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Help and advice for HAIL WESTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1932.

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HAIL WESTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1932.

[Description(s) transcribed by Martin Edwards and later edited by Colin Hinson ©2010]
[from The Victoria County History series - 1932]

"HAIL WESTON, the parish of Hail Weston lies upon a clay soil, with the sub-soil of Oxford Clay. The River Kym, anciently known as the Hail or Hayle from which the parish derives its name, forms the northern and eastern boundary of the parish. There was an ancient bridge over the river which is mentioned in 1377; it was still standing in 1798 when it was described as being built of stone with four arches, but the parapet was ruinous. The present bridge was built in the late 19th century.

There are two springs which are reputed to have had medicinal qualities but they, perhaps, derive more fame from the poem by Michael Drayton entitled "The Holy Wells of Hailweston". These springs were used for medicinal purposes in the 16th and 17th centuries, but later fell into disuse. In 1844, the springs were sold and were then used by the Hail Weston Springs Co., who were aereated water manufacturers.

The village lies on the north side of the road from St. Neots to Kimbolton. The church is at the south-east end of the village, which contains several half-timbered houses and cottages of the 17th century. A few Neolithic implements have been found, but greater importance is given to the bronze statuette of the Romano-british period which was found a few years before 1824.

The parish has always been closely connected with Southoe, and though the civil parishes were separate, ecclesiastically they are still united."

[Description(s) transcribed by Martin Edwards ©2003 and later edited by Colin Hinson ©2010]
[mainly from The Victoria County History series- 1932]