Open a form to report problems or contribute information

 
1 Introduction 2 Message details 3 Upload file 4 Submitted
Page 1 of 4

Help and advice for Norfolk Hundreds

If you have found a problem on this page then please report it on the following form. We will then do our best to fix it. If you are wanting advice then the best place to ask is on the area's specific email lists. All the information that we have is in the web pages, so please do not ask us to supply something that is not there. We are not able to offer a research service.

If you wish to report a problem, or contribute information, then do use the following form to tell us about it. We have a number of people each maintaining different sections of the web site, so it is important to submit information via a link on the relevant page otherwise it is likely to go to the wrong person and may not be acted upon.

Norfolk Hundreds

White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845

WALSHAM HUNDRED

Is a long, narrow district, of an irregular figure, bounded on the south-east by the river Yare; on the north, by the river Bure, which separates it from Tunstead Hundred; and on the south and west, by Blofield and Taverham Hundreds; extending about 15 miles north-west from the confluence of the two rivers near Yarmouth, and varying from two to eight miles in breadth.

A considerable portion of the soil is low marshy land, and was frequently subject to inundation, particularly in the vale of the Bure, which extends the whole length of the Hundred; but the commons and marshes have been nearly all enclosed, and well drained, during the present century.

At the Norman Conquest, this Hundred was called Walesha, from the watery nature of its soil, and was then held by the Crown. Henry I. transferred a great part of it to Eborard, Bishop of Norwich, as a life-hold, at an annual rent of 100 shillings. In the time of Edward II., John de Clavering was seized of many manors here and in Blofield, and one court was held for both these Hundreds, which together form the Deanery of Blofield, in the Archdeaconry of Norwich.

A House of Industry was erected at Acle, in 1788, for seven parishes, to which ten other parishes were afterwards united, but the house was burnt down in Nov. 1834.

Walsham Hundred is crossed both by the Norwich and Yarmouth Railway and Turnpike, and contains thirteen parishes, of which the following is an enumeration, shewing their population, in 1841, their annual value, as assessed to the County Rate in 1843, and their territorial extent, in assessable acres.

PARISHES. Pop. Annl.
Value
£.
Acres.
Acle 864 5828 3165
Beighton 288 2568 996
Halvergate 495 5722 2636
Hemblington 284 1630 663
Moulton 235 2068 1001
Ranworth-with }
Panxworth + }
290
141
3614 2444
Reedham 614 5048 3271
Tunstall 116 2748 1598
Upton-with- }
Fishley }
528 3936 2112
Walsham (South)
St. Mary 388 2152 1285
St. Lawrence 225 3562 1867
Wickhampton 139 2708 1602
Woodbastwick 283 2572 1418



Total 4890 44,156 24,058

[There is more information about individual parishes]

+ Fishley and Panxworth are ecclesiastically separate parishes.

The whole Hundred is in BLOFIELD UNION, and in Ludham and Loddon Police Divisions. Its population was 4525, in 1831, and its annual value, as assessed to the property tax, was £27,061, in 1815, and £49,026, in 1842.


Notes

Some placenames in the transcription (of pages 494 to 495) above are given below together with their standard spelling :-
Moulton/Moulton St Mary, Walsham (South)/South Walsham


For more information see :-

These pages are for personal use only. They may not be copied, and the links within them may not be harvested for use on your own web pages. Please see the Copyright Notice.

Copyright © Mike Bristow.
April 2006