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Butterworth

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BUTTERWORTH, a township and two subdistricts in Rochdale parish, Lancashire. The township lies on the verge of the county, near the Manchester and Leeds railway, 3 miles E of Rochdale. It includes the hamlets of Clegg, Wildhouse, Belfield, Butterworth Hall, Lowhouse, Haughs, and Bleaked-gate-cum-Roughbank. Real property, £26,906; of which £6,355 are in mines. Pop., 6,704. Houses, 1,332. There are cotton and woollen factories, a church of 1798, dissenting chapels, two endowed schools, and charities £32. The subdistricts are B. Freehold-side and B. Lordship-side; and are jointly conterminate with the township.

John Marius Wilson, Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870-72)

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Civil Registration

The Register Office covering the Butterworth area is Rochdale.

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Description & Travel

You can see pictures of Butterworth which are provided by:

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Gazetteers

1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"BUTTERWORTH, a township in the parish of Rochdale, hundred of Salford, in the county palatine of Lancaster, 4 miles to the E. of Rochdale. It is on the border of Yorkshire. The inhabitants are employed in the great cotton and woollen manufactories of the neighbourhood. At Milnrow, now a chapelry, is an endowed free school, founded in 1720 by Alexander Butterworth, the revenue of which is about £90 per annum. There are other charitable endowments, producing yearly above £30. In this township is Clegg Hall, an old seat of the Asshetons, built in the reign of James I. It is the scene of a traditional story given by Mr. Roby in his "Traditions of Lancashire.""

1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"MILNROW, a chapelry in the township of Butterworth, and parish of Rochdale, county Lancaster, 2 miles E. of Rochdale, its post town. It is a station on the Oldham and Rochdale branch of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway. The village, which is extensive, is situated on the river Beile, and on the road to Shaw Chapel. The manufacture of flannels and woollens is carried on to a great extent, and there are extensive printing and bleaching establishments, also cotton mills. Some of the inhabitants are engaged in the neighbouring collieries and freestone quarries. The Leeds and Liverpool canal, and the Manchester and Leeds railway, pass through the township. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Manchester, value £155, in the patronage of the Vicar of Rochdale. The church is dedicated to St. James. There are National and British schools, and places of worship for the several denominations of Dissenters. John Collier, otherwise "Tim Bobbin," the popular author of "The Lancashire Dialect," an eccentric caricaturist, poet, and musician, resided 57 years at this place as the village schoolmaster."

1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"NEW HEY, a hamlet in the parish of Prestwich, county Lancaster, near Rochdale. It is a station on the Oldham and Rochdale branch of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway. It is situated between the rivers Irk and Medlock."

1870-72, John Marius Wilson, Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales

MILNROW, a village and a chapelry in Butterworth township, Rochdale parish, Lancashire. The village stands on the river Beil, near the Rochdale canal, and near the Oldham and Rochdale branch of the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway, 2 miles ESE of Rochdale; is a seat of extensive manufacture, doing large business in the woollen trade; and has a station with telegraph on the railway, and a post office under Rochdale. John Collier, better known as "Tim Bobbin", author of poems in the Lancashire dialect, was for 57 years a schoolmaster in the village; and the Rev. Canon Raines, distinguished for antiquarian knowledge and research, has thrown lustre upon it. The acreage of the chapelry is returned with the parish. Rated property, £22,245. Pop., 6,200. The property is much subdivided. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Manchester. Value, £300. Patron, the Vicar of Rochdale. The church was built in 1798, and was about to be rebuilt in 1867. There are several dissenting chapels, a national school, and a British school.
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Historical Geography

In 1835 Butterworth was a township in the parish of Rochdale.

You can see the administrative areas in which Butterworth has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

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History

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Maps

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View maps of Butterworth and places within its boundaries.

View a map of the boundaries of this town/parish.

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SD952135 (Lat/Lon: 53.618053, -2.074142), Butterworth which are provided by:

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Probate Records

For probate purposes prior to 1858, Butterworth was in the Archdeaconry of Chester, in the Diocese of Chester. The original Lancashire wills for the Archdeaconry of Chester are held at the Lancashire Record Office.

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Societies

You can also see Family History Societies covering the nearby area, plotted on a map. This facility is being developed, and is awaiting societies to enter information about the places they cover.