Clun

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"CLUN, a parish, market town, and borough, in the hundred of Clun, in the county of Salop, 7 miles from Knighton, and 14 from Ludlow. The parish, which is very extensive, including 13 townships besides Clan, which is the most populous, derives its name from the river Colun, or Clun ... More"[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015]

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Gazetteers

Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015

"CLUN, a parish, market town, and borough, in the hundred of Clun, in the county of Salop, 7 miles from Knighton, and 14 from Ludlow. The parish, which is very extensive, including 13 townships besides Clan, which is the most populous, derives its name from the river Colun, or Clun. In the Norman times it belonged to the Fitz-Alans, earls of Arundel, who erected a castle on an eminence overlooking the river, and exercised the power of life and death. This castle was destroyed by Owen Glendwyr during his rebellion against Henry IV. In the reign of Henry VIII. the parish was annexed to the newly-made county of Montgomery, but was afterwards separated and joined to that of Salop. The town, which is situated on both banks of the Clan, is surrounded by an amphitheatre of hills. The main street extends along the northern bank of the river, which is here crossed by a handsome bridge of five arches; on the S. side stands the church and the older part of the town, the houses of which are built of rag-stone, with thatched roofs. The town-hall is a modern erection of stone, built upon arches. It contains one large upper room for the holding of the courts, with an area below for the use of the market. The town is well supplied with water, but is imperfectly drained and paved. It is a borough by prescription, having been incorporated by charter granted by the lords-marchers, and afterwards confirmed and augmented by Thomas Earl of Arundel, in the reign of Edward II. The government is now administered by two bailiffs, 30 burgesses, and a recorder appointed by Earl Powis, as lord of the manor. There is no manufacture carried on in the town. It is the head of a deanery, of a Poor-law Union, and of a sub-registration district, embracing 19 parishes and townships. Until recently it was the seat of a hundred court, held every three weeks, for the recovery of small debts, but is now included in the new County Court district of Bishop's Castle. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Hereford, value with the curacy of Chapel Lawn annexed, £680, in the patronage of Earl Powis. The church, dedicated to St. George, was once dependent on Wenlock Priory. It is a very ancient edifice, chiefly in the Norman, but in some parts in the Saxon style of architecture, containing many interesting monuments and a fine old font. The original oak ceiling is still preserved in the N. aisle. There is a district church at Newcastle, in the same patronage, the living of which is a perpetual curacy The Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists have chapels, and there are several schools. The charities are very considerable, producing £1,554 per annum. The principal is a hospital founded in 1614 by Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, who endowed it with tithes and lands in various parishes producing a clear annual revenue of £1,200. Out of this endowment the chapelries of Church Stoke and Knighton have been from time to time augmented. The hospital itself is a plain quadrangular building, with a large garden in front and a chapel. The warden has a salary of £80 a year with house, and the brethren, who consist of 14 poor men, have each two or three rooms, with a garden, besides clothing, and fuel, with 10s. per week allowed them. The district in which Clun is situated formerly constituted a distinct hundred, called the hundred of Clan, and formed part of Wales. According to Leland, in the reign of Henry VII. it comprised a great forest of red deer and roes, belonging to the Earl of Arundel, and until recently there was a large common known as Clun Forest; but disputes arising as to the enjoyment of the common rights, an Act of Parliament was passed in 1837 for its enclosure. Within a quarter of a mile of the town, in a north-westerly direction, is a single entrenchment raised by Owain Glyndwr to shelter his troops whilst attacking Clun Castle, and at a short distance to the S. is Walls Castle, from which it was battered. In the vicinity are the Bury ditches, a British camp, and Caer Caradoc, where the Roman general Ostorius defeated Caractacus. The fortification of the latter is one of the most curious and interesting in the country, and is in a good state of preservation, owing to the care taken of it by Earl Powis of Walcot, who has the manor and is owner of the property. The weekly market, held on Wednesday, is well attended. Fairs for sheep and cattle are held on Whit-Monday and Tuesday, the 23rd September, and the 22nd November."[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015]

Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015

  • " BICTON, a township in the parish and hundred of Clun, in the county of Salop, 4 miles from Bishop's Castle."
  • " EDICLIFF, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 5 miles S.W. of Bishop's. Castle."
  • " EDLICLIFT, (or Edeecliff), a township in the parish and hundred of Clun, county Salop, 2 miles N. of Clun.
  • " GUILDEN DOWN, a township in the parish and hundred of Clun, county Salop, 1 mile N. of Clun, and 4 miles S. of Bishop's Castle."
  • " HOPEBENDRID, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop; 4 miles S. of Clun, and 4 S.E. of Bishop's Castle."
  • " KEVENCALONOG, a township in the parishes of Clun and Bettws-y-Crwyn, county Salop, 6 miles S.W. of Bishop's Castle."
  • " MENUPTON, (or Manutton), a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 5 miles S. of Bishop's Castle.
  • "NEWCASTLE, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 6 miles S.W. of Bishop's-Castle, and 3½ S.W. of Clun. Ludlow is its post town. The village, which is of small extent, is situated on the river Clun, or Colun, which rises on the borders of Montgomeryshire and joins the Teme near Leintwardine. It is wholly agricultural, and is surrounded by hills. In the neighbourhood are traces of a British camp, and Caer Caradoc, where the Roman general, Ostorius, defeated Caractacus, also remains of Offa's Dyke, and the ruins of a castle which belonged to the Fitzalans, but was destroyed by Owain Glyndwr. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Hereford, value £160."
  • " OBARRAS, (or Hopebarras), a township in the parish of Clun, hundred of Purslow, county Salop, 7 miles S. of Bishop's-Castle.
  • " SHADWELL, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 4 miles S.W. of Bishop's Castle."
  • " SPOAD, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 6 miles S.W. of Bishop's Castle, on the river Clun, near Offa's Dyke."
  • " TREVERWARD, a township in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 4 miles N. of Knighton."
  • " WHITCOTT-EVAN and WHITCOTT-KEYSETT, townships in the parish of Clun, county Salop, 5 miles S.W. of Bishop's Castle."

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Historical Geography

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