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Help and advice for Inquests 1890-1891

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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

Articles taken from the Western Morning News

[printed in Plymouth.]

1890-1891

Transcribed by Lindsey Withers

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.


[Numbers in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: Abell; Adams(2); Adamson; Aggett(2); Allen; Amery; Anderson; Ash; Ashford; Bailey(2); Baker(4); Balkham; Ball; Barrett; Bartlett; Barwick; Bastin; Bate; Batstone; Battishill; Baxter; Bellamy; Bennett; Berraball; Bidgood; Blackburn(2); Blackler; Blackmore; Blackwell; Blagdon; Blake(2); Blatchford(2); Blight; Blithe; Blyth; Boon(2); Bowden(2); Braddick; Braddock; Bradford; Brayley(2); Brett(2); Bridgeman; Briggs; Brimacombe; Broad; Brook; Brown; Buckley; Budge; Bullen; Bulow; Buncombe; Burns; Burrow; Burrows; Caines; Callard; Cann; Cannicott; Carwardine; Case; Caseley; Casely; Causeley; Causley; Cave; Chalmers; Channings; Chant; Chave; Chinnock; Choake; Chown; Clapp; Clarke(2); Cleave; Clements; Clemo; Clinton; Coaker; Cole(2); Coleman; Collacott; Collard; Colwill; Cook; Cooke; Coombe; Couch; Courtenay; Cox(2); Creber(2); Crogan; Cross; Crowhurst(2); Cude; Cumming; Curtis(2); Dampier; Danskin; Davies; Davis(2); Daw; Day; Delay; Dempsey; Denning; Distin; Dodd; Doidge; Dolbear; Down(2); Downs; Drew; Driscoll; Dunrich; Dunn; Dyer; Dymond; Eales; Easterbrook; Eastman; Eccles; Eddy; Edmunds; Edwards(2); Eggbeer; Ellen; Ellis; Elmslie; Emmett; English; Escot; Fairchild; Farleigh; Farley(3); Farrant; Filmer; Flynn; Foale; Ford(4); Foulkes; Found; Franks; Fraser; Freathy; Frith; Frude; Fry(2); Furze; Gale(3); Gardiner(2); Germon; Gilbert(2); Gilgard; Gill(3); Gillett; Gilliat; Glynn; Goddard; Goodyear; Gosling; Goss; Grant; Granville; Green; Greengrass; Greenham; Greenslade; Gregory; Grey(2); Grindley; Gullett; Gunn; Hadden; Hall; Hallett; Hamlyn; Hancock; Hannabus; Harod; Harper; Harris(2); Harry(2); Hartley; Hawkings; Hawkins(2); Hayter; Heale; Healey; Heard; Hearson; Hebbes; Heine; Hendy; Henshaw; Hewett; Hicks(2); Hill; Hinchliff; Hodge(2); Holland; Honeycombe; Hookway; Hooper(2); Hoskings; Hoskins; Hotten; Howell; Howells; Howlett; Hugo; Hunt; Huntley; Hurford; Hurvid; Incledon; Jackman; Jackson(2); James(2); Jeffery; Johns(2); Johnson; Jones(5); Joslin; Kay; Kellegrew; Kellond; Kelly; Kendall; Kidgell; Kidger; Kiehoe; Kingdon(2); Kinnings; Kinsman; Kneebone; Knight(2); Lacock; Lake(5); Lambe; Lamerton; Lancey; Lane; Lang; Langan; Langmead; Larsen; Launchbury; Launder; Lavers(2); Lawrence; Lazarus; Lee(3); Lendon; Lethbridge; Lewarne; Litchfield; Loosemore; Lose; Loveday; Loveridge; Lovitt; Luggar; Luscombe; Lynch; Lyndon; Lyons; MacDowell; Maddaford; Mallett; Maloney; Mann; Manning; Marsh; Marshall; Martin(4); Masters; Matthews(2); McCafferty; McCowen; Meheux; Middleweek(2); Miller; Mills; Mitchel; Mitchell; Molland; Moon; Moor; Moore; Morcomb; Morrish; Mortimer; Moss; Moule; Muchamore; Mudge; Mumford; Neary; Neilson; Nelder; Netherton(2); Nicholls; Northmore; Norris; Nott; O'Leary; Organ; Osborne(2); Pack; Pain; Palmer; Parnell; Passmore; Patridge; Pawley; Peake; Pearce(2); Pearse; Peeke; Penfound; Pengelly(2); Pengilley; Perrie; Perrington; Perrow; Perryman; Philipps; Pickard; Pike; Pim; Piper; Plucknet; Pollard; Pood; Poole(2); Pope; Powell; Prowse(2); Pym; Pyne; Quance; Ramsey; Rapson; Rasmussen; Rawlings(2); Reade; Redman; Rendle; Renfrey; Rice(2); Richards(3); Robins; Rodd; Rogers; Roland; Rose; Rounseful; Rowe(2); Rowley; Roy; Salter(3); Saunders(4); Searle(2); Sellaway; Semister; Sharland; Shaw; Shephard; Sheppard; Short; Simpson; Skardon(2); Skinner; Sloman; Small; Smallridge; Smith(5); Snell; Soper; Spear; Spiller; Squarey; Stacey(2); Standley; Steer(2); Steinborn; Stentiford(2); Stephens(2); Stockman; Stone(2); Stoneman; Storey; Sullivan; Sutton; Swords; Symons; Tapper; Taylor(3); Thomas; Thompson; Thorn(2); Thorne; Tippett; Tolley; Toull; Treays; Treble; Tritton; Tuck; Tucker; Tuckett; Turner; Tyler; Underhill(2); Van Linge; Vanstone; Veale; Vickery; Vigors; Vuller; Winecombe; Vowles; Walker; Wallis; Walter; Ware(2); Warren; Watkins; Watters; Watts; Weatherdon; Webber; Weeks(2); Wells; Western; Westlake; Wharram; Whetter; White(2); Whiteway; Wicket; Wilcocks; Will; Williams(4); Willings; Wills(2); Wilson; Winger; Wivell; Wood; Woodley; Woodward; Woollcombe; Wotton; Wreford; Wreyford; Wright; Wyatt(3); Yelland

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 January 1890 PLYMOUTH - MRS SARAH ANN WARREN, widow, aged 71 years, of 6 Nelson-street, Plymouth, was apparently well on Sunday night, but next morning her grand-daughter found her dead lying on the bed. In the room were signs of much sickness. Deceased had suffered severely from rheumatism. At an Inquest held yesterday, Mr T. H. Williams, surgeon, said deceased died from chronic rheumatism, which produced syncope and death. A verdict was returned in accordance with his testimony.

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - ELIZABETH DUNRICH, a widow, aged 69, was found dead in bed at Buckland Monachorum on Sunday morning, having died during the night from syncope. At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of ANNIE SEARLE, a middle-aged woman, dressmaker. Mrs Jane Jewell deposed that she last saw deceased alive at half-past ten on Monday night. Food was carried to deceased on several occasions during the day, as she complained of feeling poorly. At half-past eight on Tuesday morning Mrs Jewell found her dead in bed. Mr Brenton, surgeon, said a post-mortem examination shewed that death was due to asphyxia induced by acute inflammation of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) concurred with the Foreman (Mr Thos. May) that Mrs Jewell had acted in a very Christian and neighbourly manner.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 January 1890 PLYMOUTH - Shocking Fatality At Plymouth. The Inquest. - The death of ERNEST THOMAS BULOW, 34, tailor and cutter, living at 7 West Hill-terrace, Plymouth, whose mangled body was found on Thursday morning on the railway, about 200 yards east of Mutley tunnel, was yesterday Inquired into by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Coroner, at the Guildhall. Mr T. Wolferstan watched the case on behalf of the relatives. - MRS EMILY BULOW, deceased's wife, stated that her husband had been out of work since a week before Christmas. On New Year's night he was at home to supper, and seemed in very cheerful spirits. He had not been at all depressed of late, nor had he complained of anything. After supper he went out on business and she did not see him afterwards. - Walter Bennett, engine driver in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, said that on Wednesday night he drove an empty engine from Devonport to Friary and back, and at half-past one next morning his cleaner woke him and said he found blood on the engine. Witness examined it and found what he thought was human blood and hair. He had noticed no obstruction on the road. - William Smith, another driver, after examining Bennett's engine, went up the line and found a man's body about 200 yards from the east mouth of Mutley tunnel. - William Henry Hole, porter, Great Western Railway, searched the line with P.C. Ham and found first, a boot, further up a stocking, and then a cane. He next came upon the body, further on a le, and for 40 yards on the line was strewn with bone and flesh. He brought the remains to the mortuary. People constantly crossed the line at that place. - P.C. Ham corroborated and added that there were marks of flesh on the line for 34 yards before the body was found. In the deceased's pocket was an envelope addressed to himself. - The coroner explained that the verdict must either be "accidental death", "suicide," or "found dead." - It seemed probable that BULOW was simply crossing the line and knocked down. He had heard that he was not in pecuniary difficulty, though out of work and he was known to be a steady man. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 January 1890 BICKLEIGH NEAR PLYMOUTH - MARY ALICE DAMPIER, aged three years, at Roborough House, on Thursday morning wanted a toy and it being rather dark her brother took a box of matches from a chest of drawers, and lighting one of the matches gave it to his sister, who letting it fall set fire to the bed clothes. She was badly burnt and died from the effects. At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, coroner, the Jury of whom Mr R. Saunders was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made last evening by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM JOHNSON, naval pensioner, 33 Moon-street, found dead in bed the previous day. Emma Walker, who had been in the habit of giving deceased his dinner, on Monday fetched a bottle of medicine for him, he telling her he was suffering from the effects of drink. Mr W. Gard, surgeon, was of opinion that deceased had been attacked with violent retching and had ruptured a blood vessel in the head. Mr Gard knew deceased through having tended his wife for some weeks. During that time he was under the influence of drink. The Jury, in accordance with the Coroner's suggestion, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by excessive drinking."

Western Morning News, Monday 20 January 1890 CHAILEY, SUSSEX - Death of LIEUTENANT TRITTON - On Saturday evening the body of LIEUTENANT TRITTON, 14th Hussars, only son of Major TRITTON, Erle Hall, Plympton, was removed from Brighton for conveyance to Plympton. The Inquest was held on Friday afternoon at Chailey Workhouse. Lieut.-Colonel Hugh Gough, 14th Hussars, spoke of deceased as an experienced and very keen horseman, and with suppressed emotion he thanked the many who did all that was humanely possible to save the life of his poor brother officer. Mr A. Cook, a farmer, described the accident. Deceased set his horse at a gate, by which to make a short cut to the hounds. The horse did not seem to rise at all, and turned a complete somersault close to the gate, and went right over, falling on MR TRITTON. The horse rose and galloped off. Deceased was lying on his right side, and apparently trying to vomit. His mouth was partly filled with dirt, and his face covered with earth. He seemed to be sensible, but he could not see witness until he had removed the dirt from his eyes. He said, "I'm smashed." Lieutenant TRITTON swallowed a mouthful of spirit, but vomited it up again. It was a heavy gate at which the accident occurred. It would be 3ft. 7in. in height. The ground sloped a little towards it, but it was a very good place to go over. When they were bringing deceased to the Workhouse he said twice that he wanted a rest. He did not seem to be in much pain. If the horse had risen at the gate in a proper way it could easily have gone over. Deceased did not appear to be pulling the horse. - Frederick Pryor, a pork butcher, Lewes, said the horse seemed to see its feet - then they seemed to slip a little under the gate. It did not seem to rise at the gate at all. Deceased was going at a fair pace to take the fence. He asked deceased if he were hurt, and deceased answered, "Yes, badly." Witness's impression was that when the horse stiffened himself suddenly at the gate it went over without being able to help itself. - Mr Barnard, surgeon, Chailey, who met deceased as he was brought into the Workhouse on a gate, said he was in a state of collapse and semi-conscious. No bones were broken. He remained with deceased for about three hours and a half, when he died. Death was due to shock of the system, caused by pressure on the vital organs. He thought the bladder was ruptured. Deceased did not appear to suffer much pain. He understood the deceased to say he was "squashed." He asked witness to take his hand before he died, and spoke to him at times. There was only a very faint attempt at reaction before he was put to bed. - Dr Lewis Smythe said he found MR TRITTON - who was a remarkably fine specimen of manhood - cold, almost pulseless, and suffering from shock. He formed the opinion that the bladder was ruptured. Everything possible was done to produce reaction, but unsuccessfully. Internal haemorrhage had been going on causing great exhaustion. The chest and abdomen were much injured. If the whole College of Surgeons had been present they could not have saved MR TRITTON'S life. He died without a struggle. Colonel Gough was with the deceased at the time of his death, administering every consolation and hope, and was deeply grieved at the sad occurrence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Bovisand on Saturday concerning the death of THOMAS HENRY GREEN, a clerk employed at the Plymouth branch of the Reading Brewery Company. Mr W. L. McLoughlin, the company's agent, identified the body and said the deceased left his office at eight o'clock on the evening of December 12th. He did not return to his lodgings, but next morning his walking stick was found under the Hoe, and nothing further was heard of him until Friday last, when a lad named Macdonald discovered his body floating in the water at Wembury. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Deceased was a native of Oxford and the body will be taken there for interment.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 February 1890 TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, holds an Inquest this evening upon the body of DRUCILLA EGGBEER, 48, cook at the Western Hospital for Consumptive Patients, Torquay, who died suddenly on Sunday morning whilst at her work. Hearing a noise as of someone having fallen, another servant entered the kitchen and found the deceased lying on the floor. She was conscious and spoke, but died before medical aid arrived. She had not been ill previously.

PLYMOUTH - FREDERICK GEORGE, the infant son of LOUISA NETHERTON, residing in Clarence-street, Plymouth, in good health when put to bed on Friday night, was next morning found dead, and Dr Williams, who was called in, attributed death to convulsions. At the Inquest held last evening the Jury, of whom Mr T. Donovan was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 February 1890 HUXHAM - Shocking Domestic Tragedy Near Exeter. Murdered In The Presence Of Her Son. - Information reached Exeter yesterday of a tragedy which occurred the previous evening at Huxham, a village about five miles out of the City. JAMES GOSLING, a labourer, and his wife EMMA, both aged about 47 years, had resided in the village, which is about a mile and a half from Stoke Canon, for several years, and had led a quarrelsome life. In June last GOSLING was brought before the magistrates for ill-using his wife, and was sentenced to six weeks' hard labour. After he came out of prison they lived together again, frequently quarrelling, but not seriously until Tuesday evening. GOSLING spent the evening in the Stoke Canon Inn, and before leaving at closing time he shook hands with everyone in the house, an incident which occasioned some little surprise. He reached home soon after ten o'clock, and, according to a statement made by the eldest son of the dead parents, FRANK, aged 13, GOSLING was then the worse for liquor. The son had gone to bed, "Father and mother," he said, "were downstairs in the kitchen together and I heard angry words, but took no notice of them until mother cried 'murder.' I then went down and saw her in the road. She was dressed, but had no hat on. Father was running after her and they ran along the road towards Stoke. Father overtook mother, pushed her into the hedge and I saw him cut her throat. I ran back and called Mrs Cross and father returned into the house. He gave me some money and told me to put it on the table, and I did as he told me. He then sat down and with a razor cut his throat. I went to Stoke Canon for the Police, and when I got back father was dead. There were eight children in our family - seven sons and one daughter. Three of the children are younger than me, and I slept with them. Father cut mother's throat with his pocket knife." - Mr Cross, an old man who lived next door to the GOSLINGS, says the deceased man called to his wife to "Come in," but she refused and remained in the road. He asked her a second time and then rushed at her. He (Cross) told his daughter what had taken place, and as GOSLING came back she said, "What have you been doing?" He replied, "I've done it now; I've cut her throat." he then went into the house and before Cross, who is old and infirm, could prevent him cut his own throat. There were several cuts on the woman's hands and face shewing that there must have been a struggle. A Mrs Melhuish, a neighbour, entered the cottage and wiped up the blood with a pair of trousers. - While GOSLING treated his children kindly, he had behaved in a brutal manner to his wife for nearly twenty years. He found employment in the neighbourhood trimming hedge rows and working on land, and is described by those with whom he had worked as a civilly spoken but somewhat taciturn man. So frequent were the quarrels between the deceased man and wife that the neighbours had come to take little notice of them. A few years ago GOSLING wounded his wife on the head with a "gamble" (used for knocking down pigs). The poor woman had often been heard to leave the house and walk the road all night. More than once the interference of a neighbour prevented the man doing fatal injury to his wife; and he had several times served imprisonment for his brutality. On the night in question the deceased woman seems to have anticipated something more serious than usual happening, for when her husband came home she had on her ulster, as if prepared to pass the night from home. GOSLING himself had been drinking in the Stoke Canon Inn, about a mile and a half from home, and when he left there at shutting-up time he shook hands all round, and said "Good bye." To one person he added, "I shan't see you again." This would seem to point to premeditation. GOSLING was, however, more cheerful than usual in company that night. He earned about 15s. a week, and the family lived in a very cosy cottage. MRS GOSLING was very delicate and unable to work away from her house. The members of the family were much affected when giving evidence at the Inquest last evening, and half the Jury were in tears. They gave their fees to the children, so suddenly and tragically made orphans. The bodies, as laid out, shewed no wounds, but were very white from the loss of blood. The Inquest. - The Inquest was held last night by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, at Barnhayes Farm, quite near the scene of the tragedy. Mr J. N. Franklin was elected Foreman of the Jury. Having viewed the bodies - which lay side by side in white shrouds in an adjoining room - evidence was taken, the first witness being HENRY GOSLING, who deposed that he was the eldest son of deceased, and lived at 2 Clifton-road, Exeter. He was a journeyman baker, and had not seen his parents since Christmas. his father was a labourer, 47 years of age. His mother was 46. They did not live happily together. - FRANK GOSLING, 13, another son, said he was in bed and asleep when his father returned in the evening, and was awoke by hearing his mother and father "kicking up a row" downstairs. He did not hear many words pass, but his father called his mother three bad names, which he declined to mention. His mother shouted "Murder," and witness came down and went into the road. He there saw his father killing his mother. She was down by the side of the road, and father was cutting her throat. His father said, "FRANK, you've come too late; her's dead." His father then returned into the cottage, about twenty yards back, and witness followed him. Directly his father reached the kitchen he took the razor from the mantelpiece, sat down on a chair, and cut his own throat. He stood up and then fell down on his face. His father cut his mother's throat with a medium-sized pocket knife (produced). His father and mother often quarrelled, but not lately. Had often heard his father threaten to murder her. Last time he heard them quarrel was a month ago. Thought his father had bane drinking, or he would not have "kicked up a row;" but witness did not notice any signs of drink last night, as his father walked steadily. After the murder and suicide, witness called up Mary Ann Cross, a neighbour. There was no one else in the house except his three little brothers, who were upstairs asleep. - Henry Radford, farm labourer, said he was called by Mrs Cross at twenty minutes past eleven on Tuesday night. She said that GOSLING had cut his wife's throat and was going to cut his own. Witness went to the cottage and saw GOSLING lying on the floor in a pool of blood with his throat cut. GOSLING was not dead, but moaning. Witness called him by name, but got no answer, and then called the neighbours, returning with Edwards. After they came in deceased drew one deep breath and expired. Going out to get more assistance he saw the woman lying dead on the left hand side of the roadway, about two gunshots from the cottage. She was quite dead. - P.C. J. Collard said he was called from Stoke Canon about midnight. About seventy yards from the deceased's house MRS GOSLING was lying on her back in the road dead. There were not many signs of a struggle. In the house was JAMES GOSLING lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood with his throat cut, dead. A blood stained razor (produced) was lying by his head, open. A knife (produced) was lying on the table, also open; and appeared to have been wiped. He had known deceased for five years, and GOSLING often beat his wife. On one occasion he was called when GOSLING had struck his wife across the head and wounded her with a "gamble." Since then GOSLING had been twice charged with wife beating. The last time was in June, when he was apprehended on a warrant and sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment. On Monday he asked MRS GOSLING "how it was going on at home?" She replied "Better." Witness had ascertained that GOSLING was not drunk on the Tuesday night, but had been drinking. - James Somer, surgeon, Broadclyst, called to see the deceased, found that in the case of JAMES GOSLING all the principal blood vessels on the left side of the throat were severed. The windpipe was slightly injured and some of the blood vessels on the right side were severed. On EMMA GOSLING he found jagged wound on the throat. The blood vessels on both sides were severed and the windpipe partially. - Mary Ann Cross, unmarried, living at Huxham next door to the GOSLINGS, said she heard the boy, FRANK, scream just before eleven o'clock. He was screaming, "Father, father; Mary Ann" (meaning witness). Witness opened the window and asked what was the matter, and the boy said "Father is killing mother down the road." Witness said "It is nonsense, FRANK," and the boy replied, "He is I saw him down the road." The boy went in, and the father came in just after. Witness said, "GOSLING, what have you been doing?" and he replied, "I've done it; I've finished her." Witness had heard them quarrelling many times, but not on the previous evening. EMMA GOSLING had often told her that her husband used to kick and beat her. The last time she heard them having words together was last Saturday. - The Coroner having briefly summed up, and said as regards the woman there must be a verdict of wilful murder against JAMES GOSLING. As to the man they could return a verdict of temporary insanity if they thought fit. - The Jury then returned a verdict of Wilful Murder of his wife against JAMES GOSLING; and they found that the latter committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 February 1890 OTTERY ST MARY - Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Volunteer Inn, Ottery St Mary, on Wednesday, touching the death of CHARLES ELLEN, aged 6 years, son of MR WM. ELLEN of Hind-street, Ottery. Mrs Roberts, of the Volunteer Inn, took her little son and the deceased to Cotleigh on Thursday, January 30th, and whilst at play deceased fell down, but at that time took no notice of the fall. In the evening the deceased complained of pains in his stomach. At first his mother thought he had a cold, but becoming alarmed she sent for a doctor. Dr F. M. Reynolds, of Ottery St. Mary, found him suffering from inflammation of the bowels, and the child rapidly weakened and died on Sunday morning. A post-mortem examination revealed the fact that deceased had sustained internal injuries by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PAIGNTON - An Inquest was held last night at Paignton Townhall on the body of WILLIAM HODGE, a gardener, 53 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself the previous day. He was in company with a boy named Shute, and they went together to a field occupied by the latter's father. Shute left him at the gate for about a quarter of an hour while he fed some pigs and on returning found HODGE hanging from an oak sapling in the hedge, his feet being about a foot from the ground. Robert Andrews cut him down. Mr Goodridge, surgeon, said deceased's neck was broken, and death was instantaneous. His widow deposed that he had been greatly depressed and suffering from nervous prostration for some time past. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity".

PAIGNTON - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry last night at Paignton into the circumstances attending the sudden death of MR GEORGE S. GODDARD, fleet paymaster of H.M.S. Britannia, on Wednesday. Mr w. E. Colebrook, a brother-in-law of deceased, living at Exeter, proved that he had on more than one occasion seen him very faint after exertion, and thought he had a weak heart. Mr W. E. Benny, assistant-paymaster of the Britannia, proved that deceased was on the ship on Wednesday morning attending to his duties, and they came together by train as far as Paignton. In the train MR GODDARD said he felt poorly, and should have stayed at home that day if his duties had not called him on board. Mr Lamishead proved that MR and MRS GODDARD came into his shop in the Palace-avenue between 12 and 1, and in a few minutes MR GODDARD said he felt faint and sat in a chair. He neither spoke or moved again. They loosened his collar and sent for medical assistance, but it was clear within a minute or two that he was dead. Mr C. W. Vickers, surgeon, was passing at the time and he gave his opinion that deceased died from syncope. The Jury returned a verdict to this effect and desired that an expression of their sympathy should be purveyed to the widow and the family.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST STONEMAN, the infant son of MR STONEMAN, dairyman, 8 Wake-street, Pennycomequick. The child was born early on Tuesday morning and appeared to be strong and healthy. Later the same day the child appeared to breathe with difficulty, but the parents, thinking it might get better, did not call in a medical man. It died, however, early the following morning. Mr Britton, surgeon, was called in about ten hours afterwards, but was unable to certify the cause of death. The Jury found a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 February 1890 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - An Inquest was held at Moretonhampstead on Saturday to Inquire into the cause of the death of LUCY AGGETT, aged 13 months. A Jury of thirteen, with Mr W. Gilbert as Foreman, was empanelled. SUSAN GERMON, the mother, residing at Millbrook, said deceased was born before she married WILLIAM GERMON, a labourer. It was weakly from birth. Its life was not insured. It was brought up by the bottle. Witness's mother took care of it for six months, while she was in service. She had been married five months. She had given it new milk, with bread and plain cakes. It had had no ailments. Witness had one other child, 2 years old. she had had four children altogether. Only one was now living. The others died when about twelve months old, from inflammation. No Inquest was held on them and none were insured. Deceased had not been able to keep its food down for two or three months. It had had a pennyworth of new milk with cakes per day. It had vomited for the last three months every time it was given its food. Had had no medical advice. She took the child to Dr Collyns and had medicine about November. Was not alarmed, and did not think the child likely to die. Gave it some brandy with milk. did not go to the doctor because she had not the money. It slept on her left arm on Tuesday night. Her husband was on her right side. She gave the child food before going to bed and it brought it up again in two or three minutes. It went to sleep after that and she gave it cold brandy several times during the night. About a quarter to eight she found the child dying. She called Mrs Crout, who came in, but the child was dead when she came. Mr G. N. Collyns, surgeon, said he could find no record of this case in his book, but he had no doubt the child was brought to him. He had made a post-mortem examination. All the organs were perfectly healthy, and perfectly bloodless. The liver was rather larger than should have been. There was not a vestige of fat about the body, and there was not a sign of food in the intestines. The child clearly died from inanition, either from want of food or inability to digest what was given it. Cakes or bread was not proper food for an infant. A weak child would not be able to digest new milk unless diluted with water. More children died from improper food than from want of food. WILLIAM GERMON, the husband, deposed to having frequently seen the child vomit when given food. Did not think it was because food given was improper. Did not tell his wife to go for a doctor. - Mary Crout, who lives next door, said the child was weakly from birth. About a week ago she advised the mother to go for the doctor, but she said it was no good, as she owed him some money. - The Coroner (Mr Hacker) told the Jury it was for them to say if they thought there had been culpable neglect on the part of the parents, or whether they thought it had been improperly fed in ignorance. There certainly seemed great ignorance prevalent on this matter of feeding infants. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 February 1890 PLYMPTON ST MARY - WILLIAM MUMFORD, 78 years of age, residing at Horniwink Cottage, Crown Hill Down, Plympton St. Mary, whilst going upstairs to bed on January 26th suddenly fell backwards. He received two severe scalp wounds and broke three of his ribs, and died on Friday. At the Inquest held at the Colebrook Inn yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, evidence was given by Henry Lee, a labourer, living in the same house as deceased, and Dr Stevens said death resulted from shock to the system, caused by the fall. The Jury, of whom Mr James Reynolds was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The coroner and Jury had to walk 3 ½ miles from the Inn to deceased's residence to view the body.

Western Morning News, Friday 14 February 1890 EXMOUTH - Death Under Chloroform At Exmouth. Interesting Medical Evidence. - An Inquest was held at Exmouth yesterday afternoon, before Mr C. E. Cox, Honiton, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of EMILY VEALE, aged 24, teacher of music, who died whilst under the influence of chloroform, for the purpose of an operation, at the Maud Hospital, on Tuesday afternoon. Mr Carter was Foreman of the Jury. The Coroner remarked that as this was a somewhat important and unusual case, he had thought it necessary - without desiring in any way to cast the slightest reflection on the medical gentlemen immediately concerned - to summon Dr Curtis, of Exmouth, as an independent witness. (Hear, hear, from Jurors.) Dr Curtis had, therefore, that morning made a post-mortem examination of the body. - JAMES VEALE, grandfather of deceased, said his grand-daughter resided with him and was a teacher of music. She was 24 years of age and unmarried. She had suffered from lupus, a skin disease, for many years, and had undergone more than six operations previously to Tuesday last, always under chloroform, administered, he believed, by the same medical gentleman as in this case. The previous operations were successful. This last operation on Tuesday afternoon was intended to remove a few spots of lupus which remained and the deceased was quite willing to have the chloroform. She was very happy in the Maud Hospital, where she had been staying for nearly a month before her death. She was very kindly treated there. - Mr Arthur Curtis, M.R.C.S., practising at Exmouth, said he had that morning made a post-mortem examination. He examined the heart more particularly and found nothing the matter with that organ. In fact, there was post-mortem evidence that the heart acted after breathing stopped. There was no organic disease of any other internal organ. The cause of death was stoppage of breathing through paralysis of the muscles of respiration, due to chloroform. - By the Jury: it was not possible to account for the drug being successful previously and fatal on this occasion. - Mrs Charlotte Anna Long, founder and lady superintendent of the Maud Hospital, Exmouth, said deceased was readmitted a month ago to undergo another operation to the face on account of lupus. About three weeks ago she underwent an operation under chloroform; Dr Cook then administered, Dr Hodgson operated; and witness and a nurse were also present. Deceased then shewed no alarming symptoms. The second and what would have been the final operation, during this visit to the Hospital was fixed for Tuesday afternoon last, and the same persons were present, and an under nurse in addition. Witness was chiefly occupied in handing sponges from a basin of hot water to the medical gentlemen to arrest the bleeding. Chloroform was applied by Skinner's inhaler, and the first untoward symptom witness noticed was sterterous breathing, which occurred, perhaps, five minutes after the deceased had been under the influence of the drug. By Dr Cook's direction, witness kept up the tongue out of the throat with forceps, and artificial respiration was attempted for quarter of an hour by both medical gentlemen in turns. Witness meanwhile noticed that the deceased's eyes became fixed, and the face peaceful. The galvanic battery was now used over the heart, but to no effect. Other measures adopted included free admission of air to the room, and lowering the patient's head. The Maud Hospital was founded about four years ago and chloroform had been administered there about 200 times and without a previous mishap. It was invariably given by Dr Cook or Dr Hodgson. Four or five drops of nitrate of amyl were, witness added, also applied to the nostrils. - Mr John Cook, one of the surgeons to the Maud Hospital, said deceased suffered from lupus and some of its consequences, but apart from this was quite healthy. Lupus was, however, a serious disease, eating away flesh and disfiguring a patient, but it was not immediately dangerous to life. During the past twelve months deceased had undergone five or six operations, and with no bad effects, as to the chloroform. The drug was always applied by witness through Skinner's inhaler, which was merely a piece of flannel stretched on a wire metal frame about the size and shape of a small saucer. Witness never measured the chloroform, as persons varied so much in their capacity to inhale the drug and in warm weather, also, patients had to be watched narrowly, as the chloroform evaporated more quickly. Therefore, a measure for chloroform was impracticable. About twenty drops were given on the flannel, and repeated if the patient shewed signs of returning consciousness during the operation. That was what was done on the present occasion; the face being the seat of the disease, witness had to stop the administration to give place to the operator, the nose being the first point to be treated. In the first place witness was seven or eight minutes administering the chloroform before the patient was in a fit state for the operation. Soon after Dr Hodgson commenced to operate and had done so only about three minutes, when witness - watching deceased's respiration and pulse - noticed that she was recovering and more chloroform had to be administered. Then the patient suddenly stopped breathing, and witness drew out her tongue with a pair of forceps and immediately began to perform artificial respiration (Dr Sylvester's method). Dr Hodgson relieved witness after ten minutes, and he continued it for about a quarter of an hour longer. Then, while Dr Hodgson was getting the galvanic battery ready, witness resumed the efforts at artificial respiration. For nearly half an hour these efforts were continued, but deceased never shewed a sign of life. - By the Jury: The deceased had inhaled much more chloroform on previous occasions. He remembered a previous case, before he came to Exmouth, in which a patient took chloroform all right on two occasions, but died the third time it was administered. It was impossible to account for the fatal result in that or in this case. There were no means whatever by which a medical man could predict how a patient would behave under chloroform. It was similar to the varying effects of alcoholic drink on different persons. No medical examination would reveal that, nor who would suffer and who would not from sea-sickness. It was, probably, a question of the susceptibility of the nervous centres, which could not be revealed until one tried, and then the try might be too late. - By the Coroner: Witness had given chloroform in cases of heart disease more than once and more than twice, and had never seen any patients behave better under the drug. He had seen four deaths on the operating table from chloroform, but never one in a person with heart disease. Fatty hearts might be dangerous under chloroform, but not hearts with valvular disease. - By a Juryman: It was not customary to have more than two medical men present on such an occasion. - Dr Curtis and Dr cook had administered chloroform in many cases with which witness had been connected and he was always quite satisfied with the way in which he acted. - Dr Cook, recalled, told the Jury that there was no warning. Breathing stopped suddenly. Witness saw this by the chest falling and not rising again. In some cases the heart failed first, but not as a rule. When he saw the breathing stop he did not waste valuable moments in listening for the heart - by which he might have learnt something - but immediately and continuously performed artificial respiration. He had given chloroform in about 500 cases, about 200 being in Guy's Hospital, where he was house surgeon. He had never lost a case of his own before this. Had seen several cases of collapse restored. All anaesthetics were more or less dangerous. Considered from a philosophic point of view chloroform was half a poison and an administrator's whole skill was concentrated to prevent it acting wholly as a poison - to maintain the balance, to prevent a patient slipping down to death on the one hand and coming round during an operation on the other. It was the giving of a deadly poison, but only to a degree. But in some cases it was impossible to avoid an accident. - The Coroner: It is very rarely fatal, I believe? - Dr cook: I think the statistics give one in a thousand. This was the last time deceased would have required surgical treatment for lupus. It was a progressive and disfiguring disease; and the treatment consisted in scraping off every piece of diseased tissue and getting new skin to grow. The operation was, therefore, intensely painful, and could not be endured without chloroform. - In reply to a Juror, Dr Curtis said in his opinion loss of blood from the operation, and the disease together, would not make death under chloroform at all more likely. He considered it satisfactory that there had been only one death out of 200 cases of chloroform administered in the Maud Hospital. Witness was house physician in one of the great London hospitals, and had given chloroform to persons of all ages; and there was no explanation that he could offer for death occasionally. Sometimes they could make an explanation, but often there was none. - The Coroner, summing up, thought the medical evidence full and exhaustive, clearly pointing to accidental death. They had in this case the independent testimony of Dr Curtis to aid their judgment. - The Jury, after a few minutes' conversation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." In a rider they exonerated Dr Cook, who skilfully administered the chloroform, from all blame, and expressed the opinion that everything possible was done to restore life after respiration had ceased.

Western Morning News, Monday 17 February 1890 BERE FERRERS - FRANCIS WHETTER, a navvy, about sixty years of age, whilst working in a cutting on the new railway at Beerferris, was caught in the shoulder by an engine conveying stones and thrown on the metals. The engine driver pulled up immediately, but not before the engine passed over the man's left leg, severing it and tearing his left side. Dr Reed was soon in attendance, but the poor fellow soon succumbed to his injuries. At an Inquest held on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at Beeralston, the Jury, of whom Mr Richard Maddaford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 February 1890 PLYMOUTH - A Plymouth Fisherman Fatally Stabbed In France. - The Inquest on the body of HENRY CALLARD, aged 21, son of a fisherman residing at 6 Parade, Plymouth, which was adjourned from January 29th, was resumed yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth. Deceased joined the ketch Honor, of Plymouth, at Christmas and sailed for France. On the 12th ult. he arrived at Falmouth and travelled by rail to Plymouth, stating that he had been stabbed in the head on board a steamer in a French port by the captain of the steamer. He treated the matter lightly and nothing more was got out of him respecting the incident, except that after being stabbed he became unconscious, and when he recovered, eight hours afterwards, he found himself in the hospital at Lannion, his clothes saturated with blood. The day after his return to Plymouth he was admitted to the Hospital, Mr Nash, the house surgeon, finding the wound very foul. The operation of trepanning was performed twice. The pains in the head, however, became worse. On the 23rd CALLARD became partially unconscious and on the 28th he died. Thomas John Larballestier, captain of the Honor, was the only new witness called yesterday. He stated that he shipped CALLARD as an able seaman on December 25th for a voyage to Lannion, and they arrived there about the 3rd of January. On the 8th they were again ready for sea, but CALLARD was missing. The steamer Frost, of Glasgow, Captain Collin, was the only English vessel in the port, and he sent his mate aboard to see if CALLARD was there. The mate was told he was not. The mate went a second time and received the same answer. Then witness went aboard himself and roused the crew up. The mate in the meantime struck a match and looking down the hold saw CALLARD lying there. CALLARD was carried ashore and witness went for a doctor, who ordered him to be removed to the Hospital. There witness asked CALLARD what he knew of the occurrence, and he replied that he was standing under the bridge of the Frost and saw Captain Collin standing behind him and knew no more until he was taken up from the vessel's hold. Witness gave information to the Police, who arrested Captain Collin, and he was sentenced to two months' imprisonment for common assault. - The Coroner said as they had not sufficient evidence to prove that the captain of the Frost struck the blow, it was impossible to return a verdict of manslaughter. A verdict of "Death from Injuries sustained, but how delivered and by who, there was no evidence to shew," was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 February 1890 EGG BUCKLAND - JOHN SKINNER, naval pensioner, aged 51, of Egg Buckland, was suddenly taken ill while conversing with some friends in the shop of Mr R. Spence, butcher, Regent-street, Plymouth, on Saturday evening and was removed in a cab to his home. Subsequently he became unconscious and remained in that state until Monday evening, when he died. Mr Aldous, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to apoplexy. Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest last evening and a verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 February 1890 PLYMOUTH - Much Engaged Doctors At Plymouth. - Inquiry was held by Mr Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, on Saturday, concerning the death of WILLIAM COLWILL, master carpenter, aged 72, of 14 Grenville-street. For a week deceased had been suffering from influenza and bronchitis, but was able to come downstairs each day, and was not under medical treatment. On Friday evening Mrs Thomas, a neighbour, who looked after the old man, noticed a great change in his appearance and sent for his son, who arrived about eleven o'clock. Deceased was then conscious, but appeared to be sinking and died about three hours afterwards. In his evidence, WILLIAM HENRY COLWILL, the son, said immediately on finding the condition his father was in, he went for medical aid. He called on no less than five doctors - Messrs. Greenway, Cuming, Whipple, Square and Way - but neither could come. Mr Way said he would come for a guinea but not without, and witness had not that amount with him. His father died about twenty minutes after his return. In reply to a Juror, who asked what excuses the other doctors made for not coming, witness said Mr Cuming was unwell, Mr Whipple told him he did not go out at night and knew nothing about MR COLWILL, and Mr W. Square said he could not go and recommended him to call Mr Way, who was the nearest practitioner to Grenville-road. - Mr H. Greenway, surgeon, who attended deceased in August last, attributed death to syncope. He explained he was unable to visit him on the previous evening when the son called him because he was then engaged in a serious case in his own house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 February 1890 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, at the Clifton Hotel, Clifton-street, Plymouth, yesterday, respecting the death of SUSAN GERTRUDE, daughter of ROBERT MOULE, pawnbroker, who died suddenly on Saturday. A little boy in the house called deceased's father's attention to the fact that the child was sick. A doctor was sent for, but the child died in a few minutes and before medical aid arrived. Dr E. H. Edlin who made a post mortem examination said both bronchial tubes were obstructed by particles of coagulated milk. In vomiting the deceased must have sucked down the rising obstruction into the larynx and death was caused by suffocation. The Jury returned the verdict of "Accidental Death."

SHALDON - At Shaldon yesterday a Coroner's Inquiry was held respecting the death of a male child, whose mother, LILY CLINTON, wife of ARTHUR CLINTON, commercial traveller, lodging in Ringmore-road, found dead by her side on Friday. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was 19 days old, was fed on condensed milk and water for a fortnight, after which time it refused such food, and on Thursday evening the nurse gave it a couple of teaspoonsful of nourishment which was all it would take. The mother said it had not had any food the whole day and night previous. The nurse advised that a doctor should be fetched on the following morning, but the infant died that morning. Mr Corbould, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said the cause of death was insufficient vital vigour rather than neglect. The mother told him that she had fed her other two children on condensed milk and water and he replied that what might suit them as healthy children might be wholly unfit for the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Malnutrition," and exonerated the mother and nurse from blame.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport Guildhall yesterday as to the cause of death of THOMAS GALE, 72 Dockyard pensioner, found lying in a lane at the back of Alcester-street, Ford, on Saturday evening by Rev. H. L. G. Coombs, vicar of Ford. Mr Gard, surgeon, deposed that having made a post-mortem examination, his opinion was that death resulted from syncope. The right lung was much diseased and the heart affected. The Jury, of whom Mr Millard was Foreman, found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and thanked Mr Coombs for his humane attention to the deceased pending the arrival of the surgeon.

NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held last evening at Newton by Mr S. Hacker, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY OSBORNE, a labourer, 19 years of age, who died on Saturday morning after three weeks' illness. Medical aid was called on Friday night too late to be of any avail, and a post mortem examination by Dr Ley shewed death to be due to an abscess on the brain, which had been forming for two or three weeks. If it had been attended to there would have been a chance of saving his life. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and regretted that medical assistance had not been procured earlier.

BARNSTAPLE - JOHN LAKE, aged 85, a retired wool stapler residing at Barnstaple, fell a week ago and broke his thigh. He died yesterday morning and at the Inquest held in the afternoon a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 February 1890 TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident At Tavistock. The Duties Of A Ganger. - Circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HOOKWAY, aged 36 years, formerly of Tiverton, who was employed as a fireman on the new railway between Lidford and Devonport, formed the subject of Inquiry at an Inquest held at Tavistock Cottage Hospital, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, District coroner. - Mr H. Tonkin was Foreman of the Jury. - Charles Richard Philp, a navvy, stated that n February 13th he and the deceased were engaged in blasting holes in Launceston-road cutting. After blasting three holes with gunpowder, and "burning back," or removing with an iron bar, all the loose pieces of rock which they considered dangerous, they were in the act of clearing the line of the fragments, as a locomotive was expected, when a large rock, which appeared to be firmly fixed about 14ft. above them and weighed 8 cwt., suddenly fell away. Witness managed to make good his escape, but the rock caught the deceased's right leg and badly crushed it. The deceased had said just previously, pointing to the rock, "That lump is all right. It will stand for a century." - The Coroner said Mr Phillips, an independent witness, who saw the accident, had kindly come forward to give evidence. - Mr Allen Julian Phillips, Windsor Cottage, Tavistock, stated that he was on the Launceston-road Bridge and observed several men at work in the cutting. He also noticed what appeared to him to be dangerously loose rocks overhanging the men. He saw a large rock fall and several men run away. One man seemed to be injured. The ganger was on the bridge part of the time witness was there, but not when the rock fell away. - The Foreman of the Jury asked whose duty it was to see that the loose rock was properly removed. - The witness Philp replied that the ganger overlooked the men, but he was not present when the rock fell. - The Coroner: They are experienced men, and understand their work. - The Foreman thought what had taken place did not confirm the Coroner's statement. He had seen men at work in a dangerous position under some rocks until the ganger told them to get further away. If they understood their work, he did not believe they would work under loose rock. - The Coroner to witness: But you did not consider this rock dangerous, did you? - Philp: No, sir. - The Coroner: The deceased himself said, "It will stand for a century." - The Foreman: Yes, but they had not examined the rock. Mr Phillips's evidence confirms me in the opinion that the men were at work in an obviously dangerous position, and that sufficient care had not been taken to remove the loose rock. - Mr J. T. Hislop, surgeon, of Tavistock, who attended deceased at the Hospital, said the right leg was severely crushed, and he and Dr Swale amputated it the same evening. Gangrene subsequently set in and the limb was further amputated above the knee on the 16th. Death resulted from exhaustion. - The Foreman, after consulting the other Jurors, said whilst all agreed that the deceased's death was the result of an accident, some felt that the ganger had not taken sufficient care to prevent the men from working in a dangerous place. A great many fatal accidents had occurred on the works, and it was a very serious matter. If the ganger was standing on the bridge he must have been able to see the appearance of the overhanging rocks better than the men. The ganger did not work, and therefore it seemed to him that it was the ganger's business to look after the safety of the men. The Coroner to Philp: The ganger did not know you were going to blast did he? - Witness: No sir. - Sergeant Coles remarked that Mr Baker (the ganger) was outside if the Coroner or the Jury wished to see him. - The Coroner: We don't need him. I don't think this is a case in which we can censure the ganger. - The Foreman: It is only right to caution a man when he has the lives of others in his hands. - Philp: The ganger is generally fair in that respect. He warns us if he sees us working in dangerous places. - The Coroner: Well, gentlemen, at all events, you say that the deceased's death was the result of an accident. As to the other matter I can call in the ganger and suggest to him that great care should be taken with regard to the safety of the men, but the witness says the ganger is a very careful man. To the witness: You don't find fault with him at all? - Philp: Not at all. - The Coroner to the Jury: You had better decide the matter by a majority of votes. - The Foreman: Will you not call in the ganger? - Mr Maker, a Juror, did not see why the ganger should be called in, because he was sure there was not a more careful man living. The ganger had told him that he hoped to get through the cutting without an accident. - The Foreman thought they ought to have the ganger before them to hear what he had to say. - Some of the Jurymen said they did not think the ganger was to blame, as he had nothing to do with the blasting operations. In reply to the Coroner, Philp stated that the deceased, as fireman, was in charge of the blasting operations. The ganger had to look after two sets of men, who worked a considerable distance apart. The deceased was a capable fireman. After further consultation the Jury simply returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, Camden-street, concerning the death of MR JOHN LETHBRIDGE, 71. MRS MARY ANN LETHBRIDGE, daughter-in-law of deceased, 39 Gibbon-street, deposed that on the previous day, about three o'clock, she saw deceased in his bedroom. He complained of pain and was endeavouring to vomit. In exerting himself he fell on the floor. He was propped up with pillows and Dr Cash Reed was immediately fetched. Dr W. Cash Reed said he examined deceased about twelve months ago and found him suffering from advanced heart disease. Death was due to syncope, induced by the efforts to vomit. The Jury, of which Mr W. Anthony was Foreman, found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - JOHN WARE, 64, of 4 Quarry-street, Plymouth, died suddenly early yesterday morning. At an Inquest, held at the Galatea Inn, King-street, by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, last evening, Mr Watefield, surgeon, stated that deceased, who had suffered from bronchitis and asthma and a very weak heart, died from syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Coroner, last evening on EMMA SAUNDERS, twelve months old, whose parents live at 65 Chapel-street. The child was seized with convulsions, caused by teething and died before medical aid could be summoned.

EXETER - Two Inquests were held at Exeter yesterday. The first related to the death of JOHN WRIGHT, alias "Snowball", a chimney-sweep, whose body was found in the Canal on the previous day. Evidence shewed that the deceased, a native of Reading, had been in the habit of sleeping in barns, or wherever he could find shelter. He had given way to drink and was last seen under its influence about a month ago on the road between Exminster and Alphington. Nothing was found on the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at the County Gaol in the afternoon, before the Deputy Coroner (Mr Gould), touching the death of CHARLOTTE ELIZA PALMER, aged 36, who at the time of her death was undergoing two months; imprisonment for larceny and had up to Thursday last carried out the tasks imposed upon her. On that day, however, she fell ill and died on Sunday from epilepsy.

KINGSWEAR - Doctor And Herbalist At Kingswear. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, at the Royal Dart Hotel, Kingswear, into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH SEARLE, 47, wife of a farm labourer living at Bowhay, Brixham. Deceased had been suffering from heart disease of long standing and she had been attended by Dr Searle, of Brixham, for several years. About a fortnight ago the husband called in William Carey Ryder, herbalist of Kingswear. Having expressed his belief that he could effect a cure, Ryder administered medicines in powders and pills. Three or four days afterwards she began to vomit. She took to her bed and became worse. Ryder saw her two or three times on Friday. In reply to the husband he said he could do nothing more for her and he had better send for a medical man. The woman died the next day. A post-mortem examination by Dr Searle, assisted by Dr Ernest Wills, Torquay, shewed that death was due to heart disease. The evidence of the medical men was to the effect that heart disease was practically incurable and that deceased must have died from this cause at some time or other. They also agreed that drugs if given to a person suffering from heart disease, which would have a depressing effect, would accelerate death. - Ryder stated that he gave deceased a preparation of dry squills and, when the sickness came on, ipecacuhana to relive it. He treated her for a cough, although the husband told him she was suffering from heart disease. Dr Wills said squills taken in the quantity administered to the deceased by Ryder would have a markedly depressing effect upon a person with a diseased heart. Ipecacuhana would have a similar effect, as it was used as an emetic for the purpose of producing sickness. The Coroner observed that it was a significant fact that, until the medicines were administered by Ryder, the deceased was going on in her usual state of health, but that, as soon as she was put under his treatment, she was taken ill, took to her bed, and eventually died. The question for the Jury was whether Ryder's treatment accelerated her death; because if Ryder, having no competent knowledge of the science of medicine, had so treated her by giving her injurious drugs as to accelerate her death, he would be legally responsible. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 February 1890 EGG BUCKLAND - Nitro-Glycerine Fatality At Egg Buckland. Votes Of Censure. - At Egg Buckland yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, assisted by Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy Coroner, resumed the adjourned inquiry into the death of GEORGE TAPPER, labourer, who was killed through an explosion of nitro-glycerine at Colehill Quarry, in the parish of Egg Buckland. - Major Cundill, inspector of explosives, represented the Home Office, and Superintendent Allen watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police. - Edward Gullett of Riverford, tenant of Colehill Quarry, said he arrived at the quarry on the 18th inst. at quarter past one o'clock. In the blacksmith's shop at the quarry entrance he saw the deceased and his nephew, Wm. Gullett, the latter of whom said to him, "I am putting some water warming to put in another charge of dynamite and soften." Witness replied "All right," and left to go into the quarry with some tools. When about 50 feet from the smithy door he heard an explosion. He immediately returned and found TAPPER in a sitting position leaning against the side of the building. Deceased exclaimed, "Oh, Ned it is a bad job; the water has exploded." Witness called to his son William, and a man named John Lock, who were at work in the quarry and went towards them. Lock and Wm. Gullett had heard the explosion and were making their way towards the smithy. All three returned to the shop and brought out first the deceased and afterwards witness's nephew, who was in the back part of the shop, and partly able to walk. On being asked if he was much hurt, Wm. Gullett replied "Yes, uncle," and added that they had been warming the water, and no blame attached to anyone. TAPPER lived about 20 minutes, dying in the quarry. His body was afterwards removed to his home at Commonwood Cottage, and the other injured man was removed to the Hospital at Plymouth. The water, with which it was intended to thaw the dynamite, was warmed in an iron pot, suspended over the fire by an iron bar. The utensil was originally a paint drum and held about six quarts of water. Witness did not test the heat of the water, and could not say whether deceased was blowing the fire. TAPPER had worked for him for about ten months and during the past three months he had been entrusted with the duty of thawing dynamite. His usual practice was to place the iron pot half filled with water over the fire. When the water was heated sufficiently to make steam, the pot would be taken off the fire, and a coarse bag put over it, with the dynamite cartridges on top. The steam coming through the bag would thaw the dynamite, the process usually occupying about a quarter of an hour. It was possible for the nitro-glycerine to leak into the water if it was overheated. The cartridges were purchased from Mr Stanbury, the Plymouth agent of the Kennal Vale Gunpowder Company. With each box of cartridges he received printed instructions for thawing the dynamite. The process of thawing he had described had been used by him for twenty-three years, and no accident had ever occurred before. He was not registered to keep explosives, not had he any police licence. Deceased had thawed dynamite about twenty times during the past three months, and was quite competent to perform the duty. - By the Jury: Had himself changed the water used for thawing the dynamite two weeks before the accident. - By the Inspector: He always emptied the pot after the second heating when he himself thawed the dynamite. In his possession on the morning of the accident he had 10 ¼ lb of dynamite and about 15 detonators. Eight of the cartridges he took to the quarry, leaving the rest at home. Five were used during the morning and the other three were found after the accident intact. When Mr Stanbury supplied him with the explosives he never asked him if he had a proper warming apparatus or police certificate. In fact, he never asked any questions or cautioned him. Witness conveyed the dynamite from Plymouth to Riverford in a trap and kept it afterwards in a wooden box in his stable. - These printed instructions for thawing the dynamite say:- "Avoid by any means putting it near to stoves, fire-places, or flames. The most convenient method is to use the warming apparatus for that purpose." If you had read that instruction do you think you would have heated it on the top of the smithy fire? - I have never read that instruction. Deceased adopted the mode of thawing the dynamite I have described because he had seen me do it. - Major Cundill, sworn, said the method adopted for thawing the dynamite was a most improper one. If Mr Gullett had really used it for twenty-three years, he was extremely lucky not to have been blown up long ago. In thawing dynamite with water over a fire he went the surest way to blow up the place. He had before him a list of thirty-five men killed through carelessness in thawing dynamite and everyone of those men's lives had been fooled away. Hot water or steam broke up dynamite and nitro-glycerine, being a liquid, would filter through a bag such as was used at Colehill Quarry. It was quite possible, also, from the slipshod way in which the thawing was done, that small portions of the cartridges might have got into the water. Nitro-glycerine would not mix with water, but went to the bottom of the utensil, and the heat would cause it to explode before the water would boil. Similar occurrences had happened before. In one instance a very small quantity of nitro-glycerine got into the water through a leaky tin, and an explosion followed, killing five men. ~Commenting upon the sale of the cartridges to Mr Gullet without inquiry or caution, the inspector said all the better class companies gave positive orders to their agents not to sell dynamite to people who could not shew they had proper warming pans and police certificates. - The Coroner, in summing up, said Mr Gullett had given his evidence in a clear, straightforward manner, concealing nothing. At the same time, he ought to have thawed the dynamite in a proper warming pan, with two circles, the inner one for the dynamite and the outer for hot water. With such an apparatus there would have been no risk of the nitro-glycerine percolating into the water, and it was for the Jury to determine how far Mr Gullett was to blame for his neglect in not providing it. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider censuring Edward Gullett for thawing dynamite by improper methods and recommending the use of proper warming pans on all future occasion. - The Coroner, in conveying to Mr Gullett the censure passed by the Jury, said if they had brought in a verdict of manslaughter he could not have found fault with it.

PLYMOUTH - The Inquest At Plymouth. - An adjourned Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening concerning the death of WILLIAM GULLETT, quarry labourer, aged 34, who died in the Institution on the 19th inst. from the effects of an explosion which occurred whilst thawing dynamite for blasting purposes at Cole Hill Quarry, Egg Buckland. The Inquiry was adjourned in order that the Home Office might be communicated with, and Major Cundill, R.A., H.M. Inspector of Explosives, was now in attendance. Major Acland Allen, superintendent of county Police, watched the proceedings. Mr W. R Rossetter was Foreman of the Jury. EDWARD GULLETT. proprietor of the quarry, recalled and examined by Major Cundill, said the stuff which exploded was dynamite. He obtained the dynamite himself from Mr Stanbury, 2 St. Andrew's-street, giving orders for it himself. He had had no licence or Police certificate to keep dynamite since 1884. He had thawed dynamite in the same way for fourteen years. An old paint drum containing water was placed on the smithy fire. A coarse canvas bag was placed over the boiling water, and the dynamite steamed until it became soft. He could not tell whether the water was changed every time a cartridge was steamed, but when heating dynamite himself he always changed the water the second time. - Did you ever receive any caution from Mr Stanbury about the proper way of thawing? - Witness: No sir, nor from anyone else. Continuing, witness said that rules accompanied every 5lb packet, but he did not read them. He instructed the deceased in the first instance as to the method of thawing. - The Coroner: Did you know that there was a proper apparatus for thawing dynamite? - Witness: No sir, I never knew that there was such a thing. - Mr W. G. Nash, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted on the 18th suffering from various wounds, which witness described. Deceased stated that his injuries arose from the explosion of a dynamite cartridge which had been heated in an old straw hat over a tin of water. It was the second that he had heated, and he was using the same water. His mate was standing before the fire, and he was heating the water when it exploded. He attributed it to what he termed the "nourishment" getting out of the dynamite into the water. He died on the 19th. As the result of a post-mortem examination he found that a number of lacerated wounds had been inflicted, from some of which he extracted small pieces of iron. In several places the wounds had penetrated to vital parts. The cause of death was shock from the injuries, haemorrhage of the liver and internal injuries. - Major Cundill explained to the Jury that dynamite, as they probably knew, was composed of two substances, namely, earth and nitro-glycerine. If the dynamite were put in water or steamed the heavy yellow nitro-glycerine would fall to the bottom of the vessel. There was no doubt that the method adopted in the present instance of thawing dynamite was most reckless and dangerous. Mr Gullett had told them that he did not read the rules but a more insane person could not be imagined, except, as had been the case in some fatalities, where dynamite was fried in a tin over the fire. No doubt the old hat used had holes in it and the nitro-glycerine got into the water through it from the previous cartridge which was warmed. The nitro-glycerine would form a layer under the water, and there were all the conditions necessary for a severe blast. They had the fire underneath a layer of nitro-glycerine, which was tamped with water, and as soon as the glycerine got hot enough, there was a severe explosion. Some of the larger dynamite companies issued strict orders to their agents not to sell dynamite to those who had not proper warming pans. These pans were on the principle of a glue pot, the inner vessel being of painted canvas and felt, which could not be placed on the fire without utterly destroying it. The water was heated on the fire and then taken to the inner can which was placed in the hot water. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added the following rider: "The Jury desire to censure EDWARD GULLETT for his negligence in thawing dynamite, and for the imperfect appliances used by him and suggest that in future he should obtain the proper utensils."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 March 1890 ALDERSHOT, HAMPSHIRE - Singular Death Of A Soldier [Special Telegram.]. Aldershot, Wednesday. - A private in the Devonshire Regiment named WILLIAM WILLIAMS, a native of Newton Abbot, aged 21, was seen late last night with a woman near the Redan Fort, Aldershot. He was very drunk. This morning about seven, a boy went to slide on a pool in the fort, and found the man lying dead in about a foot of water. £1 5s. was found on him by the Police. At the Inquest this evening, Dr Harwood said that death was probably due to shock. No foul play is suspected and an Open Verdict was returned. Sergeant Madden said the deceased was usually a sober man.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accidents At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held Inquests at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital last evening on the bodies of ALICE MOOR, aged 4, residing at 29 St Andrew's-street, Plymouth, and FLORRIE GRANVILLE, aged 6, residing at 17 Francis-street, both of whom died at the Hospital from shock caused by burns. In the first case JANE MOOR, the mother, said she was not at home at the time of the occurrence. Fanny Rendle, a neighbour, stated that about 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning she heard a child shouting "father," and looking upstairs she saw smoke and the deceased on the landing in flames. Rushing up she took a quilt from the bed, rolled the deceased in it, smothering the flames. Agnes Hannah, who gave corroborative evidence, sent for a policeman, and P.C. Tapp arriving, took the deceased to the Hospital. Mr W. G. Nash, house surgeon, stated that the child was brought to the Hospital just before noon, suffering from superficial burns. She died just before eleven the same evening from shock. - In the second case, ELIZA GRANVILLE, the mother, said on Tuesday morning while getting breakfast, the fire went apparently out. She went to get some coals, and returning found deceased in flames. In trying to put the flames out she fell back and became unconscious. A can containing oil was found almost empty near the deceased, and it was supposed that she threw the contents of the can on the smouldering ashes. The mother in trying to put out the flames burnt her hands badly. Mr Nash, house surgeon said death was due to shock. The Jury, of whom Mr George Wright was Foreman, returned in both cases verdicts of "Accidental Death." The Coroner and Jury expressed sympathy with MRS GRANVILLE.

Western Morning News, Friday 7 March 1890 TEIGNMOUTH - Shocking Fatality At Teignmouth. A Remarkable Case. - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth yesterday by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of HUGH GILLIAT found on the railway on Tuesday morning. Mr G. Frances was Foreman of the Jury. Inspector J. Hockaday watched the case on behalf of the G.W.R. - Mr John Weymouth Bodley, proprietor of the King's Arms Hotel, Dartmouth, stated that to the best of his knowledge the deceased was HUGH GILLIAT, who had stayed at his house from Thursday last until Monday. He said he was CAPTAIN GILLIAT, and had won the Victoria Cross for saving the life of Major Pearson. He had shewn witness a bullet wound in his leg and said that he had also suffered from ague and fever. On Friday morning he went to a chemist and obtained some laudanum, the empty bottle being afterwards found on the bedroom table. Mrs Bodley took him his breakfast that morning, and he drank the coffee, but did not eat anything. Shortly after they found him lying on his bed and he was vomiting. His eyes were staring and he appeared to be in great pain. Witness went to the chemist and questioned him as to the contents of the bottle. The chemist said he did not think the quantity of laudanum was too much for a man who had been drinking heavily, as he thought the man had by his shaking. Witness had no doubt the deceased took the laudanum to commit suicide, but the vomiting saved his life. He seemed better during the day, and in the evening entered into conversation with Mr Roberts, solicitor, about his travels in India and Australia. On Saturday morning he was queer again. He was not a heavy drinker, though he may have had six or eight "whiskies" a day. Witness heard that deceased's effects were at the Torcross Hotel, where he had been staying for a month, and had left without paying his hotel bill. On Monday last he appeared much agitated over a letter he had received and shortly after went out. Witness had not seen him since, nor did he know of his whereabouts until he saw the account in the Western Morning News of the finding of the body. Witness had since heard that deceased attempted to commit suicide on a previous occasion. Mr Millman, veterinary surgeon, of Dartmouth, addressed a letter for the deceased, to Mrs Saunders, The Vicarage, Betchwood, Reigate, Surrey. - Mr John Huntley, of the Beehive Inn, Teignmouth, said the deceased came into his house on Monday evening about half-past six and asked to be allowed to sit by the fire. He was supplied with a "drop" of rum and a glass of beer. He entered into conversation with the customers in the bar and stated that he was on his way to Torquay. He left the house about ten o'clock. - George Studd, a lad, gave evidence of the finding of the body on the railway, and P.C. Wyatt described the position of the body. The trunk was on the down side of the metals and close to the wall and the right leg on the line a few yards off. There was no evidence of deceased having been seen to cross the railway. There was a protecting wall along the side of the railway which the deceased would have to get over. - F. Sergt. Richards produced the telegrams which had passed between him and the relative at Reigate, and a Mr or Mrs Saunders had telegraphed their intention of coming that day. - The Coroner thought it would not be satisfactory to close the Inquest before the Jury had heard what the relatives had to say and he would propose to adjourn the Inquest for a few days. The Foreman considered they had sufficient evidence to shew that deceased was killed by the train, and he did not see the necessity of an adjournment. The Coroner still thought otherwise and the Inquest was adjourned until tomorrow.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 March 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH HICKS, aged 63, residing at 22 Looe-street, who died suddenly. Dr Brenton, as the result of a post-mortem examination, found that deceased died from asphyxia, due to bronchitis. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Murray was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner on the body of ETHEL DAISY PENFOUND, 4 months old, daughter of a hammerman in the Dockyard. The child was apparently well at eleven o'clock on Thursday night and the next morning its mother found it dead by her side. A post-mortem examination by Mr F. Everard Row shewed that the child had died from congestion of the lungs.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 March 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held two Inquests at the Harvest Home Hotel, Tavistock-road, Plymouth, yesterday. The first related to MRS ELIZABETH BLACKBURN, aged 77, 14 Tavistock-place, who fell downstairs on Sunday, March 2nd. Mrs Vincent and MISS BLACKBURN having given evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr R. Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquiry had reference to the death of ETHEL GWENDOLINE WALLIS, aged 11 months, living at 1 Guildford-street, who was found dead in bed by her mother on Sunday morning. Dr Pullin deposed that deceased had been sickly from birth and he had warned its mother that it was liable to be convulsed at any moment. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Clark on Saturday investigated the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH JACKSON, aged 52, a porter residing at No. 1 Edgcumbe-place. ELIZABETH, the widow, stated that on Friday he had his dinner about half-past twelve and at quarter past one he went to his work. Three-quarters of an hour afterwards he was brought home in a cab unconscious. She sent for Mr Bean, surgeon, who arrived soon after and pronounced life extinct. - Henry Cowley, a labourer, said he saw the deceased lying in the road in Garden-crescent and took him home. Mr Bean, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to aortic disease. The Jury, of whom Mr William Rowe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

LONDON - Suicide Of A Plymouth Lady In London. - At Paddington yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of ANNIE REDMAN, aged 46, wife of the late GEORGE C. REDMAN, 7th Dragoons, who formerly resided in Plymouth. Deceased's sister, Mrs Emily McLoughlin, a widow, residing at Stonehouse, deposed that as deceased was very much depressed in spirits, her friends at Plymouth thought it advisable for her to go to London to be under treatment. Annie Sprout, of 14 Boundary-road, St John's Wood, who keeps a home for medical and surgical cases, said she received deceased on December 14th. At times she was very much depressed, but lately had been much better. Last Tuesday evening, after playing whist, she went to bed. Next morning whilst witness and some of the nurses were at breakfast, they heard deceased fall from her bedroom window into the back garden. Dr Mint was called in and ordered her removal to Hospital. Deceased had no delusions and never threatened her life. A nurse named Burbridge corroborated. Dr R. H. Cole, resident house surgeon, St Mary's Hospital, found deceased on Wednesday suffering from a compound fracture of the thigh and a fracture of the spine. She grew worse and died in twenty-eight hours. Deceased said she had fallen from a window, and had been depressed. She asked if she should die and on his telling her she would, she expressed a hope that she might live until her mother could see her. The Coroner was afraid there could be no doubt that in a sudden impulse deceased threw herself out of the window. A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 13 March 1890 CALSTOCK - Mr Thompson, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of WILLIAM WREFORD, aged 25, navvy, lodging at Beeralston, drowned at Calstock on Monday evening. Captain Adams, of the steam barge Rumleigh, stated that, hearing the shouts of P.C. Doidge, he at once took the ferry boat to the spot and after some time recovered the body of deceased with a boat hook. Efforts to restore animation failed. John Cox said he, deceased, and several other navvies had spent some hours in Calstock, visiting a public-house and walking about the streets. Deceased was slightly the worse for drink, but able to walk by himself. He was not accustomed to take much. Their companions had gone home before. Witness went into a shop to buy biscuits and deceased consequently got some distance ahead, missed the way to the ferry, passed along the quay, and, tripping in a chain, fell into the river. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. [Note: In a previous article of the death, deceased was said to be a native of Crediton, Devon.]

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter Hospital yesterday touching the death of TOM CLEAVE, aged 38, of Newton Abbot. The evidence shewed that the deceased, formerly an inmate of the Newton Workhouse, suffered from epileptic fits. In one of these he fell out of bed and broke his right arm. The limb was set by a surgeon, but in another fit deceased again broke his arm, and he was removed to the Hospital, the Union consenting to pay a certain sum for his maintenance. He died from the effects of the injury. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

ASHBURTON - MR THOMAS PEARSE, a butcher and a considerable landowner in Ashburton, and who for many years represented that parish on the Newton Board of Guardians, about fourteen years since sustained great losses through the failure of some of his speculations. Giving way to despondency, it was found necessary to remove him first to Wonford Asylum and then to Exminster. Three years ago he returned home, and feeling his position very much he confined himself to his bedroom. For the last month he kept his bed altogether. On Saturday afternoon, when his wife took him up some food, she noticed a great change in him and fetched Dr Ackerley, who found him dead. At the Inquest held yesterday the widow related these facts, adding that deceased had not had medical attendance because she thought he was suffering only from despondency. Dr Ackerley, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that the body was fairly nourished. In the gullet were portions of food deceased was too weak to swallow. Failure of the heart's action owing to exhaustion was the cause of death, and the Jury, of whom Mr Cruse was Foreman, returned a verdict in accord with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 March 1890 EXETER - Killed On The Railway At Exeter. Suicide Or Accident? - Mr W. H. Cole, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday concerning the death of CHARLES HENDY, aged 15, of 14 Pinhoe-street, killed on the railway near his home. Deceased left his home at seven o'clock on Saturday night and was seen an hour later in the High-street by Jans Harding, a pupil-teacher, with whom he was acquainted, walking citywards. At seven o'clock on Sunday morning John Raymont, a signalman on the London and South Western Railway, on duty at the junction signal-box just outside the city boundaries, found HENDY'S dead body lying between the rails on the Exmouth branch, a short distance from the junction with the main line. Deceased's head was pointing towards Exeter and the disturbed state of the ballast indicated that he had been knocked down by a train going towards the city and dragged some little distance. His left leg was almost completely severed and there were other injuries on the body. His clothes were torn and his hat and boots were picked up several yards away, one boot being half-way down the right embankment and the other on the opposite side of the line. On the body was found a packet of letters addressed to the lad by a girl named Blanche Smith. It was stated there was no public right of way across the line, but a path used by the company's workmen led past the spot from the road to the junction engine shed. The last train over the branch passed at 10.30 the previous night. - HENRY HENDY, a brother of deceased, said he could only account for the presence of the deceased on the line on the supposition that he was going to the engine shed. The Coroner said he gathered from the letters found on the deceased that there had been some disagreement at home. - Witness said there had not been any to his knowledge. No member of the family had resented his brother's correspondence with Miss Smith. Deceased had never threatened to commit suicide, but had expressed an intention to enlist. That was not, however, in consequence of any unpleasantness at home. - The Coroner: Then, if it is stated in these letters that he was unhappy that is untrue? - Witness: yes, that is untrue, as far as I know. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the fact that the deceased was found with his boots off was very singular and disposed of the suggestion that he was going to the engine shed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 March 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at P[?] Inn, Harwell-street, yesterday on the body of HONOR JAMES, aged 72, who died at [?]-street, Plymouth, yesterday morning. Mrs [?] her daughter, stated that deceased had been unwell for a few days, but she did not anticipate any fatal results. Dr Pullin deposed he attended deceased and had made a post-mortem examination, and found that death was due to fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury of whom Mr J. Scown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 March 1890 ALWINGTON - At the Inquest yesterday on the body of JOHN SLOMAN, who died whilst acting as bearer at the funeral of Mr J. R. Pine-Coffin, at Alwington, it was shewn that he fell once and recovered and then fell a second time and died, and the Jury found a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease, accelerated by excitement."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 March 1890 PLYMOUTH - CHARLOTTE KNIGHT, 66, residing at Sutton-road, Plymouth, was yesterday morning found dead in bed by Jane Reed, who entered her room to put out the lamp and draw up the blinds. Mary Ann Pooley last saw her alive on the previous evening. She was then very weak, but did not complain. Mr Cuming, surgeon, visited deceased on Monday afternoon and found her suffering from bronchitis and a feeble heart. At an Inquest held last evening by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, the Jury, of whom Mr John Jewell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 28 March 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Guildhall, yesterday, on the body of EDWARD HOWLETT, aged 27, one of the crew of the ketch Charter, of Lowestoft, who was drowned in Sutton Pool, Plymouth, on Monday evening. There was no evidence to show how deceased met his death, but Harry Burgess, captain of the ketch, and Charles Knox, boatman of Plymouth, stated that they grappled for the body in the Pool on Wednesday and found it about 300 yards from where the ketch lay. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Kemp was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." - The Coroner said there had been several deaths in the vicinity of the Pool lately, and both he and the Jury thought it was time that the authorities improved the lighting of the place.

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 March 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - The Suicide Of a Soldier At Devonport. - At the Military Hospital, Stoke, yesterday afternoon, an Inquiry was held by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, respecting the death of THOMAS DAVIS, private in the 2nd North Staffordshire Regiment, who committed suicide while on sentry duty in Raglan Barracks on the previous day. Lance-Corporal Proctor said deceased looked very ill and was very quiet in his manner when he posted him at two o'clock on the previous day. He nodded assent when witness asked him if he was satisfied with taking over his duty. - Private Stevenson, who found DAVIS in the sentry-box, said deceased must have shot himself by placing the rifle in his mouth. The shot penetrated his skull and his helmet and passed out at the back of the sentry-box. Deceased was groaning very loudly when witness found him. Surgeon Reid, A.M.S., pronounced him dead when he saw him shortly afterwards. Deceased had been under the charge of Sergeant Houston, for drill practice at Fort Staddon for about six weeks ending 22nd February. He was immediately afterwards admitted into Hospital and came out on Monday. Houston had always found deceased to be cheerful and pleasant, but soon after ten o'clock on the previous morning he noticed that he was very peculiar in his manner, and in answer to two or three questions which Houston put to him he simply gave a vacant laugh. Deceased joined the battalion about April 1st, 1888, soon after its arrival at Devonport. - Surgeon Sloggett, Army Medical Staff, said deceased was admitted to Hospital suffering from skin complaint. He afterwards suffered from a severe attack of indigestion, but was discharged cured. While in Hospital he shewed very hypchondriachal symptoms. It was an interesting point to note that his brother was in Hospital under observation for epilepsy. This pointed to madness being in the family and might have had a depressing effect upon him. Witness was not surprised to hear that he had committed suicide. The Jury found that deceased shot himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. Captain Watkins, one of the officers of the regiment was present during the Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 April 1890 EXETER - Exeter Coroner severely cautioned a nurse at an Inquest he held on the body of a baby which died from inanition. The woman who attended the mother in her confinement, gave a certificate as follows: "This is to certify that I, Louisa Cole, witnessed the birth and death of the female child of HENRY GREENGRASS, of the R.A., at Topsham Barracks. Child's life, 234 hours." The Coroner said to give such a certificate was a very improper and an illegal thing, and he warned her to be careful that she did not do such a thing again.

WEARE GIFFARD - Much interest was excited at Bideford by the death of WILLIAM DYMOND, 17, he being a member of St Peter's Church choir and well known in the town. At the Inquest, Mr W. Bright, of Wear Gifford, with whom deceased worked, stated that on Thursday at half-past seven he told him to go into a loft and fix the rope in position for turning. As he did not come to dinner, he went to the loft and found the lad hanging by a rope. He cut him down and deceased fell to the floor below. Robert Perkins, who was called to help, stated that the rope was knotted loosely around the neck and the other end was fastened securely over a beam. It had been hoped that the evidence would shew that death was the result of an accident, but the jury found that deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

ERMINGTON - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, with a Jury, of whom Mr George Coleman was Foreman on the body of KATHLEEN LAKE, aged 11 months, living at Mount Pluck, Ermington. Evidence was given by Dr Cornish that the child had died from a fit caused by teething.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 April 1890 EXETER - REGINALD SIDNEY EGBERT HOWELLS, the infant son of the REV. J. C. HOWELLS, Baptist Minister, of Exeter, died suddenly of convulsions, brought on by whooping cough, on Tuesday morning and, at an Inquest yesterday afternoon, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 7 April 1890 BAMPTON - Mr Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Bampton on Saturday relative to the death of MR JOHN SHORT, saddler. Deceased, aged 68, had suffered ill-health for some time and a recent attack of influenza left him weak in body and depressed in mind. Subsequently paralysis set in, but he had the use of his arms and on Thursday, whilst in bed, he cut his throat with a pocket-knife. Dr Guinness was called in, but deceased died about two hours afterwards from loss of blood. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Insane." Deceased was at one time a member of the Local Board and the School Board. He leaves a widow and three grown-up daughters.

TOTNES - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Seymour Hotel, Totnes, by Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr E. Middleton was Foreman, on the body of MARY ANN HONEYCOMBE, of Totnes, aged 70. SARAH HONEYCOMBE, a daughter of deceased, who resided with her, said on Friday afternoon she left her mother, then apparently in her usual health, to fetch some water. Returning in five minutes, she found her in a kneeling position with her head resting against the wall. Dr Perkins was called to the deceased, and found her dead, death being due to Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 April 1890 CHAGFORD - WILLIAM BURROW, wheelwright, Chagford, died on Sunday morning from injuries received on Saturday by his horse bolting and upsetting the cart on him. At the Inquest held yesterday Mr Burd, Coroner, complimented George Collins, a lad of 17, the principal witness, on his behaviour at the time of the accident, and also on the manner he gave his evidence. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

MODBURY - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest at Leigh Farm, Modbury, yesterday, on the body of GEORGE WYATT, about 60 years of age, a labourer. Edmond Hicks, of Leigh Farm, gave deceased instructions to fell a tree in the shrubbery and there he was found dead an hour afterwards. Mr G. V. Langworthy, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, the result of over-straining in felling the tree, the deceased being delicate. The Jury, of whom Mr C. H. Sullivan was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 11 April 1890 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by the Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) at the Homeopathic Hospital, Plymouth, on the body of THOMAS PLUCKNET, fatally injured by a fall. Deceased, a mason's labourer, residing at 56 Union-place, was 61 years of age. Joseph Datson, a fellow workman, stated that deceased was employed by Mr Partridge in erecting a building at the back of Mr Creber's premises in Union-street. While stooping to move a plank resting across some binding beams deceased fell forward, striking his head against a piece of timber on the floor ten feet below where he was standing. He was picked up unconscious and taken to the Homeopathic Hospital. P.C. Elliott produced the piece of wood against which the deceased struck his head. Dr Vawdrey was called to attend deceased, but found him dead on arriving at the Hospital. There was a wound three inches long over the right eyebrow, extending to the bone. The cause of death in his opinion was fracture, with depression of the inner table of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 12 April 1890 NEWTON FERRERS - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Dolphin Inn, Newton Ferrers, yesterday Inquired into the death of JOHN WILLS TAYLOR, aged 70 years, a retired Plymouth cabinet-maker, who died somewhat suddenly on Thursday night. Mr J. E. Adkins, surgeon, attributed death to diseased heart and lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Stevenson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, on the body of EMMA HARPER, 40, widow, found in Coxside Creek on Thursday, John Webb deposed that he lived with deceased at the Freemasons Arms, Cattedown, until three weeks ago, when he was obliged to leave her on account of her drunken habits, and he did not see her again until called to identify the body. The Jury, of whom Mr Rowe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM JOHN GUNN, 45, labourer, Plymouth Starch Works, was taken ill at work and shortly after saying "I'm dying," died, and before medical aid, which was promptly sent for, could be obtained. At the Inquest, held by Mr A. S. Clark, yesterday, William Penwill said deceased had often complained of pains in the region of the heart and Mr Wey, surgeon, who arrived shortly after GUNN died, attributed death to bronchitis and heart disease resulting in syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 April 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening into the circumstances attending the sudden death of ROBERT PROWSE, 26 years of age, a private in the Army Reserve. Deceased, a native of Wadebridge, had lately been working on the L. and S.W. Junction Railway and for the last thirteen months had been living with Susannah Davey, an unmarried woman, during which time he drank a great deal. He had slept for the last four months at Hancock's refreshment house in Catherine-street. About noon on Sunday he came down from his bedroom and remarked that if he had not been called by the servant he should have remained in bed all day. Mrs Hancock advised him to go back to bed again, and he said he would. He thereupon fell backwards and died in about two minutes. Mr F. Everard Rowe, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, found that the body was poorly nourished. The main artery leading from the heart had become rotten by disease and had burst into the bag of the heart, the deceased bleeding to death internally. This might have been caused by hard drinking.

TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Teignmouth last evening, on the body of MICHAEL CAINES, sailor, whose body was picked up in the Teign on Sunday morning. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, the Jury adding a rider to the effect that it would have been better if deceased's friends, finding he was under the influence of drink, had placed him in the care of the Police.

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday on the body of ALFRED TOLLEY, 24, private Devonshire Regiment. Deceased on Friday evening left the Higher barracks for a walk with Private Gliddon, and when he had walked about thirty yards from the gate he complained of a pain in the left side. After resting for a few minutes he fell into his companion's arms and was carried back to the barracks. Surgeon-Major O'Brien, who was immediately summoned, found life extinct. Death was due to heart disease and congestion of the lungs. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 April 1890 DARTMOUTH - A Dartmouth Sailor Burnt To Death. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Dartmouth yesterday on the body of CHARLES BALKHAM, aged 38, a sailor. - Louis Travessa, a coal lumper, of Dartmouth, deposed that he, George Adams, and deceased were on Saturday evening in charge of a coal hulk, which was being towed by the tug Hanley from Portsmouth to Dartmouth for the Channel Coaling Company. About 8 o'clock BALKHAM, relieved from watching by witness, went down into the forecastle hatchway, smoking and carrying a lamp. About eleven o'clock Adams came out of the aft hold and asked where CHARLIE was, and witness replied in the forecastle. Adams went to the forecastle and presently came back and told him that BALKHAM was in the fore cabin burnt to death. Witness had not heard any call for help and had not smelt anything burning. - George Adams, a coal lumper and fisherman, said somewhere about midnight witness awoke up from his sleep in the after cabin as though he had been called. Going on deck and learning from Travessa that CHARLIE had gone into the forecastle hold, he went to look for him, although nothing had occurred to excite his suspicions. Witness looked down the forecastle hatchway, and saw the lamp with a small flame on the beam. There was no floor in the hatchway. The lamp was on the beam about half-way down, and it was still lighted. There was no smell of paraffin about. He blew the lamp out. - The Coroner: Why did you do that? - I don't know. - Adams, continuing, said he put the lamp on the beam after he had made it out. Up to that time he had not seen nor called the deceased. He then turned round to go up the ladder to come on deck, when he saw deceased right in the hold, in a glow of fire right up from his waist to his neck. Deceased was lying about twenty feet from the ladder. Witness then went right into the hold and caught hold of the deceased's arm and tried to pull him towards him. The whole of the deceased's head and body, with the exception of his legs, was in one glow of fire. One arm was over his head, as if he had been resting his head on it. There was no fire about his legs. When witness took hold of deceased's arm all the clothes that were on it came off in his hand like a cinder. BALKHAM'S clothes were hot. He was quite dead. Did not see his face. When he pulled at the arm it was like a fixture of stone. The smell was something horrible and he came on deck as he felt faint and sick, and it was some time before he could speak. - John Perring, master of the tug Hanley, of Dartmouth, engaged to tug the hulk Jane, said between 11 and 12 on Saturday night he heard a lot of shouting on the hulk. He left the tug drop astern, and asked what was the matter. The men on the hulk told him that BALKHAM was burnt to death. He asked them if the fire was out. They replied no, and that they wanted a bucket. He told them to put an oilskin over the fire, for the tug could render them no assistance as the weather was rough. They arrived at Dartmouth about 6.30 on Sunday morning. Upon going into the hold of the hulk after it was moored, he saw BALKHAM lying on his right side and facing the keel. The lamp was still lying on the beam. Deceased was burnt down to the knees. He could not see where his pipe was. - Dr Robert Wills Soper stated that on Sunday morning he was called to the hulk, where he found deceased lying on his right side in the forecastle hold facing the keel. His right arm was above his head as though he had been using it for a pillow. All the clothes on the upper part of the body were burnt. With the police-sergeant he turned out the deceased's trouser pockets and there found a pipe and a box of matches and a tobacco pouch. There were no marks of violence on the body but the burns. Any fumes from the lamp would have gone up and not down towards the deceased. There was no doubt that the pipe was put into the pocket whilst hot and caught the trousers on fire. - A Juryman: A very common practice, too. - Continuing, Dr Soper said deceased was in all probability suffocated by inhaling whilst asleep the fumes which came from his burning trousers. - In answer to a Juryman, Dr Soper said the fumes from the clothes may have been so gradual as not to awaken the sleeping man, and if he was having a heavy sleep it would not have awakened him at all, but would rather have had the opposite effect. In his opinion the man was first smothered and then burnt. The right trousers' pocket was burnt and all the clothes and the body above it were burnt. The head and face were, no doubt, burnt after death. - P.S. Stentiford corroborated the doctor's evidence and added that money amounting to 2s. 11 ½d. in the pocket was greatly charred. - George Adams and John Pering, both recalled, said deceased at the time he went aboard the hulk was perfectly sober. - The Coroner, Mr Hacker, having remarked on the reckless practice of putting pipes just smoked into pockets, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they believed the fire originated from the pipe being put into the pocket before the fire was properly out of it. - A box of matches found on the deceased was burnt about half-way up, but, strange to say, the sulphur ends had not ignited in the least. Deceased has been twice married, and had one child by his first wife. The child and his second wife survive him.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner of Plymouth, and a Jury of whom Mr c. G. Edwards was Foreman, yesterday investigated the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH ANN BLATCHFORD, a married woman 27 years of age, and the mother of three children, residing in Moon-lane. Under the impression that she was enciente, she, acting upon the advice of a woman, performed upon herself an operation resulting in such injury that acute peritonitis set in, causing death on Sunday morning. Dr T. H. Williams, of Gibbon-street, was called to attend her on Thursday for sickness and diarrhoea, but it was not until Saturday, when she had become much worse, that she admitted what she had done. She said that when talking to some women at the bottom of Moon-street, one told her she would lend her something that would put it all right. She repeatedly told the doctor she did not know the woman. Dr Williams, as the result of a post-mortem examination, stated that the deceased was not in the condition she believed she was, and in that opinion he was borne out by Mr Jackson, surgeon. The Jury, in returning a verdict that death was due to Deceased's own Act, exonerated the husband from all blame.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 April 1890 LYDFORD - On Saturday afternoon Mr Burd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Princetown Convict Prisons on the body of JOHN HAROD, formerly of Cambridge, and who was undergoing a sentence of ten years' penal servitude, about four of which had expired. Deceased was sent on Friday to a store for a basket and as he did not return with it quickly another convict was sent to call him. He was then found hanging by the neck from a beam. the convict immediately called an official, who at once cut the deceased down and summoned the medical officer, who pronounced life extinct. Deceased, who was 52 years of age, and was a gardener previous to his conviction, had been very well behaved during his imprisonment, but often complained of pains in his head which had been badly injured by falling from a horse before his conviction. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide by Hanging."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 April 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, held an Inquiry last evening at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, respecting the death of SAMUEL EASTMAN, aged 65, who resided at 24 Parade, and died at that Institution on Saturday night. Deceased, believing he was suffering from piles, performed an act which necessitated his removal to the Hospital on Friday, and the performance of an operation. Peritonitis set in and that, combined with the previous shock, caused death.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Clark also held an Inquest on LOTTIE BEATRICE ROLAND, aged 9 days, who died that morning in a fit at 25 Plym-street. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 April 1890 PLYMOUTH - THOMAS JOSLIN, a coal porter, 41, slipped whilst, with four other men, carrying a plank on the Constance, of Fowey, in Sutton Pool, Plymouth, and fell across the rail of the vessel. Early yesterday morning he died, and at an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 25 April 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - MR THOMAS BENNETT, 69 years of age, who lived with his son, MR WILLIAM BENNETT, in Haddington-road, Stoke, was found dead in bed about nine o'clock yesterday morning. He had suffered from a weak heart, and Mr W. Gard, surgeon, who was called in, considered that death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Coroner.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Sailors' Home, Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, yesterday, on the body of ALEXANDER DANSKIN, an apprentice on board the ship Port Sonachan, of Scotland. he died on board a few days ago. Captain Renney said deceased had been poorly for some time, and before he died he lost his reason. Dr Buchan, who went on board to see the body, said in his opinion deceased died of malarial fever and dysentery. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Lucas was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 28 April 1890 WIDECOMBE IN THE MOOR - After hearing the evidence of the husband and other witnesses, the Jury who on Saturday investigated the circumstances attending the death of MRS MARY MANN, who was found dead in the leat about half a mile from [?] Farmhouse, Widecombe, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." In deceased's pocket was found her husband's razor. Mr H. H. Hannaford was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 April 1890 IVYBRIDGE - EMMA JANE PAWLEY, aged six years, died suddenly at Pawley Cottage, Addicombe, near Ivybridge, on Saturday, and yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest. Mr Brown was Foreman of the Jury. MRS PAWLEY said deceased had fits three months ago, and they had recurred at intervals. One of deceased's schoolmates said that she was playing with the girl on Saturday afternoon, and they heard a loud clap of thunder. Deceased ran indoors, saying she was fainting. She fell down and died in a quarter of an hour. Mr J. Rendle, surgeon, of Ivybridge, said death was due to syncope and a verdict to that effect was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Returning home from Chapel on Sunday afternoon, MR JOHN LEE, insurance agent, 2 Rosehill-cottages, Stoke, found his wife, whom he had left a few hours previously in apparent good health, was dead. A post-mortem examination made by Mr Leah, surgeon, Stonehouse, shewed that she had suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart, and at the Inquest held by Mr Vaughan yesterday, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. MRS LEE was 48 years of age.

TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Torbay Infirmary, Torquay, last evening on the body of FREDERICK JAMES HURVID, 20 years of age. Mr Arthur Watson, assistant house surgeon, stated that death ensued fifteen minutes after admission and was caused by rupture of the liver and internal haemorrhage. Thomas McCabe, driver of the Queen's Hotel 'bus, saw deceased run out from behind a fish cart right under his horses heads He pulled up as sharp as he could, but felt the jar of one wheel going over the boy. Samuel Melhuish, behind whose cart deceased was running saw the two near wheels of the 'bus pass over the boy. He immediately got down and assisted the boy into his cart and drove him to the Infirmary. The accident could not have been avoided, though the driver did the utmost to do so, and pulled up at once. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and said no blame was attributable to the driver of the 'bus.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 April 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday held three Inquests in cases of sudden death. The first related to GEORGE BRIGGS, aged 79 of Looe-street. He had been ailing for some years. On Monday he appeared worse. In the afternoon his wife left him to get her dinner and on returning found him dead. Dr Williams was sent for. The second case related to HENRY VOWLES, second officer of the steamship Ewe, which put into Plymouth Sound. William Vize Carmichael, captain of the steamer, said deceased was about 38 years of age, and had been ailing for the last week or ten days. On Monday morning he became much worse, and by his advice lay down. In the afternoon he died. Dr Fox, port sanitary officer, who went on board the Ewe, and gave the necessary permission for the landing of the body, said in his opinion death resulted from syncope. The third Inquest was on NATHANIEL BUNCOMBE, aged 62, a retired horse dealer, living at 28 Granby-street. P.C. Baines, seeing deceased fall in Union-street, on the previous evening, immediately went to his aid, and sent for Dr Pullen, who pronounced life extinct. Dr Pullen, who by order of the coroner had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to the rupture of a large blood vessel in the head. Verdicts of "Death from Natural Causes" were returned in all cases. Messrs. W. Rowe, W. Axworthy and W. Weare were Foremen of the respective Juries.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 May 1890 BIDEFORD - A little boy, son of MR BRADDOCK, butcher, Bideford, fell off a ladder and sustained severe injury to the nose last week. A doctor sewed up the wound. Towards the end of the week lockjaw set in, and the poor boy died on Saturday night. At an Inquest last evening, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 May 1890 BRIXHAM - At the Inquest yesterday on the body of MR T. B. EDWARDS, outfitter, Brixham, his widow said between one and two o'clock on Tuesday morning she was awoke by his heavy breathing. She spoke to him and received no answer and shortly afterwards he died. Dr Hayward, who had made a post-mortem examination, said his opinion was that death was due to heart disease A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

OTTERY ST. MARY - A verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned yesterday by the Coroner's Jury at Tipton St. John's, near Ottery St. Mary, against MARY MITCHEL, wife of a carter, who on Monday evening drowned her infant in a tub of water. The woman had been in a despondent state lately, consequent on the death of her eldest child a short time ago.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 May 1890 TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Hospital, Torquay, last evening, on the body of EDMUND THOMAS BAKER, aged 9, son of EDMUND BAKER [?], who died in the Hospital on Saturday night a few hours after admission from injuries sustained to his head through falling off a trestle eight feet high, and the trestle falling on him, whilst at play on a waste piece of ground [?]. Another boy who also fell off escaped uninjured. The house surgeon stated that deceased's skull was fractured at the base and that there was also another fracture of the front of the skull, these injuries being in all probability caused by the boy falling with the back of his head on a stone and the trestle striking his forehead. The boy's father thought the piece of ground ought to be fenced, but the Coroner said there was no law to compel that, and that is devolved upon parents to look after their children. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 May 1890 EXETER - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr Hooper at the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday on the body of ELIZABETH WOODWARD, aged 76 years of Exe-lane, Exeter, who died on Monday from injuries caused by a fall a month ago.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 May 1890 PLYMOUTH - Detective-Sergeant Thomas at the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, identified the body of the man found by James Sambridge, fisherman, in Sutton Harbour on Wednesday evening as that of RICHARD MIDDLEWEEK, and William H. Roberts, fisherman, said he saw him walking up and down the Barbican about four o'clock in the morning. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - MRS CATHERINE LYNCH, aged 62, living with her daughter at 14 Warren-street, Morice Town, fell on Saturday, but no great change was observed until Wednesday, when Mr Hinvest was called in and found she was dead, death being due to syncope. At an Inquest last evening, the Jury, of whom Mr Egg was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner (Mr Vaughan) thought a doctor should have been called in on Saturday, as deceased's fall was doubtless due to extreme weakness.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 May 1890 EGG BUCKLAND - An Inquest held by Mr Rodd, Coroner, at Pounds Cottage, yesterday, on the body of SAMUEL CROSS, 49, labourer, Devonport Dockyard, living at Egg Buckland, who was found by William May, shipwright, dead with his face in about six inches of water in a lane near Pounds on Saturday evening. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. Dr Doudney, who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to asphyxia. About twenty minutes before deceased was found he was seen by William Foster, gardener, opposite Milehouse Inn, and deceased remarked then that he was all right.

EAST STONEHOUSE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned by a Coroner's Jury at an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, last evening, on the body of EBENEZER GREENHAM, 37, naval schoolmaster, who died at the Institution on the previous day. Deceased was going down a ladder on board H.M. training-ship Impregnable on the 15th inst. when he slipped and fell to the deck, a distance of 15 or 16 feet. He was conveyed to the Hospital and never regained consciousness. Mr F. J. Lilly, Hospital surgeon, was of opinion that the cause of death was fracture of the base of the skull.

NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held at Newton Workhouse last evening relative to the death of RICHARD LAWRENCE, 64 years of age, a coachbuilder, of Teignmouth, who had been ill for the past twelve months and unable to work. On Wednesday morning last he went away from his home for a walk, and alter in the day was found near Ipplepen in an unconscious state, and removed to the Hospital at the Newton Union, where he died on Saturday without regaining consciousness. Dr Nesbit proved that death was due to softening of the brain. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Some of the Jury gave their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 May 1890 TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner held two Inquests at Torquay yesterday on the bodies of FREDERICK BAKER, aged four months, the illegitimate son of ROSINA BAKER, laundress, and the twelve-months old female illegitimate child of JANE BLACKBURN, a widow. both died in convulsions and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes was returned in each case. In the second case the Coroner censured the mother and grandmother for not summoning a doctor.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 May 1890 TIVERTON - About a fortnight ago WILLIAM BOWDEN, of Withleigh, while assisting to fell a tree at Culmstock, had his back broken. He was taken to Tiverton Infirmary, where he died on Saturday, his 73rd birthday. At an Inquest at Tiverton last night a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 June 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Laudanum Poisoning At Devonport. Accident Or Suicide? - The death of MRS HENRIETTE SEMISTER, of 2 Alma-villas, Pennycomequick, on Thursday morning, formed the subject of Inquiry at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, on Saturday. Deceased, about 70 years of age, was the widow of MR JAMES SEMISTER, cotton agent of Manchester, and had for the last eighteen months lived with her brother, Mr Osborne, retired naval instructor, and his wife. During that time she had suffered from neuralgia, and had been under the care of Mr E. B. Thomson, M.D., of Plymouth, for brain disease. About three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon she was found in the garden at the back of 2 Alma-villas, by Minnie Finch, domestic servant in Mrs Osborne's employ, and subsequently a bottle, containing a small quantity of laudanum, was found there also. As deceased spoke rather strangely, the servant called her master and mistress, and Mr Osborne assisted her into the house. Finding that she was in a helpless state, Mrs Osborne questioned her, and she replied that she had been taking laudanum. Mrs Osborne asked her where she obtained it, and she answered "It was only a little: I have had it a long time." Against the wish of the deceased Mrs Osborne went immediately for Dr Thomson, and in the meanwhile Mr Osborne and a neighbour tried to keep deceased awake by walking her up and down the passage. Dr Thomson arrived soon afterwards. Deceased died about quarter-past one the following morning. Dr Thomson stated that he had been attending deceased since February. She complained of pains in the head and sleeplessness, and shewed symptoms of brain disease. - The Coroner: Do you think she took the laudanum intending to take her life? - Witness: I think so. - The Coroner: And that she was insane at the time? - Witness: yes. I have been informed that this was not the first time she had made an attempt on her life Witness added that her friends had been exceedingly kind to deceased, and faithfully carried out the instructions as to her treatment. The Coroner complimented the doctor on the way in which he had given his evidence, and the outspoken way in which he had expressed his belief that deceased had taken the laudanum while temporarily insane. Throughout this case the doctor had acted properly. It sometimes happened that pressure was brought to bear on a medical man by the friends of a deceased person to induce him to give them a certificate so as to spare them the pain of an Inquest. In this case the doctor had acted very properly in not giving a certificate until he had communicated with the Coroner. It could not be allowed that any doctor should have the power to giving a certificate under similar circumstances to those which had been disclosed at that Inquiry: and if it came to his (the Coroner's) knowledge that a doctor was to grant a certificate in such a case, he should disinter the body and hold an Inquest. In all such cases it was very important to know whether the poison was self-administered or by other persons, or whether it was taken by accident or design. The Jury, of whom Mr Boxhall was Foreman, found a verdict that laudanum was administered by the deceased, with intent to take her life, she being at the time Temporarily Insane.

Western Morning News, Friday 6 June 1890 DARTMOUTH - WILLIAM FRANCIS THORNE, aged 25, who whilst endeavouring to put a belt on some shafting in the boiler-shop of Simpson, Strickland and Co., engineers, on May 21st was caught by the sleeve and drawn up, his legs being badly crushed, died in the Cottage Hospital on Wednesday evening. At the Inquest held by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, yesterday, evidence was given by Albert May, W. Cole, and Dr Millar. After a visit to the works, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and recommend the firm to alter the machinery, so that the belts might be adjusted without risk of accident. Mr James Torrie represented Messrs. Simpson, Strickland and Co. at the Inquiry.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 June 1890 MALBOROUGH - At an Inquest held at Salcombe yesterday, before Mr Donald Fraser, Deputy Coroner, into the cause of death of VIOLET MARY DISTIN, a child two and a half years old, who fell over the quay and was drowned, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider recommending the local authority to fence the open ground on the foreshore at the end of Island Street.

PLYMOUTH - LOUISA BLAGDON, aged 48, a woman of intemperate habits, was Monday morning found dead at the bottom of the staircase at her lodgings at the Royal Standard Inn, 108 King-street, Plymouth. At an Inquest held by Mr Coroner Clark, at the Galetea public-house, in the afternoon, William Vickers, landlord of the Royal Standard Inn, said that deceased was a married woman living apart from her husband. His wife, at ten o'clock on Sunday night, refused drink to BLAGDON, who was the worse for liquor, and conducted her to her room upstairs. Nothing further was seen of her until he discovered her dead at six o'clock in the morning. Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, stated that in his opinion death was due to suffocation, caused by a fall whilst the woman was in a state of intoxication, the head having been bent under the body. The Foreman of the Jury (Mr Mudge) expressed surprise that no one in the house should have heard the woman fall over a flight of stairs. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

ASHBURTON - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Ashburton on Monday evening, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, into the cause of death of a child named JOSEPH MACDOWELL, 3 ½ years old. It was shewn in the evidence that while the mother was dressing a younger child the deceased caught hold of a kettle on the fire-place and drank from it out of the spout. The water was at boiling heat, and the deceased was so severely scalded that Dr Gervis was called in. That gentleman now stated that the direct cause of death was suffocation produced by the swelling of the throat as the effect of the scalds. He thought when he first saw the child that there was a chance of saving its life, but it would have involved an operation which could only have been performed at the Cottage Hospital. The mother, however, declined to allow the child to be taken to the Hospital, as, believing that it would die, she preferred that it should die at home. At the suggestion of Dr Ackerley, who also saw the child after the accident, the Jury added to their verdict a rider to the effect that in cases of accident, where there was no proper accommodation at the homes of the people, it was desirable that the patients should be removed to the Cottage Hospital.

Western Morning News, Friday 13 June 1890 SHEEPSTOR - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Park Cottage Inn, Sheepstor, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM WARE, aged about 70 years, a warrener, living at Didsworthy Warren, Sheepstor, who died on Monday evening from poisoning. The evidence shewed that deceased swallowed the poison accidentally, and a verdict of "Death from Misadventure" was returned. Mr W. Andrews, sen., was Foreman of the Jury, who expressed their deep sympathy with the family of the deceased.

MODBURY - A man named JOHN WYATT living at Modbury, about a fortnight ago was driving a wagon from Aveton Gifford to Modbury, when the horse bolted, throwing WYATT into the road, and the wagon passed over his legs, crushing them. He died on Monday, through shock to the system, and at an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Wednesday, a verdict of "Death from Congestion of the Lungs, accelerated by the Accident" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 June 1890 BRIXHAM - An Animated Coroner's Inquest. - Dr A. Fraser, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Bolton Hotel, Brixham, yesterday, concerning a child, aged two months, of ALBERT ROSE, a fisherman. the child was found dead in bed by its mother's side, and Mr A. G. Hayward, surgeon, stated that it died from suffocation. He added that the room in which the father, mother and three children lived was far too small for so many persons, and that not more than two persons ought to live in a room of that size. The Deputy Coroner strongly condemned the practice of mother sleeping with very young children, and remarked that numerous cases of suffocation arising from this practice came under his notice. - Mr Edward Lockyear, a member of the Local Board, complained of the long interval that had elapsed - five days - between the death of the child and the holding of the Inquest. He thought there had been neglect of duty on the part of the Coroner. - Dr Fraser explained that he was telegraphed for to Inquire into this particular case, and that the intervention of Sunday had necessarily caused a delay of one day. He assured them that Mr Hacker, the Coroner, was always most anxious that prompt attention should be given to all cases requiring that Inquests should be held. Mr T. S. Brown, Foreman of the Jury, said he felt that there had not been that promptitude which they had a right to expect. Some time ago his son committed suicide at Torquay, and the body was allowed to lie in a cellar on some old bottles, with vermin, perhaps, creeping over it, from the Sunday evening until the following Tuesday evening and he was not allowed to move it or put it in a coffin. He understood that the Coroner was in the town on the Monday attending the races, but the Inquest was not held until the next evening. Mr J. Dickers, while sympathising with Mr Brown, thought his remarks were out of place, and the Deputy Coroner reminded the Jury that they were now assembled for a specific purpose, and could not properly discuss extraneous matters. He was unable to explain why it was that sanction was withheld, in the case referred to by Mr Brown, to put the body in a coffin, but sometimes happened that private information came to the knowledge of the coroner which made it necessary, in his opinion, that the body should not be moved. He was sure that Mr Hacker was always most solicitous, in the performance of his duties, not to wound the feelings of the relatives of deceased persons. The incident was here brought to a close and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

TEIGNMOUTH - The Fatal Carriage Accident At Teignmouth. The Inquest. - Dr Fraser, Totnes, Deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH LEWARN, wife of MR WM. LEWARN, Trafalgar House, Plymouth, manager for Messrs. Bayly and Fox, timber merchants, who died on Saturday from injuries sustained in a carriage accident on the Den, owing to collision with a runaway horse. Mr John Rees Williams was chosen Foreman of the Jury. - The Deputy Coroner, in asking the Jury to view the body, briefly referred to the fatality as a very sad one, and remarked that their local knowledge would be of assistance in connection with the Inquiry. - MR WILLIAM LEWARN, of Plymouth, husband of the deceased, stated that he and his family had been staying at 5 Courtenay-place, and identified the body as that of his late wife. She was 64 years of age. She came to Teignmouth for the benefit of her health about a month since, and used the donkey carriage freely so as not to exert herself. She was in good health on Saturday morning, when he accompanied her to the butcher in a donkey carriage, led by a boy. After going with her to the shop of Mr Mann, butcher, he walked away in the direction of the lighthouse, and his wife was driven around the Den. The accident must have happened a few minutes afterwards. He did not hear of the accident and see his wife again until nearly an hour afterwards. She was then in bed, under the care of the doctor. She was alive but did not speak and in a few minutes she expired. - Dr Frederick Cecil Piggott, residing at 28 Orchard-gardens, stated that he was out on his rounds on Saturday morning and about eleven o'clock, he was leaving the house in Brunswick-street. He was driving a Victoria carriage, and the horse was facing the Den. Directly he had entered the carriage the horse started nervously, but in the ordinary way, and it had gone about 15 or 20 yards when he saw the coachman make an attempt to pull up the animal. The fore part of the carriage then parted from the hinder portion on the right side. The coachman was still attempting to pull up the horse, and the carriage had gone two or three paces further, when it parted on the left side. The horse then bolted. That portion of the carriage in which witness was sitting stopped suddenly and dropped forward. the last he saw of the front portion was when the horse was going full gallop around the corner by the Royal Hotel, dragging after it the coachman, who still had hold of the reins. After being helped out of the hinder part of the carriage, witness ran on to the Den, and he there saw a crowd outside Den-crescent. He hastened in that direction, and when he reached the outskirts of the crows he saw the poor donkey-carriage boy (William Tapp) being carried across the roadway and laid on the grass. Within a minute MRS LEWARN was also carried or assisted across. His horse had never run away before. - A portion of the broken carriage was here produced by P.S. Richards and the Jury examined it and saw where the bolts had broken off. - Continuing Dr Piggott said the carriage was thoroughly done up less than twelve months ago. - The Foreman: Is it not a practice to have a carriage examined from time to time? - Witness: One may answer "Yes" to that, though one does not send it at stated intervals. But my carriage has been in the coach-builder's hands in March or April. - A Juryman (Mr Tothill): Has your coachman ever complained to you of something being the matter with the carriage? - Witness: He has pointed out things on one or two occasions, when it has promptly gone to the coach-builder. But he has not done so very recently. - The Foreman: Then you had every reason to believe, when you started in the morning, that the carriage was in a fair and good condition for its work? - Witness: Certainly, every reason. I have had such unfortunate experience that I am particularly careful about that. - In reply to Mr W. H. Hartnoll, another Juryman, Dr Piggott added that the mare was a good animal and free from vice, and also that it was not the same that ran away before, as he only bought her last March. - A Juryman: I take it that all the fault was in the carriage and not in the horse. - Philip Matthews, coachman to Dr Piggott, stated that, after meeting his master with the horse and carriage at the Infirmary at 10.20 on Saturday morning, he drove him to several places and then to Brunswick-street. After having gone about a dozen yards witness felt a jerk, upon which he pulled on the reins, and cried "Whoa!" The horse gave a spring and pulled him off the box. He held on to the reins, the horse dragging him about 20 yards, when he was compelled to leave go and fell. After getting up he ran as fast as he could, and, on turning the corner, he caught sight of the horse, with the front part of the carriage attached to it, missing the shrubberies near the club. A moment later he heard the collision. When he came up to where the horse lay, the animal was kicking very much. He caught hold of its nose and cried, "Steady, old girl!" and it stopped kicking. The harness was unloosed and he led the mare away. When he had got her clear from the carriage he noticed the deceased lying on the ground and he saw the boy picked up and put in a cab. After getting the mare separated from the carriage, he led her away to the stables and washed out her wounds. - The Deputy Coroner: When you started in the morning, did you think the carriage was all right? - Witness: Yes. - Had you inspected the bolts? Had you any suspicion about them? - No suspicion whatever. - And the carriage had been done up recently? - Yes. - Can you account in any way for its sudden parting? Was there anything to cause a strain? - No; the brake was not on. - And you can't account for the jerk? - I can't account for it in any way whatever. - Then you have no notion of how it happened? - No notion whatever. - A Juryman: Were you hurt? - I had a scratch on my knee and another on my elbow. - Did you make it a practice to examine the bolts of the carriage? Did you discover any defect in them? - I discovered one about five weeks ago, but that was not in one of the bolts which broke. - And did you tell your master of it? - I told him of it in the evening and he ordered me to get it attended to, and it was done the next morning. - Did the horse give a sudden turn when the bolt broke? - No; the horse was going along the side of the roadway towards the middle. - Was it a quiet horse? - Yes; it would be impossible to find a quieter one. - Do you think it was the portion of the carriage attached to it that caused it to run off? - Yes; as soon as the carriage became separated the front portion dashed against the horse's hind legs. - Have you examined the carriage since the accident? - Yes. - Have you found any other defects? - No; none except from the broken bolts. - Dr George Herbert Johnson, surgeon, said he was a witness of the accident. About five minutes past eleven he was about to start on his rounds from the door of his house in Den-crescent, when he heard a rumbling sound, and looking in the direction of the Den, he saw a horse at full gallop going across the centre of the Den, dragging the two fore wheels of a carriage after it. Witness ran out in the Crescent, and saw the horse turn by the rockery in front of it, grazing it as it passed through, one wheel coming into contact with the rockery. The horse then made a clean bolt across the road and came with a great crash against the railings and wall opposite 4 Den-crescent. the wheels and circular part of the carriage swung violently round, but witness saw nothing more until he came up close to the scene of the accident, a distance of fifteen or twenty yards. He then saw the donkey carriage, considerably damaged, lying low on its left side against the wall. Inside the donkey carriage was the deceased, lying on her left side, with her head leaning on the carriage. The boy was lying on his back with his feet facing the deceased, he having been injured on his left side. The horse was at this time in front of the donkey, kicking out violently, but the donkey was standing by unhurt. for the moment the deceased was unconscious, as was also the boy, and witness assisted in removing them both on to the grass. The deceased was subsequently conveyed to her lodgings at 6 Courtenay-place, and the boy was taken to the Infirmary. Witness attended the deceased, whom he found conscious and wondering what had happened. He examined her head and found a large scalp wound on the left side of the forehead. The bone was freely exposed and the fracture extended from the side of the head forwards and downwards into the left orbit. The left eye was also considerably bruised and there was an effusion of blood. There was likewise depression of the temporal bone. After dressing the deceased's wounds he left her for about twenty minutes and on his return he found her sinking. She had remained conscious for about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes and, then becoming insensible, she passed away soon after twelve o'clock. The cause of death was shock from the fracture of the skull and injury to the brain. - Replying to questions, Dr Johnson added that the injuries sustained by the deceased were so severe as to preclude all hope of her recovery, even if there had been no shock. The injuries were caused, not by the horse kicking the deceased but by the donkey carriage being overturned against the wall. It was very questionable whether the boy would recover, as he was still unconscious. - The Deputy Coroner, summing up, pointed out that according to the evidence the Jury would not have the slightest difficulty as to their verdict, it being evident that the unfortunate occurrence resulted from a pure accident. The coachman did all he could to prevent the horse from running away. The serious injuries which the deceased received put all hope of her recovery out of the question. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Foreman expressed his confident belief that the other Jurymen would join with him in conveying to MR LEWARN their regrets at the sad occurrence and that his visit to Teignmouth should have ended so unfortunately. Of course, it was a pure accident, for which no person, so far as could be seen, could be held responsible. He tendered to MR LEWARN - whatever consolation it might be to him - their deep and sincere regrets. (Hear, hear.) - MR LEWARN, who had been much distressed during the Inquest briefly thanked the Jury for their kindness and for the trouble they had taken in the case. - The Jury added a unanimous rider to their verdict exonerating Dr Pigott and his coachman from all blame. Through Dr Pigott they gave their fees for the Infirmary. - The body of MRS LEWARN was removed from Teignmouth to Plymouth yesterday soon after the Inquest. Mr r. W. Pedrick, undertaker, Teignmouth, being entrusted with the arrangements. The greatest sympathy is felt at Teignmouth for MR LEWARN and his family.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 June 1890 EGG BUCKLAND - Drowned In A Well. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Old Road Inn, Laira, relative to the death of CLARA JANE MUCHAMORE, aged six years, who was drowned on Sunday in a well behind some houses in the course of construction by Mr C. Tozer at Laira. The evidence of deceased's mother shewed that the deceased was in the habit of playing in the garden at the back of the house, which was separated from the buildings by a fence, but that a child could get through it. On Sunday deceased was sitting with witness in the parlour, when suddenly deceased jumped up and ran out of doors and witness did not again see her alive. - Samuel Tozer, foreman for Mr C. Tozer, said he covered over the well on Saturday securely with boards and pole, but on Monday, when he came to work, the boards had disappeared. It was a frequent thing to miss boards and planks. A Juror: Why did you particularly cover over the well referred to? - Witness: Because I received instructions from my master to do so, on account of a previous accident. - Henry Oram, a labourer, who had been in the employ of Mr Tozer until Saturday, said there were two or three planks on a ladder across the well, but there was plenty of room for a child to fall through. - After a long deliberation, the Jury, of whom Mr Brooks was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Dead." The exonerated the builder from all blame, but recommended for the future that after working hours the well should be securely closed. Samuel Tozer was severely censured for not strictly observing the orders of his master. A letter was read from Mr C. Tozer expressing his regret at what had happened, and offering to pay all the expenses attached to the funeral of deceased.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by the Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) last evening concerning the death of WILLIAM POWELL, pensioner from the 7th Fusiliers, who was found in his room on the previous day with his throat cut. The evidence shewed that deceased had committed suicide in a most deliberate manner. He was found in a kneeling posture, with a razor, the handle of which was tied with a cloth, at his feet. The head was almost severed. Deceased's wife stated deceased had served in India for about 16 years, during which time he had had brain fever. He was at times in a very desponding state and required to be closely watched. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 June 1890 PLYMOUTH - SAMUEL R. PEAKE, a lad of 12, living at Colebrook, Plympton, when home for his holidays in November went to work for Mr Gillard, of Boringdon Farm. One day he came home and told his mother that whilst tilting a cart laden with turnips, the tail-board slipped out and knocked him against a wall. No marks of injury were to be seen, but the poor lad gradually sickened and died in the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital yesterday. At the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr Nash, house surgeon, said death was due to an abscess on the brain caused by a blow, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with his testimony.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 June 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Circumstances attending the death of JOHN PHILLIPS, aged 61, superannuated shipwright of 4 Clowance-lane, Devonport, were the subject of an Inquest by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, last evening. Deceased left his house yesterday morning and paid a visit to his brother at Morice Town. In ascending New passage-hill on the return journey he was taken ill and leaned against a lamp-post for support. A friend obtained a cab and accompanied him home, where he expired about twenty minutes afterwards. Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, said the body was very badly nourished. There was water in each lung, the kidneys were diseased and one side of the heart was enlarged. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 June 1890 NEWTON ABBOT - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Newton yesterday relative to the death of an old shoemaker, 81 years of age, named WEATHERDON. Deceased lived by himself in a wretched state, and on Sunday morning was found on the floor dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and requested the Coroner to communicate with the sanitary authorities as to the state of the house situate in Wolborough-street, and owned by Mr Snelling.

PLYMOUTH - SIMOND KELLAND, aged 53, blacksmith, of 7 Melbourne-cottages, Plymouth, was sleeping with his sons, SAMUEL and GEORGE, early yesterday morning, when his groans awoke GEORGE. SAMUEL, roused by his brother, lifted his father's head and called to him, but the father never spoke and died almost immediately afterwards. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday, Mr A. B. Thomson, who, up to a month or six weeks since had attended deceased for weakness of the heart, attributed death to syncope and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - ARTHUR EDWARD, aged 3 years, son of JOHN HIGGS ADAMS, a journeyman plasterer, residing at Buckland Hall, Plymouth, was on 6th inst. in the same room with its mother, who was washing the baby. The child fell against the kettle on the hob, and the hot water poured down its neck and waist. The mother removed its clothes as quickly as possible, applied oil to the burns and sent for Dr Pullin. It suffered intensely, as the scalds were deep, but the poor child seemed to progress favourably until Thursday, when it refused nourishment, and on Saturday died. At the Inquest held at Birkhead's Hotel last evening, by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr Pullin said death was due to congestion of the lungs produced by the scalds. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EAST BUDLEIGH - The Budleigh Salterton Fatality. - An Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel, Budleigh Salterton, yesterday, on the body of ELLEN RAMSEY, aged 6. ALFRED RAMSEY, the father, a game watch, living at Littleham, said on Friday evening, he saw deceased and three children of Pratt, his next-door neighbour, leaving for school. That was the last time he saw her alive. The next afternoon Bessie Pratt shewed him the rock from off which she had been washed. He saw the body of his child floating, but neither he nor his dog could then reach it. John Pratt, a lad, said he and his brother and sister, instead of going to school, went to the beach to get shell-fish. Deceased was on a rock lower than that on which he and the others were, and a wave washed her off. Whilst on the rock she called for her father and mother. At first he was on the rock with deceased, but he left it. they were on the rock many hours, till the tide went out and they could walk home. Deputy Coroner Cox expressed sympathy with the parents of deceased, and also with the children who had survived, and to whom the sad affair would, he hoped, be a terrible warning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and the Jury unanimously expressed the opinion that a mortuary was needed for Salterton.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 June 1890 PLYMOUTH - FLORENCE MABEL DUNN, aged six years, residing at 24 Rendle-street, was, on Saturday, taken suddenly ill. Mr Bean, surgeon, was called in on Sunday and found her dying, and she died early next morning. In his opinion death was due to peritonitis. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - JOHN BRADDICK, formerly carrying on business as a barber at Devonport, but who for many years has been leading a vagrant life, died suddenly at Northcorner shortly after six o'clock yesterday morning. P.C. Prestwood with assistance removed the body to the mortuary. An Inquest was held later in the day by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, when a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Fire At Plymouth. Severe Censure. - The Inquest on the body of HENRY CHIVES CHOAKE, aged 8, who perished in the fire at 6 High-street, Plymouth, on Sunday night, was held at the Guildhall yesterday afternoon, by Mr A. T. Clark, Borough Coroner. Mr Black was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Inspector Henry Hill watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. The Coroner mentioned that it would be the especial duty of the Jury to discover if there were any grounds for supposing that the fire was maliciously caused. - JESSIE ALEXANDRA CHOAKE, mother of deceased, stated that she was an unmarried woman. At a quarter-past eleven on Sunday night she was awakened by cries of "fire." She awoke James Livingstone, with whom she was living. As he opened the door a volume of smoke and flame burst into the room. She (witness) at once called for the boy, who slept on the floor, but got no answer, and on searching his bed found he was not there. Livingstone pulled her away from the smoke, and held her at the window. They remained there for about ten minutes, when a ladder was brought. As witness went down the ladder Livingstone looked for the child. Livingstone was not the father of the child. - The Coroner: When you were sitting at the window did you hear your son cry? - No, sir, not at all. - In answer to Jurymen, witness stated that Livingstone made no attempt whilst she was at the window to look for the child, because he was afraid she was going to jump out. - It was here stated that the room was twelve feet square. - William Richard Brock, of the Corporation Fire Brigade, stated that he was called at about a quarter to twelve to go to High-street. After he had been to work on the fire for a little while, Mr McKeer told him there was a boy upstairs. Witness at once went up the ladder and found in the room another fireman named Bishop, who had just discovered the boy. He (witness) handed the boy out of the window. Deceased never uttered a sound. - In answer to a Juryman, Brock stated that the boy was partly underneath his mother's bed, which was about four feet from the window. He never saw the smoke of a fire so dense as that of Sunday night. - James Livingstone, a labourer, said he went to bed at nine o'clock on Sunday night. At half past eleven he was awakened by cries of "fire." On trying to get to the landing he was driven back by smoke and flames. CHOAKE attempted to jump out of the window, but he prevented her. For quite fifteen minutes he held her on the window, all the time calling to the boy. After putting deceased on the ladder, he searched for the boy until he was obliged to leave the room. - In answer to the Foreman, witness said he did not always go to bed at nine o'clock, but had done so recently. He judged the time he was called by the people who were about the street. He shouted to the crowd that there was a boy in the room when he got on the ladder. - Alfred Lewis, a fisherman, stated that he smelt smoke and opened the front door, which was not locked. On looking in he saw the shopkeeper (Mr Davy), and heard his mother called "fire." Davy was dressed at the time. witness then gave an alarm in the street. - In answer to the Coroner, witness said when he and Mr New were on the ladder they heard a child groaning. He was only away five minutes and on returning the ladder was against the house. - James Ezra Davey, who kept the shop at 61 High-street, deposed that he went to bed at ten o'clock. some time afterwards his mother called him and said the place was on fire. He at once called the neighbours and inmates. Neither witness nor his mother were dressed at the time. He had about £60 worth of stock on the premises. It was insured, together with the household goods, in the London and Lancashire Office for £200. Mr Tonkin valued it at that amount, but it was not worth so much. He could not tell where the fire broke out, but the flames were at the back of the shop. - In answer to a Juryman, witness said he believed his furniture and stock was worth £110. When he insured in March last the stock was over-valued. - Inspector Henry Hill, of the Plymouth police force, stated that they received the first alarm of fire at 11.42 at the Central Police Office. He arrived on the scene at seven minutes to twelve. Some minutes afterwards a cry was raised that there was a boy in the house. He never heard Livingstone say anything about the child when he first came down. Livingstone wanted to go up the ladder again but that was after the child was brought down. - Mr C. H. Cuming, surgeon, Sussex-street, stated that he was called at midnight to see the boy at the Central Station. Life was extinct. he believed the child was first suffocated and afterwards rapidly scorched. - This concluded the evidence. The Coroner remarked that on the statements made they could only deal with the cause of death, leaving it for the Jury to say whether the conduct of the mother of the child and Livingstone was reprehensible. It should have been the first duty of the mother to save her offspring. They could not over-praise the bravery of Brock and Bishop, the two firemen, who entered the building at the risk of their lives in the hope of saving the boy. - After a brief consultation, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. They severely censured the mother of deceased and Livingstone for not having made sufficient attempts to rescue the child. The Jury hoped that the bravery of Bishop and Brock would be suitably recognised. - Mr C. J. Brooks, superintendent of the West of England Fire Brigade mentioned that Brock for his bravery at a fire in Cobourg-street, was presented with £5 and a certificate of the Royal Society for the Protection of life from fire.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 July 1890 SIDMOUTH - A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was yesterday returned by a Jury of whom Mr James Coulson was foreman, at the York Hotel, Sidmouth, where an Inquest was held relative to the death of THOMAS FARRANT, who was found dead on Sunday morning at Sidmouth. A label with "Poison" and "Baker's Vermin Killer" printed on it, was found in a vessel, which also contained a sediment of arsenic, in deceased's bedroom, and a letter in deceased's handwriting asked Mr H. Newton to superintend his burial.

STOKE DAMEREL - "Death from Suffocation" was the verdict returned at an Inquest last evening, before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough coroner, into the cause of death of EDWARD W. WEBBER, five weeks old, whose parents live at Morice Town. About midnight on Saturday the mother nursed the child and about five o'clock next morning found that it was dead. Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, came immediately on being sent for, and on his evidence yesterday the Jury found their verdict. They also commended Mr Row for the promptness with which he obeyed the summons to attend the child.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 July 1890 PLYMOUTH - How The Poor Live In Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Plymouth workhouse relating to the death of FRANCIS MALONEY, aged 4, which occurred at the Workhouse Infirmary on the previous day. The Coroner explained that on the 12th ult. an Inquest was held at 9 Lower Batter-street on a sister of the deceased, when the Jury severely censured the parents for neglecting their children. The premises in which the family resided were then in a most disgusting condition - not fit for pigs to live in. The Jury directed him to write to the landlord, Mr Vincent, a gentleman connected with that house, about the matter, but he had not had the courtesy to reply. On the following day the mother removed the deceased to the Workhouse Hospital. - FRANCIS MALONEY, labourer, father of deceased, said that three months ago the child fell on some railings at Portland-square and injured its head, on which abscesses formed. It had been weakly ever since, and had refused food. He had never neglected the child. He had not seen the child since its admission to the Hospital. - Mr E. G. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, said the child, on its admission, was thin and ill-clothed, but not dirty. It was at once placed in the Hospital and received every care till its death. It ate ravenously on its admission. - Mr F. A. Thomas, medical officer of the Workhouse, deposed that the child was very much emaciated when he first saw it, and suffering from acute phthisis. He had made a post-mortem examination and found the lungs infiltrated with tubercles. The body was very poorly nourished and deceased appeared to have been ill-cared for before its admission to the Workhouse. From what he had heard he was not certain that the condition of the deceased was not caused by the surroundings of the place in which it had lived. The cause of death was phthisis, accelerated, in his opinion, by neglect. - By Mr C. L. Croft, who appeared for the Guardians: There was no injury to the child's head nor any trace of it. Deceased took food but the latter did not assimilate. - The Coroner said there was not the slightest doubt that the child had been neglected. He was glad to hear that the premises were now in a cleaner condition. But for the Inquest the whole place would have been infected. - The Jury, of which Mr R. J. Nicholson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes", declining to censure the parents on the ground that they seemed to have done all they could after the previous censure. - Mr W. Stidston, governor of the Court of Guardians, represented the latter body, and Detective Crabbe watched the case on behalf of the Police.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 July 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - WILLIAM HOSKINS, market porter, of 26 James-street, Devonport, died suddenly in bed on Sunday evening, and a post mortem examination made by Mr J. C. Wilson, surgeon, shewed the cause of death to be heart disease. At the inquest yesterday a verdict was given in accordance with the medical testimony.

EAST BUDLEIGH - On April 29th last, MR ELLIS SAGE, of Kersbrook Farm, Budleigh Salterton, for some time a member of the Local Board, was thrown out of his pony-trap, his leg being broken. For some time he seemed to be on a fair way to permanent recovery, but on Sunday he died. An Inquest was held yesterday by Deputy Coroner Cox, and the Jury, of whom Mr Friend was Foreman, after hearing Dr Mercer and other witnesses, found "That ELLIS SAGE died from embolism at the base of the brain, which produced paralysis and that these supervened on the injuries to his leg, caused by the accident on the 29th April last." No blame was attached to anyone. The Jury expressed their deep sympathy with the widow and family. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at East Budleigh Church.

STOKE DAMEREL - Death Of The Devonport Postmaster. The Inquest. - At the Royal Albert Hospital, yesterday, Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry concerning the death of WILLIAM CARTER KIDGELL, postmaster of Devonport, who was run over by a tramcar, on Saturday night, and succumbed to his injuries. Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., watched the proceedings on behalf of the Tramway Company and Mr H. Moreton, the manager of the company was also present. - The Coroner, in opening, said there were many practices which he had noticed on the tramcars, and of which he disapproved, and as the matter was of great importance, he invited the Jury to assist him in making the Inquiry an exhaustive one. Often he had seen the cars greatly over-crowded, and reasonable time was not always given to take up or set down passengers. Rules made for the safety of passengers should not be set at nought, and people's lives and limbs endangered in order to make the cars carry more than they would properly accommodate. Under those circumstances it would be for the Jury to determine whether anyone was to blame for MR KIDGELL'S death. - Francis Bartlett, tram driver, stated that at about a quarter to eleven o'clock on Saturday night, he took charge of No. 3 car at Derry's Clock, Plymouth, and noticed deceased standing on the driver's platform. There was a strict order prohibiting passengers standing and riding with the driver. Deceased was the only one riding on his platform. There was plenty of room inside. Deceased had ridden on the driver's platform for at least two years, and would never go inside. - The Coroner: Then there is a strict rule which you have allowed to be broken for two years, and this is the outcome of it? - He has been riding night after night on the driver's platform. - Continuing, witness said he had often requested deceased to go inside, but he would not. MR KIDGELL rode out on the platform with him on Saturday, and witness last saw him between Edgcumbe-street siding and the Halfpenny Gate. Witness was standing behind him and witness being engaged with the horses, did not see him fall off. MR KIDGELL was perfectly sober and witness could not tell what caused him to fall During the journey the door opening out on his platform was not opened. Deceased was standing on one side of the car on his left and under the steps leading to the top At the bottom of Devonport-hill witness felt the car go over something, and the man in charge of the side horse called out "Whoa, you have run over someone." As quickly as possible he brought the car to a standstill and looking around saw that MR KIDGELL was gone. Going back behind the car he found him lying on the ground. There was a guard to the tram, and he thought the hind wheel ran over him. The step must have canted him out, and he must then have rolled towards the car and gone under the hind wheel. - By the Jury: Did not request MR KIDGELL to go inside the car until after the tram started. At the Queen-street siding he asked him whether he would go inside or on the top. Deceased replied he would rather remain where he was. He said nothing further all the way. - Asked by the Coroner whether he thought it right to allow the deceased to set at defiance the rule prohibiting riding on the driver's platform, witness said MR KIDGELL had been accustomed to ride there so long that he did not like to refuse him permission. - By the Jury: Deceased must have fallen off, as he always got out at the Crown Hotel after the tram stopped. He did not complain to him of being giddy or unwell. Had driven a tramcar three years. No tram inspector visited the car during the journey. - Frederick Dimmick said he was in charge of the side horse at Devonport-hill. Just below Richmond-walk, on Saturday night, he saw deceased riding on an approaching tramcar, with his left-hand clasping the bar, suddenly spin around and fall on his right side between the front and rear wheels of the tram. Did not notice the tram jolt or run over a stone. The car was travelling steadily at a walking pace when the accident occurred. Had seen people many times ride in front of the car. At times more than two ride with the driver, sometimes when the car was very full. There was always a lot of people riding on the conductor's platform. - By Mr Rodd: No one besides the driver and deceased was on the front platform. - By the Jury: Deceased fell before witness hitched on to the side horse. - Mr J. H. Gough, house surgeon at the Royal Albert Hospital, deposed to deceased's admission to the Institution on Saturday night. His left leg and hand were both badly smashed and the right elbow was bruised. Soon after admission the left leg was amputated below the knee and the left hand above the wrist-joint. The patient did as well as could be expected for the first twenty-four hours but gradually got weaker and died from exhaustion during the Monday night. - By Mr Rodd: Deceased was not sensible on admission, but recovered consciousness the next day. He said he did not remember anything after falling off the tram, but did not make any statement as to how it occurred. - By the Jury: He had no reason to suppose deceased was not sober. Deceased lost a good deal of blood. - Wm. Hy. Way, tram conductor, said it was his duty to see that the tram car carried not more than the licensed number and that the passengers were in their proper places. He saw deceased on the driver's platform. Under the rules no one had any right to ride with the driver, but deceased had done so nearly every night for two years. Hundreds of time he had requested people to go outside, but they had refused and remained on the platforms. - The Coroner: I hope for the future you will do more than request, and compel them to leave the car if they will not go in or outside. - Witness, continuing, said no one had a right to stand on either platform. Previous to Saturday he had often spoken to MR KIDGELL about riding on the driver's platform, and the inspector had many times asked him to go inside or on top, but he always refused. - The Coroner: Did you report to Mr Moreton MR KIDGELL'S refusal to comply with the rules? - Mr Moreton has seen him there himself, and has told us to keep him inside or on top, but he would never go there. - By Mr Rodd: The trams were licensed to carry 20 inside and 26 out. At the time of the accident there were about 23 passengers on the car, and there was, consequently, ample room. - By the Coroner: The cars are sometimes crammed full, but not often. - Mr Rodd: You know what the public are, Mr Vaughan. - The Coroner: yes; but I know also what the duty of the Tram Company is. In many towns such overcrowding would not be allowed. In Nottingham recently a tram conductor was fined for carrying only one above his number. - Mr Moreton: They have by-laws in Nottingham. We have none here. - The Coroner: Then we ought to have. - Mr Rodd pointed out that in this case there was no evidence of overcrowding. - The Coroner admitted that was so, but explained that his object was to elicit facts which would show the necessity of steps being taken to prevent any recurrence of the grievous mistakes which had taken place in the past in the conduct of the trams, and which, as they had seen, led to accidents. - In reply to the Jury, witness said deceased was conveyed to the Hospital immediately after the accident, and he ran on ahead to advise the authorities of his coming. - Nurse Mary Sowden stated that deceased while in Hospital told her he was riding on the platform of the tram, and went to step off the tram. He had his foot down on the step, and being near-sighted, was about to step on the ground, when he felt giddy and fell forward. He remembered nothing afterwards. - William Symons testified to deceased having often complained to him of giddiness. On one occasion giddiness seized him while descending the stairs, and he had great difficulty in saving himself from falling. Deceased was fond of smoking and objected to riding on top because of his liability to giddiness. - The Coroner, in summing up, said it was clear the deceased was a wilful passenger who conduced to his own death, and who, if he had been merely injured instead of killed, would have been considered reprehensible for persisting in riding in front of the car against the company's rules. But rules made for the safety of passengers should not be allowed to be broken with impunity. If they had been enforced in this instance, MR KIDGELL would still have been alive. There was a very proper and useful rule prohibiting people getting in or out at the driver's end, but he had seen it broken and he hoped for the future the regulations framed by the company would be strictly enforced. - The Jury, after a private consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider, expressing the hope that in future Mr Moreton would cause the rules to be rigidly observed, especially those prohibiting passengers riding on the platforms with the driver or conductor. They also requested the Coroner to communicate with the Town Council, and urge the adoption of by-laws to prevent over-crowding and riding on the platforms of tramcars. - The Coroner promised to see the Town Clerk on the subject; and as Mr Moreton had left, Mr Rodd undertook to convey the finding of the Jury to the Tram Company.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 July 1890 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatal Accident On Board The Nautilus. The Game Of "Follow The Leader." - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of ROBERT ROGERS, a boy belonging to the training brig Nautilus. David Charles Sandercock, first class boy, serving on board the same brig, stated that deceased with four other boys, including witness, were in the rigging of the ship playing the game of "Follow the Leader." The course was from the deck to the forestay and then down to the fore-tack. Deceased was the last, and in descending the rigging hand over hand witness surmised that he failed to grasp the rope with one hand before he had loosened it from the other. Deceased then fell to the deck, striking his head against the chart box, and was almost immediately rendered unconscious. Surgeon John Grant, of the Seaflower, was at once sent for and he ordered the lad to be removed to the Royal Naval Hospital, where he died on the 11th inst. The Foreman of the Jury elicited that no one is ever told off to superintend these games of the boys, although when they are ordered aloft on duty they are placed in charge of an officer. The weather was quite calm and the brig was at anchor, so that the lads were indulging in their exercises under the safest and most favourable conditions. Sub-Lieutenant Morris Ellerton, replying to a question put him by Mr J. P. Goldsmith, Admiralty Solicitor, said the exercise in which deceased was engaged was essential for the due discharge of his duties. It was only by practice in running up and down the rigging in the course of their training that they could become proficient when at sea in a storm. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner was instructed to write to the Admiralty recommending them "to place a commissioned or non-commissioned officer on duty to watch the boys during their play in the rigging.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 July 1890 PLYMOUTH - Suicide At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clarke, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at Plymouth Gaol on the body of WILLIAM COLEMAN, 41. On 10th inst., deceased, a stoker, in the employment of the Plymouth Gas Company, and who for some time had been in a depressed state, attempted to commit suicide by swallowing some rat poison at the Victory Inn, Norley-street, where he resided. A police constable administered emetics, and sent for a doctor. COLEMAN seemed to get better, and on being brought before the Magistrates was remanded for a week. Mr R. Rainford, chief warder, said on receiving deceased, he immediately sent for the medical officer, who ordered him to the Hospital. He procured two attendants from outside to take charge of him, and he received every attention. - Mr S. Wolferstan deposed that deceased appeared comparatively well when he first saw him. He afterwards told him that he had been in trouble about his wife and also over money matters, and seemed in a despondent state of mind. On Sunday last deceased complained of soreness of the mouth and thirst. On Wednesday morning deceased was deeply jaundiced and could not speak. Everything possible was done for him, but he died about twelve o'clock. Deceased died of poison by phosphorus. - The Foreman (Mr J. Martin): You did not administer any medicine until Sunday night? - Dr Wolferstan: There was no indication of poisoning until then. - The Foreman: Don't you think if you had administered medicine when deceased came in you might have saved his life? - Dr Wolferstan: It is the nature of phosphorus not to produce poisonous effects for three or four days. - The Jury found that deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane and complimented P.C. Easterbrook on his prompt and intelligent treatment of deceased.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 July 1890 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry on Monday at the Gregory Arms, Doccombe, near Moretonhampstead, into the death of THOMAS WARWICK STEPHENS, aged eight. The boy, who had been suffering from whooping-cough, was on Sunday evening, 13th inst., brought home by Robert Boyce, a farm labourer, who complained that the child had flung a stone at him and cut his head. Boyce had caught STEPHENS and threatened to throw him into a brook, and it was evident the boy was very much frightened. The mother sent him to bed and he became unwell. On Tuesday a doctor was called in and on Wednesday the boy became convulsed and continued so until his death on Friday. Mr F. G. Engelbach, L.P.C.P., testified that the boy died of meningitis, which was sometimes associated with whooping-cough, and might be brought on by excessive fright. A verdict was returned to the effect that the cause of death was meningitis, accelerated by fright. the Jury exonerated Boyce from any blame in the matter.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 July 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Fatality At Ford. - Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Ford Station on the body of LILLIE BURNS, aged 5. Mrs Parnell said on Tuesday afternoon she was told that a child was lying dead in a pool of water under the bridge above Ford Station. Witness, with Mrs Richards, proceeded to the spot and found deceased there. She lifted the body out of the water and tried by every means to restore life, but the child was quite dead. Mr Brown, the stationmaster, and Mr Best, chemist, arrived almost immediately after, and the body was taken to the waiting-room at the Station. Dr Gard afterwards arrived and said death had been instantaneous. Florence Richards, the little girl who was with the deceased, said they were playing together, and went over on the embankment. The deceased seeing some poppies growing at the edge of the embankment, climbed over the fence to pick them. In doing so she lost her balance and fell over. - The Coroner said the child had got through a gate that was not in proper order and over a fence that was not very high. He thought the Railway Company ought to have fencing that would prevent any person either getting over or beneath it. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury adding that the Railway Company ought to get better fencing and that the owner of the gate leading into the embankment should keep it in proper order that children might not get in. The coroner remarked that after the fence had been put in order, if children got in they should be summoned. Mr Henry Foster, inspector, South-Western Railway, promised to report the suggestions made. Children had, he said, caused much trouble at Ford by damaging the fencing.

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 July 1890 TAVISTOCK - Circumstances attending the death of MABEL EMILY, aged 8 years, daughter of JON EDWARD RAPSON, gardener, 10 Ford-street, Tavistock, formed the subject of Inquiry, by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr J. D. Dingle was foreman, at the Cornish Arms, Tavistock, yesterday. Edith Hynes, aged 8 , stated that the deceased was playing with other children on the banks of the canal at Fitzford when she fell into the water. Witness helped her out. The father said the child vomited on Sunday, but otherwise appeared well. She went out on Monday, but was taken ill in the night. Mr J. Northey, M.R.C.S., Tavistock, deposed that death was caused by inflammation of the brain, the result of a fall and shock to the system, and a verdict was returned accordingly. As there was a mark on the right temple it is believed that the child struck its head against a stone in falling into the canal.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 6 August 1890 DAWLISH - "Death by Drowning" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held yesterday at Dawlish, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, concerning the death of CHARLES JOHN PINCHIN MIDDLEWEEK, a boy of 11 years. Deceased was bathing in company with other boys when he was seized with illness and died almost immediately. The medical evidence was to the effect that he was probably seized with syncope induced by his having stood in shallow water for some time under a hot sun. Mr H. L. Friend was Foreman of the Jury, who expressed great sympathy with the lad's mother.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 August 1890 SOUTH BRENT - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Pack Horse Hotel, South Brent, last evening, touching the death of ELI FARLEIGH, who committed suicide by hanging himself, as reported in yesterday's Western Morning News. Mr r. C. Codd was Foreman of the Jury. Laura Soper, a domestic servant with MR W. FARLEIGH, brother of the deceased, stated that during the afternoon she saw several peculiar changes with the deceased, but did not take much notice of it, as he was accustomed to such symptoms. About half-past five she went to the garden to call him to tea, but failed to find him, but on looking in the hay loft she discovered him hanging from a beam. Dr Johnson said that deceased had been suffering from lowness of mind for a long time, and through his orders he was sent to the Workhouse Asylum so that proper care might be taken of him. He seemed to slightly recover and returned home at his own wish. A verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was returned.

PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Inn, Turnchapel, yesterday, touching the death of CHARLES HOLTEN, aged 13, who was drowned on the previous day. The deceased was in a boat with several other children, taking out bait to the deceased's father. On the way back he was trying to race with another boat, when the paddle slipped out of the sculling notch and the boy, who was standing on the seat, fell overboard and was drowned. The Jury, of whom Mr John Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 August 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr James Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Cross Keys Inn, Stoke, yesterday, concerning the death of RICHARD DOIDGE ROWE, builder, who was found dead in his garden at Stoke about midnight on Saturday. P.S. Mutton gave evidence as to finding deceased lying immediately inside the garden door, on his face. His hands were underneath his chest and his chin rested on the bottom garden step so as to throw his head back and make his whole body rest on his neck. Several papers and some small cash were found in his pockets. Mr J. R. Rolston, surgeon, made a post-mortem examination, which shewed that there was great fatty degeneration of the whole viscera, the heart and liver being especially affected. Deceased at the time of his death was wearing slippers and was extremely wet, circumstances which Mr Rolston thought accelerated his end. The immediate cause of death was syncope. the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Thursday 14 August 1890 SALTASH, CORNWALL - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr A. C. L. Glubb, County Coroner, at the Tamar Inn, Saltash, relative to the death of JAMES MATTHEWS, of Stonehouse, a boy aged 7 years, who had been on a visit to his grandmother, Mrs Quick, Silver-street, Saltash, and was found drowned in the Tamar on Tuesday evening. From the evidence of Mary Jane Kitt it appeared that the boy was not seen alive after four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. - Edward Christian deposed to finding the body near the Town Quay, Saltash, about 8 p.m. It is supposed he was fishing off the quay and accidentally fell into the river and a verdict in accordance with this belief was returned by the Jury.

Western Morning News, Monday 18 August 1890 SOUTHSEA, HAMPSHIRE - An Inquest has been held at Southsea respecting the death of MATILDA MOON, aged 39, the wife of a naval pensioner living at Plymouth. The deceased, who was living apart from her husband, was folding some clothes in a beer-house, where she was employed, when she suddenly threw up her arms and fell, death taking place shortly afterwards from heart disease.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 August 1890 AVETON GIFFORD - As already reported, WALTER LUGGAR, a harvest labourer, at Aveton Gifford was unloading corn from a cart on Friday last, and the cart lurching was thrown to the ground and his neck broken. Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at Aveton Gifford, and the Jury, of whom Mr W. Ellis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatality At Devonport Gunwharf. - The death of J. W. M. BATE, 22 years of age, able seaman of the Racoon, from injuries received through falling down a hatchway at the Gunwharf on Saturday, formed the subject of Inquiry by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner yesterday, at the Royal Albert Hospital. Mr Gameson, of the firm of Venning and goldsmith, Admiralty solicitors, watched the proceedings for the Admiralty, and Inspector James for the Metropolitan Police. Edwin Southard, gunner, of the Racoon, in charge of a party of men sent ashore for the purpose of returning stores to the Gunwharf, and be detached a party of seven men of whom deceased was one, to run a trolly up to the Armoury, which was run fairly under the hatchway for the cases to be hoisted to an upper storey. One man remained in charge of the trolly and the other six one went upstairs, manned the winch, and opened the hatchways. Scarcely two minutes had elapsed before deceased fell through the hatchway immediately over witness. In descending he fell on witness's shoulder and witness thought his head fell on the edge of the arm chest. With the assistance of four men witness had deceased removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where the doctor pronounced life to be extinct. The Coroner, after hearing other evidence, said he considered that there was no one to blame for the accident, and the Jury concurring, a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 1 September 1890 ILFRACOMBE - All the bodies of the five persons drowned by the swamping of a boat at Watermouth, on 12th inst. have now been recovered. The last, that of LOUISE KAY, aged 10, was picked up at Hillsborough Hill, near Ilfracombe, on Saturday afternoon. At the Inquest in the evening, it was identified by Miss Calwell, with whom MISS KAY and a friend were staying. The Inquiry was adjourned. On its being resumed the case will be gone into fully and the verdicts given in respect of this and two other bodies.

PLYMSTOCK - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Morley Arms, near Pomphlete, on the body of RICHARD HODGE, aged 11, who was killed on Thursday, by falling off the new railway across the Laira. - Mary Jane Morgan, of Plymouth, said deceased was the son of the late SERGEANT HODGE, of the Plymouth Police force. Sydney Fane, aged 9, sated that on Thursday last, he was coming home from the Plymouth races, when he met the deceased, and having no money with which to pay the bridge toll, they climbed on to the railway bridge. From the top, deceased threw a stone in the water, slipped his foot and fell, striking his head against the buttress beneath. About a quarter of an hour afterwards his body was picked up by Samuel Roberts. The Jury, of whom Mr Joseph O'Rell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The Coroner expressed his thanks to Mr Fursman, landlord of the Morley Arms for his kindness in allowing the body to be taken to his premises.

SIDMOUTH - Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Sidmouth on the body of BESSIE HARRIS, the servant who disappeared from Salcombe-hill, Sidmouth, a week previous, and whose body was found on Friday under a weiring in the river Sid. Deceased's father, a coachman employed by the Rev. John Hawker, of Cotleigh, near Honiton, stated that deceased left a situation in Plymouth in a very strange manner in June, and Dr Shortridge, of Honiton, under whose care she had been, told him she might be suffering from a disease of the brain. She had only been at Sidmouth a few days before her disappearance, although she had lived with the family on a former occasion for two years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 2 September 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held at Devonport last evening respecting the death of LOUISA MARY JANE THOMPSON, aged two months, whose parents live at 49 Hotham-place. The child was taken ill on Saturday and died during the same night before a medical man was called in. A post-mortem examination was made by Dr Keily, of Plymouth, who considered that the child had not been neglected, but that it had been injudiciously fed. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Robin Hood Inn, New-street, Plymouth, yesterday, concerning the death of WILLIAM LACOCK, aged 4 weeks, living at 31 New-street, who was found dead in bed on Saturday night. Mr Thomas, surgeon, stated that he made a post-mortem examination of the body and found the lungs in rather a congested state. Cause of death in his opinion was suffocation. The Jury, of whom Mr Roberts was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

STOKE DAMEREL - Suicide At Devonport. - Mr Coroner Vaughan held an Inquest at Devonport yesterday on the body of WILLIAM ROUNSEFUL, aged 29, belonging to the Army Reserve, of 100 Albert-road, who committed suicide on the previous night. Deceased's mother stated that her son, who had been out of work for some time past, came to her house at dinner-time on Sunday, and said he did not know how he should be able to stand his troubles, as he had two children ill, and his wife was about to be confined. In accordance with his usual custom, he went to the house about nine o'clock the same evening, and after engaging in conversation for some time, proceeded to the rear of the premises. About an hour afterwards witness went into the court, and found that her son had hanged himself against the clothes post. He had fastened a rope round his neck and jumped off the steps adjacent to the post. A neighbour named Fouracre loosened the rope, but it was found that life was extinct. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity " was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 September 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the King's Arms Hotel, Exeter-street, Plymouth, yesterday, into the cause of death of an infant named BALL (not registered) aged two weeks, who was found dead in bed at 2 Gascoyne-street, Plymouth, on Tuesday morning. Mr Williams, surgeon, who was called to see deceased, gave it as his opinion that the child died from infantile convulsions and the Jury, of whom Mr Blight was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

ILFRACOMBE - The Boating Fatality At Coombmartin - At Ilfracombe last evening Dr Slade King, Deputy Coroner, resumed the Inquiry into the death of MARY J. DAY, aged 28, LOUISA HANNAH DAY, 12, and CHARLES DAY, 20, who were drowned off Coombmartin on August 12th. Inquests on the boatman PARKIN and his assistant HICKS, drowned at the same time had previously been held. Charles Sloley proved recovering the body of MARY JANE DAY on Friday, August 22nd; Edward Lovering, that of CHARLES DAY on August 24th, about three miles off Coombmartin; and George Comer, a boatman, that of LOUISA DAY last Saturday, among the rocks under Hillsborough. - Richard Lovering stated that on August 12th, between four and five o'clock, while on the beach at Smallmouth, he saw Parkin, the boatman and Hicks, his assistant, with two ladies and one gentleman, in a boat which was under sail and heading west-north-west. The sea was choppy, with a blood tide out of Coombmartin Bay. About a quarter of an hour afterwards he heard that a boat had gone down half a mile from the land. Witness and a man named Irwin immediately rowed to the spot, but all they saw was a dog swimming in the water, which they saved. Parkin's boat, the Seaflower, was one of the best in Coombmartin. She was about 17 feet long, had 5 feet beam, and was well found. - By the Jury: Irwin told Parkin before he left that the best thing to do was to row down by the shore. - William Bray, joiner of Berrynarbor, deposed that about a quarter past four on the afternoon of August 12th, while looking out of a window at Watermouth Castle, his attention was drawn to a boat going down the Channel under lug and mizzen sail. He watched her with interest because he thought she was carrying too much sail, and seemed to be shipping a great deal of water. When about 500 or 600 yards off the shore she struck into a large wave, which seemed to half fill her. He then saw the sail go down and a man stand up in the boat and put out an oar, commence to row, but the boat was then in the race of the tide almost broadside on. Then another sea struck her before the man could get her round, and she disappeared. He immediately went with a man named Delbridge to the beach, sending Delbridge on to Smallmouth, where he knew there were boats. Within ten minutes after that he saw Irwin's boat with Lovering in it, rowing about on the spot. - The Coroner asked MR DAY if he wished to put any questions. - MR DAY asked as to the reputation of Parkin as a boatman. - Mr Lovering said Parkin had been working a boat for five or six years and ought to know something about the work. - MR DAY wished the Jury to express disapproval of the manner in which the boating business was carried on in the district of Coombmartin and hoped they would see their way to send their decision to the Board of Trade. - Captain Facey, the Foreman, said the Board of Trade had nothing to do with the matter. - The Coroner said there had appeared in the London press a great deal of mis-statements and some animosity against Ilfracombe in regard to the accident. The first mis-statement was that it occurred in Ilfracombe. One evening paper spoke very strongly of the lax way in which the Ilfracombe authority dealt with boating. The Local Board did all it could to secure the safety of boating in the district. He then read a copy of the licences granted by the Board. It contained a declaration that the boat to be licensed was sound and seaworthy and properly equipped, and that the boatman was duly qualified and capable to work the boat, and that the man applying to assist a boatman was capable and qualified to give that assistance. They could not expect the Board to sit with nautical assessors and examine each man who applied. The Board did all it could do. It issued licences after proper declarations had been made and they had the boats examined periodically. Accidents had happened at Deal and Llandudno recently in very much the same way as at Coombmartin. They were accidents and no one could be blamed for them. He hoped the Press would give the same publicity to this public reputation as they had given to the charges against the townspeople. The Jury returned a verdict in each case of "Drowned by the Accidental Swamping of a Boat," and declined to add any rider as suggested by MR DAY, the Foreman remarking it would be quite useless, as their experience in the past had proved.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 September 1890 TAVISTOCK - The Railway Fatality Near Tavistock. - Mr R.R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Tavistock yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of THOMAS WILLIAMS, carter, of West Bridges Cottages, Tavistock. Mr J. G. Dunn was Foreman of the Jury. Mr H. Blatchford represented the Duke of Bedford, in whose employ deceased was at the time of the accident. The Great Western Railway Company was represented by Inspector Chamberlain. - William Bath, labourer, of Tavistock, said that owing to the curve the driver did not see deceased in time to give him effectual warning. The train drew up about a quarter of a mile beyond the level crossing. - P.S. Coles, stationed at Tavistock, stated that he picked up portions of WILLIAMS' remains and with the assistance of Mr G. Merrifield placed them in a wagon. The hands and feet were not severed from the body, neither was the head. - Mr Henry Blatchford, surveyor to the Duke of Bedford, deposed that deceased came to him on Tuesday for instructions to go to Mr Perry, the tenant of the fields adjoining the crossing, to get the key which would open the gates. Witness then cautioned him, as he had done on previous occasions, to be careful in crossing the railway. Deceased had crossed the line many times through the same gates, and hundreds of times over other crossings. He considered him competent to have possession of the key. On the north side of the line there was a space of twelve feet between the line and the fence, and on the south side there was a space of thirty feet. Deceased stepped from the north side when the accident occurred. - Andrew Palmer of Launceston, engine driver, stated that he worked the 7.40 train from Launceston to Plymouth on Wednesday morning. The train consisted of an engine and eight coaches. It reached Marytavy at 8.20, leaving at 8.21, and being a minute late. According to the regulations of the company, he always sounded the whistle in approaching level crossings, and he did so on the present occasion. On first sighting the crossing he saw that it was clear. In another moment he saw a horse's head over the line, and at once applied the vacuum brake and the steam break of the engine. H e saw that the horse was moving across the line. When nearing the horse within a few feet he saw the man p ass quickly by the side of the cart between the horse and the engine. The man and the horse were knocked down and the train proceeded for about 250 yards when it was pulled up. He could have stopped it fifty or sixty yards higher up the line had it not been that the slimy substance from the horse made the rails very slippery. When the train stopped, the horse was in front of the guard-irons. If it had not been for the copse-wood skirting the railway, witness might have seen the line some hundreds of yards further ahead. The gradient at the scene of the accident was about one in sixty. Steam was shut off at the time. - William Clark, the guard of the train, said almost immediately after hearing the whistle he saw something being pushed in front of the engine. Deceased's body was taken from under the backs of the third carriage. He did not think the bushes by the side of the railway contributed to the accident. The deceased's widow stated that he was 59 years of age. - A Juror having stated that it was rumoured that the train was nearly a quarter of an hour late, Inspector Chamberlain said it started from Launceston only two minutes after time, being a heavy excursion train and it would have reached Tavistock at the proper time had it not been for the accident. - In reply to the Foreman of the Jury as to whether the crossing would be safer if the bushes was reduced, the engine-driver said he believed it would, as bushes interfered a good deal with their sighting all along the line, there being so many curves. It was stated that the bushes in question belonged to Mr Giles. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought the engine-driver did his duty in an admirable manner, as he pulled up the train as quickly as possible. - In reply to a Juror, Mr Rodd, said he would not support a recommendation respecting the bushes, as in this case they did not appear to have contributed to the accident. - The Juror: Then I propose that the Court be cleared while we consider our verdict. - The room having been cleared, the Jury, after a few minutes' consultation , returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and highly commended the engine-driver for the vigilance he had shewn under the circumstances. The Coroner said he thoroughly endorsed the rider, a copy of which he would transmit to the railway company.

Western Morning News, Monday 8 September 1890 BUCKFASTLEIGH - An Inquest on the body of the little girl, daughter of MR RICHARD HAMLYN, who was drowned on Friday, was held at the Sun Inn, Buckfastleigh, on Saturday, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner. The mother of deceased gave evidence as to missing the child, and after searching for her for about half an hour found her in a lime pit at the back of the house. She got her out and a neighbour, Mr H. Potter, went for Dr Ubsdell. When he arrived life was found to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 September 1890 PAIGNTON - Shocking Fatality At Paignton. Two Men Killed. - A shocking occurrence took place at Paignton yesterday morning, by which two men in the employ of the Local Board, named RICHARD EMMETT, aged 63, and WILLIAM PARNELL, aged 46, lost their lives. They were engaged with a Board horse and cart scavenging, and soon after eight o'clock entered Mill-lane. PARNELL was driving. they stopped at the first dust heap, and both men were getting off the cart, one at each side, when the horse suddenly bolted, and came into contact with a stone-cart coming up the lane. EMMETT, who was still clinging to the fore part of the cart, was crushed against the wheel of the stone-cart and was instantly killed. The front rail of the stone-cart was driven into PARNELL'S neck, also crushing his collar bone and upper ribs, and he was taken, bleeding profusely into a neighbouring house, where he lingered for an hour and then died. The frightened horse ran as far as the Gasworks, and there overturned the trap. - A specially-convened meeting of the Local Board was held yesterday afternoon to express the sympathy of the members with the bereaved families of the deceased workmen, and to consider what steps should be taken for their relief. Mr O. S. Bartlett presided, and all the members of the Board were present with the exception of Mr Edwards who is at present away from home. The Chairman explained the sad circumstances of the case, and mentioned that the Board could not use the ratepayers' money to relieve the widows and orphans, but each member might individually do something in this direction, Mr Washington Singer having promised to head subscription list with £10. On the motion of the Chairman, seconded by Mr Hunt, a resolution was unanimously passed expressing sympathy with the bereaved families of the deceased and recommending their cases as deserving of public charity. The members of the Board were constituted a preliminary committee with the view of opening a subscription list for the relief of the widows and orphans. The Board also granted free grave spaces in the cemetery for the interment of the two men, and a day's leave was granted to all the Board's employees to enable them to attend the funerals. It was decided to hold a public meeting on Saturday evening in support of the relief fund. The sum of £25 including the £10 given by Mr Singer was collected in the room. The Inquest. - Mr Sydney Hacker (Coroner) held an Inquest on the bodies of the deceased at the Townhall last evening, Mr J. M. Langlen being chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Local Board was represented by Mr O. S. Bartlett (chairman), and Mr w. J. Wyatt, the Board's surveyor, was also present. SUSAN EMMETT of 3 Mill-cottages, daughter of the deceased, RICHARD EMMETT, identified the body of her father; and the body of WILLIAM PARNELL was identified by his brother, ROBERT PARNELL, a farm labourer, of Goodrington. - Madge Austin, ostler, said that at eight o'clock that morning he was driving a horse and stone cart through Mill-lane when he saw a cart belonging to the Board coming towards him, PARNELL (who was driving) and EMMETT riding on the front of the cart. Before reaching him PARNELL pulled to the side of the lane and let go the reins, and the two men were in the act of getting off the cart in order to shovel up a dust heap, when their horse bolted and the wheel of their cart collided with the shaft of witness's cart. The two men were thrown from the shafts of their cart, PARNELL striking the rail of witness's cart and EMMETT the wheel. The horse then galloped past witness and was not stopped until it reached the Gasworks, where the cart was over-turned. - John Densham, carpenter, of Polsham-road, who witnessed the accident, said that the animal bolted at the rate of ten or twelve miles an hour. He saw nothing whatever to frighten the horse. Witness and others immediately went to the assistance of the men, and medical aid was summoned. - Richard Freer, labourer, said Thomas Mitchell, carter, gave similar evidence and said they saw nothing to account for the horse bolting. - Dr Alexander deposed to examining PARNELL. He found that he had been badly crushed and this his injuries were fatal. He died in an hour from internal haemorrhage. EMMETT, who died from shock, had no external signs of injury. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees in aid of the widows and orphans of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 September 1890 PLYMOUTH - Two Inquests were held at the Plymouth Workhouse yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner. The death of JOHN HARRIS, a seaman, aged thirty-eight, formed the subject of the first Inquiry, and it was stated by Mr Aubrey Thomas, surgeon, that deceased had been admitted into the Hospital suffering from injury to the spine, and was in great pain. He died on Tuesday from spinal paralysis, and on these facts the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The next case was that of JOHN BUCKLEY, a child aged 2 years, who was admitted to the Workhouse yesterday suffering from diarrhoea and died in about an hour after its admission. Mr Bean, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from a fit caused by inflammation of the bowels, and in this case also a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Killed On The Railway At Devonport. - About twenty minutes to six o'clock yesterday morning William Coffin, watchman in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company, discovered the body of a sailor, subsequently identified as RICHARD JOHNS, stoker of H.M.S. Aurora, in a deep cutting of the Cornwall Railway immediately west of Keyham Barracks. Deceased appears to have been trespassing on the railway company's property, and to have got on to the line by crossing a farm at Keyham Barton. The body was found at the bottom of an embankment, about 60 or 70 feet high, with his feet lying close to the rail, and it appeared that deceased had rolled or slipped down the side, which was somewhat steep, and had rough stones projecting from the side. His cap was found in some brambles, about half way down the slope. He had sustained a serious wound at the side of the head which Mr Rae, surgeon, who saw the body after its removal to the Stoke railway station, considered was sufficient to cause death. - At the Inquest held last evening by Mr Vaughan, at the Railway Station, evidence was given by Coffin, the watchman, P.C. May and W. H. Munday ,stoker on board the Aurora. Deceased was about 30 years of age, and was on ten days' leave. He was stated to have been perfectly sober on the previous night, when he let Morice Town and his subsequent movements were not known. The Jury, of whom Mr Vere was Foreman, found a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr J. P. Goldsmith, Admiralty solicitor; Inspector James of the Metropolitan Police; and Inspector Scantlebury, of the Great Western Railway Company, were present at the Inquiry.

TORQUAY - A Death From Lockjaw At Torquay. - Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Torbay Hotel, Torquay, yesterday morning, on the body of JAMES TUCKER, stonemason, who, as stated yesterday, died from lockjaw at that Institution on Tuesday morning. On Thursday, the 28th August, the deceased rode to Kingskerswell on a bicycle. On the return ride he was followed by a horse and cart in which several of his men were riding. When between Kingskerswell and the Halfway House deceased turned round to see if his cart was coming on and was then thrown from his machine into the bridge. He was badly shaken, and the thumb of his left hand being cut he rode home in the cart. On the following day he went to Dr Gardner, who, finding that the thumb was swollen and inflamed, told him to foment it with hot water and poultice it, and come to him again. Dr Gardner did not see him again till the following Friday, when deceased told him that he had left off fomenting and poulticing the wound. On the following day Dr Gardner noticed symptoms of lockjaw, deceased complaining of pains in his arm, jaw and back, and on his advice the deceased went to the Hospital, where he was treated by Dr Cave, the house surgeon. He was able to speak and was perfectly sensible up to the time of his death, at twenty minutes past four on Tuesday evening, the symptoms of lockjaw increasing each day during the time he was in the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 September 1890 EXETER - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH HUBERT MARTIN, a railway cleaner, aged 29, who was drowned at the Exeter Regatta on Saturday. No further facts were elicited than those given in the Western Morning News of yesterday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding as a rider an expression of sympathy with the family of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 September 1890 PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Lee Mill, Plympton, yesterday, on the body of ERNEST VIGORS, aged eleven years, in the employ of Mr Paige, of Challonsleigh Farm, Plympton St. Mary, who was caught between the beam and driving-wheel of a horse machine on Monday morning and instantly killed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 September 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Cambridge Inn, Cambridge-street, Plymouth, yesterday, to Inquire into the cause of death of SAMUEL LAZARUS, aged 14 months. Mr Wagner, surgeon, said that he attributed death to convulsions, caused by scalds which the child had received a few days before. A verdict in accordance with the medical officer's testimony was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, to Inquire into the cause of death of WILLIAM WELLS, aged 19 years, a labourer in the Devonport Dockyard. James Fitzpatrick stated that on the 5th inst. deceased and some other men were engaged in removing plates from the new pound to Mutton Cove and whilst WELLS was shifting the points of the dockett the lever slipped, pushing him back on a barrel. He was knocked senseless and for some days was very ill. On the tenth inst. he was admitted to the Hospital, where he died on the 17th inst. Mr J. Bates, surgeon, said in his opinion deceased died from "Inflammation of the Lungs" caused by the fall. The Jury, of whom Mr H. Towell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". Mr J. E. Venning watched the case on behalf of the Admiralty.

Western Morning News, Monday 22 September 1890 CHUDLEIGH - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at the Ship Hotel, Chudleigh, on Friday evening, on the body of CHARLES SAUNDERS, baker, who, as already reported, committed suicide by shooting himself with a pistol. After hearing the evidence, which showed that the deceased had lately suffered from heart disease, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 September 1890 STOWFORD - Coroner Burd held an Inquest yesterday on the body of MRS HARRIET COOMBE, wife of MR WM. COOMBE, of Castle Farm, Stowford, Halwill, who died suddenly on Sunday. Dr Doidge, of Lifton, gave it as his opinion that the immediate cause of death was heart disease (syncope) and the Jury found a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Alfred S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at Plymouth Workhouse relative to the death of ELIZABETH PASSMORE, 70 years of age, the widow of a waterman, who died in the Institution on Sunday. Evidence was given that the deceased fell out of bed on the 8th inst., and was afterwards admitted into the Workhouse suffering from a broken thigh and shock to the system, to which she succumbed. A verdict in accordance with this evidence was returned.

TORQUAY - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr S. Hacker at Torquay Police Station yesterday morning, on the body of ERNEST EDWARD PYM, the nine-weeks old child of EMMA and ROBERT PYM, of Stentiford's Hill. At five o'clock on Sunday morning the mother awoke and fed the child and two hours and a half later she found that the child was dead. The evidence of Dr Richards shewed that death was due to Suffocation.

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 September 1890 EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday, on the body of GEORGE TUCK, of Heavitree, who died from injuries received in falling off a pair of steps while cleaning a window.

PLYMOUTH - GEORGE CHANNINGS, aged 16 months, living with its parents in Raleigh-street, Plymouth, died suddenly on Thursday morning and at an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Mr Warner, surgeon, expressing a belief that it died of convulsions.

PLYMOUTH - The same Jury returned a similar verdict in the case of RICHARD JONES, living at 5 Willow-street. Mr Brenton, surgeon, attributing death to want of nourishing food.

HARBERTON - Sad Fatality At Harbertonford. - ARTHUR JAMES CLEMENTS, aged 12 years, was on Thursday morning at work at the woollen factory at Harbertonford. During a short time CLEMENTS was left along, and in endeavouring to reach something he climbed a vat of boiling dye, and, slipping, fell in. Although dreadfully scalded, he managed to get out and immediately left the factory and ran to his home without anyone in the factory knowing of the accident. On the employee returning to the room he missed CLEMENTS, and saw the dye about the floor, and shortly afterwards heard of the accident. On the poor boy reaching home he was undressed and put to bed. he was so dreadfully scalded that the flesh peeled off as his clothes were removed. Dr Cooke, of Totnes, was soon in attendance, and did all in his power to relieve his sufferings, but the poor little fellow died about five o'clock the same afternoon. Yesterday afternoon Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 September 1890 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the Cobourg Inn, Plymouth, on the body of HERBERT PENGELLY, aged three months. Deceased's mother stated that the child was quite well on Saturday night; at eight o'clock the next morning, on waking up, she found it dead by her side in bed. Dr Thomson, who was called in, said the child had been overlain, and the Jury, of whom Mr G. Williams was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Thursday 2 October 1890 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall yesterday on the body of SUSANNAH SULLIVAN, aged one month. MARY J. SULLIVAN, the mother, said about six o'clock that morning deceased woke her up by crying. She nursed it and fell asleep again. About half-past seven witness dressed and got the breakfast for the other children. On going over to the bed to nurse the deceased, she found her dead. Mr C. E. Ball who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to suffocation, and had evidently been overlaid. The Jury, of whom Mr William Rowe was foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 October 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - Burning Fatality At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital last evening on the body of CATHERINE MARY ECCLES, 4 years of age, daughter of SERGEANT ECCLES, of the Derbyshire Regiment. Deceased's parents occupy a room in Raglan Barracks, and about half-past nine yesterday morning the wife of Lance-Sergeant Morgan, 2nd North Staffordshire Regiment, noticed smoke issuing from SERGEANT ECCLES'S room and then the deceased in flames. The child was wrapped in a blanket and carried to the Hospital, where it died about three-quarters of an hour after its admission. The whole of its clothing was burned and the flesh was greatly charred. It was stated that the mother after lighting a fire in the stove left the door of the stove open and went out of the room. The child was lying on the bed at the time, and the Coroner suggested that, attracted by the light of the fire, it left the bed and accidentally set fire to its night-dress. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner and Jury expressed their sympathy with the parents.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 October 1890 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Friary Station. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, concerning the death of JOHN VICKERY, 45, labourer, - John Dyer, under foreman of gangers on the new station works at Friary, Plymouth, deposed that on Friday evening he heard groaning. Saw deceased lying in the middle of the new railway and went towards him. Deceased said, "Jack, knock me on the head; I am come to an untimely end. Take my legs off the rails." His legs were only held on by small strips of flesh. Deceased was at once removed to the Hospital on a shutter. - Thomas Blatchford said he was on duty superintending the shunting of certain trucks. After the engine had been coupled to the trucks he gave the order to go ahead. He was on the last truck. As they were running out he heard groans, and on looking back found that they had run over a man. He ran back to deceased, who said, "Lift me out of this." - By the Jury: He was standing on the opposite side of the truck to which deceased was found. - Joseph Gilman, driver of the engine, said on receiving orders to go ahead the fireman came to his side of the engine to see if the shunter was all right, and deceased must have been injured at that time. There were four trucks attached to the engine. - Fred Coombes, fireman, corroborated the driver's statement. He was only absent from his side (on which deceased was found) for half a minute. By the Jury: They did not blow the whistle before starting. - Mr Walter Gifford Nash, house surgeon, deposed that both legs and the left arm of deceased were nearly severed. VICKERY suffered very much from the shock. Mr Swain amputated the limbs, but deceased never recovered consciousness. On his admission, deceased remarked "I have seen many men like this, but never thought I would come to it myself." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all the parties concerned from blame. Mr J. Avery represented the London and South Western Railway Company.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 7 October 1890 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident To A Plymouth Football Player. The Inquest. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, last night held an Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, into the circumstances attending the death of EDWIN CHARLES DENNITHORNE DOIDGE. - CHARLES VALENTINE DENNITHORNE DOIDGE, carpenter, living at 20 Plym-street, father of deceased, said his son was 17 years of age in July. He left home to play football between two and three o'clock on Saturday afternoon, and witness saw him after the accident. He said nothing as to how the accident occurred. He simply said "Goodbye." His son was apprenticed to a plasterer. - Benjamin Frederick Hocken, a compositor, and friend of the deceased, said he had known him for several years. They both belonged to the Olympic Football Club. On Saturday a match, in which deceased took part, was played at Beaconfield. At half-time the ball was kicked up, and witness and deceased both ran after it, but neither of them secured it. Witness caught the deceased round the waist from behind, and he in return tried to throw witness over his head, but fell heavily forward with his head under him and witness fell on top of him. Witness saw something was wrong, and deceased, in answer to a question, said he thought he had broken his neck. He was taken to a farmhouse until a hansom was obtained when he was removed to his home and afterwards to the Hospital. - In reply to the Coroner, witness said there was no ill-feeling. All was done in good temper. - Mr Gifford Nash, house surgeon at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, spoke to the deceased being admitted to the Institution on Saturday evening. It was evident that he had received severe injuries to his neck. He was quite conscious and gave an account of the accident, agreeing with that just given by Hocken. He gradually became worse and died from asphyxia, caused by paralysis of the muscles of respiration, on Sunday morning. Witness had since made an examination of deceased's neck and found that the fourth vertebra of the neck was dislocated, causing compression of the spinal cord. That was the cause of death. - The Coroner said there appeared to be no doubt that Hocken and deceased were playing together. His opinion was that football at the present day was a little too rough in the style of play; but probably they heard of more accidents because the game was increasing in popularity. - A Juryman remarked on a strange coincidence. Deceased, before he went to the football field, called at the shop of Mr Jane, hairdresser. Jane's jocularly remarked "You're not long for this world," to which deceased replied, " I am going out to the football field this afternoon to break my neck." - The father of the deceased asked why that matter should be introduced? Did the Jurymen wish to imply that his son went to the football field with the intention of breaking his neck? (Cries of "No, no.") - The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Injuries Accidentally Inflicted," and exonerated Hocken from all blame. They also expressed their sympathy with the parents of the deceased.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the First and Last Inn, Exeter-street, yesterday, on the body of JAMES BRETT, aged 10 weeks, found dead in bed by its mother on Saturday morning. Dr Dutten, who was called to see deceased, had by order of the Coroner made a post-mortem examination, and found that death was due to suffocation. The Jury, of whom Mr James Gloyn was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. The Coroner strongly commented on the imprudence of mothers taking their children to bed with them. This was the third Inquest he had held within the last few days on children overlaid by their mothers.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident On A Steamboat At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at 5 May-place, Plymouth, the residence of the deceased, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY BOON, aged 44, butcher and [?] dealer, who received on Thursday last, on board the steamship Commerce, injuries which resulted fatally. Mr [?] Bond represented the Brittany and channel Islands Steamship Company, and expressed on the company's behalf sorrow at the calamity that had befallen MR BOON, who had been known to them for many years and sympathy with his family in their bereavement. - Walter Blatchford, a drover, in the employ of deceased, said he was engaged with Mr Boon at about 9 p.m. on Thursday in shipping bullocks on board the steamer Commerce at New North Quay Jetty. He had just been talking to MR BOON when one of the bullocks drew back. There was a cry that a man was in the hold, and soon after, he saw the deceased being brought up and placed near the side of the vessel. In his opinion one of the bullocks in moving, pushed deceased, and the latter fell into the hold, but witness did not see him fall. In reply to the Foreman, witness said it was not usual to unship the [?] of a steamer until bullocks were made fast. He was sure that the bullocks had not broken loose after being shipped. - John Wyatt, foreman for the owners of the Commerce, said he was assisting to get MR BOON'S cattle on the Commerce. The animals were driven to their places in the fore part of the steamer, backed, were driven forward and backed a second time; and on their being a second time driven up he called to the mate, who replied that it was right, and understanding that to be the case, he commenced to take off the hatches. When they got one hatch off there was a cry of a man being in the hold and witness, with a man named Rodd, went into the hold and found deceased. Deceased, after about two minutes recovered consciousness, but only said they were to send for a doctor. In reply to the Coroner, witness said there had been no quarrelling and no one was near deceased when he fell. He did not believe the cattle backed a third time, but could not say. The Foreman of the Jury thought more lights should be provided for this [?]. - Dr Thomas Henry Williams, said he saw deceased at his house in bed on Friday morning. He (deceased) was paralysed from the shoulders downward. He was perfectly conscious and spoke to witness of the accident. He said he was on board the Commerce with Blatchford shipping bullocks. They had put two of the beasts on board, and when Blatchford was tying up one, the other being loose, one stepped back as deceased was passing round on her side. To get out of the way of the bullock he stepped on to a hatchway, that had been closed a minute or so before and fell down into the hold. He repeated this statement a few times and told witness that there was great carelessness on the part of some person in removing the covers before the cattle were tied up. Deceased died on [?] morning, the cause of death being injury to the spine. - The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said there was [?] as to the cause of death; the question was how deceased fell down the hold. There was no evidence as to it being other than an accidental cause and he (the Coroner) thought that whereas there might have been some carelessness there was nothing that would [?] charge of negligence against anybody. He joined with the concurrence of the Jury, to express sympathy with MR BOON'S widow and relatives. After a few observations made by the Jury, and in an [?] made by MR J. E. BOON, brother of the deceased, regret was expressed that the wharf was not [?] when work of this kind was being carried out. - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr [?], was present on behalf of the Railway [?] Insurance Company, with whom deceased was insured for £1,000. Western Morning News, Saturday 11 October 1890 DAWLISH - At Dawlish last evening an Inquest was held on the body of a newly-born male child. William John Milton gave evidence of finding it in the hedge behind some brambles on Strand hill. P.C. Edwards deposed to finding blood stains by the hedge and traced them to a yard in High-street, thence from a water closet to a dwelling in the same court, occupied by a man named JACKSON. After an examination of the body by Mr A. de W. Baker, he arrested ELIZABETH BESSIE JACKSON, aged 15. Mr Baker said the child was fully developed and had not been washed or cared for. He considered the child was born just alive and if medical assistance had been procured would undoubtedly have lived. Jane Drew, a nurse, said the girl JACKSON volunteered a statement that she was confined in the water closet on Tuesday evening, that the child cried a little and that she carried it to a lane in Strand-hill about two o'clock in the morning and threw it over the hedge. - MARIA JACKSON, mother of prisoner, said she knew that her daughter was enciente, but was not informed of the confinement until Wednesday morning. The Coroner in summing up said from the evidence it clearly appeared that ELIZABETH BESSIE JACKSON was the mother of the child. The Jury returned a verdict "That the child died at its birth from want of proper attention."

NORTH TAWTON - At the adjourned Inquest last evening on the body of MARY ANN ROBINS, aged 72, found in the railway train at North Tawton on Wednesday, WILLIAM ROBINS, 54, St. Sidwell's, Exeter, said deceased was his mother, and lived at Kennford. Her health usually was good, but she had complained of pains in her head. Mr G. Barbury, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said the only marks of violence on the body were three on the face. Deceased had been suffering from Bright's disease and heart disease. Death was due to the failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER - At Devon and Exeter Hospital, yesterday afternoon, the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest relative to the death of JOHN WILLIAMS, a young man, who died in the Institution on Wednesday night. Deceased, who had resided with his father at Bradninch, was employed at the works of the Hansard Publishing Union, at Bridge Mills, Silverton. On 30th September he was attending to some machinery on the ground floor, and when putting a belt out of gear by means of an iron bar he accidentally fell, and becoming entangled with the belting was carried into the machinery and severely crushed about the lower part of his body. The house surgeon, Dr Force, described the injuries of the deceased, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider recommending that the proprietors of the mills be requested, if possible, to attach to the machinery a lever bar with a crutch for the purpose of throwing the belt off, and thereby obviate the necessity of using a loose iron bar for the purpose.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 October 1890 ST BUDEAUX - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Woodland Fort Inn, Honicknowle, St Budeaux yesterday, on the body of BEATRICE HEARD, aged [?] years. LUCY HEARD, the mother, stated the child was ill on Saturday with a severe cold and cough, and on Sunday morning became worse and died. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Stephens was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clarke, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Sailors' ~Rest, Vauxhall-street, Plymouth last evening, on the body of JANE SAUNDERS, an elderly widow, who was found dead in a house in Looe-street last Sunday morning. Mrs Matthews, who lived in the same house, stated that deceased appeared in her usual spirits on Saturday, but on going into her room on Sunday morning with a cup of tea she found her lying dead in bed. Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said there was great fatness of the valves of the heart and in the stomach were small fragments of cheese and four undigested onions. He gave the cause of death to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, last evening, into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN CAVE, one year and nine months old, the son of a coastguardsman at Brixham. Deceased was in the care of its grandmother, who lives at[?]-street, Devonport, and on Wednesday last was suffering from the measles. The grandmother, however, did not call in Mr Hinvest, surgeon, until about one o'clock on Friday afternoon, when the child was found to be suffering from congestion of the lungs. The doctor gave medicine, but had little hope of its recovery, and it died soon afterwards. Mr Hinvest considered it had been greatly neglected and that if a medical man had been called in sooner, its life might have been saved. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and they severely censured the grandmother for her gross neglect.

EXMOUTH - The Fatal Fire At Exmouth. - Mr Cox, Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at the Albion Inn, Exmouth, into the circumstances attending the death of MARIA RUETTA BASTIN, aged 60. The remains were identified by Mrs Portbury, of Exeter, a niece, who, however, had not seen the deceased for three years. The evidence of William Bibbings, George Perriam, and Mary Jane Bricknell, neighbours, went to shew that the deceased woman was very eccentric in her habits, held aloof from those around her, and was greatly addicted to drinking. The fire was discovered by Mrs Bricknell, who lives next door, and who found smoke penetrating to her apartments. On going into the street she observed that MRS BASTIN'S house was on fire. She raised an alarm, and the front door being locked was broken down by Perriam and Bibbings. These witnesses described the position of the body, which they immediately got out on to the landing. There was then no sign of life, and portions of the remains, notably the head, was very much charred. Mrs Bricknell confessed that she was not surprised at what had happened, having on more than one occasion observed smoke coming from deceased's house. - Dr Hodgson was of opinion from the position of the arms, which were raised, that death was due to the effects of the burns, and had not those places previous thereto. - Mr Moore, superintendent of the local fire brigade, proved finding on the premises sundry jars of brandy, gin, and sherry. He was of opinion that the fire had not been caused by the overturning or bursting of a lamp, as it must have been smouldering for some time before being discovered, and there was oil in the lamp when found on the floor. P.S. Clements having given evidence, the Coroner remarked upon the extraordinarily dirty state of the house and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 October 1890 PLYMOUTH - ALICE MAUD MARY TAYLOR, aged 11 years, daughter of HENRY TAYLOR, a mason, of Plymouth, was on September 20th at her sister's, Mrs Cotton's, in Cambridge-street. In the afternoon W. S. Avent, in the employ of Turpin and Sons, contractors, was removing ashes, &c., from the yard when the girl ran by and received a blow from the shovel in the forehead and fell down. Avent picked her up and she ran into her sister's. Her head was bandaged and in the evening she walked home by herself. For a fortnight she seemed to get better; then it was noticed that her mouth was drawn down on one side. Dr R. H. Wagner was called in and pronounced it to be a case of lockjaw. She lingered until Tuesday. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, last evening, Mrs Fanny Stephens, of 31 Cambridge-street, said that the striking of deceased with the shovel was an accident, and Dr Wagner said lockjaw was the result of the injuries received, although the wound had healed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Avent from all blame.

Western Morning News, Saturday 18 October 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - ELLEN, daughter of JOHN HENRY WYATT, warrant officer, living at 93 James-street, Devonport, was on Wednesday evening playing with her brother with toys in a room at the top of the house. There was a paraffin lamp on the table. MR WYATT and his wife were in a front room when they heard the children scream. rushing in they found the deceased in flames. It is supposed that a toy had fallen on the floor and that one of the children in picking it up capsized he table, and the lamp being overturned set fire to the little girl's clothes. MR WYATT extinguished the flames and procured some linseed oil and wadding from a chemist. Messrs. Wilson, sen. and jun., surgeons, were called in and advised the child's removal to the Royal Albert Hospital. The child was badly burnt about the head, face, arms and back. No hopes of its recovery were entertained from the first, and it died about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon. The child's brother was also burned about the leg. At an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Borough Coroner, last evening, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and joined the Coroner in an expression of sympathy with the parents.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 October 1890 PLYMOUTH - JOHN BRADFORD, age 79, whilst at work with his [?] BRADFORD, at Battery-hill quarry, Stonehouse, suddenly complained of a choking sensation. He was taken to his residence in St Andrew's-street, Plymouth and Mr [?], surgeon, was sent for, but when he arrived he found he was dead. At an Inquest held at the Guildhall, by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr Cuming, who made a post mortem examination, said he took from the deceased's stomach pieces of meat, two and three inches big and in his opinion death was due to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 October 1890 TORQUAY - Suicide At Torquay. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Infirmary, Torquay, yesterday on the body of GEORGE HENRY HEBBES, aged 31, found in Upton Vale on Sunday morning. Mr W. C. Bubb was Foreman of the Jury. - P.C. Hockridge gave evidence of the finding of the body. The throat was cut nearly from ear to ear. - MR GEORGE HEBBES, an independent gentleman, residing at Oxford, said deceased was his nephew, who came from Maidenhead with him to Torquay on Saturday afternoon. They obtained rooms at 9 Cary's-parade, and after tea went for a walk round the town. When standing listening to the Salvation Army at the top of Union-street, deceased suddenly disappeared, and was afterwards seen coming out of Mr Phillips' nursery grounds. They went down Union-street, and whilst witness was in Mr Lewis's shop, deceased again disappeared. Witness walked about the town until one o'clock in the morning looking for him and also gave information to the Police. He resumed his search next morning at seven o'clock. Two months ago deceased's wife was found dead in bed beside him. Since then he had been much depressed and complained of violent pains in his head. His medical advisor ordered the deceased to Torquay for the benefit of his health, and said that cheerful society was what he wanted. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The circumstances attending the death of CHARLES EDWARD ROY were investigated by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday, at the Pride of Devon Inn, Cecil-street, Plymouth. Deceased, who resided at 9 Belmont-street, was a mason's labourer, and 43 years of age. On Saturday, after a dinner of beef-steak and half a glass of porter, he sat down in the chair and had a little doze. He went to sleep and died in his sleep. He had complained of pains in the heart. Mr J. H. S. Day attributed death to syncope, from failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 October 1890 TIVERTON - THOMAS CUDE, labourer, Melbourne-street, Tiverton, was on Sunday evening chatting with his wife about the probabilities of the recovery from illness of one of their children, when he rose to reach his pipe on the mantelpiece, and falling forward, struck his temple on the fender. Upon being lifted up he was found to be dead. At an Inquest held last evening a verdict of "Death from Failure of the Heart's Action" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 October 1890 CHUDLEIGH - IRENE CAUSLEY, aged 9 years, daughter of MR CHARLES CAUSLEY, stonemason, Chudleigh, was during Friday night seized with violent pains in the stomach. Dr Wade, who was sent for, at once saw she was suffering from an irritant poison, and she died on Monday morning. At the Inquest held by Mr S. Hacker, yesterday, it was stated that she ate pilchards for dinner on Friday and that a post-mortem examination made by Drs. Harvey and Wade, shewed that she died of an irritant poison, probably arising from the fish. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 31 October 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - The Drowning Of A Shipwright At Devonport. The Inquest. - At Newpassage Inn, Morice Town, yesterday morning Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry concerning the death of ARTHUR ALLEN CLARK, skilled shipwright, 23 years of age, of 14 Alexandra-road, Ford, drowned on Saturday morning in the Hamoaze. Mr J. H. Gameson (Venning and Goldsmith), represented the Admiralty: and Inspector James, the Metropolitan Water Police, and Mr F. H. Eddy, carpenter, of H.M.S. Cambridge, were also present. - Thomas Cundy, carpenter's mate, of H.M. Gunnery ship Cambridge, said he left the drill-field about 10.40 on Saturday morning, in company with deceased and another shipwright named Puleston, in a dingey about 14 feet long, 5ft. broad and 2ft 6in. deep. After getting clear of the pier witness made sail and headed towards Torpoint, the boat being on the starboard tack. After proceeding about 100 yards, and as he was going to make up towards the Cambridge, he noticed the sheet, which he held in his hand, was about to gibe, and told his companions to look out for themselves. He saw the squall coming, but before he could say anything the boat went over on the port side and filled. He asked CLARK and Puleston if they could swim, and they both said "No." He caught hold of each of them under the shoulders and placed them on the gunwhale of the boat, where they would have been safe if they had held on. Puleston, however, let go and witness again went and assisted him to get hold of the gunwhale. He then noticed the CLARKE was half-way between the boat and the shore, towards which he was swimming. - The Coroner suggested that it would have been better if a larger boat had been used. - Witness said he had used the boat in all weathers for the last twelve months between the Cambridge and the field, and no accident had occurred previously. Puleston sank a second time and witness who had on his oilskin, went down with hi, but they both came up again and were rescued by a boat which put out from the creek. CLARKE had on a mackintosh. - Mr May: Why, after you gave your companions warning to look out for themselves, did you not at once let go the sheet? - I did. - Mr May: If the sheet had been let go, the boat could not have gibed. - The Coroner: What length of time elapsed from the time you saw the squall until you let the sheet go? - Witness: Hardly a minute. - A Juror expressed the opinion that the witness did not understand the meaning of "gybing." It would be impossible for the boat to gibe if the sail was flapping. - Mr Vere, Foreman of the Jury, pointed out that witness was a carpenter's mate and not a sailor. - The Coroner thought witness not being a proper sailor did not pay proper attention to the speedy warning of the coming squall as an experienced seaman would have done. If he had let go the sail and luffed the boat up quickly the accident would not have happened. It was an error of judgment. - In reply to a further question, witness said that deceased swam against the tide for about 100 yards. If he had had the presence of mind to swim with the tide he would in all probability have been carried on to the jetty in safety. - William John Reynolds, refuse contractor for the Government, said about half-past eleven on Saturday morning he was in his boat coming up St. John's Lake when he saw the Cambridge's dinghy. He put his boat into the mill lake and took his sail down. A heavy squall came on from the W.N.W., and blew him on shore. As he was trying to push his boat off he heard cries for help, and saw three men struggling in the water. He jumped into a small boat at the stern of his vessel and pulled to the men as quickly as possible. Deceased, who was separated from the others, was close on shore. Witness sat down and rowed towards him, but when he reached the place where he had last seen him he had disappeared. Where deceased sank there could not have been more than four feet of water, but probably there was a mud bottom. He picked up Puleston and Condy and with a grappling iron tried to recover CLARKE'S body, but did not succeed. - WILLIAM CLARKE, father of deceased, said his son was a very good swimmer. - Inspector Webber having given evidence as to the searching of the body, the Jury found that "Deceased was Accidentally Drowned whilst in the performance of his duty." - A Juror suggested that a recommendation should be forwarded to the Admiralty that a sailor who understood the management of a boat should be placed in charge of all boats that were sent from the ship. - The Coroner said the Admiralty were represented at the Inquiry, and they would be brought acquainted with what had been stated there. The witnesses Condy and Reynolds were highly complimented by the Jury on the means they had taken for the purpose of saving life.

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 November 1890 TORQUAY - JEREMIAH SALTER, 64, a pensioner, of Park-lane, Torquay, died suddenly on Wednesday night, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest yesterday, Dr Pollard shewing that death was due to paralysis of the brain.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Duke of Cornwall Hotel, Plymouth, by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, respecting the death of KATE MARTIN, aged 23 years, a domestic servant, who died early on Friday morning. Kate Jenkins a fellow-servant, stated that deceased had been poorly for some days, but nothing serious was anticipated. Mr Williams, surgeon, said he made a post-mortem examination of deceased and found a large clot of blood on the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr M. Axworthy was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 3 November 1890 BERE FERRERS - At the Plough Inn, Beer Ferrers, on Saturday, Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the child of JAMES BAILEY, a mason. Mary Waycott, midwife, said it only survived its birth twelve hours and Mr Rees, surgeon, having made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to non-expansion of the lungs, owing to general debility. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 November 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - At the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, last evening, Mr Coroner Vaughan Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of W. H. BARTLETT, 13 years of age, of 55 Granby-street. Deceased had attended an anniversary service on Sunday at the Royal Dockyard chapel, and on leaving the gallery, said to one of the scholars, "I am going to slide down the rail." He walked down a few steps and a little later was seen falling over the rail on to the stone floor in the lobby, pitching on his head. Mr Tozer, his teacher, conveyed him in a cab to his home, and his mother afterwards removed him to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died about half-past seven yesterday morning. At first he appeared to be going on favourably, but about two o'clock in the morning there was a change for the worse. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr J. J. E. Venning (Venning and Goldsmith) represented the Admiralty.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 5 November 1890 EAST STONEHOUSE - The Suicide Of A Petty Officer. - An Inquest was held yesterday by R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, as to the death of RICHARD MANNING, petty officer, belonging to the Cambridge, who committed suicide on Monday morning by hanging himself in a portion of ward 28. The deceased's comrades states that he always seemed a very quiet and well-behaved seaman, but of reserved manners, and latterly he appeared strange at times on board ship, but shewed no signs of mental derangement, whilst under treatment in the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Western Morning News, Thursday 6 November 1890 PLYMOUTH - Two Inquests were held at Plymouth yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark. The first at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, was on the body of EDWIN JOHN BRIMACOMBE, aged nine days, living at 7 Howe-street, found dead in bed beside its mother on Wednesday morning. Mr Williams, surgeon, attributed death to inanition, the result of premature birth. The Jury, of whom Mr Murray was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquest was held at Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, on the body of THOMAS SMITH, aged 64 years, a journeyman baker, living at 29 Richmond-street. Deceased's wife, AMELIA SMITH, stated that on Tuesday evening she was called to the corner of Richmond-street, to see her husband, who was very ill. He was conveyed to his home and shortly afterwards expired. He had been in very bad health for the past twelve months. Mr J. E. Square, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Hilson was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 November 1890 PLYMOUTH - MRS PHOEBE AGNES ORGAN, aged 71 years, living at [?]water-terrace, Plymouth, on Friday morning, after breakfast, retired to her bedroom, and about an hour afterwards her sister found her dead on the floor. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, on Saturday, Mr Burke, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by the effort of going upstairs. The Jury, of whom Mr H. Bowe, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by the Devonport Borough Coroner last evening relative to the sudden death of ROBERT EDWARD HOOPER, 47 years of age, naval pensioner, of 34 [?], Morice Town. Deceased was at [?] with other reserve men on Saturday and appeared to be in his usual health. A few minutes after going to bed on Sunday night, he complained of great difficulty in breathing, which continued, and when Mr Gard, surgeon, who was sent for, arrived, he found the deceased lying dead by the bedside. A verdict of "Death from Heart Disease was returned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 12 November 1890 EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, respecting the death of JOHN POOD, 65 years of age, of 26 Emma-place, blacksmith, a pensioner from Devonport Dockyard. Mr F. J. Moore, agent of the Battery Hill quarries, stated that the deceased was his father-in-law had resided with him for the past three years. Witness went with the deceased to the Wesleyan Chapel, King-street, Plymouth, on Sunday evening and returned home about a quarter of an hour before deceased. Witness was in the passage when deceased opened the front door, entered the passage and immediately afterwards fell forward and died. Deceased had frequently complained of pains in the heart and shortness of breath after walking up hill. Mr Leach, surgeon, was of opinion that death was due to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr c. Balch was Foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 November 1890 PLYMOUTH - ANN MARIA PAIN, aged 72 years, living at 10 [?]-street, Plymouth, dropped down dead in the street yesterday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr Brenton, surgeon attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr S. [?] was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EGG BUCKLAND - At the Laira Inn yesterday, Mr Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM TOULL, a retired naval gunner, aged 57 years, who resided at Elm-place, Laira. ELLEN TOULL said deceased was her husband, but she had not lived with him for the last four months. She had never heard him complain of any illness. HENRY TOULL, aged 13, said his father died about [?] o'clock on Thursday morning. Mr W. Stamp, surgeon, Plympton, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to an effusion of fluid on the brain. The Jury of whom Mr W. Fuge was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 November 1890 CHESTER - Drowning Of A Plymouth Captain. [Special Telegram.]. Chester, Tuesday Evening. - An Inquest was held by the Chester Coroner today on the body of a seafaring man washed up at Hilbre Island, Chester. Mr Shaw, seamen's missionary,. Runcorn, identified the body as that of CAPTAIN CHARLES CURTIS, of the schooner Blanche, of Plymouth, which was wrecked off the mouth of the Dee in the recent gale. Job Williams, assistant-signalman at Hilbre Island, gave such unsatisfactory evidence as to the delay in launching the lifeboat at Hoylake to the rescue of the schooner's crew, that the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry for a week.

Western Morning News, Monday 24 November 1890 CHESTER - At the Inquest held on the body of CAPT. CHARLES CURTIS, of the schooner Blanche, of Plymouth, which left Runcorn for home with salt, and was wrecked on 7th, the answers to questions respecting the efforts of Hoylake lifeboat to rescue the crew were not regarded as satisfactory. The Inquiry was adjourned for a week. During a recent mission at Runcorn, CAPTAIN CURTIS took a deep interest in the work at the Mersey Mission House, and the news of his death was received with much sadness. Mr J. Westcott, owner of the Blanche, bore the expenses of the funeral. Rev. J. Fell, one of the chaplains of the Missions to Seamen, officiated and spoke of the commendable part deceased had taken in missionary work. Captain Carter, Runcorn, and Mr Marwood, Liverpool, were present and a number of floral tributes placed on the coffin.

Western Morning News, Friday 28 November 1890 EXETER - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by an Exeter Jury yesterday afternoon in the case of HARRIET LOUISA PIPER, who was 81 years of age. Deceased lived in Summerland-street with her sister who is 90 years of age. She was seized with a sudden illness and died on Wednesday morning from failure of the hearts action.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 December 1890 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Cambridge Inn, Plymouth, by Mr Clark on the body of IRENE COX, aged four months, the daughter of JOHN ROBERT COX, a commercial traveller, of Albert Cottage, King-gardens. At eleven o'clock on Thursday night the deceased was nursed by its mother and was found dead the next morning in bed. Dr E. B. Thomson, who was called, gave it as his opinion that the child had been overlaid. The Jury, of whom Mr W. J. Stanbury was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 December 1890 TOTNES - At the Inquest at Totnes yesterday on the body of JAMES WOODLEY, 16, servant to Lady Smith, found in the leat, it was shewn that deceased attended to a horse at Major-General Staveley's on Sunday evening and then left to attend church. It was suggested that in the dark he fell into the leat which runs by the side of a favourite walk. His watch stopped at ten minutes to seven. Strong remarks as to the unprotected character of the leat was made, the Coroner (Mr Hacker) describing it as a death trap. The police stated that many lives had been lost in it, and that on the nights of race days police were placed to warn people. In returning a verdict of "Accidental Death" the Jury, of whom Mr E. L. Middleton was Foreman, strongly recommended that the owners build a wall along the leat.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 December 1890 EAST STONEHOUSE - At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, on the body of FRANCIS POOLE, aged 55, a shipwright residing at 71 High-street, Dr Waterfield, who had, by order, made a post-mortem examination, said the deceased suffered from aneurism of the aorta, and the Jury, of whom Mr. Elsen was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HATHERLEIGH - MR H. ABELL, aged 55, who met with an accident at Hatherleigh on Saturday week, died on Friday, and in the evening an Inquest was held at the Bridge Inn. Mr J. Edwards stated that on 6th instant he rode from Okehampton to Hatherleigh with deceased. arriving at Hatherleigh about half-past six he got out at the Bridge Inn, deceased driving towards his home, about 300 yards further on. They did not call in anywhere on the journey. ABELL was sitting in the middle of the trap. Mr G. Horn said on going up South-street about seven o'clock he saw a horse and trap standing, and heard someone groaning. Then he saw deceased lying in the roadway upon his back on the opposite side of the trap. With help he carried deceased to his home, about 500 yards away. Deceased told him that he was driving very steady when the near wheel of the trap caught in a doorstep and jerked over, throwing him out. Deceased remembered trying to catch the rail of the trap but missed it, fell upon his head and back of his neck. The light was not good at the spot where the accident occurred. Dr Glynn said the cause of death was Paralysis, due to injury of the spine of the back. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 December 1890 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - The man found dead near Moretonhampstead on the morning of the 29th November, and who, at the Inquest held on the 1st December, was found to have died from the effects of exposure to the intense cold of the 28th November, has been identified as WILLIAM WILLS, a cab-driver of Plymouth, whose wife resides in Summerland-street. The identification was brought about by the description of the body and clothes which appeared in the Western Morning News report of the Inquest. Communications have passed between P.S. Page, of Moretonhampstead and P.S. Holwill, of Stonehouse, and relatives and acquaintances of the deceased, resulting in undoubted identification. A pattern of trousers cloth given to WILLS by a resident of Plymouth was found to match. The boots and the repairs to them were also further aids to identification.

EXETER ST THOMAS THE APOSTLE - Mr Gould held an Inquest at St Thomas, Exeter, yesterday, respecting the death of WILLIAM COLE, aged 75 years. Deceased, a retired tailor, on reaching home on Wednesday evening, complained of having been knocked down by a horse whilst endeavouring to cross from Commercial-road to the other side of the Exe-bridge. He was picked up by a man named Moxey, who, seeing he was bleeding freely from a wound under the right eye, offered to take him to a chemist. COLE preferred to walk home and on arriving there medical aid was called in. On Friday morning, whilst in his bedroom, COLE had a fall, which rendered him unconscious. He never regained his senses, and died on Saturday night. Mr Keeping, photographer, who saw the first accident, said deceased was not knocked down as he stated, but in hurrying to get out of the way of a horse and carriage belonging to Colonel Wade, of Ide, he stumbled and fell against the kerbstone. The horse was being steadily driven, and was pulled up as quickly as possible. Dr Philand said death resulted from an effusion of blood on the surface of the brain, caused by the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned and Ash, Colonel Wade's coachman, was exonerated from all blame.

CHUDLEIGH - A baby, five weeks old, son of WILLIAM FORD, engine driver, Chudleigh, was found lying dead between its parents on Friday morning and at the Inquest yesterday, a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" was returned. Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, referred to the frequency of these cases, and suggested that it would be safer for young children to sleep in cots than in bed with their parents.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 December 1890 TOTNES - The Treatment Of Paupers At Paignton. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Totnes Union Workhouse by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of a vagrant named THOMAS PEARCE HEALEY, 80 years old, and generally known as Dr Ely. On Friday night last deceased called at the Police-station at Paignton and asked them to get him a bed as he had been to four places and they refused to take him in. The Police took him to the assistant-overseer, who offered to give him an order for the Union Workhouse at Totnes. A man named Distin passing at the time offered to share his room with deceased, and they left. The arrangement, however, did not appear to have been carried out, as during the night the Police met the deceased three times, and the last time he complained of being very tired. The Policeman then took him to an inn in the town and sat him in the porch and left him. On passing the spot again he found deceased had gone. Going down the street, he found him lying in the road. He lifted him up and took him to the assistant-overseer, who objected to taking him in. A discussion took place between the Policeman and the assistant-overseer as to whose duty it was to take deceased in, and eventually the assistant-overseer took him into his house and gave him some tea. A medical man sent for, ordered him to be taken at once to the Totnes Workhouse. A cab was called and deceased was taken to Totnes, no one being with him. On arriving at the workhouse deceased was unconscious. He was seen by Dr Hains during the morning. He was then still unconscious and he died during the afternoon. Deceased was in a very dirty condition. Some Jurors thought it most improper that the poor old man should have been left in the cold so long while the Police and the assistant overseer were discussing whose duty it was to look after him,. and the Jury in returning a verdict of Death from Syncope accelerated by Exposure, added a rider suggesting that the Totnes Board of Guardians should consider what should be done with paupers in an unfit state to be removed. It was stated at the Inquest that deceased was evidently an educated man and had stated that he had been a barrister. He was well known in the neighbourhood.

Western Morning News, Saturday 20 December 1890 TORQUAY - SALLY CANN, a child four years old, whose parents live at Melville-street, Torquay, set fire to her clothes with a piece of lighted paper on Tuesday during the absence of her elder sister, and died in the Hospital from the burns on Thursday afternoon. A Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 December 1890 PLYMOUTH - Before the Plymouth Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, an Inquest was held yesterday at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, relative to the death of MARY ANN YELLAND, who died in the Hospital on Saturday. Deceased was the wife of JOHN YELLAND, a journeyman clogmaker, residing at 5 Morley-lane, Plymouth, and was 73 years of age. In October last she fell over some steps at her residence and broke one of her legs. She was taken to the Hospital, where she had since remained and where she died suddenly on the day named. Medical evidence was to the effect that the cause of death was syncope and the Jury found accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 December 1890 STOKE DAMEREL - MRS SARAH ADAMSON, landlady of the London Spirit Vaults, Prince's-street, Devonport, died suddenly yesterday morning. About half-past eight she was found lying on the floor behind the bar, in an apparently lifeless condition and Mr J. Wilson, surgeon, who was called in, pronounced her to be dead. As the result of a post-mortem examination, Mr Wilson considered that death was due to heart disease, and a verdict to that effect was returned at the Inquest held later in the day before Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall last evening, touching the death of EMILY MITCHELL, aged three months, who was found dead in bed yesterday morning. LAVINIA MITCHELL, mother of the deceased, about quarter to two in the morning awoke with the intention of nursing the deceased and found her dead. Dr R. H. Wagner made a post-mortem examination and found that death was due to inflammation of the lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Southern was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. PLYMOUTH - Mr Coroner A. S. Clark, held an Inquest at the Galatea Inn, Plymouth, yesterday, concerning the death of the infant son of JAMES INCLEDON, a labourer, living at 80 King-street West. Deceased, who was only two days old, was found dead in bed by its mother's side early that morning. The father, questioned by the Coroner, said his wife was very weak and ill and unable to nurse the child, who was fed by a neighbour. Elizabeth Smith deposed to feeding the deceased twice on Monday with bread and milk. On both occasions it vomited. Mr. c. E. Bean, surgeon, as the result of a post-mortem examination, attributed death to suffocation, which he thought was probably caused by pressure against the breast of the mother. He added that the stomach and intestines were perfectly empty , not a particle of food being found in the body. The absence of any trace of food was inexplicable, except on the theory that through the vomiting none passed into the stomach. The mother was too ill to attend to the child properly. The Coroner remarked that cases of suffocation were unfortunately becoming very frequent. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated" and added an expression of opinion that the child had been to some extent neglected.

Western Morning News, Friday 26 December 1890 PLYMOUTH - At the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, on Wednesday evening the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, and a Jury investigated the cause of death of LARS CHRISTIAN LARSEN, 29 years of age, a Norwegian, who died in the Institution on the previous day. Deceased had been an able seaman on board the Golden Horn, now in dry dock at the Great Western Docks. On Thursday night, about half-past ten, he was found to have fallen into the dock, a distance of thirty feet. He was taken on board the vessel, and medical assistance was procured. On the following morning he was removed to the Hospital, where he remained in a state of partial consciousness until the 23rd inst. An operation was performed, but without any favourable result. The medical evidence shewed death to have resulted from a compound depressed fracture at the back of the skull and after hearing the evidence of the Captain of the vessel, who, with the exception of the house surgeon at the Hospital, was the only witness called, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry touching the death of GEORGE CROWHURST, a journeyman carpenter, 70 years of age, was also held on Wednesday night at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, before the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clarke. From the evidence of the house surgeon it appeared that deceased was admitted to the Hospital late on the night of Saturday, the 21st inst., suffering from a compound fracture of the right leg. There was snow falling at the time and the roads being slippery deceased had to all appearances fallen in the street, though there was no evidence to prove this. From the time of his admission the patient grew gradually worse, and on Tuesday became delirious. On Wednesday he died suddenly, in all probability from a clot of blood from the broken limb lodging on the heart. A verdict of Death from Accidental Causes was given.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 December 1890 PLYMOUTH - The Drink Demon. Sad Deaths At Plymouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, at the Pride of Devon Inn, Cecil-street, respecting the death of ELLEN GOSS, aged 60 years, who had resided at 135 King-street. Mr F. Pullin, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased at about half-past nine on Saturday night and found her in a semi-intoxicated state. The woman, who died early on Sunday morning, was in a filthy and neglected condition and the stench of the room was unbearable. her hair had completely fallen out from neglect and the scalp was in a shocking state. Her left leg shewed signs of mortification, and also did the upper part of the left foot. A post-mortem examination shewed that deceased had suffered from cirrhosis of the liver, the result of alcohol, but the immediate cause of death was syncope. He had been informed that the woman had not left her room for a week, and the bed was in a most revolting condition. In his twelve years' experience he had not met such a shocking case. A woman named Deekin, who had occasionally attended deceased, said she had "scrubbed the floor" on Saturday and did not think the place was in a filthy condition. MRS GOSS had been a very hard drinker and had been complaining for about five weeks. - A son of the deceased said his mother had had a bad leg for years and stopped in bed, so she told him, to rest it. He had brought her ointment regularly. He slept in the next room to that of his mother, but had not noticed anything offensive. A Juryman remarked that the deceased had been addicted to drink, but that her sons had done what they could for her. Death from Natural Causes.

PLYMOUTH - The Jury afterwards Inquired into the death of MARY RICHARDS, 66, who had been found dead in her room at 20 Frederick-street, on Saturday. - Mrs Grice stated that on Friday night deceased complained to her that she was suffering from diarrhoea. MRS RICHARDS had been an intemperate woman. Her son sent her money, but nobody visited her on account of her bad temper. On Saturday, at one o'clock, she was asked to go to the deceased, and found her dead. P.C. Wyatt said he found the deceased at two o'clock sitting in a chair near the fire and leaning against the wall. In her right hand she held a glass containing rum and [?] and in her left hand a bottle containing a similar mixture. Deceased must have been dead for some time. Mr c. E. Bean, surgeon, who had attended deceased on the 8th inst for a slight attack of diarrhoea, said she had been a very heavy drinker, and took very little solid food. He thought it probable that she had died from syncope. A Juryman said he had known deceased for thirty years, and every penny she could get was spent in drink. - The Jury (of which Mr Taylor was Foreman) in each case found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM ALLAN LANE, 53, market gardener, residing at 10 Baring-street, Plymouth, was on Saturday selling vegetables in Headlands-park when he ruptured a blood vessel and died shortly afterwards. At an Inquest last evening before Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr E. G. Dutton, surgeon, said he had attended deceased for internal haemorrhage and was of opinion that death resulted from a ruptured blood vessel in the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport Guildhall yesterday, the Borough Coroner (Mr Vaughan) held an Inquest concerning the death of REGINALD JONES, 14 days old, son of a private in the Essex Regiment. The mother, who lives at 181 Pembroke-street, said the child had been sickly from birth and died on Saturday morning before a medical man could be called in. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, said the child suffered from cold and pleurisy and the Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TORQUAY - Death Of A Recluse At Torquay - Mr Sydney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Castle Hotel, Torquay, last night, touching the death of ELIZABETH WHARRAM, 65, of Fern-villas, St Luke's-road. The evidence shewed that the deceased, who was a maiden lady, had for more than twenty years been living alone, and for several years had not left her house. She admitted nobody to the house, her food being placed on a shelf through a window. She lived rent free in the house of a brother-in-law, and received an allowance of £5 a quarter from a relation in London. As the shutters of the house were closed for three days last week the door was burst open on Saturday and deceased was found lying across her bed in the attic dead, and half naked. Dr Karkeek, who made a post-mortem, and there were no marks of violence on the body. He considered that death was due to cold, consequent upon clots of blood in the heart. The body was dirty and the bed clothes and the rooms of the house were in a filthy condition. Upon a search being made, plenty of food and some money were found in the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."#

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Quarrel At Devonport. - At the Devonport Guildhall yesterday Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, resumed the adjourned inquiry into the death of JOHN JOSEPH PEARCE, a mason, who died on Christmas morning from injuries received during a street scuffle two days before. At the previous Inquiry, evidence was given that deceased and his brother, WILLIAM met Joseph rundle, a hammerman, who, as the man advanced towards him, held up his umbrella, the point of which fractured a small bone over the deceased's eye, causing suffusion of blood on the brain. Mr W. Earl, solicitor, watched the proceedings on behalf of Randle. - Further evidence was now given by Inspector Winter, who produced the umbrella which he received from Rundle. On informing him of the death of PEARCE, Rundle replied that he had heard the news, and that nearly killed him. He proceeded to narrate the circumstances to him, and stated that at eleven o'clock last Tuesday evening he left the Black Horse Inn, and saw WILLIAM PEARCE, a tailor, on the ground struggling with a much smaller man named Richards. Rundle remonstrated with the sailor, who, he thought, was serving the other man badly, and the two men got up. Richards went away and Rundle and WILLIAM PEARCE went towards [?]-street. On the way an altercation took place between them and the sailor assaulted him. Looking round, Rundle saw the deceased, who was a brother of the sailor running towards him. JOHN PEARCE was a bigger man and he was afraid of the two. For protection he held out his umbrella and deceased might have run against it with some force. He denied pushing the umbrella in the direction of PEARCE, or attempting to strike either of the assailants. Both the latter rushed upon him, and they all three fell, Rundle being undermost. He called for help, and after some time was released. Rundle added that he had no intention of striking the deceased, and merely defended himself. On his coat collar were blood stains, but there were none on the umbrella. By Mr Earl: Rundle told him he fell on his face and the blood stains were on the back of his coat. - Dr Cook, recalled, gave his opinion that the injury to deceased could have been caused by his falling with moderate force against the point of the umbrella held in the position described by Rundle. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought there could be no doubt Rundle held up the umbrella merely in self-defence, and the deceased rushing upon him, the weapon pointing upwards came into contact with the eye. In his judgment the conduct of WILLIAM PEARCE, the brother, was the original cause of the fatality. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Rundle from all blame.

PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM TIPPETT, 50, residing at 13 Buckwell-street, Plymouth, was on Sunday morning in the act of drinking a cup of tea, when he was seized with an epileptic fit and at once expired. At an Inquest held last evening by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Dr Wagner stated that deceased had been subject to fits, and in his opinion had died from suffocation consequent on falling on his face during a seizure. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 1 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM JOHN BARWICK, a mason's labourer, residing at 5 Cromwell-road, Plymouth, on Tuesday morning at quarter to six found his infant son dead in bed. At an Inquest subsequently held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at BARWICK'S residence, Mr c. E. Bean, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, attributed death to pneumonia. The Jury, of whom Mr James Goss was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Death From Burns At A Plymouth Lime-Kiln. - WILLIAM WATKINS, shipwright, aged 43 years, who, as already stated, was found on December 16th badly burned, at the edge of one of Messrs. @Sparrow Bros. lime-kilns, Catt-down, died at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital on Tuesday night, and Mr A. S. Clarke, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Hospital. The evidence was to the effect that about 11 p.m. on the day named Captain Pengelly, of Clovelly, was walking near the kilns, and heard a man crying "I'm on fire," apparently from the top of one of them. He ran up, and found WATKINS at the edge of the kiln. He threw his overcoat on him, but that caught fire. He ran to Prince Rock shouting for help, and on his return found a constable with WATKINS, who was then conscious. Witness asked how he got there and the man said, "Drink has brought me here." Witness had no doubt that the man was sitting near the kiln for warmth, and that the fumes overcame him. WATKINS' food bag was lying near him. - EDWARD WATKINS, brother of the deceased, identified the body. Mr Nash, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that deceased died from exhaustion caused by the burns. He was severely burnt on his legs and thighs, the right side, and the back. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence, and the jury commended Captain Pengelly for his prompt action in the matter. Captain Pengelly thanked the Jury.

Western Morning News, Friday 2 January 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Death By Burning. - The circumstances attending the death of SARAH K. M. ENGLISH, 3 ½ years of age, from the effects of burns, formed the subject of Inquiry yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough coroner, at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport. The mother, who lives at 29 John-street, Morice Town, said that shortly before eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning she left deceased with her brother in bed, and told them to remain there until she came back again. About five or six minutes afterwards she heard the boy shouting out that his sister had set herself on fire. She rushed upstairs, and found the girls night-dress in flames. The child was removed to the Hospital, and died about three o'clock the same day. Witness was unable to explain how the accident happened. Her little boy, who was hardly six years of age, had told different stories about the matter. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

KINGSWEAR - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, last evening held an Inquiry at the Royal Dart Hotel, Kingswear, touching the death of the child of GEORGE HENRY DODD, aged five years. The mother's evidence shewed that she brought the child downstairs on Monday morning shortly after nine o'clock and went into the back kitchen to draw some water, having left the child standing before the fire. She immediately afterwards heard screams, and the child ran towards her in flames. He had nothing on but his nightdress, and this was in a blaze. She tried to extinguish the fire with a mat, but the child struggled violently, and she had to take off the nightdress. Dr Kendall was then sent for, but the burns were so extensive that the child succumbed to its injuries the same night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 January 1891 TAVISTOCK - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held by Dr Thompson, County Coroner, at Lutchley yesterday, on the body of a daughter of DANIEL WICKET, aged five years, who caught her clothes on fire on December 20th, and was burnt about the left thigh and knee. It having been stated that the mother applied turpentine to take out the fire, the Coroner and Mr Bowhays, surgeon, said it was wrong t do so as turpentine was an irritant. Linseed oil and limewater should have been used.

PLYMOUTH - GEORGE BAKER, aged 8 years, living at 34 Frankfort-street, Plymouth, was taken ill on Saturday morning and died the following day. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, yesterday, at the Anchor and Hope Inn, Mr C. Bean, surgeon, attributed death to acute pneumonia, occurring in a weak and consumptive child. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of ANDREW RENFREY, aged 77 years, a retired coachman, living at 4 Raleigh-street, who whilst getting out of bed on Sunday night fell forward on his face and died in a few minutes. Mr C. Bean, who stated that deceased had suffered from heart disease and asthma, attributed death to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Sad Fatality At Plymouth. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, on the body of JOHN ROWLINGS, dockyard labourer, who had expired at the Institution on Saturday. Mr William Brewer was Foreman of the Jury. - Samuel Loveridge, established rigger, Devonport Dockyard, deposed that he and fifteen other men, including deceased, were on Saturday despatched to lift a clump to which a buoy had been attached abreast of Millbay Pier. After taking off the buoy, the stone was lifted to the water's edge. They then proceeded to put in a small cap to hang the chain while they unshackled, and to connect another chain to the clump. During this operation the shackle opened out, and the chain ran through. he had himself fastened the bar of the shackle, and could not account for its slipping out. His back was towards the deceased at the time of the accident. He saw deceased lying on the deck, and immediately had him conveyed to the Hospital. William Symons, rigger's labourer, said he was working with the deceased, and was in the act of placing a rope over the pollard, when something took charge and knocked him backwards against another man, who was precipitated down the hatchway. He then observed that deceased was pinned against the mast by a wire rope, which was attached to the clump for regulating purposes, and that his left thigh was in a shocking state. - Mr T. H. Burnett, master rigger, explained the working of the shackle, which was self-acting. Though only introduced into the Dockyard during the last twelve months, it had been in use at Malta for years, and was now issued to all men-of-war. The shackle was 2 ¼ inches in diameter and would bear a strain of 25 tons: It should be only 3 ½ inches between the jaws, but it now measured 5 inches. He had used similar shackles for seven years, and had always found them safe. The clump weighed nine tons. The opening of the jaws caused the bolt to slip, and the chain, of course, ran through. All ironwork in the Dockyard was tested before being issued. He had never heard of a similar accident in all his experience. - Staff-Surgeon Isaac Henry Anderson said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on Saturday suffering from a compound fracture of the left thigh. It was found necessary to amputate the limb, and deceased died in about two hours after admission from shock and loss of blood. ROWLINGS was conscious when admitted, but too exhausted to be able to speak. The Deputy Coroner said he was satisfied that the shackle was fitted for the purpose for which it was used. The accident was one of those for which nobody could account. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all from blame. Mr Gameson represented Mr J. J. E. Venning, Admiralty law agent, Devonport.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - Running Down Of The Plymouth Trawler, Coquette. The Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of WILLIAM SIMPSON, one of the crew of the Coquette, a Plymouth trawler, which was run down by the steamer Fairway, of London, on the morning of the 18th ult., off the Eddystone, was held at Plymouth last evening. An Inquest was also opened on the body of WILLIAM FRUDE, also belonging to the Coquette, which had been recovered on the previous day. - Mr Gordon Dale represented the relatives of deceased, Mr A. E. Nelson, instructed by Messrs. Lowless and Co., of London, appeared for the owners of the Coquette; and Mr W. Clifton (Messrs. Crump and Sons), London, represented Captain Gould and the owners of the Fairway. - After evidence of identification and of the recovery of the bodies had been given, Mrs Crews, master of the Coquette, said he sailed from Plymouth on the 17th December to the fishing ground outside the Eddystone, and shot the trawl about three or four miles from that point. After several hours the trawl was hauled up, and at half-past eleven the foremast was hove in over the boom on the port side, on the starboard tack. The crew then went below for tea, leaving WILLIAM SIMPSON on deck. The usual port and starboard lights were burning. After tea FRUDE went on deck, and witness was cutting a pipe of tobacco when FRUDE called out, "Skipper, there's a steamboat coming up." He and Giles immediately went on deck and saw that the steamer had white masthead and green lights. When the steamer got within two or three hundred yards from them, she ported her helm and opened her red lights Witness saw that she had no chance of going clear of the Coquette, and ran down to the cabin and brought up his son William. All the crew then shouted to the steamer to "hard a port," and witness, holding the helm, shouted to FRUDE to trim the foresail, thinking that it might drive them past the bows of the steamer, but there was no wind. The steamer then struck them on the port side. Witness shouted to the crew, "There's hope yet boys; follow me." They all ran forward with the exception of the old man Giles, and got into the rigging of the trawler. Witness then got hold of a stanchion belonging to the steamer and told FRUDE that if he could get up and take the child from him they should all be saved. Something then fell from aloft and knocked all four down, and he lost FRUDE and SIMPSON. He reached the rigging a second time, but was again knocked away and lost his son. A third time he regained the rigging and reached the bow of the steamer. He shouted for help, but go no answer for two or three minutes. A man then came and asked him what was the matter. he said, "There are four of my men in the water, and there is no one to give them a rope to save their lives." The captain then came on the bridge and ordered the boats to be got ready. When the crew got the boat out the hook of the tackle broke, and the boat went down stern foremost. The boat was being baled out for twenty or thirty minutes before she was fit for use. While they were baling, one of the crew shouted that another red light was visible on the port bow, and it turned out to be that of the trawler R.J.W. He told the captain that if he shewed a red light the trawler would send a boat to the wreck before that of the steamer could be baled out. The Coquette sank about a minute after he got on board the steamer. Asked by the captain where his lights were, witness answered, "There they are, over the bow." The lights were then sinking into the water. A boat sent out by the R.J.W. could not find any of the men, and witness was taken into the galley by two of the crew. He was there a considerable time before the captain brought him into the cabin and told him the name of the steamer. The captain asked him if he would go on board one of the trawlers, as it would cost him a lot of time to bring witness to the harbour, and the trawler Elizabeth Jane brought him to Plymouth. He was certain that when he boarded the steamer there was no look-out whatever; if there had all the lives might have been saved. - By the Foreman: He had his proper lights - red and green. It was usual for steamers going up Channel to go over the trawling ground. - By a Juror: The captain was not on the bridge when he got on board, and did not offer him any stimulants or dry clothes. He (witness) had hold of the guard irons of the steamer immediately after the collision. - By Mr Nelson: When he got his trawl up he put his foresheet to windward and was then heading N.E. by E. He had seen his side lights burning before he went down below; had a white light when trawling which he took down when the trawl was taken up, and put side lights in their place. There were no gangways on Plymouth vessels; they always carried the boat on deck on the starboard side. When he first saw the lights of the Fairway they bore on his port bow. The steamer struck him on the port side and not on the side on which the boat was. If the steamer had struck them on the starboard side, she would have smashed the boat to pieces; he had now the boat undamaged. He saw the red light of the steamer before the collision. The Fairway was porting in order to come under their stern. His red light was burning in the port rigging when he got there. There were about fifty trawlers on the ground; had no time to get a flare up shewn. The captain told him that he heard the blow struck when he was below and that it frightened him. - By Mr Dale: The Coquette was heading N.E. by E; the Eddystone was bearing about N.N.W. between eight and ten miles from him. The night was very dark, the tide about a quarter to the flood and the current about 1 ½ miles. - By Mr Clifton: He took down the white light himself, and turned it out. If an overtaking light had been necessary he would have got a flare-up light from below. SIMPSON, a boy of 14, was on deck while they were taking tea. They were only making a mile an hour headway. When he first saw the steamer she was bearing on the fore side rigging, going clear inside of the Coquette; he said to FRUDE that the steamer would come up clear of them inside. The steamer at that time was about three-quarters of a mile off. He could not give the bearings when he first saw the steamer's red light. The first he heard of the captain was when he called out to get the boat ready. He could not say that the captain was not on the bridge when the collision occurred, but he told witness that he was in his berth at the time. Though there was a great deal of delay, he thought the men were anxious to get the boat out. One of the young men in the galley said, "That is that fellow being on deck again." He did not complain to the captain when he saw him. - John Waterfield, ate of the R.J.W., said at ten minutes past one on the morning of the 18th ult. he was on deck smoking when he observed a steamer coming right abeam of them, about two miles off and sat on the rail, and watched her up. Heard a trawler on the lee port bow singing out, "Hard aport," three times, and immediately saw the steamer run into the trawler and put its starboard light out; the Coquette was lying to at the time. His crew immediately put out a boat, and in three minutes was among the wreckage, but could find none of the men. He had seen the trawler's green light and the time. After they had hauled their boat in they spoke to the steamer and learned that only one man had been saved. If a proper look-out had been kept the collision would not have occurred. - By Mr Nelson: If the Coquette's red light was in its place, the steamer must have seen it. The steamer struck the Coquette on the port side. He could not say whether the steamer ported or not. - By Mr Dale: The steamer was hardly a quarter of a mile from the Coquette when the crew of the latter shouted, and in his opinion if there had been a man on the look-out there was plenty of time to port her helm and clear the trawler. - By Mr Clifton: The wreckage was 30 yards on the steamer's starboard; the steamer was heading E. by S. Had their boat in before the steamer blew her whistle. - Charles foster, skipper of the trawler Welcome, said he saw a steamer coming up with a red light. A little time before she came up she starboarded her helm and shewed the whole of her three lights. She continued starboarding until he could only see the green light; then she passed about a quarter of a mile from there. That would have taken her in clear of them and the Coquette. The steamer must have altered her helm to strike the Coquette. They heard the crew of the Coquette shouting to the steamer. The steamer must have ported, but witness lost sight of her lights. He did not see the collision, but immediately after saw the wreckage. - By Mr Nelson: All Plymouth trawlers carry their boats on the starboard side. - By Mr Clifton: The Coquette or any other trawler might fall off a point or two. In the state of the wind the vessels were sometimes quite unmanageable. He had shifted his vessel, as he thought there were too many of them in a cluster. The steamer altered its course for witness's vessel, so that someone must have seen them. He could not say how the steamer was heading when he first saw it. - The Coroner, not thinking it possible to finish the Inquiry that evening, adjourned the Inquest until two o'clock this afternoon at Plymouth Guildhall.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Queen's Arms Hotel, Tamerton Foliot, yesterday, on the body of JANE JAMES, aged 15 years, living with her parents at Kemp's-cottages, who died last Sunday morning. On Friday she suffered from what she thought was a cold. Medicine was obtained, but no medical man saw her. Mr E. Doudney, surgeon, stated that deceased, who was well nourished, died from perforation of the stomach, caused by gastritis. He could not say that if medical aid had been obtained at the outset that her life could have been saved, as the complaint was frequent in girls of that age and often resulted fatally. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Maddock was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 8 January 1891 CREDITON - Suicide Near Crediton. - At an Inquest held at Salmon Hutch near Crediton, on Tuesday, on the body of WILLIAM ROBERT PETHERBRIDGE CASELY, ANN CASELY, mother of the deceased, said on Tuesday morning, about five o'clock, she heard him making a doleful noise like a dog howling. She called out, "WILLIE, WILLIE, what is the matter?" He then came to the foot of her bed. It was too dark to distinguish him, but she heard him say, "I shall be all right in a minute or two." Then he returned to his room. Directly afterwards she heard him making a noise, and entering his bedroom, struck a match, and shouted to her husband, "My God! My God! he has cut his throat." Subsequently she found his razor on the floor. he had been ill from about eighteen months ago, when he made a similar noise. The doctor then told her to keep everything dangerous out of his way. Dr Leslie Powne, who was called in, said death must have been almost instantaneous. About 18 months ago deceased was suffering from religious mania of a despondent type, but after a week or two he practically recovered his usual state of health. Persons suffering as deceased did were liable to a suicidal frenzy. - A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr W. Arscott was Foreman.

Western Morning News, Friday 9 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - MRS ELIZABETH PERRYMAN, aged 67, living at 20 Bishop's-place, Plymouth, went out shopping on Tuesday evening and when she returned was taken very ill, but recovered and went to bed. On her husband awakening in the middle of the night he found her dead. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the West Hoe Hotel, Millbay-road, yesterday, the Jury, of whom Mr W. Bishop was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Syncope."

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 January 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - MRS MARY ROE WATTERS, aged 64 years, living at 6 Phoenix-street, Plymouth, was found dead in her bedroom yesterday morning by her daughter, Mrs A. Williams. Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, subsequently held an Inquest at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, when Mr W. H. Waterfield, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, accelerated by the cold weather. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Chegwyn was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, respecting the death of ETHEL HOOPPELL EASTERBROOK, about three months old, whose parents live at 3 Charlotte-row, Morice Town. The child, which appeared to be in its usual health, expired suddenly, and the cause of death not being apparent, Mr W. James Cooke, who had been called in, made a post-mortem examination, and found that the heart of the child was imperfectly developed, a portion not having closed over. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 12 January 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Drowning Fatality At Devonport. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM CURTIS, 56 years of age, an employee of the Devonport Waterworks Company, who was found drowned on Friday afternoon in one of the Company's water tanks, was held by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, on Saturday. Mr Handley, the Company's foreman, stated that deceased came to the office about quarter to eight on Friday morning, and had the keys of the Granby Green tank, from which water was supplied to Devonport Dockyard for working machinery. About half-past ten witness went to the Company's store in Canterbury-street expecting to find deceased there. After making some inquiries about him he proceeded to Granby Green, where he found the water tank open. The keys were in the padlock, and the turncock's bar and key were on the ground, but he could then see nothing of deceased. Witness explained the construction of the tank, which would hold about 100,000 gallons of water and was about seven feet deep. There were four steps under the hatchway, and on one of these was the impression of the heel of a man's boot. In ganging the height of water in the tank deceased probably rested one foot on the step and knelt on the partially opened hatchway. Deceased's widow said her husband had complained of giddiness and taking all the circumstances into consideration, the Jury came to the conclusion that deceased while stooping down to gauge the depth of water lost his balance and fell headlong into the tank. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was accordingly returned. Mr Foster Bone was present at the Inquiry on behalf of the Waterworks Company.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 January 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide At Stonehouse. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, to Inquire into the death of ELLEN MARY DOWN, aged 20. MRS DOWN, mother of the deceased, said her daughter had been a domestic servant in the employment of Mr Shobrook, Edgcumbe-street. She left her situation about six weeks ago, and had since that time lived at the house of her parents. On the 7th instant she complained of a headache, for which witness administered medicine, but on the two following days she became worse and vomited a good deal. On Friday last she appeared much better, and took some gruel and brandy, but on Saturday morning she relapsed and Mr Waterfield came in the afternoon. Before sending for the doctor her daughter told her she had taken poison. She asked her the reason, and she said she was enceinte. She also said that she had asked "Walter" to marry her, and he had refused. The reason she did not send for the doctor sooner was that deceased had been subject to bilious attacks, and witness had always treated her for them. - By the Foreman: She did not know that her daughter was enceinte until Saturday morning. She first sent for Mr Bulteel, but that gentleman was too ill to come. - Corporal Walter Marsh, North Staffordshire Regiment, stationed at the Raglan Barracks, Devonport, deposed that he had known deceased for over two years, and last saw her alive on the 5th inst. at the barracks. She asked him if he was going out, and he said he could not as he was on duty. Deceased had never asked him to marry her, but witness was, he believed, the father of her child. Two months ago deceased had informed him of her condition, but had never threatened to take her life, nor shewn that she felt her position very much. - By the Foreman: He had intended marrying deceased, but her mother had forbidden him to keep company with her. - Dr W. H. Waterfield said he was called to see deceased on Saturday evening. He found that she had been prematurely confined. Deceased told him that Marsh had promised to marry her, and, when he refused, she was afraid of what her people would say, and had taken three pennyworth of rat poison, which she had bought at a chemists. She had, she said, taken all the poison in an orange, on Monday last, for the purpose of destroying herself. The particular rat poison taken did not require registration. On making a post-mortem examination he found all the symptoms of poisoning from phosphorus. He also found, in an undigested state, the piece of orange in which the poison had been inserted. Death from phosphorus poisoning generally intervened in five or six days. In his opinion death had resulted from an irritant poison - probably phosphorus. - By the Foreman: If he had been called in on Tuesday he might have been able to save the girl's life. The poison she took ought, in his opinion, to come under the Act. - The Coroner said, taking into consideration the condition of the deceased, the refusal of her lover to marry her and the reasonable fear of reproach on the part of her parents he held she was temporarily insane when she took the poison. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," and at their suggestion the Coroner admonished deceased's mother for not calling in medical aid sooner.

PLYMOUTH - FLORENCE MARY KINNINGS, aged 7 years, living at 19 Chedworth-street, Plymouth, had a severe pain in her throat on Sunday, and it not being any better on the following day her mother obtained some medicine. Early yesterday morning she became worse and died. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, subsequently held an Inquest at the Wellington Hotel, Wellington-street, when Mr T. H. Williams, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, induced by inflammation of the windpipe. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 15 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - The Fatal Accident At Compton Leigh. The Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at Hyde Park Hotel, Mannamead, investigated the circumstances attending the death of MR BENJAMIN BURN KENDALL, of Wentworth Villa, Mannamead, and a member of the firm of Curgenven, Mugford and Kendall, woollen warehousemen, Whimple-street, Plymouth. The following gentlemen constituted the Jury: - Mr W. Veale (Foreman), Colonel Robinson, Colonel Benhan, Captain Reade, Captain Wotton, Captain Pounds, Captain Aylmer, and Messrs. C H. James, E. Coppin, Theobald Butler, R. Bray, W. Stidston, and H. O. Serpell. After viewing the body, the Jury inspected the grounds of Compton Leigh, the residence of Mr E. A. Pearn, where deceased met with an accident. To reach the spot where he fell into the roadway MR KENDALL must have forced his way through a rather dense shrubbery to the left of the house. A lamp in Hartley-avenue, close to the point at which the accident occurred, was, Mr Pearn surmises, mistaken by deceased for one outside the entrance gate. MR KENDALL having, owing to the hardness of the ground, left the carriage drive without being aware of the fact. The boundary wall is nearly on a level with the shrubbery, and is 10 feet in height from Hartley-avenue. - On returning to the hotel Mr Pearn stated that deceased came to Compton Leigh at half-past seven on the evening of Wednesday, the 13th inst., and left at a quarter to eleven. MR KENDALL usually left at ten o'clock, but on this occasion he said his children were at an evening party in the neighbourhood, and he would have to stop up a little later. When deceased left there was a good light from the window, and the lamp outside the entrance gate was distinctly visible. Witness did not hear of the accident until Friday, when a gentleman asked him how MR KENDALL was. he then went to MR KENDALL'S residence and MRS KENDALL said something about deceased running against some trees. He did not question deceased, who was in great pain. On reaching home he told his gardener that MR KENDALL had met with an accident. The man then said, "That accounts for the blood I saw on the pathway and kerbstone." Witness then asked, "How on earth did he get there?" There was no doubt that deceased had walked over the boundary wall into Hartley-avenue. MR KENDALL had informed his wife that he lost his way in the darkness and did not know where he was going. Deceased, who was perfectly sober when he left the house, and made no unusual remark, was acquainted with the pathway leading to the entrance gate. Witness could find no footmarks, on account of the hardness of the ground. On Thursday morning the hat belonging to deceased, with a quantity of blood in it, was found in Hartley-avenue at the spot where deceased must have fallen. - Mr G. Aldous, surgeon, stated that on being called to see deceased about one o'clock on Thursday morning, he found him sitting in a chair in the dining-room and suffering from a scalp wound and an injury to the chest, involving a fractured rib, and a wound in the left lung. He was perfectly sober and conscious, but could give no clear account of the accident, and made very light of it. Deceased was under the care of witness until his death on Tuesday, the primary cause of which was a fractured rib and a wound in the lung, occasioned by a severe fall. On Friday afternoon MR KENDALL became delirious and made use of the words, "Holly bushes." He was conscious during Thursday and on Friday morning and became conscious again on Sunday afternoon. Deceased was suffering so much pain and was struggling so violently, being a strong man, that witness was obliged to keep him under the influence of a drug, as perfect quiet was essential to his recovery. - MR BENJAMIN BURN KENDALL, son of the deceased, stated that his father arrived home about twenty minutes to twelve on the night of the accident without his hat, a matter which seemed to concern him greatly. He was bleeding freely at the head, and said he had received a fall, but could not tell how the accident occurred. On Sunday afternoon his father was slightly conscious for about three minutes, during which time witness asked him if he knew him. Deceased said he did, and called him by his name. Witness then inquired how he felt and his father said he had no pain. Deceased subsequently asked "Haven't I had a fall?" Witness replied that he had, and a bad one. Deceased then said "Didn't it occur in Pearn's grounds?" to which witness replied in the affirmative. Witness afterwards asked him did he know how he met with the accident, and deceased said "No," and again became unconscious. They heard deceased arrive at the house, but finding that he did not mount the steps they went out and helped him into the house. He had a great quantity of blood about him, and witness was proceeding to fetch the doctor, when deceased said "Oh, no; it will pass off in a minute. I fell the most pain here" (putting his hand to his left side). Witness, however, at once fetched Mr Aldous. - By the Foreman: His father came home alone. When the doctor arrived they wanted to carry deceased up to bed, but he insisted on walking up himself, and did so. On Thursday morning witness went up to Hartley-avenue, and found a pipe belonging to deceased surrounded with blood. His father, he considered, must have been unconscious on the pathway for nearly twenty minutes, judging by the quantity of blood there. - The Coroner said there was no doubt from what the Jury had seen and heard, that MR KENDALL had accidentally walked over the wall at Compton Leigh, thereby receiving injuries which resulted in his death. It was a very sad accident. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and passed a vote of condolence with the widow and family of MR KENDALL.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 January 1891 EAST BUDLEIGH - An Inquest was held yesterday at Budleigh Salterton relating to the death of EDWARD THOMAS PENGILLEY, a child, who died on Tuesday last. A considerable amount of interest was shewn, it being rumoured that death was due to unnecessary exposure. Dr Evans stated that the child had been weakly from birth and that the actual cause of death was congestion of the lungs, caused by exposure to the cold. The Coroner, in summing up, commented on the melancholy nature of the case, and while acquitting the mother of any blame, spoke in strong terms of the father, who by giving way to drink, had placed himself in such a position that he was refused a tenancy, thereby indirectly bringing about the exposure of the child, from the consequences of which it, doubtless, met its death. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Saturday 17 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - MRS LUCY JANE KELLY, a widow, aged 55, who lived with her sister, Mrs M. Aldridge, at St. Leonard's-on-Sea, last week came to Plymouth see her son off to the Cape. She drove in a cab to 17 Cheltenham-place, and asked Mr Fisher who resides there, if he could tell where she could get lodgings. Seeing she was very ill, his wife asked her inside and put her to bed. Next day Mr Whipple, surgeon, was called, but she died in a week. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, yesterday, Mr Lucy, surgeon, attributed death to inflammation of the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their appreciation of the kindness Mr and Mrs Fisher had shewn to an entire stranger.

Western Morning News, Monday 19 January 1891 EGG BUCKLAND - SUSAN PERRIE, a maiden lady, aged 80, was found dead in bed on Thursday morning in the cottage in which she had for twelve years resided at Egg Buckland. Mrs Ferris, a widow, occupying part of the same dwelling, saw her after she had retired on the previous evening, and made the discovery that she was dead on taking her a cup of tea the next morning. Mr Dewdney, surgeon, subsequently made a post-mortem examination, and ascertained the cause of death to be syncope. Mr Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 January 1891 TORQUAY - At an Inquest held at Torquay yesterday on the body of the infant child, three days old, of JOHN RICE, labourer, of Temperance-street, a verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned. Dr Cave, who made a post-mortem examination, said he found the child had eaten biscuits and he condemned the practice of some parents in supplying children of tender age with such food. Death was due to convulsions.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - Early yesterday morning JAMES KINGDON, of 2 Notte-street, Plymouth, found his child EMMA, aged three weeks, lying on its face by its mother's side dead. Mr C. Bean, surgeon, at the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark last evening, stated that he found blood oozing from the baby's lips and the lungs and veins were congested. The child having just previously taken nourishment, had lain on its face and been suffocated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated."

Western Morning News, Saturday 24 January 1891 TORQUAY - On the evening of Boxing-day, WILLIAM GILL, 53 years of age, a cabman, of Ellacombe, Torquay, was getting on to his cab at the Wellswood stand, when the horse started, and the cab colliding with another in front GILL fell backwards to the ground and was rendered unconscious. He was conveyed to the Torbay Hospital, where he died on Thursday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr S. Hacker last evening, deceased's employer, John Hodge, said he spoke to deceased shortly before the accident, and he then noticed that he had had something to drink, but was not the worse for drink. Dr F. E. Cave said there was haemorrhage from the ears and nose, which was a symptom of a fractured skull. Deceased remained unconscious for 36 hours and partially unconscious for a further 24 hours. Upon making a post-mortem examination, witness found a small fracture across the base of the skull, but not sufficient to cause death. Death was due to laceration of the front of the brain. Verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXMINSTER - Drowning Of A Sergeant-Major Near Exeter. - Mr H. Gould, Deputy coroner, held an Inquest at the Stowey Arms Inn, Exminster, last evening, respecting the death of ALEXANDER ELMSLIE, sergeant-major 1st Forfarshire Volunteers, and recently residing with his family at Heavitree, Exeter, whose body was found in the Exeter Canal, near Countess Weir Bridge on Thursday. SUSAN ELMSLIE, wife of the deceased, said that deceased left home about ten o'clock on 1st January, and she had not heard anything about him since. Deceased had been on sick leave since the 15th November and his memory was very bad. Deceased was in the habit of taking long walks. He never exhibited a suicidal tendency, and was quite happy and comfortable at home. Deceased was of temperate habits and said when he last left home that he was going for a walk. - John Endicott said the deceased on the 1st January near the Country House Inn, on the Topsham Road, asked him which way he must go to cross the river. Witness told him he could not cross the river unless he went to the Countess Weir Bridge, and shewed him the way. Did not notice anything wrong with him. - Samuel W. Hutchings proved finding the body in the Canal about 200 yards below Countess Weir Bridge. The Police-Constable at Exminster deposed that deceased had a gold ring on his finger and a scarf pin, pocket handkerchief and kid gloves but had no money about him. - The wife of the deceased recalled stated that deceased never carried any money with him. Medical evidence proved that there were no marks of violence on deceased, and that death probably was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 26 January 1891 EXETER - Suicide Of An Exeter Tradesman. Sad Result Of Strong Drink. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest at Exeter on Saturday, touching the death of MR S. T. GILBERT, boot and shoe manufacturer of 103 Fore-street. Deceased's widow said her husband was 46 years of age. On Friday evening she was with him in the sitting-room and remained with him until about quarter past one when he went upstairs to go to bed. - The Coroner: What was his condition? - Witness: Tipsy. He had been drinking brandy. - The Coroner: You mean brandy and water. - Witness: There was very little water with it. I cannot tell how much he drank on Friday, but as a rule he took about a quart a day. I very seldom shared any of it with him. My husband had a very good appetite. About two minutes after he had gone upstairs on Friday night she heard a noise as if something had fallen on the floor and on going to the bedroom found deceased lying upon his back on the bed. He was dressed just as when he left the sitting-room with the exception that his coat was off. There was blood upon his face. She spoke to him, but received no answer. She called up the servant and then rang the bells of the neighbours houses. She had had no misunderstanding nor any unkind words with her husband. He kissed her several times during the evening. He was not sober when he went to bed. She was not aware that he had fire-arms in the house. - A Juror: Had he ever threatened to take his life? - MRS GILBERT: Yes, on several occasions. At the time of the jubilee he threatened to blow his brains out, and so he had several times since. - The Coroner: Did he give any reason for his threats? - MRS GILBERT: None whatever. - Alice Mole, servant in the employ of deceased, said she was aroused on Friday night by a loud report and jumped out of bed. Her mistress came into the room and said, "Be quick, MR GILBERT has shot himself." She dressed herself and went into her master's bedroom, and there saw deceased lying on his back with blood running down his face. - Frederick Edwards, manager of the Devonshire Liberal Club, said early on Saturday morning he was walking down Fore-street when he saw two females running about, evidently in great distress. He offered to render them assistance, and they then asked him to follow them upstairs. He did so, and saw MR GILBERT in his bedroom in a half lying and half sitting posture. The servant informed him that deceased had shot himself. Witness felt his pulse and found him dead. He left the room to fetch a policeman and met one coming up the stairs. They returned to the room together and on making a search found a revolver lying just under deceased's hand. It contained one discharged cartridge. - Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, found a small crack in the skin at the back of the head, and the bone of the skull beneath was fractured. The mouth was full of blood and there was a hole through the upper part of the palate, which penetrated to the brain. The muzzle of the pistol must have been placed in the mouth close to the base of the skull. Death must have been instantaneous. There was no possibility of the wound being caused by accident. - Dr Harris had attended the deceased for several years for various complaints, including illness from the effects of alcohol. He last saw him alive on Monday, when he was in the sitting-room, and was suffering from the effects of drink. He tried to reason with him, but it was practically of no avail. There was a large tumbler on the mantelpiece at the time, and it was three-parts full of brandy and water. Witness pointed to it and said, "That's what is ruining your prospects." Deceased had promised witness to give up drink, but he always took to it again. MRS GILBERT was always in distress about her husband's habits, and he told her to try and keep the liquor away from him as much as possible; and also to warn persons at places where he would be likely to go for it not to supply him. These directions she followed as far as possible. There was no doubt that the drink had unhinged deceased's mind. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," adding that the insanity was brought about by excessive drinking. They expressed sympathy with the widow and family.

EXETER HEAVITREE - Mr W. H. Gould held an Inquest at Heavitree on Saturday on the body of a married woman named CAROLINE ALLEN, aged 32 years. Deceased has not enjoyed good health, having frequently complained to her husband, a ward porter at the Exeter Asylum, of weakness of the heart. She went to bed, as usual, on Wednesday night, and the next morning her little girl found her dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 January 1891 PLYMOUTH - MRS FANNY HARRY, aged 43 years, residing at 16 William-street, Plymouth, was found dead in bed by her husband on Sunday morning. Mr Clark, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Oddfellows' Hall, Morley-street, last evening, when Mr W. Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, induced by heart disease. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Lavis was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - MR WILLIAM WALTER SHAW, aged 65, a pensioner, residing at 16 Wyndham-square, Plymouth, whilst going upstairs to his bedroom on Saturday evening fell down dead. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday, Mrs Toms, deceased's landlady, stated that Mr Kelly, surgeon, who was unable to be present, had made a post-mortem examination and found death to be due to a rupture of a blood vessel of the heart, accelerated by the exertion of walking upstairs. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Percy was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 January 1891 TOTNES - Death From Burning At Totnes. - At the Inquiry held at Totnes last evening by Mr Hacker, Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr E. L. Middleton was Foreman, relative to the death of MINNIE FARLEY, aged 15, daughter of a rural postman, the father stated that during Sunday night, while watching by her, she told him she was sitting by the fire, and whether she nodded or not she could not say, when her sister returned from the bedroom with a book for her she told her, her apron was on fire. She tried to undo her things, but before she could do so, the flames reached her chin. Her sister, ANNIE ran over the stairs and she rushed after her. Finding no assistance she ran back again and her little brother got out of bed and threw a bucket of water over her and that put out the flames. She said continually during the night that her brother ALBERT had saved her life. - In reply to a Juror, FARLEY said deceased never had a fit. - Dr Fraser, called to the deceased, said the fire in the girl's clothes was not entirely out when he arrived and he got some water and put it out. She was very extensively burned. The lower part of the body was scorched all over and the skin came off like a glove. He had no hopes of her recovery from the first. The evidence of the mother, who left deceased and a younger sister up, and other children in bed, while she visited her sick mother; ANNIE FARLEY, 10, deceased's sister; and Richard Stone, a baker, who hearing the girl's cries ran to her help, also gave evidence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed deep sympathy with the parents.

Western Morning News, Thursday 29 January 1891 INSTOW - Suicide Of A Surrey Gentleman At Instow. - An Inquest was held at Instow, last evening, relative to the death of HERBERT WILLIAM DELAY, who shot himself on Tuesday. Deceased, a son of MR W. DELAY, of Upper Tooting, Surrey, was originally learning his profession as an engineer, but losing an eye at the work, and falling ill, was sent down to Mr E. R. Berry-Torr, of Westleigh House, two years ago, to learn agriculture. The change did not improve his health, and he grew deaf. At the end of last year, by Mr B. Torr's advice, he consulted Dr Thompson. After he had been to the doctor a few times he told Mr Torr "it was all up with him," and burst into tears. In answer to inquiries, he said the doctor could do nothing for his deafness. As he was going home, Mr Torr advised him to see a specialist in London. He did so, and returned to Westleigh on January 20th more despondent than ever. When he first came to Westleigh he bought a revolver, but Mr Torr objected, as he used it so carelessly and deceased took it home. On Monday he went to Barnstaple and did not return until Tuesday, when Bessie Bowden noticed he was very pale and strange in manner. In the afternoon, as he was reading in the breakfast-room, she heard him mutter "I'm done for," and then whistle. She went to assist Mrs Torr, senr., into her carriage, and deceased came out, and, saying "Good-bye, you will never see me again," walked off quickly. He had said that sort of thing so often that she attached no importance to it. That was the last time he was seen alive. Richard Huxtable, a labourer, was going home from work at half-past six and at Raddy Bridge, a very lonely spot, found deceased's body, a ghastly sight, in a sitting posture, with its back to the wall and with a bullet wound in the forehead. A five-chambered revolver was in its hand, and P.C. Smith found it contained four cartridges and a fifth cartridge case. It was the same deceased used to carry. There were three more cartridges in deceased's pocket, also a Waterbury watch, and a pocket-book in which was an ivorine card almanac with the prayer, "God have mercy on me," in the handwriting of the deceased. It was rumoured that when in Barnstaple DELAY had £300 or £400 in notes and gold; but when found he had not a copper. There were no signs of struggling near the body. Mr Berry Torr mentioned that only a few pence were found in deceased's room at Westleigh and he was very seldom rusted by his people with much money. Dr Thompson of Bideford, said deceased suffered from disease of the internal ear, which was increasing. It produced inflammation of the brain, accompanied by symptoms of insanity or delirium. The deceased was undoubtedly very despondent over his case. The cause of death was a bullet wound in the forehead, which from an abrasion on the right hand, caused probably by the recoil of the revolver, he thought was self-inflcited. - The Coroner (Mr Bromham) in summing up, said the Jury had nothing to do with rumours about deceased possessing money. If there was anything in that it would all come out at the proper time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Friday 30 January 1891 TORQUAY - At an Inquest held yesterday at Torre on the body of ETHEL MAUD LAVERS, aged 1 year and 10 months, the daughter of THOMAS LAVERS, carriage proprietor, it was shewn that while sitting at table on Tuesday deceased fell from a baby's chair placed on another chair and died from convulsions five hours afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 2 February 1891 TORQUAY - JANE MARTIN, 78 years of age, wife of JOHN MARTIN, stone cutter, of Stentiford's-hill, Torquay, fell down stairs while carrying a bucket of water on the afternoon of the 17th ult., breaking the two bones in her right leg and one of her ribs, and sustaining a scalp wound. She was removed to the Torbay Hospital, where she died on Friday night. At an Inquest on Saturday night the House Surgeon (Dr Cave) said that when brought to the Institution deceased was suffering from bronchitis as well as the injuries. Death was due to congestion of both lungs, consequent upon the injuries. From the beginning he could see it was a fatal case. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

CHUDLEIGH - An Inquest was held at Chudleigh on Saturday, concerning the death of SARAH ELLEN CAUSLEY, aged 3 years, daughter of JOSEPH CAUSELEY, farm labourer. The child attended school on Wednesday in apparent health. In the evening it complained of feeling unwell and was put to bed. During the night she suffered from violent diarrhoea, and the mother gave it a Stedman's soothing powder. The child continued unwell during Thursday and in the evening died suddenly. A post mortem examination by Dr Hounsell revealed a stoppage in the bowels, occasioned most probably by the violent purging. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 February 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, on the body of AMBROSE WALTER SELLAWAY, aged 11 months. A post mortem examination, made by Mr Leah, surgeon, by order of the Coroner (Mr Rodd) revealed the fact that death was due to convulsions from dentition. The Jury, of whom Mr H. Powell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," in accordance with the medical evidence.

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - Whilst MRS E. CREBER, of 4 Albert-road, Plymouth, was dressing her infant, GWENNA, aged 10 months, yesterday morning, it died suddenly. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the Patna Inn, North-road, when Mr A. Rees, surgeon, attributed death to dental convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Williams was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 6 February 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of EDITH MARY CARWARDINE, twelve months old. Deceased was an illegitimate child, and had been nursed by its grandmother, who lived at 23 Cornwall-street. Convulsions, caused by teething, came on during yesterday morning and the child soon afterwards died. Mr J. R. Rolston, surgeon, said the child was poorly nourished and badly fed, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan held an Inquest at Millbridge respecting the death of ERNEST G. C. VINECOMBE, aged five, son of a first-class petty officer, living at 10 Russell-place. On 10th ult. deceased's elder brother, aged seven, in the absence of his mother, got out of bed and took a box of matches from the mantel-piece. In playing with the matches, he accidentally set fire to the clothes of the younger brother. Hearing the children screaming, the mother rushed into the room, and found the child in flames which she extinguished by wrapping the boy in a blanket. There were rather extensive burns over the right side, on the chest and arms, to which the mother applied linseed oil. She also sent for Dr Keiley, of North-road, Plymouth, who remained in attendance on the child until its death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr A. S. Clark, respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY JACKMAN, aged 59, a merchant seaman, who was found drowned in Sutton Pool yesterday morning. William Gilbert, a bargeman, said he was unloading bricks from the barge Providence yesterday morning, and on going down under her to pick up some bricks saw the deceased lying on his face. An Open Verdict was returned. Mr W. H. Simmons was Foreman.

Western Morning News, Monday 9 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Cobourg Inn, Cobourg-street, on Saturday by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, respecting the death of THOMAS W. N. DAW, aged 9 years, which had taken place suddenly early on the same morning. Dr Keily said that deceased had a contracted chest and that death had taken place from acute bronchitis and congestion of the lungs. Death from Natural Causes.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was subsequently held at the Workhouse with reference to the death of FANNY LENDON, 33, which had taken place on the previous day. Deceased, admitted on the 14th November, was stated to be a domestic servant from the Imperial Hotel. She was at once seen by the medical officer, and remained in the Infirmary until a few days ago, when she was transferred to the needle-room. On the previous day deceased vomited a quantity of blood, and though instantly attended to by Mr Thomas, the medical officer, life was found to be extinct. The cause of death, Mr Thomas stated, was aneurism of the aorta. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr W. Cullicut acted at Foreman.

EXETER - An old man named THOMAS TREBLE, aged 76, of Garden-square, North-street, Exeter, died suddenly on Friday, and a Coroner's Jury on Saturday found that death was due to Natural Causes.

IVYBRIDGE - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Ivybridge, respecting the death of a newly-born male child, whose parents, named SYMONS reside at Woodland. No medical man attended at the birth. Mr Randle (surgeon), having stated that the infant (an unusually small one) had not sufficient vitality to partake of the necessary nourishment for its subsistence, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Mr R. King, jun., was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - CHARLOTTE JOHNS, aged 69, residing at 91 King-street, died suddenly on Monday evening. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to fatty degeneration of the heart.

EXETER - Sad Death At Exeter. - An Inquiry was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital touching the death of WILLIAM BLIGHT. - CAROLINE BLIGHT identified the body as that of her husband, about fifty years of age. She had not lived with him since October. She, however, saw him on Friday night, and they parted on friendly terms. He was perfectly sober. - Richard Turner, a cabdriver, said on Friday night about 10.45 he was going up St. John's-hill, and saw a man lying on his back on the footpath with several other men round him. The man was still there when he returned at quarter to twelve. Those who were with him hailed witness, and told him if he saw a policeman at the bottom of the hill to send him up. They said the man was not drunk, but ill. On being told his name was BLIGHT, and that he lived at Stepcote-hill, he got him into the cab and rove him there, where he saw two policemen and a sergeant. They directed him to take the man to St. Thomas police station, as he was drunk. When he got to the station, he, by police orders, drove deceased to the Constabulary Barracks in New North-road. - In answer to P.S. Sullock, of the city police, witness said when the sergeant stopped him in the West Quarter, deceased answered the questions put to him. Nothing was said about taking the man to the Hospital. - Replying to P.S. Egan (St Thomas), Turner stated that he never said the man was drunk, only that he was ill. - P.C. Newberry said on Friday night about 12 o'clock he was in Cowick-street, St. Thomas, with P.S. Egan, when Turner drove up and stated that he had a man in his fly, and that he had picked him up near Little John's Cross. The man had the appearance of being drunk, and nothing could be got out of him more than that "he was bad." Witness went with deceased to New North-road, where he was searched. On him was found some tobacco, two knives, 3s. 1 ½d. in money and a small bottle of rum. The man seemed as if he had been drinking, and he said he had had two glasses of beer, a pint and a half of cider and a glass of gin. On the following day the constable was told that BLIGHT had been refused drink at two public-houses in St. Thomas because he was drunk. He bought the rum at the Prince Albert to take home to his father. - P.C. Powe, of the Constabulary Barracks, said about ten minutes past four he was called to see the deceased, who was in one of the cells covered over with blankets. He had no coat on and only one stocking. Witness put his hand on him and found he was very cold, and the beating of his pulse was scarcely perceptible. They rubbed his limbs and placed him before the charge-room fire. Dr Brash, sent for, ordered restoratives and later on advised that the man should be taken to the Hospital. He was conveyed to that Institution on a stretcher about noon. The man was not drunk when he saw him, but smelt of liquor. - Mr Reginald Martin, house surgeon at the Hospital, said when the man was admitted he was paralysed in all his limbs and chest. He died from paralysis of the respiratory muscles on Sunday morning. He had made a post-mortem examination, and found haemorrhage of the upper part of the spine, which was caused naturally, and was not of long standing. - The Coroner did not think there was sufficient reason for thinking the deceased was drunk when found. - The Jury coincided and returned a verdict of "Death from natural Causes." - The Jury and the Coroner agreed that Turner, the flyman, acted with great kindness.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - MRS ANNIE CLAPP, 72 years of age, residing at 2 Strawberry-cottages, Plymouth, yesterday morning fell down stairs and broke her neck. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - Death From Accident At The Plymouth Workhouse. - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Plymouth workhouse on Thursday into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES VULLER, aged 86 years, labourer, an inmate of the House. - Mr E. G. Dyke (Master of the House) stated that on December 26th deceased left the Workhouse to visit some friends, and in the evening was brought back unconscious in a cart. He said he had fallen into a quarry at Rocky-hill, Devonport and hurt his head. He went to Ford Workhouse and they refused to admit him because he wore the clothes of the Plymouth House. He was bleeding from the head. Mr Thomas, surgeon, attended him, and he died yesterday morning. - Mr Thomas, medical officer of the House, said that deceased when admitted was quite exhausted and was bleeding from a severe lacerated and contused wound on his head. Death was due to fracture of the skull and shock. Had not Mr Dyke attended to the man promptly he would have died in a few minutes. Had he been received at Ford Workhouse the result would have been the same. The man was quite sober when admitted. - A Juror: I think the authorities at Ford should be censured. They ought to have taken the man in. It was a most inhuman thing. - The Coroner: We should be wise to censure them. I think I should make some inquiries into the matter. If the statement of the deceased is true the action was very reprehensible indeed. We may each have our own opinion. I think the Commissioners should know of it and if there is any truth in it I hope they will take it on themselves to censure the man in charge. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - A child, named JAMES AUGUSTINE PERRINGTON, aged 17 months, whose parents reside at 3 Clarendon-terrace, Plymouth, died suddenly on Tuesday morning during a fit of coughing. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the No Place Inn, Eldad-hill, Millbridge, yesterday, when Mr R. Burke, surgeon, attributed death to congestion of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Friday 20 February 1891 EAST BUDLEIGH - An Inquest was held yesterday, at Knowle House, Budleigh Salterton, on the body of MARIANNE, wife of REV. PHILIP WOOLLCOMBE, who died somewhat suddenly. Deceased, who was in her 72nd year, had been in ill-health for some time, and last Sunday suffered from continued sickness and she died unexpectedly the following evening. Dr Evans attributed death to the rupture of the aorta, consequent upon an internal illness of long-standing. The Jury, of whom Lieutenant-Colonel H. J. O. Walker was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Two Inquests were held by Mr A. S. Clark, at Plymouth, yesterday. The first was at the Dock Hotel, Millbay, Plymouth, and was in reference to the death of WILLIAM JOHN HENSHAW, aged 12. Mr Waterfield, surgeon, stated that deceased died from the effects of a blow behind the ear, and the boy's life might have been saved had medical assistance been rendered earlier. During the Enquiry deceased's mother entered in a drunken state and assaulted Mr Cann, the Coroner's Officer. It was stated that deceased's mother had been drunk for several days past, and the Jury severely censured her for not obtaining medical assistance when the boy first complained of illness.

PLYMOUTH - The second Enquiry was held at the Spread Eagle Inn, Treville Street, and was concerning the death of MARY ANN LAKE, aged 78. Mr Bean, surgeon, deposed that deceased died from syncope, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

CORNWOOD - Fatal Landslip At Cornwood. - Whilst some men were engaged at work at Messrs. J. Olver and Co.'s Edon Clay Works, Edon Down, Cornwood, on Wednesday afternoon, about six tons of clay fell away from the top, a portion buying WILLIAM FREDERICK SMALL, aged 41 years, a labourer, residing at Small's-cottages, Lutton. He was dug out in about five minutes, but was quite dead, his body being very badly crushed. Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Mountain Inn, Lutton. Mr J. Olver watched the case on behalf of the company. - William Garland stated that they were working the quarry in two slopes, deceased being on the lower one, and whilst engaged at his usual work a quantity of clay fell away, burying deceased and severely damaging a wagon standing near. The fall was quite unexpected, there having been no signs of the earth cracking. It was, he thought, due to the frost and rain. He saw the earth as it fell, and shouted to deceased, but there was no time for him to get out of the way. He was dug out in five minutes, but was quite dead. - The Coroner: What depth were you working underground? - Witness: We had not been undermining that day at all. We were working two slopes about 17 feet 8 inches. Mr Olver: It is 24 feet. - The Coroner: Please do not say anything. I want to get the evidence from the witness. - A Juryman thought Mr Olver had no right to be present. - Mr Olver: I have a perfect right to be present, with the Coroner's permission, to watch the case. - Thomas Bunker having given corroborative evidence, the Jury, of whom Mr R. Mudge was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 February 1891 TOTNES - LEWIS HAMLYN STOCKMAN, aged 2 years and 6 months, died on Friday from injuries received by falling into a dish of boiling water on 7th inst. At the Inquest on Saturday its mother stated that whilst getting the dinner, poured the water from some greens she had boiled into the dish on the floor and deceased, whilst playing around the table, stumbled and fell into the dish. She at once undressed the child and by the advice of Mrs Scoble, a neighbour, applied paraffin to the scalded parts. It seemed to give the little sufferer ease. Two days later Dr A. Hayward was called in. Death was due to convulsions, brought on by exhaustion consequent on the scalds, A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - Circumstances attending the death of JANE, wife of G. MADDAFORD, farm labourer, Tavistock, formed the subject of Inquiry at Tavistock on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr J. D. Williams was Foreman. Deceased, who was 64 years old, got up about half-past five o'clock on Friday morning to get breakfast. After she had left the bedroom her husband heard a groan, and found her seated on the stairs. She said she could not recover her breath. He sent his son for a doctor, abut she died in a quarter of an hour, and before the doctor could arrive. She had suffered from shortness of breath for a considerable time. Dr Brodrick attributed death to aneurism of the aorta of long standing, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EAST STONEHOUSE - An Enquiry was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, on Saturday, by Mr Rodd, Coroner, relative to the death of JOSEPH KIEHOE, A.B., on board the Leila, lying at the Great Western Docks, Millbay, Plymouth. David Booth, chief officer, said deceased was about twenty-five years old. On Thursday evening about six o'clock deceased was on duty as night watchman, and witness missed him from the vessel when he came aboard about eleven o'clock. George Holland, boatswain of the Leila, said he last saw deceased alive in the Dock Hotel, where he left him about nine o'clock. He was not sober and witness advised him to go on board. To his knowledge he did so. Deceased had visited the public-house three times that evening. Private Thomas Weggins, R.M.L.I., said in the camber at Longroom on Friday he saw a man's face and hands in the water near the steps. He took the body out. The Jury, of whom Mr A. Trout was Foreman, returned an Open Verdict. Staff-Captain Tomlin, Queen's Harbour-master and Inspector James, of the Great Western Railway, were present.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 February 1891 PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident At Plymouth. Scene At The Inquest. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of MARY ELIZABETH GILL, aged 3 years. Sergeant Scantlebury watched the case on behalf of the Police. - JOSEPH GILL, of 14 Clifton-street, father of deceased, stated that on Sunday afternoon the child was placed in is arms insensible and after a few twitchings of the muscles, died. Witness carried her to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, but she was dead before being admitted. - John William Tooker, 41 Clifton-place, said about five o'clock on Sunday evening he entered Clifton-street from Tavistock-road, and noticed Mr Rollins, milkman, driving down. Just then the horse over-stepped itself on the left side and Mr Rollins gave it a slight cut with the whip, but not sufficiently hard to make it excited. He then pulled the left rein rather tightly. Deceased was standing in the gutter and the left wheel tilted up and passed over her. Mr Rollins did not seem to notice the accident until he heard the man shouting, then he jumped off the cart and went to pick the child up, but before he arrived a young man ran and caught the child in his arms. They had some cross words. It was not true that the horse bolted. Mr Rollins was short sighted. By the Jury: Rollins was not driving it more than ordinary speed, and pulled up very quickly. MR GILL, the father of the child: What were the cross words between this man and Rollins? I demand to know. - The Coroner's Officer (Mr Cann): Please be quiet. Do not interfere. - MR GILL: Who be you, I would like to know? You take a back seat. you are not anybody. I can be corrected by the Coroner, not by the likes of you. - The Coroner: Please be quiet, or I shall have to order you out of court. - MR GILL: All right. I know my place as well as you. I do not wish to interfere: I want justice. - Robert George Harris, living at 25 Clifton-street, said he wished to contradict the reports that the child was kicked by the horse. Rollins was driving down the street in the gutter, which he always did and which was a very dangerous practice. He was travelling at a fast trotting pace. The child was in a stooping position as though picking something up from the gutter, and as it was getting up the wheel caught it, knocking it down and passing over it. Witness at once ran up to deceased. - Rollins drove on to his door, which was not far away. - By the Jury: Rollins asked him whether the child was hurt, and he said "Yes, it's killed through your carelessness." Rollins was driving very fast. - A Juror: You said in your evidence that Rollins was driving down the road in the gutter, and that he had no right to do so. Why had he not? - Witness: The road is about 30ft. wide, and he should keep the centre of it. He always turned into the gutter when near his house. A Juror thought the witness ought not to criticise Rollin's actions. - Harris: I give my evidence fair and square. - Susan Treleavan stated that she heard a horse and cart coming down the street and stop suddenly. On looking out she saw the child lying in the road and Mr Rollins jumping out of his cart. He immediately picked the deceased up. - MR GILL: I object to that witness evidence being taken, Coroner. She saw through the glass window. She has got to see straight The Coroner: Please do not continue talking. I shall have to turn you out of court. I have borne with you as the father of deceased. - MR GILL: I don't care. Those women have hatched the story. Treleaven told me she knew nothing about the affair except what her mother had told her. - George Harris: Who picked the child up first? - Mrs Treleaven: Mr Rollins did. - Harris: It is a lie. I picked the child up first. By the God above I swear I was first. Ask Mr Rollins. He will tell you the truth. - Mr Rollins: I first picked the child up. - Harris: It is a got up thing. You and the women are afraid you will get into trouble. - The Coroner: Constable turn the man out of court. - MR GILL: All right Mr Coroner: I have my friends as well as you. I want justice. - The Court was then cleared and the Coroner, addressing the Jury, said he was very sorry this unseemly behaviour had taken place. The evidence of Miss Treleaven and Mr Tooker was in his opinion thoroughly reliable. The other two men were under the influence of drink and in his opinion had a grudge against Mr Rollins, whom he did not think was to blame. He would have committed GILL for contempt of Court, but he was naturally upset by the loss of his child. Harris said Rollins was constantly driving in by the kerb. This sounded as though he had been watching him for some time. - The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Mr Rollins from all blame. At the suggestion of the Foreman the Jury joined in an unanimous vote of thanks to Mr Clark for the admirable manner in which he conducted the Inquiry under trying circumstances.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 February 1891 DAWLISH - At Dawlish yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of CATHERINE FAITH GREY, an infant. The mother, FLORENCE GREY, stated that she married at Exeter on January 1st fur years ago. She could not say where she was married; it was not at a church. She had a marriage certificate once, but had not got it now. Her husband was GEORGE HENRY GREY, a carpenter, and he lived with her the first twelve months after their marriage. She last saw him about three months since at Torquay. She did not know where he was; it was very seldom she saw him. She had two other children living. She was a laundress, and the place where she worked was about a minute's walk from her house in Commercial-road. Her usual custom was to run home periodically during the day to nurse and care for the child, and she also left the key of her house with a neighbour named Briscoe. On Saturday shortly after dinner, she saw there was something the matter with the child and it was found to be dead. Mary Briscoe corroborated. She believed all GREY'S children were properly nourished and cared for. Mr C. F. Webb, surgeon, considered the child was generally poorly nourished. The cause of death was convulsions. The Jury (Mr F. Gamlin, Foreman), returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - MR NICHOLAS STONE, aged 79, returned to his home, 20 Wyndham-square, Plymouth, on Saturday, stating that a boy had run against him striking him in the stomach, but the lad was not to blame. MRS STONE sent for Dr Keily, who found her husband suffering from peritonitis, with a tendency to collapse. He never rallied and died on Monday morning. At the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, at deceased's residence, yesterday, Dr Keily attributed death to shock to the system, the result of the blow, and the Jury, of whom Mr A. Harding, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 February 1891 TORQUAY - At an Inquest held by Mr S. Hacker, at Torquay yesterday, relative to the death of GEORGE FRANCIS MUDGE, the ten weeks' old son of RUSSELL MUDGE, coachman, of Park-hill-road, it was stated that on Monday the mother found that the child was dead. Dr Eales's evidence was to the effect that the child died from convulsions, probably due to indigestion brought on through being fed with bread and biscuits. The Coroner condemned the practice of giving such food to children of tender years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PAIGNTON - At Paignton Temperance Hotel yesterday Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest relative to the death of FREDERICK SAUNDERS, aged 74, whose death from hanging we recorded yesterday. The body was identified by the REF. F. G. SAUNDERS, curate of St Saviour's, Brixton, London, nephew to the deceased, who said his uncle was an artist, and had lived for some years in America, afterwards in London, and he came to Paignton about two years ago. He was a great sufferer from a chronic disease, and had fits of depression. Mrs Pope, of the Temperance Hotel, proved that deceased had lodged there since last May. He was an invalid, very quiet and regular in his habits, and suffered greatly from pain at times. She saw nothing unusual on Monday, when he went out for a walk. He went to bed at eight o'clock as usual, and at 9.20 next morning she took up his breakfast according to custom. The door opened with difficulty and on entering she found him hanging from a clothes' hook behind the door by a silk handkerchief. She gave an alarm, and the body was immediately cut down by a man named Searle. The latter deposed that deceased was not quite cold, and that his feet were touching the ground. He was dressed in his night clothes and had been in the bed. Dr Collins said deceased consulted him last October, and he was suffering from a painful internal complaint which caused great nervous depression. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Friday 27 February 1891 TOTNES - A Disappearance At Buckfastleigh. - GEORGE COURTENAY, aged 33, employed in the factory of Messrs. Berry at Buckfast, was last seen alive by a fellow-workman near the bank of the river Dart about seven o'clock on the morning of the 23rd January. His hat was subsequently found near the spot where he was last seen. The river was dragged from Buckfastleigh to Totnes Weir, without result. Yesterday Mr A. Weeks, clerk at the Totnes Post-office, near the Weir at Totnes, discovered the body caught in the branch of a tree, the boots appearing just above the water. An Inquest was held at Totnes last evening. - George Petherick, a fitter, of Buckfastleigh, said deceased was an invalid and had suffered from epileptic fits for 13 years. Sometimes he had three fits a day. Deceased was a single man. - Samuel Rosewarne, of Ashburton, employed at Berry's Factory, deposed to seeing deceased about seven o'clock on the morning of the 23rd on the bank of the Dart, near the factory. He spoke to deceased, who answered him as before-mentioned. The Deputy Coroner (Dr Fraser) said it was highly probable that deceased had a fit, and rolled into the river. The Jury, of whom Mr S. Chudleigh was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 February 1891 NEWTON ABBOT - ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE, a shell-fish dealer, was found drowned in the Hackney Canal near Newton, on Wednesday last. At the Inquest yesterday it was shewn that deceased returning home alone was not sober. It is held she accidentally fell into the water, where she was afterwards found dead by a passer-by. Dr H. A. Davies attributed death to drowning, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - JOHN COX, aged 68, of Tavistock-road, Stoke, died suddenly during Thursday night. At the Inquest yesterday Mr G. T. Rolston, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 March 1891 BRISTOL - Sad Suicide Of A Devonshire Doctor At Clifton. [Special Telegram.]. Bristol, Monday Night. - The Bristol City Coroner, Mr Wasbrough, held an Inquest this evening relative to the death of DR FRANCIS SIDNEY HAWKINS, lately practising at North Tawton. The Coroner said it was a very sad case of suicide. The deceased, who was about 30 years of age, had disposed of his practice in Devon, and had come on a visit to his mother. On Saturday evening he was found dead in his room with his throat cut. - Dr Walter R. Thomas, brother, said the deceased was a surgeon, and was 29 years of age. He had a practice at North Tawton in Devonshire, from which he had lately retired. He returned home on Saturday afternoon. On Saturday evening witness came to 7 Berkeley-square, about ten o'clock, as he usually did, and he then saw the deceased. At about half-past eleven witness wished him "Good night," and he then appeared very cheerful. At about five o'clock on Sunday morning, hearing a fall, MRS HAWKINS, the mother of the deceased, went to his room and they found him lying on the ground covered with blood, with his throat cut. A doctor was immediately sent for, but when he was found to be dead witness was fetched. The deceased was in no financial difficulties, for he was a man of private means, and witness had ascertained that he had a substantial current account at the National Provincial Bank at Okehampton. Witness had noticed no aberration of the mind, but during the past season he had had two serious falls in the hunting field. It was quite possible that his brain might have been affected by these falls, although nothing strange was noticed in his manner. The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that taking all the circumstances into consideration, they could only come to the conclusion that the deceased must have been seized with some sudden impulse which induced him to commit the act. He had heard that a suicidal tendency was one of the strongest and most irresistible tendencies that a person could possibly suffer from, and he thought that perhaps the deceased had had an attack of it. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed Suicide while in a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 March 1891 PLYMOUTH - On Sunday week ELIZABETH EDMUNDS, aged 72, residing at 37 Ebrington-street, Plymouth, while getting out of bed fell, receiving injuries to her forehead. She died on Sunday. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the Harvest Home Hotel, Tavistock-road, last evening, Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to shock to the system. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Child Drowned At Exeter. A Courageous Act. - Mr Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter yesterday touching the death of LILY ELIZABETH BARTLETT GREGORY, a little girl aged six years, who was drowned in the Exe on Monday afternoon. - ADA GREGORY, mother of deceased, said the little girl went out with her sister just after three o'clock to go to her aunt's, who lived in Horse-lane, near the river. Shortly afterwards she met the younger child coming up the lane crying. She said LILY had fallen into the water. MRS GREGORY ran down to the quay, but could see nothing of her daughter. The other little girl said deceased had fallen in by the bride near Commercial-road. THOMAS GREGORY, her nephew, who had followed witness, said he could see her floating past towards the ferry boat, and he jumped in after her. He could not bring her to the shore, however, as he was nearly gone himself, and they were both picked up by some sailors who put off in a boat. - By a Juror: I think deceased was running backwards and calling out to her sister "MAUDIE GREGORY can't catch me," when she fell into the water. - THOMAS GREGORY, cousin of the deceased, said he was in his father's yard at work on the previous afternoon, when he saw MAUDIE GREGORY going up Quay-lane crying that her sister was in the water. He ran to the Quay and saw deceased struggling in the middle of the stream. He took off his coat, jumped in the river and swam out to her. He asked a young man who was on the bank to fetch a boat, but as he could see no boat coming he tried his best to swim ashore with his cousin. He could not tell whether she was alive at that time. He thought he was drowning himself and called for help. He then saw a sailor coming up in his boat and he came to his assistance taking both of them into the boat. - The Coroner said it was a noble and gallant act on the part of GREGORY. The Jury endorsed this view, and thought the case ought to be recommended to the Royal Humane Society. - Dr Bell said he was called to see the deceased about half-past three on Monday afternoon. The child was quite dead. There were no marks of injury, and death was due to drowning. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and the Coroner said he should allow THOMAS GREGORY 10s. for expenses, and would carry out the suggestion of the Jury with regard to bringing his case before the Royal Humane Society.

Western Morning News, Saturday 7 March 1891 CORNWOOD - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, at the Mountain Inn, Lutton, near Cornwood, on the body of ERNEST BLACKER, aged three years, the illegitimate son of EMMA MARY BLACKLER. ELIZABETH BLACKLER, grandmother of the deceased, said whilst playing around a form in the kitchen on Thursday, he suddenly made a peculiar noise, and on taking him up found him black in the face, and he expired almost immediately. Mr J. M. Randle, surgeon, Ivybridge, who by order of the Coroner had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to a fit. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Mudge was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 March 1891 EGG BUCKLAND - HESTER SCOBLE DREW, aged 12 months, living with her parents at Stop Gate, Embankment-road, Laira, died suddenly in its mother's arms on Thursday evening. Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Laira Inn, when Mr G. Dutton, surgeon, attributed death to convulsions, probably caused by teething. The Jury, of whom of Mr S. Coombe was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide Of A Woman At Teignmouth. - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Teignmouth yesterday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MARGARET DRISCOLL, aged 44, wife of PATRICK DRISCOLL, a coastguard stationed at Shaldon. - PATRICK DRISCOLL, of 16 Strand, Shaldon, said that he came to reside at Shaldon only a few days ago, having previously, and for eighteen years, been stationed at Teignmouth. His wife had suffered from an affection of the head and feet, and had been attended by Dr Robinson. About three years ago she suffered from an internal complaint. She was at times depressed. His wife went out on Saturday night about half-past seven. He sent his daughter to look for her mother, and the girl came back saying her mother was at the chemists. He (witness) thought his wife appeared very strange when she came back and before he left home he asked his daughter to keep an eye on her mother. - BRIDGET DRISCOLL, daughter of the deceased, said she had noticed her mother appeared to be depressed for the past three months; she wanted to keep out of the way of everybody. Deceased appeared to be all right on Saturday until just before eight p.m., when she looked strange. Her father sent for witness about 7.45 p.m. to come home from work and keep an eye upon her mother. She remained with her all night, and the next morning about 6.30 she went downstairs and lighted the fire. When she returned about a quarter to seven she found her mother vomiting and frothing to the mouth. Witness found the bottle produced under her mother's pillow. Her mother died about 7.30 a.m., previous to which deceased asked to be given some water, which the (witness) did, also sending for Dr Johnson. - A son of the deceased stated that on Sunday morning he was called to the deceased, who was ill, and he asked her if she wanted a doctor, when she replied, "No, DAN: I am very happy." - Mr Ed. Silk, chemist, deposed that on Saturday evening the deceased purchased an ounce of oxalic acid, saying she wanted it for cleaning hats. Previously his assistant had supplied her with some laudanum. The woman seemed sane and reasonable. - Mr Geo. Henry Johnson, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that death appeared to have been caused by an irritant poison, such as oxalic acid. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide by taking oxalic acid whilst suffering under "Temporary Insanity." The Coroner commented on the loose way in which chemists were allowed to sell poison when an excuse was made that it was for cleaning purposes. The Act of Parliament was badly framed, and there was no protection against cases of the kind before them unless the Act was made more stringent. He wished it to be made known that no blame whatever was attached to Mr Silk in supplying the articles.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 March 1891 PLYMOUTH - Alleged Brutality By A Husband At Plymouth. Verdict Of Manslaughter. - At the King's Arms Hotel, Exeter-street, Plymouth, yesterday, an Inquest was held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH WEEKS, aged 54 years, lately residing with her daughter at 7 Higher-street, who died on Monday morning. - Inspector H. Hill watched the case on behalf of the Police, and Mr J. H. Trehane on behalf of the family. - Mary Moore, daughter of deceased, stated that about a month ago, her mother came to live with her. She was very ill, and when asked what was the matter, always replied that she was suffering from the ill-usage of her husband and a pain in her left side. Mr Brenton, surgeon, had attended her for the past month. - By the Coroner: Her mother was treated very unkindly by her husband. That was her reason for coming to live with witness. A few days before deceased came she was in bed, when her husband called her a foul name, asked what she was in there for, and saying "Out you come," rushed towards her, catching her by the hair, with the intention of pulling her out of bed, but witness prevented him. - By Mr Trehane: Deceased's husband, CHARLES WEEKS, was a stonecutter, living in Moon-street, and she was married a year and nine months ago. They lived together until the past month. He treated deceased fairly well for the first year. WEEKS was a very violent-tempered man. When deceased came to her she was covered with bruises. During the past eight months, witness had been fetched by neighbours of her mother's several times, as she was being so badly treated. On one occasion, about six months ago, WEEKS struck deceased in the face so severely that it was discoloured, and one of her eyes was also much swollen. She also had a severe kick in the abdomen which was much bruised and discoloured. Witness did not see the assault, but her mother told her about it, and showed her the bruises. She also accompanied her to the Guildhall to obtain a summons against WEEKS, but did not do so not having sufficient money. The female searcher at the station also saw the bruises. About six weeks later her mother was again assaulted, being severely bruised on the breast. Deceased was treated by a "sixpenny doctor" in Ebrington-street. During the whole of her illness WEEKS never came to see his wife. Deceased always attributed her illness to her husband's unkindness. Witness gave her as good food as she could afford. - Emily Hole stated that deceased and her husband lived at 39 Looe-street. For about six months witness had occupied the same house and had several times seen the deceased ill-treated. About two months ago WEEKS came home earlier than was expected, and because there was not any fire lighted, he called the deceased to him, and struck her under the ear, and pulled her by the nose into the room. Upon witness interfering he said "Mind your own business. I would treat you the same if you were my wife." About six weeks ago witness heard a fall in the deceased's room, and on going downstairs, she found her lying on the floor and saw WEEKS kick her. A few weeks ago deceased came to witness's room, and on her (witness) saying, "Well, MRS WEEKS, you are not the person you used to be," the deceased replied, "No, for if CHARLIE comes home and the fire is not lighted, he slaps me over the ear." The deceased several times complained to witness of the treatment she received. WEEKS always seemed to be in a bad temper. - Mr W. Brenton, surgeon, said he first visited the deceased on February 20th. She complained of extreme weakness, caused by her husband's ill-treatment. She was unable to sit down, owing to a severe bruise. Witness had seen her three or four times since; the deceased always complained of general debility. He last saw her alive on Saturday. Witness had made a post-mortem examination and found a certain amount of wasting of the body, occasioned probably by insufficient food, and general harsh treatment. there were bruises on the front of the shins of both legs, evidently of about a month's standing. There was an old-standing bruise on the right calf, which had evidently been a wound, but was then healed. There was a very severe bruise on the lower part of the body, which he attributed to a kick. There was also old-standing disease of the liver, but not sufficient to cause death. He thought deceased had been in the habit of taking too much alcohol, and had had insufficient food. He attributed death to general debility, accelerated by ill-usage and want of proper care. If deceased had received ordinary kindness and attention she would doubtless have been alive. - There was not sufficient disease to cause death. - Mr Trehane: Are you certain that death was accelerated by ill-treatment? - Mr Brenton: I cannot say that deceased died from the injuries she had received, but they certainly accelerated it. - Mary Moore, recalled, said her mother had been a heavy drinker up to the past six months, when she had abstained. - By a Juryman: Deceased was not under the influence of liquor when her husband had assaulted her on the occasions mentioned during the past six months. - The Jury, of whom Mr G. Webbon was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against CHARLES WEEKS.

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 March 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, on the body of JOHN PENGELLY, aged 65 years, residing at Providence Cottage. James Mardon, residing in the same house, said on Friday last he saw deceased in the back court, but had not seen him since. His suspicions being aroused he gave information to the Police. P.S. Grills said he went to the deceased's room and knocked. Receiving no answer, he went in and found the deceased dead on the bed. Mr H. W. Waterfield, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Halford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 13 March 1891 PLYMOUTH - NORAH HEWETT, aged 49, residing at 12 Lower-street, Plymouth, was found dead on the pavement in Windsor-lane, Plymouth on Wednesday evening, by P.C. Earle. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Mr C. H Cuming, surgeon, attributed death to bronchitis acting on a weak heart and producing syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr r. Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 16 March 1891 PLYMPTON - At an Inquest held by Mr Rodd, at Bottle-hill, Plympton, it was shewn that ANN FARLEY, aged 55, went to see her father who was ill at Hemerdon on Monday evening. Leaving during the hurricane, nothing more was heard of her until her body was found on Thursday evening by James Locke, a neighbour, in a field near her house in a snow drift. Mr W. D. Stamp said death was due to exposure and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

IVYBRIDGE - At Ivybridge on Saturday Mr R. R. Rodd, county Coroner, opened the Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN STENTIFORD, 25, labourer at the Great Western Docks, Plymouth, killed on Thursday in the collision of relief engines conveying men to the snow block on the Great Western line between Cornwood and Ivybridge. Mr F. C. Lane, of Plymouth, attended on behalf of the relatives of the deceased, and Superintendent Acland-Allen for the Police. Mr Edward Allen, J.P., was elected Foreman of the Jury. After the body, lying at the railway station, had been viewed, the Inquest was adjourned to Friday, April 3rd. Mr Lane said that the witness Willcocks was still very ill in the Hospital, and Mr Storey and Way, the engine driver, were not yet recovered. The name of the signalman at Ivybridge is Walter Emery, and it is stated that he had shewn the danger signals on Thursday in the usual way. Mr C. E. Compton, divisional superintendent, will attend the adjourned Inquiry on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company.

EXETER - Mr H. Willcocks Hooper held two Inquests in Exeter on Saturday. The first was on the body of an infant child, named SAMUEL HENRY RICE, which had died from congestion of the lungs; and the second was on an old man, named JAMES CASE, aged 76, who died suddenly from heart disease on Friday. Deceased came downstairs and was walking across the kitchen when he fell forward against the wall and expired. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned in each case.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 17 March 1891 OFFWELL - An Inquest was held at Land Cottage, Offwell, near Honiton this morning by Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, on the body of CHARLES BIDGOOD, aged 57 years, an agricultural labourer of Offwell. Mr Irish was Foreman of the Jury. MRS BIDGOOD stated that her husband left home, Rock Cottage, on Monday morning to go to his work on Gittisham-hill. He was then in his usual good health and took his dinner with him. She became very anxious about him as he did not come home on the Tuesday, but she was unable to get out to search as owing to the snow she could not open the door. - Francis John Hurford, son of Mr John Hurford, farmer, of Offwell, proved finding the body lying on its face and hands in Land Copse on Sunday morning at half-past six, when he was going to look after some sheep. - Abraham Boyland, landlord of the New Inn, Honiton-hill, deposed that deceased came into his house on Tuesday afternoon about four o'clock, and was much overcome by the weather. It was then snowing very hard and the wind was blowing a hurricane. Deceased was covered with snow and icicles were hanging from his beard. Witness and his family were having tea and he offered deceased a cup and some bread and butter, but he refused it, and afterwards had 3d. of hot whisky and water. He considered he had had a little too much, but was not drunk. - The Coroner said that witness had no business to give a man drink when he was in any way the worse for liquor. Hot spirits had a very bad effect on a person when suffering from a cold, as it made them hot for a time and worse afterwards. He hoped it would be a warning to witness not to supply liquor again in such a case. - Witness, continuing, said he did not consider BIDGOOD very much the worse for drink, as he could walk all right and knew what he was talking about. He apparently went up the road towards his home all right. - Frank Bromfield, son of Joseph Bromfield, the deceased's employer, stated that deceased went to his father's house on the Tuesday evening about half-past five, when he asked for his wages for the previous day. Witness paid him 2s. 6d. He (deceased) had been working on the roads for his father on Gittisham-hill. BIDGOOD was very much the worse for liquor. Witness's sister pressed him to stay there that night, but deceased persistently refused, and said "I will go home if I swim through the snow, as my wife will be very anxious." His father also asked deceased to sit by the fire, but he would not stop. - Alice Bromfield corroborated, adding that deceased went staggering on his way towards Offwell. - Mr Hurford stated that where deceased was found the snow was not very deep. Had frequently passed by the place since Monday, but saw nothing. - Rev. J. H. Copleston said everything was done to find the deceased before; search parties were formed, and enquiries made without avail. Deceased probably lost his way. Other houses besides the New Inn were to blame for supplying BIDGOOD with drink. - P.C. Hodge, stationed at Offwell, said he had made enquiries and found that deceased slept in the Lamb Inn stables on Monday night, and had some liquor in the morning before leaving, and went from there to the Railway Inn, and on to the New Inn, where according to the landlord's evidence he was undoubtedly the worse for liquor. He found 2s. 6d. in silver, 2 ½d. in bronze, and other articles on the deceased. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he did not think there was any doubt that deceased came to his death from exposure. He had a small blow over the eye, but that might have been caused by the fall against the root of the tree where he was found. There could be no doubt that he was not sober, and it was possible that the liquor helped on his death. He did not think the Jury could return any other verdict than one of "Death from Exposure." The Jury returned a verdict accordingly and gave their fees to the deceased's widow.

MILTON ABBOT - JOHN MASTERS, 77, labourer, of Milton Abbot, was found dead in his bedroom by a neighbour named Doidge, on Friday last. Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body yesterday and a verdict was returned in accordance with the evidences of Mr F. W. Williams, Surgeon, of Tavistock, who said that MASTERS died from syncope, induced by bronchitis and valvular disease.

STOKE DAMEREL - Charge Of Murder At Devonport. Prisoner Before The Magistrates. - Private Edward Alexander burke, King's Own Scottish Borderers Regiment, stationed at Raglan Barracks, was at Devonport Police-court yesterday brought before Messrs. R. I. Watts, and W. Peek, charged with "feloniously and wilfully and with malice aforethought, killing and murdering FREDERICK LOVEDAY," a lance-corporal in the same regiment, on the 28th ult. LOVEDAY did at the Military Hospital, Stoke, on Sunday morning last and on the previous day his depositions were taken. Private Pollard, arrested by the military authorities for being concerned in the murder, has been discharged from custody. - Mr F. Bone (magistrates' clerk) read the depositions of LOVEDAY as follows:- "I am a lance-corporal in the King's Own Scottish Borderers. On the 28th of last month I went out of barracks at half-past eight at night. I asked Private Wilson, C Company, to go for a walk. We went outside the barrack gate, turned to the right, and into a public-house about sixty yards distant. We had two or three pennyworth of rum each. We were in that public-house for half an hour. We then went into another public-house a little higher up the street. Wilson did not go into this public-house with me, but left me, and I went in alone. There were several men in the house at the time. I don't know who they were. There was a bit of a row there. I came out, and had not gone far when I was knocked down by somebody in rear of me. I don/t remember anything more until next morning. I don't know who knocked me down. The regiment has lately come from India. While there I was a long time in the police. At Rangoon, Burke of F. Company, and Scott, of B. Company, threatened to get me into a quiet place and do for me. I see Burke present. I make this statement in the belief that I am dying. I was brought to the Hospital on the second day after my injury, and have been here ever since. - Cross-examined by Burke: I do not remember fighting in the public-house, and I do not remember your bringing me home. Burke did come and ask me the next morning if I accused him of knocking me about. I did not apologise and I said to him that I was told that he had knocked me about." - Private George Swinswood said on the 28th ult, between nine and half-past nine in the evening, he saw LOVEDAY standing outside the Exeter Arms public-house, near the barracks, when the prisoner came out, knocked deceased down and commenced kicking him. Private Pollard came out of the public-house at the same time. - Prisoner: At what time did you see me kick Corporal LOVEDAY? - Between nine and ten. I was going into the barracks to answer my name. - Are you certain it was me? - Yes. - Private Edward Parke deposed that on a Friday, about half-past nine, he saw prisoner kick Corporal LOVEDAY as he lay on the ground. - Prisoner: Was I the only one there? - No; there were several others there with me. - What did you do? - I picked up Corporal LOVEDAY and the military police took him into barracks. - The Head Constable (Mr S. Evans) applied for a remand until Tuesday next. There were a good many people in the Exeter Arms at the time of the occurrence, and he should like to obtain some independent testimony. The application was granted, and prisoner was removed in custody. The Inquest. - At Military Hospital, Stoke, yesterday, Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of LANCE-CORPORAL FREDERICK LOVEDAY, King's Own Scottish Borderers, alleged to have been caused by Private Burke, of the same regiment, now in custody. A double Jury was empanelled, Mr Hatfield being chosen Foreman. Superintendent Evans and Inspector Matters watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police, and Lieutenant Seller, K.O.S.B., was present on behalf of the military authorities. - Private John Pollard, King's Own Scottish Borderers deposed: At Exeter Arms, Cumberland-street, Devonport, between nine and ten o'clock on the evening of February 27th, I saw Lance-Corporal LOVEDAY and Private Burke. They commenced quarrelling and Lance-Corporal LOVEDAY struck Burke with his fist on the left cheek. The landlord jumped over the counter and ejected LOVEDAY, and Burke ran out of another door. I remained in the bar, but on hearing groans a few seconds afterwards, went outside, and there saw LOVEDAY on the ground with Burke standing over him. Burke was just going to kick him, but I prevented him doing so. Burke then ran away. I saw LOVEDAY picked up and carried to the barracks by two military foot police. About a quarter of an hour after I got to the barrack-room Private Burke came in without cap or stick. He at once commenced to swear at LOVEDAY and said, "I have paid off an old debt." Burke also said, "I gave him three nice ones with my feet." Burke was the worse for drink. - Private George Swinswood, K.O.S.B., stated: Between nine and ten o'clock on February 27th, I was proceeding past the Exeter Arms, where I saw LOVEDAY standing outside. Burke came out of the public-house, knocked LOVEDAY down from behind and kicked him three times in quick succession. I helped to lift LOVEDAY off the ground, and two military police assisted him into barracks. - Private Edward Parker corroborated the evidence of the last witness, and added that next morning LOVEDAY complained to him of suffering great pain in the side. - By the Foreman: Neither of the men were made prisoners that night. My statement was not taken down in barracks. - The Foreman remarked that he asked the question because each of the witnesses commenced their evidence exactly alike. - Charlotte Greygoose, residing in Cornwall-street, stated that she saw a private knock down a lance-corporal who had just taken off his great coat. The corporal's head struck the kerb and the private kicked him about the body four or five times, swearing all the while. Witness was nearer than anyone else to the men. Several soldiers came up, but none attempted to take the private away. They said, "Serve him right." Witness pulled the private back by the collar and struck him in the face, and the soldier then ran away with a comrade. Could not identify any of the soldiers present except LOVEDAY. The latter was struck in the face first and not from behind. - Janet Wilson, residing at Cornwall-street, corroborated the evidence of the last witness. She stated that one soldier said "That is the way we serve them in Lancashire." After the corporal was kicked she noticed blood on his cheek. - Brigade-Surgeon Charles Alfred Adkins deposed: Corporal LOVEDAY was admitted to the Hospital on the 2nd inst., complaining that he had been knocked about. I examined him and found no external injuries. LOVEDAY told me he was suffering from severe pains in the side. There were no bruises there; but his eyes were both blackened. He did not appear to have been severely injured. A day or two afterwards deceased was suffering from pneumonia and complained of great pain in both sides, which would be one of the symptoms of the disease. He received benefit by the Hospital treatment for pneumonia, but subsequently inflammation of the liver set in. I did not attribute these diseases to any injury he might have received, but concluded that having recently come home from India, he caught a chill. As he complained of having been injured it was my duty to report the matter to deceased's commanding officer, which I did. - Surgeon Andrew Baird, of the medical staff of the Military Hospital, who had made a post-mortem examination of deceased, said he found three large abscesses in the liver, also extensive inflammation of both lungs. He attributed the abscesses to deceased having suffered from dysentery in India. There was nothing to lead to any supposition that LOVEDAY'S death was caused or accelerated by violence. - By the Foreman: There was nothing in the state of the brain or skull to shew that he had received injury. Any discolouring on the cheek had appeared since death. In his opinion death was solely due to natural causes. - The Coroner said had it not been for the medical evidence he should have adjourned the Inquiry in order to give Burke an opportunity of defending himself. He thought they could only return a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. At the same time he could not help feeling that somebody ought to have arrested one, or both of the men, after the affray, especially when Burke open boasted of what he had done in the barrack-room. The officer in court had informed him that deceased's depositions entirely contradicted the evidence of the two women. He (the Coroner) did not place any reliance on the evidence of either of the women, and should have pointed out the discrepancies if it were necessary. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 March 1891 CHIVELSTONE - The Great Storm. Wrecks At The Start. Stranding Of The Marana. The Inquest. - In reference to the stranding of the Marana on the Blackstone Rocks, near the Start Point, on the evening of the 9th inst., Mrs Briggs, wife of one of the lighthouse-keepers at the Start, says that she was looking out of her window a little after half-past five o'clock, when she saw the steamer pass very close to the east side of Start Point as if she had come out from the bay. Seeing her great danger, and thinking it was impossible for her to clear the rocks running off from the Point, she hastened to another window, from which she had a view of the Blackstone Rocks. She then saw the steamer broadside on to the rocks. At once she ran and gave the alarm to Mr James, the head-keeper, who, having despatched a messenger with all haste to the officer of coastguard, turned his attention to the stranded vessel to see if he could be of any service. But, he says, within a very few minutes the vessel parted in two, the stern part sinking near the rocks, whilst the fore part washed away and sank a short distance to the west of the Start. The sea was dashing over the rocks with fearful fury, and he saw nothing of the crew, and concluded that they had all been immediately drowned, as he did not think any boat could live in the sea that was running. Mrs Briggs, however, saw two boats driving away from the steamer as she skirted the coast just previous to striking the rocks, but she saw no men in them. These boats, it is thought, were the boats launched by the crew, as that would be the work of only a few minutes. - Mr Crickett, chief officer of coastguard at Hallsands, says he received intelligence of the casualty at 6.40 p.m. by a messenger sent by Mr Jones, of the Start Lighthouse, who said the vessel had struck the rocks about 500 yards south-east of the Start. He immediately despatched a messenger to Prawle, a distance of nearly five miles, for the life-saving apparatus. Another messenger he sent to Torcross to Mr Ridge, the chief officer of coastguards there, and Mr Crickett then proceeded to the scene of the wreck, but on arriving nothing could be seen of the vessel, as she had totally disappeared, for she was supposed to have gone to pieces five minutes after she struck. The coastguard at Hallsands say that they saw the Marana fully an hour before she struck and she was then near the Skerries Bank off the Start, acting in such a manner that they considered her steering gear then out of order. They saw her come into the bay and afterwards go out again, and watched her very closely, but they thought she had gone clear of the Start until they heard otherwise from the lighthouse keepers. - The Inquest on the eight bodies recovered from the wreck was held at Prawle on Monday by Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Henry Foss was Foreman. - George Stone, of East Prawle, gave evidence of the finding of the body of the second mate - Albert Rich, coastguard at Prawle, said all the clothes were on and a life-belt. There was no watch or chain, but a pipe, whistle, two keys, and a letter-case were in the pockets. A card in the case had on it the name, "MR NEWBRAY HALL, Haylett House, Surbiton, Surrey. - Charles Edward Word, of 14 [?]-square, Lavender-hill, London, clerk in the employ of Mr M. H. Hall, solicitor to the London and South-Western Railway Co., identified the body as that of NEWBRAY HALL, of Haylett House, Surbiton, the son of my employer. He was second mate of the steamship Marana, and was 25 years of age, unmarried. His father told me his son had the letters "E.O.H." tattooed on his right arm. The body has those letters. - James Bowhay, who was with Stone when he found the body, said there was a ring on the little finger of one of the hands and he took it off and reported it to the coastguards. The body was not knocked about. - P.C. John Greenslade, stationed at South Pool, who searched the body of the man that died in the brake, said he found on him a bundle of discharge certificates, all bearing the name of EDWARD RASMUSSEN. Nothing up to the present has been heard of the owners of the vessel, who are George Bell and Company, of Orfel Chambers, Water-street, Liverpool. - Michael John MacCarthy, John Putt, Robert Putt, George Putt, James Bowhay, and Charles Smyth, then gave evidence of finding the other bodies. - John Neilson, one of the survivors said, I reside at 141 St George-street, Whitechapel, London, and am a native of Sweden, I was a fireman on board the Marana. EDWARD RASMUSSEN, was a Swede, and his parents live at Gottenburgh. The other bodies are that of a Russian Finn, able seaman; the boatswain, an Englishman, but whose name I do not know; another was called NEILSON a fireman, and belonged to Gottenburgh, and was a married man. The other body is that of a Swede called STEINBORN, a donkeyman on board. I shipped at London on board the Marana the Thursday previous to her sailing, and I went on board at eight o'clock on Sunday morning, leaving the Victoria Docks at eleven o'clock the same morning. We had a cargo of railway sleepers, and were going to Swansea to take in bunker coals, and from there to Colombo. The crew numbered 28 all told. On Monday, 9th inst., I had tea at five o'clock, and went to my bunk. It was the first mate's watch. As I was turning into my bunk I heard someone shout out, "Land right ahead." It was blowing a bit stiff in the afternoon at 3 o'clock, and as the gale increased the canvas was taken in. The vessel struck almost immediately after I heard the shout, and the engines were going full-speed at the time. I came out and stood in the forecastle door. The captain was then on the bridge. The vessel struck first at the bow. When I came on deck she struck aft as well, knocking her propeller and rudder away. The captain then gave the order to get the starboard lifeboat ready for launching. All the three officers were on the bride. The wind was blowing hard, and the waves were dashing all over the ship. It was daylight, but the Start light was lit. We could see the land enough, although it was thick with heavy rain. There were two lifeboats, one on each side of the ship, and two smaller boats. We lowered the lifeboat and got into it, some 20 or 22 being in it, and got away from the ship on the starboard side. The boat was in charge of the boatswain, and the second and third engineers and the chief steward were in the boat. We left on board the captain, the three mates, the chief engineer, and the messroom steward. Just as we were turning to get clear of the rocks, we looked at the ship and saw the captain and the others leave in the other boat on the starboard side. They got safely away from the ship. After the vessel struck we hoisted a red pendant with a white ball as a signal of distress. When we got away it was getting dark, and we saw nothing of the other boat afterwards; They were following us. We pulled in shore to a kind of bay, but not thinking it safe to land, we went out of that. We could see nothing but rocks on our coming down, and in getting out of the bay our boat capsized. There was a very heavy sea running up against the rocks. We got hold of the keel of the boat, some twelve or fourteen of us that remained, and then the boat turned over again. After that only four or five of us remained sticking to the boat. We stuck to the boat until she broke up on the rocks. When I let go the boat I could feel the rocks with my feet and I then walked on shore. There were four of us that came on shore, but I could see nothing of any others. When we got on shore we walked to a brake and got shelter. We had to help RASMUSSEN up as he had no boots on. He was living half an hour before the coastguards found us, but we had been on shore a long time before they found us - about five or six hours. - The Coroner: Was the captain on the bridge when the steamer struck? - Yes. The engines were going full speed. There was no room for the captain and the others in the boat, and they could no launch the other lifeboat because it was on the weather side. - Anders Johnsen, a fireman on board the Marana, and residing at 142 St George-street, Whitechapel, said: I was in the engine-room when the casualty happened. I knew of nothing wrong before the ship struck. I was on duty. The engines stopped when the vessel first struck with the force of the shock. The chief engineer said to me "Go on deck and see what has happened." I went up and the first thing I saw was the Start light. The captain was on the bridge, and all the men were on deck. The captain said, "Take time, I will give you orders." There were enough life-belts for all, and all got them with the exception of myself. I told the captain I had not got one, and he said, "Take mine," and I took it. The captain was an able man. I was told that there was a man on the look-out. - John Perry, manager of Lloyd's signal station at Prawle, said whilst searching for the survivors on the night of the 9th, he felt sure he saw a faint light out at sea, and it might have been from the second boat. When they found the survivors at half-past two on Tuesday morning it was blowing a hurricane, with blinding snow. The men said they were sure there were no more sailors living on the beach. They had great difficulty in getting Johnsen up, as he was almost dead from exhaustion. - By Mr wood: MR HALL'S body was found. It was probably thrown up on Tuesday morning as it was found at high water mark. - Mr Hewett, chief coastguard at Prawle, gave evidence as to the life-saving apparatus being sent for by the Start lighthouse-keeper, and his proceeding there with six coastguards and 11 of the Volunteer Life-saving Company. - By Mr Wood: The nearest life-saving apparatus station is at Bickham, 3 ½ miles nearer Salcombe, in the west; but there is not another to the east of Prawle, but at Brixham, a distance of 25 miles. The only persons who saw the steamer come on shore were the lighthouse-keepers. I stood on the cliffs at Prawle from 5.30 to 6 o'clock on Monday evening, and I could not see fifty yards away, it was so thick with blinding snow. It was impossible to look to the windward. - John Neilson said it was not so bad when they left the ship; but it was getting worse and worse. - The Coroner asked Mr Hewitt where he thought the best place to have another life-saving apparatus, if it should be decided to place one. - Mr Hewitt thought Hallsands, but there had been no wrecks in Start Bay for a number of years. Where the Dryad struck it was rocky cliffs straight up and down, and she went to pieces immediately. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider that a life-saving apparatus should be placed between Prawle and Brixham, a distance of 25 miles. - The body of the second mate, NEWBRAY HALL, was taken to Salcombe after the Inquest and forwarded by Kingsbridge packet to Plymouth, to be sent by rail to London. A letter found on the body of MR HALL, commencing "Dear NEWBRAY" and signed "Blanche" a visiting card, and the gold make turquoise ring on his little finger were handed to Mr C. F. Wood, representing the family.

PLYMOUTH - ELIZABETH DAVIS, infant daughter of ROBERT DAVIS, residing at 24 William-street, Plymouth, died on Monday morning during a spasm. At an Inquest held yesterday, before Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to convulsions, and the Jury, of whom Mr Short was Foreman, returned a verdict to that effect.

Western Morning News, Saturday 21 March 1891 EXETER - Fatality On The South Western Railway. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Exeter, yesterday, relative to the death of MISS CECILIA ANN JONES, killed on the London and South Western Railway between Bow and Yeoford on Thursday. Mr H. J. Foster watched the proceedings on behalf of the Company. - Miss Mary Harriet Scott, of 7 Windsor-terrace, Saltash, said deceased was about 52 years of age. MISS JONES was an authoress, and for the last two years had resided with her. During the last nine months she had been subject to epileptic fits. Deceased left Saltash about 9.30 on Thursday morning to go to London, and stated that she would return next week. Sometimes when MISS JONES had fits she lost consciousness, but between the fits, she was perfectly rational. - Walter Spreadborough, rear guard of the London and South Western train leaving Plymouth at 10.33 on Thursday morning, said when between Bow and Yeoford junction he saw a lady either fall or jump from a carriage about 40 or 50 yards from his van. He at once applied the vacuum brake and stopped the train, and informed the head guard, Jones. The train was shunted back to where the body of deceased was lying in the 6ft. way. Witness and Jones, with the assistance of two or three passengers, placed the remains into the rear van and brought them on to Exeter. When he applied the brake the door of the carriage closed of itself. He did not think the doors were locked on either side. When they reached Exeter the attention of the examiner was drawn to the door of the compartment out of which deceased fell. The lock was found to be in good working order. Detective Foster also tried the door and found it secure. The lady was travelling in a compartment by herself. - By a Juror: We are not expected to lock the doors of carriages on one side. - Mr Foster said there was an order against the doors being locked, as in case of an accident it would prevent the passengers from getting out. - Jesse Jones, front guard of the 10.33 a.m. train, said deceased joined the train at Plymouth (North-road). She asked him for a foot-warmer, and whether he was going through to London. He got her the foot-warmer. She had no one with her, and she travelled in the compartment alone for the whole distance. On arriving at Okehampton MISS JONES asked him how long the train remained there. He told her only one minute, but she would have five minutes at Exeter. She replied, "All right." Deceased looked a trifle nervous. - Sergeant Sullock, of the City Police Force, deposed to taking charge of the body of deceased on its arrival at Queen-street Station. In the dress pocket was found a purse containing £3 5s. 9d., eight postage stamps, and a railway ticket to Waterloo. He received from the Station-master two leather bags, a basket, a shawl, and an umbrella. In one of the bags was a letter, unposted, addressed to Miss Scott, 7 Windsor-terrace, Saltash. - Dr Brash said he was called to see deceased shortly after one o'clock on Thursday. He found the skull was fractured, the bones of the face were broken, and the right foot was crushed. The wound in the head was sufficient to cause instant death. The train evidently went over the foot, but the injury to the head was caused by the fall. By a Juror: The great danger to epileptics is that they have no warning as to when a fit is coming on. I do not think a person would be induced to get out of the train when a fit was coming on. - The Coroner said this was a sad case, but there was no evidence to shew whether death was caused accidentally or otherwise. They were indebted to the London and South Western Company on this occasion, as at all other times, for the great readiness with which they had afforded them all the information at their disposal. He personally thanked Mr Foster for the trouble he had taken in the matter. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 March 1891 PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest at Plymouth on Saturday, Mr Williams, surgeon, said the death of MAUD LYONS, aged eight months, daughter of MARY LYONS, living at 12 Looe-street, was due to convulsions, and a verdict "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The father stated that he had been out of work for seventeen weeks, and had undergone great privation. Mr Clark, the coroner, said he would communicate with the Mayor and see if he could be helped. Many of the Jurors gave him money.

STOKE DAMEREL - Drowned At Devonport. - Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Guildhall on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of FRANK ERNEST COLLACOTT, 17 years of age, whose body was found in the Admiralty reservoir in the People's Park early that morning. Mr Tucker, grocer and baker, of Millbridge, said deceased, an errand boy in his employ, left his shop on Friday afternoon with a basket of bread for consumers at Ford. He had been about six months in his employ, and for the last two or three weeks had shewn a lack of memory. He had always found deceased honest. On Friday morning he saw in deceased's possession a Post-office Savings Bank book. The account had been opened at Ford. The only thing suspicious about the matter was that the notice of the receipt from the Controller General was addressed to a place where deceased did not live. Five shillings had been banked and deceased might have easily saved this amount from his earnings. - Charles Roberts, a mason, working on the reservoir, and saw the boy's cap in the water just underneath. He concluded that the owner of the cap had gone to fetch a pole to recover it. Later on he grew uneasy, and when he left work he communicated with the Police. - P.C. Willcocks gave evidence as to recovering the body early on Saturday morning near the place where Roberts saw a cap floating. The reservoir on the side adjoining Granby Green was entirely unprotected and there was nothing to prevent the smallest child or anyone else from slipping in. - Mr E. Aslat, clerk of works at Devonport Dockyard, said the danger of this part of the reservoir being unprotected had been foreseen for some time. Railings would soon be erected. - Mr Gameson (Venning and Goldsmith, Admiralty solicitors) pointed out that deceased would have been a trespasser by going on the bank of the reservoir where the basket was found. At the Coroner's suggestion the Jury, of whom Mr Williams was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 March 1891 EXETER - MISS MINNIE GREENSLADE, aged 23, an assistant teacher at St. David's School, died suddenly at her father's residence, Sandford-street, Exeter, on Saturday. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Death from Syncope" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The Fatality At the G. W. Docks, Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, relating to the fatality to ALFRED JOHN GILBERT, carpenter, aged 36, at the Great Western Docks, Plymouth, on Saturday last. - Joseph Murley stated that at 8.45 p.m. he was engaged with others, pulling out the tail end of the shaft of the steamer Winestead. GILBERT'S duty was to block up the shaft, which he accomplished about 5 o'clock. - Thomas Tudor said he was in the shaft tunnel by the stern tube, and Nathaniel Barker, rigger, was in the fore end. They had six candles burning. Tudor sang out that all was clear, and gave the word to "bark her." The shaft was then pulled out about 4 inches, and a second time about a foot. The end of the shaft fell into the hold and canted round. It was then discovered that deceased had been jammed by the end of the shaft against the iron angle of the tunnel. GILBERT'S work was done at 5 o'clock, and he had no business in the hold when he met with his death. Witness could not account for his being near the shaft. - A witness named Hawkins, said he saw deceased in the workshop, 200 yards from the vessel, about ten minutes before the accident took place. - Mr M. H. Bulteel having stated that death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attaching no blame to anyone. - Mr Douglas, foreman at Bickle's Engineering Works said deceased had been employed under him for four months, and had performed similar work as that which he had been engaged at the time of the accident. The firm intended, without prejudice, to defray the funeral expenses, give the widow temporary assistance, and take the eldest of the four orphans as an apprentice. Mr G. Holmes was the foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 March 1891 HOLBETON - MRS GRACE SHEPHARD, aged 79 years, died rather suddenly at her home, at Creacombe, Holbeton. At an Inquest held by Mr Rodd, Coroner, yesterday, Dr Brindley, of Yealmpton, yesterday attributed death to syncope, and the Jury, of whom Mr R. Shepherd was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 March 1891 EXETER - Two Inquests were held in Exeter yesterday. The first was on the body of MRS POPE, a widow, aged 78, who fell down stairs on March 11th and fractured her left thigh. She died from exhaustion yesterday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. In the second case an infant child, named ROSE MOORE, died from convulsions. The midwife, who attended the mother, gave a certificate of death, and the Coroner remarked that it was a most improper thing to do, as she was not properly qualified.

Western Morning News, Monday 30 March 1891 BARNSTAPLE - JAMES LOVERIDGE, painter, of Barnstaple, fell from a chair while bathing his feet and expired immediately. At the Inquest on Saturday Dr Ware said death was due to Syncope.

EGG BUCKLAND - Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquiry at the Morley Arms, Laira Bridge, on Saturday concerning the death of ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, aged 60, wife of a quarry labourer, living at Pomphlete. Soon after ten o'clock on Thursday evening deceased's son WILLIAM, while at supper, heard a scream in the quarry adjoining the dwelling and going outside found his mother lying unconscious on the ground. Calling his father, who had gone to bed, he removed her to the house and went for a doctor, but life was already extinct. Mr J. B. Jacobs, surgeon, subsequently made a post-mortem examination, and ascertained that syncope was the cause of death. Verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 April 1891 NEWTON ABBOT - Railway Fatality At Newton. Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Newton yesterday touching the death of ALBERT BULLEN, able seaman, H.M.S. Defiance, Plymouth, and MARGARET ASH, 24 Rendle Street, Plymouth, killed at Newton Station on Easter Monday evening. Mr C. E. Compton, traffic divisional superintendent (with Mr H. Muggs, station-master, Newton), attended the Inquiry on behalf of the G.W.R. Co. Mr J. Pascoe was the Foreman of the Jury. ELIZABETH BULLEN, 1 Crescent-terrace, Torquay, having identified the body of her brother, stated that he was 21 years of age, and she last saw him alive at Torquay at half-past six the previous evening. During the afternoon he had been in company with MARGARET ASH, and he was sober when he left Torquay. - Frederick Drew, able seaman, H.M.S. Defiance, said he knew both BULLEN and ASH. ASH was twenty years of age, and did not live with her parents, who resided out of Plymouth. He and deceased came from Torquay together by the 7.24 train on Monday evening, and were standing on the Newton platform waiting for the Plymouth train to start, when he saw ASH fall off the platform on to the rails below. He called the guard's attention to the matter. - The witness appeared in a dazed condition, and very little information could be obtained from him, although he was closely questioned. He did not see the sailor fall, but only his female companion. - The Coroner thought witness knew very little of the occurrence. - John Murrin, platform inspector, stated that the three o'clock train from Paddington on arriving at Newton was divided, a portion going to Plymouth and the remainder to Kingswear with some additional carriages. He was told someone had fallen under the train, and instituted a search, the bodies of deceased being shortly afterwards discovered beneath the carriage. They were placed upon the ambulance and taken to an adjacent room. When the empty carriages were being backed the passengers made a rush to get in, and although there were ten or a dozen officials on duty they were unable to keep them back. - Joseph Surridge, parcels porter corroborated. - Sergeant Tucker, on duty at the Station, thought the deceased must have fallen between the moving and stationary coaches and that four wheels passed over them. They must have fallen close by the stairs leading to the platform bridge. The station officials did their utmost to keep the crowd back. Witness assisted in getting the bodies out. BULLEN was quite dead. ASH was alive and conscious, muttering "Mercy on me." - John Murrin, recalled, said the platform at the time contained the passengers of several trains from Torquay. Three trains were, however, being run through to Plymouth on that day. - Herbert Danvers, surgeon, stated that on being called to the Station, he found BULLEN dead. ASH was alive, and he ordered her removal to the Cottage Hospital, where Drs. S. Haydon and Nisbett also attended her, but she died half an hour after admission. He considered the position of the waiting-room in the centre of the platform, and just at the foot of the stairs, was dangerous, in view of a congestion of traffic, as people coming over the footway had no space to spread out, the platform on either side of the waiting-room being no more than seven or nine feet in width. - A Juryman named Parker also drew attention to the bad lighting of the Station near the foot of the stairs, and just above the spot where the accident occurred. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and considered that no blame was attaching to the Station officials. They added, however, a rider to the effect that the attention of the Great Western Railway be called to the remarks of Dr Danvers, and thought it would be advisable to remove the refreshment rooms from the centre of the platform, to give more accommodation to waiting passengers, and that more light was needed at the foot of the stairs. - Mr Compton promised to represent these opinions to the manager of the G.W.R., and stated that this was the first occurrence of its kind during the time he had charge of the district, a period of 25 years. - The Coroner also said he would formally send the rider to the manager of the Company.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquest At Devonport. - At the Station Hospital, Stoke, yesterday, an Inquiry was held by Mr Vaughan, Coroner, into the circumstances attending the death of GUNNER GEORGE LAUNCHBURY, Western Division Royal Artillery, stationed at crownhill up to the 6th February last, who died in the Hospital on Monday morning. The Coroner read a certificate sent to Mr Milford, the registrar of the district, stating that the primary cause of death was a wound in the leg. Lieut. de Berry handed in what professed to be a statement of the deceased. It was the effect that on the night of the 30th January, while getting into bed, he injured his left leg by striking it against the bedstead, the lights being out. As the pain went away he said nothing about the accident at the time. On the 5th February while at work with a party of men repairing a sleigh he again knocked his leg. Shortly afterwards he reported himself to the medical officer, who ordered him to be sent to Hospital. For some time he progressed well towards recovery, but inflammation of the brain afterwards set in, from which he died. - Surgeon James Hamilton Nicholas, M.S.C., made a post-mortem and found extensive inflammation of the membranes of the brain, which he considered was the cause of death. In answer to the Coroner, witness said young recruits were subject to inflammation of the brain, but he was unable to assign a reason for this. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 3 April 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict of a Coroner's Jury sitting at St George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, to Inquire the cause of death of SEPTIMUS LANGAN, the boy who was run over by a coal cart in Newport-street, on Wednesday morning. He was playing with other boys in the roadway, and slipping fell in front of the cart, which was leaving Mr Fenn's coal yard with a load of coal. Mr Waterfield, surgeon, attended him at the Steam Packet Inn, but found him dead, the wheel having crushed his head.

Western Morning News, Saturday 4 April 1891 IVYBRIDGE - The Fatal Accident At Ivybridge. A Qualified Censure. - The adjourned Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN STENTIFORD, killed by the collision which occurred near Ivybridge whilst engaged in assisting to clear the main line during the recent storm, was held at the London Inn, Ivybridge, yesterday, before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. Mr Eric Ward (Whiteford and Bennett) appeared for the G.W.R. Co.; Mr Percy T. Pearce for Way, engine-driver, and Williams, fireman of the colliding train; Mr F. W. Skardon for Henry Willcocks, one of the injured men; and Mr F. C. Lane for the relatives of deceased. Major Ackland-Allen watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police. Mr E. Allen was Foreman of the Jury. - Mr J. M. Randle, surgeon, stated that he saw deceased after he was discovered in front of the engine buried in the snow. Death was due to suffocation. The face and head were much swollen. He could not say whether or not deceased received much bodily injury, as he was not ordered to make a post-mortem examination. - Henry Reeves, labourer, deposed that he found deceased by the side of the engine covered with about five feet of snow. He was quite dead. Deceased was leaning with the back of his head inclined towards the buffer of the engine, as though he had been driven into the snow. The man was holding the handle of the shovel, which was broken, in his right hand. - Mr C. E. Compton, divisional superintendent, G.W.R., stationed at Plymouth, produced a copy of the code of regulation for the company's servants. He said there were no particular regulations which had any direct bearing on the running of the relief trains during the block, because the circumstances were exceptional. On the evening of March 11th he instructed Inspectors Millman, Wootton and Smith, to proceed to the snow drifts the next morning with three engines, and work their way to the train, which was embedded in the snow near Ivybridge. Under ordinary circumstances a man would be stationed at either end of the train to warn others, but no one could get near the train. - By Mr Lane: there were references in the rules to ordinary trains blocked by snow giving directions. - Mr Lane: Would you consider the obstruction applicable to the rule which states that previous to any truck &c., being placed on the line or workmen's train being obliged to remain on the line, three detonators should be placed on the line at a distance of a mile from the obstruction in the direction of a coming train, even if it was not expected? - I think it was physically impossible to do so at the time of the storm,, but after the snow plough had got through, it was possible, if thought necessary, to send out signalmen. - Witness, in answer to Mr Pearce, said he did not believe the rules laid down would apply under the exceptional circumstances. In the absence of special instructions engine drivers would be guided by the general rules. He could not say why signalmen were not sent out on March 12th. - Mr Pearce: Was it not the duty of those in charge to have sent men away with detonators? - I would rather not answer that question. - By a Juryman: I will not say the men were justified in suspending the whole of the rules. - Mr Eric Ward mentioned that he had received a letter from the solicitor to the Great Western Railway Company, notifying that the company accepted all responsibility for the accident, and would compensate the widow. The directors also expressed their great regret at the sad accident. - Nicholas Way, engine driver, deposed: At 2.5 p.m. on March 12th I left Millbay Station to go to Ivybridge. I received a written order from Inspector Bibbings to go to Hemerdon, and he also told me I was going to Ivybridge, but no instructions were given me as to the rate at which I should proceed. I started with a breakdown van in company with foreman Storey, who was on the engine with me, William Williams, fireman, and Guard Gooding, and a relief gang. At Hemerdon signal-box the signal was against me, and I pulled up. I received instructions from the signalman and Inspector Millman to "get right away." Passing through Cornwood a signalman held out a white flat, and I proceeded towards Ivybridge at the rate of about 20 miles an hour. On sighting the snowed-up train a quarter of a mile off I applied the brakes and blew off the steam whistle. I reversed the engine, but the brake did not answer quickly, and I collided with the train. Storey and Wilcocks were both injured. I never saw deceased. - By a Juryman: I did not know the blocked train was on the Hemerdon side of Ivybridge Station; otherwise, I would not have gone away without written instructions. I expected to find a signalman a mile from the block, according to regulations. Previous to the collision I had not been up the line that day. I was not told where the block existed. - By Mr Pearce: When I sighted the obstruction I did all in my power to avert a collision. I have been an engine driver two years, and in the company's service twenty-four. - Witness, in answer to Mr Ward, said he was under the impression that the line was clear to Ivybridge, because he was told "Right away" and a white flag was shewn him at Cornwood. - Inspector Bibbings produced the message he received directing him to send Way to Hemerdon with a relief train. He denied giving Way any verbal order to proceed to Ivybride. He did not know where the obstruction was. - William Williams, fireman, stated that when Inspector Bibbings handed him the order he said, "Right away for Ivybridge." Witness corroborated other portions of Way's evidence. - Thomas Gooding, guard of the relief train, said he knew the obstruction was on the Plymouth side of Ivybridge, but was not aware that the driver was ignorant of the fact. It was generally known at Plymouth Station. He thought he was going to the scene of the accident. - Edward Smith, foreman of labourers, working at the scene of the accident, stated that he heard the sound of a whistle and saw the train approaching a short distance off. He called out to the men to clear out for their lives. In all probability deceased tried to get away by running round the front of the engine, which was forced several feet further into the snow embankment, from which deceased was dug out. At the time he thought every man was safe. - By Mr Pearce: There might have been a foreman of platelayers present. Could not tell if Inspector Wootton was the person responsible for sending out signalmen. - The Coroner thought the rules referred to by Mr Pearce had only reference to passenger traffic, but several of the Jury expressed the opinion that the rules had a direct bearing on the case. - Joseph Jennings, driver in the Great Western Docks, stated that at the time of the collision deceased was working in front of him on the left-hand side of the engine. He heard the whistle, and whilst trying to get away the engine knocked him aside. He did not see deceased. When witness got to North-road he was told there was a man missing. - Inspector John Wootton, locomotive department, called at the request of the Jury, deposed that he arrived at the scene of the accident about twenty minutes before it occurred. - In answer to Mr Pearce, witness said the rule relating to inspectors sending out signalmen did not apply in his case, as he had only charge of the engineering department. - Inspector Millman present at Hemerdon signal-box when the train stopped, said some conversation took place between the signalman and the guard of the train. Witness never spoke to Way. The signalman doubtless told the driver "right away." He thoroughly understood the train was proceeding to where the line was blocked. - Robert Blackmore, signalman at Cornwood Station, stated that he was present when the relief train passed through, and he had no recollection of having shewn a white flag on that day. He was not in connection by telegraph for the whole of the week. - Walter Amery, signalman at Hemerdon, deposed that he never said "right away." The guard asked if it was right, and he said "Yes." Witness understood that Mr Storey knew where the line was blocked. Witness read a telegram addressed to Mr Storey on Monday night, informing him that the 6.50 train was blocked at Langham Bridge. Did not know if Mr Storey received the telegram. - In answer to a Juryman, witness said he was suspended for five days, but had been reinstated. - Mr Compton explained that witness was not suspended on account of the accident. - In reply to Mr Pearce, Mr Compton said had the foreman of the locomotive department or the foreman of the permanent way thought necessary they could have sent back men to keep trains out of danger. Possibly, if the driver had been informed where the block existed, the accident would have been averted. It was, however, thought that everybody knew where the line was blocked, as engines had been running up and down several times. - This concluded the evidence. - Mr Pearce submitted that the evidence was entirely in favour of acquitting the engine-driver and fireman of all blame; and the Jury said they did not desire him to address them. - Mr Lane thanked Mr Compton and the other officials for doing everything in their power to aid the Jury, and Mr Ward, acknowledging the compliment, said the Company had brought more witnesses than were subpoenaed in order to aid the Jury. He would not address them, because he believed they would see that the accident occurred owing to the almost insuperable difficulties to be overcome. - The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after one hour's deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that "necessary precautions were not taken by the officials to make the exact position of the block known to the driver and other officials of the colliding train. They also think that a signalman, or signalmen, should have been engaged on that day to warn any uprelief or other trains. At the same time, they take into consideration, and wish to make allowances, for the exceptional severity of the weather, and unusual strain on the heads of the various departments." The Jury gave their fees to the widow of deceased. The Inquiry lasted seven hours.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 April 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - MR J. H. FILMER, who for many years carried on business as a chemist and druggist at 7 James-street, Devonport, died on Friday afternoon at the age of 70. An ardent Liberal he for some time represented St John's Ward in the Council. He was also a member of the Devonport Board of Commissioners. At an Inquest held on Saturday by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, Mrs Kate Howard Sowden, his daughter, said he had enjoyed good health until within the last three weeks, when he suffered from a wheezy cough, and for the past fortnight he had not eaten any solid food. No doctor was called in until about half an hour before his death, and Mr J. E. C. Wilson found life extinct. He attributed death to exhaustion, partly caused by bronchitis and a verdict of "Death from Natural Cause" was returned. The Coroner and Jury expressed their sympathy with the family.

PLYMOUTH - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Warne's Hotel, Anstis-street, Plymouth, on Saturday, on the body of the two days' old child of EDWARD COOKE, residing at 44 Francis-street. Deceased was on Friday evening found by the nurse dead in bed. Dr Wagner attributed death to syncope, caused by the pain of strangulation of the bowels.

WESTWARD HO! - An Inquest was held at Westward Ho! on Saturday concerning the death of AGNES ELLEN POOLE, aged two years old, who was drowned in the Nassau Swimming Bath on Thursday afternoon. The child's parents keep the baths. She was carrying sticks which her brother chopped in the engine-house into her mother's kitchen. After two journeys, the child did not return, but the boy continued his work, being under the impression that his sister was with his mother. When, however, he had finished, he found AGNES was missing. After a search the mother discovered the child in the large swimming bath. Dr Gooding was called and pronounced the child was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the parents.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 8 April 1891 EGG BUCKLAND - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by a Coroner's Jury at the Laira Inn, Laira, yesterday, on the body of ALBERT HENRY ADAMS, aged 7 months, living at 4 Stanlake-terrace, Laira, who died suddenly in its mother's arms on Sunday evening. Mr A. C. Way, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by congestion of the lungs.

PLYMOUTH - ELIZABETH DOLBEAR, aged 46, residing at 14 John's-lane, Plymouth, was taken suddenly ill on Monday, and died almost immediately. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr G. Jackson, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Stanbury was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth Prison last evening by the Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) respecting the death of WILLIAM JAMES HARRIS, aged 7 weeks, son of ELIZA JANE HARRIS, a single woman. Mr S. Wolferstan, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased on Friday morning last, when he found it was terribly afflicted by a congenital disease. He continued seeing it until Monday, when it died. The Jury, of which Mr William Stanbury was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 April 1891 LYDFORD - Death Of A Convict At Dartmoor. The Admission Of Reporters At Inquests. - An Inquest was held at Princetown yesterday, concerning the death of WILLIAM LOVITT, a convict, who died in the prison on Sunday. The Inquiry was to have been held inside the Prison, and the Jury waited outside the gates, in charge of a Policeman. Previously, a representative of the "Western Morning News" was told at the second gate that he would have to wait, before obtaining admittance, until the Jury were admitted. Our reported waited on the Deputy-Governor (Colonel Plummer) who asked if reporters had previously been present at Inquests held in the Prison. Upon being informed that reporters had attended Inquiries respecting the death of convicts, Colonel Plummer gave permission for our reporter to attend. Together with the Jury the representatives of the Press were conducted, by warders, to a detached building. Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, in consequence of the death of Mr Burd, conducted the Inquiry. After the Jury had been sworn, Mr Male, chief clerk of the Prison, objected to reporters being present, stating that it was not customary, and left the room to consult with the Deputy-Governor. The latter returned with the clerk, and informed the coroner that if he desired to have reporters present the Inquiry must be held outside the Prison. The prison instructions would not allow of reporters being present. - Upon our reporter pointing out that permission had been given him to enter by the Deputy-Governor, Colonel Plummer said he did not know that on previous occasions reporters had been specially authorised to attend. He was informed that the presence of reporters was contrary to law, and he was only carrying out his orders in objecting to their being present. - The Jury, of whom Mr Higman was Foreman, unanimously decided in favour of reporters remaining, and after viewing the body, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry to the Duchy Hotel. The following evidence was then taken:- William Male, chief clerk in Dartmoor convict establishment, produced an order of the court for 14 years' penal servitude and five years' Police supervision, dated March 20th, 1882. Deceased was sent to Dartmoor from Chatham on February 1883. He was imprisoned for housebreaking and larceny and had undergone a previous sentence of penal servitude. Deceased was 41 years of age, married, and a Roman Catholic. A sister of deceased saw him before he died. - William Simpson Frew, medical officer of the Prison, deposed that LOVITT died about nine o'clock on Sunday evening. The cause of death, verified by post-mortem examination, was valvular disease of the heart. Deceased had been under treatment in the Hospital since March 17th, and he had suffered from heart disease since 1877 - prior to his first conviction. - David Penrose Webster, assistant-warder, said he was present when deceased died. LOVITT made no complaint as to his treatment. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". - Deceased, according to the prison documents, had twice received 36 lashes with the cat, and had several times attempted to break out of Portland and Dartmoor Prisons.

PLYMOUTH - MRS AGNES WILLINGS, aged 71 years, residing at 21 Mainstone-terrace, Plymouth, was found dead beside her bed on Tuesday morning by a neighbour. Mr A. S. Clark, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at 2 Home Sweet Home, Cattedown-road, when Mr A. C. Wey, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by bronchitis and dropsy. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Cann was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAVISTOCK - At Tavistock Workhouse yesterday, a Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against EVA HOLLAND, a tramp, for causing the death of her child, aged seven months, by neglecting it. Deceased weighed only 7lbs.

Western Morning News, Saturday 11 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - GEORGE HEARSON, a naval pensioner, aged 69, living with his wife at Washington-terrace, Mutley, yesterday morning went to see his son, a fisherman, living at 26 Cambridge-street, Plymouth. Upon being told that his son had gone to sea and would not return until the next day, he sent Mrs Brown, the housekeeper, for some whisky. When she returned she found the old man cutting his throat. Her screams brought to her help Richard Curtis, a shoemaker, living in the same house, and he took away the knife and wrapped a towel around the man's throat. HEARSON, however, had severed both the windpipe and the jugular vein, and when Mr Brenton came he was dead. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark last evening, a Jury, of whom Mr J. Short was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Western Morning News, Wednesday, 15 April 1891 - At the Inquest on GEORGE HEARSON, naval pensioner, late of Washington-terrace, Mutley, held at the Cambridge Arms, Plymouth, on Friday last, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" and not of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 13 April 1891 PAIGNTON - At the Pier Inn, Paignton, on Saturday afternoon, Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry concerning the death of THOMAS KELLEGREW, harbour-master, who committed suicide on the previous day. Olive Chinnock, a grand-daughter, who lived with deceased, proved that he got up on Friday morning and went to the doctor for a bottle of medicine, of which he took a dose. He went to bed about half-past eleven and refused dinner. Just after one he called for his wife, and on her and the grand-daughter going upstairs they found him with his throat cut and leaning over the side of the bed bleeding copiously. Dr Alexander did all that was possible to close the wound, which was a very severe one, and the loss of blood great, but KELLEGREW died about six o'clock. It was proved that he had been drinking heavily, had suffered from delirium tremens, and latterly had been strange in manner, and had previously threatened to cut his throat, though no importance was attached to the threat. On Wednesday he went to the Police-station and asked to be locked up. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 14 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - When MARGARET DOWN, of 9 Alma-cottages, Coxside, Plymouth, awoke early yesterday morning, she found her son, REGINALD, aged ten weeks, dead by her side. At an Inquest held last evening, Dr A. C. Wey who was called in said death was due to convulsions. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark, last evening, a Jury, of whom Mr J. Turpin was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TORQUAY - Suicide Of A Woman At Torquay. Jumping Over A Cliff. - At Torbay Hospital last evening, Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on the body of SUSANNAH MARY JANE PERROW, aged 47, of Prince-road, Ellacombe, who has since January been living with her sister as caretaker of Carclew, Hesketh-road. Deceased was ill in November last, and since then had suffered from pains in the head. When she went to bed on Saturday night she told her sister that on the following morning she would take a walk, as she had been advised that morning walks would do her nerves good. Shortly before six on Sunday morning deceased opened the shutters of the bedroom, but finding it was earlier than she had supposed returned to bed. When her sister awoke a little before nine she found deceased had left the house, and getting anxious in consequence of the state of her health first communicated with her relatives, and then gave information to the Police. About half-past eight a fisherman named Richard Pym was rowing along shore under the cliff of Daddy Hole Plain, when he saw something lying on the rocks, and getting nearer he saw an upraised arm, while 20 or 30 yards up the cliff he saw hanging what appeared to be a handkerchief. As Pym could not land at that point, he gave information to Thomas Lobb, a coastguardsman, and the two reached by a zig-zag path a flat rock on which the body was lying. On the top of the cliff, which was guarded by an iron railing, was found a black glove similar to one on the deceased's left hand. The height of the cliff was between 260 and 270 feet, and the deceased, who was still alive, was carried to the top on an ambulance stretcher and afterwards removed to the Hospital. - Mr Arthur Watson, one of the surgeons, found that she was suffering from a lacerated scalp wound, concussion of the brain, and several minor injuries. She rallied for a time, but died at a quarter-past eleven on Sunday night. - In reply to the Coroner, Mr Watson said deceased must have fallen in a slanting position or her skull would have been fractured. Deceased's sister said she (deceased) dreaded the return of the family to the house, and often talked on religion. Although a good woman, she often said she was too great a sinner for God to pardon her. Deceased had not recently threatened to do herself harm, but while her mind was badly deranged in consequence of family trouble twenty-five years ago she threatened to take her life. - A verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 April 1891 IVYBRIDGE - ELIZABETH LUSCOMBE, single, 82 years old, was found dead in bed at Western-road, Ivybridge, on Monday morning. At the Inquest held by Mr Rodd yesterday, Mrs Dyer, with whom deceased had lived for about ten years, said they took supper together on Sunday night, and deceased then seemed much as usual. Mr Randle, surgeon, attributed death to failure of the heart's action, and old age. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - While CHARLES HICKS, a carpenter, of Westwell-street, Plymouth, was on Tuesday, last week, stooping to examine a stone which had been thrown towards him he over-balanced himself and fell down. He was taken to his home and died yesterday morning. At the Inquest at Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, Dr r. H. Wagner, who had attended deceased, stated that death had resulted from shock to the system, caused by the fall, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 17 April 1891 IVYBRIDGE - MRS KATE BOON, wife of MR JOHN BOON (ironmonger of Ivybridge), died suddenly on Monday evening. At the Inquest held by Mr Rodd yesterday, GERTRUDE BOON, stepdaughter of deceased, and Mrs Charlotte Kimmins, a neighbour, deposed to finding her dead on the floor, after leaving her about five minutes for the purpose of getting her a chop for supper. Mr Randle, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination by the Coroner's order, said he found the internal organs generally much diseased, particularly the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". The Jury expressed sympathy with deceased's husband.

Western Morning News, Monday 20 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - OLIVE MARY HARRY, aged nine months, the daughter of ELLEN HARRY, 4 Redford-road, Plymouth, died rather suddenly on Friday. At the Inquest held by Mr Clark, Mr J. Anderson, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to peritonitis. The Jury of whom Mr H. Osmond was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - Death From Excessive Drinking At Devonport. - The circumstances attending the death of LOUISA JANE DYER, age 43, wife of a moulder in the Dockyard, living at 8 John-street, Devonport, formed the subject of an Inquiry by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner, on Saturday. About nine o'clock on Friday evening deceased was seen in Tamar-street by a neighbour, Mrs Street, who thought she was ill. She followed her into John-street, and saw her enter her house. Shortly afterwards Mrs Kinsman, who lives in the same house, was called by deceased's daughter, and found deceased lying on the floor of her room. A pool of blood was on the floor. She sent for deceased's husband, and soon after he came deceased died. Mr Gard, surgeon, who was called in, said deceased had been dead about half an hour. There were traces of blood from the front door up to deceased's room. He made a post-mortem examination the following day, and found that nearly all the internal organs were in a more or less congested state, the liver being particularly small. He attributed this condition to excessive drinking, to which deceased, according to what her husband told him, had been addicted. Both Mrs Street and Mrs Kingsman in their evidence said nothing about deceased's excessive drinking habits, although questioned on the point, and the Coroner, believing that they had purposely kept back the facts, disallowed their expenses as witnesses. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes accelerated by deceased's drinking habits," was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 April 1891 BRIXHAM - Mr Sidney Hacker opened an Inquest yesterday on the body of the lad HUGH THOMAS, landed at Brixham on Saturday by the fishing ketch Legra, from the ship Portia, from Hamburg to Hongkong. After hearing the evidence, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until Thursday, to enable the relatives of the deceased to attend. The Coroner said the skipper of the trawler was much to blame in bringing the body ashore, especially as it was sewn up in canvas. He might have been bringing the body of a murdered man ashore. It was the duty of the captain of the ship to come into port, seeing that he was no great distance from land.

PLYMOUTH - HENRY HANNABUS, aged 77, residing at 10 Summerland-place, Plymouth, was found by P.C. Pill, sitting in a chair dead, on Sunday. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, at the Lord Clarendon Inn, Summerland-place, yesterday, Mr R. H. Wagner, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to an epileptic fit. The Jury of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 23 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - MR EDWIN MORTIMER, aged 44 years, residing at 55 Richmond-street, Plymouth, for some time past in ill-health, was taken worse on Tuesday and died. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Oddfellows Hall, Morley-street, Plymouth, when Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to acute inflammation of the pericardium. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Webber was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

STOKE DAMEREL - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, the Devonport Coroner, yesterday, respecting the death of the infant daughter of MR MARSH, of 4 Wake-street. The evidence of Mr Thompson, surgeon, of Plymouth, shewed that the child had suffered from bowel complaint and apoplexy.

Western Morning News, Friday 24 April 1891 BRIXHAM - An adjourned inquest was held last evening at Brixham, on the body of a sailor landed by a fishing vessel from a vessel passing down channel. MR RICHARD THOMAS, a police-constable stationed at Anglesea, identified the body as that of his brother, HUGH THOMAS, aged 20, a sailor on board the Portia. It was his first voyage in that ship, but he had been in the same employ for eighteen months. The last time witness saw him he was very weak. A month ago he wrote him from Hamburg that he was bound to Rangoon. The Coroner (Mr Hacker) who said if the usual course had been taken by the captain of the ship and Walter Furneaux, the skipper of the fishing smack, much trouble would have been saved. He then condemned the place, called a mortuary, and said he certainly did not know how Dr Searle had managed to make a post-mortem in such a place. It was the duty of the Local Board to provide a more suitable place. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and asked the Coroner to communicate with the Local Board respecting the provision of a proper mortuary.

Western Morning News, Saturday 25 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - ALFRED JONES, a naval pensioner and hawker of ash, aged 57, residing at 3 George-lane, Plymouth, was taken suddenly ill on Thursday night and died almost immediately. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Dr McBeath, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to the bursting of an aneurism. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 27 April 1891 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner held two Inquests on Saturday at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The first was on the body of ROBERT HOOPER, a boot and shoemaker, aged 77, 71 North-street. ELIZABETH HOOPER, widow of the deceased, said for two or three weeks past deceased had complained a great deal of pains in the head, and had been very low-spirited. On Thursday evening she went out and when she returned about eight o'clock, saw deceased crouched before the fire. Witness at first thought he was faint, but afterwards saw blood flowing from his neck. P.C. Bennett said he found HOOPER lying on his side in front of the fire in a pool of blood, which had flowed from a large wound in the throat. Near by him was an open razor covered with blood. Mr T. H. Williams, surgeon, who was soon in attendance, said it was a hopeless case. On Friday deceased was removed to the Hospital, dying before he reached it. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquest was on the body of SARAH JANE ADAMS, a domestic servant, aged 27, in the employ of Rev. R. C. Cowell, of 2 Ebenezer-place, who died from injuries received through her clothes catching on fire on Friday. Lily Warne, aged 13, a fellow servant, said on Friday evening she was in the scullery when she heard screams. She rushed into the kitchen and saw deceased enveloped in flames. She threw a bucket of water over her and succeeded in putting out the flames. Deceased told witness that some hot cinders had fallen off the grate and caught her apron. Deceased was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Mr W. G. Nash, house Surgeon, said deceased was severely burnt about the face, neck, cheeks and front of both arms and legs. She told him that some cinders had fallen out of the grate and caught her apron. She died on Saturday morning from shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr H. Slade Foreman of both Juries.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 29 April 1891 AXMINSTER - Shocking Burning Fatality At Axminster. - An Enquiry was held yesterday at the Axminster Cottage Hospital touching the death of CHARLOTTE MAUD CHANT, aged three years and three months. - MRS CHANT, the mother, who lives at Uphay Cottage, about a mile from Axminster, went out on Saturday morning, leaving the deceased in charge of an elder sister, eight years old. When the father came home to dinner, he found the infant naked, much burned about the body, and wrapped up in a shawl, in the arms of the other girl, whose name was NELLIE. NELLIE said, "MAUDIE has burned herself," and the man at once went in search of his wife, and sent his son for Dr Langran, who arrived in about half an hour. He dressed the wounds, which were very severe, and covered the left hand and arm, and the breast, face, neck and lower part of the back, and then ordered the child's removal to the Hospital, where it died on Monday morning. Deceased revived a little on Saturday night but she never properly recovered from the shock. - The Matron said deceased did not appear to suffer great pain as she was unconscious. - The Coroner had considerable difficulty in getting a statement from NELLIE CHANT as to how her sister was burned, but it seemed that in the kitchen of the cottage there is a raised fire place which has no grate, fire-dogs being used. Deceased was sitting on the floor on one side and NELLIE was on a stool opposite. The younger child got up to walk across the room when her sister noticed her clothes were in flames. She threw some water over her and commenced undoing her clothes, and afterwards wrapped her in a shawl and nursed her until her father arrived. - The Coroner said it was, perhaps, somewhat dangerous to leave a little girl of eight years in charge of a house and an infant, but it had to be done by people of this class and he did not think any blame could be attached to MRS CHANT. The Jury coincided and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST STONEHOUSE - The sad death of JOSEPH BERRABALL, aged 66 years, a cab proprietor, of Bishop's-place, Plymouth, who fell from his seat on his cab on Monday evening, and was killed through a wheel of the conveyance passing over his neck, was the subject of an Inquiry held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Giles was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Dr W. H. Corbett, surgeon, stated that the deceased fell from his seat in consequence of a fit, and that the wheel passing over him dislocated the spinal column. Some time back deceased met with a serious accident, which incapacitated him for some considerable time, and three months ago his wife died.

Western Morning News, Saturday 2 May 1891 ALWINGTON - CHARLES MATTHEWS, a boy 14 years of age, living in farm service at Rollstone Farm, Alwington, met his death by hanging on Thursday. From the evidence given before Mr Coroner Bromham, it appeared that at about midday Mr Joseph Sergeant, his master, told him to get a couple of barrows of mangolds for the horses and then left him. On returning he learnt that his son had found MATTHEWS hanging in the roothouse dead and had cut him down. There was no apparent motive for him hanging himself, he being apparently very happy with Mr Sergeant, in whose employ he had been for over two years. It was suggested that he was playing with a sheep rope, which hung from a beam in the roothouse, that he put his head through the noose, and that the form by which he reached the rope slipped from under him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 4 May 1891 TOPSHAM - Suicide At Topsham. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Topsham touching the death of BESSIE SALTER, aged 18. Mr G. Hopewell was Foreman of the Jury. - Lucy Davey, of Topsham, wife of James Davey, a blacksmith in the Royal Navy, said deceased was her sister and lived with her. About half-past two on Thursday she suggested deceased should go to Woodbury Salterton for a character. Deceased said, "Rather than go there I will drown myself." Deceased had tried without success many times to obtain situations, and that had preyed on her mind. There was nothing else to trouble deceased that witness knew of. - Sarah Sargent said when she heard deceased tell her sister she would rather drown herself than to go to Woodbury Salterton for a character, she said "Don't trouble, BESS; I'll write out to the lady for you." Deceased was quite willing for witness to do so. Witness often saw deceased, who made no complaints and always appeared in the best of spirits. - Alfred John Melhuish, a groom, of Topsham, stated that on Thursday afternoon he was going through the pathfields to the Retreat, when he heard screams and saw a young woman in the water. Not being able to swim he ran for assistance. When he returned with help, however, she had sunk. He found a hat with a brooch pinned in it on the bank near some steps leading to the river. Deceased seemed to be trying to get out of the water when he saw her. - Benjamin Bowden, landlord of Countess Weir Inn, recovered the body about five o'clock on Thursday in fifteen feet of water. P.C. Brownson stationed at Countess Weir, discovered footprints on the mud at the steps at a point called Jackson's Corner. Nothing found on the body threw any light upon the Inquiry. Dr Frood, of Topsham, said there were no marks of violence. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Friday 8 May 1891 PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday, Mr Reeves, surgeon, attributed the death of the infant son of WILLIAM WEEKS, of 24 Harwell-street, Plymouth, to inanition and the verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 9 May 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Inquest On A Dockyard Diver At Stonehouse. - An Inquiry was held yesterday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, relative to the death of JOHN CLARKE, a diver of Devonport Dockyard, which took place on Wednesday last. - Henry Pope stated that on Thursday he was in charge of a party of riggers and labourers engaged in extending the Government moorings at Barnpool. Deceased, who had had about seven years' experience as a diver, entered the water shortly before three and remained down for eighteen minutes, coming to the surface on account of losing the bolt of the shackle. CLARKE again descended after about ten minutes had elapsed, and came up in twenty minutes, expressing his intention to go down once more and finish his work Deceased, however, immediately afterwards complained of a "pricking and stabbing" sensation in his legs and became so ill that he was sent to the Dockyard surgery. The diving apparatus was in perfect order. - Joseph Highlett, rigger diver, deposed that he had been down three times, and could not succeed in fixing the shackle. Deceased then volunteered to go down. There were about 20 fathoms of water, and working at that depth was most trying. It was perfectly dark, and the diver was obliged to grope about. It was slack tide. Witness did not care about going down again, but he would have gone all the same. Deceased was 37 years of age, and resided in Morice Town. The shackle that deceased had to manipulate weighed about three-quarters of a cwt. - Captain Tomlin, Queen's harbour-master, explained that deceased was not forced to go down, and that they waited particularly for slack water before commencing diving operations. - Mr Ernest Dunman Minter, surgeon at the Hospital, deposed that a post-mortem examination shewed that all the organs of deceased were extremely congested. The heart was fatty and the lungs collapsed and congested. A medical examination prior to the deceased entering the water would not have shewn that the heart of deceased was affected. Diving would accelerate death in the case of a man whose heart was in the condition of that of the deceased. The sensation mentioned by the witness Pope was the result of the stoppage of circulation. - The Jury (Mr W. Helston, Foreman) found that CLARKE had died from Natural Causes, but that death was accelerated by diving operations. The Coroner, in acquainting Mr J. J. E. Venning, Admiralty agent, with the terms of the verdict, requested that gentleman, by the desire of the Jury, to represent to the Admiralty the fact that deceased had left a widow and six children. - Mr Venning promised to lay the facts before the Admiralty in the most favourable light.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 12 May 1891 PLYMOUTH - The seven days' old female child of MARGARET COUCH, living at 4 Granby-lane, Plymouth, taken ill early on Sunday morning, died soon afterwards. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, attributed death to convulsions in a very weakly child. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Glanville was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - ROBERT HANCOCK, aged 63, a pensioner, residing at 37 Gibbon-street, Plymouth, died suddenly on Sunday evening at his home and at an Inquiry held at the Clarence Arms, Gibbon-street, by Mr A. S. Clark, yesterday, Mr T. H. Williams, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease, and the Jury, of whom Mr E. Whiting was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Countess Weir yesterday upon the body of WILLIAM STENTIFORD, aged four. Deceased accompanied his father, a wagoner, and an elder brother to Trews Weir on Sunday, April 26th to feed some horses. When the father went into the stable he told the children to play in the meadow. About ten minutes afterwards the elder boy said his brother had gone home to breakfast as he was hungry. He saw the child's hat 200 yards away, and from other things he saw it was apparent that the boy had fallen into the water. The body was not recovered until Saturday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death At Plymouth. - An Inquiry was held at the Minerva Inn, Looe-street, Plymouth, yesterday, by Mr A. S. Clark, coroner, respecting the death of GEORGE HENRY JONES, aged 33 years, a fish hawker, residing at 24 Looe-street, who died suddenly early in the morning. - EMILY JONES, wife of deceased, stated that on Sunday evening about a quarter to ten her husband went out to get something to drink, and was brought home about half-past ten intoxicated by two men, who laid him down on the floor. Witness asked him to come and have his supper and go to bed, but he refused, saying he was all right and intended to stop where he was. Witness went to bed and about four o'clock deceased woke her up, asking for a drink of water, which she gave him. About ten minutes later witness not hearing him breathing, got out of bed, and found he was dead. Witness noticed on Sunday morning that deceased had a mark on his forehead, and that his hands were bruised, he told her he had been fighting in a public-house. Deceased was of a quarrelsome nature, and when he had been drinking suffered from fits. - By a Juryman: When deceased went out he had 4s. in his possession, but when he returned he had only 1s. 6 ½d. - P.S. Farmer stated that he had not heard of any public-house brawls in the locality during the past few days. - Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, stated that deceased was a fairly robust man. There were some slight bruises on the left hand, and three small abrasions of the skin on the forehead. Further examination shewed signs of pericarditis, now well. The other organs were healthy. The stomach contained a large quantity of undigested food, but there was no smell of drink. Some extravasated blood was found in the tissues beneath the abrasion on the forehead, under which was a line fracture of the skull of about two inches, through which clear fluid was oozing. On the under side of the skull there was another fracture running across the top about four inches in length. The membranes of the upper side of the brain were congested and shewed signs of commencing meningitis, a large quantity of fluid being diffused beneath them. In witness's opinion , death resulted from meningitis caused by a blow fracturing the skull and creating concussion. Witness did not think that such a blow could be inflicted by a hand. All the symptoms described by the widow ere those compatible with the result of the injuries received by the deceased. In witness's opinion the injuries were caused about two days ago. - The Coroner remarked that as the case had assumed a very serious aspect, he should adjourn the Inquiry until Thursday, by which time he hoped that P.S. Farmer would have some information respecting the public-house brawl in which the deceased received his injuries.

Western Morning News, Friday 15 May 1891 PLYMOUTH - The Inquest upon the body of GEORGE HENRY JONES was resumed by Mr Clark at Plymouth yesterday. Mrs Emma Barter deposed that several boys brought deceased home drunk on Sunday week last. JONES knocked his head several times against the stairs, and used his fist as if he were fighting. Other evidence was given which satisfied the Jury that the fracture of the skull from which he died was caused by deceased's own act, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - A child named EARNEST JAMES SKARDON, 1 year and 11 months old, residing at 26 Wyndham-street, Plymouth, died on Monday. At an Inquest held at the Rochester-Inn, Cecil-street, by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday, Mr J. Anderson, surgeon, attributed death to congestion of the lungs and ulceration of the bowels. The Jury, of whom Mr Saltern was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 18 May 1891 BARNSTAPLE - MARY ELIZABETH RICHARDS, aged 3 ½, the daughter of a leading tradesman at Barnstaple, died from the effects of terrible injuries received on Friday. Whilst playing in the nursery with matches her clothes caught fire. At the Inquest on Saturday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury expressing sympathy with the parents.

BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Fatal Mine Accident. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the London Inn, Horrabridge, on Saturday afternoon, to Inquire into circumstances attending the death of HENRY ROWE, miner, aged 27, of Little Horrabridge. Mr James Dockett was Foreman of the Jury. On Friday afternoon deceased was working in the shaft at Bertha Consols Mine, when a platform on which he was standing suddenly collapsed, and he fell a distance of twenty-six fathoms, sustaining such shocking injuries that death was instantaneous. Sufficient evidence having been given to justify an order for burial, the Coroner stated the H.M. Inspector of Mines had asked him to adjourn the Inquiry to Tuesday or Thursday and the Court would, therefore, stand adjourned until four o'clock on Thursday. Deceased has left a widow and three young children.

SOUTH MOLTON - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at the Inquest held at Southmolton on the body of JAMES RODD, rural postman, who was killed on the Devon and Somerset Railway on Thursday evening. It was believed that while walking along the line he slipped and fell, the goods train passing over him before he could get out of the way.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 20 May 1891 TOTNES - At an Inquest held at Totnes yesterday on the body of the eight months' old illegitimate child of JANE WILSON, a laundress, found dead by its mother's side on Sunday morning, Dr Smith, who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to convulsions from teething, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 21 May 1891 DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held yesterday at Dartmouth Guildhall by the Borough Coroner, Mr R. W. Prideaux, touching the death of JAMES GARDINER, an able seaman of H.M.S. Britannia. Dr South and Lieutenant Benson, of the ship, were present. Charles Anderson, able seaman, H.M.S. Britannia, said he left deceased at the Queen's Hotel at 10 minutes to 10 on Monday evening perfectly sober. John Newdell, a marine belonging to H.M.S. Britannia, deposed to seeing deceased coming along Clarence-street about 10 o'clock and that when opposite the gas works he fell on one knee and was picked up by a man named Williams. He was then breathing, but expired in a few minutes. Dr Crossfield, who arrived just after 10 o'clock and found GARDINER dead, said there were no marks of violence, and death was probably due to heart disease. Dr South was of the same opinion, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 22 May 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Death Of A Seaman Diver At Stonehouse. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of WILLIAM EDWIN WALKER, aged 27, a seaman on board H.M.S. Cambridge. - Samuel Burns, diving instructor on board H.M.S. Cambridge stated that deceased, on 14th inst., was ordered, with six other men in a boat, to practise diving alongside H.M.S. Conqueror's bouy abreast of Devonport Dockyard. Deceased was the first to go under water, which at that time was about 20 to 21 fathoms in depth. The apparatus was in perfect order, and he remained below the surface about ten minutes. When ordered to ascend, he did so very quickly coming to the surface in one and a half minutes, instead of taking about five minutes, the ordinary time. Witness remarked that he should not hurry up in that way as it was dangerous. He laughed, and said "I am all right." On deceased's clothes and helmet being removed, however, he complained of pains in his stomach, and he said the pains left him and went to his feet. Deceased was taken on board a ship lying near, and ordered to walk up and down. He did so for a short time, but the pain increasing, he was removed in the steam launch to H.M.S. Cambridge and subsequently to the Royal Naval Hospital. - By a Juryman: Deceased commenced to learn diving on April 1st, and between that date and May 14th he had entered the water about 30 times. - Mr Ernest Minter, surgeon, stated that when admitted to the Hospital deceased was suffering from paralysis from the waist downward. The spinal cord was softened and death was accelerated by diving. The Jury of whom Mr L. Danger was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes, accelerated by diving."

EXETER - Fatal Accident At Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital last evening on the body of DENNIS O'LEARY, 43, of Preston-street, Exeter, who died in the Institution on Wednesday, from injuries received in an accident at Queen-street Station two months ago. Deceased, a blind man, used to stand in the Station-yard selling matches. On March 19th, about ten minutes past one, he entered the Station as he was in the habit of doing occasionally, but instead of turning to the left, as he should have done, O'LEARY appeared to lose himself, and was seen by one of Smith and Son's newsboys to be feeling about with his stick near the edge of the platform. Before the lad had time to warn him, he fell over on to the line. An engine was passing at the time, and before the driver had time to pull up, three wheels had passed over the poor fellow's legs. Deceased, who was conscious, and exclaimed "My God! what shall I do?" was taken out from beneath the tender and conveyed to the Hospital on a stretcher. It was there found that the right thigh was very much crushed and that O'LEARY was in a state of collapse. The leg was amputated. Deceased went on favourably until about a month ago, since which time he gradually got weaker and he died on Wednesday. A post-mortem examination shewed that there was some dead bone in the stump of the leg and pleurisy intervening was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HORRABRIDGE - Fatal Mine Accident At Horrabridge. - The adjourned Inquest concerning the death of HENRY ROWE, a miner, aged 27 years, who met with his death on Friday, the 15th inst., at Bertha Consols Mine, was held by Mr Rodd, at Horrabridge yesterday. Mr J. Dockett was Foreman of the Jury. Mr Pinching. H.M. Inspector of mines and Mr Henry Gill, agent for the Bertha Consols Mine Company, were also present. MR W. ROWE, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, deceased's brother, was much affected during the Inquest. - John Dawe, of Sawdon, stated that he was with deceased in the mine putting in a skip-road. Deceased was on the stage and witness was on the sollar. After deceased had finished screwing the runners, he gave witness the spanner and auger to carry away. He left him and went about seven feet above. When he turned round deceased and the stage had fallen. He afterwards found him on the sollar at the 30 fathom level seriously injured. In answer to Mr Pinching, witness said deceased fixed the ladder on which one end of the plank of the stage was fixed. The stage was fixed about six feet below where witness was. He could not say whether the stage was properly lashed or not. Deceased had been at work there for a fortnight or three weeks, and witness never heard him complain that the place was dangerous, nor had he complained of feeling light-headed. Did not think the ladder could have fallen without having been shifted by someone at the foot where it rested against the footway. He and deceased were the only ones at work there at the time. When witness left, the deceased had no more work to do except to shift the stage lower. He fell about twenty fathoms. - Deceased's brother said he understood deceased had made some objections to working on the stage on account of the danger. He further understood from the mine agent that the ladder was found firmly placed after the accident. - Witness said he knew nothing of that. - A Juryman asked if there was no one appointed to see that the stage was properly fixed. The Inspector: If a man is a miner he fixes his own stage. - A Juryman: Ought he not to have a "gig"? - The Inspector: No. - Henry Ayres, a miner, of Tavistock, said he was at the winch at the time, but did not move it, as he had no signal to do so. - Dawe, recalled, said the winch rope was lashed to the head of the ladder after the deceased gave him the tools to take away. - Ayres, continuing, said the rope was slack. He noticed when the accident occurred there was a "going away" of the rope which was not broken. - The Inspector said he had examined the mine and was satisfied that no blame attached to anyone, as it was deceased's business to have seen that the stage was properly lashed. The timber was all right, the plank was not broken, and the ladder would have been perfectly secure had it been properly fastened. - Ayres said the men never had any trouble in getting any timber or rope for lashing, when the required either. - Deceased's brother asked if the Jury thought a single plank was sufficient. The slightest slip and a man lost his life. - Mr Gill said the deceased could have had as many planks as he wished. - The deceased's brother: I go away from here a very dissatisfied man. - The Coroner: You must not say that. - The brother: I wish to cast no reflection on anyone. - The Foreman thought there should have been a wider platform. He knew what it was to be on a scaffold: a man was liable to slip. - The court was then cleared and after a few minutes consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The directors of the mine, through Mr Gill, have conveyed their condolences to the family and friends of the deceased man, who has left a wife and three young children.

Western Morning News, Saturday 23 May 1891 COMBEINTEIGNHEAD - THOMAS ASHFORD, aged 68, farmer, of Netherton, Coombeinteignhead, died suddenly while driving in his cart home from Newton on Thursday morning and yesterday a verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes" after Dr McDonald had attributed death to apoplexy caused by heart disease. Deceased leaves a wife and young family and the Jury gave their fees to one of the little boys.

Western Morning News, Monday 25 May 1891 EGG BUCKLAND - Fatality At Laira. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Old Laira Inn, on Saturday, respecting the death of EDWARD SUTTON, aged 7 years. Mr H. Clark, of Efford Manor, watched the case on behalf of the managers of the Laira British Schools, and Mr Woollcombe, jun., on behalf of Messrs. Martin Bros., of Lee Moor Clay Works. - Henry Osborne stated that about noon on Friday he was driving five wagons with clay from Lee Moor to the wharfs at Laira. Witness stopped outside the British Schools and cautioned the children who were coming out of school. The wagons then proceeded about twenty yards, when he heard a scream, and looking round saw deceased lying on the rails dead. - William Chapman said, in spite of Osborne's warning, deceased and two other boys jumped on the last wagon and when attempting to dismount SUTTON caught himself between a post and the wagon, and was instantly crushed to death. Mr C. Burns, surgeon, stated that deceased's chest was severely crushed, both collar bones were fractured and other parts of the head, shoulders, as well as the body were crushed and fractured. - The Jury, of whom Mr R. Brooks, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Jury exonerated the driver from all blame. Sympathy was expressed with the parents.

LONDON - Heroic Death Of A Plymouth Sailor. - Mr S. Langham, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the London City Coroner's Court, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HUNT, lately residing in George-street, Plymouth, whose body was found in the River Thames off the London Customs-House Pier, on the 21st inst. Thomas Maxwell stated that on the morning of the 21st inst., when a short distance from the Customs' House Pier in his boat he noticed the body of a man floating past and immediately seized it and rowed back to the landing stage. The deceased was afterwards recognised as WILLIAM HUNT, aged about 40 years, of Plymouth, who lost his life in endeavouring to save a comrade who had fallen off the rigging into the river. - P.S. G. Spurgeon stated that deceased jumped overboard from a ship lying off Fresh Wharf, about three weeks ago to save a comrade. - James Roberts and William Allen, able seamen, of Plymouth, identified the body and gave evidence as to how the deceased lost his life. The Coroner remarked that no doubt the body was that of the poor fellow who lost his life to save a comrade. He was a credit to the town and ort which gave him birth, and he was glad to think that such instances of gallantry and self-sacrifice were not rare in the British merchant service. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure" and added a rider expressing their admiration of the bravery and heroism shewn by the deceased in rescuing a comrade he himself was drowned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 26 May 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - JAMES NOTT, aged 67, boat proprietor, who lived by himself in Tamar Wharf Cottage, Morrice Town, was found dead in bed yesterday morning. For the purpose of keeping an appointment made on the previous evening, Mr W. H. Kessell, of Joll's Cottages, went to deceased's house yesterday morning and failed to get an answer. This led to the discovery of his death. Mr F. Everard Row was called in and stated that NOTT had been dead about twelve hours. At an Inquest held later in the day by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 28 May 1891 EXETER - At Exeter Workhouse, yesterday, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of JOHN WOTTON, aged 63, who died in the Hospital on Monday evening. MARY JANE WOTTON, wife of deceased, stated that on the evening of the 11th of May her husband, who had been afflicted with bronchitis for many years, knocked down from the bedroom. On going up she found him in his chair, with his throat cut. She asked him why he had done it, and he replied, "Because I want to get out of it." A medical man sent for stitched the wounds, and deceased was removed to the Workhouse Hospital. Dr Woodman, the medical officer, said deceased had several jagged cuts on the left side of the neck, and another in the bend of the arm, where an artery was separated and bled considerably. The man told him he was tired of so much pain. The wounds had almost healed, but deceased had gradually got weaker and death was due to chronic bronchitis, accelerated by loss of blood. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind, brought about by lengthened illness."

EXETER - A Railway Fireman Killed Near Exeter. - An Inquest concerning the death of JOHN THOMAS MARTIN, 29, fireman, killed on Tuesday, on the S.W.R. between Cowley and Exeter, was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday. Mr Foster, S.W.R., and Inspector Shattick, G.W.R. were present. - William Kemmins, engine driver, said deceased was fireman on his engine. They left Plymouth at 11.29 on Tuesday and proceeded as far as Cowley, where they were stopped by the signal in order to allow a G.W.R. train to pass. When the line was clear they went on towards Exeter, and when they had gone a short distance deceased called his attention to the fact that something was missing from the brake on the tender. Witness crossed over immediately and found that a pin was gone from the brake-block. He then went back to his own side and noticing the signals were on, sounded the whistle for them to be taken off. Just afterwards he heard a "rush," and turning round found his mate was missing. He applied the vacuum brake and stopped as quickly as possible and saw MARTIN lying on the ground. He was placed in a carriage at the rear and from Queen-street Station he was removed on a stretcher to the Hospital. There was no reason for deceased to go off the foot plate of the engine, but he might have been watching the brake block. It was not his opinion that the signal posts on the side of the line were any obstruction. - In answer to a Juryman, however, he said that if anyone leaned out over to any great extent they might be struck by them. - John Salter, passenger guard, gave evidence as to being called by the last witness and to finding deceased lying in a crouching position on the ground insensible and bleeding from the nose and mouth. - Henry Andrew, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said MARTIN was dead when brought in. There was an abrasion on the left eye, several large wounds on his left side and blood was oozing from the mouth. A depressed fracture was discovered in the region of the left temple and it extended across the base of the skull. There was considerable haemorrhage on the surface of the brain and between the brain and the skull, and several internal injuries quite sufficient to cause death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury expressing the opinion that no one was to blame.

Western Morning News, Friday 29 May 1891 BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - WILLIAM STEPHENS, aged 63 years, a miner, residing at Clearbrook, was found dead in bed by his wife on Wednesday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Skylark Inn, Clearbrook, yesterday, Mr John De Dwyer Sexton, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr William Laskey was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - BEATRICE LOOSEMORE, aged four years, daughter of ELIZABETH LOOSEMORE, 7 Watson-place, Plymouth, fell and knocked her nose on the 13th inst. Little notice was taken of it at the time, but on 17th inst. she became ill. Mr A. C. Wey, surgeon, was sent for, and the child died on Wednesday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday, Mr Wey attributed death to compression of the brain, caused by a fracture at the base of the skull, and the Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Geach was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Saturday 30 May 1891 PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Fatal Accident At Sparkwell. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Treeby Arms, Sparkwell, yesterday, respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY NELDER, aged 40. JOSIAS NELDER, nephew of deceased, stated that on Wednesday deceased, assisted by witness and a man named Collings, was at work near Venton Farm, on the Beechwood estate, felling trees which had been uprooted by the late storm. They were throwing two trees at once, as one was lying in the way of the other. They had not sawn the base of the trees through. One of the trees, being over-weighted on top, flew up, struck deceased on the chest, and hurled him fifteen feet away and almost immediately fell on him, crushing his chest and killing him instantly. The tree fell in a direction different to that which was anticipated. - Mr R. Ellery, surgeon, of Plympton, said he found the deceased's body very badly crushed, and he attributed death to internal haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and on the suggestion of the Foreman (Mr James Sandover) agreed to send a vote of sympathy and condolence, together with their fees, to the widow, who is left with several young children.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 3 June 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE -Drowned In A Tub At Stonehouse. - BESSIE JANE, aged 13 months, the only child of JOHN S. LANGMEAD, mate of the steam launch Deerhound, residing at 2 Wesley-place, Stonehouse, was drowned in a tub of water yesterday afternoon, and an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, at St. George's Hall, in the evening. The mother of the child stated that a tub of water in which her husband washed the previous day, was placed in a dark corner of the room by the side of the bed, and she had not noticed it. In the afternoon she left the child on the bed, playing with a photograph of its father, while she went into the backyard for about ten minutes to attend to the washing. When she returned she found the child in the tub face downwards, and picking it up found it was quite dead. She rushed with it to Mrs foster and a doctor was sent for. The child had been sickly from birth. Mrs Foster corroborated, and John Coote, a neighbour, who went for the doctor, said that MRS LANGMEAD had always been kind to the child. Dr W. H. Waterfield attributed death to suffocation by drowning and the Jury in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressed the opinion that the mother was careless in leaving the child alone on the bed.

Western Morning News, Friday 5 June 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquiry was held last evening by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of MARY JANE SKARDON, wife of a leading man of joiners in Devonport Dockyard of 3 Stuart-terrace, Pennycomequick. On Wednesday deceased was actively engaged in household work. Her husband, hearing a noise in the back part of the house, went into the washhouse, and there found his wife lying on the floor, where she had apparently fallen. She died about two o'clock yesterday morning and Dr Keiley, who was called in, attributed death to apoplexy, caused by a rupture of a blood-vessel in the brain. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - Public-House Brawl At Devonport. A Sad Sequel. - The circumstances attending the death of HARRIETT FORD, 56 years of age, wife of an army pensioner of 10 Cannon-street, Devonport, formed the subject of Inquiry by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, on Wednesday. - JOHN GEORGE FORD said deceased was his wife and on Monday evening about half-past nine he found her in bed and bleeding slightly from a wound behind her right ear. She told witness that Mr Bone had thrown her out of the passage. She got up the next morning, did her work and went out. She stayed out until 10.30 at night, when she retired to bed. She got up shortly before six in the morning and went about her work. A few minutes afterwards she began to scream and asked him to get her a seidlitz powder. He went for threepennyworth of best brandy and on returning in about three minutes found her in bed looking quite purple. He put the brandy to her lips but her teeth were quite closed. She was dead. - Kate Munday of 8 Queen-street, said on Monday evening she went with deceased to Bone's beer-house where deceased treated her son and witness to two pints of beer and quarrelled with him. Some conversation took place as to the woman her son was living with. He threatened if she did not be quiet he would knock her down. She became irritable and he attempted to strike her, but Mrs Bone held his hands and prevented him. He threw his cap at her afterwards. After being there ten minutes, they left by Mr Bone's persuasion. Her son would not leave the house with her and Mr Bone persuaded the son to go inside. Deceased did not go further than the door and witness remained a few minutes waiting for her. Witness saw her take up a pewter pot and threatened her son that if he struck her she would throw the pot at him. Mr Bone then put her out of the outside door, but as she would not go away, Mr Bone got a policeman to order her away. She then went into her own home. About two hours afterwards witness again saw deceased in the road near Mr Penman's public-house in the same street, about five doors from Mr Bone's. She had been crying and she had her arm up to her head, which was bleeding very much. She told witness that she had been put out of Mr Bone's house, and that she had been "shoved out on the kerbstone." On Tuesday morning she complained to witness that she felt sore all over her body. Later in the day she complained of feeling so queer that she thought she would go and lie down and she did. About half-past ten the same evening she said she felt so much pain between her two shoulders that she could scarcely breathe. A little later witness and deceased went into the Standard public-house and each had a pennyworth of ale. - WILLIAM PETER FORD, seaman belonging to H.M.S. Cambridge, said on Monday evening he met his mother, and at her request went with her to Mr Bone's public-house. He had a pint of beer; she had none. As he was about to leave, his mother asked him to have another pint of beer, and he consented. His mother and he had a few words and Mr Bone threatened to put her outside. The words he said to her were "I do not want to strike you, mother, but don't aggravate me." He attempted to strike her, but Mrs Bone prevented him. Deceased tantalised him so much that he turned his back on her. Mr Bone told deceased to go out and as she refused he lifted her by her waist out of the side-door into the passage against the door. One of their feet caught in the side of the door and Mr Bone fell forward, but saved himself from falling by withdrawing his arm from underneath her waist and she fell. He did not see on what part of the pavement she struck against. He said he thought Mr Bone dropped his mother wilfully; but on being reminded by the Coroner what he had just previously stated he withdrew the statement. - Richard Bone, landlord of the Gunwharf Inn, stated that deceased's son took up a four-legged table and said he would "bash" in her face if she did not leave him. She took up a tobacco cutter, a pewter pit and an earthenware match stand to heave at him and these were taken away from her one after another. He corroborated the evidence of the witness Munday respecting his ejecting deceased and her subsequent return about an hour afterwards. He again caught hold of her and put her out. She caught hold of the edge of the door and pulled it towards her. He pushed her out and she, having hold of the door closed it. There was a wide slab step ten to eleven inches deep between the door and the pavement, and there was ample room for her to stand on the slab clear of the door and of the street. He did not shove her violently. Much to his surprise he saw her fall and assisted her to rise, and gave her some water to drink. She was bleeding a little. She went away in company with two policeman. - By the Jury: Neither he nor deceased tripped while he was putting her out. - P.C. Westlake having given evidence, Mr J. Everard Row, surgeon, deposed as to the result of a post-mortem examination that there was a bruised wound above and behind the left ear, about half an inch long, which went down to the bone. On the right side of the brain there was a large blood clot, the pressure of which on the brain caused death. - The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Mr Bone from all blame.

Western Morning News, Saturday 6 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - MATTHIAS HEINE, aged 67, an inmate of Plymouth Workhouse lunatic ward, was found dead in bed about half-past five on Thursday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday, Mr F. Aubrey Thomas, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Moule was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, remarked that the Commissioner of Lunacy visited the house a short time ago and spoke in glowing terms of the cleanliness, kindness and attention which were shewn the patients by himself and the doctor, and also of the quality of the food.

STOKE DAMEREL - Inquiry was made yesterday by Mr J. Vaughan into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH SPEAR, 52 years of age, in the Ferry-road, Morice Town, on the previous evening. Deceased, in the employ of Messrs. James Brothers, together with a fellow-workman named Smith, hurried to catch the Torpoint ferry and placed on board two bags of cement. On returning from the ferry deceased suddenly screamed, and fell into his companion's arms and, without speaking, died a minute or two afterwards. A post-mortem examination made by Dr Gough, house surgeon of the Royal Albert Hospital, shewed that the heart was much diseased. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Deceased leaves a widow, who carries on a small business in George-street, Stonehouse.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 9 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - CATHERINE DOWNS, aged 76 years, residing at 3 Strawberry-cottages, Plymouth, fell over a stair a few weeks ago and had ever since complained of a pain in her hip. Last Monday week she was removed to the Workhouse, where she died on Sunday. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest, when Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, attributed death to shock to the system, consequent upon the injury received by the fall. The Jury, of whom Mr M. Westaway, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 10 June 1891 DARTMOUTH - The body of ROBERT GRANT, aged 67, was found floating off the Southern Embankment, Dartmouth Harbour, early yesterday morning, by a lumper named Chase. Deceased was engaged in the Newfoundland fisheries and was home on a visit, having only arrived at Dartmouth on Monday night, when he informed his nephew, William Steart, of his intention to get a bed at the Coffee Tavern. This, however, he did not do. At an Inquest held last night the Jury returned an Open Verdict, and added a recommendation to the authorities to light the town and embankment at night, since it was presumed that the deceased must have walked over the quay in the dark.

Western Morning News, Thursday 11 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - Death In Plymouth Prison. - The circumstances attending the death of MORICE CROGAN, age 19, in Plymouth Prison, was the subject of a Coroner's Inquiry yesterday. - Mr Robert Ramford, chief warder in charge of the prison, stated that CROGAN was sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour on October 6th, 1890. The whole time he was in prison his character was very good. Ever since his first months' imprisonment deceased had been employed at mat-making. - By a Juror: Deceased received no punishment of any kind. - Mr Sedley Wolferstan, medical officer, said he, when he saw CROGAN on October 6th when admitted to the prison, he was in good health. On April 6th, when he complained of feeling unwell, he was suffering from inflammatory disease of the apex of the right lung and he was put on improved diet, relieved from all work, and treated medically. On May 27th he became worse and was placed in the Hospital, where he died on Wednesday morning. The cause of death was rapid consumption. - By a Juror: The ordinary prison food was quite sufficient for deceased when well. The improved diet consisted of five ounces of meat, one pound of white bread, 1 ½ pints of new milk, eight ounces of potatoes, and 20 ounces of liquid tea daily. - By another Juror: Witness did not think deceased's lung was impaired when admitted to the prison, neither did the prison work do him any harm; in fact, it was very healthy and strengthening. (laughter). - The Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark) remarked that convicts were as well taken care of as in the adjoining establishment - the Workhouse. (Laughter). He hoped that the doctor's glowing statement of the food would not induce any of the Jury to go to prison, for, unless they were seriously ill, they would not get such good food. (Laughter). - The Jury, of whom Mr G. Webbon was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Jury asked the Coroner whether they would soon be paid for their services as Juries were in other towns. - Mr Clark said he was doing what he could in the matter, but thought the Jury should be satisfied with rendering their assistance to their country. From this view several of the Jury dissented.

STOKE DAMEREL - Sad Death Of A Pensioner At Devonport. - At Devonport Guildhall yesterday, Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, Inquired into the cause of the death of JAMES BLAKE GREY, pensioner, 67 years of age. P.C. Hosking deposed to being called that morning to 35 Chapel-street, and finding deceased lying dead in bed. The room where the body lay was situated on the ground floor and was in a very dirty state, and smelt dreadfully. The bed and bedding were in a filthy condition, and deceased's shirt was full of vermin. - Mr F. Everard Row, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said the body was excessively dirty and covered with scratch marks. In the liver, kidneys and stomach, there were evidences of alcoholism. The body was fairly nourished. Death was due to syncope, caused by his general condition. If a person in good health had remained in that room for a night he should have expected him to be very ill the next morning. - Amelia Johnson, wife of Thomas Johnson of 35 Chapel-street, deposed that deceased had boarded and lodged at her house for about six years. He was a hard drinker and about a fortnight ago was brought home drunk. She looked after his linen, when he had any. He wore the same shirt night and day for two months and never washed himself. He had laid in bed ever since Sunday. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she was unable to get deceased to be more cleanly in his habits, as he resented her interference. - Thomas Johnson, husband of the last witness, deposed that that morning he saw deceased and asked him to come out of his bedroom, outside of which he had not been for a month. In consequence of his dirty habits he gave him notice to leave, but he had been brought back again. He complained to witness of having a pain in his back, but refused to have a doctor called in, saying if that were done he should insult him and that witness would have to pay his expenses. Deceased paid £2 a month for his board and lodging. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 13 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - HARRIETT BESSIE LAUNDER, aged four months, living at 14 Vauxhall-street, Plymouth, was found dead in bed beside her mother, early on Thursday morning. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark, last evening, Mr c. Webb, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by malnutrition. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 15 June 1891 TORQUAY - Death of Lady CAROLINE HUNTLEY At Torquay. - At Heathcourt, Barton-road, Torquay, on Saturday, Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry relative to the death of LADY CAROLINE HUNTLEY, aged 80, the widow of the late SIR HENRY HUNTLEY. Deceased had for some time been living at Heathcourt, the residence of Rev. R. H. Drury, where her sister, Miss Clara Maria Drury, also lived and was in her usual health until Sunday, May 24th. On the morning of that day LADY HUNTLEY went to church and in the afternoon the two ladies had an early dinner together, after which LADY HUNTLEY went to the drawing-room and Miss Drury to her own room. An hour-and-a-half later Miss Drury upon going into the drawing-room, found her sister lying on the floor. LADY HUNTLEY said, "Come in, Clara, I have had a dreadful accident and cannot move. " Deceased also said that as she was walking from the sofa to the table she fell over a stool, that she had screamed once or twice, but could make no one hear and that she had been lying there for an hour and a half. She was lifted on to the sofa, and Dr Powell was sent for. After being confined to her bed for a day or two, she got much better, but complained of a great pain in her left side. She died at four o'clock on Thursday afternoon. - Miss Drury, Susan Short, a parlourmaid, and Mary Ann Searle, the nurse, having given evidence, Dr Powell deposed that deceased's left leg was a good deal bruised. Otherwise, making allowance for the shock of the accident she was in her usual health. She went on very well until the day of her death, which happened very suddenly and was due to failure of the heart's action. Deceased did not shew symptoms of heart disease. The shock and fall might have been a slight contributory cause. - The Coroner, in summing up, said that in the eye of the law any person whose death was hastened, however little, by any occurrence, died from that occurrence. - The Jury, of whom Mr T. Taylor was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BRIXTON - The circumstances attending the death of MABEL BUDGE, aged 17 months, whose parents live at Hartland Cottage, Brixton, were Inquired into by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, at the Foxhounds Inn, Brixton, on Saturday. Bessie Coneybeer, a neighbour, stated that on Thursday afternoon she arranged with MRS BUDGE to take the child home with her. Witness left deceased outside the door whilst she went in to wish MRS BUDGE goodbye. She was not in the house more than two minutes, and when she came out she saw deceased lying in a washing tray standing close to the door and which contained about eight inches of water. She immediately lifted her out and sent for the doctor. Mr J. B. Jacobs, surgeon, said death was caused by suffocation. Deceased was an extremely heavy child for its age and probably over-balancing itself, fell into the tray and had not sufficient strength to get out. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Barratt was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" exonerating Miss Coneybeer from all blame.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 June 1891 TAMERTON FOLIOT - FRANCES CREBER, widow, aged 58, living with her son at Whitsun Farm, Tamerton Foliott, was apparently in good health when she went to bed on Friday night, and as she was not up at six o'clock, her customary hour, next morning, her son entered her room and found her in bed dead and quite cold. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on the farm yesterday, Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon, Plymouth, who had made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to rupture of the stomach, caused by chronic ulceration. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Maddock was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

MALBOROUGH - Fatality To A Coastguard At Bolt Head. - Mr D. Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday afternoon at Bolt Head Coastguard Station into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH LITCHFIELD, a coastguardsman. Capt. W. Steer was Foreman of the Jury. - James Stipling, chief boatman, Bolt Head Station, said deceased had been a boatman attached to the same station for 2 ½ years, was 34 years of age, and leaves a widow and five children. On 10th instant LITCHFIELD was day watchman. Just before three o'clock he (witness) received a letter from Salcombe for Hope Cove, and as he got no response to his signal for deceased to come back, he went to look for him. Not finding him at the look-out house, he supposed he had been called away to Hope Cove by signal. Finding LITCHFIELD did not turn up to his tea, and that he had not been to Hope Cove, he, with another coastguard, made a thorough search of the coast, and the chief officer at Hope Cove despatched the coastguard galley along the coast. The search was continued until midnight, and resumed again at daybreak the next morning, this time being assisted by the Salcombe coastguards, both on sea and land. The search continued throughout the day without success. On the morning of the 12th he received information from the divisional officer at Salcombe that a coastguardsman had been seen by some fishermen standing on a dangerous part of the coast called the Ravages. He at once proceeded there and, finding he could not lower a man over the cliff, sent a messenger to Hope Cove. - The Coroner: Is not a rope ladder kept at the station? - Witness: No; only two life-belts and two life-lines. - The Coroner thought that on such a dangerous coast, where wrecks frequently occurred, a rope ladder should be kept at the station. - Witness, continuing, said he saw no signs on top of the cliff of a person having fallen over, but the cliff was from 200 to 300 feet high. The officer at Hope Cove sent the punt with three men, and the body of deceased was found on the rocks directly underneath the spot where he was last seen by the fisherman. Deceased was always in good health and not subject to fits. - The Coroner asked if there was any protection on that part of the coast that the coastguards patrol? - Witness said the patrol path was safe under ordinary circumstances, but if there was a gale of wind they had, of course, to be careful. The patrol path was a good distance away from the cliffs, but if a small vessel or boat got close in shore, it would be necessary for the man on duty to leave the patrol path and go out on the cliffs and there was nothing to prevent as man falling over. - William Shillabeer said LITCHFIELD relived him at the meeting first at half-past 12 on the afternoon of the 10th, and he saw nothing more of him afterwards. - Arthur Pearce, a fisherman, residing at Salcombe, said he was passing off the coast about half-past one on the afternoon of the 10th, when he saw a coastguardsman standing on a dangerous place on the cliffs at the Ravages. He was looking out over the rocks as if watching something. In a short time he went back from there, and went around a little cove place, and then came a little way down again. He beckoned him to go back, as it was a very dangerous place, and deceased held up his hand as if he understood the warning. - Robert Walker, stationed at Hope Cove, described finding the body in a crevice of the rock. It must have washed to the place where they found it, although he must have fallen close by. - James Lancy, another coastguardsman, described a search he made to find the spot where deceased fell, but after making a careful search he could find no indication whatever of the spot where the deceased struck in falling. Deceased's hat had not yet been found, but his clothing was very much torn. - Mr A. H. Twining, surgeon, said deceased's skull was badly fractured, with a portion of the brain protruding, both collar bones were broken, and one of his thighs fractured. Death must have been instantaneous. No doubt deceased fell on his head. - The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," endorsed the Deputy Coroner's opinion, that the Board of Trade should place a rope ladder at Bolt Head station.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 17 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - JOHN WILLIAM, aged eleven months, son of MARY WINGER, 26 Cambridge-lane, Plymouth, was taken ill on Thursday with whooping cough, and on Sunday appeared better. On Monday afternoon it was seized with convulsions and died almost immediately. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Dr E. B. Thomson attributed death to convulsions and the Jury, of whom Mr J. Woodcock was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 18 June 1891 TORQUAY - At Torbay Hospital last evening an Inquiry was held respecting the death of JOSEPH CHAVE, 75, carpenter, who fell on his back while walking down Market-street on Tuesday night and immediately expired. Mr A. Watson, house surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, said death was due to heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 23 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - ELIZABETH JANE TREAYS, aged fifty-seven years, living at 45 Flora-street, Plymouth, was taken very ill while out for a walk with her husband on Sunday afternoon and died shortly after arriving home. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday, Mr A. McBeath, surgeon, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Taylor was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE DAMEREL - At Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, last evening Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry touching the death of EMMA WHITE, aged 19, a teacher in the infants' department of Morice Town Board School. On Thursday evening she was proceeding up Newpassage-hill, when she was observed to stagger and reel, and fall heavily on her face and hands in the roadway. She was moved in an unconscious state to the Royal Albert Hospital where Dr Gough, the house surgeon, found her to be suffering from concussion of the brain. She afterwards improved a little, and became semi-conscious, but on Saturday evening suddenly became worse and died about nine o'clock. Mr Gough stated that there was a bruise over the left eyebrow, which might have been caused by a heavy fall. The Jury returned a verdict that death was due to Injuries to the Brain caused by the fall, and expressed their sympathy with the bereaved relatives.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 24 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - CHRISTIAN FRANKS, aged 80, living at No. 10 Ordnance-street, Devonport, who went to stay with friends at the Fortescue Hotel, Mutley-plain, on Monday, was yesterday morning found dead in bed by Julia Marshall, a domestic servant, who went to his bedroom with a cup of tea. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark, Coroner, yesterday, Dr Thomson attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 27 June 1891 WEST ALVINGTON - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquiry yesterday at West Alvington, Kingsbridge, respecting the death of ALFRED ERNEST FOALE, aged 12, who died from injuries received while working a pair of horses with a roller in a field on Gerston Farm. Deceased went out in the field to work directly after dinner, and he could not have been at work long before he slipped his foot and got under the roller, where he remained until between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. The cause of death was said to be the complete stoppage of circulation through the weight of the roller pressing on the lad for so many hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the boy's mother who has been a widow 18 months.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 30 June 1891 PLYMOUTH - At Plymouth Workhouse last evening Mr Coroner A. S. Clark conducted an Inquiry respecting the death of JANE PIKE, a widow, 82 years of age, which had occurred suddenly in that Institution. Deceased who had been an inmate of the lunatic ward of the Workhouse since 1872, was in the habit of sitting in the sun with her head uncovered, and Dr Thomas, medical officer to the Workhouse, said that death was probably due to the rupture of a blood-vessel in the brain caused by exposure. A verdict to that effect was returned.

EXMOUTH - At the Inquest held yesterday, respecting the death of the daughter, one month old, of JAMES PIM, of the Dolphin Inn, Exmouth, the mother stated that she went to bed between 11 and 12 o'clock on Friday night, and when she awoke just after seven in the morning the baby was by her side dead. It was healthy and had never had convulsions. Dr Hodgson attributed death to suffocation. The father, in reply to the Jury, said the child was not insured. A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation by being pressed against its mother's breast" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Sad Death Of A Lion Tamer. A Coroner On Debasing Amusements. Dangerous Performances Condemned. - At South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening, an Inquest was held before Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, relative to the death of THOMAS BRIDGEMAN, otherwise known as "Captain Cardono, the greatest of all lion tamers." which had occurred in the Institution that morning as a result, it was alleged, of injuries received from a lion during a performance in Bostock's menagerie at Gunnislake on Wednesday last. - ROBERT THOMAS E. BRIDGEMAN of 3 Olive-terrace, Crawford-street, Camberwell, brother of deceased, said his brother was known as Captain Cordono, and was by profession a lion tamer. He had been with Messrs. Bostock since he was a boy. He was 44 years of age. - William Henry Runse, keeper, in the employ of Messrs. Bostock, said on Wednesday afternoon last, between four and five o'clock, deceased was performing with five lions in a cage in the menagerie at Gunnislake. He made the lions jump over a bar, run round the cage and jump over his legs. After he had compelled the lions to walk round, he was trying to get a young lion into a corner, when he turned his back on a large one named Wallace, which struck him on the back with his paws, knocked him down, and bit him. A man named Reed and witness at once attacked the lion with picks and scrapers and Cardono got on to his feet, made the lions run twice round the cage and then left it, walking to his own dressing place. - By the Jury: It was customary to have hot irons ready when the beasts were at all savage, but they were not so on the occasion in question. Deceased had been fifteen or sixteen years performing with lions and had had slight scratches from the same animal before, but they were scarcely worth mentioning. The animal was still in the show, but was now in a separate cage. - Sidney Braham, manager for Messrs. Bostock, said the deceased had performed with lions for the last eight years, and had to his knowledge only received a scratch on one occasion, about ten months ago, at Newcastle. He had suffered greatly from pneumonia. - By the Jury: The proprietors did not intend to allow the same lion to be exhibited along with the others again. - Alexander W. F. Sayres, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted to the Institution on Thursday morning last. He had wounds on the left armpit and shoulder and scratches elsewhere. He was suffering from acute bronchitis, from which he died that morning. Death was accelerated by the injuries he had received. - By the Jury: He would probably have died from the bronchitis without the wounds. - The Coroner, in summing up, said he had seen the entertainment at the menagerie, and he saw nothing in it either brave or interesting. It was nothing but foolhardiness, and if they could take any steps which would tend to prevent a recurrence of such an event it would be an excellent thing. There were several other performances which suited the morbid tastes of the most depraved classes amongst the British public, but they could not take any steps with regard to them unless they were before them. There was nothing to recommend such performances to any taste. Some people might possibly be attracted by the hope of seeing a man injured; but there was nothing to recommend them to an enlightened man, and if the Jury gave a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony as to the cause of death, and added a rider, suggesting that some means should be taken to prevent such unsightly performances, they might do a great deal of good. - The Jury adopted the Coroner's suggestion, adding a rider to the following effect: - "That, in the opinion of the Jury, steps should be taken to prevent the dangerous practice of persons entering the cages of lions and other wild animals, except when absolutely necessary."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 1 July 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Suicide Of A Petty Officer At Devonport. - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, at the Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, held an Inquiry yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of ALFRED RAWLINGS, aged 39, first class petty officer, H.M.S. Aurora, serving on board the ship as sick bay steward. About ten minutes past four o'clock on Monday afternoon, Henry Harrison, first class petty officer, saw deceased in the sick bay, drink out of a glass, a black liquid. Before he drank it witness said, "Doctor, are you going to have a cough mixture?" and deceased replied, "Yes.". RAWLINGS always seemed a cheerful man. - Staff-Surgeon W. H. Patterson, stated that at about half-past four he was called to see deceased who was lying on his bed in a state of stupor. With great difficulty he aroused him and RAWLINGS told him he had taken some tincture of opium. He gave deceased some strong hot coffee and two men walked him about to prevent him going to sleep; but at six o'clock he shewed signs of collapsing. They kept him alive by artificial respiration until half-past five yesterday morning, when he died. He found a bottle (produced) which would hold one ounce of opium. The bottle must have been brought from the shore. At the beginning of June he sent deceased to the Hospital for observation, as he appeared to be suffering from the effects of drink. RAWLINGS had complained to him of domestic trouble; but had not mentioned their nature. Deceased bore a good character and had a considerable knowledge of drugs. - Alfred John Bickthorn, surgeon, R.N. Hospital, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination and found that deceased died from opium poisoning. - Jonathan Sh[?], surgeon of the Aurora, gave corroborative evidence. - The wife of deceased, in answer to the Coroner, said she was not aware of her husband having any domestic trouble, but recently he had drunk freely. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

DARTMOUTH - Fatal Fall Over A Cliff Near Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held by Mr R. W. Prideaux at Dartmouth yesterday, respecting the death of MR R. C. READE, an architect, of Torquay, who died on Monday evening, at the Cottage Hospital, from injuries received in falling over the cliffs at Willow Cove, about three miles from Dartmouth. - Mr C. E. Robinson, C.E., said he accompanied deceased to the cove on Sunday afternoon. He went into the water before deceased, and while deceased was bathing witness said he would go up the cliffs and wait for him. There was no means of getting at the cove without climbing. It was about ten minutes to four when he left deceased, and he waited on the top until about twenty minutes to six, thinking deceased might be sketching. Eventually becoming alarmed, he went down again and saw deceased lying on the rocks. His dog was about sixty feet up the cliffs, barking loudly. Witness gave deceased some brandy and water, put him in a safe position and fetched help from Little Dartmouth Farm. Miss Borrowman descended the cliffs, at great risk, and bathed deceased's head before a boat came and took him to the Cottage Hospital. Dr Soper said deceased sustained a compound fracture of the right leg, there was haemorrhage from the right ear and several scalp wounds. He died on Monday evening without recovering consciousness. In reply to a Juror and to REV. R. READE, brother of deceased, Dr Soper said a mark over the right eye was not such as would be made by a blow, but was an effusion of blood, attributable to a fall from a considerable height. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and REV. R. READE expressed his gratitude to Miss Borrowman for her kindness to his brother and the Coroner also spoke highly of her courageous and humane conduct.

Western Morning News, Monday 6 July 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - "Found Drowned" was the verdict returned on Saturday by the Jury who, with Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, investigated the circumstances attending the death of BERTIE, aged 10, the son of SERGT. W. J. STOREY, R.A., Devonport. Josias Taylor, hearing that deceased was missing, dragged in Stonehouse Pool, and found the body near fox and Eliott's timber wharf. No evidence was forthcoming as to how the unfortunate lad got into the water. Mr J. Chapman was Foreman of the Jury.

Western Morning News, Thursday 9 July 1891 CHUDLEIGH - JAMES TUCKETT, a farm labourer, 50 years of age, was, with Joseph Reed, on Monday morning engaged in a field at Chudleigh cutting thistles. About ten o'clock they stopped for lunch. TUCKETT, whilst eating bread and cheese, suddenly rolled over on his side, became unconscious and died in a quarter of an hour. Reed, thinking he was choking, did what he could to help him. At the Inquest, held yesterday, Dr Hounsell said deceased's mouth was nearly full of bread and cheese and some was in the gullet. His belief was that some of the food stuck in the throat and produced apoplexy. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 13 July 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by the Devonport Coroner (Mr J. Vaughan) on Saturday, at the Coffee Tavern, Tavistock-road, Stoke, touching the death of HERBERT EATON MORRISH, the infant son of COMMANDER J. D. MORRISH, of the Royal Naval College. The evidence shewed that the nurse saw the child on the previous night between seven and eight o'clock, and again at nine, but on going up to its cot between ten and eleven, she found the child dead. Dr Rae, who was immediately sent for, gave evidence that the child, who had been subject to convulsions, was suffocated, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 15 July 1891 PLYMOUTH - Sad Death From Drink At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, last evening held an Inquiry at the Workhouse respecting the death of THOMAS MCCOWEN, aged 73 years, a pensioner, until lately residing at 54 King-street, who died on Monday. Mr W. Laurence, grocer, residing at 54 King-street, stated that MCCOWEN had lived with him for several years as a lodger. He was a pensioner from the army, and was addicted, when he had the money, to drinking very heavily. He had been ill for some time, and was taken so much worse on Thursday that he was removed to the Workhouse. - Mrs Emma Dyke, Matron of the Workhouse, said when admitted deceased was in an unconscious state and appeared very ill. He was removed to the Hospital where after being put in bed he had a fit. He never recovered consciousness, and died on Monday. Mr A. Thomas, surgeon of the Workhouse, said that he saw deceased soon after his admittance to the Hospital. He was in a dying condition. In his opinion death was due to acute alcoholism, and which caused syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr B. Copplestone was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

NEWTON ABBOT - A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held on Monday evening on the body of a boy 3 ½ years old, named GEORGE HENRY PROWSE, son of MR J. PROWSE, pawnbroker, Newton Abbot, who accidentally fell into the river Lemon on Wednesday last whilst playing with some other children. The medical evidence proved that the child died from concussion of the brain.

MILTON ABBOT - At an Inquest held at Chillaton, near Tavistock, by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, yesterday, upon the female child of EMMA BLITHE, of which she was confined on Saturday morning last, Mr Doidge, surgeon, deposed that the child had not had a separate existence. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

PLYMOUTH - MR MARK BLACKMORE, aged 68 years, a master baker, residing at 18 Gilwell-street, Plymouth, whilst brushing his trousers at the bottom of the stairs of his home on Monday afternoon suddenly fell down and died. Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Sir Francis Drake Inn, Camden-street, when Mr G. H. Eccles, surgeon, attributed death to syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr B. Copplestone was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Thursday 16 July 1891 YEALMPTON - At an Inquest held at the Volunteer Inn, Yealmpton, yesterday, by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, respecting the death of GEORGE HOSKINGS, of Modbury. Mrs S. M. Tippett, the only passenger in deceased's van on Monday evening, stated that in ascending Kitley-hill, he attempted to get off and his foot slipping, he fell. She called out, but received no answer, but heard a groan, just as the van passed over something with a jerk. Getting out of the van, she saw deceased on the ground under the van. She remained by the horses until help came. Mr J. E. Adkins, surgeon, said HOSKINGS was quite dead when he was called to him about half-past eight on Monday evening. The ribs were badly fractured. The Jury, of whom Mr Ford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 20 July 1891 EXETER - The Fatality At Exeter City Brewery. - On Saturday afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter, relative to the death of JAMES FRASER, aged 35, who was suffocated in a vat at the City Brewery on the previous day. Mr J. E. Norman, a member of the firm, who witnessed the accident said deceased was going to test the vat was safe so that it might be cleaned out. Witness cautioned him twice, once after a candle had gone out on being placed in the vessel. Deceased, however, went down the ladder. A man named Peek, who was by, called out "He's gone," and wanted to go down after the man, but witness prevented him. When his back was turned, however, Peek went down the ladder and Mr Norman called to him to come up. Peek seemed to gasp and witness thought he too was going. He caught him by the wrist and pulled him up as far as he could and held him until a man named Pyle came to his assistance. When they got him out he soon recovered. Peek then offered to go in again with the rope tied round his waist. They let him down, but the gas soon overpowered him and they pulled him out more like a dead than a living man. Then a man named Lang volunteered to go down, but he was pulled up in the same way. Two other employees, Pyle and Stone, also tried to rescue FRASER, and the latter succeeded in putting a noose over his leg. By this means FRASER was pulled up, but he did not show any signs of life. - Dr Farrant stated that he tried artificial respiration for an hour without the slightest effect. The cause of death was asphyxia caused by immersion in carbonic acid gas. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure." They approved of the conduct of Peek, and suggested that printed notice of the danger of gas in the vats should be hung up in the brewery.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 28 July 1891 ST MARYCHURCH - Sudden Death At St. Marychurch. A Sad Case. - Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at St. Marychurch Townhall yesterday concerning the death of EMILY PACK, 44, wife of WILLIAM PACK, landlord of the Fortune of War Inn, Plainmoor. Deceased, who has for some time been subject to fits and addicted to drunken habits, went to bed on Saturday evening without supper and next morning said she did not want breakfast as she had had some brandy. Her husband then went to the bedroom, and found that a bottle of brandy, which he kept there in case of illness, had been opened, and a little of the brandy taken. He hid the bottle, but deceased found it, drank nearly half its contents and then told her husband that she had discovered it. MR PACK again removed the bottle and upon walking into the passage saw his wife kneeling on the floor with her head resting on a barrel. Thinking she was asleep he left her for a quarter of an hour and then noticing that she had ceased breathing laid her on her back thinking she was in a fit. He then bathed her face, called the servant and sent for a doctor, but found deceased was dead. She had been in the habit of drinking heavily for some time. She would go out drinking day after day, perhaps for a week and then keep quiet for a week or two. Dr Boyes said he was called to the house at midday on Sunday and found deceased dead. As the result of a post mortem examination he found that death was due to syncope. A large quantity of alcohol would cause death in the case of such a person as deceased. There were no signs of deceased having had a fit. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 1 August 1891 ERMINGTON - Mr R. Rodd, sen., held an Inquest at Burraton Farm, Ermington, yesterday, touching the death of MARY JANE HARTLEY, 48 years of age. Deceased, who had recently left Plymouth for a change of air, was taken suddenly ill at the farm on Wednesday evening and died. Mr Atkins, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease and a verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 3 August 1891 ST MARYCHURCH - An Inquest was held at St. Marychurch, by Mr S. Hacker, in respect of ARTHUR SMITH, 52, a potter, of Broad Park-terrace. After leaving his work on Friday deceased went to the Commercial Inn and while sitting in the bar complained of being ill and died in a few minutes. Dr Boyes said death was due to failure of the heart's action, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY - Mr Hacker, Coroner, afterwards held an Inquiry at the Torbay Inn, Torre, into the death of ELIZA CHALMERS, 79, wife of the REV. T. S. CHALMERS, retired Nonconformist minister, of Rowley, Vansittart-road. On the 15th July the deceased, who had for some time suffered from heart disease and been a confirmed invalid, went to her bedroom and upon her husband going to the room shortly afterwards he found her lying on the floor, with her face bleeding as the result of a fall. On the following day deceased complained of pains in the left arm and Dr Powell, who was then called, found that the arm was fractured. She died on Friday, death being due to old-standing heart disease, accelerated by the shock of the accident. Verdict, "Accidental Death".

STOKE DAMEREL - The Fatal Accident At Devonport. - At the Military Hospital, Stoke, on Saturday, Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry respecting the death of Deputy-Surgeon-General GEORGE ELMSLY WILL, principal medical officer of the Western District, who died at the age of 56 from injuries the result of a fall from a horse under circumstances already reported. - Ernest William Harrison, insurance agent, of 9 Duke-street, Devonport, said a few minutes before one o'clock on Thursday he was proceeding from Devonport to Millbridge, and when near the entrance to the tunnel of the London and South-Western Railway saw deceased riding towards the Station Hospital. The horse was then going very quietly. When the deceased got to the opening leading towards St. Michael's-terrace the hose was a little stubborn, and wanted to go in the direction of St Michael-s-terrace. Deceased wished to turn it round and the horse began to "buckjump." The horse's head faced south, and had advanced six or seven yards up the road towards St Michael's-terrace. The rider at last got him back into the main road, and then the horse began to gallop suddenly towards Fellowes-place, and got out of witness's sight. Witness ran after it, and when he reached Stoke Church he saw deceased being brought by several men up the hill towards him. Deceased was holding the stirrup leather in his hand all the time he saw him, but whether it was broken or not witness could not say. He noticed after the horse had bolted and gone sixty or seventy yards that deceased's right foot was not in the stirrup; the left foot was in. In plunging, the horse turned the corner so sharply as to come in contact with the kerbstone and then the officer got it into the centre of the road and it bolted. - James Hall, joiner in H.M.'S Dockyard, of 20 Hotham-place, Millbridge, said he was at the bottom of Stoke Church-hill when he observed facing him a gentleman on horseback rushing at headlong speed down the hill. The horse passed close by him and swerved to the left towards Wilton-street. When about 12 feet from the main road he saw deceased slipping off the horse very gradually, as if to escape from it on its right side. He fell on his back, free and unencumbered by any stirrup, across the road, with his head towards the horse, and rolled over two or three times in the direction the horse was going. Blood issued very freely from his nose. The horse did not kick him or step on him. Deceased did not pitch on the front or top of his head, but the back fell as heavily as any part of the body. Help immediately arrived and deceased was removed to the Hospital. - Sergt. H. W. Mosely, M.C.S., said while in Valletort-road he saw deceased turn the corner sharply from the bottom of Stoke-hill. The rider fell by the crossing and to the right side of the horse, which continued its course in a straight direction. He waved his hat in its face, turned it on one side and caught it. He returned at once with the horse to officer's assistance. (The right stirrup was produced for the Jury's inspection, and was seen to be completely worn out.) From the appearance of the ground, witness was of opinion that deceased was dragged about seven yards. - Sergeant Arthur George Ford, M.S.C., said deceased was brought to the Hospital about one o'clock. His death too place some minutes afterwards; Surgeons Nicholas and Atkins being present. - The Coroner having remarked that he never called medical evidence unless it was absolutely necessary and that he did not consider there was any need to do so in the present case, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The funeral is arranged to take place at Milehouse on Wednesday afternoon.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 4 August 1891 PLYMPTON - Suicide On The Railway At Plympton. - The circumstances attending the death of MAJOR H. CHAMBERLAYNE SMITH, late assistant-commissary-general of the Commissariat Department, was investigated by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr B. Maddick was Foreman, at Plympton yesterday. - Mr R. Ellery, M.R.C.S., stated that deceased, who was 65 years of age, and had suffered from sunstroke while in India, lived with him from 1880 to 1884 as a patient. Although a little peculiar in his manner at times, he enjoyed excellent health. In 1884 deceased left Ridgway for London, and witness did not see him again until last Wednesday, when at MAJOR SMITH'S request he visited him at Dartmouth. Deceased then said he was suffering from lowness of spirits and inability to sleep. They had supper together, and the MAJOR appeared to be in better spirits on retiring. Deceased returned with him to Ridgway. On Saturday witness proposed to drive deceased into Plymouth, and he (deceased) left the house at ten o'clock in the morning to visit, as he said, some favourite spots. that was the last time witness saw him alive. His right leg was severed, and the skull fractured, the latter being sufficient to cause death. - William Hoskin, a ganger employed on the line, stated that about half-past ten on Saturday morning he found deceased standing on the line near Stuggy-bridge, and, as he was trespassing, inquired his name and address, which he gave correctly and then moved away. Witness reported him for trespassing. - Samuel Jones, driver of the engine which ran into deceased, said he saw the MAJOR standing near the line near Stuggy-bridge. He twice attempted to cross, but appeared to shrink from so doing. Witness blew his whistle, and shouted. As deceased did not move, witness's mate said, "Whoa, mate," and deceased at that moment deliberately placing himself in front of the train, witness at once put on the brake, and when the train stopped it was found that the deceased had been dragged some distance. Death must have been instantaneous. Information was conveyed to Mr Wills, the station-master, and the body removed. Witness went on with the train, but Hocking, the guard, remained behind with the body. - James Moore, stoker, corroborated. - John Abraham Hocking, guard, stated that he saw the deceased when the train was several hundred yards off. He appeared to be about to cross the line, but hesitated. There was plenty of time for him to cross before the train was near. Twice he put out his right foot and drew it back again, but when the train was quite near he stepped on the track. The train was stopped but not before deceased had been dragged several yards. On the arrival of P.C. Cridland the body was conveyed to the Station, and subsequently to the residence of Dr Ellery. - The Jury in a few minutes returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," adding that no one connected with the railway was to blame.

Western Morning News, Saturday 8 August 1891 EXETER - WILLIAM FURZE was seen by two boys to walk into the Exeter Canal on Wednesday, after leaving his hat on the bank, and his body was found on the following day. At an Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

BRIXHAM - At an Inquest held at Brixham yesterday, respecting the death of WILLIAM EALES, drowned in Torbay on Bank Holiday, by the capsizing of a small pleasure boat, the young man Dyer, who was in the boat with the deceased at the time, stated that the sheets of both sails were belayed. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 10 August 1891 BERE FERRERS - WALTER CHAMPION PEARCE, aged two and a half years, was playing in the road near his home in Frog-street, Beeralston, on Thursday evening when a horse and trap driven by a farmer, named T. Channon, came along at a slow pace. The child getting close to the horse was knocked down and died within a short time. The driver did not see the child until the accident had occurred. At the Inquest held on Saturday by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, Mr R. Hill, surgeon, attributed death to concussion of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr R. Manneford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 11 August 1891 DARTMOUTH - Boating Accident At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held yesterday at Dartmouth by Mr R. W. Prideaux, Coroner, on the bodies of WILLIAM CHARLES DENNING and SIDNEY HAWKINS, who were drowned in the harbour on the previous day. Warrant-Officer Case, H.M.S. Britannia was present. - Mr W. G. DENNIN, steward of H.M.S. Britannia, said DENNING was his son, 26 years of age, and was a cadet's servant on the Britannia, while HAWKINGS was a warrant-officer's cook belonging to the same ship. HAWKINGS lodged with his (witness's) son. They left home at half-past six on Sunday morning. - Charles Screech said he saw DENNING sailing from the moorings about twenty minutes to seven on Sunday morning. He came alongside the Gasworks Steps and took in HAWKINGS. - Edward Hayman deposed to seeing both deceased shift their seats to tack, when a "puff" struck her, and she capsized. Witness gave the alarm to a man named Binham, who went off in a launch, but it was too late. A lad named Wilcox also went off. Wilcox was also present when the boat was picked up, and saw that the mainsheet was made fast. Evidence as to finding the bodies was given by P.C. Launder and John Dennis. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The funeral will take place on Thursday. The local Rechabite tent, to which both young men belonged, have charge of the arrangements.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner for the Borough of Plymouth, held two Inquests yesterday. The first related to ELIZA MILLER, aged 34 years, residing at 26 Anstis-street, and was held at Warne's Hotel, Neswick-street. MR RICHARD MILLER, deceased's husband, stated that whilst they were walking on Sunday evening between Smeaton Tower and the Armada Memorial she was suddenly taken with a pain in her head and began vomiting. After a minute or two she said the pain had passed. They then walked on slowly for a short distance, when she was again taken with vomiting and fell on her knees before he had time to catch her and expired. A police constable who was near sent for Dr Pearce, and with assistance deceased was carried to the Hoe Lodge. Dr Pearce on arriving administered restoratives, but without effect. By the order of the Coroner he made a post-mortem examination and attributed death to extreme disease of the valves of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr Richard Percy was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquiry was held at the Workhouse. Mr E. G. Dyke, the master, stated that HENRY GLYNN, aged 41, hawker, residing at 111 King-street, Plymouth, was admitted. Seeing how ill he was, he had him carried to the Infirmary, and sent for the house surgeon, Mr Thomas, but GLYNN died ten minutes after his admission and before the arrival of Mr Thomas. A post-mortem examination shewed that death was due to acute pleurisy, with effusion. The Jury, of whom Mr Vincent was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 15 August 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - JAMES BAXTER, 36, sailmaker, lately residing at 13 East-street, Stonehouse, died suddenly while in bed early yesterday morning. A post-mortem examination made by Mr W. H. Waterfield shewed that BAXTER had died from a rupture of the heart, a large clot of blood completely filling up the cavity of that organ. Deceased had been invalided from the Royal Navy with rheumatism and indigestion about eighteen months ago. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. A Juryman called attention to the offensive condition of the corpse, the room being only 13 feet in length. The Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd) said that the friends of the deceased objected to the post-mortem examination being conducted at the mortuary, but he would direct the police to have the coffin screwed down immediately, and the funeral would take place on the next day. He was very much obliged to the Juryman, but he had already provided against the possibility of a nuisance to the other tenants of the house.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 18 August 1891 PLYMPTON - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday on the body of MR JOHN LAVERS, foreman of the carpenters engaged on the Saltram Estate, who resided at Merafield, near Plympton. The deceased had suffered from indigestion very acutely for some time and on Thursday was in so much pain that he consulted Dr Ellery. On the following morning, about 6.30, he was in severe pain, but on coming down from his bedroom at about 10.30 he told his daughter-in-law, MRS ELIZABETH LAVERS, that he was feeling better. Just afterwards he was seen to lean forward in the chair and after breathing heavily for a short period, expired, before medical assistance could be summoned. He was sixty years of age and had been employed on Lord Morley's estate for a great number of years. The ultimate cause of death was syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr F. Phillips was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 19 August 1891 TORQUAY - At Torbay Hospital, Torquay, yesterday, Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of EDWIN CHARLES WILLS, aged 4 years, who with his father, a London postman, had been staying at 18 Bronshill-crescent. At seven o'clock on Saturday evening deceased was put to bed and ten minutes later his aunt, hearing screams, ran up to the bedroom and found the child in flames, and matches, which had been left in a box on the mantelpiece, were strewn on the floor. Deceased, who was badly burnt about the legs, chest and left arm, was removed to the Hospital, where he died in great agony at one o'clock on Sunday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 20 August 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry respecting the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY STACEY, a baker, aged thirty-one years, was held yesterday at the Eagle Tavern, Coxside, Plymouth, by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr Endicott was Foreman. Deceased lived with his sister at 7 Sutton-road, and was with her in the parlour on Tuesday, when he left her to go upstairs. Shortly afterwards she heard a fall on the floor and called Thomas James Luscombe, who found deceased with his throat cut from ear to ear, and apparently very deep. Dr Dutton was fetched, but ere he could come STACEY died. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 21 August 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Drinking And Its Results. Inquest At Devonport. - Mr Albert Gard, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Ferry Hotel, Morice Town, yesterday respecting the death of HENRY KINSMAN, the five-months-old child of JAMES KINSMAN, waterman, 16 Tamar Wharf. MARY JANE KINSMAN, the mother, having been told that she need not give any evidence likely to incriminate herself, deposed that about eleven o'clock on the previous night she and her husband went to bed. She nursed the child, which was lying on her left hand, between herself and her elder boy, aged four. The child appeared to be all right and went to sleep. At two o'clock witness awoke, and found that the child, which was on its side, was dead. She immediately sent for Mr Rae, surgeon. About half-past three on Wednesday afternoon witness returned home with the child in her arms. She had had a few glasses of beer, but knew what she was about. As she was coming up the stairs her foot caught in her dress and she fell. The child fell and its head struck against the side wall, causing a wound on the face. No one witnessed the accident but herself. The wound on the child's face did not bleed very much and it appeared to be all right. She put the child to bed at seven o'clock and went out, leaving the child in charge of Mrs Rockey, a neighbour. She returned home about half-past ten. - The Coroner: What state were you then in? - Witness: Well, I had a good deal of drink in me. I was not then sober. I did not know what company I was in. When I have drink in me I am half mad, and do not know what I am about. this will be a warning to me. I undressed myself and went to bed properly. - JAMES KINSMAN, husband of the last witness, said his wife came home about half-past three. She had been drinking. She had the child in her arms, and fell down. He took the child from her and gave it to Mrs Rockey and then went out of the home. About nine o'clock he met his wife at a public-house. They remained together about half-an-hour, had "a glass" each, and returned home together. His wife was under the influence of liquor at half-past ten. - Mary Jane Rockey said witnesses had made a mistake as to the time. When MRS KINSMAN came home with the child it was five and not three o'clock. MR KINSMAN brought her the child, which had a little blood running down its face. She took it to her room and gave it a little warm milk. She kept it until seven o'clock when she took it to MRS KINSMAN'S room. MRS KINSMAN, who had been drinking, went out of the house shortly afterwards, leaving the child in bed. Witness went in the room again, and found the child bright and cheerful. - Mr G. A. Rae, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, said there was a superficial abrasion of the right temple, such as would be caused by the child falling against masonry, but it was not sufficiently severe to cause death. There were external indications of convulsions and asphyxia. The lungs and heart presented the conditions usually found in cases of death from asphyxia, and he formed the opinion that the child had died from suffocation, probably caused by being overlaid by the mother. - The Coroner said the evidence had disclosed a pitiable state of things in respect to the drinking habits of the mother. What had occurred was very discreditable to the husband, who, knowing that his wife was in an unfit state to take care of the child, made no inquiry as to the injury it had received, and on meeting his wife later on connived at her drinking habits by drinking with her instead of at once taking her home. He would leave them to form their own conclusions as to whether the mother was in a fit state to nurse the child. He did not see that it was a case of manslaughter, but if the evidence had been a little stronger, the mother might have been before the magistrates on the following morning on that charge. - MRS KINSMAN, sobbing bitterly: I will not touch drink any more. It would not have occurred if it had not been for the drink. - The Jury found that the child died from Suffocation, and in a rider severely censured the father and mother for their conduct. - The Coroner severely upbraided the father for what had occurred, and advised both him and his wife never to touch drink again.

BIDEFORD - Strange Case of Drowning At Bideford. - Mr J. F. Bromham, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Newfoundland Hotel, Bideford, last evening, into the death of RICHARD HENRY COLE, a boy, drowned in the river Torridge last Thursday under somewhat strange circumstances The body was seen floating in the river above Bridge by Charles Beer, a labourer, yesterday morning, and he brought it ashore. HENRY COLE, deceased's father, is a bargeman, and when the boy was not at school he accompanied his father in the barge. On Thursday morning of last week the barge left with COLE, his boy, Robert Bowden, and a friend of his named Wallis, of Swansea. Their destination was the Watch-house, Appledore, to discharge gravel. After discharging the cargo the men went ashore leaving the boy on board. Returning at about eight o'clock in the evening they weighed anchor for the return journey. The boy was helping, and pulled up the foresail. The wind was blowing considerably at the time, and the sail flapped considerably before it filled. The father was at the helm, and soon after starting asked where his son was, and Bowden, who it is said was not quite sober, replied "below." It was quite a common thing for the boy to go in the forecastle to sleep when on late trips and the father felt quite easy about him. When they arrived at Bideford at about 10 o'clock, however, and Bowden went to the forecastle to wake the boy it was discovered that the boy was not on board. COLE believed the boy was knocked overboard by the foresail. Greatly alarmed he sprang ashore at the quay and rushed to tell his wife. He did not think of informing the police until they came and spoke to him about it. There was some suspicion amongst the Jury that COLE might have been chastising the boy, and that in fear of worse to come he had deliberately jumped overboard; but the evidence of Bowden, though somewhat confused, was clear that the poor lad had not been treated unkindly. The strange feature of the case is that although the barge is so small, neither of the men heard a cry or a splash. It was elicited by the Jury that no one saw the boy haul up the foresail, but that they presumed he must have done so, as none of the others did. The majority of the Jury, after much discussion, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." William Braund, the thirteenth Juror, thought there was no evidence to warrant such a verdict. The Jury gave their fees to the Dispensary.

Western Morning News, Saturday 22 August 1891 SOUTH BRENT - Fatality At Brent. - An inquest was held at Elwell farmhouse, Brent, yesterday, respecting the death of JOHN FAIRCHILD, who was killed in the Avonwick cutting of the Kingsbridge railway Mr C. Harris was Foreman of the Jury. - W. Hy. Sanders, foreman of works, said deceased was boring a hole, for blasting about 8ft. from the ground, when the whole mass of earth above and below him, suddenly gave way, without the slightest warning. Witness was within six feet of deceased and only just escaped the "fall," which comprised several hundred tons of earth and stones. The deceased was buried about three quarters of an hour before he could be found. It was supposed that a large stone overtook him as he was trying to escape as one leg was badly crushed. Such slips of earth are of frequent occurrence, and no rule is laid down as to the manner of cutting such banks of earth. It was left entirely to the discretion of the foreman. It was thought that the recent heavy rains had much to do with the dislodgement. - Mr Relf, the contractor, said the work was being done in the usual manner. Asked if the banks could not be "sloped " at the same time the "gullet " was being cut, he said it was impossible: the gullet must be cut first, leaving the perpendicular sides to be removed afterwards. - Dr Gillard said the deceased died from suffocation. - The Jury, who visited the scene of the accident, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was a steady and respectable man, and leaves a wife and young family, another child being daily expected. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

TAMERTON FOLIOT - BERTHA VANSTONE, aged two-and-a-half years, living at Broadley Farm, Tamerton Foliott, was taken ill on Tuesday and died on Wednesday morning and yesterday Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Lopes Arms, Roborough. The evidence of her father shewed that on Monday the child ate a large quantity of ripe gooseberries. Mr C. J. Mansel, surgeon, attributed death to English cholera, caused by eating gooseberries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TOTNES - Shocking Accident At Totnes. A Man Crushed To Death. - About noon yesterday three men in the employ of Mr Richardson, the lessee of Totnes Racecourse, were unloading a bulk of timber weighing about a ton from a truck on the Totnes Tramway, when the timber, very slippery owing to the heavy rain, suddenly slipped and slid towards the men. Pomeroy and Bunclark who were on the line, stooped and just saved themselves, the bulk crushing Pomeroy's hat. HENRY WHITEWAY, of Totnes, who was on the truck, was caught by the bulk and crushed between it and the next truck. The trucks were parted as quickly as possible, and deceased fell to the ground. When picked up he was just breathing and was conveyed to the railway station. Dr Smith was soon in attendance, but the poor fellow was then quite dead. Deceased was fifty-four years of age, and leaves a widow and grown-up children. Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest last evening, Mr E. L. Middleton being Foreman of the Jury. William Pomeroy gave particulars of the accident. The balk was 35 feet and weighed about a ton. In reply to the Foreman, witness said deceased and the others were perfectly sober. - Charles Bunclark corroborated. Deceased appeared to be alive when taken up, he groaned twice, but never spoke after he was released. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and handed their fees to the widow.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 25 August 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by the Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr Clark) at the Guildhall last evening, into the death of JAMES FARLEY, residing at 5 Hastings-street, aged 60, whose body was found floating in Sutton Harbour, North Quay, on Sunday afternoon. JOHN HENRY FARLEY identified the body as that of his father and stated that he was a general labourer employed by the Plymouth Corporation. He last saw him alive on Saturday afternoon last about 3 p.m. John Demellweek, aged ten years, the son of a fisherman, residing at 32 Woolster-street, Plymouth, stated that whilst walking on the quay with a companion about 1.15 p.m. he saw the body floating and ran to the Harbour Avenue police station and fetched P.C. Bennett with the ambulance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 26 August 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident At Keyham. The Inquest. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, into the cause of death of CHARLES DEMPSEY, aged 20 years, a second-class stoker stationed at the Keyham Barracks. Mr Gameson appeared for Mr J. J. E. Venning, (Venning and Goldsmith, Devonport), to watch the case on behalf of the Admiralty. - John Chadwick, petty officer at the Royal Naval Barracks, said on Monday he was in charge of a wagon taking provision chests and hammocks from Royal Naval Barracks to Keyham yard. There were twelve stokers and thirty steaming party engaged to draw the wagon. The wagon was not full. Deceased was one of the party, and was pulling one of the drag ropes. In going down the incline the wagon took charge. There was a shoe attached to the wagon, but being told it was not required it was not applied. Deceased was in front of the wagon. Witness could not say whether the rope tripped him up or whether he tripped over the edge of a grass plot. The wheels of the wagon passed over him. He was picked up and conveyed to the sick bay. - Corporal Tyson was recalled, and stated that he told Chadwick not to apply the brake, because the incline was so slight and the wagon only partly loaded. - Mr John P. Coolican, surgeon, R.N., said he saw deceased on the morning in question in the consulting-room at the Royal Naval Barracks. He was then in a state of profound shock and nothing could have saved him, and he died in about a quarter of an hour. The cause of death was shock caused by internal injuries. - The Jury, of whom Mr Wm. Huntley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Corporal Tyson and John Chadwick from blame.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident Near Ivybridge. - Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, held an Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening into the cause of death of WILLIAM NORRIS, aged 29 years, an engine-driver, residing at Cornwood, who was found by the side of the railway between Cornwood and Ivybridge, on his back with his head towards the rails. - Henrietta Minifey, mother of the deceased, stated that she last saw him about a fortnight ago, and he was then a total abstainer, but some time before that he had given way to intemperance. - Daniel Wedlake, an engine driver, who was proceeding with a goods train from Millbay to Brent, proved finding the body of a man apparently dead by the side of the railway with his head towards the rails. He at once stopped the train, and found deceased was not dead, but unconscious. They then put him on the train and took him to Ivybridge Station, placed him in the waiting-room and sent for Dr Rendle. On his arrival he at once sent him by a pilot engine to Plymouth, and subsequently to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Mr A. W. F. Sayres, assistance House Surgeon to the Hospital, stated that deceased was suffering from several scalp wounds. Death in his opinion was due to concussion of the brain. - The Jury returned a verdict that Death was due to Injuries received to the Head.

Western Morning News, Thursday 27 August 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held last evening by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, into the cause of death of THOMAS SPILLER, aged 79 years, residing at 3 Gibbons-lane, carpenter. THOMAS IRONS SPILLER, son, stated that he lived with his father. On Tuesday when he was going to bed he was called by his mother who said that deceased was dying. He immediately ran back into the room and held his father up when he expired. Mr Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, due to senile decay. The Jury of whom Mr Richard Lavis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 29 August 1891 EXMOUTH - The Fatal Explosion At Exmouth. Adjourned Inquest. A Defective Tube. - The adjourned Inquiry respecting the deaths of SAMUEL GILLETT, WILLIAM TAYLOR, GEORGE MOSS and GEORGE ESCOTT, killed by the explosion on board the steamer Beaver, on Monday last, at Exmouth, took place yesterday. Mr Vine, solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the owners of the vessel, Messrs. Carter Brothers, and Company, Exmouth. Mr C. W. Williams appeared for the Board of Trade. - The Coroner mentioned that though the Inspector from the Board of Trade was present, he had been instructed by the authorities not to give evidence, but to render any assistance required by the Jury. They would agree with him (the Coroner) that it was essential that he should do so in such an important case. - John Carter, managing owner of the Beaver, said the vessel was launched in January 1890. About a month since she was inspected by Mr Bodley, of the firm of Taylor and Bodley, Exeter, who made a report. She was also inspected in November 1890 by a consulting engineer, who reported on the condition of the hull and boiler. The boiler had also been tested at Lloyd's to 160th steam pressure. The machinery was periodically cleaned and no defects had been reported. Mr Bodley repaired certain parts of the steamer about a month since. - Alfred Bodley said when the engine was inspected by his boiler-maker on the 22nd July last two small leakages found in the boiler were repaired. At the request of the owners he inspected the engine shortly after the accident, and found that the water had blow out of the boiler down as low as the scalding-off cock, which was partially opened and the hose attached. There was no fire in the port furnace, it having been blown entirely out by the force of the explosion. The port combustion chamber and the furnace tube on the top row was collapsed for some considerable distance on the under-side, commencing about 5 inches from the aft end. The tube should contain no water and was for gas only. The effect of the tube collapsing would be that a great rush of steam would pass from the tube into the engine-room. The other tubes were in perfect order. The safety valves were slightly in excess of the reputed weight. His opinion was that the condensed water contained oxygen and this, with the free acid induced from the lubricating matters in the engine, corroded the tube and reduced its thickness to 1-20th of an inch; hence its weakness and collapse. - Mr Williams (Board of Trade Inspector) pointed out that the tube was the thinnest in the boiler. It seemed to be an odd one. - Mr Bodley, in answer to the Jury: The standard measure of the tube was No. 11, and it should be 1/8th of an inch thick. The other tubes in the boiler varied from No. 5 to No. 8. There was no reason why they should differ in thickness. The tube had been thinned by oxidation, which was the cause of the accident. The pressure on all the tubes was the same. - The Coroner remarked that the difference in the size of the tubes certainly called for explanation. - Mr Peters (a Juror) said the only explanation was that the surveyor at Lloyds had not done his duty. - Mr Bodley, continuing: The certificate given from Lloyds was the highest of its class. If the tube had been a No. 5 the explosion would not have occurred. - William Cooke, consulting engineer, of Liverpool, said he examined the Beaver in May 1890 for Mr R. Thompson, of London, the then owner. He inspected the stays in the upper part of the boiler and certain alterations he then recommended were carried out. He again examined it in November last, when Messrs. Carter had become the owners. The vessel had been stranded, and his instructions were to reinstate the vessel, in order that it should retain its class in Lloyd's register. He reported that there was considerable damage, which would take some time to repair. Lloyd's surveyor, the chief engineer, and himself examined the boiler, and they found that it had suffered no damage from the accident. They did not make any special examination of the size of the tubes as the vessel was nearly new, and they would not do so unless it failed to perform its duties. The tubes should be of uniform size. The corrosion around the collapsed tube had been much more rapid than usual, and it would have a very serious effect. It was what they called "rapid action locally." The tube in its original thickness was quite sufficient to bear the pressure required of it, but there was no doubt it had crept in through someone's negligence. - By Mr Vine: Many vessels were going about with tubes quite as thin, and if the local action had not settled so heavily upon the tube it would have gone on all right. The tube came quite up to Lloyd's standard, but the others were heavy. - Harry W. Wilkins, Lloyd's surveyor and ship engineer, Plymouth, said his instructions were to report to Lloyd's Committee, from whom the Coroner could get any information he required. He did not intend giving evidence. - The Coroner reminded him that he had power to commit him if he refused to give evidence. - Mr Wilkins was then sworn, and said he inspected the boiler and tubes on the previous day, and found them in good condition, with the exception of the damage done to the one tube. He believed it was made of different material to the other tubes, but that was a very common thing in ships and boilers. It might have been a very good one when put in, but having "gone" on the other side, the engineer had no chance of finding it out. It was not good workmanship, and he should not have passed it himself. - By Mr Vine: He should not think of examining the tubes within a period of four years from the last inspection. - Richard Harris, boiler-maker, in the employ of Taylor and Bodley, Exeter, stated that he examined the boiler on the 27th July last, and found it in good working order. He did not test the strength of the tubes, as he did not consider it was his duty. He sounded some of them with a hammer, but could detect nothing wrong. - Frank Lockyer, formerly second engineer on board the Beaver, tendered himself as a witness, and deposed that he left the vessel a month previous as he was afraid to remain in her. The statement of the captain that he was drunk was a lie. He gave notice to leave to Mr John Carter, his reason for doing so being that the safety valve was "stuck"£ at 170lb. pressure and was defective. - Mr John Carter: I ordered the witness off the ship when he was intoxicated. - Witness: Another lie. He did not complain to the captain, but told the chief engineer, who said he would attend to it when they got into port. - Mr Bodley (recalled) said he examined the valves, and neither of them were "stuck." - Mr Williams (Board of Trade) also said the valve was not "stuck." - Captain Carter said the safety valve was never higher than 148lb pressure whilst Lockyer was on the ship. - Lockyer: it's a lie. - Captain Carter: The log-book will prove it. No complaint was made to me about the safety valve, the key of which was in my possession. - The log-book (produced) shewed that the highest pressure of the valve during the time Lockyer was on board was 145lb. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and found that the explosion was due to a defective tube, but they were unable to attach the responsibility to any individual.

Western Morning News, Monday 31 August 1891 BERE FERRERS - THOMAS WIVELL, aged 37, was working at the Rumleigh Clay Works, Bere Ferrers, on Friday, when a lump of clay weighing about 3 cwt. fell away, striking him in the back and partially burying him. Shortly after being taken out he died. At the Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, on Saturday, SAMUEL WIVELL, deceased's brother, said deceased knew his work very well. John Henry Bond, who was working with deceased gave an account of the accident, and Mr Rowland Hill, surgeon, attributed death to shock. The Jury, of whom Mr James Longman was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 1 September 1891 BUCKFASTLEIGH - The Coroner's Inquiry respecting the death of the wife of MR STEER, the gardener at Bigadon, Buckfastleigh, who drank a wine glass full of weed killer on Saturday resulted in a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane." Mr R. Chaff was Foreman of the Jury.

STOKE DAMEREL - Two Inquests were held by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday. The first was concerning the death of JOHN BLAKE, age 75, a pensioner from the Devonport Police Force. Deceased was taken ill on Sunday evening and died before medical assistance arrived. Mr E. C. Wilson, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, found the heart to be very fatty. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - The second Inquiry related to the death of WILLIAM QUANCE, butcher, 53 years of age. On Sunday evening Mrs gibbons who lived in the same house as deceased, heard a heavy fall in MR QUANCE'S room, and proceeding there, found deceased lying on the floor, face downwards, and bleeding slightly from his nose and a wound on the forehead. Mr E. C. Wilson, who was called in, pronounced life extinct. Having made a post-mortem examination, he came to the conclusion that death was due to heart disease, from which deceased had suffered for a long time, and not to the fall. The Jury found a verdict to that effect.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident Near Ivybridge. - An Inquiry was held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, last evening, respecting the death of JOHN HENRY TURNER, aged 47 years, lately residing at Woodland, Ivybridge, a labourer employed by Pearson and Sons, contractors for the doubling a portion of the Great Western Railway - Eli Croker, labourer, engaged by Pearson and Son, residing at Leemill, Plympton St Mary, stated that deceased was acting as ganger of men laying sleepers on the new viaduct at Bittaford. Finishing that work, they returned to the end. Deceased alone crossed from the new viaduct to the old, a span of from 15 to 20 feet, by a batten 9 inches wide. There really ought to have been two battens there. Hearing cries, witness looked round and found that deceased had fallen from the batten to the turnpike-road beneath, a distance of 40 feet. On going down to him deceased asked to be put into a cart which was near. This was done, and he was taken to Ivybridge, where Dr Randle ordered his removal to the S.D. and E.C. Hospital. Mr A. W. F. Sayres, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that deceased was admitted there on Saturday afternoon suffering from extreme shock. Both thighs were broken and one rib was fractured. Deceased died on Sunday. A post-mortem examination shewed that death was due to internal haemorrhage and severe shock. - The Inquiry was adjourned until this evening to enable the Jury to view the scene of the accident. Mr Grinner represented the contractors.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 September 1891 EXETER - MR PETER WESTERN, an Exeter butcher, died suddenly from heart disease on Monday night and at an Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner for Plymouth Borough, and the Jury to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN HENRY TURNER, 47, who, at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, on Sunday, succumbed to injuries received by falling from Bittaford viaduct, near Ivybridge, on Saturday, journeyed to the scene of the accident yesterday afternoon. Returning to Plymouth Guildhall, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, Messrs. Pearson and Sons, contractors, being exonerated from all blame. On the motion of the Foreman (Mr Southern) a vote of thanks was passed to Mr Compton traffic superintendent Great Western Railway, Plymouth, for providing a special train for the Jury.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 September 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - Mysterious Death Of A Naval Surgeon. Inquest At Stonehouse. - At the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of Surgeon EDWARD THOMAS COOK, of H.M.S. Speedwell, who was found in an unconscious state on Saturday morning in the mail train which arrived at Millbay Station shortly before five o'clock and who expired three hours afterwards at the Hospital. Mr G. H. Gameson (Venning and Goldsmith) represented the Admiralty. Mr John Mooney was chosen Foreman of the Jury. No evidence was given which threw any light on the mysterious affair, and the Inquiry was adjourned for the production of two letters found on deceased, and also to hear other evidence. Several Jurymen intimated that they would have liked to ask the lieutenant of the ship if he could inform them what reasons deceased gave when he asked for leave, but could not do so as witness left the court immediately after giving his evidence. - Arthur Hearle Tremayne, lieutenant of H.M.S. Speedwell, stated that deceased joined the ship in January. On Thursday afternoon last he left the ship, having been granted 48 hours leave. - Witness, in answer to the Foreman, said the commanding officer of the ship was on leave. As far as he knew, deceased had not got into difficulties on board ship. Deceased was wine caterer, and he believed his books were correct. - Francis Bibbings, inspector of the Great Western Railway, stationed at Millbay, deposed that at 4.55 a.m. on Saturday last his attention was called by Guard Terry, of the mail train, to one of the sleeping carriages, where he found deceased lying on one of the beds in un unconscious state. With assistance he removed him to the waiting-room, and he was there attended by a medical gentleman travelling by the train. Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, was sent for, and he arrived within ten minutes. He (witness) searched a Gladstone bag belonging to deceased, but found no bottle of any kind. The windows of the carriage were closed and the blinds drawn. In deceased's pocket he discovered two letters. - A Juryman: What letters did you find? - The Coroner: The letters have nothing to do with the taking of morphia. - Charles Edward Bean, surgeon, Buckland-terrace, Plymouth, deposed to being called at five o'clock on Saturday morning to see a gentleman who was reported to be dying at Millbay Station. He immediately went to the station, where he found deceased in a state of deep coma. His skin was livid and moist, his pupils strongly contracted, breathing stertorous, and pulse, full, soft and low. Witness came to the conclusion that he was suffering from poisoning by some preparation of opium; and his condition was such as to suggest a strong and fatal dose. He examined the body for injection marks; but found none. Soon afterwards breathing ceased, but it was restored by means of electricity. Deceased was under his care for about one hour and a half, after which he was conveyed to the Hospital. - Alfred John Pickthorne, surgeon at the Royal Naval Hospital, stated that deceased was brought to the Hospital at about half-past six on Saturday morning and was attended to by Dr Stone, the principal medical officer, and himself. Deceased expired at ten minutes past eight. He had made a post-mortem examination. The heart was fairly healthy, but the other organs were in a condition which suggested opium poisoning. The stomach had been sealed up for analysis. In his opinion death was caused by opium poisoning. - The Coroner said he should adjourn the Inquiry for an analysis of the stomach to be made. - A Juryman: How about the letters referred to? They may throw a light on the subject. - Another Juryman: We want to know something about deceased's movements, and it is possible that the letters may help us to come to a decision. - The Coroner: The letters have nothing to do with the question. - A Juryman: I can't agree with you. If there is anything in the letters relating to the matter we ought to see them. These letters should be produced. - The Coroner: I will look at the letters, and if there is anything in them which will help us, you shall see them. - The Foreman: the Jury think it necessary that the guard of the train should be called, and that the letters should be produced. - The Coroner: I intended to adjourn the Inquiry until an analysis of the stomach had been made, and also to call the guard. Before then I did not think it necessary that the letters should be inspected. - The Inquiry was then adjourned until Monday next. - The remains of the late Surgeon EDWARD T. COOK, of the Speedwell, will be interred today at 2 p.m., in the cemetery attached to the Royal Naval Hospital with military honours. The cortege will assemble at 1.45, and Captain Brooke will be in charge of the party.

PAIGNTON - At Paignton last evening Mr Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry into the death of MR JOSEPH EDWARD WREYFORD, cabinet maker, of Winner-street. MRS WREYFORD, the widow, deposed that her husband, 59 years of age, got up on Sunday morning at half-past six and went downstairs. She followed half an hour later, and not seeing him looked in the cellar, and there saw him hanging to a beam. She called Mr Coysh, living in the same house, who cut him down; he was still warm, but dead. On Wednesday last he received a summons to appear as defendant in an affiliation case at Brixham Sessions this week, and it preyed upon his mind and made him strange in manner. He spoke to her about it on the Saturday and said he was innocent, but could not bear the thought of it. He had no pecuniary or other trouble. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 September 1891 NEWTON ABBOT - A boy named SHARLAND, aged three years, fell into the leat at Bradley, near Newton, on Sunday and was drowned. At an Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 September 1891 BARNSTAPLE - Mr A. Incledon Bencraft, Coroner for Barnstaple, yesterday held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary on the body of GEORGE HENRY RICHARDS, aged 10, who died in the Institution from the effects of an accident. The lad was in charge of a horse, driving at meal-combing machine at Roundswell, when he was kicked by the animal. The injuries inflicted were terrible. The frontal bone of the skull was fractured, portions of brain matter exuded from the wound, and the left eye hung out over the cheek. The Jury, of whom Mr C. W. Vosper was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Two Inquests were held at Plymouth by Mr A. S. Clark yesterday. One related to MONTAGUE RICHARD FOULKES aged 7 weeks, the son of a merchant seaman residing at Zion-street, which was weakly from birth, and died from convulsions before Dr J. H. Williams, who was sent for, could attend. After hearing the evidence of the mother and doctor, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury, of whom Mr F. Bidgood was Foreman.

PLYMOUTH - In the second case the deceased was JANE FRY, aged 71 years, the wife of SAMUEL JOHN FRY, a retired tradesman, residing at 2 Trafalgar-place. they had spent the evening of the 1st inst. at their niece's in Morley-place, and were returning home about half-past ten, when MRS FRY fell off the kerb, saying "Oh! what a fall I have had." She was with difficulty conveyed home and was attended by Dr Bean until Monday, when she was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. Next afternoon she collapsed and died. Mr A. W. F. Sayres, assistance house-surgeon, said deceased fractured her thigh by the fall and a post-mortem examination revealed heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Syncope, accelerated by injuries received in an Accidental Fall" was returned by a Jury of whom Mr T. Mogford was Foreman.

Fatal Accident To A Farmer. - Yesterday afternoon at the Gulmswell Farm, Haccombe-with-Coombe, Mr Sydney Hacker held an Inquiry into the cause of the death of MR STEPHEN LANG, aged 74, a farmer, who was fatally injured on Monday last, the 7th September. MR RICHARD STEPHEN LANG, a son of the deceased, said that his father informed him that whilst riding a colt, an entire horse, belonging to Mr John Rendell, leaped a ledge and came after the mare. The mare bolted and threw him. Mr Edward James Murch stated that on returning to Coombe from Torquay on Monday, he saw the deceased lying in the road trying to get up. He helped him home. - Dr McDonald deposed that he saw the deceased after the accident. He found that three of his ribs were broken, and one of those penetrated his lungs. His face was also much cut. Mr. J. Boyes Rendell stated that the horse was lent to him for work, but in consequence of the wet weather he had been unable to use it, and had put it into a field. He found in the evening of the day in question that the horse had broken out of the field, which was eight feet above the road, and which had a rough scrub fence. The animal, he had always understood, was quiet. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but added the following rider:- "The Jury consider that Mr Rendell, of Stokeinteignhead, has been guilty of great negligence in placing a horse of such description in a field adjoining the highway, the fence not being in a fit state to prevent such an animal from getting out: and we think Mr Rendell should have shewn a greater amount of discretion than to have allowed the horse being placed so near a public highway."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 September 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - The Strange Death Of A Devonport Painter. - Mr J. Vaughan, the Devonport Borough Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr E. Murch was Foreman, were occupied for over two hours at the Guildhall last evening, Inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES EDWARD MORCOMB. Deceased who was 28 years of age, was a coach painter, occupying two rooms with his wife and four children at 7 Queen-street, Devonport, and he was found dead in his bedroom on Sunday afternoon. ELIZA MORCOMB stated that on Saturday afternoon her husband returned from work, and they had a quarrel respecting some debts which she had incurred without his knowledge. He was of a sulky disposition and they did not speak to each other again for the rest of the day. She went out to market about 7 o'clock in the evening, but before doing so deceased turned the children out of their bedroom, saying that he would sleep by himself. She returned about eleven o'clock, but said she was not the worse for drink. When questioned, however, by the Coroner as to her movements between nine and eleven o'clock, she shewed great reticence; but eventually she owned that she went to a public-house in Northcorner-street, kept by a man named Brown, and had something to drink. On the Sunday morning she rose about eight o'clock and went to the door of the room in which her husband was sleeping and knocked, but he did not answer although she heard him snore. The door was locked. She again called him between ten and eleven and again heard him breathing heavily, although he did not answer. About noon she rattled the door violently, but he did not make any reply although she heard him cough. About one p.m. she called him to dinner but again received no answer. About tea time she finding that he was not dressing obtained the assistance of Mrs Hugo, a neighbour, and after endeavouring to get a key to fit the door they obtained a ladder, and Mrs Hugo entered the room through the window. Mrs Mary Hugo of 33 Queen-street, stated that she found deceased on the floor partly dressed, his head being under the bed, which had not been slept in. - Mr F. E. Roe, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Sunday evening and from an examination of the body he should think the man died about three o'clock on that afternoon. He had since made a post-mortem examination. There was a bruise on the right temple, probably caused by a fall on the matting beside the bed. Deceased had probably suffered from indigestion, as there were marks of that complaint. Both lungs were congested, and in the right one were evidences of old disease. The heart was small and one side of it was flabby and there was a growth on one of the valves. The heart was full of blood, which it had not power to expel. Death was due to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAVISTOCK - A Soldier Drowned Near Tavistock. Gallant Conduct Of An Officer. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Tavistock last evening into the circumstances attending the death of PRIVATE HENRY HAYTER, 2nd Dorset Regiment, drowned in the River Walkham at Grenofen, near Tavistock. Private George Burt stated that on Saturday afternoon he, another private named Arnold and the deceased, left the halting camp at Grenofen to bathe in the river. Neither of them could swim. Deceased went into the river and dived, and was at once out of his depth in a pool about 16 feet deep, with a strong current, which took him under a bridge. Witness could see the body at the bottom of the river. He hastened to the camp and Lieutenant Day, 2nd Welsh Regiment, returned with him, dived into the river and brought up the body of the deceased. The current was still very strong. Lieutenant Day did all he could to restore animation. Private Arnold had tried to borrow a rope from an adjacent farm before Lieut. Day's arrival, but could not procure one. - Mr C. C. Broderick, surgeon, Tavistock, who saw the body at the camp, said its appearance indicated that death was caused by drowning. There were no marks on the body suggestive of foul play. The Coroner, in summing up, spoke in high terms of the plucky manner in which Lieut. Day dived into the river for the deceased, despite the strong current which was flowing under the bridge. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Foreman of the Jury (Mr J. Morriss) added that he and his fellow Jurors fully endorsed what the Coroner had said with respect to the courageous conduct of Lieut. Day. The Coroner promised to communicate to the gallant gentleman the sentiments expressed by himself and the Jury.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 September 1891 PLYMOUTH - MARTHA HEALE, aged 79, residing at 2 Parade, Plymouth, was taken ill on Monday morning and died soon afterwards. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the Three Crowns Hotel, Mr R. H. Wagner, surgeon, attributed death to apoplexy. The Jury, of whom Mr William Burns was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 September 1891 BARNSTAPLE - ELIZABETH ANNIE MILLS, aged 45, a teacher at the Silver-street School, Barnstaple, died suddenly on Tuesday night after walking rather quickly upstairs. At the Inquest yesterday it was shewn that death was due to a weak heart.

EXETER - JOHN CASELEY, aged 80, a resident at Day's Almshouses, Exeter, and nearly blind, fell some time since and injured his ribs. On Tuesday he died, and at an Inquest held yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 21 September 1891 PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM STANLEY NETHERTON, aged three months, whose parents reside at 27 Ham-street, Plymouth, was on Saturday morning found dead in bed by its mother's side. Mr A. S. Clark held an Inquest in the evening at the Clarence Inn, Clarence-street, when Mr T. H. Williams, surgeon, attributed death to infantile convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr Daniel McGivern was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 September 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - At the Ferry Hotel, Morice Town, last evening an Inquiry was held by Mr J. Vaughan, Coroner, respecting the death of IRWIN JOHN HUGO, aged 17, ward-room servant on board H.M.S. Cambridge, gunnery ship, Devonport. About nine o'clock on Sunday morning deceased was seen by Private Plummer, R.M.L.I., who was on sentry duty, going down the gangway carrying a bucket of ashes. Later on he was reported to be missing, and the empty bucket was found near the ash tub on the landing where the ashes were thrown. Henry Harrison, C.P.O., a diver, was instructed to dive in the locality of the ship, and after a search of about three hours recovered the body. There was nothing to shew by what means deceased came into the water, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

BERE FERRERS - Killed On The Railway Near Bere Ferrers. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr J. Helson was Foreman, were engaged yesterday at the Bere Ferrers Railway Station in investigating the circumstances attending the death of JAMES HADDEN, aged 55 years, found dead on the down line of the railway at Tavy Bridge on Sunday morning. - P.C. Bradfield, of Devonport Police Force, stated that last Saturday he met deceased in Fore-street, Devonport and being able to converse a little in the Kaffir language, they had a chat. Deceased said he was a native of Scotland and had been a gold-digger in Cape Colony, only returning from the Kimberley Fields to Plymouth in the steamer Scot a few days ago. Witness had been informed that deceased had had £16,000 stolen from him, but on asking if that was so, he denied it, and said he did not bring much money ashore, and that all his luggage was on board the steamer. Deceased had been drinking very heavily, and although shewn the way which he said he wanted to go, persisted in going in a wrong direction. - Frank Dunn, fireman, in the service of the South Western Railway Co., said he was on the 7.22 train from Plymouth on Sunday morning, and when passing over Tavy Bridge saw the body of a man lying near the metals. He called the attention of the guard, who reported the matter to the station-master at Bere Ferrers, who caused the body to be removed to the Station on a trolley. - Mr A, K. Reed, surgeon, said the skull was fractured, a bone penetrating the brain some inches. The right arm was torn off at the shoulder and the rest of the limbs were terribly smashed. The lower part of the back was broken in. The injuries were such as would be caused by being knocked down by a train. Deceased was about 55 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead." - When HADDEN landed in the tender from the Scot at the Great Western Docks on Thursday he appeared to be suffering from aberration of intellect. All the property he possessed was a portmanteau, and it only contained clothing. When he left the Customs examining-room he brought out the empty portmanteau in one hand and the clothes under his other arm, and did not attempt to repack the portmanteau until advised to do so. He had no money to pay for his passage to London, where he desired to be sent, nor to pay the dock dues. His portmanteau was, therefore, detained. The following day, Friday, he hired a cab, and on returning to Millbay Station offered the cabman in payment a piece of paper on which was written, "Pay me ten shillings," the signature to which was illegible. He was ordered out of three different trains during the day, as he was not provided with a ticket for either. At the North-road Station, he ordered a sumptuous repast and after having disposed of it, on the reckoning, 10s. 9d., being presented, he offered in payment a similar note to the one offered to the cabman. When ordered off from the Millbay Station he became violent and severely kicked Inspector Bibbing. It was stated by some of his fellow passengers on the Scot that HADDEN had suffered severe injuries to his head in South Africa by a fall in a mine where he was employed, and since then he had been incapacitated from labour.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 September 1891 KINGSTON - At the Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner at the Dolphin Inn, Kingston, yesterday, the body discovered among the rocks under Beacon Point by Harry Barkshire, was identified by Sergeant W. H. Lidiard, of the Royal Marine band, Stonehouse, as that of GOODWIN BLYTH, about 14 years of age, a drummer boy, drowned whilst bathing at Bantham Sands during the annual excursion of the band on August 24th. The sergeant believed deceased could not swim. There was a rough surf on the beach, and the sand was so soft as to give no foundation. Whilst he was swimming about he heard someone shout out, "The boy is gone." Several were in the water, and tried to get at him, but without avail. The Jury, of whom Mr H. Helmer was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Lieutenant W. M. Johnston Stewart was present, representing the corps to which deceased belonged. This morning the body will be removed from the belfry of the church, where it has lain since it was brought from the beach, and conveyed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, for burial, probably in the Eldad cemetery.

PLYMOUTH - Drowned In Plymouth Sound. - A sad accident occurred in Plymouth Sound on September 12th, through which BERTIE GILL, aged 12, of 57 Gibbons-street, Plymouth, was drowned. The body was not, however, recovered until yesterday morning, and in the evening Mr A. S. Clark, held the Inquest at Plymouth Guildhall. John Bennett, a little boy, stated that he was in the employ of Mr Jones, chemist of 41 Southside-street. On the afternoon of September 12th, he was sent by his master with some medicine on to a mail boat. He met GILL and they walked together to the Barbican, where witness asked John Charlick, a boatman who was going to take him to the ship, if his companion might go as well. After some demur the man consented. When they got near the Breakwater Fort deceased got on the edge of the boat unseen by the waterman and the mainsail flapping over knocked him overboard. An Open Verdict was returned.

Western Morning News, Thursday 24 September 1891 BARNSTAPLE - FANNY LANCEY, aged 90 years, of Bradiford, Barnstaple, whilst walking towards Pilton, was knocked down by a carriage. She sustained a fracture of the thigh, and after a fortnights' illness died. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 26 September 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - "Syncope, accelerated by Drinking Habits," was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr Coroner Vaughan, at Devonport, yesterday, respecting the death of BESSIE BROOK, a married woman, of 10 Jessamine-lane. James Edwards, with whom deceased had been living for the past twelve years, said she had complained of a pain in her left side for a considerable period. She drank heavily, and he found her intoxicated nearly every night when he returned from work. On Thursday evening she went out, as he believed, for drink, and fell down in the lane, where she died. She had never threatened to take her life. Mrs Carr, a neighbour, said about six o'clock on the previous evening deceased said to her that she was dying. She caught hold of her and went out with her into the street, where deceased fell and died before medical assistance arrived. Mr D. Wilson, surgeon, said the post-mortem examination shewed that deceased's liver greatly enlarged, probably due to her drinking habits.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 September 1891 REVELSTOKE - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Noss Mayo on Saturday evening on the body of MARY HARE LYNDON, aged one month, the daughter of WILLIAM THOMAS LYNDON, a gardener. Mr C. Adlin, surgeon, of Yealmpton, said the deceased died from "convulsions" caused by irritation of the stomach, due to thrush. The Jury, of whom Mr G. Lewis was Foreman, returned the verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DARTMOUTH - Burnt To Death At Dartmouth. - An Inquest was held at the Dartmouth Guildhall on Saturday, before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Borough Coroner, touching the death of ELIZABETH BOWDEN, a widow, aged 88, who had resided at Newport-street. Mrs Samballs, wife of a stoker at the gasworks, stated that she had looked after the old lady for two years past. On Friday evening, the 18th, she was in her usual health, and witness left her in bed about eight o'clock, with a rushlight burning on a chair some distance from the bed. Just afterwards witness was called to deceased, and found her lying on the bed very much burnt. Captain W. H. Edmonds deposed to being at Mr Heath's on the evening in question and hearing a noise upstairs Mr Heath went up and immediately called to witness to go up, which he did and found deceased in flames beside the bed. He extinguished the flames with a blanket. Dr Harris stated that death was the result of the shock produced by the burns, which though not deep were superficially extensive. The Jury, of whom Mr W. J. Salway was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 September 1891 PLYMOUTH - Elizabeth Thomas, servant at the Olive Branch Inn, Wyndham-street, Plymouth, on Sunday morning saw in an outhouse in the rear a man lying on the floor, with his head resting on the seat. Thinking he was asleep, she called Mr J. Glanville, who lived next door, and he found that the man was dead. P.C. Michelmore was called and he with assistance removed the body into the inn. It was that of a man between forty and forty-five years of age, height 5 feet 6 inches, hair brown, moustache light brown, no whiskers, dressed in black felt hat and dark pepper and salt suit. On the body was a purse containing 3s. 2 ½d., two cuff studs, a collar stud, a tobacco box bearing the name E. ROWLEY, a knife, two keys and a scarf pin. Mr A. S. Clark yesterday held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Guildhall, when Mr C. Bean, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by extensive disease of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Endicott was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Inspector Woods watched the case on behalf of the Police. After the Inquest the body was identified as that of EDWARD ROWLEY, of 25 Clarence-place, Stonehouse, a dock labourer.

Western Morning News, Monday 5 October 1891 CHAGFORD - Mr Prickman, Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Chagford on HETTIE AGGETT, aged 2 years 5 months, daughter of WEEKES AGGETT, builder, who fell into a pan of hot milk placed on the floor to cool on Thursday and died the following day. Dr Hunt attributed death to shock to the system resulting from the scald, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - JOHN H. BLACKWELL, 12 years of age, while playing in the courtlage of his home, 21 West-street, Tavistock, on Sunday ran against the corner of a window frame in a glass house, cutting his right eyebrow. Little notice was taken of the injury at the time, but the lad subsequently fell ill and died on Thursday. At the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Rodd, Mr Hislop, surgeon, as the result of a post-mortem examination, ascribed the cause of death to acute congestion of the brain, accelerated by the blow. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

LAMERTON - CHARLOTTE ELLIS, aged about five years, residing at Coombe-cottages, Lamerton, on Thursday morning dressed and came from her bedroom apparently well. She suddenly complained of a pain in her head. The mother put her to bed and she died in about half an hour. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd on Saturday, Mr J. T. Hislop, of Tavistock, surgeon, who had held a post-mortem examination, stated that death was due to apoplexy, caused by a rupture of a blood vessel of the brain. The Jury, of whom Mr Lethbridge was foreman, returned the verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - Mr Clark, the County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, into the cause of death of WILLIAM RICHARD FRY, aged 59, general labourer. Edward Higgins, boatman, stated that Monday the 28th September he was near the Admiral McBryde public-house, on the Barbican. He then saw a flour waggon go down Quay-lane. Behind it was a handcart, loaded with fish-boxes, which was in charge of deceased. The waggons stopped at the bottom for the brake to be taken off, when the man that was steadying the handcart behind let go. Before the deceased could stop he was pushed against the back of the wagon and injured by collision with the tail-board. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Strang was Foreman, returned a verdict that death was due to peritonitis, caused by the accident.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 6 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark held two Inquests at Cattedown, Plymouth, yesterday. In the first the deceased was ELIZA ELIZABETH NORTHMORE, aged two years, whose parents lived at 21 St John's-road. the child was knocked down by a horse driven by a man named Ashman and sustained internal injuries. Frances Mary Johns and Mr Cox Way, surgeon, having given evidence, the Jury of whom Mr Boon was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

PLYMOUTH - In the second case deceased was PERCY JAMES GILGARD, aged 11 months, residing at 2 Julian-street, Cattedown, Plymouth. Margaret Donovan, grandmother of deceased, stated that on Friday last she had him in her arms and put him on the ground to play with a toy, when his brother snatched it from him. He immediately began to scream, and as the plaything was not returned to him he went off in convulsions and died in a few minutes. Mr Cox Way, surgeon, attributed death to Convulsions caused by teething. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 7 October 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Horrible Suicide At Devonport. - Shortly before midnight on Monday, JOHN KINGDON, 38 years of age, naval pensioner, who with his wife and three children occupied a portion of 13 Morice-street, Devonport, committed suicide. Deceased has been invalided out of the navy about fifteen months, and within the last few weeks had been working as a labourer on board H.M.S. Sirius in Keyham Yard. Owing it is alleged, to being unpunctual in coming to his work, he received his discharge on Saturday. He had, moreover, contracted several debts which he was unable to meet, and lately gave way to drink. On Monday he went to Plymouth to get work, but did not succeed in his application, and returned home in rather depressed spirits. About eleven o'clock, while he and his wife were sitting together in their room, he suddenly blew out the candle and his wife having re-lighted it he blew it out a second time. MRS KINGDON, asked him what he was about, but he merely replied "Hush!" and told her to get to bed. She did not do so, and about ten minutes afterwards she heard him rushing about as if he was sick. As he gave no answer to her questions, she lit the candle and saw that he had cut his throat with a small penknife, which he held in his hand. She tried unsuccessfully to take the knife away from him, and he cut his throat a second time, the wound extending from ear to ear, and bleeding so profusely that he died in two or three minutes. Mrs Lettice Horne, the landlady, on hearing what had occurred, obtained the assistance of Messrs. Willie and James Wilson, surgeons, who pronounced life to be extinct. - At the Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Borough coroner, MRS KINGDON reluctantly admitted, after being closely pressed on the point, that deceased had been drinking lately, but only "a little." Including his pension, he had been in receipt of about 25s. a week while in work. - Mrs Horne said deceased was a quiet, agreeable man, and she had never seen him the worse for liquor. He was very reserved, and lately was rather depressed. - The Coroner remarked that the doctor had told him that the deceased was recovering from delirium tremens. - A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 10 October 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Fatal Lamp Accident At Devonport. - Mr James Vaughan, Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, yesterday, touching the death of ELIZABETH KNEEBONE, aged 65, the widow of JOSEPH KNEEBONE, a shipwright in the Dockyard, who died at the Hospital on Tuesday from injuries she received on the 24th ult. Shortly after midnight on the latter date Mary Lang went with the deceased to her room at 35 Queen-street, and placed a paraffin lamp in the window. She then left her and went to her own room, which was on the same landing. Some ten minutes later she heard a fall and a smash, and on going to the room found deceased on fire on the ground by the door. The lamp was also lying smashed on the floor. Deceased refused to have a doctor, and a chemist's dispenser named Chiswell dressed her right arm, which was much burnt, with carbolic oil and old calico. Deceased was adverse even to this being done and refused to be taken to the Hospital when advised by Sergeant Mutton, and later on when similarly advised by Dr David Wilson, who saw her some twelve hours after the occurrence. Becoming worse, however, she eventually agreed to be taken to the Hospital in the evening. Nurse Edith McCann, when deceased arrived, found her suffering from extensive wounds on her right side, and after the first day or two at the Hospital she gradually got worse, her constitution being impaired by drinking. She was unconscious for two days before her death on Tuesday, and gave no explanation as to how the accident happened. It was stated that the deceased was in the habit of reading in bed, and that she was under the influence of drink, though not incapable, when she went to bed. From the position in which the lamp was found it was conjectured that the deceased had moved it from the window, where it was placed. - The Jury, of whom Mr Edward Murch was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Monday 12 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr Alfred S. Clark, Coroner, at the Black Lion Inn, Exeter-street, Plymouth, respecting the death of JOHN WILLIAM PEEKE, who died at 18 Lower-street, aged 67 years. MARGARET PEEKE, the widow, said deceased was a lime-burner, and had suffered for six years from asthma, and had been in bed for the last week. On Friday night he became worse and she sent for Dr Wey, but her husband died before his arrival. Dr Alfred Cox Wey said there were no marks of violence, and the cause of death was syncope, owing to bronchitis and asthma. The Jury, of whom Mr Osmond was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DARTMOUTH - Mr P. R. Hockin, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at Dartmouth on Saturday respecting the death of JOHN LEE, aged 67. The Inquest took place at the house of Mr L. C. Pillar, who had kindly allowed the body to be taken there. RICHARD LEE, son of the deceased, said his father was a retired shipwright of Portsmouth, and had come to Dartmouth, where he was born, to see the old place after an absence of fifty years. Deceased, his brother and witness walked from Brixham on Friday morning and in the afternoon, as they were walking in Newton-road, deceased was pointing out an old orchard he remembered when he suddenly fell to the ground. He was raised and placed in a chair and died in a few minutes. Dr Harris attributed death to failure of the heart's action in consequence of so much walking and excitement caused by revisiting the town. A verdict of "Death from natural Causes" was returned, the Jury thanking Mr Pillar for his kindness.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 13 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - CHARLES LEWIS TYLER, aged 29, mentally afflicted, residing at 23 Waterloo-street, Plymouth, was found dead in bed by his mother on Sunday morning, and at the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, at the Wellington Inn, Mr Eccles, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, caused by constitutional weakness and asthma. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - HARRIETT JESSIE MAUDE SMALLRIDGE, aged eleven months, was at two o'clock on Sunday morning found dead by its mother's side at 24 Laira-street, Plymouth. At an Inquest held at the Laira Hotel, yesterday, the mother stated that the child ate beef for supper and Mr A. S. Clark, the coroner, asked Mr A. Way, surgeon, if that would cause convulsions. Mr Way replied that death was due to coma caused by an effusion of blood on the brain. That would result either from teething or eating the beef. He could not tell which; but no child under twelve months of age ought to be fed with meat. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 14 October 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - At an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday, respecting the death of MR JAMES NEARY, aged 58, of 4 Hand-place, Morice Town, found dead in bed, a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned.

Western Morning News, Friday 16 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - EDWARD FLYNN, a Marine pensioner, 56 years of age, of 16 Clarendon-terrace, Plymouth, was about ten o'clock yesterday morning, with other Dockyard workmen at Keyham, raising a caisson, and the men were waiting for Mr Ryall, foreman, to give the next order, when FLYNN staggered and fell. Mr Collingwood, surgeon of H.M.S. Curlew, was called, and having administered a little brandy, ordered deceased to be removed to the Dockyard surgery. Before reaching there, however, he died. Mr Collingwood made a post-mortem examination, and found that the left side of the heart was diseased, and a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan last evening.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was yesterday held by Mr A. S. Clark, Plymouth Borough Coroner, into the cause of the death of JOHN CLEMO, aged 67, a tin-dresser, who was injured in an accident at the Pnoenix United Mine. WILLIAM CLEMO, a son of the deceased, explained that his father was standing near an incline where wagons ran for the purpose of conveying tin stuff from one part of the mine to the other, when he was accidentally struck by a full wagon. He fell on the rails, the wheels of the wagon passing over his arm. On the recommendation of Drs Nettle and Gill, he was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall hospital, where Mr Thomas, the assistant surgeon, said that the only chance of saving the man's life was by amputation of the arm. After consultation, that was done, but deceased never recovered from the shock. A verdict of "Death from Shock" was returned.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 20 October 1891 PLYMPTON ST MAURICE - An Inquest was held at the Forester's Arms, Plympton Maurice, respecting the death of ADA EVELINE NICHOLLS aged two months. Its mother, a domestic servant, stated that it had not been ill since its birth. She weaned it when it was a fortnight old, and gave it milk and biscuit, but it had not had any biscuit for a week. It was apparently quite well that evening when she left it in bed, but shortly afterwards she found it in a fit, and it died in her sister's arms, after struggling. Mr C. H. Stevens, surgeon; who had made a post-mortem examination by the order of Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner; said death resulted from convulsion due to indigestion, and the Jury, of whom Mr J. Pearse was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 21 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - Death From Burning At Plymouth. - Whilst HENRIETTA MARIA KNIGHT, aged 62 years, residing at 11 Notte-street, Plymouth, was endeavouring to blow a lighted paraffin lamp out on Sunday night it exploded, and she was at once enveloped in flames. She became much worse on Monday and died in the evening. At an Inquiry held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the Swan Hotel, Plymouth, last evening, CHARLES JOHN KNIGHT stated that he was retiring to rest on Sunday night when he heard his father call him and on running downstairs found his mother all ablaze. He at once threw a bed quilt over her which began burning on her shoulder. A young man named Quance who was in the house at the time handed him a blanket and quilt which he also wrapped around her. After extinguishing the flames in the room he carried the deceased across the backyard into his sister's house, Artisan Dwellings, Notte-street, and then sent for a doctor. - Mr C. H. Cumming, surgeon, stated that deceased was greatly burned about the face and limbs. Death in his opinion was due to shock to the system caused by the burns. - The Jury, of whom Mr C. Lethbridge was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance to the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 27 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - Mysterious Death At Plymouth. - Mr A. S. Clark and a Jury, of whom Mr Mugford was Foreman, held an Inquiry at Plymouth Workhouse yesterday respecting the death of THOMAS BATTISHILL, about 57 years of age. - Mr E. G. Dyke, the Master, stated that last Tuesday deceased was brought to the Workhouse in a cab by a policeman by order of Mr Annear, one of the relieving officers. He was in an unconscious state and could not reply to any questions. He continued in that state until Sunday, when he died, despite every attention from the doctor. - Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, said he saw BATTISHILL soon after his admission. He was in a comatose condition and evidently received some injury to the brain. A post-mortem examination shewed that there was an extensive fracture of the skull on the right side, and an enormous effusion of blood on the brain. The injury had been caused by direct violence, although how he could not say. - The Coroner: The case has become a very suspicious one. It may be a case of murder. The Inquiry will be adjourned until next Thursday evening at the Guildhall.

MAKER (CORNWALL) - On Saturday William Garrett, a lad, residing at Millbrook, saw the body of a man in Hancock's Lake, near Anderton, and a boatman named Morgan brought it ashore. At an Inquest held by Mr A. C. L. Glubb, District Coroner, at Millbrook, yesterday, Robert Curtneys, keeper at the Plymouth Workhouse, identified the body as that of JOHN BROWN, an inmate of the Workhouse, and who had been in his charge for the past three years. Witness had accompanied him in his walks and he never made any attempt to run away. On Friday, when in George-street, deceased went into a place of accommodation. After waiting some time, witness went in search of him, but could not find him. The police, communicated with, failed to discover him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and exonerated the keeper from all blame. Mr Croft (Adams and Croft) watched the case on behalf of the Plymouth Court of Guardians.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 28 October 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - Mr Vaughan, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Devonport yesterday respecting the death of FRANCES AMERY, missing since the 10th inst. Thomas Warren, of H.M.S. Impregnable, said he saw the body of a woman floating off the ship yesterday morning and moored it to a buoy, and informed the ship's corporal, who communicated with the Police, and they came and took it to the mortuary. - Annie Virgo said deceased, whom she had known for the past fourteen years, had no fixed residence. On the 9th inst. deceased said she intended to destroy herself. - P.C. Badcock, at Richmond-walk on the 10th inst. opposite the men's bathing place, saw deceased, and asked her her name and address. She refused to give them, and asked if he was going to see the sergeant. Witness said he did not know, and deceased left him. - Private William Kyte, Welsh Regiment, was next called, and the Coroner cautioned him that he was not bound to give evidence that would incriminate himself. - Witness said he would rather tell what he knew about it, and proceeding, stated that on 10th inst. he was on sentry duty on Mount Wise Steps, and about half an hour after midnight deceased spoke to him. He asked her if she was afraid to go home. She said no; she had a whistle, and if anything happened she could blow it for assistance. The Police Constable then came along and deceased went with him, but shortly afterwards returned and wished him good night. At two o'clock he was relieved and marched back to the main guard. Contrary to military rules, he left the guardroom and went back to his former post to look for his belt. - The Coroner: On your oath. Did you not go down to meet the deceased? - No, I swear it. - How long were you finding your belt? - About twenty minutes. - If anyone said you were away three-quarters of an hour it would be untrue? -= I would not swear t ten minutes. - Witness, continuing his evidence, said about six o'clock he went on duty again. Seeing a boatman coming in from the Admiral's yacht, he went down towards him and on reaching the pier saw a woman's hat and umbrella hanging under an arch in one of the boathouses. He called the boatman's attention to it, and he went over and took it down. - John Elliott, boatman, said about half-past six in the morning he was going into the Government steps at Mount Wise, to see if there were any more sailors to go off to the ships. The sentry came down to the pier, and asked him what it was hanging to one of the pillars in the boathouse. As he could not see anything he rowed his boat around, and found an umbrella. He took it down, and a woman's hat fell with it. The sentry said there was something else hanging there; and on looking up saw a woman's jacket. In his opinion it was not possible for the sentry to see the articles from where he was standing. - The Coroner said deceased had become estranged from her husband and family, and was in desperate straits, telling her friend that she believed she should be found drowned. He did not think there was the slightest testimony that the soldier was in any way the cause of her death. How she came into the water, whether by accident or by design, they would never know. Unless they had some proof of actual violence he could not see that they could do any other than bring in a verdict of "Found Drowned." - The Jury, of whom Mr Murch was Foreman, returned an Open Verdict.

Western Morning News, Friday 30 October 1891 PLYMOUTH - The Mysterious Death At Plymouth. Adjourned Inquiry. - Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, yesterday resumed the Inquiry at Plymouth respecting the death of THOMAS BATTERSHILL. - ELIZABETH BATTERSHILL, the widow, said her husband was a groom, 57 years of age. She last saw him alive seven weeks ago. Three weeks ago he wrote telling her he was anxious to return home. During the past twelve months, he had had peculiar symptoms. Three years ago an operation was performed on his skull at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. - Wm. White, Deputy landlord of a lodging-house in King-street, said deceased came to the house on 17th inst. He seemed to be wandering in his mind. He stayed two days. About seven weeks ago he stopped at witness's house and told him he had just come out of the Hospital, where he had undergone an operation. - Mr Painter, a naval pensioner, said he saw deceased on the 20th inst. lying in a doorway in Manor-street. He helped him up and found that blood was running down the side of his face. He took him over to a coffee shop, and tried to get a cup of tea for him, but failing that, he called P.C. Broad, who took deceased in charge. - Witness told him deceased was not intoxicated. - Mr F. A. Thomas, medical officer of the Plymouth workhouse, said, at the Coroner's suggestion, he had made a post-mortem examination. On the crown of the head there was a healed ulcer. There was a depressed fracture of the skull, with an effusion of blood, caused by direct violence. The deceased died from concussion of the brain. - The Jury, of whom Mr Mugford was Foreman, returned a verdict that deceased died from concussion of the brain, but how it was caused they could not tell. They thanked Mr Painter for his kindness to deceased.

STOKE DAMEREL - At Devonport Guildhall yesterday, Mr Vaughan, Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of ALFRED BROAD, shoeing smith, 36 years of age. Denis Kearns, of 2 St Stephen's-street, heard deceased coughing during the night, and once he seemed to be choking. Soon afterwards he heard something fall heavily on the floor of deceased's room, and on entering with two other men found him lying face downwards on the floor, his face covered with blood. They lifted him on the bed, and Mr Wilson, surgeon, was sent for, but death ensued before he came. Mr J. Wilsons aid he made a post-mortem examination and found that deceased suffered from valvular disease of the heart. The liver was greatly enlarged and the stomach much congested, caused apparently by continued and excessive use of alcohol. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Western Morning News, Monday 2 November 1891 DARTMOUTH - EDWIN HERBERT, the infant son of SAMUEL COAKER, pilot, Dartmouth, on October 1st, during the momentary absence of his brother, FRANCIS, who was minding him, crawled to a kettle of boiling water and upset it over himself. He lingered until Thursday, and at an Inquest on Saturday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EGG BUCKLAND - An Inquiry into the cause of death of JOHN THOMAS BLAKE, was held at the Crab Tree Inn, Laira, on Saturday before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. Deceased, who was 41 years old, was a wagoner employed by Mr Hitchens, forage dealer, Stonehouse. On Friday he had to bring a wagon laden with hay from Ivybridge to Stonehouse and Mr Stamp, surgeon, now stated that when he was returning home on Friday evening, from Plymouth, he passed deceased's wagon near Marsh Mills Station. The man was riding on the shaft. On going down the hill near Crabtree, he must have been asleep as the drag was not put on and the wagon coming down rather fast threw him off the shaft under the wheels, which passed over his chest. He afterwards saw the deceased at the Crabtree Inn. His death was due to injuries to the heart and lungs; the whole of the ribs of the left side were broken and death must have been instantaneous. The Jury, of whom Mr Clements was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 3 November 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - "Accidentally Suffocated whilst in Bed with its Mother" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held by Mr Vaughan yesterday respecting the death of MABEL ANNIE LAMBE, aged four months, daughter of WILLIAM HENRY LAMBE, joiner, 37 John-street, Devonport. The mother gave the child the breast and fell asleep, and when she awoke half an hour later it was dead. Mr C. J. Cooke, surgeon, found after making a post-mortem examination that the right side of the heart and both lungs were intensely gorged with blood, and his opinion was that death was caused by suffocation, through the pressure of the child's mouth and nose on the mother's bosom.

LYDFORD - Suicide In Dartmoor Prison. - An Inquest was held yesterday in H. M. Convict Prison, Dartmoor, on the body of MICHAEL MCCAFFERTY, aged 56 years, who was found dead, hanging from a ventilator in his cell, last Thursday morning. Mr G. Lord was Foreman of the Jury. Mr William Male, clerk to the governor, produced the late prisoner's caption sheet. It proved that he was convicted in 1874, of wounding with intent to murder and sentenced to penal servitude for life. His conduct whilst under confinement had been "1st Class." Deceased had been employed in the mending department of the tailors' shop and was of a very quiet disposition. Assistant-Warder R. Guppy, who was the first to raise an alarm, and Principal-Warder Pinch, who cut down deceased, were examined. The other officials who gave evidence were Drs. W. Frew, and F. S. Stone, and Warders Rodway and Cree. The medical staff were complimented by the Jury on their promptness n visiting the deceased within a few minutes of the alarm being raised. The Jury found that "Deceased committed Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," and exonerated the prison officials from all blame. The hempen rope with which deceased hung himself consisted of ten strands, the whole being about the thickness of an ordinary black-lead pencil. How he could have procured and secreted the hemp until a sufficient quantity was obtained for his purpose, remains a mystery.

STOKE DAMEREL - Drink's Doings At Devonport. A Terrible Case. - Inquiry was made by Mr J. Vaughan, Devonport Borough Coroner, yesterday, respecting the death of LEONARD PYNE, a fortnight old, the son of a naval pensioner, of 25 Clowance-lane. The Jury, on viewing the body, said the child was the smallest they had ever seen. Inspector Webber, the Coroner's Officer, found that with its clothes on it only weighed 3 ½ lbs. - The mother said for the first two or three days the baby would not take the breast and she then tried to feed it with arrowroot and milk. From one o'clock until eight o'clock on Sunday evening, when it died, it did not take the food. - The Coroner: A careful mother would have sent for a doctor. - Witness, after a great deal of pressing, said she was very sorry she had not sent for one. - Mr Harris, one of the Jury, thought the answer was one with which the Jury should not be satisfied. - The Coroner: Now tell us when you were last at the public-house. - Witness: On Thursday last, when I got half a pint of "old" ale for myself, because I was bad. - The Coroner: Is it not a fact that two of your daughters have been placed in a reformatory by your husband, so that they might be away from your influence? - The witness gave no direct answer to the question. - In reply to a Juror, witness said the child was no heavier now than when it was born. - In reply to the Coroner, Mr Wilson said the average weight of a child at birth is 7lb. - The Coroner (to the mother): You may forgive yourself, but if I were your husband it would be some time before I should forgive you. - Replying to further questions, witness said her husband earned 17s. a week wages, in addition to his pension. The nurse told her to get a doctor for the child, but she did not do so. - The husband of the last witness, a most respectable-looking man, said he gave his wife 13s. a week out of his wages, 4s. a week he paid for his two children at the reformatory. His pension amounted to £36 a year, out of which he paid £12 a year for rent. There were two children, aged 6 and 8 at home. His wife did not keep the home clean, and for several years she had taken too much drink. As soon as he saw the child he advised her to have a doctor. he had clothed his children respectably and as soon as his back was turned his wife pawned the things for drink. - Mr James Wilson, surgeon, attributed death to exhaustion, consequent on inability to take food. The child was an exceptionally small one, and required more than ordinary [?]. He should not like to say that with the greatest care the child might have lived. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Coroner, in severely censuring the mother for her conduct, expressed his regret that the law of the land did not permit him to make an order for her confinement in an inebriates' home.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 4 November 1891 TAVISTOCK - Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Tavistock, yesterday, into the circumstances attending the death of MRS MELINDA GLANVILLE MALLETT, aged 88, late of 18 Delvin-road, widow of a master baker. Mr J. Carter was Foreman of the Jury. Mr J. T. Hislop, surgeon, stated that the deceased had suffered from fits, but whether death was caused by falling downstairs or by a fit he could not say without making a post-mortem examination. It was his opinion, however, that death was due to apoplexy. As it was stated that there was no suspicion of foul play, the Jury did not consider a post-mortem necessary. Mr J. L. Davey, carpenter, deceased's son-in-law, stated that about noon on the previous day, he saw her sitting on the second stair from the top and suddenly fall to the bottom. When picked up she was dead. The Coroner remarked that the fact that deceased was sitting and not standing when she fell, was in favour of the doctor's belief that death was due to apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 5 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death At Plymouth Workhouse. The Stimulants Question. - THIRZA FREATHY, aged 41, becoming insane in March 1890, was admitted to the Plymouth Workhouse Asylum, where she has remained ever since. She was taken ill on Tuesday morning and died. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough coroner, held an Inquest last evening, Mr R. Moule being Foreman of the Jury. - Eliza Heller, nurse, stated that early on Tuesday morning FREATHY called out, "I am sick." No sooner had she said this then she lost all power over her limbs, and died directly after being laid upon the bed. - By a Juryman: She gave deceased a little water, but could not give her any brandy, as it was against the rules. Neither had she got any. - Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, stated that deceased had an abscess on the brain and a very weak heart. The immediate cause of death was syncope. He believed that if she had been given some stimulant when she first complained of being ill it would have saved her life. He intended for the future that nurses should always have a small supply of brandy in case a patient required it suddenly. - The Coroner, in summing up, spoke strongly in favour of the doctor of the Workhouse being allowed to administer stimulants where necessary, and said that great objections had been raised with regard to Dr Thomas using such stimulants, but he had scored a great point that day, for doubtless if the poor woman had been given a little brandy she would have been living still. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and added the following rider: - "The Jury desire to express the opinion that in future nurses in the various wards of the Plymouth Workhouse Infirmary should be in a position to administer stimulants to the inmates when necessary."

Western Morning News, Friday 6 November 1891 PLYMSTOCK - WILLIAM FORD, aged 14, and another boy, on Wednesday morning, went off to a coal hulk, lying off Turnchapel, and about noon FORD entered the boat to come ashore. As he was sculling the paddle slipped and he fell overboard and did not rise again. A man named Jessop afterwards recovered the body. At an Inquest held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, yesterday, Mr J. B. Jacob, surgeon, said a mark under the right ear was the result of a blow sufficient to cause insensibility. The Jury, of whom Mr John Bennett was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Western Morning News, Monday 9 November 1891 PLYMPTON - Inquest At Colebrook. - Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at the Colebrook Inn, Plympton, on Saturday, investigated the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD J. GALE, aged 14, son of JAMES GALE, market gardener. WILLIAM HENRY GALE identified deceased as his brother, principally through his clothes and leggings. - Arthur Gilbert, aged 12, said on October 19th he was with the deceased and several other boys. ~There was a great quantity of water in the river and near the station GALE and deceased took up a large branch lying in the road and put it in the water. They followed it on to Plympton St. Mary Bridge, and then deceased suggested they should go in on the marsh and try to recover it. They went a little way down, but failed to get it and then they amused themselves by throwing sticks in the water. He heard a splash and looking round saw GALE a few yards off, trying to get hold of the bank. he called out "Save me Arthur," and he caught up a stout stick and threw to him, but he disappeared before it reached him, and was not see again. - John Thornine of Underwood, said he was working in the marshes on Friday last and near Farm Pool Bridge saw something dark in the water. He passed on, but not feeling satisfied obtained his sand scraper and on scraping the spot found part of the boys clothing. He sent for the police and with assistance removed the body. It was nearly half a mile from the place where he fell in and the foot of deceased as caught in a pile. - The Jury of whom Mr F. Phillips was foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and with the Coroner expressed deep sympathy with deceased's family.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., and a Jury of whom Mr H. Summers was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" at an Inquiry held at Stonehouse on Saturday, relating to the death of WALTER CHINNOCK. MARTHA CHINNOCK, 14 Edgcumbe-street, stated that deceased was her child, aged five weeks. On going to bed Thursday night it seemed all right, but on waking on Friday morning, she found him dead in her arms. Mr T. Leah, surgeon, stated that the child was well nourished and death, in his opinion, was due to convulsions.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 10 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - JOSHUA FOUND, aged 55, a labourer, residing at Drake-street, Plymouth, was taken suddenly ill on Sunday morning and died almost immediately. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Mr J. Anderson, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to aneurism of the aorta. The Jury, of whom Mr Wm. Clogg was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH CHARLES THE MARTYR - "Death due to Shock to the System caused by Excessive Drinking" was the verdict returned by the Jury, of whom Mr G. W. Wadbrook was foreman, who with Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, at the Hyde Park Hotel, yesterday investigated the circumstances attending the death of PETER PICKARD, a retired mariner, of 11 Clifton-place, who was found in a state of coma in his stables at Seaton-lane on Monday afternoon. Mr E. B. Thomson, who was called in, did his best to restore consciousness, but death ensued in an hour. A post-mortem examination shewed that all the organs were congested, and that of a pint and a quarter of fluid in the stomach about two-thirds was spirits.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 11 November 1891 SHOBROOKE - SAMUEL HURFORD, aged 56, farm labourer, in the employ of Mr George Huggins, of Yandacott Farm, Shobrooke, on Sunday afternoon last entered the shed to milk the cows. Shortly afterwards a lad named Greenslade entered the shed and found HURFORD lying on the ground with his head under the crib. Mr Huggins was fetched and lifted him up. While doing so, the man exclaimed, "I'm dying." He never spoke afterwards and died shortly after being taken into the house. It is supposed that deceased was kicked violently by one of the cows, for Dr Body found one of the ribs on the left side had been completely broken, and blood had been issuing from the man's mouth. At an Inquest a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - LUCY ETHEL EDWARDS, aged four years, residing at 6 Edgcumbe-place, Plymouth, after eating some sweets on Monday afternoon, was taken ill, vomiting and died. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, last evening, Mr C. E. Bean, surgeon, attributed death to syncope, the result of the attempt at vomiting. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 12 November 1891 HOLSWORTHY - At the Inquest held relative to the death of GEORGE JEFFERY, who was instantaneously killed whilst driving a horse and cart at Chasty, near Holsworthy, on Tuesday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Friday 13 November 1891 PLYMPTON - "Death From Natural Causes" was the verdict of the Jury who, with Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, assembled at the Colebrook Inn, Plympton and Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of MR EDWIN FRITH, who died suddenly at his residence on Wednesday evening. The medical testimony was to the effect that death was due to syncope. MR FRITH formerly carried on the business of tea merchant in Westwell-street, Plymouth.

PLYMOUTH - JOHN WILCOCKS, aged 50, a labourer, residing at 3 Flora-cottages, Plymouth, had for a few days complained of pains in the stomach, and stayed home from work. On Wednesday evening he became suddenly worse and died before his wife could obtain medical aid. At an Inquest held by Mr Clark yesterday, Mr McBeath, surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to syncope and the Jury, of whom Mr T. Mugford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Saturday 14 November 1891 MONKTON - ALBERT E. POLLARD was sent by Mr F. Creber, of Whitethorne Farm, Monkton, on November 2nd, with two horses and a wagon to work in a field on the Colleigh-road. Shortly afterwards Mr Creber heard that POLLARD had met with an accident, and going to him at once found him at the Gate House. POLLARD told him he was riding on the shafts of the wagon when the horses broke from a trot into a gallop. In jumping off he fell and the wheels passed over his body. Emma Burrows, residing at Hut Gate, who saw the horses gallop past with the wagon, went out and found POLLARD lying in the road. He said he was not hurt, and getting up walked to her house, 200 yards away. Dr. J. C. Macaulay, of Honiton, who was sent for found POLLARD suffering from injuries to the liver and kidneys, and he died of exhaustion. At the Inquest yesterday deceased's master said POLLARD had no reins attached to the horses, but had them in the wagon, and that he cautioned him against driving without reins. The Jury, of whom Mr H. N. Pope was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, hoped the many farmers on the Jury would impress upon their men the danger of riding without reins.

PLYMOUTH - Mr C. H. Cuming having at an Inquest held at Plymouth Guildhall by Mr A. S. Clark last evening, attributed the death of HORACE PERCY BRETT, aged 6 months to convulsions, the Jury of which Mr J. Wakeham was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 18 November 1891 EGG BUCKLAND - An Inquiry was held by Mr Rodd, County Coroner, and a Jury of whom Mr J. Lord was foreman, at the Old Road Inn, Laira, yesterday respecting the death of GEORGE DAVID UNDERHILL, aged 50 years, a grocer, residing at Laira. Early on Sunday morning deceased's wife heard a gurgling in her husband's throat, and found him insensible. She sent for a doctor, but death occurred before his arrival. Mr E. J. Dutton, surgeon, attributed death to uremic convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - ROBERT GARDENER, aged 14 years, a farm labourer, until lately in the employ of Mr Perrin, of Whitford Farm, near Totnes, complained to his father at the beginning of October that he had fallen off a load of corn and struck the back of his head which gave him considerable pain, but he did not remember the day on which the accident occurred. He still continued very unwell until October 14th when he became so much worse that he was removed to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital at Plymouth, and yesterday morning he died there. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, Mr D. Stephens, house surgeon at the Hospital, attributed death to cerebral haemorrhage, consequent upon the injuries received. The Jury returned an Open Verdict, there being no evidence to show how the boy injured his head.

EXETER - Shocking Fatality At Exeter. - A shocking accident took place yesterday at the foundry of Messrs. Bodley Bros., engineers, of Exeter, by which WILLIAM THORN, aged 23, a labourer employed on the foundry, was killed. It appears that about 10.15 a.m., several men were engaged in swinging a condenser casting off an iron truck by means of three-shear legs worked by a winch. The condenser with its contents weighed over two hundredweight. When the condenser had been raised some distance, the whole affair came down with a crash. All the men except deceased managed to get out of the way, but he was knocked down by a portion of the structure, under which he fell. He was extricated by his comrades, and a medical man called in, but death resulted before the latter arrived. The top of the man's head was smashed, as were also the left frontal and temporal bones. The tripod had been in existence many years, and the shear-legs were made of wood about nine inches in diameter, braced together by a triangular frame of wood some ten feet from the ground. One of the other workmen was also knocked by the woodwork, but was not seriously hurt. The father of deceased was also employed at the foundry. An Inquest was held at the premises last evening, but was adjourned to Thursday morning, in order that the Factory Inspector, Mr Bignold, of Plymouth, might view the tripod.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, last evening, at Plymouth Workhouse, respecting the death of FANNY LEE, aged 63 years. Mr Dyke, Master, stated that deceased was admitted on the 14th August last as a lunatic. About a fortnight ago she became much worse, and was removed to the Hospital, where she died on Tuesday evening. Mr F. A. Thomas, surgeon, attributed death to effusion on and congestion of the brain, and the Jury, of whom Mr Henry Harding was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 23 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - Suicide Of A Plymouth Tradesman. - Residents in the neighbourhood of Union-street, Plymouth, were startled on Saturday morning by the news that MR ALBERT CANNICOTT, stationer, of 193 Union-street, had committed suicide by shooting himself through the head. Deceased, who formerly kept a drapery establishment in the same street, purchased the stationery business only in July last, and resided alone on the premises, his wife and family being at Exmouth. On Saturday morning the errand boy, Walter Roberts, reached the shop at eight o'clock and found it already open. Very shortly afterwards he heard a noise, which he attributed to some heavy substance falling in the next shop or a distant part of the premises, and he took no notice of it. At a quarter to eleven he went to MR CANNICOTT'S room to ask if he wanted any milk for breakfast. After knocking at the door and receiving no reply, he looked into the room and saw his employer lying on the floor with his face discoloured. Young Roberts did not know that he was dead, but realised that something serious had happened, and at once told Miss Hannans, the assistant in the shop, who sent for the Police. P.C. Voysey quickly arrived, followed shortly afterwards by Inspector H. Hill and Mr Wolferstan, the Police Surgeon. They found the deceased lying on his right side, with a six-chambered revolver clasped tightly in his right hand. Blood had flowed from a bullet wound in the right side of the head. Life was extinct, but the body was not cold. At the Inquest which was held in the evening by Mr A. S. Clark at the Commercial Hotel, Miss Emily Hannan stated that deceased had for several days been very despondent, and had frequently remarked he wished he was dead. He gave no reason, but on Thursday said he had a lot of trouble. Witness last saw him alive at eight o'clock on Friday evening. He was then in a depressed mood. - Walter Roberts and P.C. Voysey described the circumstances connected with the discovery of the deceased. Inspector H. Hill said he examined the revolver, and found a discharged cartridge in one of the chambers. All the other chambers were empty. In a chest of drawers in the room he found four cartridges, which fitted the weapon. Witness also found a receipt for the revolver, which he (deceased) purchased from Mr fox, 67 Old Town-street, in the name of Collins, on the previous Tuesday. When purchasing the weapon MR CANNICOTT said he intended to present it to a friend who was going to Australia. He asked for some cartridges and Mr Fox gave him six. In an envelope on the table addressed "MRS CANNICOTT, 14 Victoria-terrace, Exmouth," witness found the following unsigned letter written on one of the deceased's memorandum papers:- " I consider I have been thoroughly taken in over this business, and I see no chance of pulling through." Witness telegraphed to MRS CANNICOTT, from whom a reply was received by Miss Hannan, stating she would arrive at Plymouth that evening. - Miss Hannan, recalled, identified the letter produced by Inspector Hill as in MR CANNICOTT'S writing and stated she saw it in his room more than a week ago. - The Coroner said there could be no doubt that deceased died from injuries self-inflicted and from Miss Hannan's testimony there was a strong presumptive evidence that his mind was deranged. He had known deceased for years and acted for him professionally on one or two occasions and he had not the slightest doubt his mind had been in a very queer state for many months. Mr William Hearder, the Foreman and several of the Jury who were personally acquainted with the deceased, testified that his conduct had for a long time been strange, and a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held at the Plymouth Workhouse on Saturday evening by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, respecting the death of JANE THORN, aged 67 years. Ellen Lewton, residing at 29 Kinterbury-street, Plymouth, stated that deceased was her mother and that she had been an imbecile for the last twenty years. About eight years ago she became much worse and was removed to the Workhouse. Mr E. G. Dyke stated that deceased was admitted in January 1884, and she had been in the lunatic ward ever since. On Friday morning last she complained of pains in her side, and died suddenly in the afternoon. Mr F. A. Thomas, the House Surgeon, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to rupture of a blood vessel on the brain, followed by an immense effusion of blood. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Collicott was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

STOKE CANON - The Stoke Canon Poisoning Case. Result Of The Inquest. - The Inquiry relative to the death at Stoke Canon, of CAROLINE MOLLAND, was resumed on Saturday. Deceased was in the habit of taking a solution of morphia mixed with an equal quantity of water; which she procured from Holman and Ham, chemists, Exeter. After taking what she alleged was some of these drops, on the morning of 4th instant, she was seized with violent pains and died in dreadful agony. The Inquest was adjourned in order to have the contents of the woman's stomach analysed. On Saturday Mr W. Friend (Friend and Beal), appeared for Messrs. Holman and Ham, and Deputy Chief Constable Jesse was also present. Mr P. T. Rowsell, assistant, said a day or two before MRS MOLLAND'S death he supplied a carrier with three ounces of mixture, being 1 ½ ounce of solution of morphia and 1 ½ ounce of water. The prescription was made up by an apprentice. He generally made up the prescriptions himself and the apprentices had an opportunity of seeing how it was done. There was a mark on the bottle supplied to deceased to shew how much morphia should be put into it. A bottle of strychnine was on the same shelf about six inches apart from the morphia but both were distinctly marked, so that there would be very little chance of anybody making a mistake. - William John Hodges, the apprentice who made up the prescription, said this was not the first time he had dispensed MRS MOLLAND'S medicine, but he had previously done it under the supervision of Mr Rowsell. He had never known more than three ounces of the mixture supplied at one time. He was positive he did not take down the strychnine instead of the morphia. - Dr A. W. Blyth deposed to analysing the contents of the stomach, and also the bottle which had been sent him. The bottle contained a solution of strychnine, two grains to the ounce. The bottle was an ordinary six-ounce bottle, with the usual ounce divisions. The exact amount of liquor in the bottle was four ounces and nine-tenths. The solution of strychnine was practically of the same strength as the solution of morphia said to have been made up by Hodges. From the contents of the stomach he abstracted a very minute portion of strychnine, not more than 2.13ths of a grain. That would not be sufficient to cause death in an adult, but a great portion of it would be absorbed in the tissues. In his opinion this was clearly a case of strychnine poisoning. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - At an Inquiry held by the Borough Coroner, Mr A. S. Clark, at the Dew Drop Inn, Bath-street, Plymouth, last evening respecting the death of WILLIAM HENRY LOSE, aged 3 months, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury of whom Mr G. Drewer was Foreman. ELIZA EMILY LOSE, the mother, stated that early on Sunday morning she took him in her arms, and he expired suddenly. Mr C. H. Bean, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination, found that the wind pipe was intensely inflamed, and the base of both lungs congested. Death was due to Pneumonia.

EXETER - Fatality On The Railway Near Exeter. - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday respecting the death of GEORGE LAKE, 35, packer, in the employ of the G.W.R. Co. - Chief Inspector Shattock represented the company. - Deceased, a married man with four children, formed one of a gang of packers working at Cowley Junction, and had been ordered by the ganger, James Hookway, to go to a hut 250 yards distant for packing. While he was gone the G.W. engine Swallow passed on the down line a S.W.R. train on the up line. The fireman on the G.W.R. train noticed a man walking on the outside of the down line rails and blew the small whistle. The S.W. train at this moment came along and the man was hidden from view by the steam. - The signalman, James Steed, from his cabin also saw deceased walking on the line and called out to him, "Down train." The noise of the passing train, however, prevented the man from hearing him and he walked on without taking any notice. After the train had passed Steed could see no one on the line, and he called the ganger. Together they went along the line as far as the bridge, where they found deceased lying on his face quite dead. - In answer to Mr Banbury (a Juryman), Hookway said he did not consider it his duty to warn deceased that a train would pass shortly. He generally told the packers when they were working on the line altogether. - Mr Shattock explained that all the men knew what times the trains passed and were each provided with a book of rules. - Mr J. Moon, surgeon, of Exeter, deposed that deceased's head was smashed in, with the brains protruding. Both legs and one arm also sustained compound fractures. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 25 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - Two Inquests were held by Mr A. S. Clark in Plymouth Guildhall yesterday, the Foreman of the Jury being Mr N. Bidford. The first was respecting the death of JOHN HOWELL, aged 70 years, a coal porter, residing at 4 Queen Ann's-place, Cattedown. ELIZABETH HOWELL, his widow, last saw him alive on Saturday morning, when he said he was going to see Mr Toms about his money for work done on the previous day. Deceased was not addicted to drink, but would partake of a little ale occasionally. James Wm. Veale, a submarine diver, residing at 3 Stoke's-lane, Plymouth, stated that on hearing that the deceased was missing and that his hat had been found on the Barbican, he obtained the creepers from Harbour Avenue Police Station, and dragged the pool, finding deceased's body off the North Quay. P.C. Jones stated that on the deceased was found 10 ½ d. in coppers, a knife and a pair of spectacles. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. -

PLYMOUTH - The second Inquiry related to the death of the daughter, aged one day, of GEORGE BAILEY, a merchant seaman, residing in Whimple-street, Plymouth. Mr C. H. Cuming, surgeon, attributed death to asphyxia, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

OTTERY ST MARY - MARY BATSTONE, aged 79, a widow, who lived by herself in Sandhill-street, Ottery St Mary, on the afternoon of 4th instant, called to Robert Dunster and Bert Elston, two boys outside her house, to fetch Mrs Gover, a neighbour, quickly. Mrs Gover found the underclothing of the old lady was burning and that she had been badly burnt about the legs and body. She was removed to the Cottage Hospital, and there died from exhaustion. At an Inquest yesterday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

STOKE DAMEREL - HENRY STEER, aged 28 years, a carrier, residing at 44 Penrose-street, Plymouth, last Friday afternoon was driving a single horse and cart down St. Aubyn-ope, Devonport, and, on endeavouring to turn into Fore-street, the horse stumbled. STEER was thrown out violently on his head. A doctor ordered his removal to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he died on Monday afternoon. Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest and Mr J. H. Gough, surgeon at the Hospital, attributed death to fracture at the base of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 26 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquiry was held by Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, at the South Western Hotel, Plymouth, yesterday afternoon, respecting the death of ANNE KIDGER, aged 49 years, residing at 59 York-street. Alfred Arnall, a tailor, residing at 28 Arundel-crescent, stated that on the previous day deceased passed his shop window at the back of York-street, and hearing a fall he went out and found deceased in a sitting position in the passage. With assistance she was removed to a tenant's room, and placed in bed. Mr E. B. Thomson, surgeon, said death was due to syncope. The Jury of whom Mr W. Yeo was Foreman, returned a verdict of Death from "Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Friday 27 November 1891 PLYMOUTH - Mr A. S. Clark held an Inquiry at Plymouth Workhouse yesterday relative to the death of ELIZABETH RENDLE. - Louisa Hicks, 155 King-street, said deceased had lived in her house. - Mr E. G. Dyke, Master of the Workhouse, said when deceased was admitted to the House on Monday last, she was so ill that he ordered her immediate removal to the Hospital, and sent for Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon. - Thomas Brewer, Plymouth School Board porter, said he was going through King-street on Monday, when he saw deceased lying on the pavement. Being unable to find her friends, he took her to Mr Mayell, and thence to the Workhouse on his handcart. Mr w. H. Brenton, surgeon, acting for Mr A. Thomas, surgeon, who is seriously ill, made a post-mortem examination and attributed death to acute pleurisy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the S.D. and E.C. Hospital, relative to the death of SAMUEL HAWKINGS. - Thomas Notte residing at 33 Gibbons-street, said on Monday last, he was called to the deceased's room and found him cutting his throat before a looking-glass. Witness rushed over and took away the knife and bound an apron around the wound until a doctor arrived. Deceased was afterwards conveyed to the Hospital by P.C. Luckham. - Mr H. Stephens, house surgeon, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on Monday suffering from a cut throat and diseased lungs. Death was due to congestion of the lungs, accelerated by the wound in the throat. - A verdict of "Death from Congestion of the Lungs, accelerated by the Cut Throat" was returned. Mr W. Newcombe was Foreman of the Jury.

PLYMOUTH - Mr Clark held an Inquest at the Oddfellow's Hall, Morley-street, respecting the death of VIOLET ELIZABETH WHITE, aged 7 weeks. ELIZABETH WHITE, 22 Russell-street, Plymouth, the mother, stated that on retiring to rest on the previous night the child seemed to be in perfect health. On waking in the morning she found her dead by her side and sent for a doctor. Mr W. H. Brenton, surgeon, said death in his opinion was sue to convulsions, as the hands were clenched and the lips blue. The Jury, of whom Mr. J. Clotworthy was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at Exeter yesterday touching the death of JANE ANN BEATRICE DARTON STACEY, 31, who has resided in the city for about 11 years, but who was brought up at Plymouth. Deceased went to bed on Tuesday night complaining of feeling unwell and the next morning was found dead. Dr Kempe said STACEY died from bronchitis and heart disease, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER - An Inquest was held on the body of LOUISA SMITH, aged 50, who was found dead in bed, and in this case a verdict of "Death from Heart Disease" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 28 November 1891 COFFINSWELL - An Inquest was held at Coffinswell yesterday relative to the death of MISS SMITH, who was found on Wednesday suspended by a handkerchief from a bracket in her bedroom. Deceased had suffered from fits of depression at various times for some years past; and had previously made an attempt on her life. Although she had recently not been free from depression, there was no suspicion that she would kill herself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM ANDERSON, aged three months, was found dead by the side of his mother in bed yesterday morning at Buckland Hall, Station-road, Plymouth. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, at the Birkenhead Hotel, Mr McBeath, surgeon, attributed death to suffocation the child having been overlaid by its mother; and the Jury of whom Mr G. Westlake was Foreman, found accordingly. Mr T. Lyne Coode watched the case on behalf of the mother.

EAST STONEHOUSE - Mr R. R. Rodd, at St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, investigated the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD CHARLES FORD, aged 12 years, at 29 East-street, Stonehouse. JOSHUA FORD, deceased's father, stated that his son went to bed on the previous night, as usual, with his brother, and in the morning on going to call him he found him dead in bed. Deceased was subject to nervous fits. Mr W. H. Waterfield, surgeon, who was called in, said the lad had been dead quite two hours. He must have had a nervous fit; his head was under the pillow, causing suffocation. The Jury of whom Mr S. Brown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 30 November 1891 TEIGNMOUTH - MR THOMAS SQUAREY, aged 77 years, was found dead in the roadway outside his residence, 9 Den-crescent, Teignmouth on Friday night. At the Inquest on Saturday Dr Johns said deceased was paralysed and was seized with an apoplectic fit, which caused instant death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

IVYBRIDGE - The Fatal Accident Near Ivybridge. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Ivybridge, with reference to the death of THOMAS GOSLING WATTS, 21 years of age, a labourer, who, as reported in the "Western Morning News" of Saturday, was accidentally killed on Friday on the works in connection with the extensions of the Great Western Railway Company, near that place. Mr R. B. Johns (Shelly and Johns) appeared for the contractors, Messrs. S. Pearson and Son, of London. - The evidence of Charles Styles, engine driver, was to the effect that at ten minutes past seven on Friday morning he was in charge of a steam travelling crane on the new works, and that as deceased passed him on his way to work, he was about to hoist a skip of bricks. Deceased attached the skip to the chains and gave the word to "heave up." Witness wound up the skip and warned deceased to stand clear, which he did, stepping back some ten or twelve feet to a place of safety. When witness put his foot on the brake to hold it whilst he took the crane out of the winding purchase, he found that owing to the frost the brake would not act, and it "ran away." He called out, "Look out, TOM," and deceased appeared to run from his place of safety directly under the descending skip, which came down upon him and killed him instantly. - In answer to the Jury, witness said that deceased had ample time to get clear; and in reply to Mr Johns he said he had had great experience in working cranes, and he was perfectly satisfied that but for the frost the accident would not have happened. He would undertake that not only in frosty weather, but always he would in future test cranes before using them at the beginning of a day's work. - After hearing medical and other evidence, the Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and complimented Mr Searle, the stationmaster at Ivybridge, on the ready manner in which he had allowed a waiting room to be used for the reception of the body of the deceased.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 2 December 1891 INSTOW - The Fatal Accident To MAJOR HINCHLIFF. - The County Coroner, Mr J. F. Bromham, held an Inquest last evening at Worlington House, Instow, touching the death of MAJOR CHAMBERLAIN HENRY HINCHLIFF. Mr E. H. Jessop was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and the other Jurymen were Messrs. F. Lemarchant, W. Fry, W. Turner, Molland (3), J. Jones, J. Ridge, C. Pedlar, W. Beer, and C. L. Bell. - MR C. H. HINCHLIFF, son of the deceased, identified the body, and said his father was in his usual health and spirits whilst at luncheon the previous day. His father was a retired major of the 64th Regiment and was 64 years of age. - The coachman, Reuben Chapman, and the under-gardener, C. M. Scoyn, deposed to being sent, about twenty minutes past six, to look for their master, he having gone out shooting alone earlier in the afternoon and not returned when it got dusk. They had not crossed the firs field before they heard groans, and going to the gateway found the Major lying on the other side on his face. He was conscious and told them he had slipped and fallen whilst getting over the gate, and that his gun had gone off. They found the gun with the stock on the ground close to the Major's heels and the muzzle leaning against the gate. He repeated his explanation of the occurrence several times, and ordered one of the men to unload the gun. He did so, and found one cartridge discharged and one loaded. Where they found MAJOR HINCHLIFF was not more than between two and three hundred yards from the front door of the house. They had not heard a gun shot during the afternoon, and would not have taken any notice of it if they had. - Dr C. S. Thompson, who arrived at the house about a quarter of an hour before MAJOR HINCHLIFF died, said there was a small wound just below ribs on right side. The clothes and skin were singed, pointing (with the nature of the wound) to the conclusion that the gun had gone off when in close contact with the body, and that the whole of the contents were lodged within the abdomen. There was not excessive external bleeding, but the internal bleeding must have been very great. Under no circumstance would it have been possible to save his life, even though a medical man had been present when the accident actually happened. - The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and also offered their sincere sympathy with the widow and family in their great affliction.

SOUTH MOLTON - MR W. L. BRAYLEY fell down dead on Sunday evening in Duke-street, Southmolton, and at an Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Deceased, 71 years of age, was foreman for many years in the employ of the late Alderman Smythey, tanner.

TOTNES - Death From Burning In Totnes Workhouse. - On Sunday afternoon, SUSAN HILL, aged 63, an inmate of Totnes Workhouse, was found with her clothes on fire sitting in the bath in the bath-room. The fire was extinguished and she was taken to the Hospital. She stated that she set fire to herself with a match, but did not think it was going to be so bad, she was attended by Dr Hains, and died on Monday night. Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday, Mr E. L. Middleton being Foreman of the Jury. - Wm. Beer, porter, said deceased had been in the Workhouse some time, and came from Dartmouth. On Sunday afternoon he heard someone call out "Fire," and went to the sewing-room, whence the scream proceeded. He found deceased sitting in the bath in the bath-room a few stairs below the sewing-room. There was a little water in the bath and deceased's clothes were burning. he took an apron dipped it in the water and wrapped it around her. The Matron was sent for, and deceased was removed to the Hospital. - Charlotte Ann Miller, the schoolmistress at the Workhouse, who assisted in extinguishing the fire, and removed the deceased's clothes, asked deceased how she caught herself on fire, and she replied, "I set fire to myself. I did it with a match. I did not think it was going to be so bad." - Mrs Babbage, the head nurse, said two or three times deceased said she intended to destroy herself in some way, as she was tired of life. She said she set herself on fire. - Dr Hains, medical officer, said he had known deceased for some time, and lately she complained to him she could not swallow. He found nothing amiss with her, and then she told him it was through having tried to cut her throat with a knife. He saw no marks about her nor any symptoms of insanity. When he was called on Sunday evening she said she had got a match and paper and set fire to herself. She died from shock, the effects of the burns. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Burning," and expressed the opinion that deceased was Temporarily Insane.

Western Morning News, Thursday 3 December 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - ELIZA BAKER, widow of WILLIAM BAKER, retired coastguard, died suddenly at 7 Carlton-terrace, Stonehouse, on Monday evening. At an Inquest yesterday, Dr Rees, who had made a post-mortem examination by order of the Coroner (Mr R. R. Rodd), attributed death to valvular disease of the heart, and the Jury of whom Mr T. Brown was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TEIGNMOUTH - At Teignmouth yesterday Mr S. Hacker Inquired into the circumstances attending the death of SELINA OSBORNE, 69 years of age, who died at 3 Commercial-road on Sunday morning. Deceased about seven weeks ago fell down in her passage, and received a blow. A few days later she again fell and her husband, knowing she was in the habit of coming home drunk, left her lying in the passage. There she remained two days and nights, and refused medical assistance. After much persuasion, however, she was got to bed. Dr Rudd who attended her, stated that the injury she received by her fall caused gangrene in her leg, and through her intemperate habits there was little chance of saving her life. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Western Morning News, Saturday 5 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, yesterday, respecting the death of WALTER GRINDLEY. Mr William Stanbury was chosen Foreman of the Jury. CATHERINE GRINDLEY, widow of the deceased, said her late husband was a lithographic printer in the employ of Messrs. Mansfield, Plymouth, and was 36 years of age. Robert Gibson, a letterpress machine minder, said on Friday last deceased and witness were working together. The belt broke and both got the belt ready for connecting. Witness dropped the end of the belt through the holes, deceased went down and leant across the shafting. The coupling of the shafting caught his cardigan jacket and carried him around. Witness heard a noise made by deceased's feet, and immediately rushed downstairs, threw the belt off the engine and brought the shaft to a standstill, and had to cut the clothes off deceased to free him. Mr D. Stephens, house surgeon, said it was necessary to amputate the shoulder joint and the operation was performed by Mr Woolcombe. Deceased became worse and died on the 3rd inst. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Suicide At Moretonhampstead. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening at the White Horse Hotel, Moretonhampstead, relative to the death of GEORGE JOHN BELLAMY, aged 31 years, butcher. - SIMON BELLAMY, father of deceased, said his son was ingle and lived at home with him. At dinner on Wednesday he appeared as usual. He told his mother to get the books out, and he would be there again in a minute or two. As he did not come they sent for him, and his man told him his son was in the barn quite dead. The gun produced was brought to his house months ago by Mr Pollard's man, Pedrick, who shot the bullocks for him. It was Mr Pollard's gun and was kept in a little place behind the shop. Deceased had not used it to his knowledge. - William Northcott, farm labourer, in the employ of MESSRS. BELLAMY, said on going to the barn to give the bullocks meat he saw GEORGE BELLAMY dead, lying in a pool of blood. did not see any gun. - Wallace Parker, mason, who was going to North Bovey on Wednesday afternoon, said he overtook deceased. Asked him if he was going round the ground, and he did not answer. Knowing he was deaf he repeated it, and he then said "No." Made other remarks, but deceased made no reply. Deceased went on, but looked back once or twice in a rather queer manner. - William Charles Lavers, saddler and ironmonger, said on Monday night deceased bought a few caps, and taking out a powder flask, asked him if he thought it was any good, or damp. On Tuesday he came for wads, and asked to borrow a cleaner, but did not take it. Some time ago he had said he should take up shooting again this winter. On Wednesday morning he looked in the shop and conversed as usual. Said nothing about the gun then. - Robert Page said on the body was found powder and shot flasks, seven caps, purse, money, keys and an account book produced. - Mr G. N. Collyns, M.R.C.S., said deceased was lying on his back as straight as if laid out for burial. The gun was lying near on the right side with barrel pointing away from body. Had apparently been dead about two hours. The muzzle of the gun was evidently in his mouth when fired, and the lips were discoloured and swollen. The charge had fractured the bones of the head, &c., but had not passed through. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Western Morning News, Monday 7 December 1891 EXETER - At Exeter on Saturday, a Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of MRS SARAH LAKE, a widow, aged 83, who fell whilst walking across the room and fractured the left thigh, which caused her death.

EXETER - Drowned At Exeter. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Exeter on Saturday into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH SIDNEY SNELL, aged 13, an errand boy in the employ of Mr Pengilley, butcher, of St. Thomas. About seven o'clock on Friday evening he was sent to Mrs Arscott, who resides near the Port Royal, on the river banks. About quarter past eight, Frederick W. Matthews, a haulier, heard at the quay a splash, and in the river, near the bridge, opposite the Custom House, saw a lad sink. William Perriam and a man named Langdon fetched the drags, and the body of deceased was recovered in three-quarters of an hour. Matthews, being unable to swim, could not rescue the deceased. - Perriam expressed the opinion that grapnels should be kept close by the Custom House. At present the only appliances were kept on the other side of the ferry. - A Juryman said it was the most dangerous part of the river, and he had a lively recollection of falling in there once. - A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and the Coroner promised to forward to the proper quarter a suggestion that a chain should be placed at the angle of the bridge to prevent accidents. It is thought that SNELL, whose sight was rather defective, walked into the river.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 8 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - GEORGE HENRY BARRETT, aged 11 months, was on Sunday morning found dead in bed by the side of his mother, residing at 1 Woolster-street, Plymouth. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark last evening, Mr. C. E. Bean, surgeon, attributed death to pneumonia and the Jury, of whom Mr W. Parsons was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

PLYMOUTH - MISS SARAH SPILLER LAMERTON, aged 71, residing at 6 Seymour-avenue, Plymouth, who had been very unwell since last Tuesday, was taken worse early on Sunday morning and died. Mr A. S. Clark held an Inquiry at deceased's residence yesterday, when Mr. G. H. Eccles, surgeon, attributed death to congestion of the lungs, accelerated by disease of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Bickle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Wednesday 9 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - WILLIAM HENRY WESTON SHEPPARD, aged 30 years, a man of colour, residing at 6 Morley-place, was found dead on his mother's bed on Monday night. At the Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, last evening, Mr. W. H. Brenton, surgeon, attributed death to syncope and the Jury, of whom Mr S. Sears was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Thursday 10 December 1891 DUNSFORD - MR W. WESTLAKE, farmer, of Dandyland Farm, Dunsford, arriving home with his son from Exeter, fell from the shaft of the trap whilst getting out and did not speak afterwards. Falling on his forehead he had broken his neck. Deceased, 73 years of age, was a sober man. At an Inquest yesterday, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - JOHN MARSHALL, aged about 48 years, an omnibus driver, residing at 3 Catherine-street, Plymouth, on Tuesday evening was seen to cross the line at Mutley Station, and walk up the railway. Stopped by Thomas Cole, one of the porters, he came back and entered a field at Houndiscombe, where he was found dead a few minutes later by Cole. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Guildhall, when Mr J. H. S. May, surgeon, stated that he had attended deceased for some time for bronchitis and that the effort of dressing and walking to Mutley whilst in such an indifferent state of health brought on syncope. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Tremeer was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

CREDITON - Burnt To Death At Crediton. - An Inquest was held at Crediton last evening by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of BERTIE ARCHIBALD STONE, between 4 and 5 years of age. The father of the deceased, a widower, left home on Tuesday morning about 7 o'clock, leaving his four children, three daughters and one son, the eldest of whom is 14, alone in the house until the arrival of his niece who takes charge of the house during his absence. A few minutes after he left, the deceased and his little sister came downstairs in their nightclothes. The girl got on a box to dress and her brother went out into the scullery, and took a benzoline lamp from a bench, which he brought into the kitchen and held over the fire. The oil fell out and his nightdress became ignited. He ran upstairs screaming. - Mrs Keightley ran in and saw some flames about the floor of the kitchen, which she at once put out. She afterwards found the deceased on the stairs with his nightdress in flames. She did her best to put the flames out. Medical aid was also called in, but deceased, who was terribly burnt, died about half-past ten. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - Dr Boddy said it was wise in such cases to run to the nearest bed and get a blanket and to roll the child in it.

Western Morning News, Friday 11 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - MARY MEHEUX, aged 83, residing at 9 Charles-place, Plymouth, was opening a drawer on 2nd inst., when the handle came off and she fell backwards, breaking her hip bone, and sustaining a severe shock, from which she died yesterday. At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, Mr R. Hughes, M.B., gave evidence and the Jury, of whom Mr J. Searle was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Monday 14 December 1891 CUBERT, CORNWALL - There is no doubt that the gentleman found in the engine-house of Penhale Mine, Cubert on Friday, is that of MR GEORGE CROWHURST, of Stewdon Farm, Highampton, Devon. He had with him a cheque book and a banker's pass-book, showing that he had an account with Messrs. Molineux, Whitfield and Co., of Bourne. He has been missing for some weeks, and at an Inquest held on Saturday by Mr E. Carlyon, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead." The funeral took place at Cubert.

PLYMOUTH - At an Inquest held by Mr A. S. Clark, at the Three Crowns Hotel, Plymouth, on Saturday, the widow of RICHARD GALE, aged 70, stated that six months ago he fell and had been in bed ever since, often complaining of pain in his thigh. On Thursday he became worse and died. Dr Cuming, who had made a post-mortem examination, attributed death to syncope, believing that the fall only resulted in a slight shock. The Jury, of whom Mr A. Bracken, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 15 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Tandem Inn, the Octagon, Plymouth, yesterday, relative to the death of ELIZA HALLETT, aged 69 years. Her husband stated that on Sunday morning she complained of being unwell and he got up to get her a cup of tea. Suddenly her loud moaning ceased and turning round he found she was dead. Dr Bean, who had made a post-mortem examination, found that death was due to rupture of the heart, accelerated by dropsy; and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Mr T. Higman was Foreman of the Jury.

SOUTH BRENT - Mr Sydney Hacker held an Inquiry at Brent last evening, touching the death of MR HENRY SOPER, builder, who was found lying dead in the road on Saturday morning. William Prideaux, an intelligent boy of five years, stated that he saw the deceased fall over the back of the horse, adding that "one of the horse's back feet skidded along." Mr W. Lake deposed to finding the deceased lying in the road quite dead. Dr McCreery stated that deceased's skull was fractured, and that in his opinion faintness was the cause of deceased's fall. The Jury, of whom Mr. W. Davis was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with the widow and family.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 16 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - MR JOHN CHOPE CHOWN, aged 77 years, a retired master butcher, residing at 4 Victoria-terrace, Plymouth, fell twice at home on Thursday week and became so ill that he had to be removed to his bed, where he remained until Monday morning, when he died. Mr A. S. Clark, Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr S. Scoble was Foreman, yesterday held an Inquiry at deceased's residence, when Mr M. D. Keily, surgeon, stated that he had attended deceased since the 3rd inst. for concussion of the brain, which was caused by the fall. He attributed death to concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Western Morning News, Thursday 17 December 1891 HARTLAND - Gored To Death By A Bull. - Mr J. F. Bromham held an Inquest at Farford Farm, Hartland, yesterday, on the body of JAMES WALTER, 45, son of a farmer who was gored to death by a bull on Monday afternoon. Whilst being attended to the bull, usually a quiet one, turned furiously on deceased and knocked him down twice. His cousin, JOHN HENRY WALTER, ran to his assistance and beat off the animal with a stick. Deceased managed to struggle over a gate and then became unconscious. Dr Miller was called, but found the patient dead. On examination he found a punctured wound 4 inches wide and 6 inches deep over the region of the heart, which led him to believe the bull's horn had actually entered the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The bull has since been shot.

BOVEY TRACEY - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Mission Hall, Bovey Tracey, on Tuesday, on the body of ROSE HARRIET BRAYLEY, aged 2 ½ years, who died on Sunday without medical attendance. A verdict of death from Natural Causes was given in accordance with the medical evidence. The Coroner severely censured the parents for the dirty state in which the child was found. Mr Withem, inspector for the prevention of cruelty to children was present.

Western Morning News, Friday 18 December 1891 EAST STONEHOUSE - At St. George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, assisted by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, opened an Inquiry concerning the death of MARGARET GRACE COLLARD, aged 60, who received in February last injuries which Mr Lucy, surgeon, considers to have accelerated her death. Mr Rodd mentioned that Messrs. Paul Swain and M. H. Bulteel had made a post-mortem examination, but he had not yet received their report and it would be therefore necessary to adjourn the Inquiry. The Jury, of whom Mr E. S. Lancaster was Foreman, having viewed the body, the Inquiry was adjourned until Monday next.

Western Morning News, Saturday 19 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the New Town Inn, York-street, Plymouth, yesterday, before Mr A. S. Clark, Coroner, on the body of SUSANNAH BLATCHFORD, spinster, aged 55 years. Anne Neno, a sister of deceased, said she was sitting in the kitchen last night with witness's child on her lap when without a word she suddenly fell to the ground dead. Dr W. H. Brenton, who was at once called in, said he had made a post-mortem examination and found deceased had died from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury, of whom Mr A. J. Osborne was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Western Morning News, Tuesday 22 December 1891 STOKE DAMEREL - On the 27th August last, EDMUND STANLEY WOOD, 2 years of age, whose parents lived at 42 James-street, Devonport, severely scalded himself about the chest and arms by upsetting a teapot. After being medically treated at home, the child was removed to the Royal Albert Hospital, where he appeared to be progressing favourably until a few days ago when he caught cold, and bronchitis supervened. The child died early yesterday morning, and at an Inquest held at the Hospital later in the day by Mr J. Vaughan, Borough Coroner, a verdict of "Accidentally Scalded" was returned.

EAST STONEHOUSE - The COLLARD Case At Stonehouse. Inquest: The Police Censured. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, assisted by Mr. R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, held an adjourned Inquiry at St George's Hall, Stonehouse, yesterday, relative to the death of MARGARET GRACE COLLARD, aged 60, who received injuries in February from which she succumbed on Tuesday last. Mr John W. Bickle appeared on behalf of the relatives of deceased. Mr E. S. Lancaster was Foreman of the Jury. The Police refused to give evidence unless subpoenaed and were not legally represented. Superintendent Allen was present in Court for a short time. - P.C. Charles Welsman, Devon County Constabulary, now stationed at Exeter, but previously at Stonehouse, deposed that on February 14th last, about seven o'clock in the evening, he saw deceased lying on the edge of the pavement in East-street. Two women were standing by her side, and one came to witness and said deceased was drunk. Witness lifted her up by the arms. He advised her to go home, but after walking two or three yards she fell down. He took her into custody, and carried her as far as the Battery Inn, where he met a man named Thompson, who came to his assistance. She could walk a little, but after proceeding half a dozen yards he sent for P.C. Ridge. The latter took her by the legs and witness and Thompson held her body and in this way they took her direct to the charge-room, where they sat her on a form. P.C. Beer took the charge of being "drunk and incapable." Witness and Beer took her down to the cells, Beer holding deceased's legs, and witness her body. Previous to being put in the cell Mrs Holwill searched deceased. Before going into the cell deceased said she had been drinking a little brandy and did not know how she got in that state, or words to that effect. Believed deceased walked into the cell. Deceased did not to his recollection say she had fallen in East-street and hurt her leg. Did not think she was suffering from injuries. Could not tell which eye was swollen after the lapse of so much time. Her incapacity to walk was due to drunkenness. - By the Foreman: Deceased was searched whilst standing. Never heard deceased make any complaint of having received injuries. Did not think she sat on the form in the charge-room without any assistance. - By a Juryman: Deceased was not troublesome whilst being taken to the Station. Did not let her fall. - By Mr Bickle: When he accused deceased of being drunk she replied "I have had only a little brandy and water." Could not remember deceased saying "I have a bad leg." At the bottom of the stairs there was a long passage, across which P.C. Beer carried her on his back. Deceased did not say "I will reward you if you take me home." A little girl might have spoken to deceased and said "Do you live at Goad's Buildings," but it was so long ago he could not remember. - Reginald Horace Lucy, F.R.C.S., Plymouth, stated that he was first called, with Mr Bean, to see deceased on February 15th at Goad's-buildings. She was in bed. After administering an anaesthetic, they examined her. She was suffering severely from shock, had a large bruise over the left eye, both eyes were blackened, nose grazed and left knee-joint much swollen, bruised and reddened. On further examination he found the knee cap fractured in four fragments and the joint full of blood. The right elbow was swollen, much bruised above and below the joint, and a portion of one of the bones forming the elbow-joint was broken off and loose in the joint. Two fingers of the left-hand were very much bruised. Seeing her serious condition, witness ordered her removal to the S.D. and E. C. Hospital. He had made a post-mortem examination with the assistance of Messrs. Swain and Bulteel. The result of the examination confirmed his opinion as to the injuries when he made the external examination in February last. The first part of the fracture of the kneecap might have been caused by deceased making a false step and endeavouring to save herself from falling. The lower fragments must have been caused by direct violence such as the knee-cap striking some hard body. The primary cause of death was, in his opinion, due to slow failure of the heart's action. There was no disease to shew that the woman had ever been a drunkard. Had deceased been drunk and incapable, as stated, he must have found traces of the effects when he visited deceased sixteen hours afterwards. Deceased told him she had had a fit. - In answer to the Deputy Coroner, witness considered that the injuries were curable if the woman had been properly treated when found. The lapse of time before she received medical treatment undoubtedly aggravated her injuries. - By Mr Bickle: A fall whilst in a drunken state would not, in his opinion, have caused the first fracture because the fracture was of a transverse nature. The fractures were caused in two distinct stages. Within eight or nine hours of his examining witness it would have been impossible for deceased to have walked without assistance or use her right arm. - Mr Bickle having referred to the depositions before the magistrates, the Foreman expressed a hope that the proceedings would be conducted independently of what took place before the magistrates. - Mr Paul Swain, surgeon, Plymouth, corroborated the evidence of the previous witness in regard to the post-mortem examination. There was no distinctive mark which would shew deceased to have been an inveterate drunkard. If a person was incapably drunk, a medical man would detect it next day. - Mr Marcus H. Bulteel, surgeon, Stonehouse, also corroborated the evidence tendered by Mr Lucy. - P.C. Beer stated that when deceased was brought to the station she was helplessly drunk. The constables laid her on the floor on her back. Witness did not think he asked deceased her name on taking the charge. Witness told him she had taken a little brandy and port wine which had overcome her. When they got the woman to the bottom of the steps, witness said to Welsman, "Lay her across my shoulder." He then carried her up the corridor where she was searched. Whilst Mrs Holwill was searching her, she asked deceased to turn her head, as she could not stand the smell of drink. Witness assisted deceased into the cell and laid her on the bed. Witness saw her again at half-past eight. He spoke to her, but got no answer and he thought she was asleep. Sometime after the deceased was in custody the husband came to the Station and asked to be allowed to bail out his wife. Witness believed he said she was too drunk and when Sergeant Holwill came he told him she was not fit to be released. COLLARD did not say that his wife must be ill. On the following morning at eight o'clock P.C. Hayman brought deceased from the cells to the charge-room. To the best of his belief she was able to walk. She walked to the cab supported by her husband and a woman. Before leaving the charge-room deceased walked several steps without any assistance. Whilst sitting on a chair deceased said "I fell very ill," and witness replied, "Generally like drunkards in the morning." MR COLLARD asked that a medical man might be allowed to see his wife and witness replied that it was against the order. No one except a solicitor was allowed to see a prisoner. - By a Juryman: Prisoners were supposed to be visited every hour in the cell and a record of the visits made on the slate. They did not always ask defendants their name on being charged. Sometimes they were too drunk to give them. - Witness, at this point, complained that Mr Bickle had stated in the "Western Morning News" that he let the woman fall off his back at the bottom of the steps. - Mr Bickle replied that he had done nothing of the sort. - Ann Holwill, residing at Torquay, and wife of Ex Sergeant Holwill, of the Devon Constabulary, stated that when she searched deceased she was drunk and not faint. Deceased moved her arms whilst being examined, and subsequently walked across the cell. Witness took off her garters, which wee fastened just below the knee, and deceased freely moved both legs. - Sergeant Grylls said that about eight o'clock on the evening of the day deceased was arrested MR COLLARD met him in Union-street, and they walked to the Police Station together. MR COLLARD said he could not understand his wife being drunk, as she only left home shortly before seven o'clock to go to the theatre. He was present next morning when deceased was sitting on a form before the fire with a shawl on her head. She was not sitting on a chair. Deceased said, "I can't walk home." - Ex-Sergeant Holwill deposed to refusing to grant deceased bail until she was sober. MR COLLARD said, "You get a doctor," and witness replied that there was no Police Surgeon. He should have been only too pleased if COLLARD had fetched a doctor himself. COLLARD did not ask to be allowed to see his wife. He acted on P.C. Beer's statements and did not see the woman himself. - By the Foreman: When the officer in charge was satisfied that a prisoner was ill a medical officer was always called in. That only referred to cases where a prisoner complained of being ill. He did not refuse, as had been stated, to allow a medical man to see deceased. - P.C. Ridge, who assisted in carrying the woman to the Station, said he had no doubt deceased was drunk. In the charge-room deceased said "I only had a little wine and brandy." - The Deputy Coroner: Although three of you were required to take her to the Station on account of her incapable condition, yet she was able to make that clear statement. - That's what she said. - William Henry Thompson, a youth, residing at 14 Radford-road, Plymouth, considered that deceased was drunk when arrested. She appeared to be insensible. Deceased's legs were nearly off the ground, and he and Welsman practically carried her to the corner of Battery-street, where they were assisted by P.C. Ridge. Deceased never spoke a word. - Margaret Stratton, aged 14, stated that whilst deceased was in charge of the Police she said, "If you take me home I will reward you." Before she said that she saw the policeman take her up three times and let her drop. - By the Foreman: I was near MRS COLLARD when she spoke. The Policeman, in reply to deceased, said, "I have got no time to do that." Witness here identified Welsman as the Constable who arrested COLLARD. - The Foreman said the little girl had given her evidence very clearly. He suggested that Welsman should have the opportunity of asking questions if he desired. - Witness, in reply to Welsman, again repeated her statements. - P.C. Hayman deposed to going to the cells at seven o'clock in the morning and finding deceased sitting on the bed. She said she did not feel well. At eight o'clock he told her she was going out on bail. She walked into the corridor, put on her bonnet with both hands, and walked through the corridor and half-way up the stairs without assistance. She then exclaimed, "Oh!" and witness assisted her up the remaining steps. - The Foreman: Four doctors have stated that it would be impossible for her to walk without assistance. - I did not assist her across the corridor. - By Mr Bickle: He had never sworn that the woman said, "You will have to get something to take me home. I can't walk." - WILLIAM COLLARD, husband of deceased, emphatically stated that when his wife left home she was perfectly sober. About fifteen minutes afterwards Margaret Stratton came to the house and told him that the Police had arrested his wife. Beer, at the Station, said, "She is drunk - dead to the world. You can have her tomorrow morning at eleven o'clock." In the evening witness and Mr and Mrs Bird asked Sergeant Holwill to be allowed to see deceased, but he refused, making use of the same expression as Beer. Witness asked that a medical man might see his wife and Holwill replied "We should have enough to do to get a doctor for every drunken person." He (COLLARD) offered to get a doctor, but Holwill replied that a doctor was no good to her. Subsequently he called again and asked Beer to allow a female to see her during the night. Beer replied, "Some of our chaps will see her during the night." On the following morning he and Mrs Bird helped his wife up over several steps and into the cab, from which she was carried into the house. His wife was subject to fainting fits and had been treated for it by Dr Pearse. During the thirty-eight yeas of his married life his wife had always been a temperate woman and never the worse for liquor. Going home in the cab deceased kept on saying "Mind my leg and mind my arm." - Frances Baker deposed that before the Policeman came two women picked up COLLARD, who said "I can't stand, I've got a bad leg." When the Policeman arrived he said, "This is a drunken woman." COLLARD replied "No, I've a bad leg." - Witness, replying to the Foreman, said she thought deceased had had a fit when she first saw her lying on the ground. - Emma Bird, and John Bird corroborated the evidence of MR COLLARD relative to their interview with Sergeant Holwill. Mrs Bird stated that whilst lying ill deceased complained to witness of having been treated worse than a dog. - William Martin, cab driver, deposed to assisting deceased into his cab at the Police-station. She appeared to be very ill, and said "I'm dying." - William Henry Knott, Jane Tremlett, John Hancock, John Friend, Emma Friend and Louisa Hargreaves, residing at Goad's Buildings, where deceased lived, deposed that deceased was quite sober when she left home and to her being a woman of very temperate habits. - Mr Bickle intimated that the Inquiry had been so exhaustive that he felt quite confident in leaving the matter in the hands of the Jury. - The Coroner having briefly reviewed the evidence, the Jury, after one hour's deliberation, returned the following verdict:- "That the said MARGARET GRACE COLLARD died on the 15th day of December now last past from slow failure of the heart's action accelerated by injuries accidentally received on February 15th last." - The Foreman, on behalf of the Jury, said they felt a deep sense of their responsibility, and they absolutely desired to see justice meted out to all concerned. He was, therefore, desired to express their extreme regret at the discrepancies which occurred so frequently in the evidence of the Police. The Jury were aware that a long time had elapsed since the main facts of the case were before the Police. At the same time they must express their regret at those discrepancies, and had unanimously added the following rider:- "And the Jury further say upon their oath that the injuries were aggravated to such an extent that they became incurable by the improper treatment she received at the hands of the Police in not granting the husband's repeated request to provide medical treatment and further that the deceased was of temperate habits and when she received the injuries was suffering from illness and was not drunk." - The Inquiry lasted nearly nine hours.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 December 1891 EXETER - "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict of the Jury Inquiring into the death of JACOB VAN LINGE, doctor of divinity, aged 80, at Exeter yesterday. Deceased, who was a native of Holland, and had been ill for some time, was found in a dying state by the domestic servant, Lucy Ware, who visited his room yesterday morning. She had only attended to him a short time before. Deceased had been suffering from bronchitis.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - The Fatality At Stonehouse. Charge of Manslaughter. - At Stonehouse Petty Sessions on Saturday, before General Barton and Captain Lowe, county magistrates, a charge of manslaughter was preferred against William Cook, a fish hawker, who is alleged to have been the driver of the cart which caused the death of WILLIAM SWORDS in Union-street, on Thursday night. - P.C. Cole said about 11.5 on Thursday night he was on duty near Stonehouse Post-office, when he saw a horse and cart coming from the direction of Devonport, the horse galloping. there were three men in the trap. When they came near him he held up his hand and shouted to the man who was driving to stop. Instead of doing so he whipped the pony and drove through a crowd which was standing in the road below the Post-office towards Plymouth, knocking the man down. - The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr G. H. Rundle): Did he shout to them to get out of the way? - No, he did not shout to them at all. Witness, continuing, said he saw the deceased lying on the ground. He ran after the cart, thinking someone would stop it in the street. He ran as far as the Exmouth Inn, and there lost sight of it. On Friday morning, just after ten o'clock, he apprehended prisoner near the Barbican in the stable where he kept his horse, and told him he would be charged with causing the death of SWORDS. Prisoner replied, "I know I was driving through Union-street, but I did not know I had killed anyone." - The Magistrates' Clerk: Did you name the time to him? - Yes, just after eleven. I took him to the Stonehouse Police-station and locked him up. - General Barton: Had you any reason for going to the Barbican? - I had someone with me to identify the man. - The Magistrates' Clerk: Have you seen the body of SWORDS? - Yes, it is the same man who was knocked down in the street. - Superintendent Ackland Allen: Did the man in the cart in any way attempt to pull up the pony? - No, sir, not at all. - Mr W. Randle, saddler, of Union-street, Stonehouse, said about eleven o'clock on Thursday night he was standing outside his house when he heard a shout, and turning round saw a cart coming from Devonport towards Plymouth. The pony was going at a gallop and he stepped back himself to avoid an accident. He shouted to the men in the cart, "Hold hard, it is much too fast. There will be an accident." The driver was whipping the pony at the time, and shortly afterwards a man was knocked down. The streets were crowded, as it was just at the time that people were coming out of the public-houses. There were people on the footpath and in the road. - The Clerk: Where did the man drive? Right into the crows. - Did he shout? - Not at all. After the accident I noticed that he urged the pony on still faster. I saw the constable give chase. - Prisoner declined to ask each witness any questions. - P.C. Cole recalled, said, in reply to Superintendent Ackland Allen, that prisoner was the man who was driving the cart. Did you know the man who was driving the cart? - Yes. I know him when I saw him again. - General Barton said the case must be remanded until today at 11. - Prisoner applied for bail, but the application was refused. The Inquest - At Plymouth Guildhall, on Saturday, an Inquiry was opened by Mr Coroner Clark and a Double Jury into the death of WILLIAM JOHN SWORDS, aged 23, an iron caulker employed at the Devonport dockyard, and living at 23 Pembroke-street, Devonport, who was knocked down and killed by a fish-cart alleged to have been driven by William Cook in Union-street, Stonehouse, late on Christmas-eve. The Coroner intimated his intention of adjourning the Inquest after taking formal evidence of identification, in order to secure the attendance of the driver of the trap, who was in the custody of the Stonehouse police. Strangely enough, he said, Cook had been charged before the Stonehouse magistrates that morning with manslaughter and remanded until Monday. As it would be to the Jury's advantage to know the result of the Police investigation he suggested an adjournment until Wednesday. - JAMES SWORDS, iron caulker, brother of the deceased, identified the body. On Thursday evening, at a few minutes to eleven, he met his brother in Union-street, Stonehouse. Witness afterwards crossed the road with a friend, and after chatting a few minutes returned to the other side to rejoin his brother. just then a fish cart, which was being driven at a furious pace, came along and knocked the deceased down. The horse and cart drove on, without stopping, the driver taking not the least notice of the occurrence. Several bystanders picked his brother up and carried him to the Homeopathic Hospital near the Octagon. As, however, the doctor was away, he could not be admitted and he was conveyed to the Plymouth Guildhall. On arrival there his brother was found to be dead. Deceased as perfectly sober and had frank only a glass of lemonade while in his company. There were several people on the footpath, but very few in the road at the time of the occurrence. His brother was a married man with two children. - Inspector Henry Hill deposed that at 11.30 p.m. on Thursday deceased was brought to the Central Police Station by P.C. Willcocks and several civilians for the purpose of procuring a stretcher and taking him to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. After he was placed on the ambulance witness looked at him, and saw he was dead. He at once sent for a doctor, and had the body removed to the mortuary. Those carrying the deceased thought he was living until witness discovered he was dead. - The Inquest was then adjourned until Wednesday evening at half-past six.

PLYMOUTH - Inquiry was held by Mr Coroner Clark at Plymouth Guildhall on Saturday concerning the death of LILLIE DULSIE EDDY, the infant daughter of ALBERT EDDY, a French polisher, living at 2 High-street. Deceased slept with her parents and the mother on waking on Christmas morning found her lying apparently dead by her side. A slight noise came from the child's throat, but she did not appear to be breathing. Her father went at once for medical aid and called on Drs. Williams, Cumming and Lucy. He informed two of the medical men that he thought the child was dead, but neither would come. Dr Dryden, as the result of a post-mortem examination, attributed death to acute bronchitis and said the child was very weakly and had probably been ailing for some months. Verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 29 December 1891 DAWLISH - At Dawlish Castle Inn, Holcombe, an Inquest was held yesterday before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of CHARLES HENRY UNDERHILL, aged 5 months, the illegitimate child of ANNIE UNDERHILL, of Holcombe. The evidence shewed that the child was found dead on Saturday morning last in bed with its mother and grandmother. Dr Lovely stated that death was caused by suffocation, accelerated by bronchitis, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

EXMOUTH - Mr E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held two Inquests at the Bicton Inn, Exmouth, yesterday. The first was regarding the death of EDMUND FREDERICK SALTER, aged about four years and three months, who became suddenly ill on Christmas Eve and died shortly afterwards. The medical evidence was to the effect that death was due to bronchial pneumonia and pericarditis. The second inquest was as to the death of META FLORENCE MOYSEY DAVIES, three months old, found dead in bed. In this case death was stated to be due to Suffocation, and in each instance a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

PLYMOUTH - GEORGE H. F. GOODYEAR, infant son of ALFRED GOODYEAR, boot and shoe salesman, living at 12 Chapel-street, Plymouth, was taken ill on Saturday morning and died before medical aid could be obtained. At the Inquest yesterday, Dr Cash Reed attributed death to bronchitis, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 30 December 1891 ST BUDEAUX - An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy County Coroner, at the Woodland Fort Inn, Honicknowle, on Monday, relative to the sudden death of ALFRED JOHN CUMMING, 36. It was elicited that deceased - a cripple from birth - had suffered from heart disease, and had been confined to bed for some time, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury.

PAIGNTON - Suicide By Burning At Paignton. Extraordinary Case. - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest last evening at No. 3 Hillside-terrace, Paignton, on the body of MRS LOUISE BERTHA STANDLEY, wife of MR GEORGE STANDLEY, retired engineer, living at that address. The evidence disclosed that the deceased, who was forty-one years of age, had for some time been subject to delusions, and for the last six or seven weeks had been quite insane. She was also in weak bodily health and kept her bed and her husband devoted his whole attention to her. On Monday morning she was rather more cheerful than usual, and had been for four days growing stronger. Her husband made her a cup of tea at a quarter to eight and went downstairs, leaving her in bed. He returned in ten minutes and then found his wife burnt to death, and the bedclothes on fire. She was lying on the ground, with every particle of her night clothes burnt off her, covered with burns and in some places charred. a paraffin lamp, which was half full and intact when the husband left the room, was found on the drawers with the top taken off, and the wick pulled out and quite empty, and from oil stains on the carpet beneath, it was evident that the unhappy woman had poured its contents upon herself, saturated her clothing, and then set fire to herself with a match. MR STANDLEY instantly called for help and Robert Baker, a neighbour, entered and found the house filled with dense smoke and he proved that the woman was dead and the lamp emptied as described. The bed was on fire and he helped to put it out. Dr Alexander, who had attended the deceased for six or seven weeks past, attributed the immediate cause of death to Suffocation from the smoke and fumes, but said the severe burns on the body would have been sufficient to cause death. He also stated that she was undoubtedly insane, though he had never seen any suicidal tendency. He had suggested her removal to an ~asylum, but the husband objected, first on the ground of her very weak state, fearing removal would kill her; also because he gave his whole time and attention to her. The Jury, of whom Mr N. Braund was Foreman, returned a verdict that deceased committed Suicide while in a state of Insanity.

Western Morning News, Thursday 31 December 1891 PLYMOUTH - The Fatality At Stonehouse. The Inquest. - At Plymouth Guildhall last evening Mr Coroner Clark and a Double Jury resumed their Inquiry into the death of WILLIAM JOHN SWORDS, an iron caulker, employed at the Devonport Dockyard, who was knocked down and killed by a cart alleged to have been driven at a furious rate by William Cook, a fish hawker, in Union-street, Stonehouse, on Christmas-eve. Mr F. W. Skardon appeared for the deceased's relatives and Mr Percy Pearce for Cook and his two companions in the cart at the time of the occurrence - Chantler and Murtaugh. Mr Eric Ward watched the proceedings on behalf of the Stonehouse Police, having received instructions from them to prosecute Cook, Chantler and Murtaugh on Friday next. For the convenience of the public, of whom a large number attended, the Inquiry was held in the Police Court. Cook, Chantler and Murtaugh, were present in charge of Inspector Henry Hill, and were accommodated with seats in the dock. The evidence given at the first sitting of the Court having been read over - P.C. Coles of the County Constabulary, stationed at Stonehouse, deposed to seeing a cart, driven by Cook with two other men in it, driving through Union-street, Stonehouse at a furious rate shortly after 11 p.m. on Christmas-eve. Witness held up his hand and shouted to them to stop; but they took no notice. Near the Post-office the trap ran into a crowd of people, knocking WM. SWORDS down. Without stopping the vehicle drove on towards Plymouth, the driver whipping the horse to accelerate its speed. Witness ran after it, but failed to overtake it. Meanwhile the injured man was removed to Plymouth Guildhall, whence witness went, and found he was dead. Cook was driving on his proper side of the road. On the following morning Coles apprehended Cook at his stables near the Barbican, and charged him with causing the death of SWORDS. Cook replied that he drove through Union-street about eleven o'clock on the previous night, but did not know that he had killed anyone. - By Mr Pearse: Cook was almost close to him when he called out to him. Although the horse was then going at a furious rate, Cook had control over it. Instead of trying to pull it up, he was whipping it. The horse was travelling between 12 and 14 miles an hour. Could not say how the deceased was struck. Cook did not tell him the next day that he was drunk. On Boxing-day witness arrested Chantler and Murtaugh at the Plymouth Guildhall, outside the room in which the Coroner's court was held. Although they offered no resistance, he handcuffed them, and made them walk to Stonehouse. Did not know he was committed an illegal act in doing so. - Robert Sergeant, a lad employed as a toll taker at the Halfpenny gate said Cook, with two others, drove through the gate without paying about eleven o'clock on Thursday night. He recognised Cook, whom he had known for two years. Witness held out his hand to receive the toll, but Cook struck the horse with the whip and drove on. When it reached the gate the horse was already going at a stretch gallop. Cook made no attempt to pull up. He held the reins slack in one hand and with the other was whipping the horse. - William Rendell, saddler, Union-street, Stonehouse, was standing in the roadway outside his house just after 11 p.m. on Christmas-eve, when he saw a cart approaching from the direction of Devonport at a rapid pace. Seeing there was a danger of an accident, he shouted to the driver "Hold hard; that is much too fast, there will be an accident." No reply was made by the driver, who continued to urge the horse on, and immediately afterwards deceased was knocked down. After the occurrence the horse and cart was driven on to Plymouth, without any diminution of speed and witness saw the Constable give chase. Did not recognise the driver. Both the pavement and roadway were crowded with people, and where the accident happened the street was brilliantly illuminated by the light from several shops, which were still open. Deceased was picked up by bystanders, who led him away. - Private William Lally, Rifle Brigade, deposed to seeing a trap with three men in it driving through Union-street at a gallop on Christmas-eve. A little further on he met some people carrying the deceased, who had been knocked down. Witness assisted to remove him to the Plymouth Guildhall. On the way they called at two places for medical aid. At the first stoppage deceased moved his arm, but did not afterwards shew any sign of life. - Dr Dryden, who made a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased, said, besides a lacerated wound over the left eyebrow and some minor contusions, there was an extensive fracture of the skull extending from behind the right ear across the eyebrow. Death was caused by an extravasation of blood on the brain produced by the fracture. - Mr Pearse, at the conclusion of the evidence, drew attention to the arrest of Chantler and Murtaugh within the precincts of the Coroner's Court, and contended it was illegal. They attended the court on the opening day to give evidence and by law witnesses were exempt from arrest within the precincts of the Court. In afterwards handcuffing the two men the Stonehouse policeman was also acting illegally. He drew the official attention of the Coroner to the matter, because witnesses who attended there were entitled to protection. So far as Cook was concerned he extremely regretted the sad accident, if he had been the cause of it. - The Coroner concurred that witnesses were entitled to protection, and the Stonehouse Police certainly committed an error of judgment in arresting the two men within the precincts of his Court. with the handcuffing they had nothing to do, although he believed the practice was more frequently resorted to than was necessary. - Mr Pearce reminded the Coroner that Chantler and Murtaugh had been arrested as accessories to the manslaughter of SWORDS, and quoted legal authorities in which it was laid down that in manslaughter there could be no accessories. Against Chantler and Murtaugh, he submitted there was no evidence at all. - The Coroner quite agreed with Mr Pearce's submission, and should direct the Jury there was not the slightest case against these two men. He was, in fact, surprised at the action of the Stonehouse magistrates in ordering their arrest. He could not understand it. On the same principle, if a man driving an omnibus rode over a person, all the passengers might e arrested for manslaughter. There was not the least doubt that deceased was knocked down and killed by the cart driven by Cook, and the only question was whether he was guilty of manslaughter. No man had a right to drive through the thoroughfares of the town at a stretch gallop, especially when they were so crowded as on Christmas-eve. In driving at such a rate Cook committed an illegal act, which resulted in SWORD'S death, and it was clearly the duty of the Jury to return a verdict of Manslaughter against him. - The Jury retired to another room and on their return, after a brief absence, the Foreman (Mr Southern) announced that they had unanimously agreed to a verdict of Manslaughter against Cook. They were also of opinion that Chantler and Murtaugh in no way contributed to the accident, and condemned the action of the Stonehouse Police in apprehending them. In their judgment if the two men riding with Cook had attempted to deprive him of the control of the reins they would, probably, have caused another accident, and if the Jury had the power they would order their immediate release. (Applause, which was suppressed.) They also hoped the accident would stimulate the Police to greater vigilance in checking furious driving through the streets, and be a lesson to drivers of all descriptions of vehicles to discontinue the practice. To the widow and friends of the deceased the Jury tendered their sincerest sympathy. - The Coroner endorsed the hope of the Jury that furious driving through the streets would be checked. Drivers of fish and market carts especially were frequent offenders. At the same time the Police had a difficult tack to prevent it, because they could not always be present when the offence was committed. - In reply to Mr Pearce, the Coroner intimated his willingness to grant bail to Cook if the Stonehouse magistrates agreed to do so.

STOKE DAMEREL - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner J. Vaughan, at Devonport Guildhall yesterday into the circumstances attending the sudden death of MARY JANE BURROWS, 51 years of age, who was stated to have lived for the last five years with Edwin Burt, naval pensioner, of 67 James-street. The evidence disclosed that deceased had been medically treated about twelve months since for gastric catarrh and that she was then advised to give up her drinking habits. Mr Hinvest, surgeon, having made a post-mortem examination, was of opinion that death was due to acute pneumonia, accelerated by drink. The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" accelerated by deceased's drinking habits.