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Tuttington

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"TUTTINGTON, a pleasant village and parish, in a valley, 2 miles E. of Aylsham, has 227 souls, and 822 acres of land, partly in W.H. Windham, Esq.'s manor of Tuttington-with-Crackford, (fines abitrary,) and partly in Robt. Copeman, Esq.'s manor of Aylsham Wood, or Sextons, (fines certain.) Tuttington Hall, the beautiful residence and leasehold of Edwd. Blake, Esq., is the property of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.  The Church (St. Peter and St. Paul,) has a round tower, and was repaired in 1749. The vicarage, valued in the King's Book at £5. 7d., was augmented from 1769 to 1796, with £600 of Queen Anne's Bounty, vested in 15A. of land, at Halvergate; besides which the vicar has 15A 3R. of glebe, allotted at the enclosure, in 1817, and a yearly rent of £105, awarded in 1841, in lieu of the small tithes. The Bishop of Ely is appropriator and patron, and the Rev. George Jarvis, B.D., incumbent. In 1214, here was a Chapel dedicated [to] St. Botolph, but no vestiges of it are now extant." [William White, History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk (1845) - Transcription copyright © Richard Johns]

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See also Tottington.

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Church Directories

  • In 1883 the parish was in the Deanery of Ingworth, in the archdeaconry of Norwich.
    It could have been in a different deanery or archdeaconry both before and after this date.
  • The parish church is dedicated to St Peter and St Paul.
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Church History

Church of St Peter and St Paul
Description and pictures.
Church of St Peter and St Paul
Services, etc.
Church of St Peter and St Paul
Pictures of the church.
Bestelink, William
A short guide to the church of St Peter and St Paul, Tuttington.
[1980s]
Hall, Bryan
The Felmingham group of parishes, brief historical notes on the churches of Felmingham, Suffield, Colby, Banningham and Tuttington.
[Felmingham, The Churches, 1977]
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Church Records

Parish Register Transcripts
Baptisms 1544-1900, Banns 1756-1900, Marriages 1544-1900 and Burials 1544-1900.
[Parish Register Transcription Society, Dart Series, 2000?]
Marriages
These are not included in Boyd's Marriage Index or Phillimore's Marriage Registers.
Churchwardens' Rates
Principal property occupiers and the amounts paid.
1812-1813, 1815-1816, and 1823.
Churchwardens' Payments, or Disbursements
Payments for church repairs, communion bread and wine, etc.
1812-1820.

See also Norfolk Parish Links: Church Records

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Civil Registration

For the civil registration of births, marriages and deaths between 1837 and 1930 (and for the censuses from 1851 to 1901), Tuttington was in Aylsham Registration District.

See also Norfolk Parish Links: Civil Registration

You can see pictures of Tuttington which are provided by:

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Gazetteers

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Historical Geography

Tuttington is in South Erpingham Hundred.

Parish outline and location.
See Parish Map for South Erpingham Hundred
Description of South Erpingham Hundred
1845: White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk

You can see the administrative areas in which Tuttington has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

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Land & Property

Inclosure
See Skeyton
Land Tax
Principal property owners and occupiers, and the amounts paid.
1800-1801, 1809-1810, 1818-1819, 1826-1827, and 1832-1833.

See also Norfolk Parish Links: Land and Property

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Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TG224273 (Lat/Lon: 52.79752, 1.297161), Tuttington which are provided by:

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Military Records

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Poor Houses, Poor Law

  • After 1834 Tuttington became part of the Aylsham Union, and the workhouses were at Buxton and Oulton. These were replaced by a new workhouse at Aylsham in 1849.
  • Overseers' Rates
    Principal property occupiers and the amounts paid.
    1802-1803.
  • Overseers' Payments, or Disbursements
    Payments for outrelief, medical expenses, clothes, etc.
    1802-1804, 1804-1809, and 1809-1815.
  • Settlement Examinations
    People were questioned as to their places of settlement in case they became dependent on the parish.
    1752-1820.
  • Settlement Certificates
    These were issued by people's places of settlement, to allow them to move to other parishes for work, etc.
    1767-1775.
  • Removal Orders
    These were to remove people to their places of settlement, usually if they became dependent on the parish.
    1819-1832.
  • Bastardy Bonds
    Some fathers of illegitimate children undertook to support them, so that the parish did not have to do so.
    1792.
  • Bastardy Orders
    These were issued to try to force fathers to support their children.
    1804-1812.
  • Apprentice Indentures
    Poor children could be apprenticed by the overseers, to save the parish paying for their maintenance.
    1833.
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Population

These figures are from the population tables which were produced after the 10-yearly national censuses. The "Families" heading includes families and single occupiers.

Year  Inhabited
Houses
FamiliesPopulation
18013556225
18113854217
18213247228
18313451228
184150--227
185150--213
Year  Inhabited
Houses
FamiliesPopulation
186147--202
18714347187
18813939198
18913939174
19013839178
1911--38181

There may be more people living in detached parts of the parish (if there were any) and, if so, the number may or may not be included in the figures above. It is quite difficult to be sure from the population tables.

1901 Census
"Including Low Common."

Other population figures