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Halling

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"HALLING, a parish in the hundred of Shamwell, Aylesford lathe, county Kent, 4¼ miles S.W. of Rochester. The village, which is small, has extensive manufactories of Portland and Roman cement, and also kilns for lime burning. The lime used in building Waterloo and Now London bridges was brought from Halling. There is a great portion of moorland. The river Medway runs through the parish, and a ridge of hills intersects it. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Rochester, value £214, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, has a large square tower. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £238 Os. 7d., and the vicarial for £150 1s. 4d. There are remains of the ancient palace of the bishops of Rochester, originally founded before the Norman conquest, but rebuilt in the 12th century. Lambard, the Kentish chronicler, was born here."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2010]

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Historical Geography

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Maps

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