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Help and advice for National Gazetteer (1868) - Corbridge

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National Gazetteer (1868) - Corbridge

"CORBRIDGE, a parish in the eastern division of the ward of Tynedale, in the county of Northumberland, 4 miles E. of Hexham, and 16 W. of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The Newcastle and Carlisle section of the North-Eastern railway passes through the parish, and has a station near the village. The parish, which derives its name from the small river Cor., which here falls into the Tyne, contains 10 townships and hamlets It is situated on the N. side of the river Tyne, across which is a stone bride of seven arches, erected in 1674. It is a place of great antiquity, and was once a borough returning members to parliament. In 771 it possessed a monastery, and in 1138 was occupied by David I., and destroyed by fire in 1296, and again in 1311 by the Scots. It came through the Clavering family to the Percys. It possesses a market-cross, which was erected by the Duke of Northumberland in 1814; but the market has been discontinued. The living is a vic* in the diocese of Durham, value with the curacy of Halton annexed, £482, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The church, dedicated to St. Andrew, is a handsome ancient edifice, in good repair, and possesses a register commencing in 1657. The charities amount to £67. The Wesleyans have places of worship here; and there is a National school, library, and reading-room. The soil is very rich, and the chief employment of the inhabitants consists in agriculture. The Duke of Northumberland is lord of the manor, and holds a court-leet and court-baron here. Half a mile from this place, on Watling Street, was the ancient Roman town of Constopitum, till lately showing above ground, and from which place the stone used in erecting the above mentioned church was procured. A great cattle fair is held on Whitsun Eve, and another on the 4th of July, at Stagshawe Bank near here, also a tryst fair on 24th November."

"AYDON, a township in the parish of Corbridge, eastern division of Tynedale ward, in the county of Northumberland, 5 miles to the E. of Hexham. Coal and lead exist in this township It is in the vicinity of an ancient Roman station, and Roman antiquities have been discovered here."

"AYDON CASTLE, a township in the parish of Corbridge, eastern division of Tynedale ward, in the county of Northumberland, 4 miles to the E. of Hexham. This place takes its name from an ancient fortress standing on the side of a deep valley, and approached by a flight of steps. It was erected in the 13th century."

"CLAREWOOD, a township in the parish of Corbridge, in the E. division of the ward of Tynedale, in the county of Northumberland, 4½ miles N.E. of Corbridge."

"CORCHESTER, a hamlet in the parish of Corbridge, Tynedale ward, in the county of Northumberland, 1 mile W. of the village of Corbridge. It is supposed to have been the site of the Roman station Corstopitum, from the circumstance of numerous antiquities and ruins of temples having been dug up, some with Greek inscriptions."

"DILSTON, (or Devilstone), a township in the parish of Corbridge, ward of East Tynedale, in the county of Northumberland, 1½ mile S.W. of Corbridge, 3 miles S.E. of Hexham, and 18 W. of Newcastle-on-Tyne. It is situated on a small stream called Devil's Water, which, after flowing through a deep and gloomy dell, falls into the Tyne at this place. Its Saxon name was Devilsbourne. There is a chapel containing tombs of the Ratcliffes; earls of Derwentwater, who formerly had a seat here. The estate came to the Ratcliffes through the Devilstones and the Tynedales, and was given to Greenwich Hospital on the attainder of the last Earl of Derwentwater in 1716.

"GREAT and LITTLE WHITTINGTON, townships in the parish of Corbridge, county Northumberland, 6 miles N.E. of Hexham.

"HALTON SHIELDS, a township in the parish of Corbridge, E. division of Tynedale ward, county Northumberland, 7 miles N.E. of Hexham, and 3 N.E. of Corbridge railway station. It is situated near the site of the great Roman Wall, and adjoins the township of Halton. Many Roman remains have been found here. Sir Edward Blackett, Bart., is chief landowner."

"HOUSESTEADS, in the parish of Corbridge, the site of the Roman station Bor-covicus, county Northumberland. It was the seventh station on the wall, and is situated about 4 miles N.W. of Haydon-Bridge. Many Roman ruins still exist, and fifteen stones with inscriptions have been found."

"THORNBROUGH, a township in the parish of Corbridge, E. division of Tynedale ward, county Northumberland, 6 miles E. of Hexham. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the lime quarries. A lead mine has been anciently wrought, and was re-opened in 1801, but has since been abandoned."

[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]