Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted
Page 1 of 4

Help and advice for Stokenham: Hallsands and Start Bay: index

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it. We have a number of people each maintaining different sections of the web site, so it is important to submit information via a link on the relevant page otherwise it is likely to go to the wrong person and may not be acted upon.

Name Index

To

Hallsands and Start Bay

Trans. Devon. Assoc. vol. 36 (1904), pp. 302-346.

by

R.H. Worth

Prepared by Michael Steer

This major paper relates to the topography and geology of Hallsands and Start Bay, It chronicles events that preceded the horrendous Hallsands Disaster of 1917. The series of mishaps that resulted in the complete destruction of the tiny coastal village had their origins in Admiralty plans, unknown to local fishermen at the time, to extend the naval dockyard at Plymouth. The plans involved sand and gravel being taken from the seabed further up the coast. Dredging began in the spring of 1897 and during the next four years some 660,000 tonnes of material were removed. Activities were eventually stopped when opposition from several fishing villages grew as they saw their shingle beaches being relentlessly carried away. It took 18 years from the start of dredging to the final destruction of Hallsands village. Google with the Archive Organization has sponsored the digitisation of books from several libraries. The Internet Archive makes available, in its Community Texts Collection (originally known as Open Source Books), books that have been digitised by Google from a number of libraries. These are books on which copyright has expired, and are available free for educational and research use. This rare book was produced from a copy held by the New York Public Library, and is available from the Internet Archive.

  Page
Airy, Mr Wilfred 312
Allen, Dr 310
Bonney, Professor 307
Cole, Professor Grenville A J 312
Coode, Sir John 309
De la Beche, Sir Henry T 303, 314
Diamond, Mr W 319-21
Evans, Mr G F 343
Finzel, Rev C W E 336
Frederick, Captain 328
Hawkings, Mr E G 335
Holdsworth, Mr 336, 344
Homer, John Francis Fortescue 326
Hook, Mr Bryan 331
Hunt, Mr A R 304-5, 308, 311, 315-7, 319, 321-2, 344
Jackson, Sir John 326-7, 329-33, 335-6, 344
Jukes-Browne, A J 308
Kyle, Dr H M, D Sc 308-10, 316-7, 319, 321-2
Lang, Mr J C 343
Law, Mr Henry 312
Louis XIV 344
Mildmay, Mr Francis Bingham, MP 327-8, 335-7
Muge, Henrie 323
Partingdon, Dame 345
Pengelly, W, FRGS, FGS 304, 308
Philip II, Spain 344
Philip VI, France 344
Pidgeon, Mr D 311
Pipperill, Caleb 324
Risdon, Tristram 302
Stone, Mr George 344
Thorowgood, Mr W F 309
Trout, Mr William 345
Valentine & Sons, Messrs 325, 335
Vereker, Hon Captain, RN 327
Wheeler 317, 319
Whewell, Dr 318
Wilson's Rock 326, 330-2, 335
Windeatt, Mr Edward 327, 336
Worth, R N 305, 344