Hide

Highgate

hide
Hide

“HIGHGATE, a chapelry and suburban village in the parishes of St. Pancras and Hornsey, Holborn and Finsbury divisions of the hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 5 miles N.W. of the General Post-Office, and 4¼ N. of Charing Cross.

It is situated on the summit and slopes of one of the highest hills in the county of Middlesex, rising to the height of the top of St. Paul's Cathedral. Its immediate neighbourhood is particularly charming, abounding in walks and drives, and commanding views of the metropolis and Surrey hills on the S., of the undulating grounds of Essex and the course of the Thames as far as Gravesend on the E., and of the well-wooded country of Hendon, Finchley, and Barnet, as far as the hills of Hertfordshire, on the N. The village of Highgate lies to the N. and E., and contains many good shops, a literary institution, and savings-bank. It is partially paved, lighted with gas, and well, supplied with water by the New River Company, which has a spacious reservoir on the very summit of the hill. There are omnibuses to the City and West End, both from the Holloway and Kentish Town sides of the hill; and two railway stations-one the Kentish Town station, at the S. foot of the hill, on the Blackwall, Kew, and Kingston line, and another in the Archway-road, on the N.E. side of the hill, on the new line from Edgeware to King's Cross. "In ancient times," says Tanner, "upon the top of this hill was a hermitage, one of the hermits whereof caused to be made the causeway between Highgate and Islington," which afterwards was extended with great public advantage as far as Clerkenwell, and at the beginning of the present century was continued northwards under the name of the New North Road, along which upwards of eighty four-horsed stage-coaches carrying the mail-bags passed daily before the introduction of railways. In order to avoid the steep acclivity of the hill, which rises 1 in 7 at some parts, in 1809 a plan was devised by Vazie of cutting a tunnel through it; but in 1812, when the work had reached to a considerable state of advancement, the earth fell in, and the original plan was abandoned, and an open road formed on the line of the tunnel, with a lofty arch thrown over it to connect Highgate with Hornsey and the country E. of it. This cutting discloses the character of the geological formation of Hampstead and Highgate hills, which consist of blue clay, containing fossil copal, &c., with superimposed deposits of sand, nearly identical with that on the sea-shore, pointing directly to the very remote period at which they must have been formed, when a large portion of the present county of Middlesex formed the bed of an estuary of the sea. At the time of the Roman invasion, these hills appear to have been covered with a vast uncultivated forest, called the Forest of Middlesex, which was not disafforested till 1218, and portions of which still are preserved in the natural woods of Caen Wood and South Wood.

from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland - 1868

Hide
topup

Description & Travel

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]

"HIGHGATE, a chapelry and suburban village in the parishes of St. Pancras and Hornsey, Holborn and Finsbury divisions of the hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 5 miles N.W. of the General Post-Office, and 4¼ N. of Charing Cross. " (There is more of this description).

 

Description(s) from "The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland" (1868), transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003; intended for personal use only, so please respect the conditions of use.

You can see pictures of Highgate which are provided by:

topup

Gazetteers

topup

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Highgate has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

topup

Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TQ285872 (Lat/Lon: 51.569038, -0.147328), Highgate which are provided by: