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FELTHAM

Gazetteer

FELTHAM, a parish in the hundred of Spelthorne, county Middlesex, 4 miles S.E. of Staines, and 13½ S.W. of London.

It is a station on the South-Western railway. In Domesday Book this place is set down as belonging to Earl Mortaigne. In the reign of Henry II. it was given to the hospital of St. Giles without the Bars, and afterwards passed to the families of Cottington, Beauclerc, &c. In 1634 the manor-house and nearly the whole village were destroyed by fire, together with the ancient parish registers. The principal part of the parish is now laid out as market gardens for supplying the London markets. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of London, value £302. The church is a flint structure of the early part of the present century, and now nearly covered with ivy. It is dedicated to St. Dunstan, and has a curious scroll tablet. The charitable endowments of the parish produce about £50 per annum. Both Independents and Wesleyans have chapels, and there is a National school. There are some good villa residences in this neighbourhood.

[Description(s) from "The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland" (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]
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