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1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"LEYLAND, a parish in the hundred of Leyland, county Lancaster, 6 miles from Preston, its post town, and 4¾ N.W. of Chorley. It is within a mile of the joint station on the North-Western and Lancashire and Yorkshire lines of railway. The parish, which is extensive, contains the townships of Clayton-le-Woods, Cuerden, Euxton, Heapey, Hoghton, Leyland, Wheelton, Whittle-le-Woods, and Withnell. It is intersected by the small river Lostock, and is separated from the parish of Chorley by the river Yarrow. The river Darwin flows through the N. part of the parish, and falls into the Ribble at Walton-le-Dale. Leyland is a petty sessions town and populous manufacturing village. Many of the inhabitants are engaged in the cotton and muslin manufactures. There are extensive bleach works, giving employment to a large number of persons. The Leeds and Liverpool canal and the old north road to Lancaster pass through the parish. Wild boar hunting was formerly pursued here, and bones of the boar and elk are not unfrequently met with. Roman coins and numerous Celtic antiquities have been found here embedded in the moss about three yards below the surface. The soil consists of sand and gravel, with some peat moss. The principal crops are wheat, oats, potatoes, and turnips. There are several stone quarries and mineral alkaline springs at Whittle-le-Woods. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Manchester, value £1,200. The parish church, dedicated to St. Andrew, is a stone structure, with a pinnacled tower containing a clock and six bells. Like Westminster Abbey, it was originally built without a single pillar, but was enlarged and greatly altered in 1817, at which period a spacious nave was added. Adjoining the chancel is the private chapel of the St. Farringtons of Warden Hall, containing several monuments of that family. The windows are of ancient design. The church contains a sedilia, piscina, and a carved octagonal fort. In addition to the parish church there are six district churches, viz: St. James's, Euxton, Heapey, Hoghton, Whittle-le-Woods, and Withnell, the livings of which are all perpetual curacies, varying in value from £200 to £141. The parochial charities produce about £600 per annum, of which £28 goes to Queen Elizabeth's free grammar school, £176 to Balshaw's charity school, £21 to Moss-side schools, and £118 to Osbaldiston's almshouses. The infant school was erected in 1837 by voluntary contributions. There are places of worship for the Independents, Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics. The two ancient residences, Atherton Hall and the Old Hall, are now converted into farmhouses. The principal residences are-Shawe Hall, which has a museum of natural curiosities; Golden Hill House, Wellfield, Lostock Grove, and Worden Hall; this last named mansion is situated in an extensive park within half a mile distance of the village, and adds much to the improvement of the S. end of the village. The Misses Ffarington are ladies of the manor and chief landowners. Fairs are held on the 24th March and 26th October. An annual agricultural and horticultural meeting is held in September."