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Portrait of a Parish: Parkham 1841/1842

By Arthur Dark

Revised 23 Sep 2017

Appendix 1. Baptisms,Marriages and Burials in Parkham 1841 & 1842     Appendix 2. Holdings of Over 100 Acres
Appendix 3. Holdings of Between 10 and 100 Acres Appendix 4. Holdings of between 1 and 10 acres
Appendix 5. Parkham Census 1841 Appendix 6. Tithe Apportionment for Parkham of 1842

Introduction

For many years the author has been engaged in the investigation of his paternal, main line family history in the parish of Parkham in North Devon, where Darks first appear in the parish registers in the reign of Henry VIII. There his main-line ancestors remained until 1851, before departing first to neighbouring Woolsery and then to Bideford. In the course of this study he realised how lucky he was to have access to both a Tithe Map and Apportionment for Parkham of 1842 and a Census Return for 1841. Combining both sources of information gave him a vivid and extremely accurate picture of his ancestral village in the mid nineteenth century which could not have been obtained in any other way. The bulk of this publication is therefore made up with transcriptions of the Census and Apportionment so that others can judge.

This is preceded by a commentary (Part 1, Portrait of a Parish) on some of the things that were learnt which may be of interest to the modern inhabitants; who may wish to compare the Parkham they know with that of 176 years ago. It relates only to the 2 years 1841 and 1842. Queen Victoria had only been Queen for 4 or 5 years and in her sixty-four year reign England and the English countryside changed enormously and continuously. It is emphatically not a history but simply a momentary snapshot in time of a Parkham long gone. The Census for 1841 has been transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard who has generously given permission for it to appear as Appendix 5. She has also provided the transcription of the Parkham Church registers for 1841/2 in Appendix 1. The Tithe Apportionment transcription which appears as Appendix 6 is my own work.

Note on the Sources

The task of examining the Tithe Maps and Apportionments has now been made immeasurably easier by the appearance online of a superb index to all the Devon Apportionments, which enables one to examine the names of owners, occupiers, holdings and the acreages of those holdings on a parish by parish basis. Only the land utilisation element (arable, pasture, plantation, furze, waste etc.) and the field names and numbers by which individual fields, houses etc. can be identified on the map are missing from the index. But as Mike Sampson, the project co-ordinator, points out their inclusion would have simply made the task unmanageable. As it stands the index makes study of the 1842 Tithe map and Apportionment infinitely easier. Although, as ever, it is necessary to add that any conclusions need to be checked against the original sources. There are occasional, minor and inevitable errors of transcription. The index may be accessed online via the Devon Record Office at www.swheritage.org.uk/devon-archives or by going direct to the homepage of the Friends of Devon's Archives website at www.foda.org.uk and looking under Document Transcripts and Indexes.

When listing the holdings occupied by an individual it is important to check the entire parish list. Some individuals occupied holdings belonging to 2 or more owners. Since occupiers are grouped together in alphabetical order according to ownership the name of the occupier will appear in different parts of the parish index.

Additionally, an alphabetical index (use surnames only) gathers together the names of all the owners found in the Devonshire Apportionments, lists every holding owned by each individual owner, in whatever parish it may lie and gives the acreage of each holding. Thus every single holding belonging to Lord Rolle of Stevenstone near Great Torrington, who was then the biggest single landowner in Devon, can be seen at a glance (just enter Rolle in the name index).

Devon Record Office also holds out the prospect that digital copies of the Tithe Maps themselves (510 of them) may also become available online. As one, who, many years ago wrestled with the Parkham Apportionment and the huge and unwieldy Tithe map at Kew such a prospect would have appeared Utopian at the time and amazing now. In the meantime a copy on CD ROM of each of the tithe maps is available for purchase from Devon Record Office (Exeter) at a cost of £19 plus £1 postage and packing within the U.K. If to this is added a project to transcribe every individual tithe apportionment (472 of them) in its entirety and place transcriptions and digital copies of the originals online, total accessibility of tithe maps and apportionments is within sight of completion.. .

As far as the 1841 census returns for Parkham are concerned a free and complete transcription is available online as well as an appendix to this work. Compiled by Elizabeth Glover Howard, it originally appeared in the Devon section of www.genuki.org.uk . Look for the alphabetical list of Devon towns and parishes and see under Parkham. The most useful map, other than the tithe map, is the first edition O.S. 1” to the mile map of 1809 (sheet 26, Bideford) which is available in facsimile from a number of publishers.

The period 1841/1842 is a particularly significant one because it lies either in the middle or towards the end of the long period of agricultural depression and rural unrest that followed the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815. The “Hungry Forties” were long remembered but during the second half of the century mechanisation gradually transformed the nature of agricultural work, greatly increased productivity and led to a steady improvement in living standards. Increasing agricultural prosperity was checked by an agricultural depression between about 1875 and 1896. This was largely a result of the opening up of the Canadian prairies and Russian steppes to wheat production and the consequent slump in the world price of wheat. Meat also became cheaper as countries like Argentina and New Zealand started to export meat products to Europe in refrigerated ships. After 1896 the situation stabilised and for the farmer the period before the First World War became, in retrospect, another golden age. So 1841/2 represents a point where agricultural practice was still much like it had been in the eighteenth century, rural poverty was intense and mechanisation was only just getting into its stride.

The Tithe Commutation Act of 1836

The tithe was the share of agricultural produce used to maintain the parish priest. There was also land belonging to the church called the glebe which the priest could either farm directly or rent out. Tithe and glebe together represented the priest's living. Originally the tithe was paid in kind, by each farmer, on the basis of one tenth of everything produced; one tenth of the corn, one tenth of the hay, every tenth egg etc., etc. This involved a great deal of trouble in collecting, receiving, storing and disposing of agricultural produce of various kinds. It can never have been accomplished without grumbles from either side which would occasionally have developed into full-blown disputes necessitating appeals to the Archdeacon and his court. In the course of time and in some parishes, of which Parkham was one, the tithe had been commuted, i.e. a money payment had been substituted, but not uniformly and with lots of anomalies that varied from parish to parish. A parish priest who was entitled to the tithe was known as the Rector, as at Parkham.

In many parishes the tithe had been impropriated, i.e. given to a layman who therefore became known as the Lay Rector or Impropriator of the tithe and who had the right to present or nominate the parish priest to the living; a right known as the advowson. In return for these privileges the Lay Rector had to ensure that the parish was provided with a substitute (vicarius) priest in place of the Rector. This was sometimes done by the Lay Rector retaining the greater part of the tithes (Great Tithes) and the remainder (Lesser or Vicarial tithes) being paid to a parish priest who had the title of Vicar. The lay Impropriator had the right to sell both the advowson and the right to collect the tithes to other people. In neighbouring Woolsery (West Woolfardisworthy) parish the tithe and advowson had been given to the monks of Hartland Abbey. At the Reformation Hartland Abbey was dissolved and the tithe and advowson were acquired by the Coles of Woolsery. So in Woolsery the parish priest was a mere Perpetual Curate, simply dependent upon a small stipend and without even the clergy house that a Vicar normally enjoyed. Incidentally, a Perpetual Curate should not be confused with a stipendiary curate (assistant priest) who was paid by the Vicar or Rector. Collectively, Rectors, Vicars and Perpetual Curates are known as incumbents.

The purpose of the Tithe Commutation Act was to ensure that all the tithes were replaced by a completely uniform monetary rent charge based upon the national price of corn (wheat, barley, oats) which was calculated every seven years. The new system was unquestionably fairer to both sides, protecting both from the effects of inflation and deflation, since the rent charge would be adjusted as agricultural prosperity went up or down. In order to do this it was necessary to survey every affected parish and produce a very large scale map (1 inch to 3 chains or 66 yards in the case of Parkham) in which every individual piece of land was numbered and its name, extent, ownership, occupant, land use and appropriate rent charge recorded in an apportionment which accompanied the map. This huge task was accomplished with great efficiency and was completed by 1851.

In parishes where Parliamentary Enclosure had taken place earlier in the century a tithe award was unnecessary because when the commons were enclosed and the land in the 3 great open fields redistributed, the tithes had been commuted at the same time. Over great swathes of eastern and lowland England there therefore exist collections of Enclosure maps which date from an earlier period than the Tithe maps. Because the 3 field system of cultivation either never existed or died out much earlier in Devon there was no requirement for Parliamentary Enclosure and Tithe maps replace Enclosure maps as sources of information about the countryside.

It is very important to understand the difference between an Enclosure and a Tithe map. An Enclosure map shows the landscape as it is intended to look like after the open fields and commons have been redistributed and field boundaries completely recast. It depicts a plan for a totally revolutionary new landscape. Tithe maps on the other hand, depict the landscape exactly as it was when the map was drawn up. They are extremely accurate snapshots of a landscape at a moment in time. When, as in Parkham, the decennial census of 1841 was followed one year later by the publication of the Tithe map, the ability to reconstruct the parish at the very beginning of the eighteen-forties is extraordinary.

One copy of the map went to the Tithe Commissioners, one to the diocese and the third into the parish chest. It would have been a source of wonderment and of intense inspection by the parish. Never before had anybody seen a map on such a scale showing every building, every road, hedgerow, fence and boundary wall in the parish; and every single patch of land, however small, numbered. Numbers which are still the basis of those used today, in spite of all the consolidation of landholdings that has taken place since then. From now on, the boundary disputes so common in rural societies would be enormously reduced. One simply looked at the map.

Physical Setting

The land mostly comprises a plateau between 500' and 700' high of highly contorted mixed sandstones, shales (known locally as shillet) and slates with occasional bands of limestone and chert; described collectively as the culm measures. Although of carboniferous age they are destitute of coal except for a few, impersistent bands running inland along a line drawn from Greencliff through Bideford for a distance of 14 miles to Chittlehampton. These culm rocks can give rise to a relatively thin, acid, heavy and clayey soil which can produce extensive tracts of ill-drained bog and poor heathland, growing little more than gorse and bracken. Elsewhere the soil is usually classified as grade three or four agricultural land. Except in the deeply incised tributary valleys of the Torridge (which almost completely encircles the area) there are few trees to be seen. Those that are tend to be hedgerow specimens only, sharply asymmetrical in shape as a result of constant pruning by the Atlantic wind. On a cold, grey, winter's day it can become a very cheerless and desolate landscape. Its similarity to north Cornwall has often been remarked upon and, indeed, the western boundary of Hartland parish marks the county boundary with Cornwall.

The coastal scenery of Bideford Bay is, however, magnificent and attracted the attention of the painter, Turner, in the nineteenth century. Dove-grey or, occasionally, pink beaches of sea-rounded shingle or larger pebbles fringe the length of the bay, backed by a rampart of cliffs in many different shades of red, grey, brown and black. A vegetated slope curves in a bevel from the level surface to the vertical cliff face below. The curve may be convex or concave but shows plentiful evidence of slumping and sliding (mass movement) and its vegetation adds a bright green in summer.

Parkham in 1841 was a large coastal parish of 5330 acres of which no less than 1426 acres were described in1842 as commons or moorland. (1) Much of this developed on the slates and shales where a natural culm grassland was characteristic, dominated by purple moor grass and rush; permanently wet and only suitable for rough grazing. In 1842 it was still plentiful. On the drier areas furze and gorse developed . All this land was a very significant source of free fuel (furze on the drier areas) and rough grazing to those smallholders who had access to it. Representing close on 27% of the total land surface, it comprised 2 belts of irregular but continuous moorland. One ran from a point just west of the hamlet of Ash (Ash Moor), south-east through Melbury Moor (where Melbury Hill rises to the highest point in the parish at 709 feet) and on into East Putford parish as Putford Moor. The other lay west to east, extending through Melbury Bank (see 1st edition of the O.S. one inch map of 1809) as far as Bableigh Moor in the parish of Buckland Brewer. Today most of this land has been afforested, put under cultivation or flooded to create Melbury reservoir. Already, by 1842, the 168 acres of Ash Moor has been divided in to 26 numbered plots in the apportionment, even though the plots are still described as commons and there are no owners, occupiers or rent charges listed. This was because a lengthy legal process of Inclosure was then under way. (2) White's Directory of Devonshire confirms that Ash Moor had been enclosed by 1850.

 

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Common land, Parkham, Buckland Brewer & E. Putford (First Edition 1”O.S. Map of 1809)

Of the area under cultivation 3,070 acres was under arable, 296 acres was meadow and pasture, 246 acres under woodland, 18 acres under orchards plus 13 acres of gardens. Land not under cultivation included, besides the commons, 257 acres described as cliffland and 4 acres of waste adjoining roads. In a few instances cottages may have been built on these roadside patches of waste (e.g. plot 1061 in map on p.23). Such cottages do not appear to have resulted from squatting as is illustrated by a 3 life lease dated 4th October 1813 (Devon R.O. 48/22/19) between Lord Rolle and Thomas Jowliffe (sic), a labourer of Parkham. Under the terms of his lease he was granted a waste plot of 30 perches (probably 1045a on the Tithe map) adjoining the Bideford-Hartland road, beside the fields known as the Down and Three Corners Park belonging to Lower Waytown tenement. The entry fine was 5 shillings and the rent half a crown. There was also a heriot of 5 shillings. Perhaps more significant was a consideration of £20 for building and improving the premises. Modern road-widening has ensured the disappearance of these roadside cottages.

The term cliffland, as applied to a particular kind of land not under cultivation, has an especial significance in Parkham. The shoreline of Bideford Bay is marked by an extensive wave cut platform, plainly visible at low tide, which has resulted from the recession of the cliff face through coastal erosion. An area of disturbed land occupies the bevel (see above) behind the cliff edge where the land is beginning to slump and slide towards the sea. On old 6” O.S. maps this belt is indicated by elaborate hachuring. The rate of recession is rapid and cultivation of land near the cliff edge might well be followed by the disappearance of that land into the sea. One unnamed holding of 136 acres (no.1403) was leased by James Dunn from the Rev. J. T .Pine Coffin and was occupied by 'various' unnamed occupiers. It is described as 'cliffs etc.' in the land use column of the Apportionment and may represent a speculative venture by James Dunn in which land at risk from the sea was being rented out in plots to a few hardy souls willing to take on the challenge. The amount of cliffland was restricted by the shape of the parish. The parish looked rather like an inverted blacksmith's anvil with the base lying on the north facing shore of Bideford Bay. This stretch of coast was only about 2 miles long and contrasted with the very nearly 6 miles represented by the fullest east-west extent of the top of the anvil.

The population in 1841 was 995 (513 males and 482 females) having risen from 584 in 1801 (first decennial census). (3) The settlement pattern was a dispersed one of a few scattered hamlets with isolated farmsteads and cottages lying between them. Farmsteads would have been instantly recognisable by a substantial farmhouse with various ancillary buildings comprising barns and housing for animals. Four of the farmsteads in the parish are described in the Apportionment as Bartons: Parkham Town Barton, Halsbury Barton, Goldworthy Barton and Cabbacott Barton. In Hoskins's opinion the term barton 'signifies a farm much larger than average' and 'nine times out of ten, one with a long and interesting history.' (4) All four were farmsteads belonging to four of the 16 largest farms in the parish (see Appendix 1). Contrasting with the dispersed settlement pattern of Parkham is the the large nucleated village containing most of the population, but this is much more characteristic of lowland England further east.

The hamlet of Parkham, after which the parish is named, was grouped around the parish church (St. James) and contained the Rectory and 2 of the 3 taverns, the Bell and New Inn (the latter demolished in 1888). In the census it is described as Parkham Town village and had a population of approximately 94. The third tavern, Hoops Inn, was situated on the turnpike road to Bideford.

Parkham Town village lay on a spur between the deeply incised River Yeo, a tributary of the Torridge, and the Blindlake, in its turn a tributary of the Yeo. The oldest form of the name is Percheham (DB, 1086) and contains 2 elements: pearroc (land enclosed within a fence) and ham (meaning a settlement) or hamm (meaning an intake of land in moorland). If hamm the name is tautologous since both elements imply enclosure. (5) The most important other hamlets were Ash (approximately 37 inhabitants), Broad Parkham (79), Horns Cross (29), Peppercombe (56), East Goldworthy (37) and Buckish Mill (95). None of the houses and cottages within the hamlets had house numbers and farmsteads are simply identified by the name of the farm. The surfaces between the valleys average around about 600 feet above sea level and are observably plateau-like in character.

Buckish Mill was a recent settlement. Early nineteenth century Buckish Mill comprised a mostly single line of no more than 30 cottages on the eastern side of the stream that powered Buckish mill (now known as Mill Cottage) and which gave it its name. The other element in the name, Buckish, was the name of a small manorial estate belonging to the Coles of Woolsery. (6) The mill was the oldest building (no later than 1780) and had become part of the Cole estate by 1808, whilst the rest appeared mainly between about 1812 and 1835. (7) The stream marked two boundaries. The first was that between Parkham parish to the east and Woolsery to the west, so that most of the hamlet was in Parkham parish and only the mill and a few cottages were in Woolsery. The small population living on the Woolsery side of the stream would have brought the total population of Buckish Mill to above 100 in 1841. Nearly all the cottages on the Parkham side belonged to the Pine-Coffins of Portledge in Alwington parish who owned much of the land between Bucks and Portledge.

The second boundary was that between the Hundred of Hartland to the west and Shebbear to the east. Hundreds no longer exist as an administrative unit, but their Anglo-Saxon origin indicates that the settlement at Buckish Mill must have originated much later; since the boundary of parish and Hundred would scarcely have been drawn down the middle of an existing settlement. In the very

 

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Parkham Parish showing the seven largest hamlets.

In the very early nineteenth century Buckish Mill was a completely different place from the seasonal holiday village it is today. A continuous traffic of pack-horses and donkeys would have carried corn down to the mill and brought up sea-sand for improving the soil, beach pebbles for road repairing or as mowstead stones (for keeping hayricks off the ground), herring and mackerel in season, and lime from 2 kilns on the beach. Lime was used to make lime-mortar and for counteracting soil acidity. Using lime as dressing for the land seems to have begun about 1630, when the practice was described as 'a new invention'. The terraces on the steep slopes behind the cottages were used to rear goats, chickens and the occasional pig. In 1865 recognition that Buckish had become the biggest of the local hamlets led to a new ecclesiastical parish being created from both Parkham and Woolsery and a new church (St. Anne's) built to serve it.

Social and Occupational Structure

Farm-workers represented by far the biggest occupational group in Parkham in 1841 but the census distinguishes between agricultural labourers (82 of them and all male) and a group simply described as servants of whom there were 75 males (M.S. In the census) and 51 females (F.S. in the census). The vast majority of the male servants were living on Parkham farms and were undoubtedly living-in farm labourers. The term agricultural labourer is never used to describe them. Most of the female servants were also living on the farms or the very small number of gentry houses and some would also have worked on the land as well as in the farmhouse doing domestic chores. The group described as agricultural labourers, on the other hand, would have been day labourers available for hire. In general, the living-in farm servant was better-off than the day labourer since his food, drink and clothing was all provided by his master.

There were also 14 apprentices living and working on the farms (male and female). These were 'apprentices to husbandry,' poor children, some as young as 7 years of age, who had been bound as apprentices for 7 years to local farmers in return for a premium (financial incentive) paid by the Parish and after 1834 by the Poor Law Guardians. The latest apprenticeship for a child of 7 in Parkham occurs in 1813, but as late as 1842 children as young as 9 were still being apprenticed to husbandry. How well or badly they fared depended ultimately upon the character of their master, although, as always in Parkham, gossip flew fast and a relation might well be nearby keeping an eye on things. In theory, if an apprentice was aggrieved, he or she might appeal to the local magistrates. Nonetheless there is plenty of evidence in the Apprentice registers of Parkham that apprentices absconded, could lose their places (and therefore their support) and in other ways find themselves in trouble. The examples below all relate to Parkham:

Devon Record Office 1692 A-2/PO510 1802-1848

229. Charlotte Bartlett, aged 21, dau. of William and Mary, discharged from James Downings's service for having had an illegitimate child. 6.7.1842. [ Apprenticed for West Gulworthy 2.3.1831.]

230. Elizabeth Glover, aged 16, dau. of Samuel and Elizabeth, discharged from Thomas Ching's sevice for robbing him and attempting to destroy herself and absconding from his service. 18.1.1843.[ Apprenticed at 9 for Britton's Gulworthy.]

231. Sarah Nichols, aged 19, dau. of Thomas and Margaret, discharged from apprenticeship with John Grigg for being with child. 1.7.1846.[ Apprenticed 16.8.1836 for Gulworthy Mills.]

232. John Lee, age 15, son of Mary, discharged from from apprenticeship with Thomas Heddon having run away in Feb. 1848. 5.4.1848. [Apprenticed at 9 for Blindlake.]

233. John Bryant, aged 20, son of John, discharged from apprenticeship with Willam Pickard for running away in March 1846 and not returning thereto. 13.12.1848. [Apprenticed at 9 for Weekes Ash, mother deceased.]

224. William Bryant, aged 9, son of John and mother deceased, apprenticed to Joseph Clement for West Stone.4.8.1841. [Brother of John Bryant, see 233.]

The parish could act with commendable promptitude (See Apprentice Register entries 185,186 &191 – 195). When William Clement left the parish suddenly in 1832 he left behind 3 apprentices, Mary Ann Clements, aged 14 (clearly a relative),Thomas Shortridge aged 12 and Anne Deane aged 15 'wholly unprovided for and unemployed'. On the same day as their discharge from William Clement's apprenticeship was confirmed Mary Ann Clements and Anne Dean were re-apprenticed to Joseph Clement (another relative).Thomas Shortridge was re-apprenticed to Samuel Lemon for West Stone. Unfortunately for Thomas Shortridge, his employer, Thomas Lemon, promptly emigrated in the same year and we do not know what Thomas Shortridge's fate was. The most likely destination for Thomas Lemon was Canada

All these agricultural labourers, farm servants and apprentices to husbandry were working for 49 farmers, which might seem to be a high number for a single parish. Nevertheless, as we shall see later, the number of people actually engaged in working land which they occupied, was considerably greater than the 49 described as farmers in the census. What the Tithe Apportionment shows, however, is that although there were a number of big farmers (i.e. with holdings of over 100 acres) many had very small holdings and would have been described locally as husbandmen rather than yeoman farmers. The terms farmer or yeoman, husbandman and labourer are the terms most commonly used in the contemporary parish registers of Parkham (see Appendix 1). Husbandman is clearly used to distinguish a subsistence farmer from a landless labourer. Yeomen are the larger farmers, employing labour and generating large or small agricultural surpluses. The terms Yeoman and Husbandman are not used in the census. The Enclosure movement of the early nineteenth century in counties like Dorset largely forced the peasant farmer off the land and made him into a hired labourer. In Devon, on the other hand, the absence of the great open fields where land-holdings were scattered in furlong strips and agricultural practice was fossilised and immemorial meant that Devon was never subject to the Parliamentary Enclosure process that transformed rural communities further east.

Two occupations depended directly upon farming, corn milling and woolcombing. There were three millers in Parkham at Goldsworthy, Boccombe and Old Mill, all utilising the waters of the Yeo. A fourth mill (also a water mill) operated at Buckish Mill, on the Woolsery side of the boundary stream between the two parishes. Two woolcombers, father and son, were listed in the census, confirming the mixed nature of the farming and the existence of flocks of sheep as well as herds of cattle. Tucking Mill Farm in the Yeo valley was probably originally a Fulling Mill where woollen cloth was beaten with fullers earth and water to cleanse and thicken it; implying that woollen manufacture may once have taken place.

There were 2 limeburners, Samuel Paddon at Peppercombe and John Harris at Buckish Mill. Neither man could have operated the kilns single-handed but there was always casual labour available. At Buckish Mill there were two kilns known as the East and West kilns respectively. The 2 mile stretch which was the Parkham coastline formed a solid rampart of cliff and only at Peppercombe at the eastern and Buckish Mill at the western end was it breached by two small streams running down narrow valleys (combes) to the sea. In both cases limekilns had been built on or near the beaches where the valleys reached the sea. On the beach, limestone and culm (low grade coal) carried by sailing vessels from South Wales would be unloaded. The larger vessels would often discharge their cargoes of limestone whilst still afloat, the limestone being recovered once the tide had receded. Smaller vessels were beached before discharging. Once beached, they would be either trigged or careened. Trigging involved keeping the vessel upright by means of timbers wedged against the sides. Careening meant tipping the vessel on its side halfway through the unloading by means of a rope attached to the topmast. The twelve hours that then elapsed before the next high tide gave time for unloading. Even so, the totally open nature of the beaches made it a hazardous operation and confined to the summer months and periods of good weather. The limestone and culm were then fed in alternating layers into the kilns to be burnt.

Lime burning was hard and dangerous work and the kilns produced large quantities of pollutants and noxious gases. There are numerous coroners' reports of workers tending the kilns by night or of tramps seeking the warmth of kilns as places to sleep, being overcome by fumes. In some cases even falling in to the kiln.

Lime directly out of the kiln was known as quicklime and was a hazardous material. Once water was added a fierce chemical reaction took place which produced sufficient amounts of heat to ignite combustible materials. This converted it into slaked lime which could be used to make lime mortar or spread on the fields to counteract soil acidity. If farmers bought quicklime their aim would be to keep it dry until they reached their fields when it would be thinly spread on the soil. Subsequent rain would produce the chemical reaction but this could take place harmlessly in the open air. There were instances, however, when a farmer caught in a Devonshire downpour found his cart or donkeys and panniers severely burnt.

Only three fishing families can be identified in the census. John Prance and William Baglole [sic] operated from Peppercombe and James Braund from Buckish Mill. There may have been others operating part-time but on the face of it fishing was less important in 1841 than it became later. The totally open beaches at Peppercombe and Buckish Mill from which the fishing boats would embark and disembark could present sea conditions which have been compared in difficulty to those of the west of Ireland. As with lime-burning there must have been long periods when fishing was impossible. The boats could only have been made secure by pulling them up the beach beyond the high tide mark and therefore must mostly have been rowing boats. The catch was hawked from door to door in the parish by itinerant fishmongers called jowders among whom was one of the author's great-great grandfathers. Only 1 sailor is listed, William Braund, aged 20, of Buckish Mill.

The day to day needs of the parish were met by a whole army of artisans and craftsmen which made the community largely self-sufficient. Building could be done by 8 masons (+ one apprentice), 9 carpenters (+ one apprentice), one glazier and one thatcher. Furniture could be made by the one local joiner and he or one of the carpenters probably built coffins. Three blacksmiths, each with an apprentice) could make and repair any of the ironwork on the farms and shoe the many horses and donkeys. Fresh meat was provided by the eight butchers. Barrels, washtubs, pails and churns could be made by the one cooper.

Clothes could be made by 1 shoemaker, 4 cordwainers (+one apprentice), a cordwainer being the old term for a shoemaker, two tailors, one dressmaker, one milliner, one bonnet maker and 4 glovemakers.

Glovemakers steadily increased in numbers in most of the North Devon villages throughout the nineteenth century. Glovers were women who worked in their own homes and were paid by the piece. Their earnings were a very important additional source of income. The trade was controlled from Torrington where a small handful of manufacturers cut out gloves in parts that were sewn together by the glovers in the surrounding villages and then returned to Torrington for finishing. Tanning leather was an important industry in Torrington and supplied one of the basic raw materials. Silk, taffeta and other fabrics could be imported from the Midlands but lace, particularly important in making women's gloves, was obtainable from nearby Barnstaple. At this stage gloving was nothing like as important as it later became. In the 1861 census for Parkham, for example, there were 21 glovers and 1 glove collector who distributed glove parts for sewing and returned the completed work to Torrington. The glove collector was a key figure who, because she often carried finished gloves and cash, could be very vulnerable to robbery. Totally dependent upon fashion, gloving faded away towards the end of the century when glove wearing became less fashionable for women.

Mary Passmore was the village schoolmistress and lived at Cuckingstool Cottages (Kelvinstool Cottages today?) but would not have ranked as a member of the professional classes. There is little evidence to show that she was anything other than a Dame School mistress, striving to teach the elements of reading,writing and arithmetic to a motley collection of infants gathered around the table of her own kitchen, for a few pence a week. The level of literacy in Parkham was then very low and many could not read or write. Incidentally the two skills were thought of as separate and somebody taught to read need not necessarily have been taught to write.

Matters are, however, confused by the existence of a small building (10 perches) in the south-western corner of the churchyard described in the tithe apportionment as School House and Court and numbered 344. Ownership was vested in the Parish of Parkham and it was then occupied by a Samuel Martin. We cannot therefore be sure where Mary Passmore did her teaching. There is no doubt that 344 was an old building known as the Church House which existed at least as far back as the first half of the eighteenth century; when the parish accounts record payments to William Dark and later his son William junior, for repairs to the Church House between 1728 and 1765. In the early nineteenth century the Church House was undoubtedly being used as a Parish Poorhouse. Eight baptisms between 1816 and 1835 record the Parish Poorhouse as the place of abode as well as 9 burials between 1813 and 1835. These entries are all found in the printed parish registers which replaced written registers in 1812 and include a column for place of abode.

An Abstract of Returns Made by the Overseers of the Poor in 1776-7 to Parliament shows that Parkham (along with Bideford, Hartland, Northam and Woolsery) did then have a Poorhouse with accommodation for up to 20 paupers.(8) It is extremely likely that the Church House was then the Poorhouse. After 1837/8 the new Union Workhouse in Bideford would have made Parkham's Poorhouse redundant and therefore available as a schoolroom.

An agreement between the Bideford Board of Guardians and the Minister, Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of Parkham on 4th July 1848 confirmed its current use as a 'schoolroom in connexion with the National School Society'and unequivocally identifies the building as the Church House or Poorhouse. (9) The agreement conveyed ownership of the site to the Minister, Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor to be used exclusively for 'a school for poor persons in the parish and for no other purpose whatsoever'.White's Directory of 1850 confirms that a new 'National School' was built in 1848/9 in Parkham and the 1851 census lists a James Martin as 'Schoolmaster and Boot and Shoe Maker Master employing two men and one boy.' When the new Rector was inducted on the 4th March 1846 the North Devon Journal (12th March) reported that Mr. Martin was toasted at a celebratory dinner that evening as the 'village's useful schoolmaster'. On the 12th August 1848, Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette reported that the first stone of the 'new school' had been laid on the 28th July by the 2 small daughters of the Rector. The new building was a very small and simple stone walled, slate-roofed schoolroom, plastered internally and with a wooden floor. A later annotation on the 1848 agreement confirms that a government grant-in-aid of £35, made in 1859, enabled the original schoolroom to be extended from a floor area of 18 feet by 15 feet to an area of 28 feet by 15 feet and 12 feet in height. (10) Financed by the 'National Society for the Education of the Poor according to the Principles of the Church of England' such 'National Schools' and a smaller number financed by the non-conformist 'British and Foreign School Society' became the most usual mode of popular education in English villages in the nineteenth century. In 1877 the National School in Parkham was purchased by the local School Board and became a Board School under the terms of Forster's Education Act of 1870.

The professional class in Parkham in 1842 was uniquely represented by the Rector, the Rev. Richard Walter, who was both the incumbent and patron of his own living.(11) He had graduated from Exeter College, Oxford in 1785 and remained Rector of Parkham for an astonishing 57 years between then and his death in 1842. Amongst the better-off inhabitants the Rector stood head and shoulders above the rest. He was then 77 years of age and a Sarah Wilcocks aged 74 (his widowed sister) was living with him. They were attended to by no less than 7 servants. As previously explained he was as Rector of Parkham (rather than a mere Vicar or Perpetual Curate) entitled to the entire tithe income of the parish, which the 1842 Tithe Apportionment valued at £730. It must also be remembered that the living included his house and 129 acres of glebe land which he was farming in 1840 and which made him one of the largest farmers in Parkham. (12) Additionally, he owned outright 42.2.30 acres in Parkham of a farm known as Hodiland or Hadiland. Walter was buried at Parkham on the 17th July 1842. His will (will & codicil proved P.C.C. 21st Aug. 1842), shows him to have owned other property in neighbouring Woolsery and in the parish of Milton Damerel and that he was able to make exceptionally generous provision for his two daughters and their families. He was succeeded as Rector in 1846 (died 1856) by the Rev. Francis Wolferstan Thomas who seems to have actively engaged in promoting the National School.

It is very difficult for us today to envisage the standing and prestige enjoyed by a man like Walter. Quite apart from his wealth, he was as a University graduate, by far the best educated individual in the parish. He was also the ex-officio chairman of the Vestry, the committee which was responsible for both church and secular affairs in the parish and was therefore a rating authority. Vestries were either closed or open. In the open Vestry members were elected by a gathering of all the parishioners. In the closed Vestry, of which Parkham was one, the committee was a self-perpetuating oligarchy in which the members of the committee itself elected others to fill any vacancies.

Until 1834 the Vestry had the responsibility of appointing two Overseers of the Poor who, together with the 2 churchwardens, were collectively responsible for collecting and dispensing the poor rate . The loss of responsibility for the relief of the parish poor significantly reduced the power of the Vestry and was the beginning of a slow process by which the Vestry lost its civil powers. Nevertheless, in 1841 the Vestry still had to appoint a parish constable and a Surveyor of the Highways. It was not until 1856 and the compulsory creation of County Constabularies that the parish constable became redundant. The Surveyor of Highways was eventually replaced in 1865 by Local Highway Boards responsible for highways in a group of parishes.

The Vestry was also responsible for electing the parish clerk. This was a very ancient office that originated in the Middle Ages when the holder was literally a clerk in holy orders, albeit very minor orders. He would be tonsured by the bishop to show his status, but he would not be required to be celibate. In church he would assist the priest at mass and during the performance of his priestly duties. At the Reformation the minor orders were abolished and only the orders of deacon, priest and bishop were retained by the Church of England, but the parish clerk continued to be appointed and to carry out essentially the same ecclesiastical duties, but in a secular capacity. In particular he led the sung responses of the Anglican prayer book, so it helped if he was musical as well as literate. He and the Rector were the only paid officers of the parish. He cannot be identified in the Parkham census.

In many parishes he was often called upon to be the clerk to the Vestry and keep the Vestry Minutes because of his literacy and knowledge of the Rector and church affairs. In this dual capacity he could become a very significant figure whose knowledge of the ins and outs of the parish would be second to none.

Documentary evidence about non-conformity in Parkham in 1841 is hard to come by. There was a tiny Wesleyan chapel at Holwell, which still exists, which had been built under the terms of a Trust Deed dated 22nd April 1823 (Charity Commission copy, 10398). Amongst the 10 trustees appears the name of Thomas Dark 'the younger' who, along with Thomas Lemon and Richard Bailey of Parkham and Bartholomew Fulford of Buckland Brewer are all described as yeomen. The remaining 6 trustees comprised a schoolmaster, a cooper, a currier, a carpenter, a druggist and a maltster. Yeomen and artisans represented precisely the kinds of lower middle-class occupations attracted to non-conformity.

Parkham certainly lay in Bible Christian territory (north-west Devon and north-east Cornwall), the short-lived movement founded in 1815 at Lake Farm in Shebbear by William Bryant and James Thorne. By the time of the religious census of 1851 there were no Bible Christian congregations listed in Parkham, compared to two Wesleyan chapels and two Bible Christian congregations in neighbouring Woolsery. A very high proportion of those who emigrated from North Devon to Canada in the early nineteenth century were Bible Christians. It is unclear, however, if their religious allegiance was a motivating element in their emigration or that the large numbers simply reflected their local strength at the time

Thirty-two individuals declared themselves to be of independent means. These included the better-off inhabitants but there appear to have been only three other families who might qualify as being of the same or similar social status to the Rector. These must have included the Huckses and Brutons. Matilda Hucks (nee Gifford), an elderly widow of independent means, resided at Foxdown House, with 4 servants (the existing house is of later, mid-Victorian vintage). Her husband, who had died in 1836, had been responsible in 1820 for a diversion of one of the two roads which connected Parkham Town village to the turnpike road between Bideford and Clovelly. In diverting it further away from Foxdown House, which was his purpose, he widened and improved it. But his assertion of private ownership through the erection of two gates at either end was to be remembered by the parish 36 years later (see below). A young woman called Mary Kelly, also of independent means, was living with Matilda Hucks and was one of only 7 people in the parish not born within the county. In Mary Kelly's case she had been born in Ireland, the daughter of Captain Kelly of New Abbey and was Matilda's niece.

Charles Bruton descended from Thomas Bruton (alias Bruerton) M.P. for Exeter in 1584 (see History of Parliament) and was the armigerous owner of South Yeo and Tucking Mill farms in Parkham. He lived at South Yeo with his family of 4. (13) These included his son Walter Meddon Bruton, then a law student at Peterhouse (Cambridge) who later became Rector of West Worlington. (14) At his baptism in 1819, at Parkham, Walter Bruton's father is described as an Esquire. The family employed 5 male and female servants. In 1846 Walter married his first wife, Mary Kelly of Foxdown House and later named his daughter after Matilda Hucks. Walter's mother, Frances Cory Bruton, was one of the two daughters of the Rector, Richard Walter. Brutons, Huckses and Walters were therefore inextricably entwined and Mary Kelly and Matilda Hucks witnessed the Rector's will in 1841.

The Caddys of Bowden were another armigerous gentry family and probably the one with the oldest connection to Parkham. According to Burke (Landed Gentry, 1937 edition, p.308) they descended from Thomas Caddy of Parkham who married Joan, widow of John Gyll of Parkham. About 1490 Thomas Caddy was plaintiff in the court of Requests as to John Gyll's lands. The widowed Elizabeth Caddy (formerly Arnold) was living at Bowden in 1841, with six children and six male and female servants. Bowden was a farm of 80 acres but Elizabeth Caddy described herself as of independent means. Her husband John (born 1779) and a Captain in the North Devon militia in 1805, died in 1839.These 3 families (Bruton, Hucks and Caddy) are the only discernible gentry families living in the parish, other than the Rector, at this time.

All in all Parkham ought to be regarded as a society where there was very little wealth and many people, agricultural labourers, farm servants and a proportion of husbandmen were living perpetually on the margin of pauperism, which from 1838/9 onwards mostly meant entry into the Union Workhouse in Bideford.

The Tithe Dispute of 1831

In 1831 the Rector had been engaged in a bitter dispute with 61 of his parishioners who had petitioned the House of Commons objecting to the size of their commuted tithe payments, which they calculated amounted on average to 4 shillings and sixpence in every pound of the annual rental value. In some cases the tithe charged was five shillings (25%) in the pound. The petition was accompanied by an annexed schedule which set out the annual rental value of each farm and the amount of composition paid by each farmer. Unfortunately, the petition did not survive the House of Commons fire of 1834 and the names of the signatories remain unknown.

The Parkham petition, along with 2 other Devon petitions complaining of unjust tithe exactions, was presented to the House of Commons on the 11th February 1831 (see Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 19th Feb.) by Lord Ebrington. This was Hugh, Viscount Ebrington, 2nd Lord Fortescue (1783-1861) a prominent Whig politician who served as one of the 2 Knights of the Shire for Devon in the House of Commons between 1830 and 1839. He was then summoned to the House of Lords and became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland between 1839 and 1841.(15) In the case of Parkham, Ebrington alleged that the tithes amounted to between one fourth and in some cases one third of the rental. He was quoted in the paper as saying: ' If the tithe question were not put right, the most grievous consequences might be apprehended - a great ferment had been excited, which must be allayed by commuting the tithes; if it were not settled, it might disturb the peace of the Empire.' In his biography in the History of Parliament (Offices Held section) Ebrington is quoted as saying on the same occasion that he spoke 'as a sincere friend to the church' and urged the clergy to bring about a speedy commutation, observing that in Devon there was 'such a degree of frenzy on the subject as to occasion me considerable alarm.'

On March 12th 1831 the Western Times published a strongly worded report on the matter, describing the petition as 'very sensible' and declaring that Walter was 'not only on bad terms with his parishioners on account of these exactions, but that his personal demeanour to his parishioners is that which we feel a difficulty in reconciling with his duties as a Minister of the gospel, or even that of a gentleman.' Parkham was described as a 'disordered parish' and the parishioners were advised to petition the new Bishop of Exeter (Bishop Philpotts). It was suggested that Walter was receiving advice from his son-in-law, the Rev. M. Melhuish, Rector of Ashwater, 'whose tithe pranks have lately excited so much of the public attention.'

Walter responded with a very long letter in Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette (March 26th 1831), amongst other things: threatening legal action against the unnamed source of the Western Times report, denying that he was on bad terms with his parishioners, claiming that the titheable acreage of the parish was grossly underestimated by the surveyors employed by the parishioners and that a number of anomalies were the result of sub-leasing in which the principal leaseholder was responsible for calculating the tithe payments of his sub-tenants.

Walter's letter was followed by a very robust reply in the Western Times (April 2nd 1831) asserting that whilst still dressed in his clerical vestments Walter had, after church, abused one of the 61 petitioners as a 'highway robber' and 'midnight assassin.' The professional competence of the 2 surveyors who had calculated the titheable acreage was stoutly defended and any discrepancy was attributed to the inclusion of 'waste or moor' by Walter. In which case his (Walter's) argument 'goes for nothing', since this was not titheable. The report also drew attention, for the second time, to similar behaviour on the part of his 'son-in-law and adviser' in Ashwater. Once again the parishioners were urged to place the matter before Bishop Philpotts 'who has shown a disposition for Church Reform.' Philpotts was indeed a liberal, and amongst other causes, conducted a prolonged war against clerical pluralism which was then rife in his diocese. Clearly, the tithe settlement of 1842 was badly needed in Parkham.

Getting 61 farmers to sign the petition, obtaining legal advice, employing independent surveyors to assess the titheable acreage and organising the presentation in the House of Commons of a petition backed by facts and figures, as well as meeting the inevitable expenses, would have been a formidable undertaking. There is a striking correspondence between the figure of 61 and the Land Tax Return figures for Parkham of 1830. Excluding the Rector, 59 occupiers are listed in the return, so that support for the petition must have been almost total. The whole incident must be regarded as a remarkable indication of a perhaps surprising degree of social solidarity and suggests the presence of local leadership. It reminds us that there is an enormous amount about the activities of rural societies such as Parkham that we simply do not know. Parish magazines, abundant newspaper reports, letters and diaries do not exist for this early part of the nineteenth century. Known incidents such as this suggest that life in Parkham was altogether more dynamic than appears on the surface.

Isolation and Self-sufficiency

What is perhaps most notable about the census are the occupations that are absent. Crucially, in this community of nearly a thousand, when anaesthetics had not yet been invented, there is no doctor, no druggist, no dentist or any other member of the medical professions; let alone a vet. In the event of a medical emergency the only alternative to self-medication was probably a 6 and a half mile journey (with no ambulances or cars) into Bideford without the opportunity to alert a doctor by telephone or telegram. Childbirth and death would all have been dealt with by mature and experienced women from within the community. Sudden, critical illness or a serious accident would produce instant crisis. Parkham in 1841 was dangerously isolated.

In this environment faith healers and quacks would have abounded. There would always have been someone with a way with warts who could be persuaded to rub the wart with the smooth side of a freshly cut potato, murmur an incantation, and bury the potato underneath a certain tree. Infallible recipes for skin conditions and colds would circulate and constipation, that sovereign indicator that all was not well, would have been ruthlessly treated with castor oil, syrup of figs or other purgatives. Even at the end of the century Jacob describes the low levels of expectation about medical treatment and the primitive dentistry practised by local farmers; a pair of forceps taken from a rusty tea-caddy on the mantelpiece and the patient on the doormat, his head between the farmer's knees. (16)

The average age of the 16 individuals who were buried at Parkham in 1841 was 46.3 (oldest 93, youngest 1). In 1842 the average age of the 14 who were buried had dropped to 34.7 (oldest 78, youngest 1). The burials in 1842 included 'a stranger found drowned', whose age was estimated at 22. Such burials were commonplace in the coastal parishes of North Devon at this time and the bodies do not ever appear to have been identified. The operative word, of course, is 'stranger'. Members of the parish who drowned and whose bodies were recovered are always identified.

George Jacob, writing about Parkham funerals at the end of the century describes them as being very different from what they are today (17):

'There were no hearses in the country then, and from whatever part of the parish a person died they had to be carried by hand, but generally there were plenty of men who would turn up ready to carry. If the distance was one or two miles a big number was always wanted, and Joe Heal marched in front with his watch in his hand and gave orders for six to fall out every two minutes.

It was certainly more impressive to see fifty or sixty men walking in front of the coffin than it is today with everyone meeting at the church. If you were one of the six bearers picked as being friends of the deceased, you were expected to be at the house in time for dinner, and before you started on the funeral procession you would be expected to have a drink. After the funeral you would go back and have another meal and spend the evening with plenty to eat and drink. Looking back at the early part of the century a great amount of money seems to have been spent on clothes. All the relations would be dressed in black, and the women all wearing crepe for several weeks. With the skirts down to the ground and the muddy roads the crepe took a lot of cleaning after a walk. I have heard it said that a decent funeral seems to have been a lot better provided for than most of the weddings today.'

There is no post office or postboxes. The penny post had been introduced by Rowland Hill in 1840 but postboxes did not appear until the 1850's. Letters for posting would either have had to be taken to Bideford, or await the arrival of a uniformed letter carrier engaged on deliveries, who rang a bell or blew a horn to announce his presence. Parcel deliveries relied upon private carriers. The postal service developed very slowly in North Devon. R. Pearse Chope's investigations in 1901 showed, for example, that 2 letter carriers (William Colwill and Thomas Williams) were not appointed to serve Hartland and Clovelly until 1844 when a sub-post office was opened in Hartland by Richard Heard, a draper. (18) Before that time he writes: 'letters were only brought from Bideford by the ordinary carriers and were stuck up in their windows until called for. The charge for bringing them from Bideford was 2d., each.' An examination of the P.O. Appointment Book Indexes between 1841 and 1845 did not reveal a single postal appointment for the swathe of parishes between Torrington, Bideford and Clovelly/Hartland. The Post Office at Horns Cross in Parkham was not opened until 1853 when Humphrey Chalk, a blacksmith, was appointed sub-postmaster (4th May). William White's Directory of 1878/9 confirms Horns Cross as the site of the post office and also that by then a wall postbox existed 'near to the church', which was cleared once a day. A second post office, run by Frederick Martin, was operating in Parkham itself by 1893 (Kelly's Directory) and a third at Bucks Cross by 1902 (Kelly's Directory), where William Jenn was sub-postmaster.

Everyone baked their own bread and there are no retailers or general store. Most retailing would be done by itinerant pedlars or packmen, like the fish jowders, who would knock at the door; probably at regular and well known intervals. A notable absentee from the list of artisans is a wheelwright. This may reflect the fact that until the 'wheeled revolution' of the 1840's much of the work of transportation in rural Devon was still done by pack horses and panniers borne by donkeys; such was the still frightful state of the roads. It would have fallen to the local carpenters to maintain the butts and wagons. There was no resident policeman; indeed no police force. Law and order was maintained by the part-time parish constable who was chosen by the Vestry from amongst the strongest and most dependable members of the community. Normally he would indicate his presence by hanging his elaborate constable's stave outside his front door. The sole representative of national government in the parish was the coastguard who lived at Horns Cross. Although, as we shall see, the local landed gentry owned by far the greatest part of the land in Parkham, none of them lived within the parish.

The quickest way into Bideford for most people in the village was probably along the direct coast road from Bude to Bideford, which, because it was a turnpike was better maintained than any other local road. There was a tollgate known as the Waytown Gate at Lower Waytown, manned by Elizabeth Croscomb. The alternative route to Bideford was via the Yeo valley to its confluence with the Torridge and thence alongside the river to Bideford.

Bideford was the only market town within realistic walking reach of Parkham and in 1841 had a population of 5,211. (19) It had 2 market days a week, Tuesdays and Saturdays, of which Tuesday was the most important. Three Fairs were held each year with the one held on February 14th being the most highly regarded. Bideford had a post office, banks, solicitors, auctioneers and valuers, seedsmen, saddle and harness makers, insurance agents, physicians and surgeons, and a wide range of shops and taverns. Its bustling quayside was one where coastal shipping, fishing boats and the occasional arrival of ships bringing timber from North America or taking emigrants to North America could be observed. There were busy potteries which supplied the district with coarse domestic ware (sgraffito) and several basket makers. Small as it was it must have been a magnet to people in the surrounding countryside.

Most people from Parkham must have walked the 6 and a half miles to and from Bideford. Jacob (see below) writing about the period at the very beginning of the twentieth century emphasises the lack of tarmacadamed roads, even in Bideford, and the absence of public transport. The carrier from Bradworthy (about 6 miles south-east of Parkham) drove his 3-horse brake through Parkham village on his way to Bideford on market days. His was the only mode of transport available to those without pony and trap, horse and gingle. The journey from Bradworthy to Bideford took an astonishing 3 hours.

The roads were a major problem in Parkham. As we have seen, responsibility for maintaining roads in the parish rested with the Vestry but the Surveyor of the Highways was simply one of the parishioners and financial resources were always inadequate. When necessary the Surveyor would call upon the other parishioners for help to repair roads with pick and shovel and a wagon load of stone from one of the many local quarries, but that was all.

The roads and lanes of the parish would have lain feet deep in mud in winter and in summer became dust bowls. Much, by necessity, was still being carried on the backs of donkeys and pack horses and the occasional sledge or truckamuck might have been encountered. The truckamuck comprised a pair of long poles, with a horse between, trailing on the ground with a couple of cross spars behind the horse to keep the poles at an equal distance apart. Sacks could be tied to it and in many circumstances it was better than nothing. The increasing use of carriages and carts simply measured the improvement in the roads.

Only two roads led north out of Parkham village to the turnpike road, one a circuitous route via East or West Goldworthy and the other and quicker route via Foxdown, a little further west. The Foxdown road ran through the Foxdown estate which claimed ownership. Notices indicated that it was a private road and two gates, originally erected as we have seen in 1820, were the subject of constant dispute and vandalism on the part of the locals. Things finally came to a head in 1876 when the author's great-great-grandfather Thomas Dark and his nephew John Dark, the then farmer of Limebury, travelled, with others, by train to Bristol to give testimony upon oath to the Bristol Assize. The hearing occupied 2 days and at least one witness had never travelled by train before. Was the road a private footpath or public carriageway? The flavour of the proceedings is conveyed by the following extract from the local press report (See North Devon Journal, 10th August 1876, p. 8) which clearly ranked the matter as of some importance:

'Mr. Richard Dunn, yeoman of Parkham, seventy years of age, said that he knew the road leading from Foxdown, Holwill, to the turnpike road leading from Bideford to Clovelly. Remembered the time Mr. Hux [the former owner - should read Hucks] diverted the old road, and the new road had always been used by the public. - The witness caused considerable laughter by his broad Devonshire dialect. - His Lordship remarked that it would have been better for the case to have been tried at Exeter, for then there would have been a chance of the jury understanding what was said. (Laughter.) As it was they almost needed an interpreter. (Laughter.) - In cross-examination, witness admitted that before Mrs. Graves purchased the estate there was a gate at the Parkham end of the road, with stepping-stones by the side. There was formerly a notice-board there, warning people that if they trespassed on the road they would be shot. (Laughter.) - His Lordship: Shot! - Witness: Yes, and no mistake. (Laughter.) - Mr. Pinder: Did it not caution people against riding or driving along the road? - Witness: It said, “Take notice that whoever is found trespassing on this road is to be shot.” (Roars of laughter.) - You would not swear to that? - Yes I would. (Laughter.) I heard Mr. Tardrew read it before the magistrates, and they said it must be put up by a person of weak intellect. (Laughter.) - Mr. Pinder: He must have been. You can read, I suppose? - Yes, - Have you ever read any notice? - That notice was taken down. There have been two or three put up. I never read any of them. - Re-examined: Mr. Hux was a man who did wild things. He would do anything that came into his head.'

Age and length of memory were crucial. Thomas Dark gave his age as 79 and address as Bucks Cross, Woolsery and said that he had lived there and in Parkham all his life. His nephew John Dark of Limebury farm also gave evidence. Thomas`s evidence was especially important because in 1874 he had supervised the repair of the road and paid the labourers on behalf of the local Highways Board. A road repaired with public funds could scarcely be a private one. The judge found in favour of the parishioners who returned to Parkham triumphant with stories and new experiences which, no doubt, became the stuff of legend.

The Land Owners

There were five major landowners (freeholders) in Parkham and some 36 others. No single landowner had anything like a monopoly of land ownership, unlike nearby Clovelly parish where Sir James Hamlyn Williams bart. had almost total ownership of the land. (20) Historians would readily recognise in Clovelly a classic example of a 'closed parish' where the resident landlord at Clovelly Court wielded immense power and influence over what went on. Parkham by contrast, with some 41 different landowners, is an 'open parish.' Land continually changed hands in Parkham and there was nothing fixed about the pattern of land ownership. None of the 5 biggest landowners lived in the parish. The five biggest landowners in 1842, in order of importance, were: (1) Lord John Rolle with 87 landholdings, including the toll house on the turnpike road between Bideford and Bude. (2) Rev. John Thomas Pine-Coffin with 51 landholdings. (3) Samuel Trehawke Kekewich with 34 landholdings.(4) John Lee Lee with 13 (including the 338.1.33 acres of Halsbury Barton). (5) Lewis William Buck M.P., 3 landholdings (including the 314 acre Sedborough farm).

The richest and biggest of them, Lord Rolle, lived at Stevenstone House near Torrington or at Bicton House near Sidmouth. He also maintained a London town house. Lord John Rolle was created Baron Rolle of Stevenstone in 1797, the title having become extinct in 1750 when his eldest brother Henry died unmarried. Lord John was quite simply the largest landowner in Devon with an estate said to be worth £40,000 a year in 1797. (21) Greville describes him as 'a choleric hard-bitten old Tory' who characteristically opposed the 1832 Reform Act. When castigated by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Brougham, for his opposition his brief and only response is said by Greville to have comprised the words, 'My Lord, I wish you to know that I have the greatest contempt for you both in this house and out of it.' Rolle's sole claim to fame is that when about to swear allegiance to the Queen he fell down the steps leading to the throne at Queen Victoria's coronation on the 28th June 1837; he then being in his eighty-first year. The Queen responded by advancing down the steps to enable him to pay his homage. The incident was popularised in a ballad called Mr. Barney Maguires Account of the Coronation, which contained the lines:

But Lord Rolle was rolling - twas mighty consoling
To think his Lordship did not break his bones

Whilst Lord Rolle became a figure of fun Victoria's action was seen as a gesture of Queenly graciousness. Lord Rolle died (at Bicton) childless on April 3rd. 1842 when the title again became extinct. The estates then passed to his second wife's family (Trefusis) via his nephew the Honourable Mark George (son of the 2nd Lord Clinton) and in 1883 comprised 55,592 acres, worth £47,170 a year. (22) Actual ownership of the estate was vested in trustees and Mark George was obliged to adopt the name and arms of Rolle as a condition of his occupancy of the estate. Mark George resided at Stevenstone and Lady Rolle (Lord Rolle's widow) at Bicton.

The Rev. John Thomas Pine-Coffin's family seat was at Portledge in the adjacent parish of Alwington, where he was Lord of the Manor and the incumbent. He owned a very large estate in Alwington, Monkleigh and Parkham. His strange name was owed to his ancestor John Coffin who was the grandson of Edward Pine who married Dorothy Coffin of Portledge in 1671. John Coffin inherited Portledge and assumed the arms and name of Pine by private Act of Parliament in 1797 in order to perpetuate the family name of Pine

Samuel Trehawke Kekewich had been M.P. for Exeter (1826 - 1830). His family seat was at Peamore near Exeter and he had very extensive estates scattered across Devon; in parishes as widely separated as Alwington, Parkham, Exeter, Exminster, Lifton and Stoke in Teignhead.

John Lee Lee's Parkham estates included the Barton of Halsbury (338 acres), which he inherited from his uncle Edward Lee who resided at Orleigh Court in the adjacent parish of Buckland Brewer. John Lee Lee's original name was John Lee Hanning but he dropped the Hanning and substituted Lee; hence the extraordinary and confusing combination of names. John Lee Lee lived at Dillington House at Ilminster in Somerset where he inherited the huge Dillington estate from his father William Hanning (died 1834). There was a family connection with John Hanning Speke (1827-1864) the discoverer of Lake Victoria as the source of the Nile. John Lee Lee died in 1874. The proliferation of surnames reached its apogee with John Lee Lee's grandson who was named Arthur Vaughan Hanning Vaughan Lee!

Lewis William Buck was M.P. for North Devon (1839 – 1857), and lived at Moreton House, a Georgian mansion near the western edge of Bideford. He owned, amongst many other estates in North Devon, the Hartland Abbey estate, where his son George lived at the Abbey. George Buck, who followed his father as M.P. for North Devon, later (1858) changed his name to Stucley and was made a baronet in 1859. It is from him that the present owner of Hartland Abbey, Sir Hugh George Coplestone Bamfylde Stucley (6th Baronet) is descended. Lewis William Buck was a powerful presence in North Devon and was, for example, able to present Charles Bruton's son, Meddon, to the living of West Worlington, whose advowson he owned. It is doubtful if any of the Parkham farmers ever met their landlords face to face. Most of the time they would have negotiated the terms of leases and paid their rents through land agents employed by the landowners.

The Rector owned 26 pieces of glebe (church owned land) land which was therefore a life interest only (129 acres in total), plus freehold ownership of the 43 acres called Hordiland or Hardiland, which in 1842 was tenanted by Richard Dunn. The Rector also rented some 11 acres at Pynes Moor (from Charles Bruton) and 7 at Venn (from Samuel Trehawke Kekewich).

One other interesting, although small, landowner in Parkham was William Tardrew Esq., who was, unusually, a native of Parkham, baptised at Parkham on the 11th August 1771, son of Philip and Prudence Tardrew. There ia no evidence of gentry origins but William must have attracted attention to himself in 1803 when he raised a company of 83 Volunteers from Parkham for local defence. (23) By 1842 he was the owner of two small farms, Hoopers Bocombe (21 acres), then occupied by John Harding and Higher Bocombe (7 acres), then occupied by Thomas Lemon. He also leased a small group of adjacent properties (approximately 7 acres in total) on the Parkham side of Peppercombe, near the mouth of the combe, from John Thomas Pine Coffin. They comprised a limekiln (3 combustion chambers) hard by the high tide mark, a dwelling house and court, readily identifiable as Peppercombe Castle, a nearby warehouse, 4 cottages and small plots of open land: lawn, pasture, waste and garden. The beach by the kiln is marked by an excavated channel through the platform of rocks behind it known as the Lear. This channel only became visible at low tide when it gave vessels access to the beach and therefore to the kiln. A similar channel, for the same purpose, exists at Bucks Mills called the Gore. The Castle became steadily ruinous from about 1909 and was replaced by the Pine Coffins with a wooden bungalow in 1926.

 

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Peppercombe Castle 1906.  Francis Frith Collection.

The Castle was a substantial property comprising a drawing and dining room, dressing room, 6 bedrooms, water closet, kitchens and offices and a coach house and stables.(24) It is not marked on the 1809 O.S. 1” map and is remembered as a sprawling, stuccoed exercise in the Picturesque. However, the 1841 census shows that William Tardrew Esq., (described as a landed proprietor farming 60 acres and employing 6 agricultural labourers), was not then living at the Castle but at Annery Court, Monkleigh, with his wife Louisa and 4 servants. He had evidently been living there for a number of years having bought the Annery Court estate in about 1810. (25) At some point before 1822 he rebuilt the old house as a rather grand mansion in the classical style. (26) The estate comprised some 560 acres and included many cottages, the Annery limekilns, strategically situated at the head of navigation on the Torridge and a shipyard next to the kilns. He later moved the shipyard to the sea-lock on the newly constructed Rolle canal (1827) in which, along with Lord Rolle and John Thomas Pine Coffin, he had a substantial number of shares. The Rolle canal was a struggling enterprise which closed in 1871 following the closure of the Annery kilns in about 1864. Access to the Wear Giffard side of the Torridge was obtained by the road bridge built by Lord Rolle and William Tardrew in 1835. A toll house was constructed on the Wear Giffard side and since pedestrians paid a greatly resented halfpenny toll it was known as the ha'penny bridge. William Tardrew was a Deputy Lieutenant of the County and magistrate. (27) At one time he was mayor of Bideford and obviously a man of considerable substance, with various business interests, including ship owning and building as well as lime-burning. He died in 1853 and his wife in 1871.

He also leased, again from John Thomas Pine Coffin, a second and even tinier group of adjacent properties in Parkham: No. 1140, Culmer Court (3 perches), No.1141, Limekiln (8 perches), No. 1142, Waste (22 perches) and No. 1143, Old Culmer Court (21 perches). The Culmer Courts were not houses and may have been storage areas for culm (coal from South Wales). The limekiln is undoubtedly the East Kiln (2 combustion chambers) at Bucks Mills. (28) This group appears on the Parkham Tithe map only because of an anomalous dogleg in the parish boundary, which appears just before the Bucks Mills watercourse reaches the sea. (29) This may have resulted from the building of the East Kiln in the first place, when a very short stretch of the watercourse marking the boundary may have been diverted from the western to the eastern side of the kiln. Thus both the coastal limekilns in Parkham were in William Tardrew's hands in 1842 although his lease for both the Peppercombe properties and those in Bucks only dates from 1841. (30) Tardrew was certainly keenly interested in lime-burning. The six mile long Rolle canal was basically intended to take limestone and culm upstream to Great Torrington where it could feed the kilns owned by Lord Rolle near Rosemoor, so that lime could be distributed over a wider inland area.

 

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Photo of 1930 showing the East Kiln (left) and West Kiln (right) at Bucks Mills. Although the East Kiln lay on the Woolsery side of the boundary stream between Parkham and Woolsery parishes it appears on the 1842 tithe map as part of Parkham. Coastal erosion has much altered this scene. (Francis Frith Collection)

When the then lessee of both properties at Peppercombe and Bucks Mills, a Mr. Balsdon, put them up for sale in 1857 by private contract his sale notice described the Peppercombe limekiln and coal cellar as being “near where a good trade has heretofore been carried on, and still may be, if in the hands of a competent person.” In the following year, the property having still not been sold, it was publicly auctioned at the Newfoundland Inn, Bideford, on the 9th September 1858. It may be therefore that lime-burning was in decline in Parkham by that date.

The Farmers

Amongst the 49 described as farmers in the 1841 census of Parkham only 4 had holdings above 200 acres and 14, holdings of over 100 acres. The largest group described as farmers were the 27 occupying holdings of between 10 and 100 acres. Then came a group of 24 occupying holdings of between 1 and 10 acres. All told, some 86 people were occupying land holdings greater than 1 acre in extent (see Appendices 2,3 & 4). In other words although 49 described themselves as farmers in the census some 37 other individuals were also occupying land from which they were obtaining economic benefit.

The 24 (Part of Tucking Mill was held jointly) occupying land between 1 and 10 acres in extent included 4 who described themselves as farmers in the census, 7 who were artisans (Ann Heydon the bonnet maker, 2 carpenters, 1 mason, 1 blacksmith, 1 tailor ) plus 1 butcher, 1 miller, 6 agricultural labourers and one of independent means. Five names could not be found in the census.

Those occupying holdings of less than an acre are mostly occupying dwellings with gardens attached. Although these gardens might be tiny they were of enormous importance to the occupants because they gave the opportunity to grow vegetables and keep a pig. The 6 agricultural labourers who boasted holdings of greater than an acre must have regarded themselves as very fortunate. So many people were living on the margins of existence in Parkham that benefits like the ability to keep a pig or a few chickens, or have access to moorland or commons, could make all the difference between independence or the workhouse.

One very clear feature of the Tithe Apportionment is the extremely small size of many of the fields on the Parkham farms. A huge proportion are measured in rods and perches only. Since 1842 a massive reduction in the number of fields has taken place as holdings have been consolidated and hedgerows removed. One unique feature of the field pattern is what looks like a fossilised system of strip cultivation around the hamlet of Ash.

The author's paternal great-great grandfather Thomas Dark and his younger brother, Joseph Dark would have been typical Parkham farmers at the time. (31) Joseph is described in the Census as a farmer of Limebury. The 1842 Tithe Award shows Limebury as comprising 40 acres, 1 rod, 4 perches leased directly from Lord Rolle, plus 17 acres, 3 rods, 21 perches (Moleshill), sub-leased from John Sergeant. Joseph had inherited the farm from his father, Thomas senior, who had died in 1835, although why Joseph inherited rather than his elder brother, Thomas junior, we have no way of knowing. Joseph belonged to that middling group of 46 farmers working a holding of between 10 and a hundred acres. Indeed, his 57 acres was probably about average for this group.

Like Joseph, the 1841 Census describes Thomas Dark as a farmer, although Thomas's 7 acres put him squarely in the middle of the 24 individuals with the smallest holdings. The 1842 Tithe Award shows him to be occupying a compact small-holding very near to Limebury, comprising a house and six small fields. The farmhouse (1066) occupied the south-western corner and lay only a few hundred yards yards east along the road from Limebury. In the census it is named as Limebury Cross Park. A seventh field, known as Lower Piece, lay about 3/4 of a mile away on the road to Horns Cross. In 1842 all seven fields were in pasture and totalled 5 acres, eight perches. This little holding was described in the Tithe Apportionment as 'part of Hortops, Broad Parkham' and was sub-leased from William Turner, who was in turn a tenant of Lord Rolle. Additionally, Thomas occupied two more fields (total acreage, 2 acres, 1 rod, 13 perches) given over to arable and actually adjacent to Joseph`s fields. Both fields lay very near to the farmhouse on the opposite side of the road. They belonged to Samuel Trehawke Kekewich and Thomas sub-leased them from Thomas Lemon.

Although Thomas is described as a farmer in the census it is important to note that at the baptisms of his seven children he is always described as a husbandman, except in the case of the baptism of his fourth child, Thurza, when he is described as a farmer, and of his seventh, James (born 1843) when he is described as a labourer. The term husbandman is almost certainly the term that would have been used within the parish to describe his economic and social status. It was a term habitually used in North Devon at the time. Thomas later gave up farming in Parkham, moved to Woolsery and then to Bideford where he became a publican and fisherman.

Whilst Thomas struggled, Joseph's son John (born 1836) expanded Limebury by incorporating Thomas's smallholding and ultimately (in 1889) bought the freehold from the trustees of Lord Rolle for £850 when it was then 80 acres in extent. John survived the great agricultural depression at the end of the century and retired to Bideford in 1901, leaving a tenant behind at Limebury. Besides his own house in Clovelly Road he owned 3 other properties in Bideford and died in 1910 when his personaL estate was valued at £2,117.15.5d., a considerable sum for those days. John married but had no children and spent his retirement devising an over-elaborate scheme of succession which would keep the farm in the family but without his having to make the final choice as to who should inherit. In the event it was a close run thing and the farm very nearly fell out of Dark ownership. The last Dark owner of Limebury being Victor Dark of Instow (1925-2004). John's story demonstrates that it was possible for some farms to survive into the twentieth century and the period of agricultural prosperity that preceded the First Word War. His uncle Thomas's story is that of the many husbandmen who did not survive the hungry forties.

As we have seen, the 57 acres or so farmed by Joseph and the 7 farmed by his brother Thomas was then typical of the Parkham farmer at the time. What was also typical was the fact that they were tenant farmers. The vast majority of the land in Parkham was farmed by tenants. Even the biggest of the farms, Melbury (547 acres), farmed by William Pridham, was sub-leased from Henry Downing, who leased the land from Lord John Rolle. Sub-leasing was very common.

In Devon the traditional terms on which land was leased out by the freeholders was for a period of 99 years or 2 or 3 'lives', whichever was the shorter. The 3 lives might be the farmer's wife, son or grandson, for example, in order to ensure that the farm remained within the family. The terms of the lease usually required the payment of a lump sum or 'premium' at the beginning, followed by a yearly rent. When a named life took over, a fine (heriot), typically the 'best beast', was paid to the landlord. Sub-leasing can make the picture of landownership and occupancy very complicated. Such long leases could suddenly look very insecure in the event of the unexpected death of one of the lives. In these circumstances the lease was often extended by the addition of another life (if the landlord agreed) so that the same family could be found occupying the same farm for very long periods of time. On the other hand if the lease fell in and the landlord refused to renew it the family could lose the farm and have no other choice but to become landless labourers.

 

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Limebury Farm in the late 1970's

 

 

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Parkham looking from the north across the Yeo valley.

 

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Limebury Farm Tithe Map, 1842

 :

Limebury Farm, Parkham, 1842 (Field Names & Acreages)
Source: 1842 tithe Apportionment & Map. P.R.O. Ref. I.R. 29,30/9/459

Nos.   Name    Cultiv.  A.   R.  P.  
811 CleaveArable505
934 Thorn Close MarshPasture1129
935 Middle MarshArable135
936 MarshArable2125
937 MeadowPasture1211
938 RoadRoad  16
939 GardenGarden  16
940 House, Building & Court House 22
941 MowhayMowhay  32
942 Mowhay PlotArable 321
943 Will Plot"  32
945 Clover Field"3112
945 Little Plot"  20
946 Middle Hill"3132
947 RoadRoad 18
948 Thorn CloseArable6312
956 Horse Park"3133
957 Over Marsh" 222
958 Middle Marsh" 36
959 First Marsh"1131
960 Broad Close"6226
  Total Acreage 4014

Rent of £4 . 18 . 0d. paid to Rector in lieu of tithes. Land-Owner:
Right Hon. Lord John Rolle. Occupier, Joseph Dark.
Additionally: Mouse Hills (sic) 17 acres, 3 rods, 21 perches leased from John Sergeant (owned by Lord John Rolle) occupied by Joseph Dark.

Thomas Dark`s Smallholding

(Part of Hortops, Broad Parkham)

Nos.  Name    Cultiv.  A.   R.  P.  
1066HouseHouse etc.  7
1067House PlotPasture 111
1068Plot" 124
1069Clover Field" 119
1070Middle Field"113
1071Higher Field"119
1365Lower Piece" 215
  Total Acreage    508

Rent of 18 shillings paid to Rector in lieu of tithes.

Land-Owner: Right Hon. Lord John Rolle.

Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thomas Dark.

Nos.  Name    Cultiv.  A.   R.  P.  
954MoorArable209
955MoorArable 14

Land-Owner: Samuel Kekewitch Trehawke. Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thoms Dark.

Land-Owner: Samuel Kekewitch Trehawke. Lessee: Thomas Lemon. Occupier: Thoms Dark.

The Parkham farms were overwhelmingly family affairs, where much larger families than we are used to today, lived with one or two farm servants who were very likely to be related, plus an elderly relation or two. At Goldworthy Barton there were no less than 13 Downings living in 1841, nine Pickards at Ash, nine Heals at East Stone, 8 Mays at Babeleigh and 8 Moasts at Halsbury, etc. No wonder that Bartholomew Pickard, a farmer of 13.0.32 acres (part of Daniels, Broad Parkham) and living alone, named his cottage 'Robinson Cruso [sic] Cottage.'

There were no less than 4 female farmers named in the Parkham census of 1841: Ann Hortop at Peppercombe Farm, Susan Austin at East Goldworthy, Ann Andrew at Parkham Town Barton and Ann Becklake [sic] at West Goldworthy. Four more women are listed in the Apportionment as occupying land: Elizabeth Caddy (82.0.21 acres, Bowden), Mary Matilda Hucks (20.3.24 acres, Payne's Cleave), Mary Tardrew (17.1.05 acres, Flexmans Parkham Town Barton) and Ann Heydon (6.2.35 acres, part of Daniel's Broad Parkham). Three other women would have been well known in the parish: Elizabeth Stanlick who was running the Bell Inn, Elizabeth Croscomb who was manning the toll gate at Waytown and Mary Passmore the Dame School mistress. The 1841 census does not record marital status but these responsibilities often resulted from early widowhood. The experience of the Dark family shows how this situation could come about and how common it was. On the 17th December 1846 Joseph Dark of Limebury died, aged only 43 (according to his death certificate), after a two year decline; the then universal way of describing tuberculosis. A verse from Jeremiah on his gravestone stoically underlined the tragedy of the situation; 'Leave thy fatherless children, I will preserve them alive; and let thy widows trust in me.' The gravestone also gives his date of death as the 12th December and his age as 40. Joseph’s death was followed in 1848 (4th June), by that of his mother Mary (aged 83) and on the 13th October 1850 (6th October on her gravestone) by that of his widow Rebecca aged a mere forty (39 on her gravestone). She too had died from tuberculosis (phthisis on her death certificate). The quotation on her gravestone reads: 'I waited patiently for the Lord: and he inclined unto me, and heard my calling.' (Psalm 40). Ironically, Rebecca's name occurs in the list of Parkham farmers included in White's Directory of Devon for 1850.

In 1851, when the next Decennial census was held, the farm, which had by then grown to 59 acres, was in the sole charge of Mary, aged 19 and unmarried. Mary was, apparently, running the farm with the help of her sister, Louisa, aged seventeen, her brother, John, aged fifteen and two farm labourers. One of the labourers, Samuel Johns, lived in. In 1856 Kelly's Directory lists John Dark as 'Farmer of Limebury' so that by then the twenty-year old younger brother appears to have taken over from Mary, who had earlier, on the 4th March 1852, married John Collins, a blacksmith of Lawford's in Parkham, in the parish church.

Kith and Kin

Another characteristic feature exemplified by the Dark brothers was that they were both married to daughters of Richard and Grace Dunn of neighbouring Nethercott Farm in Parkham; Thomas junior to Miriam (1827) and Joseph to Rebecca (1831). Nethercott lay a little over a mile south-west of Limebury. It is impossible to exaggerate the extent and complexity of the network of blood relationships and inter-marriage that bound the people of the parish together in an all pervasive network of mutual obligation and support. Marriage horizons probably extended to no more than 10 or 12 miles (a days walk) from the home village and within that area inter-marriage and migration between the villages making it up was considerable. Nevertheless, by modern standards, it was a restricted geographical area with a correspondingly restricted genetic pool. One in which neighbours were highly likely to be connected in one way or another and in which inheritance, especially in respect of land, would be jealously safeguarded. It would have been an extremely close, claustrophobic society, very difficult for one who was not a member to enter.

Once part of it, however, the invisible network of relationships would have been extremely important in terms of everyday living. How much of the sharper edges of the Poor Law, for example, was blunted by help from neighbouring relations? How many of the 75 and 80 year olds found in the mid-century Census Returns, described as 'farm-servants' were poor relations rather than sturdy old men and women able to make a genuine contribution to running the farm? How important were aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters and cousins of varying degrees, to households much more used than we are today to widowhood and orphaning? At birth and death there must always have been someone to call upon from within the family group. Opaque when viewed from outside there could have been few secrets within it.

Two cottages lay very near Limebury Farm and Thomas Dark's smallholding. In 1841 one of the nearby cottages was called Limebury Cross Cottage (1062) and was occupied by Jasper Pickard, a carpenter, his wife Ann and an old lady called Mary Bailey. The other known as Watershute Cottage (1061) was occupied by Thomas Pickard, Jasper's son, who was an agricultural labourer, his wife Susanna (formerly Dark), their 3 children, his mother-in-law Mary Dark and another labourer called John Lee. Four neighbouring dwellings; the inhabitants all related. But it does not end there.

Three other Dark families lived nearby. Another Thomas Dark, an agricultural labourer, his wife Ann and four of their children lived at Broad Parkham. This was an older Thomas who married Ann Dennis Daniel, daughter of Bartholomew and Elizabeth Daniel, at Parkham on the 25th November 1824, when he was described as a husbandman. Further south was the solitary cottage at Windabout belonging to John Dark, another agricultural labourer, his wife Elizabeth and their 4 children. Thomas and Betsy Dark lived at Lower Holwill. Two small Dark children, Elizabeth and Ann Dark were lodging with John Lang, an agricultural labourer, his wife Susan and their 2 children, Elizabeth and James, at East Goldworthy. Richard Dark was working for William Braund, farmer of Buckish Mill, Edwin Dark was a male servant to Thomas Hockridge at Worthyeat Farm and George Dark was a male servant with the Nancekivells at Higher Holwill Farm.

It takes a great deal of investigation to uncover this network and the nature of the connections. The relationships on the paternal side are relatively easy to discover but, of course, relationships via the distaff side where the woman changes her name on marriage are much less obvious. Dr.Janet Few, in her intensive study of kinship in Buckish Mill, has shown that only 8 of the 24 occupied cottages in Buckish in 1841 were inhabited by families not related to the other 16 families. (32)

Poverty, the Poor law and Emigration

After 1834 there was a revolutionary change in the way poverty was dealt with in Parkham. Since Elizabethan times the relief of poverty had been a parish responsibility. The parish accounts are full of details of the names of payments to poor parishioners who were sick, unemployed, disabled or in any other way in need. Because the line between prosperity and poverty was so thin and so many of the parishioners were related to each other there must always have been a sense of 'there but for the grace of God go I.' Such help might therefore have had a personal quality based upon knowledge and kinship that may have have made its acceptance easier. Above all it was mostly administered to people living in their own homes.

Willingness to assist the parish poor rarely extended to individuals from outside the parish and strangers and pregnant women moving into the parish were always objects of suspicion if there was any chance that they might become a charge on the parish.. In order to prevent this it was necessary to demonstrate a 'right of settlement' in the parish which was conferred by things like birth within the parish, apprenticeship, property ownership etc. Anyone who could not demonstrate a right of settlement and fell on evil times was removed back to the parish where there was such a legal right, no matter how far away that might be. The receiving parish bore the cost of removal. Devon C.R.O. possesses numerous Parkham removal orders. Just how reluctant the parish was to maintain an illegitimate baby is shown by this extract from the parish apprenticeship register of 1827:

160. Elizabeth Hamlyn, aged 19, dau. of Richard and Jane, discharged from the service of John May being with child likely to be born a bastard and to become chargeable to the parish of Parkham. 17.2.1827. [Apprenticed for Babeleigh 7.5.1817.]

The poor Law Amend ment Act of 1834 totally changed the system of poor relief. Parishes lost their poor law responsibilities and were grouped into Poor Law Unions controlled by Boards of Guardians. Parkham belonged to the Bideford Union with 18 parishes and 25 Guardians, one of whom represented Parkham. A Union workhouse was erected at Bideford in 1837/8 in Meddon Street and any able-bodied person claiming relief had to enter it. Outdoor relief, in which the parish assisted people in their own homes, was therefore intended to became a thing of the past. A workhouse test was applied so that conditions in the workhouse had to be such that, whilst not inhumane, no one would enter a workhouse unless they had to. Families entering a workhouse would be broken up; the women put into a women's ward, the men into a men's ward and the children into separate boys' and girls' wards. Were poor families actually going to be forced to leave Parkham and pass through the great archway at Bideford? There to don a uniform that marked them out and then be separated from one another, brother from sister, husband from wife? They were and they are. This then was the prospect that faced impoverished families in Parkham in 1841. It is difficult to convey today how revolutionary and unwelcome this must have been to many in Parkham who could remember the system of outdoor relief of some years earlier.

The unrest and distress that resulted from Enclosure, combined with the economic depression following the end of of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 and resentment at the operation of the Poor Laws resulted in widespread rioting, rick-burning and threats from an eponymous Captain Swing throughout the counties most affected by Enclosure. These culminated in the infamous Captain Swing riots, rick-burnings and destruction of machinery that occurred throughout the southern counties in 1831. A number of executions of ring-leaders of the unrest followed. All of this economic unrest took place against a background of the febrile political climate that preceded the difficult passage of the Parliamentary Reform Act of 1832.

The unrest in Devon may have been somewhat less than in counties further east and may be explainable by the absence of the effects of the Enclosure Movement. Farming in Devon had not been characterized by the communal cultivation of great open fields in which individual land holdings had been scattered in small strips across a wide area. Consequently there was no equivalent to the Enclosure Movement in Devon which so disrupted the agrarian landscape and way of life further east. In counties like Wiltshire and Hampshire Enclosure more or less destroyed the small, subsistence farming class and polarised rural society between landless labourers and large land-owning farmers. Enclosure had mainly taken place at the end of the eighteenth century or early in the nineteenth, so memories amongst the rural poor were still strong. In Devon there was a higher number of small independent farmers, usually described as husbandmen or small yeoman farmers and there had been no revolutionary change in the shape of the landscape and rural life.

Nevertheless, there was unrest in North Devon, much of which was reported in the North Devon Journal (see for example the issue of the 8th December 1830). In that year workers at the Rawleigh lace factory (Barnstaple) went on strike for higher wages, following an angry confrontation with the owner, in which letters signed by'Swing' were left behind by the departing workers. In nearby Pilton an arson attack was reported. In the following year two Swimbridge men, George Goff and Thomas Roughcliffe were sent for trial at Exeter as leaders of local unrest. At the Midsummer Quarter Sessions of 1831 a George Goff was subsequently sent to prison for 6 months for misdemeanour and a Thomas Ratcliffe [sic] given 12 months for the same offence. (33) In Bideford it was reported in 1830 that several threatening letters signed 'Swing' had caused two proprietors to destroy their threshing machines and similar pre-emptive destruction had taken place in Torrington and South Molton. In Ilfracombe an Association for the Protection of Persons and Property was set up and everywhere large numbers of special constables were sworn in by local magistrates. Those sworn in are often described as 'farmers and pensioners' and presumably included ex-soldiers or sailors.

Unrest continued throughout the thirties. In 1836 (6th February) The Exeter and Plymouth Gazette reported a serious riot amongst paupers in Chittlehampton and on the 20th the Western Times reported that the Yeomanry were called out to Sheepwash and Petrockstow and 5 men conveyed to prison in Exeter. The Petrockstow riot was occasioned when the Relieving Officer attempted to substitute bread for part of the monetary dole. The author remembers, as a boy, seeing the very large collection of special constables' truncheons that used to be displayed in the museum in Bideford Town Hall. At the time he was puzzled why so many of them bore the Royal cypher of King William IV.

Rural distress in North Devon was sufficient to encourage large numbers of the smaller yeomen farmers and husbandmen to emigrate to Canada, mostly to Ontario and Prince Edward Island. Some of this emigration was privately financed and took place via Bideford and Appledore. This is additional to the assisted emigration from Plymouth and Bristol. Emigration is the best explanation for the 23 unoccupied houses recorded for Parkham in the 1841 census. It also may help explain the consolidation of holdings and the gradual substitution of short leases for 3 life leases that family historians start to observe in the 1840's and subsequently.

In 1830 Thomas Burnard Chanter advertised in the North Devon Journal that his ships Collina, Calypso, Sappho and Euphemia had been 'conveniently fitted up for Families and will take out passengers on moderate terms to Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick' In the following year The North Devon Journal described some 5000 people lining the Quay and Long Bridge at Bideford to wave farewell to the Apollo, Calypso and Bacchus, bound for New York, St. Andrews and Montreal. Such, it reported, 'is the prevailing rage for emigration, that a female who had given birth to a child but three days before, would not be persuaded by the most urgent entreaties....to remain behind for another season'.(34) Emigration continued throughout the thirties and forties and as late as 1857 the North Devon Journal had the following illuminating comment:

'About seven years ago, a young farm servant from a neighbouring village went to America leaving his sweetheart behind in a state that added nothing to the good reputation of either. When he had been there about a year, he sent home for the latter; she went out to him, and they were married. He now writes home that he has maintained his increasing family during that period, and has worked himself into a farm – not a hired one – but 50 acres of purchased land, to which 10 more are soon to be added. Besides the land, there is the stock enumerating 25 bullocks besides other animals with the rest of the et ceteras of a farm.' A few miscellaneous particulars were added, such as that they had to be their own tailors and make their own candles and soap, etc. 'Suppose the couple has been married seven years ago in this country, where would they have now been with their half dozen children? Where would have been the acres, the bullocks, the sheep, the corn, the candles, and the soap. Not only would there have been nowhere for them, but instead there-of hopeless poverty, dirt, drudgery, the Union, and a pauper's grave.'(35)

Evidence of poverty in Parkham in 1841/2 is not very abundant because the operation of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act meant that those those seeking poor relief were obliged to leave the parish in order to enter the workhouse, where they disappear from view. Unfortunately the census does not indicate the origins of the paupers resident in the Bideford Union Workhouse so we have no means of knowing how many of them came from Parkham. One resident only of Parkham, Jane Squance (aged 87), is described in the census as a pauper

Life on the Farm

There is much, of course, about daily life that the census and tithe documents cannot tell us. Written memoirs, letters and reminiscences by the people of mid nineteenth century Parkham, or indeed any other Devonshire village, are extremely rare or fragmentary. Most people were illiterate in the 1840's. Of my collection of 3 death certificates, 3 birth certificates and 1 marriage certificate of Darks born, married and died between 1837 and 1848 at Parkham, only one, a birth certificate, contains a signature. In every other case the groom or the informant made his or her mark. In these circumstances direct written evidence about how life was actually lived is very hard to find. Two sources, one written at the beginning of the century (1807) and the other by a man born in Parkham in 1897 do throw a little more light. But in each case they depend upon the extent to which one can reliably extrapolate forward and back.

One precious secondary source is R. Pearse Chope's little article entitled One Hundred Years Ago (no. 25 in Notes of The Past) in the Hartland Chronicle of 1901. Born in Hartland in 1862 and one of Devon's most distinguished local historians, he is an extremely reliable informant about local conditions in the nineteenth century; especially because he was able to draw upon the memories of eyewitnesses to earlier events .(36) He emphasises the suspicion of strangers, the enforced self-sufficiency and isolation, the predominance of hand tools like the reaping hook (as distinct from a sickle with its serrated inner edge) and the zellup or seedlip. The latter was the traditional apron wrapped around the shoulder and waist containing the seed, which was broadcast by hand from side to side. He confirms the absence of wheeled vehicles earlier in the century and the greater numbers of subsistence farmers. In particular he emphasises the harshness of the life that faced many apprentices and the poverty endured by the agricultural labourer.

Joseph Dark's father,Thomas Dark senior, probably succeeded his cousin John Dark as the occupier of Limebury in 1807. What would conditions have been like on a Parkham farm in 1807 and what kind of farming would have been practised then and at least until 1841? We can answer such questions with some assurance because it was in the same year that the Board of Agriculture published George Vancouver's great General View of the Agriculture of the County of Devon. Parkham at that time was still a completely agricultural community. Vancouver reckoned that it had 584 inhabitants (283 males & 301 females) divided into 107 families, living in 107 houses, plus one vacant house (cf. the 23 in 1841). Of these 584 inhabitants no less than 542 were engaged in agriculture (children were clearly included in the estimate). Of the remainder, only 13 individuals were classified as engaged in 'manufacture', which probably means that they were rural craftsmen, and 29 were classified as 'other'. (37)

The agriculture in which they were engaged was mixed. Vancouver calculated that 1/8 of the land was arable (corn, fallow, roots and potatoes) and the rest given over to grass. However, only 1/8 of the 7/8 given over to grass was permanent, so that 7/8 of the land was subject to a system of crop rotation. At this point Vancouver, who was a great advocate of agricultural improvement, observes tartly; 'The word system is here perhaps not quite admissible, as that word implies order in a regular series, both in time and in succession, with each other. No such rules, however, govern the practice of the North Devon farmer.' (38)

Apart from the church and the parsonage, the village and most of the scattered farmsteads would have been built of cob (a semi-wet mix of stiff clay and chopped straw) and thatched. To Vancouver's eyes the adherence to cob in a county where building stone was 'variously dispersed, and by no means difficult to procure' was puzzling and produced a curious visual effect; 'Garden walls, farm-houses, barns, stables, linneys (sic), village fences and cottages are all built of this dull, heavy and deforming material. Left without rough-cast, or white-wash, to conceal the native colour of the loam, it is utterly impossible, at a distance, to distinguish a village from a beatfield, both having uniformly the same shade, and from both of which the stranger perceives smoke issuing.'(39) Such a scene is probably only found nowadays in parts of the developing world such as China.

Turnpike roads apart, the network of Devonshire lanes joining these villages was so bad and narrow that much of the carriage was still done by pack horses and donkeys with panniers, and continued to be until well into the century. Indeed, it was not until the 'wheeled revolution' of the 1840's that carts and other wheeled vehicles became the universal means of transport. The Clovelly donkeys and sledges are a vestigial remnant of this earlier period of transport. At the end of the century James Dark (1843-1907) of Bucks Mills still employed a string (normally 8) of donkeys named after the Apostles, which he used to carry sand up from the beach at Bucks. Earlier in the century farmers regularly rode to market and elsewhere with their wives and daughters on pillions behind them.

Oxen were still commonly employed as draught animals and Marshall, writing earlier, in 1796, has this striking vignette of plough-time in Devonshire (40):

'The style of driving an ox-team here, is observable; indeed it cannot pass unnoticed by any stranger. The language, though in a great degree peculiar to the country, does not arrest the attention; but the tone or rather tune, in which it is delivered. It resembles, with great exactness, the chanting, or recitatives of the cathedral services. The plough boy chants the counter-tenor, with unabated ardour through the day; the plough man throwing in at intervals, his harsher notes. It is understood that this chanting march, which may sometimes be heard a considerable distance, encourages and animates the team, as the music of a marching army, or the song of the rowers. Let this be as it may, I have never seen so much cheerfulness attending the operation of ploughing, as in Devonshire.'

We know, this time from Vancouver, the plan of the cob cottages in which agricultural labourers would have lived. They comprised a principal room about 14 feet square, with combined fireplace and oven, and two small rooms behind; one of which would be used for storing food and provisions. The upper storey was divided into two bedrooms, one for the parents and the other for the children. Such a house, we are told, could be built and 'made very comfortable and decently furnished, for about £60.'(41) As Hoskins has often emphasised, such labourers' cottages were far too insubstantial to survive. What we see today in Devonshire are only the more substantial houses of Yeomen and better-off husbandmen. Once the thatch with its overhanging eaves was removed the cob walls below simply dissolved in the Devonshire rain and thatch, wood beams and cob soon returned to the earth. Only the brick or stone firebreast and chimney survived a little longer. Many of the cottages seen on the 1842 Tithe map, like the 3 neighbouring dwellings next to Limebury Farm and lived in by Darks and Pickards, are simply untraceable today.

The out-door farm labourer was then (1807) being paid seven shillings a week, winter or summer, plus a quart to 3 pints of ale or cider per day. This was supplemented by cheap bread-corn (barley or wheat) and 20 perches of allotment land for potatoes and a pig. By 1844, when Sir Robert Peel enquired into the matter, the North Devon labourer's wage had still only risen to 8 shillings and had remained at that level since 1837.

What wage levels of this kind actually meant in terms of living conditions is dramatically illustrated by the verbatim evidence given by James Vicary, an agricultural labourer of Great Torrington, who gave evidence in London to the Anti-Corn Law League in 1840. This report appeared in the North Devon Journal on the 2nd April 1840. His evidence is especially telling because he admits to being better paid than others:

'James Vicary, of Great Torrington, was then examined: I am a farm labourer. I arrived in London last evening. I have been employed by Mr. Braginton, for a year and a half. I get 9s a week. I have six children. The eldest is twenty-two years of age; the second, 20; the third, 18; the fourth, 16; the fifth,11; and the youngest about three years old. Four are living with me. The third earned 1s or 1s. 6d a week, on an average; the fourth, who is about sixteen years of age, is deficient in his mind, and gets nothing; the fifth goes to school, and the youngest remains at home. My wife earns 6d a week. My master gives his men 9s a week, but the regular wages of all the other farmers is only 7s a week, and one quart of cider a day. The latter is worth 2d a quart, which is equal to 8s a week. He is paid 7s in money. The reason I get higher wages is that my master is a little better off than other farmers, and he (witness) did a little odd work. I get 11s a week altogether; of that I lay out on bread 3s 6d. The farmer give us a crop of potatoes if we manure the land. I feed a pig in the course of a year. I buy corn for it and save the waste. The pig eats 7 or 8 bushels of barley at 5s or 5s 6d a bushel. We drink herb tea, or perhaps a little peppermint. My wife occasionally gets half an ounce of tea. She has no sugar. We have three-quarters of a pound of candles a week. We eat no shambles meat [meat from the slaughter house] but have a rasher of bacon and a bit of bread. We have no cheese. We may taste it once in a while. The family generally have fried potatoes and a bit of bacon. We purchase coal at 1s a hundred [weight, about 25kgs, 56 lbs]. We use on hundred and a half per week. Our yearly rent is £3.14s. I pay poor rates and highway rates- on an average 3s to 3s 6d a year. There are no church rates. We have but little clothing. I have had this jacket for five or six years or more. I only wear it on Sundays. I bought the rest eight or nine years ago. The trousers were at first only second hand. My every-day clothes are very mean. I could show you a pair of trousers that made [sic] them myself. They are patched six or seven times over. They are nigh forty pounds weight, ... loud laughter.... I have had them since within a few days of my marriage. That was about 30 years ago. During that time I have had none else except a pair of sail canvass trousers and the pair I have on. I had the canvass trousers about three years. My wife buys the linen from a pack-man. She also buys clothing for herself and the children that way. I have two shirts. My wife has one gown in the course of a year. For one pair of shoes I pay 8s 6d. I wear the best only on Sundays. Married men have no better wages than single. For seven years, till my wages were raised, I had only 1 1\2 lb bacon a week for myself, wife and three children. In 1835 I got 7s wages. Corn was then 2s 6d or 3s a bushel. Now it is 5s or 6s a bushel. I was better off then than now. I had more of a bellyful. My wife now has less money to spend. The bread used is barley bread.

The Chairman: Do you save any money? - Witness (with surprise): God bless you sir, no savings. I don't know what will become of me when I am old. In illness I get 6s from a club. I pay the club 3d a week. I owe three quarters of a year's rent. I know not how I shall pay it. I was never in debt so much before. The labourers on Lord Rolle's estate get 7s a week. There are no railways near us. The people generally are in a state of starvation.

By Mr. Sturge: These labourers who have 7s a week have no meat. Thirty years ago I got 7s or 8s a week wages. I used then to be up on job-work. In war time we lived better then. We could get a little wheat and labourers were generally better off. Some of my neighbours keep a pig, as I do. I never get parish relief. My daughter earns 1s 6d a week. She works from six o'clock in the morning till nine o'clock at night. I have not always had a bellyful of food. It is the same frequently with my family. Barley bread is used about me. If barley was cheaper, we could buy more clothing. We have heard something about corn laws lately. We first heard about half a year ago. The labourers wish that a change would take place, but some persuaded them against it. They told the labourers that it would be worse for them, but we say that it never can be worse,....hear hear, and laughter.'

According to Vancouver's earlier 1807 account the hours of work for agricultural labourers were from six in the morning to six in the evening in summer and from 7 until 5 in the winter. Pay was not increased at harvest-time 'but amply compensated for by board, and very extraordinary sittings over ale and cider.'(42) Just how extraordinary may be judged by Vancouver's verbatim account of the high jinks and jollifications that accompanied the wheat harvest:

'The reaping and harvesting of the wheat is attended with so heavy an expense, and with practices of so disorderly a nature, as to call for the strongest mark of disapprobation, and their immediate discontinuance, or at least a modification of their pastime after the labours of the day. The wheat being ready to cut down, and amounting from 10 to 20 acres, notice is given in the neighbourhood, that a reaping is to be performed on a particular day, when, as the farmer may be more or less linked to the village, on the morning of the day appointed, a gang, consisting of an indefinite number of men and women, assemble at the field, and the reaping commences after breakfast, which is seldom over till between eight and nine o'clock. This company is open for additional hands to drop in at any time before the twelth hour, to partake in the frolic of the day. By eleven or twelve o'clock the ale or cider has so much warmed and elevated their spirits, that their noisy jokes and ribaldry are heard to a considerable distance, and often serve to draw auxiliary force within the accustomed time. The dinner, consisting of the best meat and vegetables, is carried into the fields between twelve and one o'clock; this is distributed, with copious draughts of ale and cider; and by two o'clock the pastime of cutting and binding the wheat is resumed, and continued without other interruption than the squabbles of the party, until about five o'clock, when what is called the drinkings are taken into the field, and, under the shade of a hedgerow or large tree, the panniers are examined, and buns, cakes, and all such articles are found, as the confectionery skill of the farmer's wife could produce for gratifying the appetites of her customary guests at this season.

After the drinkings are over, which generally consume from half to three-quarters of an hour (and even longer, if such can be spared from the completion of the field), the amusement of the wheat harvest is continued, with such exertions as draw the reaping and binding of the field together with the close of the evening. This done, a small sheaf is bound up, and set upon the top of one of the ridges, when the reapers retiring to a certain distance, each throws his reap-hook at the sheaf, until one, more fortunate, or less inebriated than the rest, strikes it down: this achievement is accompanied with the utmost stretch and power of the voices of the company, uttering words very indistinctly, but somewhat to this purpose:- WE HA IN! WE HA IN! - which noise and tumult continue about half an hour; when the company retire to the farm-house to sup, which being over, large portions of ale and cider enable them to carouse and vociferate until one or two o'clock in the morning.

At the same house, or that of a neighbouring farmer, a similar scene is renewed, beginning between eight and nine o'clock in the morning following, and so continued through the precious season of the wheat-harvest in this country. It must be observed, that the labourers thus employed in reaping receive no wages, but in lieu thereof, they have an invitation to the farmer's house, to partake of a harvest frolic; and at Christmas, during the whole of which time, and which is seldom less than three or four days, the house is kept open day and night to the guests, whose behaviour during the time, may be assimilated to the frolics of a bear-garden.' (Vancouver, previously cited, pp. 145-147).

That such entertainment had a coarse-grained quality is obvious, but Vancouver's parsimony towards 'so heavy an expense' during 'the precious season of the wheat-harvest' seems a little un-generous. Life for the agricultural labourer throughout the nineteenth century was always hard and the occasional saturnalia an inevitable safety valve. Incidentally the 'drinkings', comprising saffron cakes, apple tarts and clotted cream were still a feature of Parkham harvests at the end of the nineteenth century and called as such.

We have the ability to compare conditions at the beginning of the century with those at the very end through the reminiscences of the late George Jacob. Jacob was born in 1897 in Parkham but whose childhood memories of growing up in Parkham before the First World War must have held good for several decades before that:

"The farmers were on the whole farming the same size farms then as now. Of course, the style of farming has altered with the times and one man with a modern machine can do more than 3 men could then. The old unwritten law of being a good farmer was to plough up the ley, have two straw crops, then put to roots, and then seed out on a straw crop and leave to grass for four years before ploughing up again...the names of the farmers on the farms seldom changed as the families were larger and there was nearly always a son to take over when the older farmer gave up. The farmhouses have nearly all been altered inside if not out. They are chiefly fairly large, but probably not too big for the old days when the families were a lot larger than they are today, and all had a servant girl living in, and a good many had one or two young farm-workers too.

There was no tap water and all the water had to be pumped from a well which, in a good many cases, was some little distance from the back door. Then it had to be carried to the open fireplace if you wanted hot water and put into large kettles or boilers, which hung on chimney crooks, which you would raise or lower according to how quickly you wanted hot water. The fire was nearly always burning as generally there was a big log at the back which would often last the day. To boil the water for the vegetables, the sauce-pans were set on a 'brandis' - a three-legged iron frame. As all the hot water had to be carried away in clome pitchers or buckets, you can realise what a lot of work was involved. The 'bodley' for cooking was being fixed in a great many farmhouses, but in quite a lot the open chimney and the clome oven was the only means of cooking the food for a big family. The 'privy' was generally at the bottom of the garden or at some quiet spot some distance from the house. One of my uncles used to say that it was 'A Sabbath day's journey' to get there.

Butter-making was one of the big jobs in the house. Until the arrival of the cream separator, all the milk had to be scalded in clome pans, and I remember how proud everyone felt when we had our first separator. Nothing today seems to look so good as the junket covered by that layer of fresh yellow scalded cream, or an apple tart covered in a like manner. Making butter during a hot summer was always a trying job as there was nothing to cool it except the cool water from the well.

As there was no electricity then the only light was by candles or oil lamps. The lamps had to be filled every day and the lamp glasses cleaned. One tiny splash of water when it was hot made the glass crack at once. The only light outdoors was the oil lantern or in some cases a six-sided lantern made of horn with a candle inside. This was not a very brilliant light.

One of the busiest days in the farmhouse was when the pig was killed - to be salted and put in the 'trendle'. The butcher would arrive at a given time and expect the water to be boiling in the copper furnace. After the pig was killed and cleaned, all the offals were brought indoors and cleaned, and the suitable parts made into 'hogs-puddings'. Then the butcher came again in the evening and cut up the pig ready for salting. This made a very busy day, but there was always the feeling that there was plenty of meat to last for some time....The general food of the old farmhouse was plenty of meat, home-made bread, pasties of meat or potatoes, saffron cake and plenty of cream."(43)

What is so interesting about this description of life on a Parkham farm at the beginning of the twentieth century is how slowly things had changed. The farming was still mixed. The water was obtained from a well. The privy was at the bottom of the garden. By privy, of course, Jacob means a rickety shed with an earth closet beneath. The privy was usually insubstantial enough to be moved to another site when necessary, leaving a rich growth of stinging nettles to mark where it had been. In many farmhouses the 'bodley' was being installed, the local name for a coal-fired, cast-iron cooking range, but 'in quite a lot” the open fireplace and clome oven was the only means of cooking. The latter were arched apertures, lined with fireclay, in which quick-burning furze or faggots of twigs were burnt to heat the surrounding bricks to a high temperature. The ashes were then raked out and bread, pasties etc. could be easily cooked in the 45 minutes or so before the oven cooled. Candles were still in use, mostly in bedrooms, but supplemented by oil lamps, whereas in 1841 tallow candles and the cheaper rushlights would have predominated. The separator, for separating cream from the milk only arrived during Jacobs's childhood.

Every detail of the above picture is confirmed by the late Rev. Fred Pennington (born on a Hartland Farm in 1911) in his autobiography From Ploughboy to Priest published in 1984. Pennington describes both the taking of the lunchtime meal to the workers in the fields at the corn harvest; and the 'drinkings' later in the day, as described by Vancouver a hundred years earlier.

The question about when technological innovations arrived on the farm is a very difficult one. Jacob recognises it was crucial in improving productivity: 'one man with a modern machine can do more than 3 men can do now.' By 'now' Jacob means 1970 when his book was published. By then, Limebury Farm had got its first mains electricity supply (1963). But what was the rate of innovation on the Parkham farms between 1841 and 1900? We simply do not know. Clearly it is not sufficient to know when the major new piece of machinery was invented. Patrick Bell of Scotland invented a reaping machine in 1828, but it was never patented and the first horse-drawn mechanical reaper (followed by the reaper-binder) is generally attributed to Cyrus McCormick (1809-1884) of America in 1831-34. A machine operating on the same principles was exhibited in England at the Great Exhibition of 1851 but it took time before mechanical reaper-binders appeared on English farms and then only on the biggest and richest. To this must be added the undoubted fact that North Devon was always regarded as a region that lagged behind the rest of the country in agricultural innovation.

Threshing machines were certainly in existence on the farms of southern England in the 1830's because, as we have seen, they were objects of destruction during the Swing riots. The invention of the stationary threshing machine is generally attributed to the Scot, Andrew Meikle, in 1786. Threshing by flail gave employment to the agricultural labourer during the winter months and so threshing machines threatened livelihoods; although the extent of their adoption in the 1830's is hotly debated by agricultural historians. The question also arises about the nature of the early machines. Some were hand or horse operated and no bigger than an upright piano. Some were very large and expensive and beyond the means of a small North Devon farmer. Nevertheless, there is an intriguing, if tragic, entry in the burial register of Alwington, one of Parkham's adjacent parishes, for the 22nd December 1813: 'buried, William Tremeere, aged 8, killed by a threshing machine'. How extensive the use of machines was in 1813, we have, of course, no means of knowing.

Combined threshing and winnowing machines powered by steam traction engines were certainly being employed in North Devon in the era of agricultural prosperity that preceded the First Word War. These big and expensive machines were normally hired and moved around from farm to farm, slowly, because the traction engine moved at about 4 miles per hour. Between these 2 great landmarks of the horse-drawn reaper-binder and the steam operated thresher, of course, lay all sorts of newly invented horse-drawn machines like grass cutters, tedders and rakes for bringing in the hay harvest. Additionally, hand operated machines greatly reduced the labour of chaff cutting, pulping roots and grinding corn to feed the animals. All these devices together increased productivity in the second half of the century and reduced the demand for labour but one suspects that on many of the small Parkham farms one would be surprised at the slowness of technical innovation.

Pat Pidler, who amassed a splendid collection of farm machinery and was born in 1930 on a farm in Swimbridge near Barnstaple (whose mother cooked on an open fire and clome oven in the traditional way) writes this of his father: 'My father could remember how, when he was young, a sickle which was held in one hand with the top of the corn held in the other was used for cutting the corn. It was placed in rows that later were tied into sheaves with straw. Then the scythe was introduced which he held with both hands and with a swinging movement cut the corn. It was then the turn of the reaper which was a machine pulled by a horse with a man sitting on the seat driving a horse, another person walking along with rake in hand raking the corn into the moving blades. This way the corn was cut in rows and then bound by hand.'(44)

Clearly, sickle or scythe were not being used simply for tidying up operations where isolated clumps left behind by the reaper were dealt with. What is also interesting about this passage is that when mechanical reaping came in the first machines were reapers only and that reaper-binders came later. Elsewhere Pidler writes about the hay harvest: 'when my father started farming he used to cut all the grass with a scythe.' (45) Altogether, the little evidence that exists within North Devon, suggests that the use of oxen as draught animals and of ancient hand tools and implements would have been characteristic of Parkham in 1841 and on many Parkham farms for some time afterwards.

Such then was Parkham in 1841/2, poised between two worlds. One reflecting the eighteenth century with its yeomen, husbandmen, and agricultural labourers, with its oxen, donkeys and pack horses, employing scythes, reaping hooks and flails to bring in the harvest, self-sufficient, secretive and withdrawn. Rural poverty was then intense and unknown numbers had already emigrated before 1841 but especially to Canada. To our eyes it would probably have seemed a somewhat unkempt countryside, what with the unmade roads and absence of tarmacadam, commons and patches of waste, cottages in need of repair and a surprising number empty and abandoned. The other world, the second half of the nineteenth century, increasingly mechanised, with fewer farm labourers and farmers, vanishing husbandmen, shrinking common land, secularised local government and a growing range of horse-drawn vehicles as roads improved. Its population becoming more literate and open to outside influences, but with the shadow of the workhouse always in the background.

Footnotes

(1) Map & Apportionment, 1842. By Thomas Brown of Bittadon,valuer and Charles Cooper of Alverdiscott, map maker. Work completed in 1840, legally confirmed 20th April 1842. See Parish Summary at the beginning of the Apportionment for land utilisation totals.

(2) Advertisment headed Ash Moor Inclosure, by Joseph Risdon of Specott near Torrington announcing a 'Last meeting on the Subject,' Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 18th November 1848 and MAF 1/537 (30th August 1850), The National Archives.

(3) Decennial Census Reports 1801 & 1841.

(4) Barton 'signifies a farm much larger than the average' and 'nine times out of ten, one with a long and interesting history.' See Old Devon, W.G. Hoskins, 1966, David & Charles, p.30.

(5) Terry Green, North Devon Archaeological Society, Newsletter No. 5 (2003).

(6) Buckish derived from Bochewis (Domesday Book 1086), land recorded in a book.

(7) Faith, Fish, Farm or Family?, Janet Few, Phd. thesis, University of Exeter, 2009, p.81.

(8) Parliamentary Survey - Abstract of Returns made by the Overseers of the Poor 1776/7. Quoted in Researching Devon Workhouses in the Westcountry Studies Library, Fact Sheet No.29, D.C.R.O.

(9) D.C.R.O. Ref: 1892A/4/PF107.

(10) For dimensions see National Archives. Ref: ED 103/742/2. School No. 4448, p.21.

(11) Joseph Foster, Alumni Oxoniensis.

(12) By 1850 the glebe had dropped from 129 to 119 acres (see White's Directory of 1850).

(13) Charles Worthy, Devonshire Wills (369/370) describes him as a Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County. He was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the North Devon Yeomanry (London Gazette, (28th October 1828) of which his brother William was Colonel and served in that regiment for 30 years, becoming the adjutant. The family originally lived in Alwington where they resided at Yeo Vale House (since demolished) before moving to South Yeo in Parkham. See also The Bruton Family in The Hartland Chronicle, 1913, No. 173 in Notes of the Past by R. Pearse Chope.

(14) J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigiensis

(15) History of Parliament, online, Vols. 1820-1832, see biographical section for biography of Viscount Ebrington.

(16) George Jacob, Looking Back on Parkham & Bideford Years Ago, Bideford 1970.

(17) George Jacob, same reference.

(18) Corrective note by R.Pearse Chope in The Hartland Chronicle, 1901, No. 054. The P.O. Appointment Book Indexes confirm the 3 appointments on the 5th and 13th March 1844.

(19) Pigot's Directory of Devon, 1844.

(20) Apart from the glebe only 3 other individuals owned land in Clovelly: William Cole Loggin, the Impropriator of Woolsery, owned 103 acres, William Ching 69 acres and John Squire 16 acres.

(21) Complete Peerage 1895,p. 394.

(22) Same reference.

(23) 12672M/O/LD/72/16, Devon Archives. Letter and list of names to the Lord Lieutenant from William Tardrew. 1262M/O/LD/72/15, North Devon R.O. Letter from Mr. J.Meddon of Winscott, Alwington, commending William Tardrew to the Lord Lieutenant.

(24) See sale notices for the Peppercombe estate in Bideford Weekly Gazette, page 1, Apr. 27th 1857 and page 1 of the North Devon Journal, 2nd Sept. 1858.

(25) Tristram Risdon, Survey of Devon , 1811, p.422. Annery Court, “ now belongs to Mr. Tardrew of Bideford.”

(26) Samuel Lysons, Magna Britannia, 1822, p. 363. “the house has been modernised by Mr. Tardrew.”

(27) See signature of William Tardrew, “Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for the county of Devon” in Parkham baptismal register, correcting the baptismal entry for Samuel Tardrue dated 12th December 1782.

(28) Sale notice of Apr. 27th 1857, previously cited. “There is also at Bucks Beach, on the coast, and in the same parish, a limekiln and stable held by the same lessee.” The lessee was a Mr. Balsdon

(29) See 25” O.S. Plan , Devon XVIII 14, Revised 1904

(30) See B648/8, North Devon Record Office. Counterpart of a lease between Thomas Pine Coffin and William Tardrew.

(31) See Dark of Parkham, CD ROM, Obtainable from the author.

(32) Janet Few, previously cited, p.127.

(33) Devon Record Office,QS32/108.

(34) North Devon Journal, 14th April 1831.

(35) North Devon Journal, 16th April 1857.

(36) Chope was one of the first to point out that there was no compelling evidence, apart from Braunton, for the existence of the 3-field system in North Devon.

(37) George Vancouver, General View of the Agriculture of the County of Devon, Board of Agriculture report, 1808,p. 406 (table).

(38) Same reference, p.139.

(39) Same reference, p. 92.

(40) The Rural Economy of the West of England, W. Marshall, (2 vols.), 1796, London.

(41) Vancouver, previously cited, p. 29.

(42) Vancouver, pp. 361-363.

(43) George Jacob, previously cited.

(44) Pat Pidler, My Boyhood Days, self published, 1987, p.23.

(45) Same reference, p.34.

  

Appendix 1. Baptisms,Marriages and Burials in Parkham 1841 & 1842      

(Transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard)

Marriages

21.02.1841Vaggers GeorgeBowden Caroline
27.03.1841Beer StephenSlee Elizabeth
29.03.1841Mounce WilliamDavie Mary
31.03.1841Gifford RichardClement Mary Ann
19.08.1841Gist SamuelHarvey Elizabeth Ann
02.09.1841Sanders ThomasBraund Mary Ann
29.12.1841Drew WilliamHeadon Mary Ann
07.04.1842Downing ThomasJohns Elizabeth
24.04.1842Prance JamesPrance Ann
21.08.1842Bartlett JohnMallett Elizabeth
31.10.1842Shapton SamuelMoals Tammy
03.11.1842Lane JoziahAshton Jane

Baptisms

DateSurnameChild's NameFatherMotherOccupationAbode
10.01.1841MorrishJames HenryJamesAmyShoemakerParkham Town
12.02.1841DowningCharlotte MariaJamesElizabethYeomanGoldsworthy
28.02.1841BrendJamesJamesAnnHusbandmanHigher Kerswell
27.06.1841PaddonThomasJamesAnnHusbandmanNorthway
04.07.1841AshtonFrancesJohnFannyHusbandmanBroad Parkham
14.07.1841DelveMary AnnGeorgeMaryYeomanWatershute
15.07.1841HealeMargaretJohnBetsyYeomanStone
31.10.1841WakelyMaryWilliamMargaretHusbandmanHorns Cross
09.01.1842BraundThomasWilliamSusannahFishermanBuckish
06.02.1842MounceEllenWilliamMaryHusbandmanParkham Town
13.02.1842DunnMary JaneRichardBetsyYeomanNethercott
13.02.1842HealeMaryRobertElizabethCarpenterParkham Town
06.03.1842WadeRichardPhilipAnnFarmerAsh
08.03.1842SouthwoodEllenWilliamMaryHusbandmanHorns Cross
*?06.1842*Heale?WilliamJohn*Betsy?*Yeoman?*Stone?
24.07.1842BartlettMary Anne Bartlett Charlotte East Goldsworthy
24.07.1842PickardJohnJamesAgnesLabourerMelbury Cottage
24.07.1842PeardGilesWilliamMaryLabourerHorns Cross
24.07.1842AclandAnnWilliamMaryLabourerBulland
31.10.1842SandersAliceThomasAnnMillerBoccombe Mill
17.11.1842ChingJohnWilliamFannyYeomanCabbacott
11.12.1842MartinWilliamJamesEmlynShoemakerParkham

N.B. * indicates very faint entries.

Burials

DateSurnameChristian NameAbodeAge
17.01.1841LeeElizabethParkham Town72 years
27.01.1841AshtonWilliamCrooked lake74 years
05.02.1841BeclackWilliamSedgeborough54 years
21.03.1841LaneJosiasGoldsworthy65 years
05.04.1841WhiteAnnHorns Cross78 years
20.05.1841PickardWilliamAsh93 years
13.06.1841HancockSusanOld Mills2 years
27.06.1841AshtonIsaacCrooked lake2 years
12.07.1841VigursJoannaDundridge69 years
29.07.1841PeardGraceGoldsworthy3 years
23.08.1841MayThomasBableigh2 years
05.09.1841JohnsMaryGoldsworthy3 years
07.09.1841HancockNathanielOld Mills37 years
11.09.1841NancekivellMargaretCabbacott1 year
13.10.1841Grigg WilliamHorns Cross65 years
06.12.1841DarkMaryWater Shute84 years
29.01.1842DobbGeorgePeppercombe49 years
04.04.1842NancekivellWilliamBroad Parkham75 years
26.04.1842GeorgeJohnMerton39 years
03.05.1842MoassMary AnnParkham Town1 year
15.05.1842RuddJamesParkham1 year
17.05.1842WalterRichard, clerkRectory Parkham78 years
31.08.1842VealGraceParkham71 years
18.09.1842HancockMarySedborough, Parkham45 years
22.09.1842HockridgeMaryLower Worthygate25 years
25.09.1842A Strangerno namefound drownedabout 22 years
21.10.1842LewisWilliamKnotty Corner, Alwington75 years
14.11.1842PickardAgnesMelbury Cottages2 years
17.11.1842May WilliamBabeleigh49 years
27.11.1842NancekivellElizabethLower Parkham3 years

 

Appendix 2. Holdings of Over 100 Acres                   

OccupierFarmAcreageCensus Description
William PridhamMelbury547.0.34Farmer
James MoaseHalsbury Barton338.1.33Farmer
William Beckalick  Bur. 5/2/1842 aged 54 (Ann Beckalick succeeded).Sedborough314.3.16Farmer
William MayBabeleigh265.2.25Farmer
Mary AndrewPart of Melbury173.1.25Not found
James DowningGoldworthy Barton150.3.27Farmer
Various, on land leased by James Dunn from Rev. J.T. Pine-CoffinUnnamed land136.2.12James Dunn Not found
Richard BaileyKerswell135.2.32Farmer
Ann AndrewParkham Town Barton117.1.14Farmer
Edward George (snr.)Cabbacott Barton111..3.12Farmer
           dittoSmiths Cabbacott43.1.35 
           dittoHaynes Cabbacott36.2.15 
           dittoBroad Parkham Tenement35.1.09 
           dittoHawkes Stone21.0.10 
James PickardSteart95.0.09Farmer
           dittoWelcom Moor23.3.15 
George DelveWatershute Blinches101.1.37Farmer
Joseph HeywoodGlovers Worthyeat63.2.08Farmer
      dittoHarrises Watershute & Berrymans41.0.30 
      dittoPart of Daniels Broad Parkham3.2.08 
William PickardBeers Down62.0.19Farmer
       dittoWeeks Ash33.0.25 
       dittoArnolds Moor7.2.17 
       dittoUnnamed2.2.13 
        dittoUnnamed0.2.19 
Thomas ChingBrittons Goldworthy64.2.35Farmer
       dittoEast Goldworthy61.3.12 
       dittoUnnamed Land0.0.21 
George FordSloo66.3.29Farmer
       dittoDaniels Broad Parkham25.0.15 
       dittoBrittons Worthyeat9.0.38 

 

Appendix 3. Holdings of Between 10 and 100 Acres

Name of OccupierName of HoldingAcresCensus Description
William BraundGalsworthy21.0.15Farmer
Lee John LeePart Halsbury39.1.07Not found in 1841 census
John ChappellHarrises Hill10.1.22Butcher
       dittoBank Hole6.0.37  
Edward George (jnr)Bishops Cabbacott47.2.14Farmer
      dittoHen House40.0.35   
John LangPart of Hore Hill14.3.06Farmer
     dittoPearce's Broad Parkham47.3.18   
     dittoShort's Cottage23.1.10    
     dittoBroomhill3.3.18    
     dittoUnnamed house etc.0.1.10    
Henry ParrHigher Dendridge10.0.21Farmer
     dittoLower Dendridge7.2.29     
    dittoPart of Stone2.0.37     
Richard BondPart of Melbury65.1.14Not found in 1841 census
Joseph ClementsWest Stone53.1.20Not found in 1841 census
       dittoDaniels Broad Parkham25.0.15      
Walter HeywoodBerrymans Watershute11.1.09Not found in 1841 census
Thomas HeadonPart of Flaxmans Parkham Town Barton15.3.28Farmer
    dittoPart of Blindlake19.0.38  
    dittoBlindlake42.2.07   
Joseph DarkLimebury40.1.4Farmer
    dittoMoleshill17.3.21 
William KievellHigher Fox Downs35.3.32Not found in 1841 census
John NanceKievellWaytown64.1.26Farmer
William NancekivellSmiths Broad Parkham47.0.06Farmer
Samuel NormanFortescues Ash54.2.04Farmer
Bartholomew PickardPart of Daniels Broad Parkham13.0.23Farmer
Thomas RobinsPart of Nichol's Ash39.1.26Farmer
Mary TardrewFlaxmans Parkham Town Barton17.1.05Farmer
Philip WadePart of Nichols Ash6.3.04Farmer
      dittoKingsland Ash27.2.19   
      dittoGilberts Ash8.2.06    
      dittoSouthcotts Ash44.1.21    
Charles BrutonSouth Yeo35.2.18Ind. means
      dittoTucking Mill48.0.15     
James BraundUnnamed house etc.10.3.07Fisherman
      ditto 0.0.10 
Ann Blinch HortopPeppercombe61.2.34Farmer
Thomas NancekivellLower Holwell18.2.25Ind.means
James PeardShapleys Goldworthy37.0.34Not found in 1841 census
Thomas PridhamPearce's Northway21.3.07Farmer
Richard DunnNethercott & Shortridges Bocombe69.2.20Farmer
Richard GriggOlivers Parkham Tenement35.1.09Blacksmith
Thomas & William HockeridgeWorthygate75.2.24Farmers
Mary Matilda HucksPayne's Cleave20.3.24Ind. means
John BatesPart of  Lower Foxdowns14.3.24Not found in 1841 census
John HardingHoopers Bocombe21.3.34Farmer
Richard DunnHordiland43.2.30Farmer
Elizabeth CaddyBowden82.0.21Ind.means
Thomas LemonWhite Fields & Parkham15.2.21Farmer
Anna Rolle Morrison & othersParkham Side76.3.36Not found in 1841 census
William BateHammetts Worthygate16.1.05Butcher
James ShortridgeHigher Waytown62.3.17Farmer
John SaundersPart of Harrisses10.2.32Tailor
James HamlynWorden34.1.05Not found in 1841 census
John HealEast Stone92.2.06Farmer
William SquanceHalsbury Mill16.0.23Farmer
Richard LaneBocombe85.2.29Farmer
John VealeHonnocotts West Stone34.2.21Farmer
Richard BateDeans Steart3.3.04Farmer
       dittoReckards Steart7.0.26  
Daniel GloverUnmamed house etc.1.3.00Ag. Lab.

 

Appendix 4. Holdings of between 1 and 10 acres

Name of OccupierName of HoldingAcresCensus Description
George BrendRobins Goldworthy4.2.20Ag. Lab.
William BondPart of Hore Hill2.1.17Ag.Lab.
Anthony ClementUnnamed Land4.0.03Ag. Lab.
Ann HeydonPart of Daniels Broad Parkham6.2.35Bonnet maker
John JewellPart of Daniels Broad Parkham3.2.14Carpenter
Thomas JewellPart of Bishops Cabbacott6.1.13Mason
Richard GrangPrestons Holwill9.0.11Not found in 1841 census
John GriggGoldworthy Mill6.2.15Miller
William TardrewHouses etc.5.1.10Not found in 1841 census
William GillPart of Northway6.3.27Not found in 1841 census
Thomas DarkPart of Hortops Broad Parkham7.1.21Farmer
Henry ParrPart of Stone2.0.37Farmer
Samuel WakelyPart of Daniels Broad Parkham1.2.05Ag. Lab.
Nathaniel HancockFrys2.0.20Independent means
John SaundersBocombe Mill8.1.20Tailor
Michael ChalkPart of Bishops Northway2.1.05Blacksmith
Thomas SquancePart of Bishops Northway6.3.33Not found in 1841 census
Thomas LemonHigher Bocombe7.3.32Farmer
Robert Lot & Thomas PalmerPart of Tucking Mill1.0.19Carpenter & Ag.Lab. respectively
William DunnDaniels Broad Parkham9.1.21Farmer
William HarrisHunger Road5.1.22Ag.Lab.
James LanePart of Northway6.1.28Glazier
     dittoPart of Northway3.0.22   
Lewis Southcombe HelePart of Brittons Galworthy5.1.29Not found in 1841 census

 

Appendix 5. PARKHAM CENSUS 1841 - HO 107/244

Transcribed by Elizabeth Glover Howard

North Side: Turnpike Road from Bideford to Hartland

Road Street etcSurnameNameRel to HeadAgeRank, Prof, OccBorn in county?
HORNS CROSS      
VILLAGEGEORGEGraceF35IndependentY
       
 VEALHenryM40Ag LabY
 VEALMary AnnF40 Y
 VEALRichardM15 Y
 VEALGeorgeM13 Y
 VEALHenryM11 Y
 VEALAnnF9 Y
       
 LANEJamesM50GlazierY
 LANEAnneF42 Y
 LANELewisM15 Y
 LANEJamesM13 Y
       
 GRIGGWilliamM65CarpenterY
       
 NANCEKIVELLWilliamM35Ag LabY
 NANCEKIVELLBetsyF33 Y
       
 WAKLEYWilliamM40Ag LabY
 WAKLEYMargretF35 Y
 WAKLEYAnnF9 Y
 WAKLEYWilliamM6 Y
 WAKLEYJamesM2 y
       
 PEARDWilliamM40Ag LabY
 PEARDMaryF35 Y
 PEARDAnnF5 Y
 PEARDGraceF3 Y
 PEARDWilliamM6 months Y
       
 SOUTHWOODWilliamM30Ag LabY
 SOUTHWOODMaryF30 Y
 SOUTHWOODElizabethF9 Y
 SOUTHWOODWilliamM5 Y
 SOUTHWOODLuisaF2 Y
       
PeppercombePRANCEJohnM50FishermanY
 PRANCEMaryF50 Y
 PRANCEJohnM17 Y
 PRANCEAthaliahF12 Y
 PRANCEJaneF9 Y
 PRANCEJosephM6 Y
       
 TANTONBetseyF30IndependentY
 TANTONJohnM7 months Y
       
 PASSMORESallyF25IndependentY
       
 KIVELLJaneF74 Y
 KIVELLMaryF30Glove makerY
       
 GERMANMaryF30F.S.Y
 MILNEJuliaF15F.S.Y
       
 RUDALLElizaF30IndependentY
 RUDALLWalterM5 Y
 RUDALLMargretF4 Y
 RUDALLMaryF2 Y
 RUDALLAnnaF1 Y
 WALLERNoraF15 Y
 BARKWILLGraceF15 Y
       
 PADDONJamesM40Ag LabY
 PADDONAnnF30 Y
 PADDONJamesM10 Y
 PADDONWilliamM7 Y
 PADDONSamuelM4 Y
 PADDONRichardM2 Y
       
 DUBBGeorgeM45Ag :LabY
 DUBBElizabethF35 Y
 DUBBFaneyF10 Y
 DUBBSamuelM7 Y
 HUTCHINGSElizabethF65 Y
       
 PADDONSamuelM62LimeburnerY
 PADDONAnnF63 Y
       
 LASHBROOKWilliamM40Ag LabY
 LASHBROOKAnnF40 Y
 LASHBROOKMaryF11 Y
 LASHBROOKAnnF9 Y
 LASHBROOKJamesM7 Y
 LASHBROOKThomasM5 Y
 LASHBROOKJohnM1 Y
       
 HARRISJohnM70FarmerY
 HARRISGraceF65 Y
 HARRISJamesM35Ag LabY
 HARRISJohnM12 Y
       
 BAGLOLEJohnM30FishermanY
 BAGLOLEElizaF30 Y
 BAGLOLEJamesM8 Y
 BAGLOLEAnnF6 Y
 BAGLOLEWilliamM3 Y
 BAGLOLEElizabethF9 months Y
       
 YEOPhilipM50Ag LabY
 YEOFrancesF40 Y
 YEOJaneF14 Y
 YEOSusanF12 Y
 YEOPhilipM7 Y
 YEOMariaF4 Y
       
PeppercombeHORTOPAnnF75FarmerY
FarmSTEERThomasM20M.S.Y
 BRAUNDAnnF15F.S.Y
 SANDERSJaneF15F.S.Y
 STEERJohnM14M.S.Y
 ASHTONThomasM25M.S.Y
 SHEPHERDSamuelM10M.S.Y
       
WorthyeatHOCKRIDGEThomasM60FarmerN
 HOCKRIDGEWilliamM56 N
 HOCKRIDGEMaryF84 N
 BONDThomasM16M.S.Y
 DARKEdwinM13M.S.Y
 GOODNEWGraceF18F.S.Y
       
SloughFORDGeorgeM30FarmerY
 FORDElizabethF30 Y
 VANSTONEJohnM20M.S.Y
 LANEWilliamM15M.S.Y
 JOHNSMariaF15F.S.Y
 GLOVERHenryM14M.S.Y
 JOLLIFFSharlotF14F.S.Y
 WAKLEYJohnM13M.S.Y
 JOLLIFFJohnM9M.S.Y
       
Higher WorthyeatPRANCEJamesM70IndependentY
 PRANCEFrancisM25ButcherY
 PRANCEAnnF25 Y
 PRANCEJaneF20DressmakerY
       
 HARRISElizabethF35 Y
 HARRISMaryF10 Y
 HARRISLucyF5 Y
 HARRISJesseM2 Y
       
 JOHNSWilliamM45Ag LabY
 JOHNSMaryF50 Y
 JOHNSWilliamM9 Y
 JOHNSJaneF7 Y
       
Buckish MillsHAMLYNWilliamM45Ag LabY
VillageHAMLYNElizabethF40 Y
 HAMLYNMaryF20 Y
 HAMLYNElizabethF8 Y
       
 SLEEWilliamM60Ag LabY
 SLEEAnnF56 Y
 SLEEGraceF30 Y
 SLEEJohnM16 Y
 SLEEEliasM13 Y
 SLEEMaryF28?MilinerY
 SLEEJamesM7 Y
 SLEEMary AnnF4 Y
       
 BRAUNDWilliamM40FarmerY
 BRAUNDSusanF40 Y
 BRAUNDElizabethF11 Y
 BRAUNDThomasM6 Y
 BRAUNDLewisaF3 Y
 DARKRichardM15M.S.Y
       
 PENINGTONSamuelM42Ag LabY
 PENINGTONElizabethF47 Y
 PENINGTONSamuelM16 Y
 PENINGTONAndrewM8 Y
 PENINGTONArietF6 Y
 PENINGTONElizaF3 Y
       
 METHERALLJohnM60MasonY
 METHERALLMaryF50 Y
 METHERALLSamuelM20 Y
 METHERALLAnnF12 Y
 DUNNDavidM1 Y
  
 PENINGTONRichardM50Ag labY
 PENINGTONMaryF45 Y
 PENINGTONAnnF14 Y
 PENINGTONMosesM8 Y
 PENINGTONRichardM3 Y
 JEWELLHenryM25Ag labY
  
 SANDERSJohnM55Ag labY
 SANDERSJaneF55 Y
 SANDERSMary AnnF12 Y
 SANDERSJamesM9 Y
  
 CHIDLEYSusannaF34Glove makerY
 CHIDLEYMaryF72 Y
 PHILIPSJohnM76 Y
  
 GOODNEWJohnM30Ag LabY
 GOODNEWElizabethF30 Y
 GOODNEWWilliamM5 Y
 GOODNEWElizabethF1 Y
 GOODNEWSamuelM20Ag LabY
  
 FOUNDRichardM78Ag LabY
 FOUNDJonnaF79 Y
  
 DAVYRobertM55MasonY
 DAVYMaryF55 Y
 DAVYLewisM20 Y
  
 JOLLIFFThomasM42Ag labY
 JOLLIFFMaryF72 Y
  
 BRAUNDJohnM70CooperY
 BRAUNDAnnF80 Y
 BRAUNDThomasM35 Y
 VANSTONESusanF15 Y
  
 BRAUNDMary AnnF28 Y
 BRAUNDJaneF8 Y
 BRAUNDWilliamM6 Y
 BRAUNDJamesM4 Y
 BRAUNDJohnM2 Y
 BAGLOLERebeccaF23 Y
  
 BRAUNDJamesM54Ag LabY
 BRAUNDElizabethF50 Y
 BRAUNDBetseyF23 Y
 BRAUNDWilliamM20SailorY
 BRAUNDFaneyF14 Y
 BRAUNDJosephM10 Y
 ALLINGraceF13 Y
  
 BAGLOLEJohnM60Ag LabY
 BAGLOLEMaryF60 Y
 BAGLOLEElizabethF14 Y
 BOREDMaryF25 Y
 BOREDHarietF6 Y
 BOREDMaryF4 Y
 BOREDElizabethF3 Y
 BOREDThomasM1 Y
  
 BRAUNDJamesM34FishermanY
 BRAUNDMaryF29 Y
 BRAUNDHannahF8 Y
 BRAUNDJamesM7 Y
 BRAUNDMaryF5 Y
 BRAUNDWilliamM4 Y
 BRAUNDJohnM2 Y
  
 HARRISJohnM27LimeburnerY
 HARRISJaneF25 Y
 HARRISSamuelM6 Y
 HARRISThomasM4 Y
 HARRISElizabethF2 Y
 EDDYGilesM60ShoemakerY
  
 LOGGINMaryF45IndependentY
 LOGGINRosaF14 Y
 LOGGINHesterF13 Y
  
SteartPICKARDJamesM40FarmerY
 PICKARDJaneF30 Y
 PICKARDElizabethF19 Y
 DOWNINGThomasM25M.S.Y
 DUBBAnnF18F.S.Y
 NICHOLDSThomasM18AprenticeY
 HAMLYNJamesM12M.S.Y
  
Down waterBISHOPRichardM35Ag labY
 BISHOPMaryF30 Y
 BISHOPHenryM4 Y
 BISHOPJamesM2 Y
  
Shute CottageGLOVERJohnM55Ag LabY
 GLOVERAnnF60 Y
 GLOVERElizabethF17 Y
  
 NICHOLDSJohnM30Ag LabY
 NICHOLDSSarahF30 Y
 NICHOLDSHarriotF2 months Y
  
? HolwillNANCEKIVELLThomasM75IndY
 NANCEKIVELLGraceF70 Y
 NANCEKIVELLThomasM50 Y
 ASHTONMarthaF55F.S.Y
  
Hoops InnCRANGHenryM25Inn keepingY
 CRANGSarahF30 Y
 CRANGElizabethF1 Y
 MARTINJudithF14F.S.Y
 JOHNSHarrietF20 Y
  
HoopsVEALJohnM40Ag labY
 VEALFrancesF40 Y
 VEALHarrietF12 Y
 VEALFrancesF7 Y
 VEALHenryM5 Y
  
NorthwayCRUMBJohnM35Ag Laby
 CRUMBElizabethF35 Y
 CRUMBAnnF10 Y
 CRUMBJohnM8 Y
 CRUMBWilliamM4 Y
  
 BRAUNDAgnissF15Farmer ?Y
 BRAUNDSusannaF8 Y
  
 MITCHELLWilliamM30Ag LabY
 MITCHELLMargretF25 Y
 MITCHELLSarahF7 Y
 MITCHELLWilliamM5 Y
 MITCHELLJohnM3 Y
 MITCHELLElizaF6 months Y
  
Northway FarmGRIGGThomasM25FarmerY
 GRIGGGraceF20 Y
 GRIGGElizabethF1 Y
 HEALAnnF10F.S.Y
  
Summary:55 houses occ7 unoccup127 males135 female262 persons 
  
2      
NewhavenWAKELYSamuelM72Ag LabY
 WAKELYRachelF73 Y
 WAKELYJohnM35 Y
  
 WAKELYJamesM30masonY
 WAKELYSarahF40 Y
 WAKELYMary JaneF11 Y
 WAKELYCalebM8 Y
  
 MOYSEJohnM75Ag LabY
 MOYSEAnnF18 Y
  
 MOYSEWilliamM35Ag labY
 MOYSEGraceF30 Y
 MOYSEJohnM8 Y
 MOYSEWilliamM5 Y
 MOYSEMary AnnF5 Y
 MOYSEJosephM1 month Y
  
 VAGGERSWilliamM35MasonY
 VAGGERSSarahF35 Y
 VAGGERSHenryM14 Y
 VAGGERSWIlliamM12 Y
 VAGGERSGeorgeM6 Y
  
 JEWELLThomasM50MasonY
 JEWELLJaneF50 Y
 JEWELLThomasM20 Y
 JEWELLHenryM17 Y
  
Cross Park CottagesCLEMENTAnthonyM47Ag LabY
 CLEMENTMaryF48 Y
 CLEMENTElizaF13 Y
 CLEMENTChristopherM6 Y
  
 GENTJohnM28Ag labY
 GENTAnnF33 Y
 GENTJamesM3 Y
 GENTJohnM1 Y
Goldsworthy Village      
 SHEPHERDSamuelM45CordwainerY
 SHEPHERDJaneF40 Y
 SHEPHERDElizabethF12 Y
 SHEPHERDJamesM8 Y
 SHEPHERDJohnM5 Y
 SHEPHERDGeorgeM3 Y
  
 CHINGThomasM35FarmerY
 CHINGAnnF33 Y
 DARKThomasM23M.S.Y
 HERNWilliamM18M.S.Y
 GLOVERAbrahamM18AprenticeY
 BRIANTJohnM14M.S.Y
 WEBBMaryF18F.S.Y
 GLOVERElizabethF14AprenticeY
  
 CHINGJohnM84IndependentY
 CHINGElizabethF64 Y
East Goldsworthy      
 AUSTINSusanF53FarmerY
 AUSTINRichardM24 Y
 AUSTINJosephM18 Y
 AUSTINThomasM12 Y
 AUSTINWilliamM31M ServantY
  
 PEARDJamesM84IndY
  
 LEEThomasM25Ag LabY
 LEEFannyF20 Y
 LEECharlesM3 Y
 LEEAnnF6 months Y
  
 JEFFRYWilliamM45Ag LabY
 JEFFRYGraceF42 Y
 JEFFRYJohnM7 Y
 JEFFRYWilliamM4 Y
 JEFFRYGraceF6 months Y
  
 LANGJohnM40Ag LabY
 LANGSusanF40 Y
 LANGElizaF14 Y
 LANGJamesM12 Y
 DARKElizabethF12 Y
 WHITESarahF12 Y
 DARKAnnF7 Y
  
 LANEJohnM35FarmerY
 BRIANTElizabethF40 Y
 BURNICLESMaryF13 Y
  
 BARTLETTWilliamM55Ag labY
 BARTLETTMaryF60 Y
 BARTLETTJaneF16 Y
  
 JOHNSSamuelM40Ag LabY
 JOHNSMaryF40 Y
 JOHNSJoannaF8 Y
 JOHNSMary BrooksF6 Y
 JOHNSBetseyF1 Y
  
 LANGWilliamM75Ag LabY
 LANGElizabethF74 Y
 LANGAnnF16 Y
 LEEChristianF8 Y
  
Horns Cross VillageCHALKMichaelM60BlacksmithY
 CHALKAnnF60 Y
 CHALKHumphreyM30 Y
 PIPERGeorgeM15M. ServantY
 LEEMaryF14F.S.Y
  
 HARVEYWilliamM45Coast GuardY
 HARVEYElizabethF45 Y
 HARVEYElizabethF20 Y
 HARVEYSamuelM13 Y
 HARVEYEmeliaF11 Y
 HARVEYElizaF8 Y
  
 LEIGHJoannaF45IndY
 GRIFFITHSFannyF10F.S. 
  
 CLOAKSamuelM50CarpenterY
 CLOAKJohnM45CarpenterY
 CLOAKMaryF40 Y
Higher Holwill Farm      
 NANCEKIVELLWilliamM35FarmerY
 NANCEKIVELLElizabethF30 Y
 NANCEKIVELLElizabeth AnnF12 Y
 NANCEKIVELLMary JaneF7 Y
 NANCEKIVELLFannyF5 Y
 NANCEKIVELLThomasM4 Y
 NANCEKIVELLGraceF8 months Y
 DARKGeorgeM12M ServantY
  
Lower HolwillBATEWilliamM62ButcherY
 BATEMaryF54 Y
 BATEThirzaF17 Y
  
 DARKThomasM75Ag LabY
 DARKBetseyF40 Y
  
 BATEHenryM25ButcherY
 WAKELYJamesM10M ServantY
  
Waytown GateCROSCOMBEllizabethF40Toll gate keeperY
 WAYWilliamM2 Y
  
Prances CottageBECKLAKESimeonM70ButcherY
 BECKLAKEMaryF50 Y
 BECKLAKESamuelM16 Y
  
Waytown CottagesJOLLIFFEElizabethF55IndY
 JOLLIFFEMariaF9 Y
  
Waytown FarmNANCEKIVELLJohnM40FarmerY
 NANCEKIVELLElizabethF35 Y
 PICKARDRichardM15M.S.Y
 JOHNSElizabethF26F.S.Y
 PALMERGeorgeM13AprenticeY
  
 SHORTRIDGEJamesM70FarmerY
 SHORTRIDGEElizabethF65 Y
 ASHTONGraceF20F.S.Y
  
Watershute FarmDELVEGeorgeM25FarmerY
 DELVEMaryF25 Y
 DELVEJohnM4 Y
 BEERJosephM15M.S.Y
 NICHOLSCharlesM15M.S.Y
 HOCKRIDGERebeccaF55IndY
 PETHERICKMaryF15F.S.Y
  
 HAYWOODJosephM60FarmerY
 HAYWOODAnnF40 Y
 HAYWOODMiriamF17 Y
 HAYWOODThomasM15 Y
 HAYWOODJosephM13 Y
 HAYWOODJames CookM12 Y
 HAYWOODAnnF10 Y
 HAYWOODWilliamM9 Y
 HAYWOODMary JaneF8 Y
  
Watershute CottagePICKARDThomasM30Ag LabY
 PICKARDSusannaF35 Y
 PICKARDJohnM5 Y
 PICKARDMary AnnF3 Y
 DARKMaryF83IndY
 LEEJohnM40Ag LabY
  
Limebury FarmDARKJosephM35FarmerY
 DARKRebeccaF30 Y
 DARKMaryF9 Y
 DARKLouisaF7 Y
 DARKJohnM5 Y
 DARKJohnM14M.S.Y
 REYMONTJohnM11AprY
  
Limebury CrossPICKARDJasperM68CarpenterY
CottagePICKARDAnnF65 Y
 BAILEYMaryF84IndY
  
Limebury Cross ParkDARKThomasM40FarmerY
 DARKMiriamF38 Y
 DARKThomasM13 Y
 DARKJohnM11 Y
 DARKJosephM7 Y
 DARKThirzaF3 Y
 DARKEllenF1 Y
 DUNNElizaF26IndY
  
Broad ParkhamNANCEKIVELLWilliamM74FarmerY
 NANCEKIVELLFrancesF60 Y
 NANCEKIVELLJohnM32 Y
 NANCEKIVELLThomasM27 Y
 NANCEKIVELLSamuelM25 Y
 NANCEKIVELLEdwardM23 Y
 NANCEKIVELLFannyF20 Y
 COPPJohnM14M.S.Y
  
 LANGWilliamM35FarmerY
 LANGAnnF30 Y
 LANGCalebM7 Y
 LANGHarriotF3 Y
 LANGJohnM1 Y
 ELLISEdwardM14M.S.Y
 JOLLIFFEAnnF14AprY
 ROWELLMaryF13F.S.Y
 JEWELLAaronM9M.S.Y
 LANGJohnM85IndY
 LANGJohnM?M.S.Y
  
 DARKThomasM45Ag LabY
 DARKAnnF39 Y
 DARKMaryF10 Y
 DARKLewisM5 Y
 DARKAnnF3 Y
 DARKElizabethF8 months Y
  
 JEWELLJohnM58CarpenterY
 JEWELLElizabethF44 Y
 JEWELLSusannaF22 Y
 JEWELLGideonM20 Y
 JEWELLMosesM17 Y
 JEWELLMorellaF15 Y
 JEWELLEmelliaF7 Y
  
 WAKELYSamuelM45Ag LabY
 WAKELYGraceF40 Y
 WAKELYWilliamM15 Y
 WAKELYRachaelF13 Y
 WAKELYGraceF4 Y
  
 LEMONThomasM50FarmerY
 LEMONSarahF48 Y
 LEMONWilliamM16 Y
 LEMONThomasM14 Y
 LEMONSamuelM11 Y
 LEMONElizabethF7 Y
 WATCHERElizabethF17F.S.Y
  
 ASHTONJohnM35Ag LabY
 ASHTONFrancesF30 Y
 ASHTONElizabethF6 Y
 ASHTONJohnM5 Y
 ASHTONWilliamM2 Y
 ASHTONAliceF2 months Y
  
 HARRISWilliamM35Ag LabY
 HARRISSarahF30 Y
 HARRISMary AnnF10 Y
 HARRISJohnM8 Y
 HARRISHarriotF6 Y
  
 DUNNWilliamM39FarmerY
 DUNNMary AnnF29 Y
 DUNNJaneF11 Y
 DUNNWilliamM10 Y
 DUNNGraceF7 Y
  
 HAMLYNRichardM60Ag LabY
 HAMLYNGraceF55 Y
 HAMLYNAnnF20 Y
  
 GEORGEEdwardM35FarmerY
 GEORGEElizabethF30 Y
 GEORGEEdwardM3 Y
 GEORGEElizabethF2 Y
 GEORGEJaneF2 days Y
 HERNElizaF11F.S.Y
 BRIANTMaryF15ApprenticeY
 NANCEKIVELLFrancesF15F.S.Y
 CANNIsaacM14M.S.Y
  
 NANCEKIVELLWilliamM35Ag LabY
 NANCEKIVELLElizaF25 Y
 NANCEKIVELLThirzaF3 Y
 NANCEKIVELLElizabethF1 Y
 NANCEKIVELLJamesM65 Y
 NANCEKIVELLJohnM35 Y
 NANCEKIVELLMaryF25 Y
  
Robinson Cruso Cottage      
 PICKARDBartholomewM65FarmerY
  
FoxdownHUCKSMatildaF65IndY
 KELLYMaryF20IndN . I
 PIDLERGeorgeM50M.S.Y
 PIDLERMaryF50F.S.Y
 VEALECharlotteF25F.S.Y
 HEARDJaneF20F.S.Y
  
Bank Hole FarmCHAPPLEJohnM30ButcherY
 CHAPPLEMargaretF24 Y
 CHAPPLEJohn AshtonM10 months Y
  
Bank Hole FarmBROOMJohnM60Ag LabY
CottageCHAPPLEGraceF59IndY
 CHAPPLEElizabethF15 Y
  
Goldsworthy MillGRIGGJohnM35MillerY
 GRIGGGraceF30 Y
 NICHOLSSarahF13AppY
  
West GoldsworthyDOWNINGJamesM46FarmerY
FarmDOWNINGElizabethF39 Y
 DOWNINGHarriot FortescueF14 N
 DOWNINGThomas FM12 Y
 DOWNINGHenry FM11 Y
 DOWNINGLucey FF9 Y
 DOWNINGJamesM7 Y
 DOWNINGEliza AshtonF6 Y
 DOWNINGCharlesM3 Y
 DOWNINGSarah JF3 Y
 DOWNINGElizaF1 Y
 DOWNINGCharlotteF5 months Y
 BOWDENRichardM17M.S.Y
 BARTLETTCharlotteF19AppY
 DOWNINGHenryM58IndY
  
Mount PleasantCANNWilliamM45ThatcherY
 CANNMaryF445 Y
 CANNPhilip HM15Blacksmiths AppY
 CANNIsabellaF12 Y
 CANNNoahM8 Y
 CANNJoshuaM4 Y
 CANNMary AnnF2 Y
  
3      
  
Hoar HillBONDWilliamM45Ag LabY
 BONDAnnF51 Y
 BONDAnnF10 Y
 BONDJamesM7 Y
  
 HARRISJaneF60Ind ? FundholderY
  
Courtice CottageGLOVERDanielM65Ag LabY
 GLOVERMaryF65 Y
  
 BONDJohnM65Ag LabY
 BONDMargretF65 Y
 HEDGESSusanF85 Y
  
RectoryWALTERRev RichardM77ClerkY
 WILLCOCKSSarahF74IndY
 ASHTONJaneF35F.S.Y
 VEALElizabethF30F.S.Y
 VEALAlliceF14F.ApY
 ABBOTRichardM25M.S.Y
 PRANCEAnthonyM15M.S.Y
 LABBOTTWilliamM15M.S.Y
 DAVYCarolineF20F.S.Y
  
Parkham TownGRIGGRichardM70PublicanY
VillageGRIGGJohannaF61 Y
 GRIGGJoahannaF26 Y
 GRIGGEdwardM22MaltsterY
 GRIGGReubenM19 Y
 SHORTRIDGEWilliamM20M.S.Y
  
 MARTINJamesM25CordwainerY
 MARTINEmlynF20 Y
 MARTINReubenM2 Y
 MARTINAnnF11 months Y
 CREDICOTTEdwardM20I CordwainerN
 HEADONJohnM15AppY
 WAKLEYElizaF10F.S.Y
  
 HEADONAnnF50Bonnet MakerY
 HEADONElizabethF20 Y
 HEADONJohnM20CarpenterY
 HEADONMaryF11 Y
 COOKLouisaF3 Y
  
 MORRISHJamesM25CordwainerY
 MORRISHEmlynF25 Y
 MORRISHMary AnnF5 Y
 MORRISHJohnM3 Y
 MORRISHHenryM6 months Y
  
 SAUNDERSJohnM60TaylorY
 SAUNDERSMaryF60 Y
 SAUNDERSDanielM30 Y
 SAUNDERSAliceF20 Y
 BLIGHTLouisaF4 Y
 EVELYJohnM30M.S.Y
 BALCHRichardM10ApY
  
 MOASEJohnM40CordwainerY
 MOASEElizabethF40 Y
  
Griggs RowSOUTHWOODThomasM55WoolcolmerY
 SOUTHWOODAnnF50GloverY
 SOUTHWOODJamesM20WoolcolmerY
 SOUTHWOODElizabethF15GloverY
  
 BRENDRichardM65ButcherY
 BRENDEgnesF65 Y
 BRENDJohnM30?J ButcherY
 BRENDGeorgeM25Ag labY
 BRENDRobertM1 Y
 HURTWilliamM20App MasonY
 PERKINGElizabethF18F.S.Y
  
 GRIGGRichardM30BlacksmithY
 GRIGGAnnF30 Y
 PRIDHAMJamesM15AppY
  
 MOASEJohnM35CarpenterY
 MOASEMary AnnF35 Y
 MOASEFrederickM4 Y
 MOASEMary AnnF1 Y
 MOASERichardM19Ap CarpenterY
 PENGILLYSusanF25F.S.Y
  
 LEEJohnM37Ag labY
 LEESarahF37 Y
 LEEJohnM4 Y
 LEEMaryF1 Y
  
 MOUNCEWilliamM27Ag LabY
 MOUNCEMaryF24 Y
  
Harris FarmTAR DREWMaryF70IndY
 TUCKERJohannaF50F.S.Y
 TUCKERWilliamM30M.S.Y
 TUCKERAliceF12F.S.Y
  
Parkham TownANDREWAnnF50FarmerY
BartonANDREWEdmundM18 Y
 ANDREWJamesM13 Y
 ANDREWGeorgeM11 Y
 HOPPERJamesM34M.S.Y
 COLWILLHarriotF20F.S.Y
  
 HEADONThomasM50FarmerY
 HEADONMaryF40 Y
 HEADONRichardM24 Y
 HEADONPrudenceF13 Y
 HEADONSusanF10 Y
 HEADONSamuelM8 Y
 HEADONEliM6 Y
 MATHEWSWilliamM21M.S.Y
 JOLLIFFEElizabethF12AprY
 LEEJohnM9AprY
  
Bell InnSTANLICKElizabethF50Inn keeperY
 STANLICKSophiaF25 Y
 MINORJohnM50LabourerN
Village      
 HEALRobertM30CarpenterY
 HEALElizabethF25 Y
 HEALLouisaF2 Y
 HEALGeorge AustinM1 Y
  
Cuckingstool CottagesBRAYENTJohnM45Ag labY
 BRAYENTGraceF45Y 
  
 PASMOREMaryF30SchoolmistressY
 PASMOREAnnF5 Y
 PASMOREMaryF3 Y
  
 ANDREWThomasM20BlacksmithY
 ANDREWAnnF20 Y
 ANDREWJamesM2 Y
 ANDREWThomasM1 Y
 ASHTONJoshuaM16AppY
  
Blindlake FarmPRIDHAMThomasM25FarmerY
 PRIDHAMSusanF20 Y
 PRIDHAMMary AnnF2 Y
  
 CORYWilliamM45FarmerY
 CORYSusanaF40 Y
 CORYElizabethF10 Y
 CORYGraceF9 Y
 CORYJamesM5 Y
 CORYJohnM15 Y
  
Windabout CottageDARKJohnM50Ag LabY
 DARKElizabethF50 Y
 DARKGraceF15 Y
 DARKElizabethF12 Y
 DARKAnnF9 Y
 DARKWilliamM8 Y
  
Dyers Moor FarmGEORGEEdwardM40FarmerY
 GEORGEElizabethF50 Y
 BAILEYMargretF45F.S.Y
 LASHBROOKGraceF15"F.S.,"Y
 WADEBenjaminM15M.S.Y
 DEANWilliamM20M.S.Y
 MANNINGSamuelM12M.S.Y
  
Kerswell FarmBAILEYRichardM40FarmerY
 HAMLYNWilliamM25 Y
 MANNINGMaryF25F.S.Y
 JEFFREYJamesM20M.S.Y
 GIFFORDMaryF15F.S.Y
 BRENDWilliamM10M.S.Y
 SAUNDERSWilliamM15AprY
  
Lotts CottagePICKHARDJamesM37Ag LabY
 PICKARDEgnessF33 Y
 PICKARDAnnF9 Y
 PICKARDRichardM7 Y
 PICKARDWilliamM5 Y
 PICKARDJamesM4 Y
 PICKARDEgnessF1 Y
  
Melbury FarmPRIDHAMWilliamM60FarmerY
 PRIDHAMMaryF45 Y
 PRIDHAMJasperM20 Y
 PRIDHAMLawaranceM15 Y
 PRIDHAMDanielM14 Y
 PRIDHAMFrancesF13 Y
 PRIDHAMEdwardM10 Y
 PRIDHAMJohnM7 Y
 SQUANCEWilliamM75IndY
 SCOINSRodaF12F.S.Y
 BATEJohnM14TaylorY
  
Melbury CottageWESLICKWilliamM33Ag labY
 WESLICKBettyF38 Y
 WESLICKThomasM11 Y
 WESLICKAbrahamM8 Y
 WESLICKGraceF6 Y
 WESLICKJamesM3 Y
 WESLICKJohnM1 Y
 CANNWilliamM73Ag labY
  
Ash Moor CottageWEBBRobertM33Ag LabY
 WEBBMaryF55 Y
 GOODNEWPrisilaF17F.S.Y
  
AshROBINSThomasM60FarmerY
 ROBINSElizabethF55 Y
 ROBINSThomasM25 Y
 ROBINSJohnM21 Y
 ROBINSGraceF18 Y
 CHAPMANRichardM15M.S.Y
 KEIVELLRichardM14M.S.Y
 BRINDCOMBEFannyF4 Y
  
 WADEPhilipM35FarmerY
 WADEAnnF33 Y
 WADEGraceF8 Y
 WADEHonourF6 Y
 WADEMarthaF4 Y
 WADEJohnM2 Y
 WADEThomasM1 Y
 JOLLIFFERichardM40M.S.Y
 JENNINGSRichardM14M.S.Y
 HARRISRobertM10M.S.Y
 CHUBBGraceF16F.S.Y
  
 NORMANSamuelM45FarmerY
 NORMANJohnM22 Y
 NORMANSamuelM20 Y
 NICKHOLSNoahM10AprY
 COTTYAnnF50F.S.Y
  
 PICKHARDWilliamM50FarmerY
 PICKARDMaryF40 Y
 PICKARDJohnM18 Y
 PICKARDAnnF17 Y
 PICKARDMaryF16 Y
 PICKARDWilliamM14 Y
 PICKARDSusanF12 Y
 PICKARDJamesM3 Y
 PICKARDAlliceF9 months Y
 BRAYENTJohnM10AprY
  
Kerswell CottageBRENDJamesM35Ag LabY
 BRENDAnnF25 Y
 BRENDElizabethF8 Y
 BRENDJohnM6 Y
 BRENDHariotF2 Y
 BRENDJamesM6 months Y
  
Welcombe MoorSCOINSJohnM45Ag LabY
CottagesSCOINSAnnF46 N
 SCOINSGeorgeM8 Y
 SCOINSReubenM5 Y
 SCOINSFrancesF3 Y
  
 LABBOTRichardM50Ag LabY
 HEARDINGJohnM28Ag LabY
  
Sedbourah FarmBECKLAKEAnnF35FarmerY
 BECKLAKEJamesM14 Y
 BECKLAKEWillliamM12 Y
 BECKLAKEJohnM10 Y
 BECKLAKEMargretF6 Y
 BECKLAKEJosephM4 Y
 BECKLAKEAnnF2 Y
 BECKLAKEMargretF60F.S.Y
 DUNNElizabethF36F.S.Y
 DUNNBartholomewM27M.S.Y
 DUNNJosephM25M.S.Y
 DUNNHarriotF23F.S.Y
  
Nethercott FarmDUNNRichardM31FarmerY
 DUNNBetsyF27 Y
 DUNNFrederickM8 Y
 DUNNOrlandoM4 Y
 DUNNSamuelM20M.S.Y
 YEORobertM18AprY
 SAUNDERSWilliamM13"M,S,"Y
 BRAYENTAnnF15 Y
 DUNNJesseM2 Y
  
Shorteridge CottagesBARTLETTWilliamM35Ag labY
 BARTLETTMaryF40 Y
 BARTLETTEdwardM8 Y
 BARTLETTWilliamM7 Y
 BARTLETTSusanF4 Y
 BARTLETTAnnF3 Y
 BARTLETTJohnM1 Y
  
 HOLMANMaryF72IndY
  
Little Boccombe FarmHEARDINGJohnM55FarmerY
 HEARDINGAnnF56 Y
 HEARDINGThomasM24ButcherY
  
Great Boccombe FarmLANERichardM65FarmerY
 LANEMaryF65 Y
 LANEJosiahM40 Y
 LANEJamesM20 Y
 JEFFREYElizaF20F.S.Y
 GREENWOODBryantM20M.S.Y
 BRENTJosiahM13M.S.Y
 BRENTWilliamM9M.S.Y
  
Lt Boccombe CottagesHARRISRobertM46Ag labY
 HARRISAnnF43 Y
 HARRISGraceF8 Y
 HARRISThomasM5 Y
 HARRISLewizaF4 months Y
 HARRISElizabethF74 Y
  
 TUCKERAdamM40Ag labY
 TUCKERThomazinF40 Y
 TUCKERJohnM9 Y
 TUCKERMary AnnF3 Y
  
Boccombe MillsSAUNDERSThomasM20MillerY
 SAUNDERSAnnF20 Y
 LABBOTTJohnM13 Y
 MOISEAnnF40F.S.Y
  
Pim Rise CottagePIDLERJohnM30JoinerY
 TUCKERRichardM7LabourerY
  
Broom Hill CottageLANGJohnM45FarmerY
 LANGRebbaccaF61 Y
 LANGBartholomewM10 Y
  
4      
Honiaets StoneVEALJohnM45FarmerY
 VEALMargretF35 Y
 VEALRichardM14 Y
 VEALElizabethF11 Y
 VEALMargtF9 Y
 VEALJohnM7 Y
 VEALMaryF4 Y
  
Houcks StoneGLOVERJamesM50Ag labY
 GLOVERElizabethF50 Y
 GLOVERSamlM3 Y
 GLOVERThomasM11 Y
 GLOVERElizabethF88IndY
  
West StoneTALLAMYWilliamM40Ag LabY
 TALLAMYAnnF50 Y
 TALLAMYThomasM7 Y
  
CabbicottGEORGEEdwardM65FarmerY
 GEORGEElizabethF68 Y
 CHINGFannyF8 Y
 BONDJamesM20 Y
 HARRISEJamesM14 Y
 HARRISEMaryF30F.S.Y
  
 KIVILThomas NM30Ag LabY
 KIVILMaryF25 Y
 KIVILMargretF11 months Y
 KIVILJohnM2 Y
  
 GEORGEWilliamM35IndY
  
Green HillGLOVERJohnM30Ag LabY
 GLOVERMaryF30 Y
 GLOVERElizabethF11 Y
 GLOVERJosephM9 Y
 GLOVERAndrewM4 Y
 GLOVERGraceF1 Y
  
 ASHTONLewisM25MasonY
 ASHTONGraceF50 Y
 ASHTONRichardM8 Y
  
BabeleyMAYWilliamM47FarmerY
 MAYElizabethF36 Y
 MAYSamlM10 Y
 MAYMariamF8 Y
 MAYElizabethF7 Y
 MAYWilliamM5 Y
 MAYJohnM3 Y
 MAYThomasM1 Y
 BEERRebeccaF23 Y
 AVERYAnnaF16F.S.Y
 HILLEdwardM24M.S.Y
 NICHOLSJohnM18 Y
 BATEThomasM17M.S.Y
 HERDJohnM14M.S.Y
  
Deans SteartBATERichardM47FarmerY
 BATEMaryF50 Y
 BATEMaryF5 Y
 PIPERNathanM9 Y
  
Cracked LakeASHTONJohnM46MasonY
 ASHTONGraceF47 Y
 ASHTONJamesM13 Y
 ASHTONSarahF9 Y
 ASHTONSilesM6 Y
 ASHTONAbrahamM4 Y
 ASHTONIsicM2 Y
  
South DundrigePARRHenryM75FarmerY
 PARRAbbF75 Y
 MOASMaryF15F.S.Y
 GLOVERJamesM15 Y
 MORISHVarlett (?Violet)F11 Y
  
North DundrigeVAGERSJohnM65Ag LabY
 VAGERSJohannaF65 Y
  
 NICHOLSThomasM55Ag LabY
 NICHOLSMargretF55 Y
  
 PALMERWilliamM45Ag LabY
 PALMERElizabethF45 Y
 PALMERAnneF25 Y
 PALMERGraceF12 Y
 PALMERPhillipM8 Y
  
Old MillHANDCOCKNathlM35IndY
 HANDCOCKMaryF40IndY
 METHERELRichardM10 Y
  
 HANDCOCKGeorgeM25MillerY
 HANDCOCKMaryF25 Y
 HANDCOCKSusanF2 Y
 HANDCOCKJamesM4 months Y
 NIGHTPhillipM15M.S.Y
  
FrysJIFFORDRichardM20Ag LabY
 JIFFORDMaryF20 Y
  
 ASHTONRichardM50MasonY
 ASHTONElizabethF50 Y
 ASHTONElizabethF20 Y
 ASHTONGraceF10 Y
  
Tucking MillPALMERThomasM30Ag LabY
 PALMERMaryF30 Y
 PALMERJohnM3 Y
  
 LOTTRobertM45CarpenterY
 LOTTElizabethF45 Y
 LOTTMaryF13 Y
 LOTTRichardM12 Y
 LOTTFannyF8 Y
 WACKLEYJohnM15AprY
 SQUANCEJaneF87PauperY
 PAWJosephM82CarpenterY
  
South YeoBRUTONCharlesM60IndY
 BRUTONFrancesF50IndY
 BRUTONJuneF20IndY
 BRUTONW MeddonM20Collegian (crossed out)Y
 HUNTFrancesF55F.S.Y
 MORRISHRichardM30M.S.Y
 MOORESusanaF20F.S.Y
 CORYElizabethF20F.S.Y
 BROWNWIlliamM15M.S.Y
  
Halsbury MillsSQUANCEWilliamM40FarmerY
 SQUANCEElizabethF50 Y
 SQUANCEJohnM15 Y
 PIPERJohnM11M.S.Y
  
BullandMATHEWSWilliamM62Ag LabY
 MATHEWSSarahF65 Y
 HOCKINGRichardM8 Y
  
 ACKLANDWilliamM40Ag labY
 ACKLANDMaryF35 Y
 ACKLANDMaryF9 Y
 ACKLANDRebeckahF7 Y
 ACKLANDJamesM5 Y
 ACKLANDHariotF3 Y
 ACKLANDJaneF1 Y
  
 SHORTRIDGEWilliamM45Ag LabY
 SHORTRIDGEMaryF45 Y
  
HalsburyMOASTJamesM55FarmerY
 MOASTJaneF50 Y
 MOASTGeorgeM25 Y
 MOASTNoahM22 Y
 MOASTFaneyF20 Y
 MOASTElizabethF17 Y
 MOASTJamesM14 Y
 MOASTJaneF14 Y
 SHUTERichardM24M.S.Y
 LEESarahF23F.S.Y
 EASTERBROOKJohnM15M.S.Y
 LEEPhilipF13M.S.Y
 ACKLANDJohnM11M.S.Y
  
BowdenCADDYElizabethF50IndY
 CADDYMary ArnoldF25 Y
 CADDYCaroline AF25 Y
 CADDYThomas AM17 Y
 CADDYSusanF10 Y
 CADDYAnnF10 Y
 CADDYEllenF5 Y
 EASTERBROOKMaryF20F.S.Y
 LEWISElizaF17F.S.Y
 HARRISESarahF13F.S.Y
 HARDINGGeorgeM20M.S.Y
 SHORTHumphreyM15M.S.Y
 HARDINJamesM15 Y
  
East StoneHEALJohnM50FarmerY
 HEALBetseyF40 Y
 HEALMaryF18 Y
 HEALJohnM16 Y
 HEALElizabethF14 Y
 HEALHeneryM11 Y
 HEALJaneF9 Y
 HEALCatharineF6 Y
 HEALThomasM3 Y
 MAASJohannaF15F.S.Y
 BOWDENWilliamM15M.S.Y
 SHORTRIDGEThomasM15M.S.Y
 TALLAMYWilliamM8M.S.Y
Totals:193 houses occ23 unoccup513 males482 female995 persons 

 

Appendix 6. TITHE APPORTIONMENT FOR PARKHAM OF 1842

OWNEROCCUPIERNO.ESTATENAMELAND USEA.R.P.
Jane AshtonJohn Baglow & William Lashbrook1517 Plotarable0130
Jane AshtonJames Lane1479Part of NorthwayHillarable0121
Jane AshtonJames Lane1500Part of NorthwaySeezmorearable1031
Jane AshtonJames Lane1501Part of NorthwaySeezmorearable0316
Jane AshtonJames Lane1512Part of NorthwayBarnbarn002
Jane AshtonJames Lane1513Part of NorthwayBarn fieldarable1016
Jane AshtonJames Lane1515Part of NorthwayNew Closearable206
Jane AshtonJames Lane1528Part of NorthwayCopsecopse0033
Jane AshtonJames Lane1529Part of NorthwayBarley Haymeadow0223
Jane AshtonPhilipYeo1508 HouseHouse002
Jane AshtonPhilipYeo1509 Gardengarden002
Jane AshtonPhilipYeo1511 Gardengarden008
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard384Bonds AshMoor parkarable4017
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard636Bonds AshStone landarable2036
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard641Bonds AshSmaller parkarable117
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard649Bonds AshWillisarable0135
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard660Bonds AshMeadowmeadow108
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard661Bonds AshOrchardorchard0119
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard662Bonds AshHouse, Buildings, Court and gardenHouse etc.0115
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard730Bonds AshBons fieldarable2119
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard733Bonds AshLong Closearable108
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Pickard602Bonds AshMenna Ground 0020
Robert Barry Executor of William Pickard lesseeWilliam Please615 House and GardenHouse etc.0115
William BatesWilliam Bates1365 Ellis CottageHouse etc.0010
William BaresWilliam Bates1367 Gardengarden018
William BatesWilliam Bates1366 Gardengarden004
William BatesWilliam Bates1362aChurch HaysHouseHouse005
William BatesWilliam Bates1363aChurch HaysGardengarden0013
William BatesWilliam Bates1364aChurch HaysGardengarden0011
William BeckalickWilliam Beckalick865 Cottage and gardenHouse etc.006
William BeckalickWilliam Beckalick870 Gardengarden0018
William BraundJohn Bagelow and William Lashbrook1493 Gardengarden011
William BraundJohn Bagelow and William Lashbrook1494 Gardengarden0020
William BraundJohn Bagelow and William Lashbrook1495 Gardengarden0010
William BraundJohn Bagelow and William Lashbrook1496 House etc.House etc.006
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2149South YeoShilliverearable315
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2150South YeoHigher downarable313
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2151South YeoHigher downarable3210
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2152South YeoHead Waresarable2018
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2153South YeoCoppicecoppice1218
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2154South YeoGeorges Meadowmeadow0132
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2155South YeoPondpond006
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2156South YeoLawnpasture520
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2157South YeoMowhay[mowhay]0015
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2158South YeoMansion & Buildingsmansion etc.0125
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2159South YeoKitchen GardenGardens0031
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2160South YeoShrubberyshrubberry0015
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2161South YeoGardenGardens0031
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2162South YeoLinhay & Roadlinhay etc.0026
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2163South YeoWastewaste0010
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2164South YeoOrchardorchard0225
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2165South YeoPlantationPlantation036
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2166South YeoSouth Yeo Meadowarable1230
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2167South YeoOrchardorchard0134
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2168South YeoDry Closearable1230
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2169South YeoMill Closearable3210
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2170South YeoPond Meadowarable2135
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2171South YeoPlantationPlantation003
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire1947Tucking MillHigher hammeadow1324
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire1948Tucking MillPlantationPlantation0033
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2058Tucking MillShrubberyshrubbery005
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2059Tucking MillShrubberyshrubbery009
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2060Tucking MillHammeadow0336
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2068Tucking MillPlantationPlantation0112
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2069Tucking MillMiddle hammeadow1312
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2070Tucking MillAller Beermeadow0328
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2071Tucking MillLower Orchardorchard0338
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2074Tucking MillShrubberyshrubbery0020
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2075Tucking MillBuckland Meadowarable0212
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2076Tucking MillHorse parkarable332
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2077Tucking MillPlantationPlantation016
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2078Tucking MillRoadroad0030
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2079Tucking MillTucking Mill Lawnarable120
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2080Tucking MillRick Parkarable2111
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2081Tucking MillRoad Closearable327
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2082Tucking MillHem to docoppice030
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2083Tucking MillCoppicecoppice1336
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2084Tucking MillFour Acresarable3331
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2085Tucking MillFive Acresarable5120
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire1941Tucking MillPlantationPlantation009
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2086Tucking MillSquance Closearable3213
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire1946Tucking MillPlantationPlantation009
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2088Tucking MillCleave Wood Coppicecoppice514
Charles Bruton EsquireCharles Bruton Esquire2089Tucking MillGreenaparkarable7130
Charles Bruton EsquireLet Robert and Thomas Palmer2072Part of Tucking MillHouse, Buildings and CourtHouse etc.019
Charles Bruton EsquireLet Robert and Thomas Palmer2073Part of Tucking MillGardengarden006
Charles Bruton EsquireLet Robert and Thomas Palmer2087Part of Tucking MillGardengarden034
Charles Bruton EsquireRev. Richard Walter681aPynes MoorPines Moormeadow5317
Charles Bruton EsquireRev. Richard Walter681Pynes MoorPines Moormeadow5317
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate217Pearn's SteartMeadowmeadow0237
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate218Pearn's SteartMeadowarable0231
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate219Pearn's SteartMowhay[mowhay]007
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate220Pearn's SteartHouse and GardenHouse etc.0033
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate221Pearn's SteartGardengarden0024
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate222Pearn's SteartHillarable0129
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate223Pearn's SteartEasearable0039
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate224Pearn's SteartHillarable010
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate229Pearn's SteartJellisarable0120
Lewis William Buck EsquireRichard Bate231Pearn's SteartJellisarable224
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick791SedboroughHorses flat Rowdenmeadow22017
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick792SedboroughWester flat Rowdenmeadow12011
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick793SedboroughWester flat Rowdenmeadow1522
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick797SedboroughWester Justmentarable1320
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick798SedboroughJustment Marsharable0210
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick799SedboroughEaster Justmentarable3018
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick800SedboroughFourth Rowdenarable8026
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick801SedboroughThird Rowdenarable8313
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick802SedboroughSecond Rowdenarable10321
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick803SedboroughFirst Rowdenarable7324
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick804SedboroughHall Meadow Copsecopse1221
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick807SedboroughLittle Justmentarable0138
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick812SedboroughHall Meadowarable22320
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick813SedboroughHall Parkarable2131
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick814SedboroughWester Cross Parkarable9020
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick815SedboroughMiddle Cross Parkarable5217
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick816SedboroughEaster Cross Parkarable14026
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick817SedboroughWester Lady Parkarable1404
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick818aSedboroughWheat Parkmeadow6136
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick818SedboroughAsner Lady parkarable9112
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick819SedboroughAsner Lady parkarable4016
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick820SedboroughRoadroad013
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick821SedboroughFurze parkarable1637
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick822SedboroughBuck piecearable0233
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick823SedboroughGardengarden0136
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick824SedboroughRookerygarden0134
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick825SedboroughHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.116
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick826SedbproughMowhay[mowhay]0031
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick827SedboroughOrchardorchard0139
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick828SedboroughGardengarden010
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick829SedboroughWhite park orchardorchard0219
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick830SedboroughAlder Bear Orchardorchard031
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick831SedboroughAlder Beararable2113
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick832SedboroughAlder Beararable0231
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Becka;ick833SedboroughFlat Meadowmeadow300
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick834SedboroughGamber Meadowmeadow1339
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick835SedboroughOak Parkmeadow230
Lewis William Buck EsquireWillam Beckalick836SedboroughLamb parkarable3318
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick837SedboroughGardengarden0025
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick838SedboroughLower hammeadow625
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick839SedboroughMiddle hammeadow536
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick840SedboroughHigher hammeadow4335
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick841SedboroughOld orchardorchard123
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick842SedboroughThorny parkarable3232
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick843SedboroughMoor parkmeadow12036
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick844SedboroughEaster Furzes parkarable9322
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick928SedboroughCopsecopse1220
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick929SedboroughEaster Dowlandarable9131
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick930SedboroughWester Dowlandarable10321
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick931SedboroughPeetarable3219
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick932SedboroughOg Marshmeadow3034
Lewis William Buck EsquireWilliam Beckalick933SedboroughDowland Marshmeadow334
Lewis William Buck EsquireJohn Dark845 House and GardenHouse etc.0118
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lesseeDaniel Glover277 House and GardenHouse etc.0010
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lesseeDaniel Glover278 Orchardorchard0035
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lesseeDaniel Glover280 Croftarable0310
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lesseeDaniel Glover282 Croftarable0225
Thomas Burnard, Susannah Glover lesseeJohn Bond279 House and GardenHouse etc.0011
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy1BowdenCooks Bowdenarable7134
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy2BowdenGreat Bowdenarable8334
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy3BowdenPlantationPlantation0028
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy4BowdenOrchardorchard0034
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy5BowdenOrchardorchard0228
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy6BowdenCooks Bowden Orchardorchard17138
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy7BowdenCooks Bowden Orchardorchard019
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy8BowdenCooks Bowden Orchardorchard0119
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy9BowdenWoodwood0212
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy10BowdenWoodwood014
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy11BowdenWoodwood2020
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy12BowdenLower Bales Closearable7318
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy13BowdenGreat Bush Closearable7224
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy14BowdenHigher Bales Closearable715
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy15BowdenLittle Bush Closearable2115
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy16BowdenLittle Bowdenmeadow3238
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy17BowdenHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.025
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy18BowdenGardensgarden0037
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy19BowdenPlantationPlantation0015
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy20BowdenOrchardorchard0231
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy21BowdenTown Placearable1123
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy22BowdenDavis Meadowarable611
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy24BowdenLower Bowden Meadarable3210
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy25BowdenHigher Bowden Meadowarable4028
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy26BowdenMowhay[mowhay]0121
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy27BowdenMowhay plotarable013
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy28BowdenRoadroad017
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy29BowdenPlantationPlantation005
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy30BowdenWestern Closearable3622
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy31BowdenThree Cornered Closearable607
Elizabeth CaddyElizabeth Caddy32BowdenWastewaste007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles SmaleJames Braund1144 Gardengarden001
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles SmaleJames Braund1145 House and CourtHouse etc.002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles SmaleJames Braund1146 Gardengarden004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Charles SmaleJames Braund1147 Gardengarden003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James BraundJames Vethers Braund1137 House and CourtHouse etc.0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Joseph BraundJoseph Braund1138 House and CourtHouse etc.003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Joseph BraundJoseph Braund1139 Courtcourt002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessess Harvey & Charles SmaleJames Braund1110 Gardengarden006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles SmaleJames Braund1111 House & CourtHouse etc.008
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles SmaleJames Braund1148 South Woodwood10233
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BrawnJohn Brawn1132 Gardengarden003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BrawnJohn Brawn1133 Gardengarden003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BrawnJohn Brawn1134 Gardengarden005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningMichael Chalk1614Part of Goldworthy BartonHousegarden004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningMichael Chalk1615Part of Goldworthy BartonGardengarden015
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningMichael Chalk1616Part of Goldworthy BartonGardengarden0039
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningMichael Chalk1617Part of Goldworthy BartonLittle Croft Parkarable1115
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1796Bank HoleMarsharable020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1797Bank HoleHill Closearable038
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1708Bank HolePoor Landarable0035
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1812Bank HoleLong Orchardorchard020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1813Bank HoleMarsh Fieldarable0111
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1814Bank HoleThree Corner fieldarable105
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1815Bank HoleGarden parkarable111
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1816Bank HoleOrchardorchard0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1817Bank HoleBuildings & courtbuildings etc.0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John BroomJohn Chapple1818Bank HoleGardengarden0028
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJohn Ching1895 Buildingsbuildings002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJohn Ching1896 Gardengarden006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1850Bartons GoldworthyLower Cross parkarable4023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1851Bartons GoldworthyHem to Cross Parkcoppice0112
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1852Bartons GoldworthyMoorarable1216
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1872Bartons GoldworthyPlotarable0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1973Bartons GoldworthyMoor Meadowmeadow6033
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1874Bartons GoldworthyDrews Downarable4239
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1875Bartons GoldworthyMoorarable308
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1881Bartons GoldworthyDownarable3232
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1884Bartons GoldworthyNorth Closearable4313
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1885Bartons GoldworthyRick Parkarable125
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1892Bartons GoldworthyGardengarden007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1893Bartons GoldworthyNorth Close Meadowarable116
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1894Bartons GoldworthyBack Meadowmeadow1018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1891Bartons GoldworthyBarn & WasteBarn & waste0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1906Bartons GoldworthyCalves plotmeadow0213
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1909Bartons GoldworthyCalves plotarable0110
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1914Bartons GoldworthyGardengarden0029
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1915Bartons GoldworthyPool parkarable2014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1918Bartons GoldworthySmall Coppicecoppice005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1919Bartons GoldworthyLower Pool Meadowarable1320
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1920Bartons GoldworthyPool Meadowarable1337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1931Bartons GoldworthyFoldarable104
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1932Bartons GoldworthyFoldarable110
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1933Bartons GoldworthyWoodwood0220
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1954Bartons GoldworthyRed landsarable417
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1957Bartons GoldworthyGardengarden016
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1960Bartons GoldworthyHay downarable420
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1962Bartons GoldworthyLower Meadowmeadow1020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1964Bartons GoldworthyCross parkarable3028
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1970Bartons GoldworthyLong Closearable1125
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1971Bartons GoldworthyHay downarable3326
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1972Bartons GoldworthyHay downarable330
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1973Bartons GoldwortgyFreezes Brakearable215
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1974Bartons GoldworthyGardenarable0013
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1976Bartons GokdworthyGardenarable0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1985Bartons GoldworthyHillarable0318
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching1986Bartons GoldworthyQuarryquarry007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching2040Bartons GoldworthyGardengarden001
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningThomas Ching2041Bartons GokdworthyGardengarden0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningAnthony Clements1965 Gardengarden0034
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningAnthony Clements1966 Gardengarden0012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningAnthony Clements1967 HouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningAnthony Clements1968 Wastewaste008
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakJohn Cloak and others1618 House & GardenHouse & garden0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakJohn Cloak and others1619 Gardengarden013
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRev. John Thomas Pine Coffin1937 Woodwood102
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRev. John Thomas Pine Coffin1945 Woodwood1138
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRev. John Thomas Pine Coffin1956 Woodwood4123
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1379Hoops InnBuildings and landbuildings etc.0027
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1368Prestons HolwellHigher Cock pit fieldarable2338
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1369Prestons HolwellLittle Northern fieldarable1317
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1370Prestons HolwellLittle Northern fieldarable2111
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1375Prestons HolwellMoorarable038
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1376Prestons HolwellLittle Meadowmeadow0119
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1377Prestons HolwellLower Cock pit fieldarable227
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John CloakRichard Crang1378Prestons HolwellGardenarable0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert DaveyRobert Davey1135 Gardengarden0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert DaveyRobert Davey1136 HouseHouse003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Robert DaveyJames Downing1578Goldworthy BartonWest Fieldarable837
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1580Goldworthy BartonEast Great fieldarable1336
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1620Goldworthy BartonCross parkarable4336
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1621Goldworthy BartonNew Closearable437
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1622Goldworthy BartonHigher Grattonarable6113
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1623Goldworthy BartonLower Grattonarable10012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1624Goldworthy BartonLower Batteriesarable10012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1625Goldworthy BartonHorsecopse0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1626Goldworthy BartonHigher Batteriesarable9022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1627Goldworthy BartonBrakearable1122
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1628Goldworthy BartonHillarable2233
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1620Goldworthy BartonSix Acresarable5333
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1630Goldworthy BartonTen Acresarable10313
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1631Goldworthy BartonFour Acres Meadowarable4311
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1632Goldworthy BartonGardengarden0013
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1633Goldworthy BartonMowhay[mowhay]0028
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1634Goldworthy BartonBuildings and barnsbuildings etc.030
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1635Goldworthy BartonOrchardorchard010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1636Goldworthy BartonMowhay[mowhay]0127
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1637Goldworthy BartonGardengarden0118
Rev, John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1638Goldworthy BartonWill parkarable500
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1639Goldworthy BartonMegs [?] Moorarable9223
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1640Goldworthy BartonLittle plotarable0110
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Dowmey1642Goldworthy BartonHigher Marshmeadow1125
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1643Goldworthy BartonOrchardorchard0234
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1644Goldworthy BartonLittle Meadowarable1110
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1646Goldworthy BartonForty Acresarable0118
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1647Goldworthy BartonHerncopse019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1648Goldworthy BartonLower Marshmeadow4117
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1649Goldworthy BartonHern to Marshcopse0133
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1650Goldworthy BartonOrchardorchard0016
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1651Goldworthy BartonHele park Coppicecoppice4126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1652Goldworthy BartonHorse park Meadowarable3133
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1653Goldworthy BartonHem to Nine Acrescopse0135
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1654Goldworthy BartonNine Acresarable10015
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJames Downing1655Goldworthy BartonBrakearable10230
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningJohn Elliott & others1897 Gardengarden007
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJohn Ellott & others1898 HouseHouse003
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJohn Ellott & others1899 GardenGardens0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1171Brittons WorthyeatRidge parkarable215
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1203Brittons WorthyeatHigher Moor Closearable181
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1206Brittons WorthyeatNew Closearable1212
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1207Brittons WorthyeatBarnbarn021
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1208Brittons WorthyeatNew plotarable0127
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1229Brittons WorthyeatMill Meadowarable2191
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1193Brittons WorthyeatLittle parkarable131
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1402Brittons WorthyeatPart of [?]meadow212
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1404SlooWest Parkmeadow4311
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1405aSlooWest Sloo parkarable2310
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1405SlooEast Sloo parkarable2310
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1407SlooShute Closearable3135
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1412SlooBack Closearable1028
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1416SlooMoorarable514
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1417SlooThree Corner fieldarable2212
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1418SlooSquare plotarable1120
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1419SlooLower Bowden parkarable2023
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1420SlooBowden parkarable5033
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1421SlooA Gistmentarable420
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1422SlooRoadroad0020
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1423SlooMeadowmeadow1119
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1424SlooMeadowmeadow1231
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1425SlooGardengarden0101
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1426SlooGardengarden0025
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1427SlooGardengarden008
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1428SlooBuildings and Coirtbuildings etc.0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1429SlooBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0018
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1430SlooMowhay[mowhay]022
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1431SlooRoad and WasteRoad & waste0201
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1432SlooPark Meadowmeadow1230
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1433SlooPool parkmeadow2330
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1434SlooBack Meadowarable110
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1435SlooRick parkmeadow2030
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1436SlooWaste spot [?]arable130
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1437SlooCleavemeadow136
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1438SlooThree Acresmeadow3032
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinGeorge Ford1439SlooSix Acresarable5120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GriggWilliam Grigg1611 HouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GriggWilliam Grigg1612 GardenHouse006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1811Goldworthy MillLower hamarable108
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1819Goldworthy MillStickarable0218
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1820Goldworthy MillSquare Closearable121
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1821Goldworthy MillGoldworthy Meadowarable0314
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1822Goldworthy MillOrchardarable0118
Rev, John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1823Goldworthy MillGardengarden0014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin. Lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1824Goldworthy MillLower Gardengarden0018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1825Goldworthy MillWell plotarable0111
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1826Goldworthy MillBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1827Goldworthy MillMill Pondpond0023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1828Goldworthy MillMowhay[rickyard]009
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1829Goldworthy MillLong Closearable0218
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John GriggJohn Grigg1830Goldworthy MillLittle hamarable0215
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John DaveyWilliam Hamlyn1116 Gardengarden0014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John DaveyWilliam Hamlyn1118 Gardengarden002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John DaveyWilliam Hamlyn1119 Housegarden002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1660Hunger RoadHillarable109
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1661Hunger RoadLong fieldarable0323
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1662Hunger RoadMeadowarable019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1663Hunger RoadMeadowarable0134
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1664Hunger RoadGardengarden0018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1665Hunger RoadBuildings and Courtbuildings0019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1650Hunger RoadRoadroad009
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1666Hunger RoadBarnbarn009
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1667Hunger RoadBack fieldarable9024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DowningWilliam Harris1668Hunger RoadOuter fieldarable115
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1150Glovers WorthyeatHalf acrearable2121
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1149Glovers WorthyeatBerrysmeadow502
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1190Glovers WorthyeatMany parkarable2011
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1169Glovers WorthyeatBerry parkarable4330
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1172Glovers WorthyeatThistle parkarable1324
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1187Glovers WorthyeatHemarable0023
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1150Glovers WorthyeatHemarable0228
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1180Glovers WorthyeatHill Will [?]arable2310
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1170Glovers WorthyeatDownarable6311
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1192Glovers WorthyeatGo Her field [?]arable629
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1194Glovers WorthyeatLittle parkarable1132
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1195Glovers WorthyeatBadjers premises [?]arable102
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1196Glovers WorthyeatRoadroad016
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1197Glovers WorthyeatLinhaylinhay003
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1198Glovers WorthyeatGreat Closearable0335
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1199Glovers WorthyeatLong Ridgearable1221
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1200Glovers WorthyeatLong Ridgearable0317
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1202Glovers WorthyeatLong Closearable230
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1204Glovers WorthyeatMow parkarable2032
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1213Glovers WorthyeatHayesmeadow0317
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1220Glovers WorthyeatBuildings and Courtbuildings0028
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1221Glovers WorthyeatPlotarable0034
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1222Glovers WorthyeatGardengarden0013
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1223Glovers WorthyeatGardengarden0016
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1224Glovers WorthyeatCrockyarable0128
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1225Glovers WorthyeatGlovers Meadowarable218
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1226Glovers WorthyeatSouth Parkarable2011
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1406Glovers WorthyeatNorth Meadowarable126
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1409Glovers WorthyeatHolwell parkarable2327
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1413Glovers WorthyeatMoorarable3022
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1414Glovers WorthyeatMany Meadowmeadow1320
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1415Glovers WorthyeatSafron landmeadow1115
Rev. John Thomas Pine CoffinJoseph Haywood1214Glovers WorthyeatPlotmeadow019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1440PeppercombeLong Closearable235
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1441PeppercombeBramblemeadow3210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1442PeppercombeHollow Beanarable1320
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1443PeppercombeBig fieldarable320
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1444PeppercombeCleavemeadow3321
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1445PeppercombeCastlemeadow011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1446PeppercombeOld Castle leyarable1337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1447Part of Goldworthy BartonRoadroad006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1458PeppercombeWaste and furzeWaste & furze14232
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1450PeppercombeCastle hill parkarable318
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1460PeppercombeSlade parkarable1322
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1461PeppercombeMiddle hill parkarable2231
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1462PeppercombeHigher hill parkarable2222
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1463PeppercombeLong fieldarable232
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1464PeppercombeNorthern Meadowmeadow1325
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1465PeppercombeLower Broady parkarable209
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch hortop1466PeppercombeHigher Broady parkarable228
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1467PeppercombeEaster Broady parkarable2120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1468PeppercombeGrey hairs Meadowmeadow1312
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1469PeppercombeJohns Meadowarable1126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1470PeppercombeCalves plotmeadow0121
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1471PeppercombeGardengarden0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1472PeppercombeWastewaste0234
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1473PeppercombeMowhay[rickyard]0020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1474PeppercombeGardengarden0021
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1475PeppercombeBuildings and Courtbuildings0223
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1476PeppercombeGardengarden0018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1477PeppercombeLittle Meadowarable0212
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Ann Blinch HortopAnn Blinch Hortop1478PeppercombeOrchardorchard036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas JewellThomas Jewell1987New HavenOrchardorchard0031
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas JewellThomas Jewell1988New HavenHouse, Court etc.House etc.006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas JewellThomas Jewell1989New HavenGardenGardens0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas JewellThomas Jewell1990New HavenCourtcourt005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Jane AshtonSamuel Jones1890 HouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Jane AshtonSamuel Jones1891 Gardengarden015
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1380Lower HolwellBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1381Lower HolwellGardengarden0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1382Lower HolwellMeadowmeadow0036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1383Lower HolwellLittle plotarable0038
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1384Lower HolwellMarshmeadow108
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1385Lower HolwellBarn Closearable2230
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1386Lower HolwellBarn parkarable3210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1397Lower HolwellGarden Closearable4124
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas Nance KeivellJohn Keivell1390Lower HolwellSquare fieldarable3020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn Metheral1114 Gardengarden0014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn Metheral1115 HouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn Metheral1117 Gardengarden003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn and William Moise1976a HouseHouse003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn and William Moise1978 Gardengarden0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John MetheralJohn and William Moise1979 Gardengarden006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1847Shapleys GoldworthyGriggs hamarable126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1848Shapleys GoldworthyCross parkarable516
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1849Shapleys GoldworthyHem in parkarable0037
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1853Shapleys GoldworthyHemcopse0119
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1854Shapleys GoldworthyHemarable1326
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1855Shapleys GoldworthyBig knowlsarable5218
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1856Shapleys GoldworthyRusowles Copsecopse020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1879Shapleys GoldworthyBig Mogs Moorarable3218
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1880Shapleys GoldworthyLittle Mogs Moorarable130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1882Shapleys GoldworthyDownarable536
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1883Shapleys GoldworthyLittle Downarable0717
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1886Shapleys GodworthyRick Parkmeadow1012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1901Shapleys GoldworthyLittle plotarable007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1902Shapleys GoldworthyLittle plotarable0013
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1900Shapleys GoldworthyMeadowmeadow0128
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1903Shapleys GoldworthyOrchardorchard0124
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1904Shapleys GoldworthyBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1905Shapleys GoldworthyGardengarden0018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1929Shapleys GoldworthyLittle Meadowmeadow0217
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1934Shaoleys GoldworthyRed land Copsecopse0134
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1953Shapleys GoldworthyRedlandarable2022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1958Shapleys GoldworthyGardengarden0016
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1959Shapleys GoldworthyHill Copsecopse1118
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1983Shapleys GoldworthyHillarable032
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PeardJames Peard1916Shapleys GoldworthyLittle Knowlearable210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles SmaleSamuel Penetent1112 HouseHouse001
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessees Harvey & Charles SmaleSamuel Penetent1113 Gardengarden0011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardRichard Pennington1108 Gardengarden0012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardRichard Pennington1109 Gardengarden003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJames Prance1215Strouds WorthyeatGardengarden007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJames Prance1216Strouds WorthyeatGardengarden006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJames Prance1217Strouds WorthyeatGardengarden0012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJames Prance1218Strouds WorthyeatGardengarden0015
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJames Prance1219Strouds WorthyeatBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJohn Prance1449 HouseHouse0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James PickardJohn Prance1450 Gardengarden0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1520Pearce's NorthwayWoodwood200
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1521Pearce's NorthwayHamarable1213
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1522Pearce's NorthwayCross parkarable3126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1523Pearce's NorthwayGreen awayarable3035
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1524Pearce's NorthwayOld orchardmeadow0036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1525Pearce's NorthwayWood parkarable1318
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1526Pearce's NorthwayMeadowmeadow1036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1527Pearce's NorthwayHillmeadow1014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1519Pearce's NorthwayWastewaste0036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1537Pearce's NorthwayOrchardorchard010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1538Pearce's NorthwayBuildings and Courtbuildings017
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1584Pearce's NorthwayNew Closearable207
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1590Pearce's NorthwayHayesarable0021
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1592Pearce's NorthwayGardengarden0019
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1593Pearce's NorthwayGarden parkarable033
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1595Pearce's NorthwayLong Closearable0332
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1597Pearce's NorthwayThree Cornersarable120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Thomas AdamsThomas Pridham1598Pearce's NorthwayLittlefieldarable0324
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William BecklakeJohn Landers1120 HouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William BecklakeJohn Landers1121 Gardengarden004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William BecklakeJohn Landers1122 Gardengarden009
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel RookerSamuel Shepherd1910 HouseHouse001
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel RookerSamuel Shepherd1912 Gardengarden002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Samuel RookerSamuel Shepherd1911 Chapelchapel001
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1126 HouseHouse002
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1127 Gardengarden005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John ShortridgeWilliam Slee1165 Gardengarden0013
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John ShortridgeWilliam Slee1166 House and WasteHouse & Waste0016
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John ShortridgeWilliam Slee1167 Gardengarden0134
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John ShortridgeWilliam Slee1168 South Wood plotarable119
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1140 Culmer CourtCulmer Court003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1141 Lime kilnlime kiln008
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1442 Wastewaste0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1143 Old Culmer CourtCulmer Court0021
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1448 Ware HouseWarehouse008
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1451 Lime kilnlimekiln0020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1452 Part of Cliffsarable126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1453 Dwelling Houses & Courthouses etc.005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1454 Lawnpasture2310
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1455 Gardengarden0134
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWilliam Tardrew Esquire1456 Wastewaste0025
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William Tardrew EsquireWillam Tardrew Esquire1457 Plotpasture0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary DarkWilliam Vanstone1123 Gardengarden008
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary DarkWilliam Vanstone1124 HouseHouse004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Mary DarkWilliam Vanstone1125 HouseHouse006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnRichard Vown and others1129 Gardengarden005
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnRichard Vown and others1130 HouseHouse006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnRichard Vown and others1131 Courtcourt002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnVarious Occupiers1403 Cliffscliffs etc.136217
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnLewis Southcombe Hele1940Part Brittons GalworthyForty Acresarable0337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnLewis Southcombe Hele1943Part Brittons GalworthyHemarsble004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee James DunnLewis Southcombe Hele1944Part Brittons GalworthyBread Parkarable4128
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Marjery DarkWilliam Bartlett1863 House and CourtHouse etc.007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Marjery DarkWilliam Bartlett1864 Gardengarden0018
Rev John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John DartJohn Harding915 Spears Bocombearable1114
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John DartJohn Harding916 Higher Spears fieldarable317
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve796Watershutt BlinchesMarshmeadow1036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve808Watershutt BlinchesClove parkarable6331
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve809Watershutt BlinchesHigher Sendenarable2335
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve810Watershutt BlinchesLower Sendenarable4011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve949Watershutt BlinchesMoles Hillarable5220
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1294Watershutt BlinchesMoles Hillarable3023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve961Watershutt BlinchesCross parkarable4117
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve962Watershutt BlinchesMoor parkarable4210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve963Watershutt BlinchesFive Acresarable5139
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve965Watershutt BlinchesFordy parkarable3010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve966Watershutt BlinchesFordy parkarable3331
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve980Watershutt BlinchesFour Acresarable4029
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve984Watershutt BlinchesThree Acresarable3033
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve985Watershutt BlinchesHigher Calves Closearable206
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve987Watershutt BlinchesWell plotarable0381
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve988Watershutt BlinchesLower Calves Closemeadow3131
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve991Watershutt BlinchesWell plotarable0033
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve992Watershutt BlinchesGardengarden0025
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve996Watershutt BlinchesWell orchardorchard0311
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1007Watershutt BlinchesPigs Meadowarable1018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1009Watershutt BlinchesLower Moor parkmeadow131
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1010Watershutt BlinchesHigher Moor parkarable1228
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1025Watershutt BlinchesBlake fieldarable1329
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1028Watershutt BlinchesLane endarable1337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1029Watershutt BlinchesWoodland Meadowarable302
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1052Watershutt BlinchesHorns Orchardmeadow0329
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1053Watershutt BlinchesBig Meadowmeadow2337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1054Watershutt BlinchesHouse, Building, Court & GardenHouse etc.0223
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1055Watershutt BlinchesMowhay[rickyard]0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1056Watershutt BlinchesLawnpasture0120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1057Watershutt BlinchesBarn parkarable3021
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1058Watershutt BlinchesRay parkarable319
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1088Watershutt BlinchesMarshmeadow0331
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1089Watershutt BlinchesWoodland Marshmeadow0337
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1151Watershutt BlinchesGardengarden010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1152Watershutt BlinchesGardengarden0130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1164Watershutt BlinchesBack Woodwood5130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1175Watershutt BlinchesWater Shut Woodwood2317
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1176Watershutt BlinchesClay parkarable132
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1178Watershutt BlinchesGreat Woodlandarable4133
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1179Watershutt BlinchesPotatoe Gardengarden004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1180Watershutt BlinchesPotatoe Gardengarden004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1181aWatershutt BlinchesColts Closearable124
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee George DelveGeorge Delve1181Watershutt BlinchesWoodwood2210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn846Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeWest Closearable2237
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn847Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeMarsharable4231
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn848Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeEaster Closearable4223
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn849Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeSouth Closearable3028
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn852Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeSeven Acresarable7228
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn853Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeRoadroad0131
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn854Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeEight Acresarable804
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn855Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeStraparable804
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn856Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeCoppicecoppice0222
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn857Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeWest four acresarable4330
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn858Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeLower four acresarable418
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn859Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeOrchardorchard0032
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn860Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeCalves plotarable0132
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn861aNethercott and Shortridges BocombeGardengarden011
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn862Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.0315
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn863Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeMowhay[rickyard]017
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn864Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeGardengarden0023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn866Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeHouse and CourtHouse etc.007
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn867Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeGardengarden0035
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn868Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeMeadowmeadow0316
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn869Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeLower Meadowmeadow0120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn871Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeMiddle parkarable1310
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn872Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeHigher Middle parkarable2012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn873Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeHigher four acresarable4118
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn874Nethercott and Shortridges BocombePart of three acresmeadow124
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn875Nethercott and Shortridges BocombePart of three acresarable1130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn876Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeWester Closearable3039
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn877Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeEaster Closearable2327
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn917Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeClavesarable1312
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn920Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeEaster Meadowmeadow2034
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn920aNethercott and Shortridges Bocombe arable004
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn921Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeWester Meadowmeadow2225
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard DunnRichard Dunn861Nethercott and Shortridges BocombeGardenarable0036
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George64Hawkes StonePlotarable034
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George65Hawkes StoneSlade Marsharable1139
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George67Hawkes StoneSladearable302
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George85Hawkes StoneVearn hillarable2113
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George92Hawkes StoneCopse Closearable2020
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George98Hawkes StoneCoppicearable0117
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George99Hawkes StoneHawkes's Downmeadow436
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George100Hawkes StoneLane end fieldarable135
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George120Hawkes StoneEnd Meadowmeadow2124
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George121Hawkes StoneGardengarden0022
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George122Hawkes StoneHouse and Garden etc.House etc.0012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George124Hawkes StoneLittle Meadowmeadow0212
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George137Hawkes StoneStone Common plotarable1034
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George105Haynes CabbacottLittle parkarable311
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George107Haynes CabbacottMiddle parkarable5235
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George108Haynes CabbacottHosk [?]arable5235
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George151Haynes CabbacottMoormeadow213
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George152Haynes CabbacottBarn parkmeadow2224
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George153Haynes CabbacottGardengarden0113
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George154Haynes CabbacottHouse, Building etc.House etc.0126
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George171Haynes CabbacottLow the Wayarable1116
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George245Haynes CabbacottAbove Wayarable138
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George2000Haynes CabbacottLower Greena parkarable4018
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George2093Haynes CabbacottHigher Greena parkarable317
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George2094Haynes CabbacottCross parkarable4218
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George253Haynes CabbacottFosk Greenmeadow1321
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1282Broady Parkhan TenementHouseHouse002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1283Broady Parkham TenemrntGardengarden0028
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1284Broady Parkham TenementLower Moorarable1219
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1285Broady Parkham TenemrntMiddle Moorarable4017
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1287aBroady Parkham TenementHigher Moorarable5024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1337Broady Parkham TenementWillismeadow1030
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1340Broady Parkham TenementLower Broad parkarable2213
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1342Broady Parkham TenementLong Closearable1120
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1343Broady Parkham TenementHigher Broad parkarable1130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1346Broady Parkham TenementNorthern fieldarable403
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1347Broady Parkham TenementGreat Closearable3327
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1348Broady Parkham TenementThree Cornersarable1136
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1690Broady Parkham TenementMarsharable1110
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1691Broady Parkham TenementHigher parkarable4210
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1700Broady Parkham TenementMeadowmeadow1316
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1707Broady Parkham TenementLinhaylinhay002
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1709Broady Parkham TenementBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0017
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1710Broady Parkham TenementMowhay and Orchardorchard etc.0137
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1708Broady Parkham TenementOrchardorchard0025
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1711Broady Parkham TenementPlotarable0024
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George1712Broady Parkham TenementGardengarden0021
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg340Olivers Parkham TownOld Orchard & HouseOrchard & House025
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg342Olivers Parkham TownHouses, Maltkiln & GardenHouse etc.0026
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg352Olivers Parkham TownCalves parkarable3132
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg369Olivers Parkham TownGiddys fieldarable314
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg372Olivers Parkham TownThree Cornersarable137
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg378Olivers Parkham TownPond Meadowmeadow2329
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg379Olivers Parkham TownGardengarden0013
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg380Olivers Parkham TownMowhay[rickyard]0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg381Olivers Parkham TownHouse and CourtHouse etc.0012
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1807aOlivers Parkham TownHigher West Hillarable208
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1808Olivers Parkham TownLower West Hillarable1324
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1809Olivers Parkham TownWester Marsh Hillarable1015
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1810Olivers Parkham TownWester Marsharable114
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1831Olivers Parkham TownClay parkarable2033
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1832Olivers Parkham TownPark Marsharable4216
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1833Olivers Parkham TownEaster Marsharable1213
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1834Olivers Parkham TownMiddle hillarable5114
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1835Olivers Parkham TownLower Easter hillarable1129
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg1836Olivers Parkham TownHigher Easter hillarable1130
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg330 Chapelchapel003
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg341 House and Garden etc.House0023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1587Part of NorthwayGardengarden009
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1588Part of NorthwayMowhay[rickyard]006
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1589Part of NorthwayHouse and CourtHouse etc.0010
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1579Part of NorthwayRoad parkarable1027
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1581Part of NorthwayHigher piecearable0230
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1585Part of NorthwayBarn Closearable023
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1586Part of NorthwayHouse Closearable0122
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1582Part of NorthwayBroad Parkarable1230
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1583Part of NorthwayCross parkarable122
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1591Part of NorthwayGarden fieldarable0134
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee William GillWilliam Gill1594Part of NorthwayGardengarden0014
Rev. John Thomas Pine Coffin, lessee John HardingJohn Harding767 House and GardenHouse etc.0024
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1641East GoldworthyMogs Moorarable1032
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1844East GoldworthySalmons parkmeadow3216
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1845East GoldworthySalmons parkmeadow1316
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1846East GoldworthySalmons patkarable1135
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1876East GoldworthyHarris's parkarable128
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1877East GoldworthyEast downarable3224
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1878East GoldworthyWest downarable520
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1887East GoldworthyYard's closearable0338
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1888East GoldworthyPoor closearanle136
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1889East GoldworthyPlotarable0023
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1917East GoldworthyLong Closearable1128
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1913East GoldworthyHankhaymeadow0326
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1921East GoldworthyOrchardorchard0030
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1922East GoldworthyBarms Closearable116
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1923East GoldworthyOrchardorchard009
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1924East GoldworthyBarn and Mowhaybarn0020
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1925East GoldworthyBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.013
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1926East GoldworthyGardengarden008
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1927East GoldworthyTown plotmeadow1131
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1928East GoldworthyOrchardorchard0117
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1930East GoldworthyLane end fieldarable0238
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1938East GoldworthyWoodwood022
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1942East GoldworthyWoodwood029
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1949East GoldworthyWoodwood3037
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1950East GoldworthyHolwillarable333
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1951East GoldworthyClay parkarable1315
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1952East GoldworthyBroad Parkarable2320
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1955East GoldworthyWay downsarable5230
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1961East GoldworthyHigher Moor and Meadowmeadow318
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1963East GoldworthyVord lanearable629
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1960East GoldworthyCross parkarable2228
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1991East GoldworthyMeadowmeadow0320
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching2007East GoldworthyMoor Meadowmeadow0210
Walter Haywood Esquire, lessee John ChingThomas Ching1939East GoldworthyDoctors Meadowarable0238
Walter Haywood EsquireThomas Ching2052 Lower plotarable0014
Walter Haywood EsquireThomas Ching2053 Plotarable007
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1173WorthgateBroad Closearable437
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1174WorthgateWoodarable1200
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1227WorthgateLamb parkarable120
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1228WorthgatePearsens Meadowmeadow1318
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1230WorthgateBarns Closearable238
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1231WorthgateBuildings and Courtbuildings014
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1232WortgateGardengarden0023P
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1233WorthgateTown Meadowarable3026
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1234WorthgateNurserynursery0115
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1235WorthgateNine Acresarable9023P
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1236WorthgateSeven Acresarable7018
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1237WorthgateEast Marshmeadow1234
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1238WorthgateMeadow Marshmeadow2118
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1182WorthgateWoodwood2016
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1183WorthgateTen Acresarable9337
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1184WorthgateWoody Closearable320
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1185WorthgateWest four acresarable4324
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1186WorthgateHemarable0235
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1191WorthgateStone parkarable3231
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1408WorthgateHolwill Meadowarable2015
Thomas Hockridge and William HockridgeThomas Hockridge & William Hockridge1410WorthgateHolwill Meadowarable1125
Matilda Mary HucksJohn Bates1669Part of Lower Fox DownWay hill Marsharable2136
Matilda Mary HucksJohn Bates1670Part of Lower Fox DownLower Way hillarable214
Matilda Mary HucksJohn Bates1671Part of Lower Fox DownHigher Way hillarable218
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks393Paynes CleaveGardengarden0035
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks394Paynes CleavePanes Cleavearable0211
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks395Paynes CleaveBrakefurze4019
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1776Paynes CleaveMill Close Meadmeadow0324
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1779Paynes CleavePlantationPlantation130
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1780Paynes CleavePlantationPlantation2125
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1781Paynes CleaveTwo Acresarable135
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1782Paynes CleaveHigher furze plotarable0324
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1783Paynes CleaveOne Actearable0313
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1784Paynes CleavePlantation plotarable0211
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1785Paynes CleavePlantationPlantation0120
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1786Paynes CleaveHigher plantation fieldarable2321
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1787Paynes CleaveLower plantation fieldarable327
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1656Lower Fox DownsGulworthy Meadowarable2010
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1657Lower Fox DownsBagels Fardengarden0116
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1658Lower Fox DownsPlantationPlantation019
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1673Lower Fox DownsFish pond Meadowarable0224
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1674Lower Fox DownsPlantationPlantation015
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1675Lower Fox DownsGardengarden0022
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1676Lower Fox DownsGarden Meadowmeadow0327
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1677Lower Fox DownsPart of Lawnpasture016
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1678Lower Fox DownsLawnpasture2215
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1679Lower Fox DownsPlotarable0030
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1680Lower Fox DownsMowhay[rickyard]0031
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1681Lower Fox DownsBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0115
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1682Lower Fox DownsGardengarden0125
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1683Lower Fox DownsOrchardorchard023
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1684Lower Fox DownsMow Close plotarable015
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1685Lower Fox DownsMow Close plotarable1227
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1686Lower Fox DownsPease fieldarable3222
Matilda Mary HucksMatilda Mary Hucks1672Lower Fox DownsWastewaste0010
Matilda Mary HucksGeorge Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks1778LillefordHouse and CourtHouse etc.007
Matilda Mary HucksGeorge Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks1777LillefordLilleford Meadowmeadow0320
Matilda Mary HucksGeorge Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks1746LillefordGardengarden002
Matilda Mary HucksGeorge Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks1747LillefordHouseHouse0021
Matilda Mary HucksGeorge Pidlar & Matilda Mary Hucks1748LillefordGardengarden0023
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreThomas Andrew451 Gardengarden0138
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreThomas Andrew452 Smiths House & ShopHouse etc.0010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreSimon Becklake1387Prance CottageLittle Meadowarable0118
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreSimon Becklake1388Prance CottageWill Meadowmeadow033
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreSimon Becklake1389Prance CottageGardengarden0010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreSimon Becklake1390Prance CottageBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0012
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary PassmoreSimon Becklake1391Prance CottageShop Meadowmeadow030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond362Part of Hore HillOrchardorchard0130
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond364Part of Hore HillGardengarden0011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond365Part of Hore HillGardengarden0013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWillam Bond366Part of Hore HillHouse and CourtHouse etc.0035
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond1999Part of Hore HillOrchard hillarable0121
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond2000Part of Hore HillClay parkarable0326
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Bond267Part of Hore HillHem to parkarable011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1492GalsworthyCopsecopse0135
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1497GalsworthyCopsecopse0123
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1506GalsworthyRidge hillarable230
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1507GalsworthyPlotarable0137
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1514GalsworthyLuzium [?]arable2116
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1516GalsworthyBig Woodwood226
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1518GalsworthyPlotarable0220
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1534GalsworthyBudds orchardorchard0114
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1542GalsworthyLittle plotmeadow019
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1543GalsworthyBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.009
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1544GalsworthyMowhay[rickyard]0014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1545GalsworthyLinhay and WasteLinhay etc.0013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1546GalsworthyMill Closearable1124
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1547GalsworthyGardengarden0014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1548GalsworthyBudds Closearable1310
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1550GalsworthyLong Closearable131
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1552GalsworthyLittle Burrow Parkmeadow135
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1553GalsworthyBig Burrow Parkmeadow1321
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke EsquireWilliam Braund1555GalsworthyLong Closemeadow1324
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Briant449 House and GardenHouse etc.0015
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1795Harrises HillDrews Marsharable1022
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1799Harrises HillDrews Marsharable112
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1800Harrises HillLong Closearable1212
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1801Harrises HillCommonsarable1236
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1802Harrises HillClay parkarable2128
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanJohn Chapple1803Harrises HillHorse parkarable212
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas LemonThomas Dark954 Moorarable209
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas LemonThomas Dark955 Moorarable014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas LemonEdward George113Smiths CabbacottFirst Meadowarable1220
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George142Smiths CabbacottDownsarable615
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George143Smiths CabbacottDownsarable3228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George148Smiths CabbacottEast parkarable2129
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George149Smiths CabbacottEast parkmeadow030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George155Smiths CabbacottHouse and GardenHouse etc.0027
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George156Smiths CabbacottMiddle Meadowmeadow1011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George157Smiths CabbacottBarn and Courtbarn etc0118
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George164Smiths CabbacottPlotarable019
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George170Smiths CabbacottWater parkpasture2327
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George182Smiths CabbacottMoorarable3026
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George215Smiths CabbacottHampasture1214
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George216Smiths CabbacottHam Hillarable031
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George244Smiths CabbacottAbove Wayarable1338
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George255Smiths CabbacottFoskarable3311
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George257Smiths CabbacottCross parkpasture4036
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George2091Smiths CabbacottBare Downarable424
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George2092Smiths CabbacottHigher Bare downarable3311
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceRichard Grigg370Part of Hoar HillLower fieldarable2228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceRichard Grigg371Part of Hoar HillHigher fieldarable2228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon328Linches Parkham TownGrannary Meadowmeadow1120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon331Linches Parkham TownHouse,Buildings & CourtHouse etc.1120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon332Linches Parkham TownGardengarden0022
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon428Linches Parkham TownSquare Closearable4013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon429Linches Parkham TownLower Closearable4013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon439Linches Parkham TownNorth Lawfordarable5131
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon444Linches Parkham TownMowhay[rickyard]0024
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon445Linches Parkham TownMeadowmeadow2330
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon446Linches Parkham TownPath Meadowmeadow1226
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon453Linches Parkham TownLower Lawfordarable3232
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headon462Linches Parkham TownHigher Lawfordarable3111
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang265Part of Hore HillBig Marshmeadow1214
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang367Part of Hore HillBarn parkarable2315
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1992Part of Hore HillGorrells Gardenarable0120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1993Part of Hore HillClay park hillarable0224
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1994Part of Hore HillPickards Closearable4016
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1995Part of Hore HillOrchard fieldarable225
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1996Part of Hore HillClay parkarable115
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1997Part of Hore HillHem to Clay parkarable0211
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1998Part of Hore HillLittle Marshpasture0238
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang2001Part of Hore HillCopsecopse005
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang368Part of Hore HillMowhayMowhay0013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang950Pearce's Broad ParkhamFurze parkarable3311
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1338Pearce's Broad ParkhamLong Closearable126
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1287Pearce's Broad ParkhamMery plotarable1030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1288Pearce's Broad ParkhamHoodlandarable604
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1289Pearce's Broad ParkhamHigher four acresarable4128
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1290Pearce's Broad ParkhamLower four acresarable4017
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1304Pearce's Broad ParkhamSlidelandarable616
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1308Pearce's Broad ParkhamSplatarable1017
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1322Pearce's Broad ParkhamMoorarable7138
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1325Pearce's Broad ParkhamGardengarden003
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1326Pearce's Broad ParkhamGardengarden007
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1328Pearce's Broad ParkhamLower Meadowarable035
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1329Pearce's Broad ParkhamHigher Meadowmeadow126
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1330Pearce's Broad ParkhamGardengarden0013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1332Pearce's Broad ParkhamBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0025
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1323Pearce's Broad ParkhamNew plotpasture0220
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1333Pearce's Broad ParkhamCourtcourt0037
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1334Pearce's Broad ParkhamMowhaymowhay0016
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1335Pearce's Broad Parkhamparkarable3122
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1339Pearce's Broad ParkhamWaggadownarable1132
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang1341Pearce's Broad ParkhamNeed parkarable028
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceJohn Lang805Pearce's Broad ParkhamFurzefurze2327
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang951Shorts CottageMoorarable2339
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1206Shorts CottageWest Broady parkarable336
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1297Shorts CottageEast Broady parkarable228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1324Shorts CottageHigher Meadowarable0134
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1327Shorts CottageWest Meadowarable2010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1352Shorts CottageEaster hillarable206
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1353Shorts CottageMarsharable230
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1354Shorts CottageLower Way Wood Housearable2210
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1356Shorts CottageHigher Way Wood Housearable1319
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1692Shorts CottageTom Short's Meadowarable1326
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1718Short's CottageMowhayarable0022
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1719Short's CottageGardengarden004
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1720Short's CottageHouse and CourtHouse etc.0011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreJohn Lang1721Short's CottageGardengarden0014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon926Whitefields Broad ParkhamMoles hill Marsharable0337
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon927Whitefields Broad ParkhamMoles hill Marsharable0223
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1302Whitefields Broad ParkhamHillarable100
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1303Whitefields Broad ParkhamLong Closearable2036
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1305Whitefields Broad ParkhamSquare fieldarable1236
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1344Whitefields Broad ParkhamLower North Groundarable3217
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1345Whitefields Broad ParkhamHigher North Groundarable2317
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1722Whitefields Broad ParkhamHouse and CourtHouse etc.0020
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1731Whitefields Broad ParkhamGardengarden009
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1732Whitefields Broad ParkhamHigher Meadowarable1230
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Maria PassmoreThomas Lemon1733Whitefields Broad ParkhamLower Meadowarable0215
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May167BabeleighWeasalarable2239
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May168BabeleighCoppicecoppice018
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May174BabeleighLower Mow Closearable5014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May175BabeleighHigher Mow Closearable9223
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May176BabeleighLittle Can parkarable1310
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May177BabeleighCrooked Closearable6113
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May178BabeleighGreat Can parkarable5024
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May179BabeleighWest Closearable8235
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May180BabeleighEast Closearable7127
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May181BabeleighLittle East Moorarable1235
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May183BabeleighLower East Moorpasture11136
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May184BabeleighEaster Marshpasture522
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May185BabeleighHigher Easter Moorpasture1030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May186BabeleighLong Moorpasture1629
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May187BabeleighNew plotarable122
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May188BabeleighGallsrys Linhay fieldpasture2124
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May189BabeleighHigher Plattsarable1321
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May190BabeleighCoppicecoppice010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May191BabeleighRobbins platpasture0232
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May192BabeleighLong Calves platpasture0331
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May193BabeleighOrchardorchard0023
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May194BabeleighWastewaste0035
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May195BabeleighLittle plotarable013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May196BabeleighGardengarden0019
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May197BabeleighHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.1118
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May198BabeleighGardengarden0030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May199BabeleighWastewaste0015
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May200BabeleighMowhay plotarable0132
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May201BabeleighOrchardorchard0328
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May202BabeleighHigher long Meadowmeadow127
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May203BabeleighHalf Acre Meadowmeadow0225
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May204BabeleighLong Meadowmeadow2218
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May205BabeleighPond Meadowmeadow0116
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May206BabeleighCoppicecoppice0117
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May208BabeleighLower pond Meadowmeadow1210
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May209BabeleighTwo Acresmeadow2228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May210BabeleighFour Acresarable412
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May211BabeleighCross parkarable4135
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May212BabeleighCross park Woodwood3327
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May283BabeleighWester Woodwood324
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May284BabeleighNorth Closepasture4221
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May285BabeleighLower Neck fieldarable5310
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May286BabeleighHigher Neck fieldarable331
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May287BabeleighHigher Western Woodwood7226
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May288BabeleighNorth Mill Closearable3138
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May289BabeleighBulls plotpasture201
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May290BabeleighCalves plotpasture1128
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May291BabeleighSouth Mill Closepasture4124
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May292BabeleighPlantationPlantation0030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May293BabeleighPlantationPlantation1319
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May294BabeleighPlantationPlantation003
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May295BabeleighLower Holley Moorarable524
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May296BabeleighHigher Holley Moorarable4337
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May297BabeleighWaste and Roadwaste etc.1218
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May298BabeleighNew Moorarable4018
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May299BabeleighRoad Moorarable8327
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May300BabeleighLittle Moorpasture1114
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May301BabeleighHigher Moorpasture24111
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May302BabeleighNear Wester Marshpasture9313
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May303BabeleighAlder Spot[no entry]0127
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May304BabeleighRushy Moorpasture8312
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May305BabeleighCorner Moorarable7319
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May306BabeleighLower Moorpasture13120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Peter GlubbWilliam May486BabeleighFar Wester Marshpasture6018
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins572Palmers AshMiddle hillspasture0210
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins574aPalmers AshMiddle hillspasture2310
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins614Palmers AshStrangpasture0039
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins650Palmers AshWillisarable0217
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins654Palmers AshGardengarden0023
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins755Palmers AshHouse and Gardengarden0027
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins760Palmers AshGarden parkpasture1314
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins765Palmers AshPool parkarable2010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas NormanThomas Robins776Palmers AshNorth Moorarable3038
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceSamuel John360Part of Hore HillClay parkarable0336
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceSamuel John361Part of Hore HillSouth Meadowarable0336
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceSamuel John363Part of Hore HillBack Meadowmeadow0313
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John388Part of HarrisesStile fieldarable1339
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John389Part of HarrisesMeadow[pasture]007
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John390Part of HarrisesPath fieldarable1338
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire,.lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John1805Part of HarrisesHigher Harrisesarable2232
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John1806Part of HarrisesLower Harrisesarable313
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsSamuel John1807Part of HarrisesHundred yardarable0232
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1036Higher WaytownHem in Green hall[?]1123
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1041Higher WaytownGreen hallarable3312
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire. Lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1073Higher WaytownWest Downarable2214
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1075Higher WaytownPond Meadowarable0228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1076Higher WaytownBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.027
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1077Higher WaytownStable Meadowmeadow028
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1078Higher WaytownHigher parkarable4333
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1079Higher WaytownLower parkarable1220
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1240Higher WaytownCross parkarable3110
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1241Higher WaytownGardengarden014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1242Higher WaytownLinhaylinhay002
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1243Higher WaytownPlotarable0038
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1244Higher WaytownLower ley parkarable1026
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1245Higher WaytownMiddle lery parkarable2032
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1246Higher WaytownHigher ley parkarable1337
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1247Higher WaytownLey parkarable1120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1258Higher WaytownShrubberyshrubbery0011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1259Higher WaytownGardengarden0017
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1260Higher WaytownGardengarden0010
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1261Higher WaytownGardengarden008
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1262Higher WaytownMowhaymowhay0014
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1263Higher WaytownBarnbarn002
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1264Higher WaytownGardengarden009
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1265Higher WaytownWill plotpasture0112
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1266Higher WaytownLower Moorarable127
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1267Higher WaytownEast Meadowarable0322
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1268Higher WaytownWest Meadowarable0331
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1269Higher WaytownDark Meadowmeadow021
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1270Higher WaytownWest Townarable3212
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1271Higher WaytownHigher Downarable6127
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1272Higher WaytownHigher Moorarable138
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1355Higher WaytownHigher Berrysarable4130
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1357Higher WaytownLower Berrysarable1216
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1358Higher WaytownLower Berrysarable2028
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1359Higher WaytownOver Marshpasture4237
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1361Higher WaytownLittle Holwill Meadpasture0135
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1362Higher WaytownCleavearable420
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1363Higher WaytownHigher Piecearable0337
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee James ShortridgeJames Shortridge1364Higher WaytownHigher Lower piecearable030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas SouthwoodThomas Southwood373 House and GardenHouse etc.0012
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas Southwood Thomas Southwood 374 HouseHouse003
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas SouthwoodThomas Southwood375 Gardengarden0038
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas SouthwoodThomas Southwood376 Gardengarden0012
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Thomas SouthwoodThomas Southwood377 Gardengarden0119
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William SquanceWilliam Squance266 Copsecopse0032
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanRobert Stanlake329 Gardengarden003
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanRobert Stanlake330 House, Garden & StableHouse etc.009
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee John NormanRobert Stanlake450 Gardengarden013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary TardrewMary Tardrew335Bears Parkham Town BartonPlantation plotarable0121
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary TardrewMary Tardrew336Bears Parkham Town BartonGardengarden0017
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Mary TardrewMary Tardrew337Bears Parkham Town BartonHouse and BuildingsHouse etc.0013
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew338Harrises Parkham Town BartonPlantationpasture0212
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew354Harrises Parkham Town BartonBrewers Meadowarable0322
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew385Harrises Parkham Town BartonPond Meadowarable4220
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew387Harrises Parkham Town BartonBroad parkarable2325
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew440Harrises Parkham Town BartonRelvinstone Marshpasture3228
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Tardrew424Harrises Parkham Town BartonLong Closepasture3025
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William VaggersWilliam Vaggers1984New HavenOrchardorchard017
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William VaggersWilliam Vaggers1980New HavenGardengarden004
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William VaggersWilliam Vaggers1981New HavenBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.004
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee William VaggersWilliam Vaggers1982New HavenGardengarden002
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale74Honnocotts West StoneEaster fieldarable402
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale80Honnocotts West StoneGardengarden0030
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale81Honnocotts West StoneOrchardorchard0112
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale82Honnocotts West StoneHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.0034
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale83Honnocotts West StonePotatoe plotarable0036
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale84Honnocotts West StoneAbove townarable3331
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale86Honnocotts West StoneHigher Road CloseRoad & waste2233
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale91Honnocotts West StoneCopse Closearable3[?]7
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale93Honnocotts West StoneRoadroad0016
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale94Honnocotts West StoneLower Road Closearable4011
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale118Honnocotts West StoneWel Parkarable2210
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neae125Honnocotts West StoneHigher Meadowarable208
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale128Honnocotts West StoneSlaidarable214
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale129Honnocotts West StoneSlaid Marshpasture[?]224
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale134Honnocotts West StoneLittle Meadowarable104
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale136Honnocotts West StoneLittle plotarable0120
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale144Honnocotts West StoneDownarable4311
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee H.A. Harvie EsquireJohn Neale146Honnocotts West StoneLower Meadowmeadow208
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard WalterRev. Richard Walter470Venn arable216
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard WalterRev. Richard Walter471Venn arable1125
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard WalterRev. Richard Walter482aVenn arable2028
Samuel Kekewich Trehawke Esquire, lessee Rev. Richard WalterRev. Richard Walter483aVenn arable1132
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1536Easter HolwillFive Acresarable526
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1557Easter HolwillSeven Acresarable7214
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1558Easter HolwillMarsharable1118
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1559Easter HolwillMarsharable1025
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1560Easter HolwillHalf Acre Marsharable032
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1561Easter HolwillTwo Acresarable1233
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1562Easter HolwillGardengarden0034
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1563Easter HolwillBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0026
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1564Easter HolwillMowhaymowhay0020
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1565Easter HolwillGardengarden0011
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1567Easter HolwillPlantationPlantation009
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1568Easter HolwillPlantationPlantation0014
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1569Easter HolwillSix Acresarable5315
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1570Easter HolwillThree Acresarable238
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1571Easter HolwillFive Acresarable430
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1572Easter HolwillFour Acresarable330
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1573Easter HolwillHigher Hillarable209
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1574Easter HolwillLower Hillarable1032
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1575Easter HolwillMarshpasture119
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1576Easter HolwillEaster Marshpasture1128
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1577Easter HolwillEaster hillarable21o
Thomas Nance KivellWilliam Nance Kivell1566Easter HolwillChapelchapel003
James LaneJohn Ashton1532 HouseHouse001
James LaneJohn Ashton1533 Gardengarden005
James LaneJames Lane1604 Gardengarden004
James LaneJames Lane1607 HouseHouse006
James LaneJames Lane1605 HouseHouse004
James LaneJames Lane1530Part of NorthwayLower fieldpasture0322
James LaneJames Lane1531Part of NorthwayHigher fieldpasture105
James LaneJames Lane1535Part of NorthwayMeadowpasture019
James LaneJames Lane1536Part of NorthwayNew Closepasture0128
James LaneJames Lane1539Part of NorthwayTown placepasture0017
James LaneJames Lane1540Part of NorthwayTown placepasture0034
James LaneJames Lane1541Part of NorthwayTown placepasture0027
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1857Sewells GoldworthyLower fieldarable118
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1858Sewells GoldworthyMiddle fieldarable1016
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1859Sewells GoldworthySquare Closearable0310
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1860Sewells GoldworthyPigs Meadowmeadow0234
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1861Sewells GoldworthyGardengarden0018
Josiah LaneJosiah Lane1862Sewells GoldworthyBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.008
Richard LaneRobert Harris401 Plotarable014
Richard LaneRobert Harris402 HouseHouse0011
Ricard LaneRobert Harris403 Gardengarden0012
Richard LaneRobert Harris404 Orchardorchard0036
Richard LaneRichard Lane405BocombeLower North Meadowmeadow124
Richard LaneRichard Lane406BocombeOrchardorchard011
Richard LaneRichard Lane407BocombeHigher North Meadowmeadow103
Richard LaneRichard Lane408BocombePlantationPlantation0114
Richard LaneRichard Lane409BocombeHouse,building etc.House etc.033
Richard LaneRichard Lane410BocombeMowhaymowhay0034
Richard LaneRichard Lane411BocombeOrchardorchard032
Richard LaneRichard Lane412BocombeGardengarden0030
Richard LaneRichard Lane413BocombeOrchardorchard0030
Richard LaneRichard Lane414BocombeLower Dunsfieldarable1314
Richard LaneRichard Lane415BocombeHigher Dunsfieldarable1127
Richard LaneRichard Lane416BocombeButter hillpasture114
Richard LaneRichard Lane417BocombeCoppicecoppice0224
Richard LaneRichard Lane418BocombeOrchardorchard0135
Richard LaneRichard Lane419BocombeWell Meadowmeadow210
Richard LaneRichard Lane850BocombePart of twelve Acresarable6236
Richard LaneRichard Lane880BocombeHigher Nine Acresarable10110
Richard LaneRichard Lane881BocombeHigher Moorarable3235
Richard LaneRichard Lane882BocombeBig Moorarable5026
Richard LaneRichard Lane883BocombeLittle Moorpasture233
Richard LaneRichard Lane886BocombeLower quarry parkpasture305
Richard LaneRichard Lane887BocombeHigher quarry parkarable4136
Richard LaneRichard Lane888BocombeLower Nine Acresarable9330
Richard LaneRichard Lane889BocombeBottom parkarable3130
Richard LaneRichard Lane890BocombeBottom park Marshpasture0123
Richard LaneRichard Lane891BocombeBottom park Marshpasture0326
Richard LaneRichard Lane892BocombeBottom parkarable2225
Richard LaneRichard Lane893BocombeRoadroad0212
Richard LaneRichard Lane894BocombeHigher thorn closearable6036
Richard LaneRichard Lane895BocombeLower thorn closearable6219
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Ackland2216 Orchardorchard0037
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Ackland2224 Orchardorchard014
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry ParrWilliam Ackland & William Shortridge2222 HouseHouse003
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry ParrLewis Ashton2100 Gardengarden008
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry ParrLewis Ashton and John Glover2099 House and BuildingsHouse etc.006
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Glover2095 Gardengarden007
John Lee Lee Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Glover2101 Orchardorchard0221
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2122WordenSeven Acresarable814
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2123WordenBig Ganders Lakearable8120
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2124WordenHem to Big Ganders Lakecopse0130
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2125WordenHemcopse0130
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2126WordenWorden Meadowmeadow3028
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2127WordenHem to Meadowcopse0020
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2128WordenWastewaste0021
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2129WordenRoadroad0038
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2130WordenHemcopse0134
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2131WordenNurserynursery0024
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2132WordenLittle potatoe Hamarable019
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2133WordenQuarry Closearable433
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2134WordenHemcopse038
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2135WordenWorden Meadowarable0117
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2136WordenWorden Meadow Coppicecoppice0131
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2137WordenWorden Meadow Orchardorchard1131
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2138WordenLittle Ganders Lakearable3122
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Hamlyn2230WordenPotatoe Hamarable1033
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal33East StoneCream parkarable6235
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal34East StoneLinhay Marsharable0216
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal35East StoneHigher Marsharable4127
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal41East StoneStone Copsecopse7211
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal42East StoneCrooked parkarable5136
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal43East StoneGraddenarable8010
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal44East StoneRoadroad0026
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal45East StoneLittle Marshpasture0213
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal46East StoneGriggs Meadowarable3031
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal47East StoneLower Marshpasture2125
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal48East StoneLittle Well Meadowpasture0126
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal49East StoneWell Meadowpasture3222
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal50East StoneHorse parkarable411
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal51East Stonelawnarable138
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal52East StoneOrchardorchard0134
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal52aEast StoneHay Mow[rickyard]0016
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal53East StoneHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.126
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal54East StoneMowhay[mowhay]015
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal55East StoneGardengarden019
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal57East StonePlantationPlantation010
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal58East StoneEast horse Stonearable3118
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal59East StoneAbove townarable4021
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal60East StomeClarkes Meadowarable2323
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal61East StoneNewer parkarable6136
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal62East StoneGreat Slewarable5036
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal63East StoneSlew Marsharable1228
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal66East StoneLittle Slewarable2033
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal69East StoneHigher horse Stonearable6020
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal70East StoneWester horse Stonearable3221
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal71East StomeHigher ladies Meadowarable2114
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Heal72East StomeLower ladies Meadowarable130
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Lee Lee Esquire2139Part HalsburyHalsbury Coppicecoppice24312
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Lee Lee Esquire2233Part HalsburyBeef park Coppicecoppice2035
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Lee Lee Esquire2191 Pickards Woodwood11236
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Lee Lee Esquire2193 Part Pickards Woodwood0133
John Lee Lee EsquireJohn Lee Lee Esquire2190 Part Pickards Woodwood0011
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Williams2219 HouseHouse002
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Williams2215 Gardengarden0126
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Williams2217 GardenGardens0017
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase23Halsbury BartonDeen parkarable16124
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase36Halsbury BartonNodgel Moorpasture7017
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase37Halsbury BartonHigher Nodgelarable16034
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase38Halsbury BartonHigher Middle Nodgelarable1220
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase39Halsbury BartonLower Middle Nodgelarable10235
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase40Halsbury BartonLower Nodgelarable13036
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2102Halsbury BartonHem to Lower Nodgelarable0132
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2103Halsbury BartonHem to Lower Nodgelarable0120
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2104Halsbury BartonBuckland Meadpasture1010
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2105Halsbury BartonHem to Buckland Meadcopse0028
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2106Halsbury BartonLittle Orchardorchard0210
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2107Halsbury BartonBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.2028
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2108Halsbury BartonGardengarden0110
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2109Halsbury BartonOrchardorchard0212
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2110Halsbury BartonParkham Meadowmeadow7330
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2111Halsbury BartonPlantationPlantation0028
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2112Halsbury BartonWastewaste0036
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2113Halsbury BartonLittle plotarable0017
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2114Halsbury BartonPondpond0011
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2115Halsbury BartonBulls plotpasture2120
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2115aHalsbury BartonCalves plotarable1311
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2116Halsbury BartonMowhay[mowhay]0117
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2117Halsbury BartonLittle Meadowpasture220
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2118Halsbury BartonWastewaste0115
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2119Halsbury BartonOrchardorchard2013
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2120Halsbury BartonHigher Meadowarable7127
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2143Halsbury BartonRoadroad1226
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2144Halsbury BartonPool parkarable11336
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2145Halsbury BartonWastewaste0019
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2146Halsbury BartonHigher Shillevenarable10116
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2142Halsbury BartonHigher Long Closearable9320
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2147Halsbury BartonLittle furze downpasture7113
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2148Halsbury BartonLower Shillivenarable829
John Lee Lee EsquireJames moase2194Halsbury BartonCoppicecoppice3320
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2195Halsbury BartonGreat furze downarable11034
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2196Halsbury BartonLong landarable17015
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2197Halsbury BartonLower Long Closearable14230
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2198Halsbury BartonHigher Green closearable1017
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2199Halsbury BartonLower Green closearable7314
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2200Halsbury BartonHalsbury Moorarable27215
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2201Halsbury BartonLittle plotarable019
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2202Halsbury BartonSpot Coppicecoppice007
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2203Halsbury BartonSpot Coppicecoppice0018
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2204Halsbury BartonSpot Coppicecoppice009
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2205Halsbury BartonSpot Coppicecoppice0013
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2209Halsbury BartonCollins Hampasture6126
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2210Halsbury BartonLittle Oak parkarable329
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2211Halsbury BartonGreat Oak parkarable9136
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2212Halsbury BartonSeven Acresarable7332
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2213Halsbury BartonRoad and Wasteroad0237
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2214Halsbury BartonLittle Moorarable2120
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2121Halsbury BartonLower Meadowarable729
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2140Halsbury BartonHem[?]0118
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2141Halsbury BartonBramleyarable313
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2218Halsbury BartonCourtcourt0135
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2220Halsbury BartonBarnbarn003
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2221Halsbury BartonMowhaymowhay0014
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2225Halsbury BartonLittle plotarable025
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2226Halsbury BartonRound hillarable11230
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2227Halsbury BartonHem to Round hillarable0039
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2228Halsbury BartonHem to Round hillarable0211
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2229Halsbury BartonNear hillarable6226
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2231Halsbury BartonRowland Meadowpasture126
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2232Halsbury BartonLittle hillarable116
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2234Halsbury BartonBeef parkarable5230
John Lee Lee EsquireJames Moase2235Halsbury BartonBarn parkarable8237
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Shortridge2223 Gardengarden008
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2172Halsbury MillPlantationPlantation002
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2173Halsbury MillPlantationPlantation005
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2174Halsbury MillOrchardorchard0027
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2175Halsbury MillGardengarden0034
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2176Halsbury MillOrchardorchard0118
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2177Halsbury MillPlotgarden0034
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2178Halsbury MillPondpond0010
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2179Halsbury MillBuildings and Courtbuildings0026
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2180Halsbury MillMowhaymowhay0013
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2181Halsbury MillWood plotpasture1128
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2182Halsbury MillHempasture0115
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2183Halsbury MillLower pickards closearable136
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2184Halsbury MillHemarable0115
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2185Halsbury MillHigher pickards closearable4123
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2186Halsbury MillMiddle pickards closearable2128
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2187Halsbury MillMill Closepasture2112
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2188Halsbury MillSpotarable004
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2189Halsbury MillSpotarable006
John Lee Lee EsquireWilliam Squance2192Halsbury MillLittle pickards closearable1315
John MayGeorge Brend1865Robins GoldworthyBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0010
John MayGeorge Brend1868Robins GoldworthyHigher fieldarable1214
John MayGeorge Brend1869Robins GoldworthySquare Closearable0328
John MayGeorge Brend1870Robins GoldworthyMiddle fieldarable110
John MayGeorge Brend1871Robins GoldworthyLower fieldarable038
John MayJohn Lang1866 HouseHouse005
John MayJohn Lang1867 Gardengarden0023
John MaySamuel Wakeley & James Wakeley1975New HavenHouseHouse003
John MaySamuel Wakeley1977New HavenGardengarden0024
John MaySamuel Wakeley1974aNew HavenGardengarden0212
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersGrace Neale1502Part of PeppercombeHouseHouse002
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersGrace Neale1503Part of PeppercombeGardengarden0026
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersGrace Neale1504Part of PeppercombeGardengarden008
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2206Parkham SidePlantationPlantation007
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2207Parkham SidePlantationPlantation0018
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2208Parkham SidePlantationPlantation006
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2236Parkham SideHigher Ash parkarable826
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2237Parkham SidePlantationPlantation0025
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2238Parkham SideLower Ash parkarable5310
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2239Parkham SideGreat hill Coppicecopse3326
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2240Parkham SideRoadroad0134
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2241Parkham SideBridge Meadow Copsewood1223
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2242Parkham SideBridge Meadowpasture1020
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2243Parkham SideBuildingsbuildings004
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2244Parkham SidePlantationPlantation1023
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2245Parkham SideLittle plotarable008
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2246Parkham SidePlantationPlantation5026
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2247Parkham SideCoppicecoppice0027
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2248Parkham SidePlantationPlantation008
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2249Parkham SideRoadroad014
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2250Parkham SideLambs Closearable7318
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2251Parkham SideBolland Woodarable11023
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2252Parkham SideHem in Great Hillcopse0124
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2253Parkham SideHem in Great Hillcopse0112
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2254Parkham SideGreat Hillpasture1810
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2256Parkham SideAlder Spotarable009
anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2257Parkham SideLittle Meadowpasture035
Anna Rolle Morrison and othersAnna Rolle Morrison and others2258Parkham SideWastewaste0030
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeJohn Neale1371Part of PeppercombeHouseHouse002
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeJohn Neale1372Part of PeppercombeGardengarden002
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeJohn Neale1373Part of PeppercombeGardengarden0011
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeJohn Neale1374Part of PeppercombeGardengarden021
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeGrace Neale1505Part of PeppercombeMeadowmeadow127
Anna Rolle Morrison and others, John Neale lesseeGrace Neale1554Part of PeppercombeChanters park[meadow]417
John NormanWilliam Bates1205Hammetts WorthgateLong Meddonmeadow1311
John NormanWilliam Bates1209Hammetts WorthgateGardengarden016
John NormanWilliam Bates1210Hammetts WorthgateBuildings and Courtbuildings0024
John NormanWilliam Bates1211Hammetts WorthgateGardengarden0022
John NormanWilliam Bates1201Hammetts WorthgateNorth fieldarable3037
John NormanWilliam Bates1212Hammetts WorthgateAcre Meadowpasture1024
John NormanWilliam Bates1309Hammetts WorthgateGreat South Downarable3022
John NormanWilliam Bates1460Hammetts WorthgateLittle South Downarable316
John NormanWilliam Bates1401Hammetts WorthgateNorth fieldarable302
John NormanWilliam Bates1411Hammetts WorthgateWet Meadowarable1011
John NormanNathaniel Hancock2008 Park Meadowmeadow128
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2006Old MellWest Meadowmeadow0112
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2009Old MellLong Closearable032
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2031Old MellWest hillarable1120
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2032Old MellGardengarden0020
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2035Old MellLittle plotpasture0028
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2036Old MellMill pondpond008
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2037Old MellBuildings, Court & Wastebuildings etc.0033
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2034Old MellMarsharable0313
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2038Old MellLittle Hampasture0025
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2039Old MellGreat Hampasture0222
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2044Old MellOrchardOrchard & House0010
John Norman, lessee John GennNathaniel Hancock2045Old MellEast Hillarable1112
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1480Part of Bishops NorthwayHigher fieldarable0216
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1481Part of Bishops NorthwayPlotarable0028
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1482Part of Bishops NorthwayCopsecopse1137
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1483Part of Bishops NorthwayMiddle fieldarable0114
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1484Part of Bishops NorthwayLower fieldarable0313
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1485Part of Bishops NorthwayBuildings & Mowhaybuildings etc.005
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1486Part of Bishops NorthwayHouse etc.House etc.0011
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1487Part of Bishops NorthwayGardengarden0016
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1488Part of Bishops NorthwayOrchardorchard003
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1491Part of Bishops NorthwayGardengarden0036
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1498Part of Bishops NorthwayWoodwood1113
Samuel PaddonSamuel Paddon1499Part of Bishops NorthwayPlotarable0031
Samuel PaddonJames Paddon and Elizabeth Hutchings1489 House and CourtHouse etc.0010
Parkham PoorWalter Haywood981 Poor landarable234
Parkham PoorWalter Haywood1008 Poor landarable0224
Parkham PoorWalter Haywood1085 Poor Land Moorwood010
Parkham PoorWalter Haywood1086 Poor landarable0333
Parkham ParishSamuel Martin344 School house and CourtSchool house etc.0010
Henry ParrHenry Parr261Higher DendridgeFurze parkarable207
Henry ParrHenry Parr262Higher DendridgeLittle furze parkarable0129
Nenry ParrHenry Parr263Higher DendridgeLittle furze parkarable0132
Henry ParrHenry Parr264Higher DendridgeFurze park Marshpasture0315
Henry ParrHenry Parr2017Higher DendridgeHillarable015
Henry ParrHenry Parr2018Higher DendridgeLittle Broady parkarable0136
Henry ParrHenry Parr2019Higher DendridgeLong Closearable1030
Henry ParrHenry Parr2020Higher DendridgeLittle plotarable0034
Henry ParrHenry Parr2021Higher DendridgeBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0029
Henry ParrHenry Parr2022Higher DendridgeOrchardorchard008
Henry ParrHenry Parr2023Higher DendridgeThree Corner fieldarable1232
Henry ParrHenry Parr2024Higher DendridgeNew plotarable0226
Henry ParrHenry Parr2025Higher DendridgeBroady parkarable1218
James PeardJames Peard1935Part of Shapleys GoldworthyHoly Well Copsecopse0120
James PeardJames Peard1936Part of Shapleys GoldworthyHoly Well Copsecopse0222
James PickardJames Pickard768Part of Shapleys GoldworthyWelcom Moorarab;e3027
James PickardJames Pickard769Part of Shapleys GoldworthySecond Welcom Moorpasture201
James PickardJames Pickard787Part of Shapleys GoldworthyThird Welcom Moorarable7131
James PickardJames Pickard788Part of Shapleys GoldworthySixth Welcom Moorarable1336
James PickardJames Pickard789Part of Shapleys GoldworthyFourth Welcom Moorarable3230
James PickardJames Pickard790Part of Shapleys GoldworthyThird Welcom Moorarable5210
Jasper PickardJasper Pickard1062 House and GardenHouse etc.0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew268Parkham Town BartonWood park Coppicecoppice4025
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew269Parkham Town BartonGardengarden014
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew270Parkham Town BartonPart of Breakearable0215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew271Parkham Town BartonEnclosure[?]006
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew272Parkham Town BartonBreakearable7129
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew273Parkham Town BartonBreake    
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew274Parkham Town BartonEnclosurearable0020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew275Parkham Town BartonPoor landarable1220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew276Parkham Town BartonPoor landarable1115
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew281Parkham Town BartonPoor landarable0222
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew323Parkham Town BartonPlotarable0329
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew324Parkham Town BartonGardengarden0031
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew325Parkham Town BartonHouse, Building & CourtHouse etc.0210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew326Parkham Town BartonMowhaymowhay018
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew327Parkham Town BartonOrchardorchard0128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew333Parkham Town BartonPound Meadowarable401
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew350Parkham Town BartonPound Meadowpasture411
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew351Parkham Town BartonGardengarden0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew355Parkham Town BartonCulver parkarable5114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew356Parkham Town BartonCulver park Copsecopse2120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew357Parkham Town BartonLittle hill plotarable0127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew358Parkham Town BartonWood parkarable815
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew359Parkham Town BartonLittle Wood parkarable1130
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew382Parkham Town BartonNorth Closearable5321
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew384Parkham Town BartonMiddle Closearable4139
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew434Parkham Town BartonNine Acresarable9114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew435Parkham Town BartonLong Closearable6220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew436Parkham Town BartonThree Acresarable3318
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew437Parkham Town BartonFive Acresarable5210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew438Parkham Town BartonIntakearable0013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew441Parkham Town BartonPlotarable0030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew442Parkham Town BartonPart Lawfordarable4323
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew443Parkham Town BartonNorth Lawfordarable5016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew884Parkham Town BartonLittle Copstonearable3210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew885Parkham Town BartonCopstonearable14226
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew1837Parkham Town BartonLower North Closearable516
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsAnn Andrew383Parkham Town BartonCosty Lossarable3017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew554Part of MelburyNorth Moorarable24212
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew555Part of MelburyMiddle Moorarable26128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew556Part of MelburyMiddle Moorarable27310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew557Part of MelburyHigher thistle parkarable17229
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew558Part of MelburyLower thistle parkarable1705
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew559Part of MelburyLittle thistle parkarable0120
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew560Part of MelburyClover Closearable19323
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew561Part of MelburyWester Marsharable21112
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew562Part of MelburyNorth Marsharable1537
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningMary Andrew563Part of MelburyMarsharable2130
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William AshtonWilliam Ashton235 House and GardenHouse etc.0027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey528KerswellHigher Moorarable5219
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey529KerswellVetch fieldarable3212
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey530KerswellSix Acresarable8117
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey531KerswellRidgey Moorpasture16121
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey532KerswellWinter Closearable3320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey533KerswellLong Moorpasture3225
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey534KerswellSquare Moorpasture3024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey535KerswellCrooked Moorpasture5316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey536KerswellCrooked Moorpasture1027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey537KerswellRush Moorpasture705
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey538KerswellWester Moorarable114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey539KerswellWester moorarable1334
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey540KerswellFurze Brahefurze4320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey541KerswellHigher Moorarable519
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey597KerswellSplatarable2035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey598KerswellRoadroad0238
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey599KerswellPond Meadowmeadow1032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey600KerswellSrangmeadow0218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey601KerswellCroftmeadow2024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey605KerswellWest Meadowmeadow2317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey666KerswellWest parkmeadow215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey667KerswellBaker parkmeadow2215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey668KerswellMowhayarable0132
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey669KerswellHouse, Building & CourtHouse etc.0312
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey670KerswellShipen Meadowarable0239
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey671KerswellNails Meadowarable1328
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey672KerswellNails Moorpasture601
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey673KerswellNails Moorarable5023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey674KerswellNails Moorarable2236
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey675KerswellNails Moorarable2318
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey706KerswellMorridgearable1211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey707KerswellBroada parkarable3216
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey708KerswellLower lane end fieldarable2117
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey709KerswellLonger parkarable1338
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey710KerswellElder parkarable1120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey711KerswellLower Garden parkarable1220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey712KerswellGardengarden0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey713KerswellHaysarable0131
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey714KerswellGardengarden0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey715KerswellOrchardorchard010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey716KerswellMowhay[mowhay]0025
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey717KerswellMowhay fieldarable1317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey718KerswellHigher Garden parkarable1318
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey719KerswellHigher parkarable3133
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey720KerswellRoadroad0138
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey721KerswellHigher lane end fieldarable3124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey722KerswellNewer parkarable319
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey726KerswellEaster Cross parkarable6027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyRichard Bailey727KerswellWester Cross parkarable410
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceRichard Bate172Reckards SteartJustment Copsearable2035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceRichard Bate173Reckards SteartJustmentarable1235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceRichard Bate213Reckards SteartJustmentarable1235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceRichard Bate214Reckards SteartJustmentarable1027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningRichard Bond503Part of MelburyTen Acresarable11023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningRichard Bond504Part of MelburySixteen Acresarable17127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningRichard Bond505Part of MelburyEight Acresarable8124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningRichard Bond506Part of MelburyTwenty Acresarable28120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard BaileyJames Braund728 House, Court and GardenGardens0022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William CannWilliam Cann1061 House and GardenHouse etc.0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing 564 Gardengarden0128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry Downing 565 House and GardenHouse etc.0021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceAnthony Clement225 Gardengarden0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Wiliam SquanceAnthony Clement226 Croftarable0127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceAnthony Clement227 Copsecopse0331
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William SquanceAnthony Clement228 Justmentarable2213
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements68West StoneShillanarable7022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements73West StoneLittle parkarable1325
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements75West StonePear parkarable5235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements76West StoneGardengarden0019
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements77West StoneMow plotpasture021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements78West StoneHouse, Building & CourtHouse etc.0027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements79West StonePlotarable0119
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements87West StoneHigher Windy parkarable434
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements88West StoneCopsecopse1013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements89West StoneLower Windy parkarable5032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements90West StoneCopsecopse4034
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements95West StoneQuarry park Copsecopse1136
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements119West StoneVel parkarable1234
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements123West StoneGardengarden0021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements126West StoneMeasowpasture212
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements130West StoneDownarable1310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements131West StonePlotarable004
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements132West StoneDownarable2314
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements133West StoneDownarable2220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements145West StoneLower Meadowpasture3024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements147West StoneLower Broom Hillarable2316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementsJoseph Clements150West StoneHigher Broom Hillarable1136
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1066Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamHouse and CourtHouse etc.007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1067Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamHouse plotpasture017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1068Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamPlotpasture0124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1069Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamClover fieldpasture1019
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee WilliamTurnerThomas Dark1070Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamMiddle fieldpasture113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1071Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamHigher fieldpasture119
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William TurnerThomas Dark1365Part of Hortops Broad ParkhamLower piecepasture0215
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark811LimeburyCleavearable5013
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark934LimeburyThorn Close Marshpasture1129
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark935LimeburyMiddle Marsharable135
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark936LimeburyMarsharable2125
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark937LimeburyMeadowpasture1211
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark938LimeburyRoadroad0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark939LimeburyGardengarden0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark940LimeburyHouse, Building and CourtHouse etc.022
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark941LimeburyMowhaymowhay0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark942LimeburyMowhay plotarable0321
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark943LimeburyWill plotarable0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark944LimeburyClover fieldarable3112
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark945LimeburyLittle plotarable0020
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark946LimeburyMiddle hillarable2132
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark947LimeburyRoadroad018
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark948LimeburyThorn Closearable6312
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark956LimeburyHorse parkarable3133
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark957LimeburyOver Marsharable0222
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark958LimeburyMiddle Marsharable036
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark959LimeburyFirst Marsharable1131
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJoseph Dark980LimeburyBroad Closearable6226
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark952Mouse HillsOver landarable3236
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1292Mouse HillsMoulls hillarable3221
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1293Mouse HillsHem to Moulls hillcopse0216
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1295Mouse HillsMiddle Moulls hillpasture1116
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1299Mouse HillsHemcopse0114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1300Mouse HillsHemcopse118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1298Mouse HillsLower Moulls hillarable6114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantJoseph Dark1301Mouse HillsPart Moulls hillarable0216
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantThomas Dark1723 Gardengarden006
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SergeantThomas Dark1724 HouseHouse002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William DunnWilliam Dunn1713 House and CourtHouse etc.008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PenningtonWilliam Dunn924Daniels Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable3226
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PenningtonWilliam Dunn925Daniels Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable1235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PenningtonWilliam Dunn1306Daniels Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable409
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1276Daniels Broad ParkhamFive Acresarable524
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1277Daniels Broad ParkhamFour Acresarable4132
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1278Daniels Broad ParkhamSquare fieldarable3311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1279Daniels Broad ParkhamMiddle fieldarable3331
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1280Daniels Broad ParkhamMoorarsble4215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John FordGeorge Ford1281Daniels Broad ParkhamThree Cornersarable232
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior2096Bishops CabbacottSouth Broad parkarable5334
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior2097Bishops CabbacottCoppicecoppice4310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior2095Bishops CabbacottNorth Broad parkarable5210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior112Bishops CabbacottMeadowpasture2334
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior162Bishops CabbacottGardengarden0028
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior165Bishops CabbacottCroftarable1210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior166Bishops CabbacottCroftarable2010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior169Bishops CabbacottCroftarable123
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior243Bishops CabbacottRidge parkpasture3221
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior243aBishops CabbacottRidge parkpasture1114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior246Bishops CabbacottRoadroad012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior247Bishops CabbacottMachine plotpasture0339
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior248Bishops CabbacottBarn parkarable1326
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior256Bishops CabbacottFoskarable4324
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Junior258Bishops CabbacottStone [Pck?]pasture9329
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior96Cabbacott BartonMuch or Morepasture2124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior97Cabbacott BartonWoodwood3330
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior101Cabbacott BartonGreat Eastarable737
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior102Cabbacott BartonLower Eastarable5230
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior103Cabbacott BartonAlder Spotarable0235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior104Cabbacott BartonMuch landarable638
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior109Cabbacott BartonLittle Eastarable3117
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior110Cabbacott BartonWorst Moorpasture1339
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior111Cabbacott BartonLane Endarable3017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior114Cabbacott BartonMowhaymowhay0129
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior115Cabbacott BartonBroad Meadowpasture308
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior116Cabbacott BartonMoory Meadowpasture1117
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior117Cabbacott BartonStone parkarable4237
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior138Cabbacott BartonStone Commonarable0113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior139Cabbacott BartonMoorarable1214
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior140Cabbacott BartonMpprarable1313
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior141Cabbacott BartonMoorarable3217
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior158Cabbacott BartonMowhay plotarable0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior159Cabbacott BartonHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.0125
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior160Cabbacott BartonGardengarden0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior161Cabbacott BartonGardengarden0028
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior163Cabbacott BartonLower Meadowpasture4119
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior232Cabbacott BartonNorth Hillarable2134
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior233Cabbacott BartonRoadroad0015
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior236Cabbacott BartonStone [?] hillarable435
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior237Cabbacott BartonSpotarable0037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior238Cabbacott BartonLay hillarable1222
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior239Cabbacott BartonMarsharable1328
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior240Cabbacott BartonLay hillarable2023P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior241Cabbacott BartonGoose hillarable204
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior242Cabbacott BartonOat parkarable2222
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior250Cabbacott BartonTownsendpasture324
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior251Cabbacott BartonRoadroad0138
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior252Cabbacott BartonLayarable936
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior254Cabbacott BartonRoadroad0017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior259Cabbacott BartonDendery Downarable723
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior260Cabbacott BartonThree Corner Closearable5124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior2046Cabbacott BartonLower Downarable7230
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward George SeniorEdward George Senior230Cabbacott BartonGardengarden0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior341Hen HouseFive Acresarable5030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior392Hen HouseNine Acresarable5030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1788Hen HouseHen House Commonsarable3312
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1793Hen HouseHen House Commonsarable3312
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1794Hen HouseHen House Commonsarable5035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1790Hen HouseRoadroad010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1791Hen HouseThree Cornersarable210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1789Hen HouseLittle plotarable0014
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1792Hen HouseNorthern Nine Acresarable9038
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksEdward George Junior1804Hen HouseTwu Acresarable211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George676MoorWest Moorarable3333
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George677MoorMiddle Moorpasture4225
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George678MoorLittle Moorarable2127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George679MoorLower Easter Moorarable726
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George680MoorHigher Easter Moorpasture6210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George695MoorTansy parkpasture305
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George696MoorTansy park Meadowarable0332
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George697MoorLittle Moor plotarable027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George698MoorRoadroad0016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George699MoorWell Meadowarable1022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George700MoorMowhay[mowhay]020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George701MoorHouse, Building, Court and GardenHouse etc.0329
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George701aMoorRoadroad013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George702MoorBarn parkarable2211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George703MoorFour Acresarable3325
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George704MoorBroad Meadowarable4217
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George705MoorLong Closearable2112
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George723MoorWindaboutarable3013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George724MoorMiddle fieldarable303
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Edward GeorgeEdward George725MoorWest fieldarable316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg345Public HouseHouse and CourtHouse etc.0017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Richard GriggRichard Grigg353Public HouseGardengarden0027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John HallettJoseph Haywood1064Part of Daniels Broady ParkhamWest Cross parkarable1118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John HallettJoseph Haywood1065Part of Daniels Broady ParkhamWest Cross parkarable2114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1032Berryments WatershuteNew Orchardorchard1123
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1084Berryments WatershuteHem[?]014
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1090Berryments WatershuteLittle Snapsarable220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1091Berryments WatershuteGreat Snapsarable2322
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1092Berryments WatershuteSnaps Woodwood1122
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood983Berryments WatershuteLong Meadowarable0327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood986Berryments WatershuteLong Meadowarable0327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood994Berryments WatershuteMowhay[mowhay]0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1002Berryments WatershuteHouse, Buildings, Garden and CourtHouse etc.0027
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Walter HaywoodWalter Haywood1003Berryments WatershuteDrang Meadowarable039
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood964Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsFordy parkarable2215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood982Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHigher Shovel parkarable3238
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood989Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsPlotarable0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood990Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsOrchardorchard0036
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood993Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHouse, buildings etc.house erc.007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood995Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardengarden0035
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood997Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsBean plotpasture0126
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood998Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHarris's plotarable034
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood999Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsPlotarable0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1000Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsPlotarable009
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1001Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsBuildings and Mowhaybuildings etc.0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1004Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsPlotpasture0037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1005Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsLower Shovel parkpasture0213
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1006Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsThree Corner Meadowpasture1310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1011Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHigher Moor parkpasture3029
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1012Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsLower Moor parkpasture0322
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1024Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsBlakewellarable2326
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1026Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsBlakefieldarable1123
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1027Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsDeep Meadowarable300
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1030Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsMarsharable0311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1031Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsRatwood Orchardorchard0123
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1033Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsWoodwood0130
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1038Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardengarden0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1040Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHouse and CourtHouse etc.007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1050Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsWoodwood0030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HatwoodJoseph Haywood1051Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHop Orchardorchard022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1059Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsCross park Marsharable0320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1060Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsCross parkarable2113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1087Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsColts Closearable213
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1153Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsWaste part, Harris's Woodwaste0020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1154Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardenGardens0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1155Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHarris's Woodwood313
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywoos1156Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsLower Hillarable0218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1157Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHigher Hillarable1112
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1158Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsFurzy hillpasture1316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1159Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsHarris's Hillpasture020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1160Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardengarden0021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1161Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsWastewaste012
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1162Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardengarden0023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1163Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsGardengarden0028
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1177Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsEasterwayarable1032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph HaywoodJoseph Haywood1093Harrises Watershute and BerrymentsBlakewell Woodwood0337
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen322Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonGardengarden008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen421Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonLittle Copsecopse1025
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen422Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonBig Copsecopse5120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen430Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonBig Marsharable2128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen432Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonLong Closearable3113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsThomas Headen433Part of Flaxmans Parkham Town BartonBig Marsharable3214
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen460Part of BlindlakeLower Closearable533
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen461Part of BlindlakeHigher Closearable6320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen463Part of BlindlakeNorth closearable6315
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen458Blind LakeOrchardorchard0339
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen459Blind LakeHillarable5312
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen461aBlind LakeMow Closearable4239
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen464Blind LakeSouth Closearable5314
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen465Blind LakeClay parkarable1233
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen466Blind LakePoor Closearable238
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen467Blind LakeBarn parkarable235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen468Blind LakeGardengarden0029
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen469Blind LakeHouse, Building, Court and RoadHouse etc.026
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen472Blind LakeBig Moorarable1212
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen472aBlind LakeBig Moorarable2320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen473Blind LakeLittle Moorarable1128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen474Blind LakeLittle parkarable1032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen473Blind LakeThree Cornersarable205
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen476Blind LakeBreakarable3210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas HeadenThomas Headen477Blind LakeLong Closearable4135
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1336Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamRockyarable0327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1693Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamDipplearable2320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1701Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBrakefurze022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1702Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHillarable106
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1703Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1704Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMiddle hillarable0127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1705Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamOrchard Plotarable0125
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1706Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBatis fieldarable0136
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonAnn Haydon1714Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBuildingsbuildings002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1331Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHouseHouse002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1734Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCorner Walleysarable0036
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1735Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMiiddle Walleysarable0137
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1736Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLower Walleysarable0338
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1764Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHigher Cleavearable017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1765Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMiddle Cleavearable0127P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1766Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCopsecopse0236
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Ann HaydonJohn Jewell1767Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMarshpasture0131
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2049Part of Bishops CabbacottHouseHouse002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2050Part of Bishops CabbacottBarn meadowarable0114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2051Part of Bishops CabbacottOrchardorchard0027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2054Part of Bishops CabbacottMeadowmeadow0222
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2055Part of Bishops CabbacottGardengarden008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2056Part of Bishops CabbacottCleavearable1110
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2057Part of Bishops CabbacottMarsharable0133
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2061Part of Bishops CabbacottHemarable009
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2062Part of Bishops CabbacottLower Closearable0214
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2063Part of Bishops CabbacottMiddle Closearable0231
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2064Part of Bishops CabbacottThree Corner hillarable0312
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2065Part of Bishops CabbacottCross parkarable027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2066Part of Bishops CabbacottHemarable0113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas SewellThomas Sewell2067Part of Bishops CabbacottCross parkarable0111
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth JollaphElizabeth Jollaph1044 House and GardenHouse etc.0118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1349Higher Fox DownMoorarable113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1350Higher Fox DownMoorarable1331
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1351Higher Fox DownBushy Parkarable1037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1687Higher Fox DownTwo Acresarable207
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1688Higher Fox DownSeven Acresarable734
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1689Higher Fox DownThree Cornersarable120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1694Higher Fox DownSeven Acresarable720
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1695Higher Fox DownSeven Acres Breakfurze2220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary Matilda HucksWilliam Rievell1695aHigher Fox DownPart of Lawnpasture020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1035WaytownWoodwood027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1037WaytownDens landarable2316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1042WaytownBean fieldarable2230
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1043WaytownThree Corners parkarable3022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1045WaytownLower Downarable5339
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1045aWaytown [?]0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1046WaytownHigher Downarable3129
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1047WaytownCross parkarable401
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1048WaytownRerisharable127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1049WaytownRerisharable118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1072WaytownPrenarable1021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1074WaytownMills Downarable424
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1080WaytownNorth Gate Closearable2315
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1081WaytownHemarable0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1082WaytownWoodland Closearable1132
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1083WaytownHemarable0332
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1239WaytownMeadowpasture4118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1250WaytownWill parkarable1317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1251WaytownOrchardorchard0122
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1249WaytownMiddle parkarable315
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1252WaytownOrchardorchard017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1253WaytownGardengarden0031
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1254WaytownBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.0231
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1255WaytownGardengarden0037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1256WaytownGardengarden010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1257WaytownMowhaymowhay0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1248WaytownLower parkarable3224
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1273WaytownLittle plotarable036
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1274WaytownWest Closearable416
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1275WaytownEast Closearable3216
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas RievellJohn Rievell1360WaytownHolwill Meadowmeadow3215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall908Smiths Broad ParkhamCleavearable0330
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall911Smiths Broad ParkhamCleavearable2125
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall912Smiths Broad ParkhamCleavearable1215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall913Smiths Broad ParkhamCleavearable2013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall918Smiths Broad ParkhamLong Closearable2016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall919Smiths Broad ParkhamLittle hillarable0235
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievellWilliam Nance Kievall922Smiths Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable1021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall923Smiths Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable0317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall953Smiths Broad ParkhamMoorarable2015
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1286Smiths Broad ParkhamLittle Sladelandarable1111
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1291Smiths Broad ParkhamFire Bingarable5234
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall918aSmiths Broad ParkhamPease Hillarable024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1307Smiths Broad ParkhamWester fieldarable424
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1309Smiths Broad ParkhamSladelandarable7[0?]22
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1310Smiths Broad ParkhamMiddle fieldarable13210
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1311Smiths Broad ParkhamSouth Downarable114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1312Smiths Broad ParkhamOrchardorchard0025
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1313Smiths Broad ParkhamHillarable020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1314Smiths Broad ParkhamGardengarden0017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1315Smiths Broad ParkhamPond Meadowarable0111
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1316Smiths Broad ParkhamBuildings and Courtbuildings0124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1317Smiths Broad ParkhamBack Meadowarable0219
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1318Smiths Broad ParkhamMeadow plotarable0313
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1319Smiths Broad ParkhamMowhayarable0014
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1320Smiths Broad ParkhamClover fieldarable4122
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1321Smiths Broad ParkhamRoadroad008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1730Smiths Broad ParkhamClay parkarable113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall909Smiths Broad ParkhamLittle plotarable0019
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William Nance KievallWilliam Nance Kievall1770Smiths Broad ParkhamGardengarden005
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1838Broom HillHigher fieldarable0333
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1839Broom HillMiddle fieldarable108
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1840Broom HillLower fieldpasture1218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1841Broom HillGarden and OrchardGarden & orchard0030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1842Broom HillHouse and CourtHouse etc.007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John LangJohn Lang1843Broom HillGardengarden002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George FordJohn Nichols and John Glover1394 House and CourtHouse etc.0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George FordJohn Nichols and John Glover1395 Gardengarden0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee George FordJohn Nichols and John Glover1396 Gardengarden0038
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman573Fortescues AshMiddle hillspasture1320
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman574Fortescues AshMiddle hillspasture438
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman582Fortescues AshLower Moor parkarable1110
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman583Fortescues AshLower Moor parkarable1237
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman585Fortescues AshHigher Moor parkfurze3236
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman595Fortescues AshMena Groundarable0311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman596Fortescues AshMena Groundfurze0225
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman608Fortescues AshLong Stilearable0311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman616Fortescues AshStrangearable0127P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman618Fortescues AshWay parkarable1017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman634Fortescues AshBeat Landarable3018
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman640Fortescues AshLang parkarable2037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman643Fortescues AshLane Endarable0327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman653Fortescues AshHigher Hill parkarable3311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman658Fortescues AshLower Hill parkpasture308
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman731Fortescues AshAsh Meadowarable1017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman735Fortescues AshLong Closearable1316
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman740Fortescues AshAsh Meadowarable1336
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman746Fortescues AshMowhayarable0115
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman747Fortescues AshGardengarden0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman748Fotesscues AshHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.0113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman749Fortescues AshPlotarable0010P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman761Fortescues AshParkarable307
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman773Fortescues AshWellandarable4311
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman774Fortescues AshNorth Moorarable3317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman781Fortescues AshBonny fordarable6124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman655Fortescues AshWill parkarable0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Samuel NormanSamuel Norman656Fortescues AshWill parkarable0031
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard633 Bates landarable0215
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth GeorgeHenry Parr2002Part of StoneHigher long landpasture0133
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth GeorgeHenry Parr2003Part of StoneMiddle landarable0211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth GeorgeHenry Parr2004Part of StoneMiddle landarable020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Elizabeth GeorgeHenry Parr2005Part of StoneLower landarable0224
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1715Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHouse and CourtHouse005
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1716Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden0017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1717Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMeadowmeadow027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1737Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHigher parkarable1331
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1738Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamPlotarable0114
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1739Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLower parkarable1113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1740Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHigher Cleavearable0317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1741Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMidd;e Cleavearable022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1742Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLower Cleavearable0126
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1743Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCopsecopse0211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1744Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1745part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHouse and WasteHouse & Waste0013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1749Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamOrchardorchard0011
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1750Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLittle plotarable003
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1751Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamOrchardorchard006
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1752Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMarshpasture0112
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1753Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLittle plotarable009
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1754Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLittle Copsearable0011
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1755Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamPlotarable0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1756Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLittle plotarable004
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1757Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamDaisy plotarable0131
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1758Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBrakefurze021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1759Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHillarable0135
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1760Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHigher plotarable0120
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1761Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBrakefurze0037
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1762Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCopsecopse1118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1763Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamBrakefurze0121
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1696Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamLower plotarable0023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1697Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCopsecopse0037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1698Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamMiddle fieldarable0122
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Bartholomew PickardBartholomew Pickard1699Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamCombe Meadowarable108
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard480Beers DownEaster fieldarable13021
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard481Beers DownPlot and Linhayarable0131
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard482Beers DownNorth Middle fieldarable10113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard483Beers DownSouth Middle fieldarable9124
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard484Beers DownWest fieldarable2407
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard485Beers DownMarshpasture4218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee William PickardWilliam Pickard588Beers DownDepps Meadowpasture2213
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard586Weeks AshHigher Moor parkarable4112
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard587Weeks AshMoor parkarable4117
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard594Weeks AshWeaks's Meadowarable5216
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard603Weeks AshManna Groundarable236
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard607Weeks AshLong Stilepasture0130
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard603Weeks AshBonnyfordarable139
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard639Weeks AshBroada parkarable424
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard644Weeks AshLane Endarable0328
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard648Weeks AshWillispasture0123
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard734Weeks AshLong Closearable1123
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard741Weeks AshMeadowpasture1115
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard742Weeks AshMowhaymowhay0136
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard743Weeks AshHouse, Buildings and CourtHouse etc.0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard744Weeks AshGardengarden0026
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard745Weeks AshOrchardorchard0028
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard777Weeks AshNorth Moorarable418
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard590Arnolds MoorLord Moorarable2111
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard591Arnolds MoorLord Moorarable3328
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard592Arnolds MoorLord Moorarable1029
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleWilliam Pickard593Arnolds MoorFurzefurze0029
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard794SteartSteart lakearable2319
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard795SteartSteart lakearable2130
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard967SteartMiny Meadowarable4219
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard968SteartMoorarable421
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard969SteartMoorarable3211
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard970SteartMoorarable0028
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard971SteartMoorarable510
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard972SteartMoorarable3018
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard973SteartMoorarable2114
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard974SteartFar Daisy fieldarable1233
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard975SteartMoorarable2019
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard976SteartRoadroad0215
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard977SteartMiddle Daisy fieldarable201
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard978SteartHigher Church parkarable523
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard979SteartSouth Easter Groundarable2024
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1014SteartEaster Groundarable615
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1015SteartChurch parkarable3134
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1016SteartDaisy fieldarable2012
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1017SteartMoorpasture1232
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1018SteartMalthouse fieldarable2136
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1018aSteartHem 0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1019SteartWester Meadowmeadow2030
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1021SteartShort Closearable2231
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1022SteartLong Meadowarable1337
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1023SteartClover fieldarable229
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1094SteartHem (under)copse0110
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1095SteartOrchardorchard0113
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1096SteartEast Meadowmeadow3012
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1097SteartGardengarden0013
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1098SteartOrchardorchard0021
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1099SteartMowhay[mowhay]0032
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1100SteartPlotarable0026
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1101SteartGardengarden0023
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1102SteartWest Clay parkarable2028
RT. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1103SteartHigher Clay parkarable0137
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1104SteartClay parkarable0230
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1105Steart[Lackacres?] Gardengarden010
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1106SteartSteart Woodwood17136
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1107SteartGardengarden0030
Rt. Honourable Lord John RolleJames Pickard1020SteartBuildings, Court & Roadbuildings etc.035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John HallJasper Pickard1063 Croftarable0132
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham487MelburyEast Moorpasture20332
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham488MelburyCox's Groundpasture528
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham489MelburyGardenGarden & orchard0111
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham490MelburyHouse and GardenHouse etc.0033
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham491MelburyCox's fieldpasture1519
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham492MelburySouth Moorpasture23015
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham493MelburyFar Melbury hillpasture28016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham494MelburyNorth Marshpasture34013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham495MelburyNorth fieldarable18328
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham496MelburyRevel Marsh[?]1117
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham497MelburyLong plotarable0234
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham498MelburyPlotarable012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham499MelburySquare Closearable24326
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham500MelburyMelbury hillpasture29126
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham501MelburyMiddle Moorpasture22332
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham502MelburyFifteen Acresarable1910
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham507MelburyNew Meadowarable48135
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham508MelburyGreat Quarry fieldarable2129
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham509MelburyLittle Quarry fieldpasture527
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham510MelburyLittle Wood Cock hillarable3227
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham511MelburyWood Cock hillpasture23226
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham512MelburyLong plotpasture135
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham513MelburyLong grass Moorpasture23127
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham514MelburyLots fieldarable12336
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham515MelburyCottage Meadowarable032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham516MelburyLots house and GardenHouse etc.0035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham517MelburyCroftarable0226
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham518MelburyHigher Great Closepasture19322
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham519MelburyMarsharable30013
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham520MelburyLower Marsharable20212
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham521MelburyGreat fieldarable24313
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham522MelburyMiddle fieldarable11332
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham523MelburyA Bove Townarable13015
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham524MelburyMowhaymowhay0121
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham525MelburyHouse, Buildings and CourtHouse etc.1139
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham526MelburyLinhay and Mowhaylinhay etc.0020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham527MelburyBack Meadowmeadow2317
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham542MelburyRoadroad0139
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham543MelburySquare Moorpature16216
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowmingWilliam Pridham544MelburyLittle Moorarable4339
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham545MelburyNorth Meadowarable1327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham546MelburyLong Meadowpasture2327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham547MelburyLower Garden Meadpasture218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham548MelburyGarden Meadowpasture1029
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham549MelburyCalves plotpasture0034
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham550MelburyGardengarden018
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle. Lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham551MelburyMowhaymowhay0031
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham552MelburyBarley plotarable0327
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningWilliam Pridham553MelburyWills Meadowmeadow1218
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins578Part of Nicholls' AshMiddle hillspasture2027
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins579Part of Nicholls' AshMiddle hillsarable4313
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins606Part of Nicholls' AshFurze hillarable100
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins610Part of Nicholls' AshRoadroad0015
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins611Part of Nicholls' AshGreat Willisarable234
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins613Part of Nicholls' AshWillisarable0224
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins635Part of Nicholls' AshStone landarable3113
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins642Part of Nicholls' AshBroada parkarable2219
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins652Part of Nicholls' AshLane Endpasture2128
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins659Part of Nicholls' AshNicholas Meadowpasture1039
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins663Part of Nicholls' AshBuildings Garden etc.buildings etc.0023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins664Part of Nicholls' AshGardengarden0030
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Andrew665Part of Nicholls' AshMow[?]0019
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins736Part of Nicholls' AshLong Closearable138
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins766Part of Nicholls' AshPlot parkarable2137
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins779Part of Nicholls' AshPart park Meadowpasture2319
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins772Part of Nicholls' AshVellandarable6036
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Henry DowningThomas Robins780Part of Nicholls' AshNorth Moorarable4132
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SandersJohn Sanders346 Two houseshouses007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SandersJohn Sanders347 Gardengarden007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SandersJohn Sanders348 HouseHouse005
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee John SandersJohn Sanders349 HouseHouse005
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew334Chapmans Parkham Town BartonLawnarable2230
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew423Chapmans Parkham Town BartonLittle Marshpasture[?]310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew425Chapmans Parkham Town BartonCrooked Closearable3329
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew426Chapmans Parkham Town BartonFive Axrespasture4225
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew427Chapmans Parkham Town BartonGreen parkarable3310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsMary Andrew431Chapmans Parkham Town BartonLittle Marshpasture1121
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsTrustees of Bideford Turnpike Road1393 Toll housetoll house001
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Rev. William KeatsTrustees of Bideford Turnpike Road1392 Gardengarden002
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade577aPart of Nichols AshMiddle hillsarable122
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade575Part of Nichols AshMiddle hillsarable2220
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade576Part of Nichols AshMiddle hillsarable1227
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade577Part of Nichols AshMiddle hillsarable0335
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade580Kingsland AshMiddle hillsarable4025
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade581Kingsland AshMiddle hillspasture1134
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade604Kingsland AshFurze hillsarable3121
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade617Kingsland AshRangearable026
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade632Kingsland AshBate landarable2032
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade732Kingsland AshCross parkarable3122
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade737Kingsland AshLong Closearable0217
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade739Kingsland AshKingsland Meadowarable1023P
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade751Kingsland AshHouse and CourtHouse etc.0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade752Kingsland AshGardengarden0023
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade753Kingsland AshOrchardorchard015
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade763Kingsland AshGardengarden0010
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade764Kingsland AshPool parkarable1324
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade775Kingsland AshNorth Moorarable4211
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade783Kingsland AshGardengarden008
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade784Kingsland AshHouse and GardenHouse etc.0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade785Kingsland AshGardengarden018
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade782Kingsland AshBonnyfordarable3034
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade570Gilberts AshMiddle hillspasture6239
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade571Gilberts AshMiddle hillspasture0318
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade612Gilberts AshWillispasture0329
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade589Southcotts AshDippopasture1020
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade609Southcotts AshOld Man Copsearable1115
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade619Southcotts AshStone land Brakefurze3037
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade620Southcotts AshStone land[furze?]203
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade631Southcotts AshBate landarable2017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade637Southcotts AshStone landarable310
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade638Southcotts AshStone landarable433
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade643Southcotts AshBroada parkarable2033
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade647Southcotts AshWillispasture0115
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade651Southcotts AshLong Meadowpasture1234
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade657Southcotts AshOld Mans Meadowpasture133
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade738Southcotts AshOld Mans parkarable2017
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade750Southcotts AshCourt & HouseCourt & house0026
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade754Southcotts AshGardengarden016
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade756Southcotts AshHouse and CourtHouse & court0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade757Southcotts AshPlotarable0039
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade758Southcotts AshMowhaymowhay0033
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade759Southcotts AshCroftarable3031
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade762Southcotts AshPool parkarable2214
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade771Southcotts AshOld Man's Marshpasture2035
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade778Southcotts AshNorth Moorarable3133
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade779Southcotts AshNorth Moorarable308
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanPhilip Wade786Southcotts AshNorth Moorarable2315
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanSamuel Wakeley1725Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamHouse and CourtHouse etc.006
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanSamuel Wakeley1726Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden007
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanSamuel Wakeley1727Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden008
RT. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanSamuel Wakeley1728Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamGardengarden0012
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Thomas NormanSamuel Wakeley1729Part of Daniels Broad ParkhamClay parkarable1112
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Joseph ClementWilliam Withycombe135Part of West StonePlotarable0118
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary SaundersNathaniel Hancock2033FrysOrchardOrchard & House0022
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary SaundersNathaniel Hancock2042FrysFry's Lower Meadowmeadow0116
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary SaundersNathaniel Hancock2043FrysFry's Orchardorchard0024
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary SaundersNathaniel Hancock2047FrysPlotarable1136
Rt. Honourable Lord John Rolle, lessee Mary SaundersNathaniel Hancock2049FrysHouseHouse002
John SaundersJohn Saunders1772Bocombe MillOrchardorchard005
John SaundersJohn Saunders1773Bocombe MillBuildings and Courtbuildings etc.009
John SaundersJohn Saunders1774Bocombe MillGardengarden004
John SaundersJohn Saunders1775Bocombe MillLittle Marsharable019
John SaundersJohn Saunders1768Bocombe MillLower Marsharable0037
John SaundersJohn Saunders1769Bocombe MillGardengarden0013
John SaundersJohn Saunders1771Bocombe MillMarshpasture0113
John SaundersJohn Saunders396Bocombe MillMarshpasture0310
John SaundersJohn Saunders397Bocombe MillMarsharable0220
John SaundersJohn Saunders397aBocombe MillRoadroad0020
John SaundersJohn Saunders398Bocombe MillPlotarable0030
John SaundersJohn Saunders400Bocombe MillWillow Spotarable0020
John SaundersJohn Saunders902Bocombe MillPlotarable0010P
John SaundersJohn Saunders903Bocombe MillHillarable1138
John SaundersJohn Saunders904Bocombe Mill arable137
John SaundersJohn Saunders905Bocombe MillBreakarable0311
John SaundersJohn Saunders906Bocombe MillBreakarable0216
John SaundersJohn Saunders907Bocombe MillLate plotpasture0228
John Saunders, lessee Adam TuckerAdam Tucker399 House and GardenHouse etc.0013
William SquanceMichael Chalk1599Part of Bishops NorthwayCross parkarable215
William SquanceThomas Lee1601 Gardengarden0027
William SquanceThomas Lee1608 HouseHouse001
William SquanceThomas Lee1609 Courtcourt003
William SquanceWilliam Setherd1602 Gardengarden0025
William SquanceThomas Squance1549Part of Bishops NorthwayThistle parkarable3015
William SquanceThomas Squance1551Part of Bishops NorthwayBurrow parkarable238
William SquanceTjhomas Squance1596Part of Bishops NorthwaySouth Meadowarable0110
William SquanceWilliam Wakeley1600 Gardengarden0031
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2014Lower DendridgeRoadroad0015
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2015Lower DendridgeGardengarden0026
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2016Lower DendridgeBrakefurze0314
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2026Lower DendridgeCrooked Closearable210
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2027Lower DendridgeNorth Closearable133
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2028Lower DendridgeHouse parkarable1036
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2029Lower DendridgeSouth hillarable0135
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrHenry Parr2030Lower DendridgeNorth hillarable0320
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Vagars2010 Gardengarden012
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Vagars and William Palmer2011 House and CourtHouse etc.0013
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Vagars and William Palmer2012 Gardengarden007
Stevens Esquire, lessee Henry ParrJohn Vagars and William Palmer2013 Gardengarden0033
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding878Hoopers BocombeMiddle Closearable315
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding879Hoopers BocombeSouth Closearable4228
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding896Hoopers BocombeHigher Closearable1339
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding897Hoopers BocombeHigher Wester Closearable1315
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding898Hoopers BocombeHouse, Garden etc.House etc.0134
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding899Hoopers BocombeWester Closearable1227
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding900Hoopers BocombeMiddle Ckosearable1315
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding910Hoopers BocombeBreakpasture4134
William Tardrew EsquireJohn Harding914Hoopers BocombeLittle Meadowarable1137
William Tardrew EsquireThomas Lemon420Higher BocombeJacobs Meadowpasture2012
William Tardrew EsquireThomas Lemon901Higher BocombeSix Acresarable5320
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn682HordilandEaster Marshpasture3336
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn683HordilandWester Moorpasture4028
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn684HordilandEaster Moorarable5322
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn685HordilandLittle Parkarable2024
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn686HordilandMiddle Closearable1332
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn687HordilandMowhayarable0137
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn688HordilandGardengarden0134
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn689HordilandHouse, Building and CourtHouse etc.013
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn690HordilandEast parkarable434
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn691HordilandMiddle parkarable4120
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn692HordilandMiddle Marsharable403
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn693HordilandWest Marsharable3320
Rev. Richard WalterRichard Dunn694HordilandWest parkarable727
Ann WhiteHenry Veale1603 Gardengarden008
Ann WhiteHenry Veale1606 HouseHouse004
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter343GlebeChurch Yardchurch yard036
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter307GlebeHemarable1312
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter308GlebeSanctuaryarable9125
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter309GlebeThree Cornersarable6312
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter310GlebeSix Acresarable621
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter311GlebeClothes fieldarable6123
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter312GlebeMowhay[?]0024
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter313GlebeRoadroad0119
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter314GlebeEast fieldarable10122
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter315GlebeParsonage Woodarable21015
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter316GlebeLamb parkarable415
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter317GlebeLawnpasture2235
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter318GlebeLawnpasture0319
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter319GlebeHouse, Buildings & CourtHouse etc.100
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter320GlebeMeadowmeadow5318
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter321GlebeGardengarden028
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter447GlebeHigher Turf parkarable4129
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter448GlebeGardenGarden & orchard0010
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter454GlebeMarsharable403
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter454aGlebeMiddle Turf parkarable2239
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter455GlebeLittle Turf parkarable1333
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter456aGlebeHemarable039
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter457GlebeMoorpasture807
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter478GlebeParsonage Moorpasture536
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter479GlebeParsonage Moorpasture17120
Rev. Richard Walter (Glebe)Rev. Richard Walter456GlebeMartins Meadowarable2329
  566Ash CommonCommoncommon4115
  567Ash CommonCommoncommon19023
  568Ash CommonCommoncommon10232
  569Ash CommonCommoncommon7216
  621Ash CommonRoad and Wasteroad and waste0122
  622Ash CommonCommoncommon12138
  623Ash CommonCommoncommon3336
  624Ash CommonCommoncommon4120
  625Ash CommonCommoncommon18035
  626Ash CommonCommoncommon19215
  627Ash CommonCommoncommon22225
  628Ash CommonCommoncommon1226
  629Ash CommonCommoncommon20025
  629aAsh CommonCommoncommon014
  646Ash CommonRoad and Wasteroad and waste2131
  495aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0131
  684aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0013
  494aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0125
  497aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0023
  498aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0030
  315aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0022
  502aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0035
  503aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0117
  508aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0028
  506aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0020
  507aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0124
  656aWaste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0123P
  106Waste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0235
  1013Waste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste018
  1034Waste Adjoining RoadsWastewaste0126
    Roadsroads8207
    Riverriver5114