the leads in the position in which he found it. The height of the leads from the ground was about twenty feet. Did not think the body rebounded after it fell, there being no marks of such a thing. Saw no dent or impression on the top of the forehead. There had been no more quarrelling than usual in the neighbourhood. It was a noisy place occasionally, especially when sailors were knocking about. - By the Chief Constable: I was first in the court of No. 19. the doors were bolted when I came. If the body did fall from the leads, it must have fallen into the court. - by the Jury: The body lay almost close to the wall of No. 19. It was perfectly straight, the feet pointing towards the back door. - Alfred Eke: I am a coal porter and live at No. 19 Bath-lane. I went to bed on the Monday night at quarter to eleven. I live in the front room. Everything was quiet when I went to bed. I heard no disturbance during the night; no shrieking or quarrelling. I did not awake till I was roused in the morning. I saw the deceased at the Dock Hotel tap about nine o'clock on Monday night. I couldn't say whether she was drunk or sober. I knew nothing of what had taken place until Lillicrap called me. I bolted the back doors of No. 19 on the Monday night. I opened them on the Tuesday morning. They were in the same condition as when I left them the previous night. - The Coroner next called Mrs Elizabeth Roseveare. He said he understood that she was the mistress of the house No. 18. If she wished to make any statement she could only do so on oath. Having heard that, did she wish to be sworn? - Mrs Roseveare said she knew nothing at all about it. - The Coroner: You can't tell until you are asked. - Mrs Roseveare: I know nothing about it. I never saw her after Monday morning - (slight hissing in court). - The Coroner asked the Chief Constable if he wished Mrs Roseveare's evidence to be taken. - The Chief Constable: She is the keeper of the house and she must know who was in the house. - Mrs Roseveare: I only occupy rooms there, that is all. - The Coroner: There are things you may be able to clear up, and you are responsible as mistress of the house. Do you object to be sworn? - Mrs Roseveare: Certainly not, but I don't know anything about it. - The Coroner: I think you are in a very responsible situation; you have a great deal to clear up. At the same time if you object we shall not force you to be sworn, but you must take the consequences. Are you going to be sworn or not? - Mrs Roseveare: Yes, certainly. - Mrs Roseveare was then sworn. She said: I do not rent the house No. 18, I only rent four rooms. I have lived there one year and seven months. I occupy one kitchen and three bedrooms. I take in lodgers, mostly single women. There are none with me now. On Monday night Annie Mitchell, a prostitute slept in one of the rooms. She says that she paid me for the bed and that she had a man with her, but I can't say as to that. The door is open half the night. ANNIE RIDDLE used to work for me. She gave way to drink a good deal. She was a married woman, but had been separated from her husband for several years. The last time I saw her was on Monday morning about seven o'clock. - Do you mean to say that she was not in your room on Monday evening? - I can swear she was not; and my sister-in-law can prove it. I never saw her again till I saw her dead in the court on Tuesday, when I went on the leads and looked over. I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock on Monday night; my bedroom is downstairs. I remember when Taylor went to bed. he had to go through our room and he wished us "good night." I bolted the door after him. I never heard a sound afterwards. I know Taylor's wife. She is my sister-in-law. She slept in the back bedroom with her two little children. She had a quarrel with the woman she lived with in Granby-street, and was turned out. I am sure she did not say that she had been quarrelling with ANNIE RIDDLE. The door leading to the leads is always open night and day, and the people go out there at times. - I can't say that I have ever seen ANNIE RIDDLE there. Is it a place she would naturally go to if she felt ill and wanted to vomit? - No doubt about that. - Did you hear her retching or making any other noise? - I tell you I never saw her after the Monday morning. - You might have heard her for all that? - No, I did not hear her. - You heard no one vomiting? - No one at all. I never heard a sound in the house after I went to bed. - W hat was the first you heard of the accident? - In the morning, after Mr Eke was called. I can't tell what time; I think it was between seven and eight o'clock. When they told me there was a woman murdered in the court, I said to my husband, "Oh, my goodness, go and see who it is." - Did you hear any screaming? - Not at all. - Have you been talking to anybody about this case? - Yes. - What have you said to Mrs Quint about it? - Nothing at all. - Do you know anybody who had a grudge against this poor woman? - No. I always called her a quiet and inoffensive girl, who never said anything to anybody. - By the Chief Constable: Did you hear any disturbance in the night. No knocking at the front door. Did not someone tell you the police were there? - No. - Did you not call Annie Mitchell and turn her out of bed? - No. - Were you drunk or sober? - I was sober. I had a quarrel with my husband, but that has nothing to do with this. We were quarrelling all day. - By the Coroner: I don't know that Mrs Quint has said anything to me about ANNIE RIDDLE. I have spoken to two or three people who have come in. Mrs Quint has been up and down, but she has passed no remark to me over it. We all know the poor thing was found dead, but I don't know anything else. - Can you account for this ...? - No sir. - You are too fast a great deal. You have heard the evidence of Mr Lillicrap - he is a highly respectable man, is he not? - Certainly. - Have you not heard him say that the body lay there in the court with the clothes not at all disarranged? Would you expect a person to fall 20ft. and not disarrange her clothes? - I never went into the court to look at her. I only went on the leads. - Can you account for that? - No. Nobody can account for it. - Have you heard any remarks about it? - No. - Did you hear anybody carry anything through the passage? - No, I never heard a sound. - Do you still adhere to your statement that you never saw ANNIE RIDDLE alone after Monday morning? - Yes. - Did you hear her again? - No. - In reply to the Coroner, Detective-Inspector Hill said he did not think Mrs Quint could throw any light on the case. - The Coroner, addressing the woman named, asked if she had anything to say. - Mrs Quint said the only thing was that Mrs Roseveare walked up over the stairs to Taylor and the girl RIDDLE, and said that she should not stay in the house with her brother that night. Mrs Roseveare ordered her over the stairs, and then the "poor girl" went into the back room. - (a Voice: " Yes, that's true.") - Mrs Roseveare again denied having seen the deceased after Monday morning. - The Coroner: Then we will have Mrs Quint sworn. - Elizabeth Quint said: I am a widow, and live at No. 18 Bath-lane, with my son. I was in the lane at eleven o'clock on Monday night when, ANNIE RIDDLE and Taylor came home together. I saw Mrs Roseveare. She was not quite sober. Mrs Taylor was also there. After Taylor and RIDDLE had gone upstairs, Mrs Taylor went up as far as the landing. ANNIE RIDDLE was making up the bed in the room Taylor was going to sleep in. Mrs Roseveare came up after Mrs Taylor. She could have seen ANNIE RIDDLE. I am quite sure of that. Mrs Taylor said, "Now I've seen for myself." Mrs Roseveare ordered ANNIE RIDDLE over the stairs, or else she would throw her over." - The Coroner: Can you give me the very words? - Witness: Yes, word by word. - "Over these stairs you shall go, or I'll throw you over - (sensation). You drunken little thing, you shan't sleep with my brother tonight." ANNIE RIDDLE went down into the back room. I left Mrs Roseveare standing on the landing by the door of Taylor's room. Mrs Taylor was standing at the tenement door. I went out and when I came back and knocked at the door, Mrs Roseveare called me dreadful names. She said nothing about RIDDLE. I afterwards saw ANNIE RIDDLE in the stairs. I saw her by the light of my candle. She was not vomiting or crying. There was great quarrelling after that between Mr and Mrs Roseveare, but ANNIE RIDDLE had nothing to do with it. I went to bed in a back room. I heard nothing of anybody vomiting from the leads. - Then you are quite sure that Mrs Roseveare is wrong when she says that she never saw ANNIE RIDDLE after the Monday morning? - Yes. I am perfectly sure of it. - Did you hear any quarrel between Mrs Taylor and ANNIE RIDDLE? - No. Mrs Taylor did not quarrel at all. Witness added that she had had nothing to say to Mrs Roseveare, but she had made a statement to a detective about the threat to throw RIDDLE over the stairs; and on her evidence on that point being read over to her, swore that it was correct. - P.C. Bennett proved conveying the dead body to the mortuary, and corroborated Mr Lillicrap's statement as to the position and state of the body. Mrs Roseveare told him that she saw deceased in the stairs of No. 18 at half-past eleven. A woman named Goulding told him that she saw her on the leads vomiting at half-past two. - Mrs Roseveare again denied that she had seen the deceased on Monday night and stated that what she told the constable was that she went up over the stairs to see if she could see RIDDLE. She did not see her. - Mr Charles Edward Bean, M.R.C.S., L.C.P., said: On Tuesday I made a post-mortem examination of the deceased. The body was that of a well-nourished woman, aged about thirty. There were no bruises or other external marks of violence, excepting a scalp wound. Each nostril was clogged with a clot of blood, but there were no traces of blood having run over the face. There did not appear to be any smears as though blood had been sponged off. There was no bleeding from the ears. On the right side of the head was a large crescent-shaped scalp wound, measuring 8 ½ inches along the curve, and across the curve 5 ½ inches. It had the appearance of an incised wound. It extended from a point about two inches behind and a little above the right ear to nearly the outer angle of the right eye. The convexity of the crescent was turned upwards. The lower flap of the scalp was clearly separated from the skull for about four inches. The middle part of the scalp wound was bruised and crushed by the violence of the impact of the blow. Under the upper edge of the wound extravasated blood was found, and also to a great extent on the opposite side of the head. From the effects of what was known as a contre coup. There was only one distinct blow. Under the centre of the wound there was a depressed triangular fracture of the skull, each side on the triangle measuring an inch. From the upper part of this depressed fracture a linear fracture extended completely over the surface of the skull; and from the lower part of the fracture there was a further linear fracture extending right round the base of the skull and joining the other. The force of the blow as so great as to separate the bones of the skull in their natural sutures. There were three rents in the brain and macerated brain matter was protruding; and a quantity of blood was effused on the brain. - The Coroner: Now, doctor, having described to us this terrifically fearful wound, I should like you to answer two questions for the guidance of the Jury. In the first place, it is your opinion that the whole of the mischief, the cut and the fractures of the skull, might have been occasioned by one and the same blow? - Yes, most undoubtedly. - The next question is this: Might all this injury have been occasioned by a person falling from a height of, say, twenty to twenty-five feet directly on the top of the head? - Yes. - I suppose that, given a certain distance, a body is sure to turn and come to the ground head first? - I don't think a body would turn in that short distance if it began to fall legs first. - But suppose a person to have been leaning over the parapet and to have begun to fall head first? - That would account for all these injuries, I think. - In answer to further questions, the witness said the stomach contained nothing but mucous. He found nothing to indicate that the deceased had been drinking. - The Coroner asked the Jury if they thought it would be serving the ends of justice to adjourn the Inquiry - ("No") . - for his part, he did not think there was any likelihood of getting more evidence. Everything seemed to have been worked up carefully by the Police. - The Chief Constable suggested that if Mrs Taylor was called the Jury might be better satisfied. - Mrs Taylor, who was in court with her two children, said she had been living apart from her husband for six years. She had been living lately in Granby-street, maintained by her mother. Called at six o'clock on Monday evening to see Mrs Roseveare, who was then quite sober. Witness remained in the house till half-past twelve, being obliged to stop, as there was a policeman or a detective trying the door, and Mrs Roseveare begged her not to go out "for the sake f her house." When Taylor came home and went upstairs with ANNIE RIDDLE witness followed and saw RIDDLE making up the bed. She said to her husband, "What I can see with my own eyes I can believe." Did not hear Mrs Roseveare say anything to ANNIE RIDDLE about throwing her over the stairs. Witness did not go to the house to challenge Taylor and RIDDLE. If she had wanted to quarrel with the woman, she could have done so long ago. She had no quarrel with her. - The Coroner: The Jury can believe that if they like. - Witness added that she left the house at half-past twelve, but returned about one o'clock and laid down on the bed with her children in one of the lower rooms. Never went upstairs and never saw or heard anything of the deceased. Heard Mrs Goulding say on the first day of the Inquest that she saw deceased on the leads vomiting, at half-past two. Witness was awake nearly all the night, but did not hear any noise. Mrs Roseveare did not go up. - The Coroner, in summing up the case, said it was a very unsatisfactory one, in spite of the care the activity, and the sagacity which the Police had shown in investigating it. There could be no doubt that the woman's injuries, whether caused by a fall or otherwise, were more than enough to have caused instant death, but it was not at all clear how they were inflicted. The probability was that the deceased fell off the leads, but whether through an accident or the agency of some second party was a mystery still unsolved. He remarked on the strange circumstances of the case, pointing out that they had under their roof the unfaithful husband, the wronged wife and the outcast paramour. It was a most remarkable thing that the woman should have fallen a depth of twenty feet and that her clothes should have been disarranged. That seemed impossible, according to the laws of gravitation. The condition of the clothing could not be accounted for unless they accepted one of two theories - either that the woman was first killed and the body carefully brought out and laid where it was found; or that she fell or was pushed over the parapet and that somebody went into the court afterwards and put her dress in order. There had been some very contradictory swearing, Mrs Roseveare's statement that she never saw the deceased after the Monday morning being flatly denied by two witnesses. He recommended the Jury to leave the hands of the Police authorities unshackled by returning an Open Verdict. - The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased came to her death by the injuries to her skull as described by the doctor, but there was not sufficient evidence to show how the injuries were inflicted. The Jury also wished to express their regret at the manner the evidence had been given by the witnesses. - The Coroner asked the Jury to specify the witnesses whom they desired to censure. - The Foreman: We give no names, sir. - The Coroner remarked that some of the witnesses - Mr Lillicrap, for example, had given their evidence very well. - The Foreman: Oh, certainly. We wish to exempt Mr Lillicrap from anything like censure. - The Coroner said that if the Jury had named any witness, it might have guided him in allowing their expenses. They were much indebted to Mr Bean for the exceedingly satisfactory description he had given of the cause of death - (hear, hear). - The Inquiry then terminated. - At the conclusion of the Inquest a large crowd of persons gathered outside the Guildhall for the purpose of catching a glimpse of Mr and Mrs Roseveare, who have figured so prominently in connection with the affair, and when they appeared they were made the subject of a very hostile demonstration. Hooting and hissing the pair, the crowd followed them through Westwell-street, where Mr Roseveare and his wife appeared to be uncertain as to whether it was advisable in the face of such a reception to proceed towards their residence. Going into Notte-street they took refuge in a public-house, the crowd surrounding the premises and groaning vigorously. Presently they emerged and engaged a hansom. But they were not yet free from their pursuers, for a number of boys commenced running after the vehicle and keeping up with it a crowd soon collected and followed them to Bath-street. The cabman was given imperfect instructions as to his destination and instead of driving the pair to 18 Bath-lane, he drove them to that number in Bath-street. A large number of the neighbours had collected in anticipation of the arrival of Mr and Mrs Roseveare, and when the cabman pulled up in Bath-street the vehicle was soon surrounded by a furious mob, who hooted and howled to the terror of the occupants of the cab. Seeing the position of affairs, and probably fearing serious damage to his vehicle, the cabman advised the couple to take refuge in adjoining premises. It so happened that the sister-in-law of Mrs Roseveare resides in a house near by, and here they took refuge from the largely increasing and demonstrative mob. It was thought advisable, in view of the attitude of the crowd, to send for the Police. P.C. Lidstone soon arrived, but he was unable to cope with the mob, though Mr and Mrs Roseveare wisely kept in the house for some hours. At about ten o'clock last night, whilst Bath-street was in a state of great disorder, a crowd proceeded into Bath-lane and commenced to attack the premises occupied by Mr Roseveare. They removed the shutters of the shop window and smashed all the glass and then broke in the front door. Further damage would doubtless have been done had it not been for the timely arrival of the Police, who stayed the violence of the mob. P.C.'s Bains and Lidstone were on duty in the lane all night. Shortly after twelve o'clock the lane was partially cleared by the Police, and Mr and Mrs Roseveare proceeded to their house amid an outburst of most derisive groans. Having safely got inside, the constables guarded the house, but at an early hour this morning crowds still remains in the lane.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 July 1889 PLYMSTOCK - Bathing Fatality At Jennycliffe Bay. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Castle Inn, Mount Batten, concerning the death of Private FRANK REDSTONE, R.M.L.I. Barracks, Stonehouse. On Tuesday week deceased visited a comrade named Baker, at fort Stamford. After drinking a quart of ale at the canteen, they went to Jennycliffe Bay to bathe and swam out towards a Dutch frigate, lying at anchor half a mile from the shore. When within 200 yards of the vessel Baker turned back and invited REDSTONE to do the same. Deceased, however, said he intended to go round the ship and swam on. Baker reached the shore and after dressing saw his companion some distance from the ship swimming towards the shore in the direction of the rifle ranges. Taking the deceased's clothes with him, Baker walked round the cliff to the point where he expected him to land, and looking over the water found he was no longer visible. With two other marines he procured a boat at Batten and rowed over to Jennycliffe Bay in search of REDSTONE, but could find no trace of him. Deceased's body was recovered by Charles Fry, a coastguardsman, on Friday afternoon, floating in the water near the rifle range. From the long immersion in the water the features were unrecognisable, but Baker was able to identify the body as that of REDSTONE by an enlargement of the right thumb joint. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." - The Deputy Coroner commented on the need of a mortuary at Mount Batten, observing that all the Inquests he had held there had been cases of drowning, and the accommodation for bodies was very poor and inconvenient.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 1 July 1889 EXETER - The Suicide At Exeter. An Alleged Victim To Betting Losses. - The Exeter Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquiry yesterday at the Guildhall into the circumstances attending the death of a man who has been identified as GEORGE BOND, of Crediton, who cut his throat in a refreshment house at Exeter on the previous day. - MRS BOND, of Crediton, identified the body of the deceased as that of her late husband. He was a butler and was out of service at the time of his death. His last situation was a temporary one at Lady Carmichael's in Regent's Park, London. Since then he was engaged to take a situation at Christchurch, but remained only one night. On Monday night he came to Crediton, and on the following went on to Exeter. His health was not good and he was often depressed in spirit, in consequence, witness believed, of his having lost money in betting. He was fifty-six last birthday. - A witness named Staddon being near the refreshment house of Miss Gitsham when the suicide occurred, said the deceased, who was a perfect stranger, asked him on Tuesday where he could obtain a comfortable bed. Witness recommended him to Miss Gitsham's. He then appeared in a nervous and depressed state. On Tuesday he was provided with a bed at Miss Gitsham's, a refreshment-house keeper and he retired to rest at about half-past six, stating that he had not been to bed for three or four nights. A servant went to call him at seven o'clock on the following morning, but received no answer, and at noon the services of P.C. Salter were enlisted and he burst open the door. The deceased was found lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood and with only his shirt on. When the body was turned over it was found that the throat was cut and Dr Bell, who was promptly called in, gave it as his opinion that life had been extinct for several hours. A razor covered with blood was found near the body. In the pockets of deceased's clothing were several testimonials speaking highly of him and there was also a racing programme from the firm of Messrs. Moore and Co., turf commission agents, of Exeter, together with a note, signed, "A.B.W.", and which related to betting transactions. Other articles in his possession included two sporting papers, another razor in a double case, several bottles containing medicine, a piece of rope with a noose at the end of it, &c. - Mr Bell, surgeon, gave evidence as to the nature of the wound on deceased's throat and the Coroner, in summing up, said the unfortunate betting transactions of which the Jury must have heard a great deal of late had evidently had something to do with the matter. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity". A sister of deceased said that in consequence of his actions it had been intended to put deceased in an asylum.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 July 1889 TOTNES - The Shocking Suicide At Totnes. The Inquest. - Yesterday morning Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Totnes Guildhall on the body of JOHN SELWOOD . The Jury met the Coroner at the railway station, and having inspected the spot where the deceased committed suicide, viewed the decapitated body which lay at the house of deceased's brother, MR JAMES SELWOOD, of Totnes, builder. MR JAMES SELWOOD said his brother was a painter, and had a wife and one child. Deceased had not done any work for years. His wife worked. He was supported partly by the parish and partly from a sick club, from which he received 3s. a week. The last time witness spoke to him, he believed, was on Thursday. He was in a bad state of health, but witness said he had not the slightest reason to be troubled in mind. He had delusions that everybody was down upon him, and that his wife was not true to him. Witness knew there was not the slightest foundation for this, and told the deceased so often. He was most sober in his habits. When a boy he had a fall from a tree and cut his head open. Deceased was 36 years of age. Henry Smith, foreman of porters, G.W.R. Co., Totnes Station, said on Saturday evening he rode on the engine with the driver and fireman down the tramway to the Totnes quays to fetch trucks. The engine passed deceased, who was sitting on the parapet of the bridge on the tram line. Coming back witness was riding in the last wagon and just as they came to the bridge he saw the body lying across the path outside the rail. He could not see the deceased as the tram advanced by reason of the curve. He first saw the deceased's legs. He shouted to the driver, who at once stopped. Deceased was lying perfectly flat on his breast about two feet from the end of the bridge. He was then on the same side as they saw him on going down. On the train pulling up, he found deceased's head, which was completely severed, lying about four feet from the rail, and between the two rails. They were travelling from four to six miles an hour. Deceased's hat and stick were placed on the end of the parapet of the bridge. Deceased could not have fallen from where he was sitting on to the line, as in that case he would have been right under the engine. As he was lying, h is feet extended nearly back to the embankment. - William Parsons, engine driver, and John Davis, fireman, corroborated. - Dr Currie, practising at Totnes, said on Saturday evening he was walking up the line to see a patient, when he was told that someone had been run over. He went up and saw the body of JOHN SELWOOD, who was a patient of his. The head was severed, and was lying between the metals. The arms were by his side. No part of the body was injured in any way, nor was there any injury to the face. Death must have been instantaneous. He had been regularly attending deceased, who had been suffering from chronic phthisis, and had been on the club for three years. He was very depressed at times; no doubt he was suffering from melancholia. His illness was quite sufficient to make him unhappy. He suffered from great weakness, and was very irritable. He had complained much of the heat and pains in the head. - Sergeant Nott, who searched the body, found no papers or letters, but a small paper of vermin killer. Deceased's sister-in-law had, with him (witness) searched deceased's drawers &c., in his house for any letters or papers, but found nothing that would throw any light upon the matter. Mr W. R. W. Foot, Totnes, chemist, said deceased bought from him, on Saturday afternoon, a two penny packet of Barber's vermin killer. He also purchased some oxalic acid and a dose of gallic acid, the latter being used for stopping haemorrhage. Deceased signed the book for the poison. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

EAST STONEHOUSE - At the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ALBERT SMALE, first-class petty officer of the Indus. Deceased was about half-past six n the morning of 26th June on board a steam launch which put off from the Flagstaff steps at Keyham Dockyard. The tide carried her towards a tug close by and deceased, who ran aft to fend off the launch, was jammed between the gunwale of the launch and the counter of the tug, receiving internal injuries. Deceased was conveyed to the Hospital, where he died on Saturday morning. Chief Petty Officer Harry Palmer, in charge of the launch, said P.C. Ryder of the Metropolitan Police, gave evidence as to the accident, and Fleet-Surgeon Stone deposed that SMALE died from inflammation, the result of injuries he received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - At Tamerton last evening an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd on the body of JOHN DART, 61, an agricultural labourer, who, whilst working in a hayfield on Saturday evening, fell down and almost immediately after expired never uttering a word. After hearing the evidence of Mr Isaac Mason, deceased's employer and Mr E. Doudney, Surgeon, Plymouth, who had made a post-mortem examination, and attributed death to heart disease, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 July 1889 EXETER - At an Inquest held at the Exeter Hospital yesterday by Mr Coroner Hooper evidence was given shewing that WILLIAM WILLS, labourer, was riding a mare from a hayfield at Exwick on June 30th, when the animal threw him and WILLS fell on his head, fracturing his skull and lacerating his brain, and he died on Sunday last. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 5 July 1889 DAWLISH - The Death By Drowning At Starcross. - Mr Gould, Deputy District coroner, held an Inquest at the Courtenay Arms Hotel, Starcross, yesterday upon the body of JAMES ROWE, aged sixteen, who was drowned whilst bathing at Starcross on Monday last. GEORGE ROWE identified the body as that of his son, who could not swim. - Josiah Sanders of Starcross, said that he went with the deceased to bathe in the river Exe on Monday last. Deceased went into the water and swam four or five strokes and then tried to come back, but could not. After splashing about for some little time he sank, and witness, seeing that deceased was drowning, called for assistance. A young fellow named Elliot went to his assistance, but he could not get hold of him. The body was afterwards recovered. Edgar Lapscombe, surgeon, of Starcross, said he was called to see the deceased, who was dead. Efforts to restore animation had apparently been made. Death was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased Accidentally met his death By Drowning.

EXMINSTER - The Suicide At Exminster Asylum. - Mr Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at Exminster Asylum yesterday on the body of CLARA ENDACOTT, an inmate of the Asylum, who committed suicide on the 1st inst. Mr George Symes Sanders, the superintendent of the Devon County Asylum, identified the body. Deceased was admitted on the 10th of January last, and was twenty-two years of age. She was suffering from melancholia, with a suicidal tendency. Instructions were given the nurses that deceased was to have continuous supervision. - Agnes Sanders, an under nurse, deposed that the deceased got up on Tuesday morning, and, after dressing, went out, but witness did not see her go. - Jane Marsh said she heard one of the patients go out on Tuesday morning and she afterwards heard another patient in her ward say that there was a woman lying outside the window dead. Witness looked out and saw the deceased lying in the yard below. She called another nurse and they went down to the deceased. She did not appear to be quite dead. her pulse was beating, but she did not appear to be breathing. - Eliza Prist, a patient in the Asylum, said that on Tuesday last she saw something which she thought was her clothes pass down in front of the window. She afterwards remarked to another patient that she thought that it was a woman that had fallen out of the window. - Robert Alsopp proved finding the body in a yard. Deceased was fully dressed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 8 July 1889 DARTMOUTH - A Juryman Fined At Dartmouth. - At Dartmouth Guildhall on Saturday an Inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner (Dr Fraser, of Totnes) on the body of an old man named RICHARD EVANS, aged sixty-six years, who was found drowned on the beach at Bayard's Cove, Dartmouth, early that morning. Evidence was given by a coal lumper named Albert Robertson and James Saunders, landlord of the Royal Oak Inn, shewing that the deceased came from Newton to Dartmouth on Friday, and at half-past nine went into the Royal Oak and asked for lodgings. The house being full, Saunders told him to go to the London Inn, and after drinking a pint of beer the deceased left the Royal Oak shortly after ten o'clock. About ten minutes to six on Saturday morning, while watching the gambols of two dogs belonging to Mr Faremouth, Captain Perring saw a corpse on the beach at Bayard's Cove near the Custom House. There was no water there at the time, but when the police, who were sent for, arrived the body was half floating in about a foot or less of water, the tide having risen. He was dead, and had a bruise or two on his right temple and cheek. - P.C. Bray deposed to taking the deceased to the mortuary, and finding a purse with only two-pence in it upon him. - A son of the deceased (CHARLES EVANS), a coal lumper, said the deceased had not been in Dartmouth for some time. He had fallen out with the family and witness did not know he was there before hearing he had been found dead on the beach. - The Coroner said there was no necessity for calling a medical man. He pointed out that there was no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water. He might have deliberately jumped in, or his domestic troubles might have been preying on his mind, or he might have got in accidentally. - The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned", and desired the Coroner to call the attention of the Town Council to the disgraceful state of the mortuary, which needed more ventilation and light and a good supply of fresh water for post-mortem examinations.

NEWTON ABBOT - Dr Fraser, Deputy County Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquest at Newton Abbot into the circumstances attending the death of a male child, whose mother MARY OSMOND, a widow, lives at Marldon, and has six other children. The child was born on the 13th of last month and died last Thursday at Newton, where Elizabeth Heath, a young married woman, living in one of the courts in Delborough-street, was nursing it for the mother in consideration of the receipt of 3s. 6d. per week. Its birth was not registered during life, but immediately after, the mother not knowing that the child was dead. The evidence of Dr Nesbitt went to shew that death was due to acute inflammation of the stomach, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 9 July 1889 EGG BUCKLAND - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held two Inquests yesterday at Crabtree, the former at the rising Sun Inn, and the latter at the Volunteer Inn. The first was an investigation into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN WHITE, aged twenty-four, formerly night watchman on the Great Western Railway. Mr H. J. Foster, district-inspector of police, watched the case on behalf of the London and South Western Railway, and Mr J. Chamberlain, inspector, represented the interests of the Great Western Railway Company. Mr W. Fewins was chosen Foreman. - The first witness, Florence Soper, stated that she saw the deceased about half-past ten on Saturday night lying across the rails near the railway bridge with his head smashed. Mr C. H. Stevens, surgeon, deposed that the deceased called at his surgery at Plympton, about four o'clock on Saturday evening to request witness to attend his wife's confinement. Witness was not at home, but met the deceased near the railway bridge just before ten when he appeared very excited. He next saw his body at the Inn and on examination found the left side of his skull smashed, evidently by the guard iron of the engine. His right hand was cut off and the left arm from the shoulder. - Harry Fewins, driver of the engine, said the train was a special running for the first time from London to Plymouth. He did not feel any obstruction in the locality where the accident occurred. On examining the engine he found a little brain matter on the guard iron. - Charles Dockell, fireman, corroborated. Alfred Walter, inspector on the Great Western Railway, also gave evidence and MARY WHITE, mother of the deceased, said she saw her son about ten minutes before ten, and he then appeared to be quite sober. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed regret that it should have been stated in the report of the occurrence as published yesterday by our George-street contemporary, that the deceased "was not quite sober when he left Plympton."

EGG BUCKLAND - The same Jury then Inquired into the cause of death of BEN PAWLEY, aged twenty-four, who resided at Granby-lane, Plymouth. Mr Fewins was again elected Foreman. - SAMPSON PAWLEY, brother of the deceased, identified the body and stated that he had been employed as packer on the Great Western Railway. Frederick Stephens, living at Laira, said he accompanied his brother on Saturday afternoon to pick cockles in the Laira. On returning about four o'clock they met the deceased near the railway bridge and he asked them to bathe with him. Deceased first went into the water, and after going out about six yards was suddenly seen to sink. He rose again to the surface and shouted for help. Witness went to his assistance, and the deceased clutched his arm and dragged him into a sand pit, but afterwards loosened his hold. Witness regained the bank, and the deceased again appearing clutched his hair, but failed to prevent his sinking for the last time. The body was not recovered until twelve o'clock on Sunday morning. - The Jury and Coroner commended the witness for his behaviour, and the former returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning."

ST. BUDEAUX - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., held an Inquiry at the Woodland Fort Inn, Honicknowle, last evening, respecting the death of WILLIAM CHARLES DYER, 27, employed as a labourer in her Majesty's Dockyard. He went out bathing on Sunday morning in the Tamerton Lake near Morley Woods, and suddenly slipped into a pit, being drowned before assistance was procured The body was recovered by Richard Budge within half an hour of the occurrence. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Penrose was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury tendered their sympathy to the widow and her three children, and also handed over the fees to her.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Case Of Somnambulism At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Station Hospital, Stoke, concerning the death of PRIVATE SIMEON BIRD, of the 2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment, stationed at the Raglan Barracks, Devonport. The circumstances have already been recorded in the Western Daily Mercury. - Lance Corporal Brew, 2nd South Staffordshire Regiment, said that about ten o'clock on Wednesday evening deceased ate some supper and went to bed. he was positive that deceased was sober. Witness retired about the same time and slept until midnight, when the orderly sergeant aroused the whole of the men in the room and inquired where PRIVATE BIRD was. No one knew, and they were then told that he had fallen through the window. Deceased had been cleaning windows on Wednesday afternoon. Private John Leadbeater, South Stafford Regiment, who was on sentry, said that about five minutes to twelve on Wednesday night he heard a noise. On proceeding in the direction from whence it came he saw deceased lying on the ground unconscious. On looking up he observed one of the windows of a room open. Deceased was conveyed with all speed to the Hospital. He did not know whether the deceased was in the habit of walking in his sleep, but he had heard the men in the same room say that deceased frequently talked in his sleep. The deceased fell a distance of over 21 feet. Private John Shambrooke, of the Medical Staff Corps, who had nursed the deceased, said that BIRD died shortly before six o'clock on Saturday evening. Deceased had sustained a grazed wound at the back of his head, and had also, he should say, injured his spine. An hour before his death the deceased was in great pain and he understood that he had been unconscious since he was admitted into the Hospital. - Corporal W. H. Bellingham, Medical Staff Corps, stated that he was the ward-master in charge of a number of patients, of whom the deceased was one. Some time during Thursday afternoon deceased was conscious and he asked him how the accident happened, but he had no recollection of it whatever. Deceased became unconscious towards the evening and never again rallied. Inspector John Matters having referred to a conversation which he had had with Surgeon Halsall, the Coroner said he thought that the evidence they had before them was sufficient to enable them to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion without calling in the doctor. The doctors, no doubt with military accuracy wanted to state the precise injury which resulted in death, but it was sufficient for their purpose if they were satisfied that the man died from injuries sustained by the fall. The doctor, in his report to the Military Authorities, which he (the Coroner) had seen, stated that death was due to multiple injuries. He thought it a fair supposition that deceased whilst walking in his sleep opened the window of his barrack-room and fell out. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 July 1889 OTTERY ST MARY - At an Inquest held at Cadhay Farm, Ottery St. Mary, evidence was given which shewed that JOHN HAYNES, labourer, aged 38, who was breaking in two two-year old colts last Saturday, was found on the highway near the farm dead, with a deep wound in his head. Mr Reynolds, surgeon, said the wound was in his opinion caused by the kick of a horse, as the print of a horses' shoe could be plainly seen. The Jury found accordingly, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow, and the Coroner (Mr Cox) added 10s.

BIDEFORD - Unfeeling Conduct At Bideford. - Mr J. F. Bromham, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Bideford Dispensary yesterday, respecting the death of WILLIAM BOUNDY, 77 years of age, a miller, of Littleham, who was found insensible on the New-road last Wednesday, and died on Monday, never having regained consciousness. ANNE BOUNDY, the widow, having given evidence that deceased went to Bideford on Tuesday afternoon, and Elizabeth Stacey, housemaid at Hal[?], having deposed to seeing deceased at 10 o'clock in the evening, sitting on a wall in the new road apparently in good health. - William Glover, shoemaker, Littleham, stated that he had known deceased many years. On Wednesday morning about three o'clock, as he was going fishing, he heard groans and sounds as of someone strangling. Thinking it was only a fisherman whom he had parted with a few minutes before, he did not go to ascertain what was the matter. He actually thought the man was ill, but being on the beach some distance from the lace whence the groans proceeded he did not trouble to go. About five o'clock as he was returning by the road he again heard groans. Then he proceeded to the spot and saw a man lying in a [?] position amongst some stones close to the sea-wall. As he could not get any reply, he lifted him into an upright position and despatched a passer-by to Bideford for the police. Then, as he could do no more, he went home and left the man lying alone. He did not at first that it was MR BOUNDY. P.C. Giles Hamlyn stated that on going to the New-road and climbing a wall he reached deceased; there was no one near him. Deceased was lying in a cramped position [portion unreadable]... stated that deceased succumbed to tension of the upper part of the spinal cord, but whether this was the result of natural causes, an accident, or long exposure in an unnatural position, he could not say without a post mortem examination. The Inquest was then adjourned for half an hour while an examination was made. Upon the Jury re-assembling, Dr Rowse said death was due to accident, probably a fall from the wall on which deceased was seen sitting earlier in the evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner commented upon the strange behaviour of Glover, who, when he saw a person lying dying or dead, coolly left him by the rubble, and went about his business.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 July 1889 CREDITON - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at Crediton yesterday concerning the death of PETER PARKER, who was drowned whilst bathing in the river Yeo at Bull Marsh on Saturday afternoon. The deceased went to bathe with some other boys and, although he could not swim was the first to go down the bank. Just before entering the river he stepped in some mud, and whilst washing it off slipped into deep water. He rose three times and Percy Moore, aged 13, endeavoured to reach him, going in up to his neck, but he could not swim and he did not succeed. The water was about seven feet deep. The Coroner said the boy Moore acted in a persevering manner and did all that he could under the circumstances. Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Drowned In The Hamoaze. - Inquiry was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES SERGEANT, second class boy of H.M.S. Impregnable, who fell overboard in the Hamoaze a fortnight ago. Evidence was given by George Palmer and Thomas Sanders, boys serving on board the ship, that on the morning of the 25th ult. the deceased, with others, was about to go ashore for a gunnery drill. He was equipped with his belts and gaiters, and on stepping on the gunwale of the boat alongside the stage at the bottom of the companion ladder, his foot slipped and he fell backwards into the water, striking his head against the stage. Palmer, who had just stepped into the boat endeavoured to catch the deceased, but the latter probably rendered insensible by the blow to his head, sank at once and did not again rise, and Palmer was only able to recover his cap. The boat was lying close to the stage, but SERGEANT endeavoured to get in at the bow, which hung off a little. Deceased, who was 16 years of age and had been only three months in the training ship, was unable to swim. His body was recovered shortly before noon yesterday floating in the water close to the ship, and was removed to the mortuary at the Hospital. The Jury, of whom Mr Dickman was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and exonerated all connected with the ship from blame. They also passed a vote of condolence with the deceased's parents, who were present at the Inquest.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 11 July 1889 TAMERTON FOLIOT - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) held an Inquiry at the Workmen's Dwellings, Warleigh Woods, near Tamerton, yesterday, respecting the demise of a navvy named CHARLES WOOD, aged twenty-three years and who was drowned on the previous afternoon. Henry McLine, navvy, stated that on the day in question he was crossing the new railway bridge which spans the Tavy, and deceased was only a few paces behind him. When he was nearly across he heard a splash and, on looking around, he noticed deceased struggling in the water, having apparently fallen over accidentally. He raised an alarm and a boat promptly proceeded to the assistance of the deceased, but he had sunk. Grappling irons were obtained, a few of the men went dragging for the deceased, and after a considerable time the body was discovered at low water and subsequently removed to Warleigh Woods. Mr Westlake, foreman of the works, which are being prosecuted by Messrs. Rolf and Pethick, was quickly on the spot. After a brief consultation the Jury, of whom Mr George Maddock was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning," and expressed an opinion that no blame attached to anyone.

Western Morning News, Friday 12 July 1889 DARTINGTON - Suicide Near Totnes. - THOMAS NELDER, a labourer, living at Newhouses, Dartington, committed suicide on Wednesday. Deceased, who was about 62 years of age, lived with his wife, his two daughters being married. On Wednesday afternoon MRS NELDER left deceased alone while she went to Totnes. Returning about eight o'clock in the evening, she noticed deceased sitting in a chair near the kitchen-table in front of a looking-glass, his head drooping forward. Going close to him she saw his throat was cut, a razor being in a pool of blood at his feet. She called for assistance, and it was found that he had been dead for sometime. He was spoken to by a neighbour about six o'clock. Deceased about two years since met with a serious accident to his head by falling from a loft, and since then he has at times been low-spirited. An Inquest was held last evening by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at deceased's house, and the Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 13 July 1889 TOPSHAM - Drowned At Topsham. - At the Town Vestry yesterday, before Mr H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, an Inquest was held concerning the death of ROBERT WARNER, a little boy about five years of age, who was drowned in the Canal on Wednesday evening. - ROBERT HOWARD, father of the deceased, said the deceased, who had just returned from school with another brother and two sisters, left the house a little after five o'clock and shortly afterwards witness heard a little boy named Hunn, who was fishing at the time, calling out, "MR WARNER, your little BOBBY is in the Water." Witness recovered the body shortly after the accident. - Leonard Hunn, son of Mr H. Hunn, auctioneer, Topsham, said that he was fishing on the Exminster side of the Canal, near the bridge which crosses the latter, when deceased fell into the water. There had been no unpleasant words between them. W. Hunn also gave evidence and Mr H. H. Hunn, father of the last witness, corroborated. Archibald Little, ferryman, said that he was going across the river with four passengers, when he heard Mr Hunn calling out to MR WARNER that his little boy was in the Canal. Witness at once ran to the spot, and in crossing the bridge caught his foot in the chain, thus causing a delay, but as soon as he had cleared himself he jumped into the water, but by this time the deceased had disappeared. Mr G. G. Bothwell, surgeon of Topsham, stated that all possible means to restore animation were used, but in vain. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Drowning." Before the Jury were discharged the Coroner and Jurymen highly commended Archibald Little, the ferryman, for the gallant manner in which he acted in trying to rescue the deceased.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 16 July 1889 EGG BUCKLAND - Sudden Death At Laira. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) held an Inquiry at the Laira Inn, Embankment-road, Laira, yesterday, touching the death of an infant male child, named ELLIS, who died on Friday, the 13th inst., about six hours after its birth. - Mary Jane Parkhouse, midwife, gave evidence, after which Mr W. H. Waterfield, surgeon, practising at Stonehouse, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination, sand he was of opinion that death was due to premature birth. The Jury, of whom Mr Fuge was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest at the Shakespeare Hotel last evening touching the death of a widow named ANN POTHAM, aged sixty-eight years, of 2 Cumberland Lawn. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had complained of palpitation of the heart and other ailments. On Saturday night she proceeded to her bedroom and had no sooner sat down then she fainted and expired. Mr Harrison, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, brought on by over exertion in ascending the stairs whilst very weak. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 July 1889 BARNSTAPLE - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Barnstaple yesterday on the body of LAURA LOUISA BROOM, aged 16 months, daughter of a dairyman, who died from injuries received three weeks since by falling into a pan of boiling milk.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 17 July 1889 PAR, CORNWALL - Fatal Accident To A Teignmouth Man At Par Station. - On Monday evening a porter named ALFRED TOWELL was killed while engaged in shunting a horse-box from the 8.30 passenger train from Fowey. One part of the train was standing at the mineral railway platform, and the other with the engine attached was pushing the horse-box into a siding. As the two lines ran into one the two parts of the train would at a certain point come very near each other. It seems that the deceased did not notice this and got on the steps of one of the coaches to which the engine was coupled to ride up, his duty being to uncouple the horse-box. He was on the inside or between the two trains and as the carriages came close together he was knocked off. His head fell across the metal and was cut in two, the brain being scattered on the ground. Death was instantaneous. Mr Pengelly, who was in charge, immediately sent for Dr Tuckey, of Tywardreath, who pronounced life extinct. The body was then removed to an office in the goods shed to await an Inquest. The deceased, who was only nineteen years of age, was a native of Teignmouth, having recently been removed to Par Station. His genial disposition had won for him the esteem of all with whom he came into contact. At the Inquest held at the Royal Hotel yesterday by Mr E. G. Hamley, County Coroner, evidence was given by John Olver (signalman), Richard Sangwin (goods-guard), William Pengelly and William Bailey (engine driver). The Jury, of whom Mr W. H. Nettle, St Blazey, was Foreman, returned the following verdict, "That ALFRED GEORGE TOWELL, died from injuries received by one of the wheels of a railway truck pressing on his head, he having been by some means knocked off the carriage on which he was standing whilst passing another train. We are unanimously of opinion that there is not the slightest blame to be attached to anyone connected with the railway company or their servants; and we think, also, there is great praise due to the engine-driver in stopping the train so quickly." The Inquiry was attended by Inspector Scantlebury on behalf of the company, and some of the friends of the deceased were also present.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 July 1889 DARTMOUTH - At the Inquest at Dartmouth yesterday on the body of JOHN WILLIAM HENRY BENT, of Exeter, son of the late CAPTAIN BENT, chief constable of the City, it was proved that he fell overboard from Mr F. Bradbeer's yacht, on Monday while preparing for a cruise and Dr E. W. Soper said deceased probably had a fit as his teeth were clenched and that accounted for his not rising. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 18 July 1889 PLYMOUTH - The Late Suicide At Plymouth. Inquest By The Newly-Appointed Coroner. - Mr A. S. Clark, who was yesterday elected coroner in place of the late Mr T. C. Brian, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening respecting the death of RICHARD SNELL WARNE, aged fifty years, a stonemason, who committed suicide on the 11th inst. - Emily Mumford, residing at 45 Richmond-street, Plymouth, deposed that deceased was her brother, residing with her at the above address. About five o'clock on the evening of the 11th inst. she went to his room and knocked at the door, but receiving no answer she left with the conviction that deceased was asleep. Some time elapsed before she knocked again and at half-past seven thinking there was something amiss she burst open the door and found deceased hanging from the bed-post and quite dead. She raised an alarm, and one of the neighbours named Curry came in and cut the body down. Deceased had been a very heavy drinker for years and a fortnight before his death was very strange in his manner. She had never heard deceased make use of any threat to take his life. - John Curry corroborated, and the Jury, of whom Mr W. G. Southern was Foreman, found that deceased committed Suicide whilst "Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Friday 19 July 1889 TOTNES - The Fatal Accident At Totnes. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Steam Packet Inn, Totnes, by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner and a Jury, of whom Mr R. E. U. Harris was Foreman, on the body of GEORGE ALBERT ROGERS, a young man in the employ of Mr Griffis, timber merchant, Totnes. - MR H. T. ROGERS, landlord of the Lord Nelson Inn, Totnes, identified the deceased as his brother, 31 years of age, and married, but without family. Deceased had been in the habit of drawing timber for Mr Griffis for thirteen years. John Penwill, who was working with the deceased at the time of the accident, said the piece of timber which fell on the deceased was 44 feet in length, deceased had got off the top of the tree which was from eight to ten feet long from the wagon, and which was on the ground, and while deceased was trying to move the other piece it suddenly shifted and knocking deceased down caught his head between the tree which slipped and the top which was on the ground. In reply to the Coroner, the witness said the deceased and himself were not in the habit of using dogs, although they had them in the wagon. The Coroner remarked that if the dogs had been used the accident would not have happened. Dr Perkins deposed that deceased's head was reduced to a pulp, the brain was scattered and the features were unrecognisable. The rest of the body was uninjured. Death must have been instantaneous. The Coroner said it was for the Jury to say if they were satisfied that no blame was attributable to anyone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 July 1889 KINGSTEIGNTON - Suicide At Kingsteignton. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest on the body of EDWARD AGGETT, aged 26, the unmarried son of SAMUEL AGGETT, farmer, Fostivilla, Kingsteignton. Deceased lived with his parents, being their only child. Whilst at work on Wednesday afternoon turning hay in one of his father's fields, he remarked that he would go and hang himself. The man working with him rebuked him for talking such nonsense, but they saw nothing peculiar in his manner. The man and deceased resumed their work. Half an hour afterwards deceased left the field and went into the house. There was no one in the house except a little girl, who saw him come in, sit down and cover his face with his hands. She shortly after left to carry tea to the men in the field and she then saw AGGETT cross the road and go into the stable opposite the house. Ten minutes afterwards Mrs Bester, a neighbour, seeing the door open, went to shut it, and saw deceased apparently standing upright, but did not then notice the rope. She spoke to him and getting no answer, called other neighbours, who came and untied the rope, which was fastened to a beam about 6ft. 6in. from the ground, a bucket upside down being close to the feet of the deceased. Efforts were made to restore animation, but life was extinct. The Coroner, as well as the Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Butland was Foreman, endeavoured to elicit some evidence of unsoundness of mind, but the witnesses agreed in saying the deceased was of a cheerful disposition and that there was nothing in his circumstances to trouble him, nor anything unusual in his conduct up to the time of his leaving the field. The Jury found that the deceased killed himself by hanging himself by his neck.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 22 July 1889 TORQUAY - A Preventable Death At Torquay. Carelessness Or Ignorance! A Husband And Daughter Censured. - Mr Coroner Hacker's Inquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of a woman named EMMA MARTIN, at Torquay, on Saturday, yielded some strange facts. At first it was thought that the Inquest was of an ordinary character, but as the Inquest progressed the proceedings proved of quite an extraordinary character. Information was conveyed to the Police on Saturday morning of the death of a woman from injuries received last Bank Holiday, and P.C. Coles was despatched to make inquiries and communicate with the County Coroner at Newton. Mr Hacker directed an Inquest to be held in the evening, and the Jury were summoned to attend at the Half Moon Hotel, the landlord of which was sworn on the Inquiry. Mr J. E. Bovey was chosen Foreman and the body having been viewed the husband was called. He said his name was EDWIN MARTIN, and that he was a plasterer, residing at 12 Spring Steps, which forms a passage between Pimlico, the "East-End" of Torquay, and Union-street. His wife was fifty-four years of age, and had suffered from bronchitis for twelve months. He saw her at two o'clock on Whit-Monday last, when he left her all right, and at six o'clock when he returned he found her in bed with her head bandaged, she having fallen over the steps. She had not been in her right senses since, and died at twenty minutes to four that morning: that was all he knew about it. - Jane Rook, middle-aged, deposed that she was a neighbour living opposite to deceased. About four o'clock in the afternoon of June 10th she heard a slipping on the steps outside and on going out saw deceased lying down head foremost, blood flowing down the steps. With help she got her to her own house, and bathed her head. She was insensible at the time and was taken to the Hospital in a cab. She had seen deceased every day since, but she was only sensible when she died. - Frank Evans Cave, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said deceased was brought to the surgery on Whit Monday, with an incised wound in the forehead. He dressed it and told her to come again next morning, but she never turned up till the Tuesday week, eight days after, when he found the wound in a bad state, suppurating, and the stitches loose. She was quite sensible when brought in, although seeming a bit dazed, but her daughter was with her each time. He thought when he sent her out the wound would heal without any trouble, but it was in a very bad state when she came eight days after. She did not seem to like the idea of coming into the Hospital, so he did not press it, but he told his colleague, who visited deceased, if he thought fit to make her come in. He then heard she was too ill to be moved. She had received medical attendance from Mr Palmer (locum tenens at the Hospital) and Mr Cook, he parish doctor. He last saw her on Wednesday, when she was in a very bad state. She answered his questions perfectly sensibly. She was suffering not from brain fever exactly, but brain symptoms, due to absorption of matter from the wound. She had two big sores in her back, the result of lying in bed in one position, as she was very thin. There was no fracture, but a simple flesh wound in the forehead. When she came eight days after, however, it had gone down and exposed the bone. The cause of death was inflammation of the brain due to the wound. When he first saw the wound it was not serious, but he did not know she had driven to the Hospital in a cab, and thought she had walked. They were not supposed to attend accidents outside. - In answer to the Foreman, witness said he considered deceased sensible when he spoke to her. He asked her how she did it and she said she fell over the steps. She came to the Hospital three times and her daughter with her. - Do you think if she came to you when you wished death might have been prevented? - I think so, but we cannot always tell how wounds will go even in the Infirmary; when I saw her eight days after the wound was in a foul state. - Mr H. Terry (A Juryman): Do you think neglect of the wound induced death? - I think so. - Mr W. B. Smale (another Juryman) suggested that the daughter should be called, and the Coroner ordered her attendance. - MARTIN, the husband, recalled, said he saw his wife every day. When he came home on the day of the accident his daughter never said anything to him. Deceased was never out of bed except once since, and never had any medical attendance except she went up herself with her daughter. She said she was getting better and washed the wound herself (surprise). She was sensible at times. - The Coroner here warned witness against making contradictory statements and asked him if deceased was insensible how was it you paid no attention to the state of the wound? - you know what she was suffering from. - Witness: Yes; well, because she said she would not go to the dispensary when she got to her senses. - The Coroner: Why did you not get medical advice directly? - Oh! I don't know. - Why did you wait till after the eight days? - Because I didn't think it was required. I didn't know. She was off and on, if not altogether insensible. - Did you take any trouble at all, or cared whether your wife lived or died? - Yes, sir, I begged her to have the doctor. - What do you mean "you begged her": You could have had a doctor couldn't you? - Yes, but I did not think it was so serious. - If it had been a day or a couple of days it would be different, but eight days is more serious. - Well, as soon as I found her so bad I got a dispensary ticket; I had no club doctor. - Mr Terry: What was the appearance of the wound during the eight days? - I did not see the wound. - Did you not think it was your duty to see the wound? - Yes it was but I did not think it was so bad. - But your wife lying ill for eight days and you did not see the wound? - No, I did not like to see it; my daughter was there. - Did you give any instructions at all? - Yes, I told my daughter; but I was to work all day. - Mr Smale: I want to know how much you know about it? - I don't know much about it; sir that's all I know. - In answer to the Coroner, MARTIN said his wife's life was not insured, and he would only get £4 from the Plasterers' Society by her decease. - ELLEN MARTIN, about 19 years of age, daughter of deceased said she found her mother in a chair in her own house after the accident. With her cousin she took her to the Hospital, where her wound was dressed. Her mother did not speak at all, but she was not with her mother whilst the wound was attended to. They had to lift her out of the cab, and when they got home they put her to bed. - Did the doctor at the Hospital give you any instructions? - I don't know, sir, if he did; I was too much horrified. - did you receive any instructions at all? - He told me to bring her up next morning, but she wouldn't go. - How did you take her to the Hospital the second time? - We walked on the Monday following. - How often did you dress the wound before that? - We only did it twice - on the Tuesday and Wednesday. - Wasn't it touched after? - No, sir; she would not let me touch it. - Did you tell your father about it? - Yes, sir, but I didn't trouble about it. I told my father, but he did not like to see. - How was it you let her lie in bed a week before going to the doctor? - Because she kept on saying she would go the next morning. - By the Foreman: Was your mother sensible when she answered your questions? - She was for awhile, but not afterwards. - At the suggestion of Mr Smale, Mrs Rook was recalled, and said she asked deceased repeatedly to go up to the Hospital, and she kept on saying, "I'll go tomorrow". She went at last of her own accord because she was getting so weak. - Were you aware of her dangerous condition? - I thought so because she lost a lot of blood. Continuing, witness said she did not think the wound was dressed during the eight days because the institution nurse, who came afterwards, asked the daughter how she could neglect her mother. Deceased made no statement as to the accident because she was insensible, but as she found her umbrella under deceased when she fell she thought she missed a step in going down. - ELLEN MARTIN, recalled, said she asked her mother how it happened, and she said she must have overbalanced her back. - The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no doubt deceased came to her death from an accident and injuries received. But during their investigation a rather peculiar set of circumstances had cropped up. At first it appeared to be a rather serious case. The wound was a simple one, from which no one would have supposed death would ensue. There was no fracture or serious injury, and, from the doctor's evidence, if the wound had been dressed with ordinary care she would probably not have died. It was for the Jury to consider whether there was any gross carelessness or neglect by the person upon whom the law throws the duty of looking after her. That person is the husband, whose duty it was to see the wife was properly attended to. They had heard MR MARTIN and his daughter, and it was for them to consider whether the evidence showed gross carelessness or neglect on their part, or whether it was to be explained by ignorance. - The Jury retired to consider their verdict and after an absence of a quarter of an hour returned with a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider "That the Jury consider the husband and daughter are deserving of censure for not bestowing proper attention to the deceased on receiving medical directions concerning her." - The Coroner, in calling MARTIN'S attention to the rider, said he quite endorsed their opinion. He thought he showed want of attention and interest in not inquiring more after his wife during the eight days. With his wife lying ill he should certainly have inquired about her.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 July 1889 TIVERTON - Mr Coroner Mackenzie held two Inquests at Tiverton Infirmary yesterday. The first related to the death of MARTHA PETHERBRIDGE, aged 24, who was in turn servant, factory hand and laundress, and at the time of her death was living with her brother-in-law in Chapel-street. She had had two illegitimate children, and on Friday night she told a neighbour that she was "like it again," and would drown herself. At the time she was under medical care, and appeared light-headed. About midday on SAturday she was in a sitting-room alone, and cut her throat with her brother-in-law's razor. Verdict - Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

TIVERTON - the Jury then Inquired into the drowning on Saturday afternoon of ALBERT DAVEY, aged three years. Deceased lived with his grandparents on the banks of the factory leat, and after being missed his body was found in the water. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 July 1889 BARNSTAPLE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Barnstaple, yesterday, on the body of GEORGE HENRY FORD, the infant son of a cabinet maker, who died from the effects of terrible burns sustained on Saturday night.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 July 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr W. Rowe was foreman, held an Inquest yesterday, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, on the body of WILLIAM ERNEST BEAVIL, son of a wood and coal dealer, Shaftesbury-cottages. Deceased was a stable-boy in the employ of Mr J. D[?], Mutley, and on Tuesday morning whilst cleaning out the stables he was kicked in the stomach by a mare. Upon being conveyed to the Hospital it was found that he was suffering from rupture of the intestines and he died on Wednesday. The surgeons suggested an operation, but the parents objecting, it was not performed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 27 July 1889 EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - The Inquest on the body of HENRY GILES, aged fifty-eight and residing in East John-street, Exeter, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday from injuries received whilst engaged in Mr Hancock's brickyard on Clifton-hill early on the morning of that day, was held yesterday at the Hospital by Mr Coroner Hooper. The evidence showed that the deceased was loading a trolley with clay, he being engaged under the surface of the ground in excavating, when a piece of the facing of the bank fell out and struck him, partially burying him. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died about two o'clock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Coroner remarking that no blame was attached to anyone.

TEIGNMOUTH - Mr Frank Tucker was the Foreman of a Jury at an Inquest held at the Teignmouth Infirmary by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of JAMES CHRISTOPHER MILLS, who expired a few minutes after his admission to the above institution, having been suddenly seized with illness in a train between Newton and Teignmouth on Tuesday night. Inspector Hockaday appeared on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. Joseph Jefferson, of Cumberland, identified the body, and stated that deceased was chief mate on board the barque which witness commanded and was now lying at Plymouth. Deceased resided in South Shields, and was about fifty years of age. Whilst in America he complained of being unwell and during the voyage home he was at times unable to attend to his duties. William James Cowen, booking clerk at the railway station and P.S. Richards also gave evidence. George Henry Austin, surgeon at the Infirmary, having made a post-mortem examination, stated that death was due to "Cardiac Syncope," and a verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 31 July 1889 DAWLISH - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Dawlish on the body of ALFRED GEORGE KERSWILL, aged three years. Deceased's parents live at Alexandra-place, and on Monday last its mother was washing. Whilst she was preparing tea he climbed up on a bag of coke and fell into the furnace; and from the scalds to his legs and shock to the nervous system the little fellow died on Monday.

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 August 1889 SOUTH BRENT - The Late MR SPENCE BATE, F.R.S. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Brent yesterday on the body of MR CHARLES SPENCE BATE, F.R.C., who died at his residence, Rock, on Monday afternoon. Captain Daubeny was Foreman of the Jury, the other members being Captain Lovell, Rev. Gerald Carew, Messrs. C. Couran, De Courey, Beamish, J. R. T. Kingwell, T. Richards, W. Inch, W. Crossing, T. Thorne, S. Carter, W. Collins and C. Browning. Great surprise was expressed that an Inquest was regarded as necessary, seeing that deceased had been attended in his illness by more than one medical gentleman, and that Dr Hingston was quite prepared to certify that death had resulted from natural causes. In some unaccountable manner a rumour was abroad in the village that the deceased died from poisoning, and it is believed that the Police communicated with Mr S. Hacker, one of the County Coroners, who, in the exercise of his discretion, directed that an Inquiry should be held. - The first witness was the widow, who stated that her husband had lived at Rock for about two years. She had known MR BATE for about 15 years, and was married to him two years next October When she married him he was a hale man, but he complained of internal pains, which he ascribed to gravel. For about two months DR HELE BATE, her husband's son, and his wife, had been visiting at Rock, and for about three weeks Miss McKechnie had also been a visitor. Last year deceased began to fail in health, and he would get up after dinner and complain of pains. During the last three weeks he became worse. He was averse to calling in a doctor; he disliked medical attendance. Three weeks ago, however, he went to Dr Hingston's and complained of weakness and said he felt very tired. Dr Hingston prescribed and told him to rest all he could. Dr Hingston attended him until he died. Witness was present almost up to the time her husband died. Mr Connell Whipple, surgeon, was also present. At first he appeared to get better; then suddenly he became worse, and during the last three days suffered acute pain. The instructions of Dr Hingston were carried out under the direction of DR HELE BATE, deceased's son. She, deceased's daughter and deceased's daughter-in-law, MRS HELE BATE, nursed him. During the last three days he suffered very much from vomiting. The Thursday night he vomited every half hour. On Sunday he never ceased vomiting, and laudanum was given him. He took nothing but brandy, except milk in which powder was placed so as to make it digest more easily. Deceased was quite sensible and talked to her and to MRS HELE BATE. On Monday Mr John Shelly, solicitor, of Plymouth, was present and made deceased's will, she and the Rev. W. T. Cole, the vicar, being the only persons present. She had no reason to attribute death to anything but natural causes. - In reply to Mr C. H. Bennett, of Devonport, who represented the family of deceased, witness said she had never said or written anything to lead anyone to suppose that she believed her husband died from other than natural causes. - Dr Hingston deposed that MR SPENCE BATE first called to see him on July 8th, when he complained of pains in the intestines. He prescribed, and told him to go home and rest. On 15th July he received a letter from MRS SPENCE BATE saying she was not satisfied with the progress he was making, and asking him to hold himself in readiness for a telegram. The telegram came and he went to Rock and saw deceased. On Wednesday he told him of his danger, and suggested that a trained nurse should be engaged, but deceased said he had every confidence in his wife and daughter, and preferred that they should wait upon him. Deceased undoubtedly died of intestinal obstruction, but the nature of the obstruction could only be ascertained by a post-mortem examination. Vomiting was quite consistent with the malady, and he discussed it with deceased, who was a man of high scientific attainments. - In reply to Mr Bennett, witness said he telegraphed to him (Mr Bennett) that he was quite prepared to certify that deceased died of intestinal obstruction, after 20 days' exhaustion. - A Juror asked at whose instigation the Inquest was held. - The Coroner said that, having received certain information, he, in the exercise of his discretion, directed the holding of an Inquest believing that it was in the interest of all parties that it should be held. - Mr Johnson, surgeon, stated that by the orders of the Coroner and assisted by Mr Raby, of Ivybridge, he made a post-mortem examination. The intestines were very much diseased. There was about a gallon and a half of effusion, the result of obstruction, and there was a collection of about 30 gall stones about the size of peas. The immediate cause of death was obstruction of the bowels caused by a malignant cancer. The wonder was that deceased lived so long. There was no sign of unnatural irritation in the stomach and death was entirely due to natural causes. - Mr Raby gave corroborative evidence. - Dr Hingston, who had not previously heard of the result of the post-mortem examination, remarked that it absolutely confirmed his opinion as to the cause of death. - A Juror thought it was quite unnecessary to have had an Inquest. (Hear, hear.) - The Coroner having observed that there was nothing in the evidence to call for remark from him, the Jury without retiring immediately returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 3 August 1889 TORQUAY - The Fatal Stabbing Affray At Torquay. Inquest And Verdict. Accused Before The Magistrates. - Mr W. F. Splatt, J.P., took his seat on the Bench at eleven o'clock yesterday, when William Townsend, 'bus proprietor, was placed in the dock and informed by Mr Splatt that the charge against him was that of unlawfully wounding CHARLES EDWIN GARD. - P.S. Osborne stated that prisoner was arrested the previous day on a charge of unlawfully wounding GARD at the Clarence Hotel, Torre. Since he had been in custody GARD had died at the Torbay Hospital. Pending the Inquest he asked for a remand till the following day. The magistrate suggested it would be better to adjourn the case until Monday, and the prisoner was accordingly remanded. Townsend, who is about fifty years of age, bore in his face evidence of the suffering which he had undergone since the affair occurred. - At five o'clock Mr Sidney Hacker, of Newton Abbot, County Coroner for the District, commenced his Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of GARD. A double Jury was empanelled, and they met the coroner in the dispensary. - Mr Carter, solicitor, intimated that he appeared on behalf of Townsend. The first witness called was ROSANNAH GARD, of 10 Parkfield-road, Higher Upton-road, who identified the body as that of her husband, aged thirty-six years last January. When Mr Townsend came with Mr Inch to her house to tell her what had occurred she asked "Who did it?" and he said "Me, MRS GARD; but not intentionally." - Alfred Way, clerk, of 2 Pennsylvania-terrace, said he called at the Clarence Hotel, where he saw Townsend sitting on a stool eating bread and cheese. Townsend and GARD were joking about the Conservative fete at Cockington the previous day. Something was said and GARD walked over to Townsend and caught hold of his whiskers. Townsend "slewed" round and faced deceased, giving him a pat on the shoulder. Deceased then assumed a boxing attitude, and one stroke from GARD knocked Townsend's hat on one side. Townsend still sat where he was and they were tipping each other on the face. GARD then walked two steps to the mantel-piece and drank out of his glass, after which he exclaimed, "Why you've pricked me; you must be a fool to play with a knife." On that Townsend closed his knife and put it in his pocket, saying "Bother the knife, I wish I never carried it." He did not notice anything the matter with GARD, who however, repeated, "You've priced me." After a few seconds GARD began to look pale. he had seen ?Townsend using his knife cutting his bread and cheese, but he did not notice it at the time the men were sparring. GARD unbuttoned his waistcoat and put his hand inside and on taking it out again discovered blood about it. Mr Rowland said, "CHARLEY, you had better go in the inside room. I'll stop that for you." He walked to the bagatelle room, witness following. Deceased fainted as soon as he got in the room, and Mr Rowland undid the waistcoat (his coat was unbuttoned all the time) and under-clothing, and got some lint to stop the bleeding. On opening the vest and shirt he saw a quantity of blood coming from a wound on the left breast. On stopping the bleeding Mr Rowland sent for three doctors. Townsend was trying to get deceased to speak to him, saying, "CHARLEY, did I do it intentionally?" and "Did I mean it?" and deceased answered "No, Will." The doctor arrived and attended to deceased, but it was at first thought GARD was dead. On his rallying the doctor ordered his removal to the Hospital, where he was taken on one of Pickford's waggons. On the way he said, " Do let me lie on my right side; let me be easy," and again, "Let me die; oh, what am I dying like this for? What have I got to die like this for?" Mr Rowland asked him if it was an accident or intentional and he said, "No, Rowland." Townsend and GARD appeared on friendly terms, and he had seen them in the bar before. There were no angry words of any kind. After the arrival of the constable Townsend gave the knife up to him. Townsend never rose from his seat till GARD discovered he was bleeding. - By Mr Ferrett (A Juryman): In his opinion it was a pure accident. - John Palmer, painter, of 13 Goshen-terrace, Chelston, Harry Kinch, cabdriver, of 3 Hoxton-road, Ellacombe, and James Gillard, of Lawes Bridge, gave similar evidence. - At this juncture the Coroner asked all the witnesses as to the condition of Townsend and GARD and they replied that both men were perfectly sober. - James Gardner of 13 Goshen-terrace, Chelston, porter and William Henry Rowland, landlord of the Clarence Hotel, Torre, also corroborated. - P.C. Wm. Anthony Greek said that on going into the bagatelle-room he inquired how it occurred and Mr Rowland said "This is the unfortunate man." Townsend said, "Yes, I did it, but I did not intend to; it was done in play," and taking out his knife from his pocket and passing it to witness said "This is the knife I did it with." He asked deceased how it happened, and could get no reply till he said, "Was it done in fun?" on which GARD nodded his head. He afterwards apprehended Townsend who was quite sober, and charged him. The constable produced the knife used and the coat, waistcoat, vest and shirt, which it penetrated. The vest was bloodstained and the knife was an ordinary one, with a blade 2 ½ inches long. - Frank Evans Cave, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said he found deceased lying on his back with a small incised wound half-an-inch long on the left breast. He could not feel his pulse, but afterwards he rallied and had him taken to the Hospital. He gave him stimulants, and he rallied considerably, so that the pulse came back to his wrist, and he went to sleep for an hour. On waking up again he became restless and died in ten minutes whilst on the stretcher, from which he had not been moved. He had examined the body and found the wound was caused by a sharp knife, which pierced the upper bone of the fourth rib. It was three-quarters of an inch deep and pierced the right ventricle of the heart. The doctor here examined the knife and coat, and said he thought that the latter first struck deceased with the sharp end upwards. Deceased did not die from loss of blood but from the pericardium of the heart becoming stopped and clotted with blood. If it had been but the sixth of an inch lower, the knife would have struck the rib and little or no damage would have been done. - Harriet Peck, nurse at the Torbay Hospital, having given evidence, the Coroner, in summing up, said the case was one of homicide, and the question for their consideration was whether death was the result of misadventure or whether it was a case of manslaughter. They had the evidence of several witnesses as to how the knife was used, and if they thought Townsend was using it without ordinary common prudence, although he had no intention of doing harm, yet as death resulted it would be their duty according to the law of England to bring a verdict of manslaughter against Townsend. On the other hand, if they thought it was otherwise, the verdict would be misadventure. - The Jury then retired and after an absence of a little over ten minutes the Foreman announced their verdict to be "Homicide by misadventure, adding that "the Jury think Mr Rowland deserves to be commended for the prompt action taken by him and wish to express their sympathy with the widow and family (of eight children) in their sad bereavement." The Jury gave their fees t the widow. - Whilst the Inquiry, which lasted over three hours, was proceeding, a large crowd of persons congregated outside the Hospital waiting the result. P.S. Osborne and Detective Bond watched the proceedings, and after the Inquest Townsend was removed in a cab to the Police Station, where he awaits his trial for stabbing. He will come before the magistrates on Monday. General sympathy is felt for him in his unlooked-for position.

STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Suicide At Devonport. A Man Throws Himself Out Of Window. - The vicinity of James-street, Devonport, was thrown into a state of commotion early yesterday morning by the circulation of a report that a Marine pensioner named GEORGE PRYOR, aged forty-five years, had committed suicide by throwing himself out of window into the street a distance of about forty feet, and falling on his head, death being instantaneous. In the absence of the County Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan), his Deputy, Mr Albert Gard, presided over an Inquest held on the body at the Town Hall in the evening. - Michael Lacey, the first witness called, stated that he was landlord of the Shamrock Inn, 68 James-street, where the deceased occupied a tenanted room. About seven o'clock he heard some people shouting "Go back, MR PRYOR." Witness at once jumped out of bed and rushed upstairs to the deceased's room. Finding the door fastened he called out to PRIOR to open it. However, no answer came, so he burst it open. Before he could get inside the room the deceased was out of the window. There was no other person there, MRS PRYOR being engaged in the next room preparing some medicine for her husband, who had been under medical treatment for nine weeks. About twelve o'clock on Thursday night witness went upstairs to give him his medicine and left him and his wife all right together. Dr Trevin, of the Dockyard, had attended him, but Dr Rolston, jun., had also been in attendance lately. Witness saw him about half-past three that morning and put him into bed. - In answer to the Foreman (Mr Geaton), Lacey said the deceased had been a labourer in the Dockyard, and about nine weeks ago met with an accident falling on his back whilst at work. When he came home he complained of a pain in the back, and had not been to work since. Before that accident he was not very healthy, but carried out his duty. Witness had resolved to apply for him to be sent to the Naval hospital that day had it not been for the sad occurrence. - George Head, a plasterer, of 6a. Albert-road, Morice-town, stated that he was walking up James-street about half-past seven, when he saw the deceased throw a box out of the window. He then got on the window-sill and rolled over, falling headlong into the street. The drop must have been between thirty and forty feet, and the decease pitched on his head about twenty yards from where witness was standing. He rushed towards the man and found him bleeding profusely from the temple and head. - John Rolston, jun., surgeon, deposed that he had attended the deceased since Wednesday, and found that he was suffering from acute heart disease and dropsy. On the evening of that day he could hardly speak as he was in a state of collapse. The following day witness called upon him when he answered the questions put to him in a rational manner. Witness did not think that the illness was caused by the accident in the dockyard, although it might have aggravated the heart disease. The state of his health had evidently affected his mind, as was often the case with people suffering from the same complaint. They often had fits of temporary insanity, which might take any form. Witness had examined the deceased, and believed he fell on the centre of the right temple. He had sustained a very severe fracture of the skull, which extended to the base, and was the immediate cause of death. He could trace no symptoms of insanity beyond what might have been produced by the heart disease. The Deputy Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said it appeared to him that there was no doubt the heart disease had affected the man's mind. The only point which might have arisen - and there did not appear to be much in that - was that the accident in the yard might have produced an ill effect, but against that they had the evidence of the doctor. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 5 August 1889 EXETER - The Fatal Quarrel At Exeter. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - Mr Coroner Hooper and a Jury sat at the New Police-courts, Exeter, on Saturday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH REDWAY, who was found dead in Mary Arches-street, in a room which she occupied with a man named Henry Brealey, with whom she cohabited. It will be remembered that Brealey was arrested on suspicion of having caused her death, and that on Friday he was remanded by the magistrates on the charge of "feloniously killing and slaying the deceased." At the Inquest the Chief Constable (Mr Le Mesurier) watched the case on behalf of the Police, and Mr Dunn appeared in the interests of the prisoner, who was also in Court. - Elizabeth Holman, a charwoman, living in apartments at No. 8 Mary Arches-street, said that on Thursday night at five minutes to ten o'clock she was called by a fellow lodger named Eliza Tiley, who lived on the same landing as witness, to go with her to a room on the next landing, in which REDWAY lived, to "go and see if it was all right with LIZZIE," because the latter had cried "Murder," and she had heard nothing of her since. Witness went up and rattled the door, and called out to Brealey three times, "Harry, open the door," but received no answer. Witness said, "I want to see if LIZZIE is all right." The door was locked, but in answer to her questions the prisoner said, "LIZZIE'S all right, she's asleep." Witness said, "She's not asleep," and Brealey rejoined "She is asleep." Witness then threatened that if he did not open the door she would send for a Policeman. Brealey still declined to open the door, and she then sent a little girl named Kate Parsons for a Constable. Shortly afterwards a Policeman arrived, and after asking twice that the door should be opened, Brealey complied, and witness entered the room with the Officer and saw the deceased lying on the bed. She was dressed in her ordinary clothes and was lying on her back dead. Brealey was sitting on another bed in his shirt sleeves. He tried to rouse her and said she had a fit. Witness told her he had better let her remain on the pillow, for she was "gone." He made no reply, but sent for a doctor. About a quarter of an hour afterwards Mr Harrison, surgeon, arrived. Witness was n the habit of seeing the deceased and Brealey daily. She (witness) frequently heard them quarrelling, but they generally made it up again a few minutes afterwards. The deceased was a woman of sober habits, but Brealey was addicted to drink. Witness heard the deceased shout in a very excited way. She also heard Brealey rise and walk three or four steps, then a blow, and with the same the deceased fell on the floor. - Several other persons who occupied tenements in the same house gave similar evidence, their statements agreeing in the main points, namely, that there was a quarrel between the deceased and Brealey, that the sound of a blow was heard, followed by a fall, and a simultaneous cry of "Murder." - Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, proved being called to the house and examining the body. There was a slight mark on the left cheek bone, but no abrasion of the skin. The mark was apparently caused by a blow. He had since, with the assistance of Dr Bell, made a post-mortem examination. There was a swelling over the left cheek bone, and on removing the scalp there was found an extravasation of blood a little to the left of the occupit bone. He believed death to have been the result of concussion of the brain. - Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, gave similar evidence. Mr Dunn said his client was anxious to give evidence, but the Coroner expressed the opinion that such a course would be very unwise, and Mr Dunn, acting upon this expression, refrained from tendering Brealey as a witness. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Brealey, who was therefore committed to take his trial at the next Assizes.

BRIXTON - An Inquiry was held at Brixton on Saturday by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) respecting the decease of JANE COCKREM, aged about seventy years, and who died on the 2nd inst. from burns. - Elizabeth Ann Canniford deposed that about ten o'clock on the evening of the 12th ult. deceased retired to bed, carrying in her hand a lighted wax candle. By some means her clothing became ignited, and about ten minutes after the deceased had gone to bed she (the witness) heard moans, which apparently came from the deceased's bedroom, and in consequence she proceeded to her assistance. When she opened the door deceased was lying on the floor in a mass of flames. - Mr George Adkins, surgeon, deposed that he had attended the deceased up to the time of her demise, and was of opinion that death was due to exhaustion. After a brief consultation the Jury, of whom Mr J. E. Yonge was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 August 1889 DITTISHAM - The Bathing Fatality On The Dart. - At the Passage House Inn, Dittisham, on Saturday, Mr Sidney Hacker, County coroner, held an Inquest on the bodies of ERNEST WILSON, 24, and HAROLD WILSON, 18, drowned whilst bathing near Dittisham on the Dart, on Thursday. Deceased went to bathe, and their boat, after they had landed, drifted. One of them, in trying to regain the boat, began to sink, and his brother, perceiving his danger, went to his assistance and both were drowned. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing," and passed a vote of sympathy to the father of the deceased, who was present. - MR THOMAS WILSON, of Wanstead, Essex (father of the deceased), in thanking the Jury, said they had a very lovely river, but at the same time it was a very treacherous one. Most of them (the Jury) were fathers, and no doubt it was too late for them to learn to swim, but he (MR WILSON) would impress upon them the necessity of insisting upon their boys learning to swim. It was a chance for life, and very often a chance to save the life of another who might happen to be in danger. He would also ask them to caution visitors, who. like his poor boys, did not know the place, for in a few yards they might be perfectly safe, and in the next yard might be gone. MR WILSON spoke with a very strong emotion, and many of the Jury were moved to tears. Immediately after the Inquest the bodies were placed in coffins and ferried across the river, where a hearse was waiting to take them to the train at Churston Station for conveyance to Wanstead for interment.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 August 1889 BARNSTAPLE - While engaged a fortnight since in uncoupling some trucks at Wrafton Station, WILLIAM HAWKES, aged 20, labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Lucas and Aird, railway contractors, fell between the rails. Eight or nine trucks passed over him, and the firebox of the engine struck him in the head. HAWKES was removed to the North Devon Infirmary, where he died on Monday night. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury expressing their opinion that no one was to blame.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday held an Inquest on the body of GEORGE WALLACE, mariner, drowned whilst sailing in the small yacht Kingfisher, in the Plymouth Royal Corinthian Yacht Club Regatta. John Langmead, a timberman in the employ of Messrs. Fox and Elliot, and residing in High-street, Plymouth, father-in-law of deceased, identified the body. The head was completely gone, but it could be recognised by the jersey, knife, purse and boots. George Smith, watchman at Plymouth Breakwater Fort, said his attention having been called to the body of a man near the Checker Buoy, he secured it. Mr Charles Wilkinson, son of Archdeacon Wilkinson, said on July 26th he was steering the Kingfisher yacht, deceased and Frederick Axworthy being also on board. The yacht had been one round, and was beating back past the Checker Buoy, when it capsized. WALLACE, who was quite calm and said he could not swim sank. Witness and Axworthy were picked up. WALLACE had charge of the boat, but did not at the time of the accident give any orders. Frederick Axworthy corroborated. The Jury, of whom Mr E. Snell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating Messrs. Wilkinson and Axworthy from all blame. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

YEALMPTON - J. DAWE WILLCOCKS, aged 74, died suddenly at Yealmpton, and at the Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, the Jury, of whom Mr H. Brooking was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," after hearing Mr G. Adkins, surgeon, who, from his knowledge of deceased and the evidence adduced, gave it as his opinion that syncope was the cause of death.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 August 1889 INSTOW - At Instow yesterday, Mr Bromham, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM LEWIS, aged 23, found in the river Torridge, opposite Tapley, the previous morning. Deceased was in service with Mrs Harriet May, Horwood Cottage. On Tuesday evening, July 30th, Ada Rouse, the servant, who had been keeping company with him, told him she could not do so any longer, and he left his place. Early the next morning he was taken into custody by P.C. Hamlyn for sleeping in a wagon on Bideford quay, but he was not prosecuted. Deceased's father, who resides at Newton St. Petrock, said deceased sent him a letter stating that he intended drowning himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

WHITCHURCH - FREDERICK JOHNS, aged 11, son of HUGH JONES, farm labourer, Lamerton, a weakly lad who had been staying with John Brailey, farm labourer, Whitchurch, for nearly three months, died suddenly on Tuesday after eating his breakfast. Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest yesterday, and the Jury, of whom Mr H. Gard was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Dr Hislop of Tavistock, who made the post-mortem examination, having found heart disease of long standing and congestion of both lungs.

PLYMOUTH - Wrestling Fatality At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held last evening by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN VINCENT, brother to TOM VINCENT, the boxer. - ELIZABETH VINCENT, deceased's mother, said her son was a labourer, 27 years of age. He died on Tuesday night at eleven o'clock. - James Gard, a journeyman basket-maker, residing at 6, Parade, said: On Monday the deceased and I were engaged in a wrestling match for prizes at Coxside. Deceased had already played for forty minutes with two other opponents. We had been wrestling for about twenty minutes, when we fell, I being on the top. VINCENT got up immediately, and took off the wrestling jacket and began to dress. he sat down a little while and became sick. Afterwards I saw him home. We were quite friendly while wrestling, never an angry word with each other in our lives. While we were walking home VINCENT said he attached no blame to me, as it might as well have happened to myself as to him. - By the Foreman: About one and-a-half hours elapsed between the first and second bout. There were several bouts during that interval between other wrestlers, and witness spent the time in drinking a pint of beer and eating sandwiches with two friends. - George Glanville, stoker in the employ of the Plymouth Gas Company, deposed that he was referee at the wrestling match. Deceased had thrown two men in less than twenty minutes. The committee then matched him with Gard. They were friends and played in good fellowship for about twenty minutes, laughing all the time. They did not make a "turn" either one side or the other until Gard caught deceased by the "fore hip." This kind of hitch generally gave a heavy fall, and as they came to the ground he noticed that the elbow of Gard rested on the pit of deceased's stomach. VINCENT then dressed and left with his friends. Before he left they gave him a little spirits, as he appeared ill. The matches were arranged for novices. - Dr M. D. Keily said he was called to deceased about a quarter to twelve on Monday night. He was lying in bed with his knees drawn up and complained of pain in the pit of the stomach. He said he had been wrestling and his opponent had fallen on him but that he could not help it. He was in a state of collapse, his temperature being at 97. Next day deceased was still in a state of collapse and so continued until the evening when he died. Deceased admitted to him (witness) that he had drunk during the day half a gallon of ale, besides several small quantities of spirits. The immediate cause of death was rupture of the liver near and including the bladder. In reply to a Juror, as to whether death was accelerated by the drink taken by the deceased during the day, Dr Keily said that the liver was in a state of congestion as the result of so much fluid, but death was caused by the rupture. - The Coroner said it was a simple case, and as wrestling was a perfectly legal game, he did not see how the Jury could return other than a verdict of accidental death. - After a short consultation the Jury, of whom Mr James Martin was Foreman, returned that verdict, exonerating Gard from blame. Deceased leaves a wife and one child.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 August 1889 MALBOROUGH - An Inquest was held at Salcombe on the body of JOHN WOOD, mariner, drowned off Salcombe harbour on Monday morning. After hearing the evidence of the two fishermen, named Distin, who picked up the body, and of Dr Twining, who tried for one hour to restore animation, the Jury was of opinion that death had taken place before the body was taken out of the water, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sad Fatality At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, last evening investigated the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST, aged 4, the son of WILLIAM JAMES SHADDICK, of 15 Morley-lane. - Elizabeth Ann Leigh, living next door, saw deceased and an elder brother cross the road to go into Little Morley-lane. She called to them to come back, as a horse and wagon were approaching. Before they could return the horse turned into the lane. The children were standing close to the double doors of the Star of India beer-shop, and one fell on the children. Frank Friend, a porter, son of the landlord at the Star of India, and another man named Collings raised the door. Mrs Leigh picked up deceased and carried him home. In a few minutes he died. P.C. Edmonds found that the top hook and twist of the door had been "eaten away" from the iron plate; the bottom one was firm. Frank Field stated that the double doors were closed, although they were generally open. He opened them, but the door which afterwards fell would not go right back as there was a fish cart behind. Then he shut it again, and whilst shifting the cart he heard a cry, and found that the door had fallen. He and Collings, who was outside, lifted the door and found two children and a dog underneath. - The witness Leigh, recalled, said both Friend and Collings were inside the yard when the door fell. Collings was drunk, Friend was sober. - Mr J. Holland, Foreman of the Jury, remarked on the unsatisfactory nature of Friend's evidence and several Jurors thought the landlord of the Star of India should be asked to account for the door being in so bad a condition. Friend said his father had not been home since noon. While the Jury were considering whether they should adjourn, Mr Friend said the doors were in working condition and the hinges appeared sound. If they had not been, the doors could not have been shut. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 August 1889 CREDITON - FRANCIS DALLY, mason's labourer and pensioner, went to Standford "Revel" and there was a row at the Rose and Crown Inn. When he reached home, DALLY said a man named Akers had fallen on him in the public-house, and he had a pain in his stomach. He was not sober. Subsequently he died, and at an Inquest held at Crediton yesterday, it was elicited that the deceased and Akers were wrestling, and the former fell under. The men were friendly and deceased did not attribute any blame to Akers. Deceased struck a man named Delve and the latter retaliated. After three rounds the deceased said "I've had enough." Delve struck him twice afterwards, and the deceased, Delve and Akers fell on the ground together. Death, Dr Edwards said, was due to the rupture of a large blood vessel. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Coroner, at the Guildhall, yesterday, Inquired into the cause of the death of BESSIE NEAME, 22, tailoress, in the employ of the Plymouth Co-operative Society. Deceased was having tea on Thursday in the Cornwall-street store, and suddenly complained of pain in her head and fell down unconscious. Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon, was speedily in attendance, and pronounced her dead. She had previously been in good health, and a witness who had known her for five years said she had never heard her complain before. Mr Brenton, who had made a post-mortem examination, said deceased was in a state of chlorosia - a condition conclusive to the formation of much fat about the heart and not uncommon in a person of the age of the deceased. In her stomach were pieces of food much larger than they should have been swallowed and that extra strain on the heart at a time when it could hardly do its regular work probably hastened death. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 August 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - ELIZABETH HARRIS, 70 years of age, living at 5 Holman's-buildings, Cornwall-street, Devonport, while washing her hands in her room on Sunday morning fell and died almost immediately before medical help could be obtained. At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Mr J. R. Rolston, jun., who made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to a rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide Of A Physician At Barnstaple. - DR HENRY FORESTER, a well-known physician residing at High-street, Barnstaple, committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself in his bedroom. The deceased, 61 years of age, had resided in the town for over 30 years, having commenced his professional career as the house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary. The Inquest was held at deceased's residence in the afternoon, before Mr R. Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner. Mr James Partridge was Foreman of the Jury. - Miriam Smith, lady's maid in the employ of MRS FORESTER, deposed that she went at about ten o'clock to DR FORESTER'S room to give him a cup of coffee, as was usual. He occupied a bedroom by himself on the first floor. She received no answer when she knocked at the door, and on entering the room she saw the doctor lying on the floor at the foot of the bed. She at once ran for her mistress. The deceased went to bed at half-past ten on Sunday night. Nothing happened during the day to upset him. - In answer to a Juror, the witness said deceased had not been drinking lately. He was perfectly sober when he went to bed on Sunday night. - MRS SUSANNAH MARSHALL FORESTER, widow of deceased, said the doctor had been very depressed lately and weak. His general health was not good. he made some unfortunate speculations and that depressed him. His daughter was married about a month ago, and he felt her departure very much. While visiting a patient three or four months ago he fell over some steps and hurt his head. He had complained more or less ever since. Nothing had recently occurred to excite or upset him. She went into his room just before twelve o'clock on Sunday night, and he was then sleeping comfortably. At ten o'clock that morning she was called by the last witness and on entering the room found her husband lying on the floor, while two handkerchiefs had been tied together, placed round his neck and passed over the head of one of the posts at the foot of the bed. She untied the handkerchiefs, and attempted to restore animation, but without avail. Mr Bosson, solicitor, and Mr Harper, surgeon, were on the spot in a few minutes. - Mr James Bosson, solicitor of the deceased, said he frequently saw DR FORESTER. For several months the doctor had been in a very depressed state, and had been twice seen by Dr Skerritt, of Bristol. He knew the affairs of the deceased well, and could say that there was nothing really to trouble him. The doctor, however, had recently troubled himself about imaginary matters. He was with him on Sunday night for an hour, leaving him at five minutes to ten. He had not seen him for a week, as he (witness) had been away. He appointed to meet him at luncheon on the following day. Deceased was more than usually depressed, and said he knew he was worse than Dr Harper thought. When called to the house that morning he found MRS FORESTER rubbing the deceased and attempting to restore animation. He assisted, and Dr Harper arrived in a few minutes. He knew the deceased had been unable to sleep well for a long time. The doctor was not excited on Sunday night. - Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, deposed to visiting the deceased at midday on Sunday. DR FORESTER complained a good deal of depression of spirits, that he was feeling weak and feeble and that he had lost his appetite. He prescribed for him and advised change of air. The deceased said he had had a good deal of worry lately. When he was called in that morning life had been extinct for two hours. The cause of death was strangulation. He had no doubt that the deceased was of unsound mind when he committed the act. - The Jury at once returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed Suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity. They added a rider expressing their deep sympathy with the widow and relatives. The Jurors decided to give their fees to the Infirmary. The sad event caused a painful sensation throughout the town, as the deceased was well known and highly respected.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 August 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening on the body of WILLIAM TAYLOR, aged 68 years. WILLIAM TAYLOR, son of deceased, residing at 38 Claremont-street, said n Friday evening his father returned home and called upstairs "I have broken my arm; come down and help me up," adding afterwards that he had fallen down an area at West Hoe. Witness had him removed to the Hospital. On Sunday he appeared to be in great pain and said "I shall never see Claremont-street again." Mr W. L. Woollcombe, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased had a fracture of the upper left arm, was a great deal shaken, and was also suffering from chronic bronchitis. He died about three o'clock that morning, the immediate cause of death being congestion of the lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HEMYOCK - The Inquest on EMILY RUSSELL, aged one month, the illegitimate child of a servant girl of Hemyock, was concluded yesterday. On the first occasion the Jury sat for seven hours; yesterday they gave two and a half hours further consideration to the case. In the result they returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". Several censured the mother and grandmother for disregarding the doctor's instructions.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 17 August 1889 EXETER - Sad Occurrence At Newton Races. A Fatal Fight. - The death of CHARLES POWELL, a labourer, aged eighteen, who resided with his parents in Coombe-street, Exeter, was the subject of an Inquest held yesterday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital by Mr Coroner Hooper. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased went to Newton Abbot races with some companions on Bank Holiday. While there they adjourned to a refreshment booth, where an altercation arose between the deceased and some strangers stated to have come from Plymouth. One of the latter said "Have a turn with me," and with the same struck him a blow in the side. The deceased thereupon divested himself of his coat and prepared for a fight upon scientific principles. Several rounds were fought in a rough and tumble way, the crowd leaving but little space for the combatants. Eventually they fell to the ground together and the deceased was picked up by one of his mates named Tootel, otherwise known as "Badger." Deceased then intimated that he had had enough and proceeded to a pump to wash the blood from his nose. While doing so he said that "Badger" had done for him, having kicked him in the head accidentally in coming to his assistance. A few days after his return to Exeter he was admitted to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, suffering from injuries to his head and died on the 13th inst. Before his death he said he was kicked while on the ground by Tootel, but that it was purely an accident. One o the witnesses stated that the man with whom deceased fought was a native of Plymouth, that he was 5ft. 8in., and measured about 37in. round the chest. Inspector Shipcott said inquiries had been made as to the identity of the man, but without result. The Coroner expressed the opinion, in which the Jury coincided, that the occurrence was purely accidental and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 August 1889 BERE FERRERS - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest on Saturday at Beeralston, on the body of HENRY DODD, aged 16, employed in No. 22 cutting of the Plymouth, Devonport, and South-Western Junction Railway. A loaded truck drawn by an engine jerked off the temporary line, ran into an empty truck, and the coupling chain breaking, deceased, who was standing near the points, was struck on the neck and windpipe and died in two minutes. Mr A. K. J. Reede, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, found laceration of the great blood vessels of the neck. The Jury, of whom Mr James E. Joll was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 19 August 1889 DARTMOUTH - Fatal Fall Down A Hold At Dartmouth. - A naval pensioner, named WILLIAM ELSTON, sixty-four years of age, met with a fatal accident in Dartmouth Harbour on Friday evening, by falling down the hold of a coal hulk, a distance of eleven or twelve feet. Deceased was one of a gang of men who were engaged by Messrs. Collins and Co., coal merchants, in coaling the Portuguese steamer Olinda, from the coal hulk, Victoria. When this was finished the hulk was, and in crossing over the Moorhen, to get to the boats, the deceased fell into the latter's hold. He was at once taken on shore to the Cottage Hospital, but died almost directly afterwards. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall on Saturday by Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, and after evidence had been given as to the fall, Dr R. W. Soper said the cause of death was the displacement of the cervical vertebrae, with injury to the spinal cord. Dr Fraser, commenting on the case, said it seemed to be through great neglect that the hatchways of the coal hulk were without any protection. It was time that the hatches should be railed around. The Jury, who gave their fees to the widow, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider that they were of opinion that in future all coal hulks in the harbour should have railings around their hatches.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 August 1889 EXETER - Sudden Death Of The Head Gardener Of Tresco. Scene At The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday, on the body of GEORGE VALLANCE, Mr Dorrien Smith's head gardener at Tresco, Isles of Scilly. Deceased, 66 years old, had suffered from heart disease and dropsy. Whilst staying with his son in Longbrook-street, Exeter, he suddenly expired. The Jury found that death was due to Natural Causes, Dr Budd considering heart disease the cause. After the verdict was given MR VALLANCE, son of the deceased, with some warmth, entered a protest against the Coroner holding an Inquest. It was most unnecessary. - The Coroner (Mr Hooper) said that was a matter entirely for him. - MR VALLANCE: I told you this morning that Dr Budd was willing to give a certificate of death. - The Coroner: I cannot allow this. - MR VALLANCE: As strongly as possible I protest against this Inquest. - The Coroner: Again I saw I will not allow you to make such statements. - MR VALLANCE asked the reporters to make a note of his protest and the Coroner again said he would not allow him to go on. MR VALLANCE then said he should express his opinions somewhere else. - The Coroner: You cannot. I have a duty to perform to the public. - MR VALLANCE It is a perfect waste of time and money holding this Inquiry. My father died a perfectly natural death. - The Coroner: You must be quiet. - The Foreman of the Jury (Mr F. Edwards) thought this Inquest was necessary, although he had known some at Exeter that were not. - MR VALLANCE: You do not know the facts of the case. The Coroner won't allow you to know them, and he won't allow me to state them. - The Coroner (sternly): I will not allow this wrangling to go on. Wherever shall we draw the line if we do not have Inquests upon persons who die so suddenly. - MR VALLANCE left the room still protesting that the Inquest was quite unnecessary, and asserting that the Coroner had told him that morning that he would override the opinion of all the doctors in Exeter. The Coroner denied that he had made such a statement.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 21 August 1889 TORQUAY - The Drowning Fatality At Torquay. - Dr Fraser, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Clarence Hotel, Torre, yesterday morning into the circumstances attending the death of REGINALD KEY, 26, of Ellerton House, Cleveland-road, Torquay, and who was found drowned in Torbay. Deceased was first seen thirty yards off Corbyn Head by Charles William Cox, retired general of the Madras Army, who saw his clothes on the rocks below and an alarm resulted in the body being towed ashore by William Hatton, master mariner, of Ellacombe. Medical attendance was summoned and William Arthur Winwood Smith, surgeon, of Chelston, arrived first, and, with Dr Richardson's assistance, tried to restore respiration by artificial means, but in vain. Deceased's father, JOSEPH HENRY KEY, clay merchant, of Newton Abbot, said his son had been subject to fits since eleven years of age. He had been forbidden to bathe alone, but left the house unknown on Monday morning. The boatman would not allow him to go out on the water though he had asked. He had been seen to have fits on the beach. The Jury, of whom Mr C. Bentley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 22 August 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Stoke. - Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Millbridge yesterday respecting the death of ALBERT ELLIOTT, aged five years and who resided at Mill Pleasant, Millbridge. The deceased met his death whilst riding behind a cab, as stated in Wednesday's Western Daily Mercury, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, a vote of condolence being passed with the parents in their bereavement.

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 August 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening touching the death of WILLIAM BROWN, 9 years of age, who was drowned in the Ferry Canal, at Morice Town, on the previous evening. Deceased, who had been bathing with a companion, was seen walking towards the edge of the canal, and was warned of his danger, but no one appeared to have seen him enter it. After considerable difficulty the body was recovered by Samuel Preece, a bargeman, who stated that he had frequently warned boys away from this place, and so did the Police, but they paid no attention. Inspector Webber said that boys under ten were allowed to bathe there. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

DODBROOKE - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Dodbrooke concerning the death of MR ERNEST ALBERT WITHERIDGE, gardener, who was found on Thursday morning with his throat cut in a garden at the back of his house in Dodbrooke. Evidence pointed to the fact of deceased being subject to epileptic fits, which left him for days together in a state bordering on insanity. It transpired that deceased had a violent fit on Sunday and one on Monday. The Jury found "Deceased committed Suicide while of Unsound Mind.

DODBROOKE - At Dodbrooke an Inquest was held yesterday relative to the death of GEORGE HENRY SHEPHERD, who expired after eating a supposed mushroom. After hearing the evidence of the parents and of Dr Webb, of Kingsbridge, the Jury found that deceased died from internal inflammation caused by eating a poisonous fungus. The Deputy Coroner (Dr Fraser) commented on the conduct of the parents in not calling in medical aid and expressed the hope that this case would be a warning to parents in similar circumstances.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 August 1889 TORQUAY - At the Inquest at Torquay yesterday on GEORGE BEST, blacksmith, who died suddenly in a barber's shop on Saturday as he was preparing to go to his wife's funeral, it was stated that the man died from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury gave their fees for the relief of the five orphan children. Dr Fraser, the Deputy Coroner, spoke of the insanitary condition of the court in Union-lane, in which the deceased lived, and the Jury endorsed his opinion that the attention of the authorities should be called to the matter.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 30 August 1889 KENTON - Mishap To A South Devon Train. - An Inquest was held at the Devon Arms Inn, Kenton, near Starcross, yesterday afternoon, by Mr Coroner Gould on the body of THOMAS BIDGOOD, driver, in the employ of Mr French, of Teignmouth, who met with a fatal accident at Kenton on Tuesday evening. The Inquiry was to have been opened at 2.30, but there was some delay owing to the late arrival of the Coroner, through a slight accident to the train by which he was travelling from Exeter, the piston rod giving way, and the passengers having to walk some distance. Fortunately no one was injured by the mishap. Mr Mules was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence showed that deceased was driving a waggon-load of hay up Kenton-hill, when a horse attached to a waggon and following him shied and ran away. He tried to stop the runaway, but was knocked down and run over, his injuries - several fractures to a leg and thigh and rupture of the main artery of that limb - proving fatal in a very short time. A rumour that the deceased was the worse for liquor at the time of the accident was shown to be unfounded and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." BIDGOOD was fifty-eight years of age.

Western Morning News, Saturday 31 August 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Keyham Dockyard. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of THOMAS SLEMAN JACKSON, engineer, aged 48 years. Mr J. J. E. Venning (Messrs. Venning and Goldsmith) watched the case for the Admiralty and Mr T. L. Coode, on behalf of Mr Percy T. Pearce, represented the relatives of the deceased. The Coroner, in his opening remarks, drew attention to a report that the registrar of deaths (Mr Bignell) had refused to register MR JACKSON'S death, although the naval medical officers had given the usual certificate of death. He wished to say that Mr Bignell had not refused to give a certificate, but merely thought he had better communicate with him (the Coroner) so that a Jury might Enquire whether the deceased had died from blood-poisoning or natural causes. - MR J. AVERY JACKSON, ironmonger, having identified deceased, William Henry James, engine-fitter in Keyham Factory, said at ten o'clock on the morning of the 16th inst. deceased was employed in the factory on a brass cover of a condenser weighing 2cwt. He was marking off the holes on the cover to receive the tubes and in lifting the cover from one side to the other it slipped on to an iron bench. It was at an angle of about 50 degrees when it fell, and caught deceased's fingers between the cover and the vice-box. The cover was round, with very little bearing. When lifting it two men were employed and one cover had been "lifted" just previous to the accident. Deceased was sent to the surgery, and subsequently to the Hospital. Frederick Channon, skilled labourer confirmed the evidence of previous witness. Mr J. L. Stone, fleet surgeon, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on the 19th inst. suffering from contused and lacerated wounds of the little and "ring" fingers of the left hand. There was also considerable constitutional disturbance. Blood-poisoning followed, from which deceased died on 28th inst. In answer to Mr Coode, witness said the primary cause of blood-poisoning was the accident and deceased was admitted to the Hospital on account of the accident. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Baker was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 3 September 1889 BICKLEIGH (NEAR PLYMOUTH) - Fatal Effect Of Scalds. - An Inquiry was held at Ham Pool, Bickleigh, yesterday, by the County Coroner, (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen) touching the death of a male child named WILLIAM GEORGE PULLYBLANK, who died on the 31st ultimo, from the effects of scalds. Kezia Legg deposed that the child was left in her care on Thursday, the 29th ultimo, the day on which the accident occurred. She stated that whilst attending to a frying-pan which was on the fire the deceased, who was close behind her, fell into a boiler which contained a quantity of hot water and got severely scalded. Mr H. J. S. Liddell, surgeon, stated that he attended deceased who was suffering from severe scalds in the abdomen and was of opinion that death was due to the shock. The Jury of whom Mr Cowhey was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 September 1889 POPLAR, LONDON - Fatal Accident To A Torquay Man. [Special Telegram.] - Last evening Mr Wynne Baxter held an Inquest at the Poplar Townhall, London, on the body of JOHN CLARE, aged 29, gentleman's servant and butler, of Lota, Torquay, who met with a fatal accident while on board the Donald Currie's steamship Dunrobin Castle, lying in the East India Dock. - MR J. CLARE, of Lota, Torquay, identified the deceased as his son. Witness was told that he had accepted a berth as steward on the Dunrobin Castle. Wm. Lowers, fireman on board the ship, said that on Friday last, at midnight, he saw deceased on deck. He warned him that the hatches were off, but deceased stumbled and fell down the main-hold. He was helping to load the vessel: in fact, all were helping, because no labourers would. - The father, recalled, said that the deceased had never been to sea in his life. - John Nicol, mate, said deceased was only engaged the day before, and his sleeping quarters had not been shewn to him. The Jury expressed their strong disapproval of the captain employing a man to load a ship which he knew nothing about. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BERE FERRERS - An Inquest was held at Beerferris yesterday touching the death of WM. COURT, navvy, aged 36, who was drowned while crossing the Tamar on the night of the Calstock Regatta. The body, which was recovered on Monday near Cotehele, was identified by Mary Squires, with whom the deceased lodged. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 4 September 1889 EXETER - Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of ELLEN MCDONALD, aged seventy-five who expired somewhat suddenly. THOMAS MCDONALD identified the body, and, after hearing the medical evidence &c. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 September 1889 EXETER - At Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday an Inquest was held relative to the death of FRANK EDWARDS, aged 5 years, of Crediton, admitted into the Institution on August 8th, suffering from a wound on his upper eyelid, caused by the kick of a pony which the boy ran after in a field. Mr Martyn (assistant surgeon) said that ten days after he was admitted to the Institution deceased had convulsions. An operation was then performed, and the boy progressed well until the 2nd inst., when he again had convulsions. A second operation was performed, but the boy died on the following morning from abscess on the brain, caused by the kick of the horse. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 September 1889 PLYMPTON ST MAURICE - At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on the body of JOHN BARWICK, stone-breaker, aged 80 years, who died at Quarry Cottage, Plympton St. Maurice, on Wednesday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" after hearing the evidence of Mr W. D. Stamp, surgeon, that deceased died from haemorrhage. The Jury gave their fees to the widow, who is over 80 years of age.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Freemasons' Arms, Cattedown, last evening, relative to the death of SAMUEL GREGORY JOSLIN, aged 2 years. On Tuesday evening deceased capsized over its face and chest a cup of tea which his father was holding. The father immediately applied linseed oil to the burns and sent for a doctor. Mr Chatterton, surgeon, 17 Culme-terrace, found deceased in a semi-comatose condition, suffering from severe burns and from excessive bronchitis, which rapidly developed by the burning injury to the lungs. Death was due to shock. The Jury, of whom Mr M. Head, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 September 1889 NORTHAM - Death From Swallowing A Needle. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at Appledore, before Mr Bromham, touching the death of JOHN EDWARDS. The evidence shewed that on August 18th deceased was drinking from a glass not generally used, when he swallowed a needle. There were two in the glass, but he felt them in his mouth, and took one of them out, saying to his wife that he had swallowed the other. He consulted Dr Pratt, and did not go to work until the following Saturday. On Wednesday last he became worse and Dr Pratt visited him twice on Thursday and Friday. On Saturday afternoon he vomited very violently and broke a blood vessel. Death ensued in a few minutes, the doctor being present when he expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was 51 years of age and was much respected. He leaves a widow and several children.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening relative to the death of THOMAS GIDLEY, aged forty years, butcher, of Regent-street. William Venton, residing 2 Devonshire-street, identified the body as that of his brother-in-law. Thomas Williams, foreman to a coal merchant and ship-owner, said on Saturday evening he was at the Fawn Inn, Prospect-street, when deceased came into the house and entered into conversation. They were talking about some vegetable marrows deceased had with him, when deceased suddenly fell back into a chair. His clothing was unloosed, and his forehead bathed and he was given some brandy, but on the arrival of Sergeant Yabsley and Mr Eccles life was extinct. Mr W. Cash Reed, surgeon, said he had attended deceased in May last for bleeding of the nose. At that time he discovered that deceased was suffering from organic disease of the heart and he told his friends the nature of the complaint. In his opinion death was due to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DAWLISH - At Dawlish Cemetery yesterday an Inquest was held before Mr G. A. Fraser (Deputy Coroner) on the body of GEORGE COOMBSTOCK, a fisherman, who was drowned whilst sailing in a match at the Dawlish Regatta on August 23rd. JOHN COOMBSTOCK, father of the deceased, stated that his son's age was 38. William Caseley, a fisherman, who accompanied the deceased on the occasion, together with another man named Wellaway, stated that whilst in the race a sudden squall caught the boat. The sheet rope was made fast and before COOMBSTOCK, who was steering, could let it go, the boat heeled over to leeward and went down. Witness and Wellaway were rescued by Rackley, who was also sailing in the match. Deceased could not swim and sank before assistance could be rendered. Richd. Rackley, boatman, of Dawlish, stated that as soon as he saw the accident he gave his son orders to lower the sail, and he ran his boat between Caseley and Wellaway, both of whom he rescued. he only saw deceased's arm twice above the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and commended Rackley for his promptness in rendering assistance.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 September 1889 PLYMPTON - Shocking Fatality On The Great Western Line At Plympton. - MR ARTHUR CLOUTTE, head master of Plympton Grammar School, was run over and killed on the Great Western line about a mile above Plympton Station yesterday. Deceased visited Plymouth early in the day, leaving his home about 9 o'clock, and returning to Plympton Station by the 12.27 train. On leaving the Station he walked towards Colebrook, but instead of taking the road leading to his house walked on in the direction of Torrage House and then evidently got on the line (at a point where there is a stiff incline) running close to the road, and commenced walking back towards Plympton between the rails. Just at that moment the down train due at Plympton at 1.4 p.m. came down the incline and Sutton, the driver, on seeing the deceased, blew his whistle repeatedly, but was unable to stop the train until it had run over the unfortunate gentleman, and had completely smashed his skull, thus rendering identification very difficult. Deceased had in his pockets a circular relating to Plympton Grammar School and some money, but beyond that there was nothing to lead to his identification. Mr Willis, the Stationmaster, in company with Dr Stamp and a Police Officer, at once proceeded to the spot on learning of the sad occurrence, and had the body conveyed to Plympton Station. Much sympathy is felt for the widow and family of the deceased in their sudden bereavement. MR CLOUTTE had been master of the school for about twelve years. - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Railway Station, Plympton, last evening, concerning the death of MR CLOUTTE. Mr H. Williams was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - After viewing the body, which was identified by Mr E. Frith, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest to Monday next, as some of the witnesses were unable to attend.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 September 1889 Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Bull Point Magazines, respecting the death of THOMAS OGLE, who was drowned on the 1st inst. in the River Tamar. William J. Westcott said deceased had full charge of the boat, all sails being set, when a sudden squall upset it, all three occupants being thrown into the water. William Barrett, of Saltash, deposed to finding the body at Willcove, on the evening of the 9th, and the Jury, of whom Mr D. Collins was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 12 September 1889 ILFRACOMBE - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, Ilfracombe, before Dr E. J. Slade King (Deputy Coroner) touching the death of HERBERT DENDLE, who met with a fatal accident during a fire brigade practice on Monday evening. The father of the deceased identified the body, stating that his son was nineteen years of age, was a mason, and had been a member of the brigade for four years. Mr Richard Jewell, chief of the brigade, explained the practice which was being engaged in at the time of the accident, adding that he believed the rope (a two inch manilla) was cut in two by a running ring which had been put on the ladder. Dr Foquett described the fracture to the skull of the deceased. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that in their opinion the ropes, etc., should be frequently and carefully tested.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 September 1889 LYNTON - An Inquest was held by Mr J. F. Bromham yesterday afternoon at Lynmouth touching the death of MR ORD. Mrs Valentine, wife of Dr Valentine and niece of the deceased, identified the body as that of WILLIAM HERBERT ORD, a brewer, residing at Somerton, Somerset. He was a widower without children. They came to Lynmouth on Thursday last. On Tuesday about twelve they were on the beach, when deceased left to bathe, promising to return by two. As he did not she got uneasy and went in search of him. About six the body was brought to their lodgings. - David Croombe, boatman, stated that being alongside the Waverley he was told that a person was making signs of distress under Castle rock. Having landed his passengers he put off and found the body floating in the water about three-quarters of a mile from the harbour. He passed a rope round the armpits and towed it to the beach, whence it was taken to Sea Breeze Cottage. Dr Berry stated that the corpse presented the usual appearances of death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned when returning from Bathing."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 September 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident In Keyham Yard. - Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital, on Saturday concerning the death of GEORGE HOLMES, a wagoner, in the employ of Mr Hitchins, contractor for the supply of horses to the Dockyards. About half-past eleven on Friday morning deceased was driving a horse, with an empty wagon attached, in Keyham Dockyard when the horse bolted, and after going a distance of about sixty yards the cart caught the corner-stone of the engine-house, and capsized. HOLMES, who had been seen standing on the shafts, with one hand resting on the top of the cart, was found underneath the horse, whose shoulder was resting on his face, and the shafts were lying across his breast. After treatment at the Dockyard surgery he was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died about three hours after admission. His skull was fractured and he had haemorrhage of the right lung a few minutes before he died. The Coroner drew attention to the fact that the deceased was standing on the shafts instead of being at the horse's head, and thought there should be a regulation prohibiting men from riding on the shafts. It was stated that the reins were nothing more than a piece of half-inch rope. - Mr Wilcocks, Mr Hitchins's foreman, said the reins which deceased had were not supplied by the contractor, and formed no part of the harness sent into the yard. The men in charge of the horses had distinct instructions not to ride on the shafts and to make the men led the horses no reins were issued. The Coroner said the men should be told that the deceased had lost his life through disobedience of orders. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider calling upon the authorities to enforce the regulation that wagoners should lead their horses in the Dockyard.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 17 September 1889 PLYMPTON - The Distressing Fatality At Plympton. Verdict "Temporarily Insane." - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, re-opened the Inquiry at the George Hotel, Plympton, last evening, respecting the death of MR ARTHUR CLOUTTE, aged fifty-six years, and late head master of the Plympton Grammar School. The proceedings were watched by a large number of the inhabitants of the town. Mr H. Williams was Foreman of the Jury, and Mr Woollcombe appeared on behalf of the friends. - Mr C. T. Bewes (Messrs. Bewes, Hellard, and Bewes), Stonehouse, was called and stated in evidence that on Tuesday, the 10th, deceased called at his office in Stonehouse. He told him that he was very much pressed for money by a creditor and asked witness whether he could lend him from £180 to £200. He told deceased that he could not give him a definite answer until he had consulted a relative and would advise him by the morrow's post. Deceased pressed him to give an immediate reply, but as his request was not immediately complied with he shortly afterwards left the office apparently disappointed. In answer to Mr Woollcombe, witness stated that the application of deceased was merely deferred not refused. - James Sutton, engine driver on the Great Western Railway, said he left Newton with his train at 11.47 on Tuesday morning, and was due at Plympton Station at 1.4 p.m. On sighting the distant signal, about a mile from Plympton, he observed a man walking in the middle of the rails with his back towards the train. He blew his whistle but the man did not take the slightest notice. A bend in the embankment shut out his view and he did not see deceased again until he was struck by the train. He immediately applied the brake, and witness, together with the guard and several others, went back to the spot where they found the body lying between the metals. It was taken up and placed on the embankment and on their arrival at Plympton the circumstances were reported to the Station-master. In answer to Mr Woollcombe: The train was going at the usual speed - thirty-five miles an hour. When he observed deceased he was walking at a very slow pace. - William Wills, Station-master at Plympton, said that on the 10th inst. deceased came up from Plymouth by the 12.10 a.m. train. His demeanour struck him as being strange, and he inquired whether the train had arrived off Ivybridge or not. Witness told him that it had, and deceased immediately left the platform. - Richard Doudney said he met deceased in Stoggy-lane, near the scene of the accident, about one o'clock on the day in question. Witness bade him good morning, but deceased responded in a very inaudible tone, and kept on towards the direction of the line at a very smart pace. - The Coroner having addressed the Court, the Jury, after having been in consultation for a considerable time, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," and passed a vote of condolence with the widow and family. - A meeting of deceased's creditors will be held today to decide upon the adoption of some definite course. A day or two since a private meeting took place, and it was then ascertained that the rumour as to deceased's monetary matters was true. The liabilities amount to about £1,000, and the assets to £100.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 September 1889 EXETER HEAVITREE - JOHN MILSOM, aged 61, a labourer, late of Sowton, when at work for Mr Burgoyne, of Heavitree, on a hayrick, fell and broke his neck. He had complained of feeling giddy at times. At an Inquest held yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Marine On The Indus. Inquest And Verdict. - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held on the Indus, at Keyham, to Inquire into the death of ALEXANDER ROBERTSON, aged 25, a private in the Marines, who served on board that ship The Coroner, Mr Vaughan, and there were twenty-four gentlemen on the Jury. After they had been sworn they proceeded to the mortuary in the Keyham Dockyard to view the body, and then returned to the ship, the Inquest being held in the Captain's fore cabin. - The first witness was J. R. Snowball, private, R.M.L.I., belonging to the Indus, who stated that he saw the deceased between eight and half-past on Saturday night. He was then in his mess and the deceased came for his bag. During a short conversation which took place between them. He noticed nothing exceptional in ROBERTSON'S manner; he was usually a reserved man, but a man who generally appeared happy. A few minutes after this witness heard a noise on the lower deck as if somebody had fallen, but did not hear the report of a rifle. - Corporal Frank Woods, R.M.L.I., said he had known the deceased for four years. On Saturday night he was performing the duties of corporal of the watch, and at 8.33 witness heard a report on the after part of the lower deck. On proceeding to the spot he found the deceased falling forward with a rifle between his legs, having shot himself through the mouth. Witness put his arm round the deceased's neck and raised him to a sitting position, assisted by Lance corporal Braffiner. Witness had the unfortunate man conveyed to the sick bay and summoned Dr Bury, the medical officer on duty, who examined the deceased and pronounced him to be dead. Witness was smoking with the deceased half an hour before he shot himself, and noticed that he was somewhat depressed, but there was nothing in his manner to lead to the supposition that he would commit suicide. Deceased was a very nice man, and bore an excellent character until recently. He had been to the manoeuvres in the Black Prince and on the return of that ship to Plymouth deceased broke his leave for 96 hours. For this offence he was deprived of two badges, lost sixteen days pay, was reduced to the second class for leave, and had 90 days' leave stopped. He had not heard deceased make any complaint about his punishment. - Captain Stewart P. Falls stated that he commanded the detachment of Marines belonging to the Indus. On SAturday last, at 10 o'clock, witness was informed at his residence in Stoke that PRIVATE ROBERTSON had shot himself. He proceeded on board and took charge of the rifle and the deceased's letters and accoutrements. The Coroner then proceeded to open the parcel, which contained part of the jag with which the deceased had shot himself. There were also some blank cartridges, with one of which the deceased had loaded the rifle. A new jag, which is a small piece of steel fitted to screw on the top of a cleaning-rod, was then inspected by the Jury. - Captain Falls, continuing his evidence, gave the deceased a very good character, stating that he had never had occasion to punish him. The report of the offence for which he was punished was sent from the Black Prince to be dealt with by the captain of the Indus. The deceased had served in the Flora at the Cape, and might have had sunstroke when on that station. Witness had been informed that the reason the deceased had shot himself was the breaking off of his engagement to be married. Captain Falls produced a letter from the young girl, which was read. The letter was full of endearing terms, and good advice, asking deceased to do what was right and all would be well. - Annie Leatherton deposed that she first met deceased on Easter Monday. About a month after this she became engaged to him. He wished to get married at Christmas, and she consented. When deceased went away to the manoeuvres he wrote every week until the 26th of August last; he then ceased to write. On Thursday she again heard from him. He stated that he had lost his badges. He wrote only a few lines. He never came to see her when he got back to Plymouth, nor did he write. Somebody had "put" him against witness, but he never reproached her. On Saturday night she received a letter from him, in which he said she was not to let anybody know he had written it. He stated in this letter that somebody had told him she was going wrong. This had driven him out of his mind, and he did not know what he was doing. He also said that by the time she received that letter he would be dead. - The Coroner, in summing up, called attention to the fact that the deceased could not have been in his right mind, otherwise he would have taken some steps to prove the statements which were made to him about the girl. Whoever told the unfortunate man the lie about the girl had a tremendous responsibility at their door. He (the Coroner) had no doubt that the deceased was in a state of temporary insanity. The Jury without any hesitation, unanimously agreed that the deceased shot himself when in a state of Unsound Mind; they also wished to say that the letter written by the girl did her great credit, and was a very right and proper epistle. - Superintendent Wall watched the case on behalf of the Metropolitan Police and Mr Goldsmith attended for the Admiralty.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 20 September 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Shocking Fatality In Devonport Dockyard. - At the Police reserve-room, Devonport Dockyard yesterday, Mr T. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM PEPPERELL MARCH, aged thirty-one, and residing at 19 Herbert-street. The deceased was employed as a mason in the Dockyard. George Hamley, mason, stated that about quarter-past seven that morning the deceased and several others, including himself (witness) were using a four-wheeled trolley for the purpose of tipping stones down an incline. They were working by the Buoy Wharf. At the time the accident occurred they had a stone on the trolley weighing about 7cwt. Its dimensions were 3 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 18 inches thick. They had got the trolley to the place required, when witness suggested to the deceased that the chain around the stone should be removed and the stone shifted around in another direction to facilitate the operation of sliding it off. Deceased objected to this, thinking that a better plan would be to put a roller underneath the stone. This was done, and with the help of a crowbar the stone was shifted about eight inches over the edge of the trolley. Deceased then gave orders to stop while he went under the stone to lift it a little. He had his back to the stone, which was resting near his neck, and gave orders for the roller to be put back a little. On his raising it the roller slipped back and the stone tilted forward to the ground, bearing the unfortunate man with it and crushing his skull like matchwood. He did not think the stone touched any other part of the deceased's body. It was raised from the deceased's head within a few seconds of the accident, but he was quite dead. - Henry Lunn, mason, corroborated and the Jury, of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Coroner remarking that he hoped other men would take warning and not place themselves in such dangerous positions. The deceased, who leaves a wife and one child, was particularly steady and a good workman.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 23 September 1889 TOTNES - Before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner for the District, an Inquest was held at the Seymour Hotel, Totnes, on Saturday, touching the death of MRS CHURCHWARD, which occurred on Thursday at Castle View, Totnes, through the bursting of an artery in her leg. Evidence having been given in accordance with our report, showing that the deceased had long suffered from a bad leg. Dr Raby was called and stated that there was not the least doubt that death resulted from the bursting of an artery in the leg, from which she bled to death in a few minutes. The deceased was over eighty years of age and resided for several years with her daughter, Mrs Crook at Bridgetown. The Jury, of whom Mr E. L. Middleton was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 September 1889 PYWORTHY - MRS BRIMACOMBE, aged 54, wife of W. BRIMACOMBE, of Derriton flour mills, Holsworthy, spent Sunday with friends at Broadshells, Pyworthy. Whilst accompanying them to church in the afternoon she complained of being unwell and said she would return, refusing all offers of her friends to accompany her. Upon Mrs Newcombe, of Leworthy, returning from church, she found MRS BRIMACOMBE lying dead very near where her friends had left her. It was evident that she had been dead some time for she was quite cold. Mr W. Kevell, auctioneer and deceased's friends soon arrived, and the body was removed. Deceased, who was highly respected, leaves several children, many of whom are young. At an Inquest held yesterday a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at Ridgeway, Plympton, yesterday, Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of MRS CAROLINE G. HAMBLY. CAPTAIN HAMBLY, R.N., her husband, stated that he and his wife visited some friends on Saturday evening, and returned home about 10 o'clock. A short time afterwards he went upstairs and in a few minutes heard a peculiar sound in the breakfast-room, immediately followed by a heavy fall. Coming down he found his wife lying on her face near the table, and called his daughter and servant. He turned the deceased over and saw a little blood flowing from the nose. He ran for Dr Ellery as soon as restoratives were being applied. Dr Ellery said he saw deceased about ten minutes after she fell and had no doubt the cause of death was an apoplectic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." On behalf of the Jury, Mr R. Hambly, Foreman, requested the Coroner to convey their deepest sympathy to the husband and family.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 25 September 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, assisted by Mr Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday on the body of JOHN STANBURY, aged about forty-four years. Mr P. Pearce (Bond and Pearce, solicitors) appeared on behalf of Mr S. Roberts, contractor. The evidence showed that deceased fell from some scaffolding at the new theatre, and Mr William Hayes, surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, said that when deceased was brought to the Hospital life was extinct. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Foreman of the Jury (Mr S. Panter) stating that they exonerated the contractor and everyone concerned from all blame.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 27 September 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Accident At The Devonport Gunwharf. - The Borough Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at the Golden Lion Inn, Devonport, last evening, touching the death of WILLIAM DAMEREL, who died on Wednesday night from injuries received at her Majesty's Gunwharf. From the evidence of Private Richard Gray, of the Essex Regiment, it appears that a shot was being rolled up a plank on to a trolley. The deceased was standing at the end of the plank, and when the shot had reached the top part of the plank it tipped and the bottom end of the plank struck the deceased in the lower part of the chest. - John Totter, labourer, was employed in arranging the shot on the trolley, but he did not see the deceased struck. After the work was completed they had orders to proceed to the new carriage shed, and deceased accompanied them. On the road DAMEREL complained of feeling very unwell. Witness fetched Mr Dunstan, store-holder, and on coming back again found the deceased in a very prostrate condition. With the aid of two other persons they took the deceased home and witness went for a doctor at the Military Hospital. The medical man was promptly in attendance, but the deceased succumbed shortly after. - James Last, the foreman was examined principally with regard to the duties he had to perform. In the course of his remarks he said he had to work the same as another labourer. - Mr Unwin, the Foreman of the Jury, suggested that they ought to have the same system for loading shot at the gunwharf as they had in operation at Woolwich. - The Coroner, in the course of his summing up, said it was apparent that there was an amount of carelessness amongst the men themselves, and in the superintendence of the men. He thought the foreman of a gang of men ought to have some time to bestow upon the labourers of each gang, and that he was placed there to see that in the execution of their work they not only did it in a satisfactory manner, but also with safety to themselves. He (the Coroner) thought that if there was one way of doing work safer than another, and especially in these days of engineering ability and appliances, the Government would set the example of doing it safely, because to the Government was committed the care of the lives and limbs of her Majesty's subjects. He had always held before he was Coroner and since, that no expense should stand in the way of procuring those means whereby the lives of men could be preserved from accident. Their foreman had told them if they had had a machine that would have been a safe way of loading the shot. He trusted the present system would be altered. If they (the Jury) would add a rider to that effect he would see the authorities and endeavour to get a machine placed there for the benefit of the future workmen. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added a rider as suggested.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 28 September 1889 ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest on the body of JOHN TUCKER, who was drowned by the upsetting of a mark boat on the occasion of the Ilfracombe Regatta on the 21st inst., was opened at the Pier Hotel, Ilfracombe, on Thursday evening by the Deputy Coroner (Dr E. J. Slade King). The body was identified by WM. TUCKER, brother of the deceased. He stated that deceased and himself were in the mark boat Thetis on the first day of the regatta. In the pilot boat race the Polly touched their boat with her sail and the pilot boat No. 9, which followed, ran down the Thetis, striking her about two feet aft and taking the mainsail out of her. Witness jumped to the pilot boat and thought his brother did the same, but when he was on the boat he found that his brother was missing. He was drowned before they could get back to pick him up. Captain Griffiths, of the Favourite, proved finding the body and the Inquiry was adjourned until Monday week in order to allow Captain Saunders, of the pilot boat, to be present.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, by the Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) last evening, touching the death of JOHN POTTER, aged fifty-three, a labourer, who died from injuries the result of an accident. John P. Goshan stated that he resided at 18 St John's-road. On Tuesday the 24th inst., he was engaged with deceased doing some masonry work at the gas offices, Athenaeum-terrace. Whilst the deceased was working on a short ladder he became light-headed, and fell to the ground, a distance of twelve feet. When picked up he was unconscious and was immediately seen by Dr Bean, surgeon, who ordered his removal to the Hospital, where he died a few days after admission. Mr W. L. Woollcombe, house surgeon at the above named Institution, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death was due to haemorrhage of the brain, caused by the fall. The Jury, of whom Mr T. May was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 October 1889 EXETER HEAVITREE - At an Inquest held at Whipton, near Exeter yesterday afternoon, the evidence shewed that GEORGE WILLIAM CHIPLING, aged five years, was kicked by a horse at work in a field on Saturday, and it was thought that deceased must have first knocked the horse, as it was said to be free from vice. The little fellow had a stick in his hand at the time. He received the kick below the left temple and there was also a wound at the back of the ear. "Accidental Death" was the verdict of the Jury.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 2 October 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of A Naval Lieutenant At Devonport. Sad End Through Drink. - The Borough Coroner for Devonport (Mr J. Vaughan) presided over an Inquest held at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening touching the death of a naval lieutenant named FRANCIS E. J. TOTTENHAM (late the navigating officer of H.M.S. Curlew), who committed suicide on the previous day by jumping through one of the Hospital windows and falling a distance of about sixty feet to the ground. The first witness called was George Neck, boots at Thomas's Hotel, Fore-street, Devonport, who stated that the deceased came to the Hotel on the 19th ult. For the first eight days of his stay there he appeared to be all right, and was moderate in his drinking habits. At 11 p.m. on Friday he rang his bell, which witness answered. The door of the officer's room was locked, and he would not open it. Witness remained outside a few minutes, and afterwards deceased requested to speak to Mrs Parker, the proprietress. Witness saw Mrs Parker about it, and on returning to deceased's room he met MR TOTTENHAM, who was dressed and ready to go out. He told Mrs Parker that someone had been looking into his window and he had two loaded revolvers ready to protect himself. He, however, shortly afterwards returned to his room. - The Coroner questioned witness as to the state of the deceased at the time, and after some hesitation he replied that he had no doubt that the man was suffering from delirium tremens. Witness, continuing, said that two naval doctors who were in the house went to MR TOTTENHAM'S room and talked to him with a view to pacifying him. By their direction witness procured a sleeping draught and the revolvers were subsequently taken away. The deceased's door was then locked on the outside and he was left by himself. Witness called to see him at half-past eight the next morning when he appeared much better, but he had an idea that he was under arrest. He had breakfast about eleven o'clock and came downstairs. Some time afterwards he returned to his room, packed up his things, and asked to be taken to the Royal Albert Hospital. Witness, with Dr Berry, accompanied him there. - In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that on the previous evening Mrs Parker said in his hearing that the deceased did not drink excessively except on one day. - The Coroner then stated that a brother officer of the deceased called upon him on the previous evening and said that deceased had been tried by court-martial about twelve months ago and was then dismissed his ship. since that time he had been a teetotaler. - James Carter Smith, the house surgeon, deposed that the deceased was admitted to the Hospital on Saturday afternoon suffering from delirium tremens. On Sunday morning deceased told him that previous to Thursday last he had been drinking very heavily. He had not a particularly bad attack, but on Sunday night he commenced to get troublesome, and at times was very excitable. About seven o'clock on Monday morning he walked part way downstairs in his nightshirt. The nurses were trying to stop him, when witness came on the scene, and, after struggling with him for a moment, persuaded him to go back to his bed, which he died. - The Coroner: Did you not think he ought to have been at the Naval Hospital? - Witness replied that when he found MR TOTTENHAM was getting so troublesome he thought the Naval Hospital would be the best place for him. He thereupon spoke to the deceased about it, but he did not seem to care whether he went there or not. On Monday morning witness sent a message to the Naval Hospital for arrangements to be made for his removal. However, about eleven o'clock that morning he was called to see deceased, who he found lying in the operating theatre suffering from a compound fracture of both thighs and also of the skull. Deceased expired about three-quarters of an hour afterwards. He had no doubt that it was through delirium tremens that he was led to jump out of the window. - Esther Maddigan, nurse at the Hospital, stated that she had had charge of the deceased from Saturday. About nine o'clock on Monday morning she went on duty and saw the deceased asleep in bed. When he awoke he asked for warm water, which she gave him. he got out of bed and washed himself and went back again quietly. He then asked for some breakfast and for about twenty minutes only after that time he was quiet. He got out of bed and tried to open the door. She held him back for some time and rang the bell. He got the door open and went down the first flight of stairs, where he met another nurse and knocked her down. Other nurses came to her assistance and Dr Smith afterwards prevailed on him to return to his room. He again got out of bed about eleven o'clock, when witness was standing near the door. She spoke to him, but saw by his determined look that he meant mischief. She rang the bell, opened the door and called for help, and whilst she was doing this she heard the glass smash. On turning round she saw that he had disappeared. Mr Green, assistant surgeon, came to her assistance, and she told him that deceased had gone through the window, but she could hardly realise that such a big man could do such a thing in so short a time. The windows had been screwed down on Saturday, but he broke one with his fist on that day. - William Coombes, carpenter, said he was at work in the Hospital ground about eleven o'clock, and suddenly heard a breaking of glass, which appeared to be overhead. He ran a few steps out of the way of the falling glass and on looking up to the third storey saw a white object, which he could not make out, falling to the ground. He went towards it and saw that it was a man undressed. He assisted in removing him into the Hospital on a stretcher. - The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said he thought it was quite clear that the deceased had been suffering from delirium tremens, which caused him to go through the window. Whether he first broke the pane of glass and got out bodily no one would ever be able to tell. It was, therefore, quite clear how death was occasioned, because at the time he was under various hallucinations and was not in his right mind. However, it was a most lamentable thing that he had brought about his death himself through the drink. It was terrible to see as much injury and crime occasioned through drink. It was a curse to the English nation to see spent on this evil money which really should be devoted to making the home bright and happy, instead of which there was nothing but misery. He wished that such misery could be avoided. - Some of the Jury expressed an opinion that a man should have been in the room in charge of the deceased. - The Coroner said it was his opinion that a man should have been present in the room, but under the circumstances the same thing might have happened, because no one had the slightest idea that he was going out of the window. - The Jury returned a verdict that death was caused by Throwing himself out of the Window, whilst in a state of Unsound Mind and suffering from Delirium Tremens.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 3 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - Death From Excessive Drinking. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening, touching the death of GEORGE ARMSTRONG, aged thirty-eight years, and an ostler. John Crocker, a licensed victualler, residing at the Royal Hotel Tap, Plymouth, stated that deceased had been in his employ for seven months as under-ostler. About three o'clock on Sunday afternoon witness saw deceased walking up the yard behaving in a very strange manner. He took hold of him but was obliged to let him fall as he had a fit. Dr Whipple's assistant, who arrived shortly afterwards, ordered his removal to the Hospital. Deceased had been a hard drinker but had always attended to his duties. Mr W. E. Woolcombe, house surgeon, deposed that deceased was suffering from the effects of drink and up to Monday he remained unconscious. After passing through a raving delirium he died on Tuesday afternoon. Witness had made a post-mortem examination on the body and from it he judged that deceased died from failure of the heart's action accelerated by alcoholic poisoning. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Martin was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 4 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon before Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of JOHAN WILHELM DAHL, aged fifty four, and a Russian sailor, who died on board the barque Olga, of Aland, Finland, while the vessel was off Scilly on the 30th September. Mr F. Smith represented Mr W. Luscombe, Russian Vice-Consul. August Froberg, master of the Olga, deposed that deceased was taken ill about three weeks before his death. He suffered from diarrhoea, and received simple medical treatment, but gradually sank and died on the above date. The Jury (of whom Mr H. Smith was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

ILFRACOMBE - Dr Slade King held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel, Ilfracombe, yesterday afternoon relative to the death of RICHARD KIFT. Evidence was given by the deceased's son, GEORGE RICHARD KIFT, and a carrier named Creek, that the deceased was quarrying stones in Francis Quarry, Ilfracombe, on Wednesday, when a large stone fell on him and knocked him from where he was standing to a distance of ten feet. Dr J. T. Gardner described the injuries to the man's right leg, which necessitated the amputation of the limb. KIFT died about an hour after the operation from shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the fees of the Jury were given to the widow.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 5 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at the Lord Clarendon Inn, Henry-street, last evening, before Mr A. S. Clark (Borough Coroner) touching the death of BEATRICE TUCKER, aged eleven months, who died somewhat suddenly at three o'clock that morning. It appeared from the evidence that the child was taken ill about eleven o'clock on the previous night, apparently suffering from convulsions. A doctor was sent for about twelve o'clock, but it was three o'clock before the child was seen by a medical gentleman. Mr Bean, surgeon, deposed that he saw the child about three o'clock, and it died shortly afterwards. He had made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death took place from acute bronchitis. The Jury (of which Mr A. Adams was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 8 October 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - An Inquiry was held at the New Crown Hotel, Devonport, last evening, by the County Borough Coroner (Mr Vaughan) respecting the demise of an infant named ERNEST LINES, aged two years, and who died suddenly early on the same morning. - ELLEN LINES, mother of the deceased, residing at No. 6 Cumberland-street, said her child had been in apparently good health up to within a few hours of his death. Early on Sunday evening, however, it commenced to vomit and a few hours after it expired whilst convulsive. Mr Rolstone, surgeon, said he had made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that death was due to convulsions, the result of his rickety condition. The Jury, of whom Mr Ball was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 9 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by the County Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) yesterday at The Spread Eagle Inn, Plymouth, touching the death of HENRY SIMMONS, aged fifty-eight years, who died on Monday. Mary Goss, residing at 3 Norley-street, said the deceased was her uncle, and on Saturday evening, the 27th ultimo, whilst picking up some coals in the coal-house, a piece got under one of his finger nails and poisoned he finger. Mr Square, surgeon, said he attended to the deceased a few days after the accident, and he was of opinion that death was due to tetanus. - The Jury, of whom Mr Damerell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - At the adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN TUCKER (who was drowned on the occasion of the Ilfracombe Regatta on August 21st), before Dr Slade King, on Monday evening, a verdict of "Death by Misadventure" was returned. The evidence of Captain William Sanders, of the pilot boat No. 9 (which collided with the mark boat in which deceased was), went to show that the mark boat Thetis drifted from her position, otherwise the collision would not have taken place. He and his crew did all they could to save the deceased and his brother, and succeeded in rescuing the latter. Another Cardiff pilot, Mr Lewis Jones, stated that the 21st August was a dangerous day for mark boats to be out. The fees of the Jury were given to the Tyrrell Cottage Hospital.

EXETER - Fatal Lamp Accident To a Lady At Exeter. - Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at No. 22 St. David's-hill, Exeter, yesterday, on the body of ANNE DACIE, who died from the effects of burns received on Sunday evening last. CAPTAIN DACIE identified the body, and said that his wife was in the habit of reading in bed. She retired to rest on Sunday evening and some time afterwards he heard a scream. On proceeding to his wife's bedroom he found her on the floor with a shawl that she wore over her shoulders in flames. His son extinguished the flames and sent for Drs. Moore and Hawkings. The deceased died on Monday night. CHARLES DACIE, a son of the deceased corroborated. Dr Moore attributed death to shock to the system. The Jury, of whom Mr Brown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 October 1889 PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Singular Death At Ridgway. - Some remarkable disclosures were made yesterday at an Inquest conducted by Mr Coroner Rodd at Ridgway, concerning the death of MARTHA GRACE MONK, aged twenty-seven, wife of a naval stoker serving on board her Majesty's ship Swiftsure, and her infant son. - Cordelia Newman, landlady of the Devonshire Inn, Ridgway, stated that the deceased woman whom she had known for six months, took an unfurnished room at her house about a fortnight ago. On 1st inst. she went into occupation. She was then very poorly, but witness had no idea she was expecting to be confined. Her sister attended to her. On Sunday morning at half-past nine o'clock she was very ill and weak and her mother was sent form. - Eleanor Andrews, mother of the deceased, deposed to seeing her daughter about ten o'clock on Sunday morning. She at once sent for a doctor, but deceased died just after his arrival. Her daughter's husband had been at sea about sixteen months. Previous to Sunday she had not seen her for seven weeks, having been away from home. - Clara Reynolds, wife of a watchmaker, Plympton, said deceased stayed at her house the two months previous to her removal to the Devonshire Inn. MRS MONK nursed her during the first month and assisted her in the household duties in the second. During the last week of her stay with her, deceased was ill in bed three days. She complained very much of sickness and witness several times advised her to have a doctor, but she refused. Amy Shepheard, who assisted in laying-out the deceased, deposed to finding the body of a newly-born male child wrapped in a print dress in a box in her room. - Messrs. Stamp and Stevens, surgeons, who made a post-mortem examination of both bodies, stated that the deceased woman had been confined within a week. Both her lungs were diseased and they attributed her death to Bright's Disease, aggravated by the exhaustion of her recent confinement. The child had never had a separate existence. The Jury found that the child was the still-born son of MARTHA MONK, and that the mother died from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 October 1889 DARTINGTON - At the Inquest at Dartington, on the body of JOHN COLE TUCKER, late innkeeper, Morley, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - MARIA JANE WHEAR, 54, died on Tuesday last at 4 Wyndham-cottages, Plymouth, and at an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday, Mr Keily, surgeon, attributed death to a painful internal disorder from which she had suffered for many years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 14 October 1889 BARNSTAPLE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Barnstaple on Saturday on the body of FRANCIS SNOOK, aged 67, who recently fell while at the Queen's Hotel and fractured his thigh. Deceased was a very clever sign-painter.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 15 October 1889 EXETER - The Injudicious Feeding Of Infants. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police-court yesterday on the body of BEATRICE VIOLET EVANS, aged five weeks, who died suddenly on Sunday last. In the course of her evidence the mother said that Dr Bull was sent for, but he refused to attend the child not being a parish case. After some delay Dr Perkins arrived and found the child, who was taken with convulsions, dead. She had fed it on bread and milk. The Coroner commented on this, and thought it a very improper thing to do. Dr Perkins said the child died from convulsions. He strongly disapproved of children of such tender years having food of that indigestible nature. Children under five months ought to have milk. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark Coroner, held an Inquest at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, King-street, yesterday, relative to the death of GEORGE H. PERCY, naval pensioner, forty-four years of age, and who died suddenly at the same inn on the previous day. - JOHN PERCY, father of deceased, identified the body. Witness said that on account of deceased's intemperate habits he had not seen him for about four months. James Davis, warehouseman, residing at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, deposed that at about one o'clock on Sunday afternoon he, in company with another man, was with the deceased in the bar parlour. After having some drink, deceased went into the court, and witness went into the kitchen. On coming out he saw PERCY standing over a bucket, with blood flowing freely from his mouth. Witness went for Dr Bean, who arrived a few minutes after PERCY'S death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The cause of death of MARY BAKER, aged sixty-three, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening. Mr J. Back was chosen Foreman of the Jury. GEORGE BAKER, rag and bone dealer, residing at 18 High-street, identified the body as that of his wife. About a quarter past ten on Sunday night he was called by a neighbour, Emma Bickle, to come from his room upstairs to his wife, who was unwell at the foot of the stairs. He fetched Mr Cuming, who pronounced life to be extinct. His wife had frequently complained of being unwell and was suffering from a tumour in the lower part of her stomach. Emma Bickle, 19 High-street, corroborated. Dr C. Cuming said he considered that apoplexy was the probable cause of death, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes - Apoplexy" was therefore returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 October 1889 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - An Allegation Against An Exeter Institution. Inquest At Moreton. - Mr Sydney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Moretonhampstead on Monday evening on the body of HARRIET WOTTON, aged 61. Mr G. Satterley was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - Eliza Ford, widow, residing at Court-street, stated that deceased was her sister, and had been living with her for three years. About two months ago, as she had cataract in both eyes, she went to Exeter Eye Infirmary. On Friday night she was brought home, no notice having been sent that she was coming. When taken out of the van she did not speak or recognise her, but seemed to be in pain as she groaned several times. She died at eight o'clock the next morning, never having regained consciousness. - JANE WOTTON, of James-street, Exeter, who said deceased was her husband's aunt, spoke of having seen her at the Eye Infirmary several times before and after she underwent an operation for cataract. On Friday the porter of the Infirmary brought her a message from the doctor that deceased must be taken home as she would get on better in her own air. Going to the Infirmary at half-past three, a nurse brought the deceased down, and witness took her in a cab to the Oat Sheaf, where Parker, the Moreton carrier, puts up. They knew at the Infirmary she was going home by the carrier. Witness gave her brandy at the Oat Sheaf, and handed Miss Parker some in a bottle for her on the journey. It was nearly six o'clock when the carrier left. She did not think deceased too unwell to travel. - Selina Parker, sister of the carrier, said deceased was sensible, but only spoke when spoken to. During the journey she had a drink of the brandy four or five times - the last time three miles from Moreton - and witness's mother also gave her tea in the van. It was a covered van with an open front and it was not cold Moreton was reached about 11 o'clock. Mrs Ford, deceased's sister, had gone to bed, not knowing deceased was coming home. Deceased spoke to her before Mrs Ford came. Mr Down carried her home. At Exeter deceased was lifted into the van, not being able to get in herself, and she sat in the same position all the way home. Mr G. N. Collyns, surgeon, deposed that when he was called to deceased just before midnight, she was in a state of collapse. She was perfectly cold, hand and foot. Brandy and Liebig's extract were administered and she was placed in a warm bed, but she never recovered. A post-mortem examination shewed that congestion of the lungs was the cause of death. The body was highly emaciated, there being no fat whatever about it. An operation had been unsuccessfully performed upon one eye, the other had not been operated upon. In his opinion deceased was not in a fit state to leave the Infirmary, and a great want of judgment was shewn in discharging her. At the request of the Jury the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until Friday that evidence might be given by those responsible for the discharge of the deceased from the Eye Infirmary.

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - JOHN LARK, 50, was yesterday morning found dead in the forage store of the Mineral Water Manufactory, George-lane, Plymouth. At an Inquest held last evening by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr Bean, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was due to rupture of an aneurism and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 18 October 1889 MODBURY - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at Modbury yesterday, respecting the death of MARK LEGASSICK, aged nine weeks, and who died somewhat suddenly on Wednesday. Mr W. Froude Langworthy, surgeon, made a post mortem examination, and was of opinion that the child died from pneumonia. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 October 1889 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - The Charge Against An Exeter Institution. Inquest At Moretonhampstead. - The adjourned inquest on the body of HARRIET WOOTON, 62, who died soon after arriving home from the West of England Eye Infirmary, Exeter, was resumed at Moretonhampstead yesterday. Alice Haynes, nurse at the Infirmary, said deceased was admitted on 16th August. As she was in a weak state of health, the operation for cataract was not performed until September 27th. After the operation she remained in bed eight days. On Thursday week she was sick, but slept soundly at night. She had tea and toast for breakfast and dressed with assistance. Dr Tosswell saw her afterwards and was told about the sickness. He said she would be better now in her own air, and could come again to have the operation on the other eye performed. He suggested that she should stay with her friends in Exeter a few days, but she said she wished to go home. The doctor advised her to travel by train, but she expressed her preference for the carrier. At one o'clock she had soup and an apple dumpling. She also ate two spoonsful of tapioca and drank half a pint of milk with an ounce of brandy in it. Witness led her down the steps as she could not see, and placed her in a cab. There was nothing to indicate that she was unfit to make the journey. She complained of no pain or illness. She had been down six days before she was discharged. - L. H. Tosswell, surgeon, said he operated on deceased for double cataract. Although she was feeble she wished the operation performed, because, even if unsuccessful, she would get a pension, but would not get it without an operation. The operation was successful, although Dr Collyns was reported to have said it was not. As she had a gathering on her finger and had been sick, he thought the Hospital air did not agree with her, and that she would be better home. There was no cough or anything to indicate more than her usual feebleness. With regard to Dr Collyns's statement that the first stage of inflammation of the lungs had been reached, and that a great want of judgment had been shewn in discharging her in such a condition, Dr Collyns might know that congestion may come on suddenly. Against Dr Collyns's statements he protested as calculated to do the Institution harm. The Jury, of whom Mr Satterley was Foreman, quickly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," attributing blame to no-one.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 October 1889 TOTNES - Fatal Rabbiting Accident At Cornworthy. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Totnes Union Workhouse by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of JOHN OULD, 66 years old, lately living at Cornworthy. Deceased was on September 30th out rabbiting in Cornworthy, and getting over a hedge, caught hold of a stick to let himself down. The stick gave way and he fell forward, his head pitching on a stone, causing a severe wound. He was, however, able to walk to his home and a few days afterwards was seen by Dr Hains, who recommended him to come to the Workhouse as he had no one to look after him, his wife being away from home nursing. On 7th inst. he came into the Workhouse, the wound then being in a very bad state. He, however, made very little of it, and was seen by Dr Hains several times, and appeared to be getting better; but about the middle of last week he got much worse, and died on Saturday evening. After hearing the evidence of Lamble, who was with deceased at the time of the accident; his son-in-law, named Lang, and Dr Hains, who said the injuries to the head were of an internal nature, the Jury, of whom Mr J. F. Ellis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 October 1889 BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - MARIA TINNEY, aged 56, wife of an agricultural labourer at Buckland Monachorum, on Monday afternoon fell down dead. Mr Liddell, surgeon, Horrabridge, by order of Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, made a post-mortem examination, and at the Inquest yesterday he said death was due to fatty degeneration of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

ST PANCRAS, LONDON - At St. Pancras yesterday an Inquest was held touching the death of JAMES DRAKE, aged 84 years, retired farmer, formerly of Doddiscombsleigh, near Exeter. Deceased, a remarkably healthy man for his age, resided with his married daughter, Mrs Diggens, of 2 Eton-street, Primrose-hill, and on Friday morning last was discovered lying injured and unconscious in the area at the back of the house, having apparently fallen out of his bedroom window - a distance of twelve feet. Deceased expired in the evening. When discovered deceased was very cold and had evidently lain in the area some hours. The bedroom window was open and the deceased's bed was beside it. He might easily have fallen out. Mrs Diggens said her father had lately been wandering in his mind and fancied he was in his old farm in Devonshire again. She thought that whilst under this hallucination he might have opened the window and fallen out. There was not the slightest reason to suspect him of an intention to commit suicide. He was happy and cheerful. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 October 1889 PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM ARTHUR DRAKE, aged 52 years, 4 Regent-street, Plymouth, died on Thursday night from inflammation of the lungs. He complained of pain and shivering in the morning and at six o'clock unexpectedly died. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last night and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 28 October 1889 TAVISTOCK - Fatal Dynamite Explosion. - A shocking fatality occurred on Saturday morning on the works of the Plymouth, Devonport and South Western Junction Railway at Hocklake, near Tavistock. It appears that shortly after nine o'clock the men who were working about fifty yards from the bridge at Hocklake were alarmed by a terrific explosion, followed by such a dense cloud of smoke that it was impossible for some minutes to ascertain what had occurred. When the smoke had cleared away Samuel Endicott, a navvy, who was the first to reach the spot, found that WILLIAM SPRING, the man in charge of the dynamite, had been literally blown to pieces as the result of the explosion, and the remains charred and burnt almost beyond recognition. They were taken to the mortuary at the Tavistock Cemetery, and it was found necessary to hold an Inquest at once, so as to obtain an order for burial as soon as possible. Mr Coroner Rodd therefore opened an Inquiry on Saturday evening at the Duke of York Inn at Tavistock. Mr John Davy was Foreman of the Jury. - The Coroner explained that he understood from Dr Brodrick that the body of the deceased was in a frightful condition and would require immediate interment. He had come over at once to take the necessary preliminary steps, but it would be his duty to report the case to the Home Secretary, who would, if he thought proper, direct an Inspector to attend the Inquiry. It was necessary to give the Home Secretary four days' notice and the Inquest would therefore have to be adjourned for that purpose. After the Jury had viewed the body the following evidence was taken. - Samuel Endicott said he was a miner working in the same gang as WILLIAM SPRING in the Hocklake cutting. The deceased was about forty years of age and he had known him about four months through their working together. He last saw him alive between twenty and thirty minutes after nine o'clock on Saturday morning. The deceased, whose duty it was, came and charged a hole for the witness with dynamite. The hole exploded all right and the deceased then left him and returned towards the bridge. He thought SPRING was an experienced man in the use of the explosive, and was in charge of the dynamite, which was kept in a box under the bridge. The deceased was a smoking man, but very steady, and the witness did not see him smoking that morning, and could not say if there were any rules prohibiting the deceased smoking in his work. Endicott heard the explosion and when the smoke had cleared he found the deceased shattered as seen by the Jury. He was the first man who went to the spot and there was no one near the deceased when the explosion took place. The witness could not account for the explosion, but there was no doubt that it killed the deceased. The Foreman said there were two or three questions he should like to ask at the proper time. The Jury having expressed themselves satisfied as to the identification of the body, the Coroner gave the necessary order for burial, and adjourned the Inquiry until Saturday afternoon next at half-past two o'clock.

TIVERTON - Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Infirmary, Tiverton, on Saturday afternoon, concerning the death of JAMES CAPE, whose body was found mutilated on the railway near Tiverton early on Friday morning. Evidence was taken from William Redwood (who discovered the body), Police-Sergeant Perry, Ashman, a packer (who helped to take the body to the Infirmary_, and C. Haynes, the engine driver, who deposed to the facts published on Saturday. The Jury returned an Open Verdict, there being nothing to show how or for what purpose deceased came to be on the railway track.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - At the London Spirit Vaults on Saturday the Borough Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD SMALE, aged sixty-six years, and who died suddenly on Friday at his residence, 11 Princes-street. The evidence of Mr J. Wilson, surgeon, showed that deceased's heart was in a weak state, and that he had been suffering from chronic bronchitis, etc. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 October 1889 OTTERY ST MARY - PAMELA, wife of CHARLES SQUIRES, licensed hawker, of Yonder-street, Ottery St. Mary, appeared to be in her usual good health on Friday. After eating a hearty dinner she complained of being unwell, went to bed, gradually grew worse and died before medical aid could be obtained. Drs. Gray and Reynolds, having made a post-mortem examination, stated at the Inquest on Saturday that death was due to Syncope, and the Jury, of whom Mr C. Lewis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 29 October 1889 EXETER - The Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY GIGG, a railway platelayer of Ottery St. Mary. Deceased, a married man, 52 years of age, whilst at work at Sidmouth junction on Friday, was attending upon a truck pulling about sleepers with a pickaxe, when the pick came out and he fell back over the truck to the ground, a distance of eight feet. In his fall he broke the fifth cervical vertebra, and death took place on Saturday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

EXETER - An Inquiry touching the circumstances attending the death of an infant, aged fifteen months, named ELLEN JANE OSBORNE, daughter of an ironmoulder, of 21 Friar's Walk, Exeter. On Saturday afternoon the child was taken with a fit and died before medical help arrived. Mr Harrison, surgeon, said that death was due to convulsions, following teething and bronchitis, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this evidence.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Borough Coroner (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest yesterday respecting the death of RICHARD BOUNSALL, aged sixty-eight, a boot closer, who died suddenly on SAturday night outside the London Spirit Vaults, Princes-street. P.C. Vanstone stated that he met the deceased in Marlborough-street on Saturday evening and deceased pointed out two scars on his face, saying his daughter had been knocking him about cruelly and had turned him out of doors because he had been unable to get work. Witness advised him to go to the Workhouse. The daughter of the deceased being called said she had lived with her father and mother ever since the death of her husband, which occurred thirteen years ago and denied that she had ever ill-used deceased. A post-mortem examination was made by Mr James Wilson, surgeon, who was of opinion that the abrasions on the face were of recent occurrence and as a result of his examination he had found the heart fatty and there were traces of valvular disease. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned and the Jury exonerated the daughter from all blame.

BARNSTAPLE - Boy Killed At Barnstaple. - Yesterday a terrible accident occurred to a boy named ARTHUR HAYWARD, working at Messrs. Shapland and Petter's Bridge Wharf Cabinet Works, Barnstaple. The boy was engaged in going up and down a lift carrying materials from one landing to another. His head by some means became jammed between the floor of the lift and the floor of one of the upper rooms as the lift was ascending. The result was his head was literally smashed and he was killed instantaneously. The Inquest was opened last night at the North Devon Infirmary before the Borough Coroner (Mr R. J. Bencraft). Formal evidence was taken as to the nature of the accident and the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until Thursday for the purpose of communicating with the inspector of factories (Mr Bignell). The Coroner and Jury then went to the works and visited the scene of the accident. The boy had only been at the works for a week.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 1 November 1889 DITTISHAM - An Inquiry was held at the Passage House Inn, Dittisham, yesterday, by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, into the circumstances touching the death of JANE WILLS FERRIS, aged sixty-three, who died at that village on Tuesday from burns received on the previous evening. Evidence given showed that the deceased had been paralysed for the past eighteen months and on Monday morning was placed in her chair by the side of the fire. In the afternoon deceased was found enveloped in flames. With assistance these were extinguished, but she died next morning. Dr Crossfield, who attended her, said the burns were merely superficial ones, and deceased must have died from the shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Killed In A Hoist At Barnstaple. - An adjourned Inquest was held yesterday at Barnstaple on the body of a boy named ARTHUR HAYWARD, aged fourteen, who lost his life in a shocking manner on Monday last by having his head crushed between the bottom of a hoist and the flooring of a landing room at Messrs. Shapland and Petter's Cabinet Factory in that town. Mr Incledon Bencraft was the Coroner, and Mr Bignell, one of the inspectors of factories, was present. The additional evidence taken was to the effect that the deceased was engaged in working a hoist at the factory which went up and down from one floor to another with material. On the morning in question the deceased was seen lying down on the hoist with his head and arms hanging out over. A man called to him, but the lad did not move and the lift was stopped, when it was found that the boy was killed, his head having been mutilated by being caught between the floors. The boy had been employed at the work a week, and had had full instructions as to how to work the lift. The Inspector said he had never before seen a boy working a lift. It was undoubtedly the work of a man. Mr W. R. Shapland, who was present, stated his intention, on the advice of the Inspector, to put a man on the work in future instead of a boy. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - EDWARD COUCH, a wagoner, aged 52, died in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday. On Tuesday whilst fetching hay in a loft in Willow Plot he fell nine feet, fracturing his skull badly. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday afternoon, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 4 November 1889 TAVISTOCK - Dynamite Explosion At Tavistock. The Dangers Of Thawing. - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, assisted by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an adjourned Inquest on Saturday at Tavistock, on the body of WILLIAM SPRING, aged 40, a fireman employed on the new railway at Hocklake cutting, who was blown to pieces by an explosion of dynamite on Saturday October 26th. Mr J. Davey was Foreman of the Jury. Mr J. Pethick (Relf and Pethick), one of the contractors; Mr H. Marten, one of the engineers; and Mr Superintendent Mitchell, inspector of explosives for the district, were present. - The Coroner stated that having reported the occurrence to the Secretary of State, he had been told that it was not thought necessary to send down an inspector of explosives. - Dr C. C. Brodrick said deceased's body was disembowelled, and the head and both legs and arms were blown off. The greatest amount of injury was received to the head, very little of which was left. - Samuel Endacott, a tunnel miner, said on the morning of the accident deceased fired a hole for him. Witness cleared the hole and deceased placed in it twelve dynamite pills. The hole exploded all right. Did not see deceased again until he found him dead immediately after the explosion. Seven or eight pieces of paper in which dynamite had been wrapped were lying about. Each piece of paper would represent a charge of dynamite. By Superintendent Mitchell: One side of the ammunition box was blown out. Inside the box there were two barrels, each containing one cwt. of powder. - By Mr Pethick: Deceased was the only man besides Frost who had access to the powder and dynamite. No one but SPRING charged holes. - Moses Frost, ganger in charge of the Hocklake cutting, said deceased was fireman at Broadwell cutting for about three months, and for two or three months had acted in that capacity at Hocklake cutting. He was a competent fireman, and witness never had a better. At the time of the explosion witness was about 300 yards away. On reaching the spot he could see nothing to account for the accident. A wooden barrel was about three-parts filled with hot water taken from the engine. Deceased had been throwing dynamite in a tin vessel suspended in the barrel from a stick placed across the top of the barrel. The only means they had of judging of the temperature of the water was by putting their hands into it. Did not consider a thermometer was necessary. - The Coroner: How can you tell whether the temperature is 150 or 170 degrees by feeling the water with the hands? - Witness replied that he had never known any dynamite to go off while being thawed in the way described. Saturday was a cold day, and it was necessary to thaw the dynamite before using it. In the printed directions Nobel's warming apparatus was recommended for the purpose. Witness had used Nobel's apparatus on the Bury Dock works, and had never known an explosion to occur with it. The process of thawing could not have occasioned the explosion, because the dynamite which deceased had been thawing was still in the tin vessel, suspended in the barrel, after the explosion, and had not been affected by it, although but a few feet from the ammunition box. - The Deputy Coroner: Do you mean to say that the barrel and the vessel it contained were not blown up? - Witness: They were not. I shewed them to the Police superintendent. The barrel was about two yards from the ammunition box. The apparatus used for thawing dynamite was as safe as Nobel's. He could bear his hand in the water contained in the barrel which the deceased was using on the morning of the accident for thawing the dynamite. - The Superintendent: You do not necessarily thaw the dynamite because it is frozen, but because you can use it quicker by doing so? - Witness: We thaw it because it is not fit to use otherwise. - The Deputy Coroner: Do you think, with your experience, it was possible for such an explosion to take place, and the apparatus, only a few feet away, not to be interfered with in the least? - Witness: Yes. I am not come here to tell a lie. - By the Jury: Hot ashes were never used for drying the dynamite. Deceased put his own caps on the fuse and the fuse to the dynamite, and he might have had a mishap in doing so. - Sergeant Coles deposed that he saw the warming apparatus which it was stated deceased had used. Several pills of dynamite in the warmer had been broken, and the paper attached to them was singed. Frost told him the pills were picked up after the explosion. - Frost, recalled, said if he told Sergeant Coles the broken pills were picked up after the explosion it was a mistake. - Superintendent Mitchell stated that on Wednesday Frost point out to him the exact spot where the deceased was killed. It was not more than three feet from one end of the ammunition box. Witness was of opinion that deceased removed dynamite from the thawing apparatus and took it away some distance from the barrel, and that it was through the manipulation of the dynamite which the deceased took away that the explosion occurred. It might have been caused through the explosion of a detonator by striking it, stepping upon it, or improperly picking it, or a stone might have fallen on it. In his opinion the explosion was not due directly to the thawing. He did not condemn the apparatus. There was danger after the temperature had reached 150 degrees. If the temperature of the dynamite had got down to forty degrees, it would be necessary to thaw it to make it fit for use. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" adding that there was no evidence to shew how the explosion occurred.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 6 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at the Harwell Inn, Harwell-street, last evening, by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, concerning the circumstances attending the death of a child named FLORENCE LAMBLE, aged four years. The child was taken ill on Friday, having a slight cough, but as she was subject to fits of coughing, not much attention was paid to the matter. The deceased appeared to get all right, but on Monday morning a change in the condition of the child took place, and a doctor was at once sent for. Dr Eustace B. Thomson deposed that the child died ten minutes after he arrived. He had made a post-mortem examination, and was of opinion that death was the result of congestion of the lungs. The other organs of the body were healthy. The Jury, of whom Mr T. W. May was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sudden Death At Stonehouse. - The Deputy Coroner, (Mr R. R. Rodd, jun.) sat at the St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, last evening, with a Jury, to investigate the circumstances attendant upon the death of ALFRED COMERFORD, aged six and a half years, the child of Armourer-Sergeant F. H. COMERFORD, of the Plymouth Division R.M.L.I., residing at 62 East-street, Stonehouse. According to the evidence of the father, early on Saturday evening last the child, whilst partaking of tea, complained of feeling poorly. After sleeping a few minutes the little fellow vomited, and the mother gave him a herb mixture styled "Composition," which he afterwards threw up. During the night a small drop of brandy was administered to the deceased, and on Sunday morning he was attacked with diarrhoea. Port wine was then given him. On the Sunday evening the father consulted Mr Williams, chemist, of Union-street, Plymouth, who from the symptoms described to him, considered the child was suffering from a bilious attack, for which he prescribed a mixture, as well as milk and soda, both of which were given the child. Deceased on the Monday morning was even worse and Mr W. H. Waterfield, surgeon, was then sent for, but before his arrival the child died. At the Inquest last evening Mr Waterfield stated that the right lung and the stomach of the child, who appeared to have been very delicate, were both congested and that death was due to convulsions brought on by exhaustion, owing to severe diarrhoea. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 November 1889 EGG BUCKLAND - WILLIAM NORTHMORE, 62, gardener, of Egg Buckland, who had been ailing for some time, died suddenly on Saturday. An Inquest was held yesterday, and after hearing the evidence of Mr G. T. Aldous, surgeon, who stated that deceased had suffered from a rupture of long standing, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 7 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, Camden-street, as to the demise of a newly-born male child which was found dead that morning beside its mother. MARY ANNE BARWICK deposed that she was the mother of the child, which was fourteen days' old. About six o'clock that morning she awoke and found it dead by her side. Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, deposed that he made a post-mortem examination and was of opinion that the child had died from convulsions. The Jury (of which Mr William Rowe was Foreman) found that the child had died from Convulsions.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 November 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Singular Death At Devonport. - Last evening Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL HARDING, 53, labourer in the Dockyard. About three o'clock on Monday afternoon deceased, who worked in the washhouse at Keyham, was seen by Michael John Rahill, in charge of the drillers' store, tying a bundle of washed canvas, preparatory to its being placed on a shelf nine feet high. Rahill left the wash-house and a few minutes afterwards William John Lewry, constable in the metropolitan police, had his attention directed to the wash-house by a marine. He entered the building and found deceased lying flat on the stone floor, his face being partly turned towards the ground, one arm stretched out and the other under him. Blood was on the floor close to his mouth. A stretcher was procured and deceased was removed to the surgery, where a wound on the back of his head was dressed by Mr Woore, surgeon. It was stated in evidence that Mr Woore said deceased was suffering from an apoplectic fit. He was removed in a cab to his home, 13 Clarence-place, and Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, was called in. Deceased was then in an unconscious state. The wound was about an inch long and Mr Row treated him for concussion of the brain and effusion of blood, due, the doctor believed, to a fracture of the skull. Mr Row visited deceased twice a day until his death on Thursday evening. By the Coroner's direction he made a post-mortem examination and found a linear fracture about 2 ¾ inches long, which he considered must have been caused by a severe blow. From the position of the wound deceased must have fallen backwards and probably very suddenly, making no effort to save himself. Witnesses stated that there was a ladder in the wash-house, but the position in which deceased was lying was not consistent with his having fallen from the ladder. The Coroner thought deceased must have been seized with a fit, and, falling, sustained the fracture at the back of his head. The Jury returned a verdict to this effect. Mr J. P. Goldsmith appeared on behalf of the Admiralty.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 12 November 1889 IPPLEPEN - The Sudden Death At Dainton. - An Inquest was held at Dainton, near Ipplepen, yesterday by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of HARRIET BLACKLER, aged forty-nine, and who died suddenly on Friday evening. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 November 1889 ST BUDEAUX - Mother And Child Drowned At St. Budeaux. - MARY ELIZABETH LEE, aged 34, and ERNEST JAMES LEE, aged 4 ½, wife and eldest son of WILLIAM LEE, living at Longlee, St Budeaux, were found drowned on Sunday near their house, in an old quarry, in which water, to a depth of 8 feet had collected. The husband started after dinner for Honicknowle, and ERNEST and his brother FRANCIS, aged 2 years, were playing in the field round the quarry. About half-past two FRANCIS suddenly ran in crying "JIMMY'S in the water." The mother ran out and the boy, instead of going with her, ran off with his elder sister to Sunday-school. Neither mother nor boy returned, and about half-past four they were missed by Mrs Rundle, sister, and next door neighbour of MRS LEE. She suggested to William Metters, a labourer, that the boy might have fallen into the pond, as he often played near it. Metters ran with her to the quarry and saw the boy's body floating on the water. He pulled it out. A crowd had by this time assembled and a labourer named Thomas Herod, who tried to restore the boy, but found him dead, enquired about the mother, and seeing cakes baking in the oven, and work seemingly left half done, thought she might have tried to save her child and have fallen into the pond. With the assistance of P.C. Stentiford he dragged the quarry, and discovered the mother's body. Mr Paget Blake, surgeon, attended, but life was extinct. At an Inquiry held yesterday by Mr Coroner Rodd, Mr R. T. Meadows, surgeon, attributed death to drowning, and the Jury, of which Mr Potts was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 13 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - Sad Fatality At Plymouth. - An Inquest was last evening held at the Seymour Arms, Plymouth, by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, respecting the death of THOMAS HENRY SMITH, aged sixteen months, the infant child of HENRY SMITH, tinsmith, residing at 5 Seymour-place. It appeared that MRS SMITH left her child alone in the room whilst she went to work in another part of the house, but fearing it would go near the grate she previously took most of the fire out. Hearing cries from the child soon afterwards she rushed to the room and found the little fellow lying on the floor with its clothes in flames. Upon the fire being extinguished the child was seen to be dead. Mr Harper, surgeon, was at once called, and pronounced life to be extinct, the little fellow, who was burnt about the abdomen and chest, having died from shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY - The Suspicious Death At Torquay. - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry at the Torquay Police-station last evening relative to the decease of ANNE MARIA BLANK HALL, a young woman who died suddenly on Monday morning. The Coroner mentioned in his charge to the Jury that they were called together to investigate the case in consequence of certain rumours and circumstances which had been reported to him. It was a case requiring careful consideration. - Mr George Drake having been elected Foreman, the Jury left with the Coroner to view the body, and on their return Mr Heale (a Juryman) suggested that the witnesses should leave the Court, to which the Coroner consented. - MRS ELIZABETH BLANK HALL, of 3 Myrtle-row, Stentiford's-hill, wife of a fisherman, identified the body as that of her daughter, aged nineteen. She first noticed that deceased was ill on Wednesday. Deceased went upstairs, and witness, hearing her fall, went out and found her in the stairs, where she thought she must have slipped. She had been up to the Pyms' room, but witness did not think Mrs Pym was quite responsible for her actions. Harry Pym, her son, kept company with deceased, but witness could not tell what conversation they had had together. After the fall deceased vomited. Mrs Pym came down just after. The next morning deceased stumbled in getting up, and fell on the floor. She cried out and witness gave her some senna, and deceased did not leave the house, or eat anything for the day. She said she felt sick and giddy. On Friday morning she sent for Dr Cook, and later in the day she got a couple of anti-bilious pills from Mr Davies, chemist. The next morning her daughter felt better, but was still confined to the house. She ate nothing till SAturday and on Sunday vomited again. She sent to Dr Cook again, but he did not attend. Dr Gardner was then sent for and came. Deceased, witness and her husband and three younger children, with Mrs Pym, slept in the same room. In answer to the Coroner, witness said that on Monday evening she went to the Devon Arms, and left her husband asleep and deceased in company with Pym. Mrs Heath fetched her and on her return she found deceased, Pym and her husband sitting in the kitchen. She asked her daughter what was the matter and she replied "Nothing," saying she had not taken anything. Witness heard something about poison, and ran out of the house frightened. Before she went to the Devon Arms she heard Pym say he wanted to go out by himself and deceased said she wanted to go with him. She did not know of any quarrels in the house. Her husband passed her the poison in a jar on her return on the Monday evening, and she threw it away amongst the ashes. Pym was in the house upstairs at the time deceased fell over the stairs. She had not given deceased notice to quit, and the only quarrel they had was on Monday evening, when deceased was crying. The Pyms had since left the house. - Mr Percy Herbert Gardner, surgeon, said that on Sunday afternoon he was called to see deceased, whom he found in bed, there being no symptoms of disease except weak and rapid heart. He asked her if she had taken anything, and she replied "No." She seemed hysterical and said she had been frightened by her young man, the words being, "He said he would do a Jack the Ripper for me." He prescribed for her, and next morning heard she was dead. From what he heard he supposed she'd had a pericardium effusion. Deceased's mother told him there was no suspicion of any kind when they came for a certificate. He had made a post-mortem examination in accordance with the Coroner's orders. There were slight bruises about the face, and the eyes were slightly jaundiced. Internally there were haemorrhages in all the organs except the brain. The cause of death was acute fatty degeneration of the heart, liver and kidneys, undoubtedly the result of poisoning. There were signs of irritant poison in the stomach, and the haemorrhages of the other organs were due to that cause. The condition of the liver and other organs was typical of phosphorous poisoning. It was not the poison itself that killed, but the disease it produced. It was his decided opinion that death was due to poison. - By the Jury: If a doctor had been called within a short time of the taking of the poison something might have been done to save deceased. Mr Gardner added that Dr Cook had attended to his summons, but the wrong address had been given. - Mrs Ann Elizabeth Hall, wife of a fisherman residing in an adjoining house to deceased, said that on Monday of last week, when passing, she was called by Mrs Pym, and found deceased under the tap faint. There was no one else about and witness helped her in the passage. Pym and deceased's father came down from upstairs, and witness ran for MRS HALL. She saw something shining, brimstone, round deceased's mouth, and she thought she had taken something. She called the father's attention to it and left deceased in his charge. She saw deceased again on Tuesday and Sunday last. She did not refer to the brimstone because there was someone else present. WILLIAM HALL, father of deceased, corroborated. - Mr Gardner, recalled, said deceased was not enciente, and vomiting usually resulted from phosphorus poisoning at once. MRS HALL, recalled, said she did not know the rat poison was in the house. She did not tell the doctor out of regard for deceased. She was not aware that her daughter had threatened to take her life. She was insured, but could not tell for how long. - Henry Pym, fisherman, now residing at Ellacombe, said he had known deceased for a year. He had been keeping company with her. On Monday week he had a disturbance with his mother, but had no quarrel with deceased. He was called downstairs by Mrs Heath, and found deceased on her back in the passage. He asked her what she had taken, and she gave him a jar. Her face was covered with "fiery" stuff, and she cried, "Oh! Harry." He wiped the stuff from her face and after some time she got round again. He did not know where she got the stuff. He spoke to her next morning and told her not to do it again. He never persuaded her to take the stuff and could not tell what made her do it. He thought she was "flurried" because of him and the neighbours used to chaff her about his going with another girl. His mother said to him, "I'll bet you a shilling she has gone to eat some stuff." Deceased had said something to him about doing it. (The Coroner here asked if Mrs Pym could be called, but Detective Dart said he could not make anything of her, as she was under the impression that there was a warrant out for her.) - By the Jury: did you ever say to deceased, "I'll serve you like Jack the Ripper?" - Witness: No, never in my life. He never struck her and she never told him she was going to poison herself, though his mother told him deceased had threatened to do such a thing. He never dreamt she would have done it. He denied that he was at the top of the stairs when deceased fell over on the Wednesday. - P.C. Bond, who had charge of the case, said that when he went to the mother at first she denied that the girl had taken poison, but afterwards admitted it, and that she had thrown the jar away. He had seen Mrs Pym, who was mentally unable to appear, saying there were several warrants out against her and she would be executed. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that whilst the case was not properly complete without Mrs Pym's evidence, he did not think anything could be gained by adjoining. The Jury had carefully to consider the testimony before them. The doctor's evidence showed that the deceased died from phosphorous poisoning. The facts showed most extraordinary circumstances and it would be for the Jury to say whether the father and mother and Pym did not deserve to be severely censured. - The Jury considered the case for about ten minutes, when they returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased died from Self-administered Poison whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity," and added that they thought the father and mother and the young man, Pym, should be severely censured for not sending for a medical man before. - The Coroner said the censure was thoroughly deserved, and added that the Jury probably thought there was the most gross ignorance on the part of the three persons named, or they would probably have looked upon it in a different light - as a case of manslaughter. - The proceedings, which had been watched by P.S. Bright, then ended, having lasted three hours and a half.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 14 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held last evening at No. 3 North Hill-terrace, Plymouth, by the Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) touching the death of SARAH ANN ACKLAND, who died suddenly at her residence early the same morning. The deceased was discovered in bed about eight o'clock apparently dead, and Dr Eccles, on being called, pronounced life to be extinct. The immediate cause of death was apoplexy, and the Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 November 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict at an Inquest held at Devonport yesterday on the body of SAMUEL BAZLEY, 61 years of age, retired licensed victualler, Devonport. Deceased went to bed in his usual health on Tuesday night and the next morning was found dead in bed. A post-mortem examination by Mr Harrison, surgeon, shewed that deceased suffered from asthma and an enlarged heart.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 November 1889 EGG BUCKLAND - Suicide On The Railway At Plymouth. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest on the body of WM. MORRISH, naval pensioner, aged 53 years, killed on Tuesday night last on the Great Western Railway between Mutley and Laira. Deceased was separated from his wife at Plymouth fifteen years ago and lived at Bristol. He had always drunk heavily. A fortnight ago he came to Plymouth to see his daughter, MRS ELIZABETH TERRELL, living at 17 Claremont-street. On Monday night last he drank heavily and was not quite himself when the next morning he went out, in, however, good spirits, telling his daughter he should return to dinner. He did not return, and Wm. Tooker, a machine agent, who was walking on the railway bank just beyond Lipson Vale at a quarter past ten, saw a man's body lying on the down metals. He tried to move him, as a train was approaching, and then found that the body was headless. The neck was just on the rail and the man had evidently lain face downwards. The head was discovered between the rails. The remains were placed in a car on a siding to await the Inquest. In the man's pocket was a letter addressed to his daughter, saying, " When you get this I shall be in heaven I hope; but the Lord knows I cannot bear this any longer. " When he left his daughter's house he had money, but none was found on him. Mrs Terrell yesterday gave it as her opinion that her father was mad with drink. She thought he suffered from delirium tremens. the Jury, of whom Mr. H. Warren was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

NEWTON ABBOT - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Newton relative to the death of MR GEORGE HAWKSLEY, 30, formerly a draper in the north of England. Deceased came to Newton for the benefit of his health, having suffered from consumption for four years. On Wednesday evening haemorrhage of the lungs set in and death ensued in a very short time. Not having been attended medically in Newton, an Inquest was necessary. The Jury returned a verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 16 November 1889 EAST STONEHOUSE - At the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, Mr R. Rodd held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM DANIELL, leading stoker, aged 37, serving on board the Thames. Deceased was alive at half-past six on Thursday morning and he told Henry Wollacott, another stoker, that he would get breakfast ready at the usual time. Alfred Pope, who came back to the ship about a quarter of an hour before eight, found deceased in his hammock quite dead. Mr Macdonald, surgeon at the Hospital, who made a post-mortem examination by the Coroner's order, said deceased suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL- Alleged Inhuman Conduct At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital, into the cause of death of EDWARD ALBERT MUDGE, 45 years of age, of 15 Summerland-place Plymouth. Deceased, an armourer, working in the fitting-shop of the torpedo school at Keyham Dockyard, while on his way to work on Thursday morning, was taken ill, and died at the Royal Albert Hospital about four hours later. - John Wallen, in the employ of Mr Jonathan Marshall, of Plymouth, said he was driving a horse and cart to Keyham, and, at the top of Valletort-road, Stoke, he saw three or four persons around the deceased, who was lying on the footway against the wall, in which position he appeared to have fallen. Witness got out of his cart, and the men left. Another man, who was passing, he sent for a doctor, and in the meanwhile chafed deceased's hands and did all he could to restore animation. Mr G. T. Rolston, surgeon, who lives close by, came very quickly and ordered deceased to be immediately removed to the Hospital and superintended the work of placing him in witness's spring cart. Mr Gough, resident surgeon, said deceased, when admitted to the Hospital, was unconscious, and remained so until his death. Deceased was suffering from apoplexy and kidney disease. Purgatives were administered without effect. If a doctor had been on the spot when deceased was taken ill he did not think he would have been able to save deceased's life. Samuel Pomeroy, working for Mr G. Smith, of Stoke, corroborated Wallen's statement as to the circumstances under which deceased was found. Several men were passing on the way to the Dockyard. One man called deceased by name, and passed on without taking any more notice of him. - The witnesses considered deceased was treated worse than a dog. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Jury, of whom Mr Fyfe was Foreman, added a rider expressing the opinion that the men who passed deceased without rendering him assistance acted in an inhuman manner, and were deserving of great censure.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall on the body of JOHN SWEENEY, an army pensioner, aged 62 years, living at 4 Abbey-place. The deceased was taken with violent coughing on Friday afternoon and commenced vomiting blood and in about five minutes died. He had no friends or relations in the neighbourhood. The Jury, of whom Mr Murton was Foreman, brought in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 19 November 1889 IVYBRIDGE - Inquest At Ivybridge. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM GEORGE TOLCHARD, aged seven-seven, roadman in the employ of the Local Board. Mr W. H. Mackay was Foreman of the Jury. Mr Robert Baskerville said he found deceased in Fore-street on Saturday morning, lying on his left side. As he was insensible, witness secured assistance and took him home, where he died in about two minutes. Dr J. M. Randle said death resulted from Natural Causes, probably syncope. A verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence was given.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 November 1889 WHITCHURCH - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday opened an Inquest at the Whitchurch Inn, on the body of JOHN TOYE, aged 20, a miner of that parish, who was killed while working at Wheal Creber on the previous day. Mr J. W. Willcock was Foreman of the Jury. WILLIAM TOYE, deceased's brother, stated that they had worked together in the mine for about two years. Deceased was thoroughly up to his work and witness did not consider anyone was to blame for his death. Captain Holman, agent of the mine, said that up to four weeks ago the brothers were engaged in the part of the mine where the deceased lost his life. During the past month, however, they had been working in another part, and on Wednesday repaired to the scene of their former labours in order to procure, for scaffolding purposes, some planks which had been left there. They were taking out the last plank that they required, when a rock, supposed to have weighed between two and three tons, fell on deceased, nearly cutting off his head. The Coroner having stated that Mr Pinching, her Majesty's Inspector of Mines, would visit the scene of the fatality in a few days, the Inquiry was adjourned for a week.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 25 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, sat at the Guildhall on Saturday to Inquired into the death of a male infant. It appeared from the evidence of the father, WILLIAM GEORGE PYATT, a brushmaker, residing at 9a Artisan's Dwellings, Hoe-street, that on Thursday evening the child was taken with convulsions. It recovered somewhat, but continued to vomit all it took, and on Friday morning witness thought it advisable to send for medical aid. - Dr R. H. Wagner deposed that he had made a post-mortem examination on the body of deceased. He attributed death to congestion of the lungs accelerated by the absence of food in the stomach. The vomiting was due to the irritable state of the alimentary canal caused by the congestion. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned by the Jury.

PLYMOUTH - The body of a man lying in the mortuary was identified by Mrs E. Cove, residing in Friary Green, as that of her father, WILLIAM ABRAM SMITH, aged sixty-seven years. Deceased had resided with her and it was a customary habit with him to rise early of a morning. P.C. T. Sandry deposed that whilst on duty that morning in Exeter-street, about ten minutes to seven, he was informed that the body of a man was lying in the doorway of 115 Exeter-street. He went to the spot and subsequently removed the body to the mortuary. Dr C. E. Bean stated that he had held a post-mortem on deceased, and as a result of his examination he considered that death was due to heart disease. The Jury, of whom Mr H. S. Roberts was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 26 November 1889 BRIXHAM - Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Three Elms Inn on Saturday evening respecting the death of WILLIAM DART, aged three years, and who was killed by a timber waggon on Tuesday afternoon at Greenswood, Higher Brixham. WILLIAM DART, the father, having identified the body, a carrier named John Blagdon deposed that on Thursday, whilst delivering coals, he saw deceased following his coal cart. On reaching Greenswood witness took a bag of coals into a house, and as he did so he noticed that the child's toy cart had caught in the wheel of a passing timber waggon, which caused him to fall. In his opinion the deceased was killed by the hind wheel. - Mary Jane Batten and William Sitter, the driver of the waggon, gave corroborative evidence. Mr c. Green, surgeon, deposed that he was called on Thursday to examine the deceased. He found a compound fracture of the skull and other injuries. P.S. Potter having also given evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr W. Cann was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Stooks, owner of the waggon, gave the parents of the child a sovereign.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death At Devonport. - The Borough Coroner, (Mr J. Vaughan) held an Inquiry at the Clarence Hotel, Morice Town, last evening, relative to the death of JOHN DOBSON, master mariner, of Polruan, who died suddenly yesterday morning. George Cheshire, manager of the Homeward Bound, William-street, deposed that the deceased slept at the above place on Saturday night. He remained in bed all day on Sunday, as he felt unwell. Witness took some food to him, but he did not touch it. He thought deceased was very bad about seven o'clock yesterday morning and at half-past eight sent for a medical man, Dr Rae, who was very soon in attendance. A letter was found in one of the pockets, but the writing was almost illegible. The purport of it was to the effect that he was sorry he had been so much trouble to his family, and that his wife deserved a better husband. - MRS DOBSON, the wife, in her evidence, said her husband lost his berth about ten months since. He had been in a fishing boat as mate for some little time and left Polruan about a week since to come to Plymouth. Dr Rae stated that he was called at half-past eight to see the deceased. He was in a dying condition. Witness applied every remedy, but without success, and the deceased expired shortly after his arrival. The fluid in the stomach contained arsenic, which he considered accelerated death. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from "Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) held an Inquest last evening into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS EDGCUMBE PARSONS, who resided at 36 Torrington-terrace, Plymouth. The Inquiry was held at the residence of the deceased gentleman, and Mr J. Sole was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr J. J. E. Venning, solicitor, of Devonport, identified the body as that of his uncle. Deceased had formerly practised in Plymouth as a solicitor, and was seventy-five years of age. From the evidence of a boy named Thomas Searle it appears that about a month since he was drawing a handcart, at a running place, through Clifton-place, and on seeing the deceased about to cross the road he stopped, as also did the deceased. Both simultaneously started, and before the boy could pull up again the shaft of his cart came in contact with the gentleman's side, knocking him down in the road. A coachman named George Rowe lifted him from the ground and assisted to carry him into the house. - Dr W. J. Square, F.R.C.S., deposed that he had known the deceased for many years, and had noticed for several months previous to the accident that his mind was failing. Witness was summoned in haste on Monday, October 28th, and on reaching his residence found the deceased in an unconscious state. He had a blow on the left eyebrow, which had bled profusely and from that time, without thoroughly recovering consciousness, he gradually declined until he died on Saturday evening. The cause was senile brain decay accelerated by the accident, which caused concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly, attaching no blame to the boy.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 29 November 1889 WHITCHURCH - the Fatal Accident At Wheal Crebor Mine. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN TOYE, aged twenty, who was killed at Wheal Crebor Mine on the 20th inst., was held by the County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) at Whitchurch last evening. Mr Pinching, Government Inspector, was present. Mr Wilcocks was chosen Foreman. The evidence of WILLIAM TOYE, brother of the deceased, went to show that on the morning in question they were working in the 48-fathom level on tribute. Witness and deceased went to the place where they had worked some three weeks ago to get some planks. The deceased was in the act of passing the last board when the rock above fell over and crushed his head. If his head had been four inches lower he would not have been caught by the rock. - In reply to Mr Pinching, witness said when the accident happened he was knocking the planks off the rearing pieces, but the planks did not support anything. The effect of taking the boards away would not loosen the ground in any way, and when he was working in that spot three weeks ago he did not notice any unsafe ground. - Mr Pinching remarked that he had examined the place where the accident happened, and he was quite satisfied that the evidence given by the last witness agreed with his own impressions. The mine was very fairly timbered throughout. Dr Northey gave the result of his examination of the deceased after death. A portion of the skull on the left side of the head was crushed, laying the brain bare, which would cause immediate death. The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - At the Tandem Inn, Octagon-street, Plymouth, last evening, an Inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) touching the death of RICHARD JAMES GILL, aged thirty-three, who died at his residence 42 Rendle-street, on the previous day from blood poisoning. ELIZABETH ANN GILL identified the body of the deceased as that of her son, and said that three weeks ago he complained of having scratched his right hand with some glass. After a short time erysipelas set in and the deceased died on Wednesday evening. Dr M. D. Kelly deposed that he had attended the deceased down to the time of his demise and he was of opinion that death resulted from blood-poisoning. The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 November 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - JOHN MILWARD, aged 68, died rather suddenly at Devonport yesterday, and at the Inquest last evening the Jury were informed that Mr Row believed death was due to congestion of the lungs, and they found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." When Elizabeth Head called deceased in the morning he said he was feeling unwell and would stay in bed. Getting up about midday, he died before medical aid could be obtained.

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 November 1889 PLYMOUTH - JOHN HENRY ELLIS returning to his home, 12 Lower-street, Plymouth, on Thursday evening, found his mother, MARY ELLIS, a widow, about 40 years of age, lying on the bed in a fit, with several neighbours around her. He told them to let her go and she would come round again, as she always did. About half an hour afterwards as she was no better, he sent for Dr Cuming, who found she was dead. At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr Clark, Borough coroner, the son said he did not send for a doctor before as his mother was used to fits. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Pengelly was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 2 December 1889 PLYMOUTH - At the Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday evening an Inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, respecting the death of an infant named WILLIAM HENRY PARR, aged fifteen months, who died suddenly at No. 33 St. Andrew's-street, the same morning. MARY ANN PARR, mother of the deceased, said that early on the morning in question her child suddenly expired. Dr Cumming deposed that he was called by the daughter of the last witness to attend to the deceased, but when he arrived at the house he found that the child was dead. He attributed the cause of death to "Water on the Brain." The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 3 December 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday touching the death of MARY ANN CONGDON, of 7 Prospect-street, Plymouth. Mr W. Rowe was Foreman of the Jury. The deceased was about fifty-seven years of age, and had for some time been in delicate health, not having been out of doors for the past month. MR A. W. J. C. CONGDON, son of the deceased; Amelia Johnson, domestic servant; and John Wood, in whose house deceased resided, gave evidence and Dr Eccles, who was fetched by Mr Wood, but arrived too late to be of any assistance, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from chronic bronchitis. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Last evening an Inquest was held at the Pride of Devon, Cecil-street, Plymouth, on the body of CHARITY LASKEY ROWSE BASSETT, wife of GEORGE BASSETT, labourer, residing at 60 Cecil-street. Deceased was fifty-five years of age and was found dead in bed by a neighbour, Mrs Emma Chubb, who went into the house about half-past eight yesterday morning. Evidence was given by deceased's husband and also by Mrs Chubb showed that deceased suffered from heart disease and asthma, for which she had been formerly been under the doctor's care. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Percy was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

CREDITON - Mr Deputy Coroner Gould held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel, Crediton, on Saturday touching the death of EDWARD TOWNING, an engine driver in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company and who met with a fatal accident on Friday at Crediton Station. Inspector H. J. Foster attended to watch the case on behalf of the railway company. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TEIGNMOUTH - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Teignmouth Infirmary on the body of GEORGE UNDERHILL, who died on the previous afternoon from injuries sustained in an accident on Saturday. ELIZA UNDERHILL identified the deceased as her husband, who was thirty-six years of age. She knew nothing whatever about the accident, but last saw him alive about six in the morning. George Passmore, a youth, deposed that he was driving in another tap in the rear of deceased at the time he met with the accident. The deceased fell from his horse and pitched on his head. Witness with assistance took deceased to the above Institution. Mr J. Austin, surgeon at the Infirmary, said he was of opinion that death resulted through concussion of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Cox was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Daily Mercury, Wednesday 4 December 1889 EXETER - Inquest At Exeter. A Mother Censured. - Mr H. W. Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of EMMA WORTH, aged two months, who died on Saturday last. The mother, in the course of her depositions, stated that she was in the habit of feeding the deceased on biscuit boiled in water. In answer to the Coroner, she said that the child's life was insured in the Prudential Office. In answer to a Juryman, she stated that she was in a public-house on the night of the child's death, but the deceased was in bed. Dr Brash said that death, in his opinion, was due to convulsions. He disagreed altogether with giving children of that tender age biscuit, as they could not digest it. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," at the same time severely censuring the mother, who they considered was much to blame. The Coroner concurred, and stated that if the Jury had returned any other verdict he should not have hesitated in sending the mother for trial on a charge of manslaughter. As it was, she must think herself lucky that she had got off so easy.

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., County Coroner, held an Inquest at the rising Sun Inn yesterday morning, on the body of ALICE, the illegitimate child of BESSIE BLIGHT (single), and who died on Sunday. According to the evidence of the mother, the child, which was six months old, was convulsive early in the morning, and subsequently died. Mr H. J. S. Liddell, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post-mortem, and found extensive inflammation of the left lung. The body was fairly well nourished but the liver was exceptionally large. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Daily Mercury, Friday 6 December 1889 EXETER - Scalded To Death At Exeter. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the New Police-court, Waterbeer-street, yesterday, on the body of WALTER ELIAS FORD, aged two years, who died on the previous day from scalds received on the 22nd October. The mother of deceased stated that on the 22nd October she had the child in the kitchen, and when she went to the fire-place deceased took up a cup of boiling tea and upset it down its chest. The child was treated as an out-patient at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but on Wednesday it became worse and died soon after the arrival of a medical man. Dr Bell stated it as his opinion that the child died from convulsions brought on by the scald and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 7 December 1889 EXETER - The City Coroner (Mr W. H. Hooper) held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday on the body of JOHN SULLIVAN, a native of Ireland, who died suddenly on Wednesday. Deceased was a pensioner. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) held an Inquest at the Hill Park Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday, respecting the death of JOHN GODDARD, aged sixty-one. LAVINIA GODDARD, widow of deceased, deposed that he was all right when he retired on Wednesday evening, but awoke about four o'clock next morning and complained of tightness of the chest. She did not think it was necessary to send for a doctor, but death took place at six o'clock. Dr Edlin said death was due to syncope and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Monday 9 December 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - The death of THOMAS EVANS, aged six weeks, was the subject of an Inquiry held by the Coroner, Mr J. Vaughan, on Saturday evening. The evidence of the mother, who resides at 3 Canterbury-street, went to show that the child was all right at two o'clock on Saturday morning, and at seven, when she awoke to nurse it, the infant was dead. Dr Everard Row, who was called to see the child, was of opinion that it had been Accidentally Overlaid, and a verdict in accordance therewith was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 10 December 1889 TORQUAY "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by a Torquay Jury who last evening, at Dunstone, situated in the Lower Warberry-road, Inquired into the sudden death on Saturday morning of MARY ANN LANE, aged fifty-seven, and a lady's maid. Deceased came with the family a fortnight since from Wimbledon. Mr Coroner Hacker held the Inquiry, and Mr W. Grist was Foreman of the Jury.

EXETER - The Fatality At Exeter. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday touching the death of WILLIAM WILLCOCKS, thirty-six, a labourer, of 5 Alphington-street, St. Thomas, which took place in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Friday from injuries received while excavating at the Salvation Army Temple, The Friars, on Tuesday last. The evidence showed that the man was working in a trench thirty-five feet long, two feet nine inches wide and from four to five feet six inches deep, when a slip occurred, and he was buried up to the neck, his chest being smashed in. The trench was not shored, and the contractor, Mr T. GT. Coles, said it was not usual to shore foundations of such a depth. It was "made" ground, fifty years old, cut cleanly, and showed no signs of coming down. He was standing in the trench fourteen feet from the deceased when the accident happened. Corroborative evidence was given, and the Jury, of whom Mr George Hawkins was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatality At Stonehouse. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, sen.) assisted by the Deputy Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd, jun.) held an Inquiry at the St. George's Hall, East Stonehouse, last evening respecting the death of an infant named JAMES WILLIAM PERKINS, aged about three years, and who died under circumstances reported fully in the Western Daily Mercury of yesterday. MARY ANN PERKINS, residing at 4 Edgcumbe-cottages, Stonehouse, having identified the body of the deceased as that of her son, deposed that about ten o'clock on Saturday evening she went to a neighbour's house and left her three children in an upstair bedroom in bed. There was a small reading lamp filled with paraffin oil lit on the table, and also a fire in the grate. Witness on returning after an absence of about quarter-hour was confront on opening the door by a dense mass of smoke. She succeeded in rescuing her children, but the deceased was so severely burnt that he succumbed to the effects on the following morning. Witness supposed that the deceased got out of his bed and played with the fire, and whilst doing so his nightdress became ignited. Sergeant McQueen of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, gave evidence to the effect that he assisted the last witness in rescuing the children. Mr Leah, surgeon, stated that he attended the deceased and found that he had been severely burnt about the left side of the body. He was of opinion that death was due to the shock caused by the fire. The Jury, of whom Mr John Mooney, R.N., was Foreman, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death At Plymouth. Poisoned Through Eating Shellfish. - Mr A. S. Clarke, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the West Hoe Hotel, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of ELIZA AMELIA ANN ADAMS, aged thirteen and a half years. - MARY ANN ADAMS, wife of a labourer, residing at 7 Edgcumbe-place, Plymouth, stated that the deceased was her daughter. On Saturday morning she complained of pains in her head, whereupon witness advised her to go to bed. Early in the afternoon she was taken with vomiting and being somewhat alarmed the mother sent for Dr Bean, who arrived shortly afterwards. That gentleman prescribed, but the deceased on taking a spoonful of the medicine again vomited. Dr Bean came again later in the evening, but deceased succumbed at ten o'clock. In answer to the Coroner, witness said the deceased ate some cockles on Friday for tea, as also did the rest of the family. She bought them the same day and they were apparently fresh. Dr C. E. Bean, 5 Buckland-terrace, Plymouth, deposed that he visited the girl and found her in a nearly unconscious state. He carefully examined her but found nothing to account for her condition. The symptoms pointed to an epileptic fit and he prescribed a mixture accordingly. About eight o'clock in the evening he was again called. The deceased was then unconscious and groaning considerably. She struggled to such an extent that the parents had to hold her down. The symptoms were most peculiar. He then left, observing that the deceased was dying and that he could not do anything in the matter. By the Coroner's order he had made a post-mortem examination. The brain and all the other organs of the body were healthy with the exception of the stomach, to which he gave a thorough scrutiny. It was somewhat dilated and congested on the left side, whilst the extremity and swallow showed signs of inflammation. Looking at the symptoms before death and the state of the stomach he was convinced that death was caused by an irritant poison. He learnt that deceased had eaten cockles and it was his opinion that she had been poisoned by them, as the symptoms were compatible with shell-fish poisoning. Dr Bean further explained that some persons were extremely susceptible to poisons, and deceased came under that class, as the whole of the family partook of the cockles without any ill effects. It had been stated that the fish were fresh, but one only might have been diseased, and that one eaten by deceased, which was sufficient to bring about the results. The Jury, of whom Mr E. Hancock was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 December 1889 EXETER - Exeter City Coroner held an Inquest yesterday on the body of JOHN TEED, of 2 Lower North-street, aged 76 years. Deceased, a basket maker, had for some time been suffering from a skin disease. He was suddenly taken seriously ill on Monday morning, remarked that "the Lord had called him and he was going home," and shortly afterwards expired. Medical evidence shewed that deceased died of heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Three Crowns Hotel, Parade, Plymouth, last evening touching the death of JOHN CASTLES, about 50 years of age. Mr Edward Rees Thackwell, painter, visiting deceased's office on Tuesday evening, found him apparently asleep in the chair. As deceased had a strange appearance he tried to rouse him, and found he was dead. Mr Cuming, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to inflammation of the lungs and acute bronchitis. The Jury, of whom Mr James Brown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 December 1889 TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Avenue Inn, Torquay, relative to the death of ELLEN MABEL AGGETT, aged nine, the daughter of CHARLES AGGETT, coachman to Dr Richardson, the Towers, Belgrave-road. Nine weeks ago the girl fell over some steps leading from the kitchen to the harness-room, sustaining severe internal injuries, which terminated fatally on Tuesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, a suggestion being made by the Jury that the steps should be protected by means of a bar or railing.

Western Morning News, Monday 16 December 1889 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Harper's public-house, 49 York-street, on Saturday respecting the death of STEPHEN JOHN DANNAN, aged six weeks. GEORGINA DANNAN, mother of deceased, said he was well and healthy on Friday night and slept all right, waking only once - at about half-past two. At five o'clock she awoke to see to her other child, who is an invalid, and noticed that deceased was dead. She sent for a doctor, but he could only pronounce life to be extinct. The Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, said he thought that as the hands were clenched and deceased did not appear to have been overlaid they would be satisfied that convulsions were the cause of death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 17 December 1889 TORQUAY - "Accidentally Drowned" was the verdict returned at an Inquiry held last evening at the Half Moon Hotel, Union-street, Torquay, into the circumstances attending the death of the two-and-a-half year old son (GEORGE WILLIAM) of MR J. S. SANDERS, shipwright, at present in the employ of the Local Board. The facts of the child being missed on Saturday and the body recovered from the new harbour on the following morning by a fisherman named Richard Hardley have already been published, and the Jury having heard his evidence, also that of the parents. the brother, George Doutch, and Dr J. B. Richardson, decided no blame was due to anyone, and brought in a verdict as before stated. Mr Doidge was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 December 1889 BARNSTAPLE - An octogenarian named JOHN TAYLOR, an inmate of the Barnstaple Workhouse, recently fell over some stairs and fractured his thigh. He expired at the Infirmary on Sunday. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr William Rowe was Foreman, held an Inquiry at the Spread Eagle Inn, Treville-street, yesterday, into the cause of death of FREDERICK JOHN JACOB CHALICE, the child of ELIZABETH JANE CHALICE, of 21 Kinterbury-street. The grandmother, Mary Ann Barry, stated that the child(which was only thirty-six hours old) was very weak from its birth and suffered from violent convulsions. Martha White, a non-certificated nurse, said she attended to the child from birth and consulted Mr Balkwill, chemist and followed his advice. The Coroner and the Jury thought it very great neglect on the part of the nurse not to have called in a medical man before using an injection in the case of so young a child and advised her to quality for a certificate as soon as possible.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 December 1889 EXETER - A Boy Gored To Death By A Bull. - A boy named WILLIAM CHERITON, aged 13, of St. Thomas, Exeter, was on the 7th instant at Whitstone, where a bull got loose from a shed. A labourer named Arnold and the deceased tried to catch the animal, but as it got angry, Arnold said, "BILL, we had better give it up." CHERITON continued, however, to chase the bull and it turned on him. Seeing the bull close up to him, he fell on the ground. The animal caught him up with its horns and carried him several yards. Arnold went to his assistance, and the bull knocked him down also. It again turned on the boy and Arnold went for his employer, Mr White, who drove the bull away. The lad subsequently died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and at an Inquest yesterday the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was stated that the deceased had teased the animal several times.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 December 1889 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday Inquired into the cause of the death, on Wednesday last, of WILLIAM JOSHUA HEAD, aged 46 years, living at 8 East-street. He was addicted to heavy drinking and for the last fortnight had indulged freely. On Monday he drank nothing and on Tuesday night became delirious. He was quiet on Wednesday until five o'clock, when he became restless, jumping in and out of bed and dragging the furniture about. About seven his wife got him to return to bed and very shortly afterwards he died. Mr Buchan, surgeon, said that he had frequently attended deceased during the past three years, and nearly always for alcoholic poisoning. It was from that he died. A verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by Alcoholic Poisoning."

STOKE DAMEREL - A case of sudden death was the subject of Inquiry at an Inquest held last evening by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner. The deceased, STEPHEN EASTLAKE, 22 years of age, was a seaman in the navy, who joined the service about eight years ago. He had been employed the greater part of that period in England, and in January went on the East Indies station. In July he was invalided home and went to the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, whence he was discharged on September 21st, suffering from consumption. He remained in his usual health until Wednesday evening, when he was seized with a fit of coughing. This ruptured a blood vessel, and he vomited about a pint of blood. Death took place within five minutes afterwards, before a doctor could be called in. Mr D. Wilson, surgeon, who saw deceased just afterwards, was of opinion that death was caused by a rupture of one of the blood vessels of the lungs, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 December 1889 EXETER - Mr Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday touching the death of CHARLES TITHERLEY, of 4 Hampton-buildings, aged 65. Deceased, who had been a mining agent, was taken suddenly ill, and saying "I am dying," died within a few minutes. Mr Perkins, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - LILIAN WITHERIDGE, the two-year-old daughter of a fisherman living at 60 High-street, Plymouth, who had been suffering from a cough for three weeks, was taken with a violent fit of coughing on Thursday night and died in her mother's arms. No doctor was called in, but the child had been supplied with medicine by Miss Bayly, of Seven Trees. A post-mortem examination of the body was made by Mr Bean, surgeon, who attributed death to suffocation caused by bronchitis, and expressed the opinion that the child's life might have been saved if medical aid had been obtained. At the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Clark last evening a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 December 1889 EXETER - Three Inquests were held at Exeter yesterday before Mr Hooper, Coroner. An infant daughter of WM. WESTCOTT, Tabernacle-court, West-street, died from convulsions. GEORGE BROOKS, labourer, Coombe-street, died suddenly on Sunday afternoon after complaining of a pain near his heart, and Dr Perkins thought the cause was a natural one. ARTHUR SHAW, 28, brass finisher, Coombe-street, had epileptic fits on Sunday and died within two hours. Verdict in each case was "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, yesterday Inquired into the cause of the death of WILLIAM JOSEPH K. NEWELL, the four years old son of WILLIAM JAMES NEWELL, Custom House officer, the watch-house, the Barbican. On Saturday week last he took cold and Dr Burke, of the Medical Institution, prescribed. On Thursday last, Dr Wagner was called in and found him suffering from bronchial catarrh, but did not think it serious. He intended seeing him on Sunday, but on that morning the father told him that the child was dead. Dr Wagner considered that between Thursday and Sunday, pneumonia set it. He would not, however, give a death certificate, as he had not attended the child long enough. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - At an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, yesterday, concerning the death of WILLIAM GREET, 75 years of age, who died suddenly in George-street on Saturday night, it was stated by Mr Hinvest, surgeon, that deceased suffered from anaemia, or bloodlessness and that death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Daily Mercury, Thursday 26 December 1889 PLYMSTOCK - Sudden Death At Oreston. - Mr Coroner R. R. Rodd held an Inquest at Oreston on Tuesday, touching the death of WILLIAM RICKARD, a labourer, aged seventy-seven. Deceased, who was employed at Messrs Bayly's pickling yard at Oreston, went to his work on Monday and appeared to be in his usual health. During the afternoon the deceased was seen to fall backwards, and on some of the men going to him he was found to be dead. Mr J. B. Jacobs, surgeon, deposed that he had attended the deceased at intervals during the past nine years treating him for fatty heart and fainting fits. In his opinion death was due to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

KINGSBRIDGE - Death Through Neglect At Kingsbridge. - On Tuesday, at the Seven Stars Hotel, an Inquest was held by Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, on the body of HENRY HANNAFORD, the child of ELIZABETH HANNAFORD, domestic servant, and aged sixteen months. The Foreman of the Jury was Mr F. J. Brooke. The child had for nine months been under the care of its grandmother, who gave evidence that the child was born in the Workhouse and had been there for seven months. Deceased had never had any teeth nor any signs of any, was subject to fits, and would have them on some occasions as often as two or three times a week. She never called in any medial man, as she thought it was unnecessary. On Saturday, when she got out of bed she went to the child and found it in a fit. She immediately sent for assistance and found that the child was dead, and then sent for Dr Webb. She was so much frightened that that was the reason she sent for her neighbours before she sent for medical assistance. Evidence was also given by ELIZABETH HANNAFORD, and Louisa Grant. Dr Webb stated that he had examined the child. It appeared to have been well nourished, but was decidedly delicate looking. The child had a large head and convulsions were the cause of death. The Jury gave a verdict that the child died of Convulsions, and added a rider censuring the grandmother for not sending for medical assistance, as they thought it was neither right nor natural and that she had seriously neglected her duty as a grandparent.

Western Morning News, Friday 27 December 1889 STOKE DAMEREL - Sudden Death Of A Naval Lieutenant. - Early yesterday morning Lieutenant FRANCIS PETER CAREY, belonging to the Indus, reserve ship at Keyham, was found dead in his cabin. Later in the day Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances of death. - Corporal William James Burnard, R.M.L.I., who was on sentry duty the previous night, stated that about two o'clock that morning he saw deceased leave his cabin and go in the direction of the officers' lavatories. He returned soon afterwards and went into his cabin. - Joseph Bowman, deceased's servant, said about twenty minutes past seven that morning he found deceased lying on the floor of his cabin. Witness shook him but got no answer. Deceased was quite cold. Witness informed the officer of the watch and Dr Wildey, who pronounced him dead. - Alexander Gascoyne Wildey, surgeon, said that deceased reported himself at nine o'clock on Wednesday morning, when witness saw him in his own cabin. He then explained that he had caught a severe chill and he was shaking like a person with ague. His pulse was weak, but not alarmingly so. He said he had been retching and that he had had a cold for some time. Witness ordered him to bed and directed him to have bottles of hot water placed at his feet. Later in the day deceased told him that he had been expectorating blood. Witness examined him and found there was a deficiency in respiratory power and that there were symptoms of older disease in the upper part of the right lung. He concluded that deceased had all the symptoms of an approaching acute illness. In the evening deceased said he felt better and wished to dine in the mess-room. His temperature was then 101 degrees and witness concluded that he would be much better or much worse the next morning. He did not anticipate a fatal result, and was much surprised in the morning to hear that he was dead. Witness thought the deceased's exposure to cold by leaving his cabin in the night caused a sudden increase in the congestion of the lungs, and impaired the heart's action. - Captain Stewart Falls, R.M.L.I., said deceased was his personal friend. He saw him on Tuesday, when deceased told him that the death of his brother, which took place about three weeks ago, had cut him up very much. - The Coroner thought they would have no difficulty in finding a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - Mr May, one of the Jury, thought a post-mortem examination should be made. He did not like the look of the body, and was not satisfied with the doctor's evidence. - Captain Falls, speaking for himself and the officers of the ship, thought that Mr May's remarks were entirely uncalled for. (Hear, hear.) - The Coroner concurred in this remark. Over scrupulousness sometimes did harm. His opinion was that the evidence was perfectly satisfactory. He did not think Mr May wished to cast any imputation on the officers of the ship, or anyone else. - Mr May said he did not cast the slightest imputation on anyone. - The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," Mr Cornish stating that the majority were in favour of that finding. - The deceased was a relative of the officer who accompanied the late Prince Imperial of France in his ill-starred journey to South Africa, during the Zulu war, and who was present with his Imperial Highness when he was attacked in the bush. Carey on the onslaught being made, left the side of the Prince, believing, as he said, that the latter was following him. Lieutenant Francis Carey was about forty years of age and a native of Torquay.

Western Daily Mercury, Saturday 28 December 1889 EXETER - A Child Suffocated. - Mr Henry W. Gould, Deputy Coroner for Exeter, held an Inquest at 2 Dean-street, Fair Park, yesterday, touching the death of MABEL, aged one month, the infant child of WILLIAM HENRY OUSLEY, a gardener. Evidence was given to the effect that the child slept with its parents and on the previous night the father, on turning back the bedclothes, discovered it to be dead. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, was of opinion that death was due to Suffocation, either from being overlaid or the clothes coming in contact with its mouth and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest at the Tavistock Cottage Hospital yesterday respecting the death of TAMSON CROSSMAN, the aged occupant of a room in one of the Ford-street almshouses, and who was seriously burnt there on Christmas Eve. Mr W. H. Mallett was Foreman of the Jury. Mary Denning, a little girl, saw the deceased in her room about six o'clock on Tuesday evening, when a candle was burning on the table near the bed in which the deceased was lying. Elizabeth Jackman, a niece, said she called at the deceased's room at half-past seven o'clock and upon opening the door found the place full of smoke. There was no light burning, but on obtaining one she found her aunt on the floor with her stockings burnt off. She was unconscious and was immediately taken to the Cottage Hospital. Dr C.C. Brodrick saw the deceased and found that both feet and legs were burnt up to the knees, and on the right side up to the thigh. He also found a bruise on the right side of the forehead. She died on Thursday morning, and he was of opinion that death was caused by a seizure, accelerated by the shock caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony and added that the burns were Accidentally received.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 December 1889 PLYMOUTH - Does Baby Farming Exist In Plymouth? - At the Sailors' Home, Plymouth, last evening, Mr Coroner A. S. Clark, investigated the cause of the death of ROBERT HENRY PONSONBY, aged 13 days, who died on December 23rd. - Martha White, wife of a fisherman, said deceased was the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH PONSONBY, a charwoman, aged 20, residing with her at 34 Woolster-street. Deceased was delicate from birth and unable to take nourishment. She had had the care of four children since December, 1888, and all had died at her house. She attended the confinement of PONSONBY, but was not a registered midwife. She was paid 4s. a week for taking care of children. In answer to a Juryman, witness admitted that she had been censured at an Inquest for her neglect of a child which died. - Mr R. G. Bird, registrar of births and deaths, stated that after White had called with the death certificate, he communicated with the Coroner on account of the deaths of several children at the same house. On December 5th, 1888, Stanley Cecil Bennett died, aged 10 weeks; in September of this year, Hugh Egg, aged eight weeks; on October 28th, Daisy Crocker Bennett, aged 14 days; and on December 23rd, deceased died. Two were the illegitimate children of the wife of a sailor named Bennett, and the others were also illegitimate. With the exception of deceased, the children were born in St. Andrew's parish, and removed to White's house. - Thomas Henry Williams, L.R.C.P., residing at 1 Gibbon's-street, stated that he saw the child on December 12th. It was suffering from debility, caused by premature birth. On Christmas-day he made a post mortem examination and his opinion that the child was immature was fully borne out. In answer to the Coroner, witness said it was quite impossible to tell by the appearance of the child if its birth was brought on by unnatural means. The Coroner remarked that he felt thoroughly justified in holding an Inquest, although the doctor's evidence shewed that the child died from natural causes. Circumstances proved that grave suspicion attached to the case, and he was certain that the deaths of many children needed stricter investigation. He was determined to put down baby farming in any form. The Jury, who returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" considered that the death of so many children in one house was suspicious and thanked Mr Bird for calling the Coroner's attention to the matter.

SHALDON - An Inquest on the body of ABRAHAM BICKFORD, caretaker at the Constitutional Club, Shaldon, was held on Thursday by Mr S. Hacker and a Jury, of whom Mr G. Marley was Foreman. Deceased's widow stated that her husband suffered from rheumatism, was blind in one eye, and could not see very well out of the other. Mr G. P. H. Powell, wine merchant, Teignmouth, stated that deceased about seven o'clock on Tuesday evening came to his office for £1 1s. 6d. for Mr Marley. He gave him the money in an envelope, and a shilling for Christmas. Deceased was perfectly sober. John Cory, toll collector, Shaldon Bridge, said deceased passed through about half-past seven. Deceased staggered a little, but as he generally walked a little lame he could not say whether he was drunk or not. James F. Jones, butcher, afterwards saw deceased groping his way along the rails within 30 yards of where deceased is believed to have fallen over. It was a dark night and as deceased did not speak he could not say whether he was drunk or sober. William Blackmore, fisherman, deposed to finding, with the aid of John Mole, the body on Christmas morning upright in about five or six feet of water, 30 yards from the wall over which deceased fell. P.C. Trewin said there were slight bruises, and a trivial cut on the lip. On the body was an envelope addressed to Mr Morley, and containing £1 1s. 6d., a shilling and some coppers. Under the wall were deceased's spectacles and his belief was that BICKFORD walked against the outer part and fell over the wall, only about a foot high, into the water. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury requested that Lord Clifford should be informed that the low wall opposite Teignbridge and Gowrie Houses was a public danger.

BRIXHAM - In the case of GEORGE FOGWILL, aged 88, retired maltster, found dead in bed on Christmas-day at Brixham, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday at the Bolt Hotel by Mr S. Hacker.

Western Daily Mercury, Tuesday 31 December 1889 EXETER - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict at an Inquest held at Exeter yesterday on the body of JOHN HEXTER, aged eighty-two. The deceased was the oldest freeman in the City. He had been keeping up Christmas rather freely and was found dead in bed on Sunday morning. Dr Brown stated that death was due to failure of the heart's action.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident At Stonehouse - At the recent Inquest on Lance-Corporal NORGROVE, R.M.L.I., who died from the effects of an accidental fall at the Imperial Hotel, Stonehouse, the Jury added a rider recommending that at that spot on the leads from which deceased fell railings should be put up. This has been done and the work has been inspected and approved of by the Coroner, Mr R. R. Rodd, sen., who has informed the Foreman of the Jury, Mr T. Buchanan, accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Last evening, at the Plymouth Guildhall, an inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) touching the death of a woman named KATE YELLAND, aged sixty-one, and who died suddenly on the 28th inst. Rosina Dyke identified the body of the deceased, and deposed that on the evening of the 27th inst. deceased came to her residence, 29 Octagon-cottages, and requested shelter for the night. Lodgings were provided, and on the following morning deceased complained of being unwell, suffering from a severe cough. A cab was procured to remove her to the Workhouse but before reaching the Institution she expired. Mr Brenton, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post mortem examination and was of opinion that death was due to the want of sufficient food, accelerated by exposure. The Jury, of whom Mr Rew was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and, in doing so, said great credit was due to Mrs Dyke for the manner in which she acted towards deceased. The Coroner concurred with the Jury in their remarks.