Ludlow

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"LUDLOW, a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, locally in the hundred of Munslow, county Salop, 10 miles from Leominster, 25 S.E. of Shrewsbury, and 143 N.W. by N. of London. It has a station on the Shrewsbury and Hereford railway. It is situated on a commanding eminence on the southern border of the county, close to Herefordshire, and in the fertile vale of the Teme, which is here joined by the river Corve.   ... More"[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015]

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Gazetteers

Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015

"LUDLOW, a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, locally in the hundred of Munslow, county Salop, 10 miles from Leominster, 25 S.E. of Shrewsbury, and 143 N.W. by N. of London. It has a station on the Shrewsbury and Hereford railway. It is situated on a commanding eminence on the southern border of the county, close to Herefordshire, and in the fertile vale of the Teme, which is here joined by the river Corve. It is a place of great antiquity, having taken its rise in a Roman settlement, and was called by the Welsh Dinan Llys Tywysog, signifying "the prince's palace," and afterwards, by the Saxons, Leadlowe. It is particularly celebrated for its castle, built by Roger de Montgomery, and once a royal residence, but now an imposing ruin, considered the most extensive in England, and extra-parochial. This castle, which was of great strength in ancient times, was seized by Henry I., besieged by Stephen in 1138, and retained by the Fitzwarrens, to whom it was granted by Henry II. It was subsequently given by John to Philip daubing, from whom it reverted through the De Lacy and Mortimer families to the crown. It was stormed by Henry IV. in 1459, having been garrisoned by the Yorkists, and was fitted up for the reception of the court in the reigns of Edward V. and Henry VII., which latter monarch held the festivities here on occasion of the marriage of Prince Arthur with Katherine of Arragon. In the reign of Henry VIII. it was made the seat of the Lords President of the Marshes of Wales, and it was here that "Comus," written by Milton for the entertainment of the family of the Earl of Bridgwater, was performed. In the Civil War it was garrisoned for Charles I.; but the Royalists having been routed in the vicinity, it was surrendered in 1645 to the Parliamentary forces. At the Restoration it was held by Earl Carbery, the patron of Jeremy Taylor, and Samuel Butler, author of "Hudibras," who, whilst residing here, wrote the first three cantos of that poem. At the Revolution, the office of Lord President of Wales having been abolished, it was dismantled. The town, which was walled by Edward I., is well built, and has recently been much improved. Broadgate is the only one of the seven gates now remaining. It was first chartered by Edward IV. It contains a townhall and market-house, guildhall, where quarter and petty sessions are held, a prison erected on the site of Guilford's tower, a police station, two branch banks, savings-bank, public library with news-rooms, assembly rooms situated in Castle-street, a literary institution and mechanics' institute, dispensary, lying-in institution, union poorhouse situated in the parish of Stanton Lacy, and a museum of natural history, containing a choice and valuable collection of fossils from the Ludlow rocks, besides antiquities and curiosities. The limits of the municipal borough are less extensive than those of the parliamentary, including only the "old borough" or parish of Ludlow St. Lawrence, with a population in 1851 of 4,691, which, in 1861 had increased to 5,178; while the parliamentary includes also the parish of Ludlow, and part* of Stanton Lacy and Bromfield, with a population in 1851 of 5,376, and in 1861 of 6,033. It has returned two members to parliament since the reign of Edward IV., and is governed under the new act by a mayor, who is returning officer, 4 aldermen, and 12 common councilmen, with the style of "bailiffs, burgesses, and commonalty of the town and borough of Ludlow." The area of the new borough comprises 1,395 acres, and its revenue amounts to about £1,900, more than half of which is derived from the town lands. A considerable business is done in the malt trade; the glove manufacture, which was formerly carried on here, is now extinct; there are, besides, two or three water corn-mills. The quarter sessions are held before the Recorder of Ludlow. There is also a county court for the recovery of debts under £50, and a Board of Poor-law Guardians for a union embracing 31 parishes, of which 6 are in Herefordshire, and the remainder in Salop. It is the seat of a superintendent registry, and gives name to a deanery in the archdeaconry of Salop and diocese of Hereford. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £23 138. 6d. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Hereford; value £150. The church, dedicated to St. Lawrence, is a spacious cruciform structure of the time of Henry VII., measuring 228 feet by 73. It has a lofty tower 130 feet high, containing a peal of eight bells and chimes; also an hexagonal porch and two chantry chapels annexed. It contains an open roof and stalls, stained E. window, a beautiful toned organ, and monuments of Lord President Bridgman and others. The interior was completely restored in 1863, at a large cost, when a new pulpit was made, all the pews and galleries cleared away, and three western windows filled with stained glass. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. The College, now converted into private houses, is an old foundation. The Royal Free Grammar School, founded by Edward VI., has an endowment, out of which £200 per annum are paid to the head-master, £150 to the second, and nearly £100 to the third, with two exhibitions at Baliol College, Oxford, and an annual exhibition to Oxford, Cambridge, or Durham. It is open not only to citizens, but to children within 10 miles of the town. There is a bluecoat-school over the market-cross, with an endowment of .£63. The National schools are a handsome new building, appropriated to boys and girls, with residence for masters, besides infant and Sunday schools. The charities consist of Hosier's almshouses, rebuilt in 1758, having an endowment of £250; also Foe's almshouse, with an income of about £200. Near the town is a mineral spring, and round the castle are public promenades commanding prospects over the rich valley of the Teme. The principal residences in the vicinity are Dinham House, seat of the Earl Powis, where Lucien Bonaparte resided, Ludford House, the Sheet, Moor Park, Oakley Park, and Stanton Lacy House. The Ludlow hounds hunt round here, and are kennelled at Wetmoor. Annual races take place at midsummer on the Oldfield, and adjoining the Bromfield railway station. There are traces of Whitefriars Priory, founded in the middle of the 14th century, and of an Austin friary, founded in the 13th. Market days are Monday and Saturday, the former being chiefly for corn and provisions, the latter for provisions only. Fairs are held on the Monday before the 13th February for cheese, on the Tuesday before Easter, Wednesday in Whitsun week, 21st August, 28th September, first Monday in November, and 6th December, for cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, and hops; also a statute fair on the 1st May for hiring servants."[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015]

Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2015

  • " FFLTON RYE, a hamlet in the parish of Ludlow, county Salop, 1 mile N.W. of Ludlow. It is situated near the junction of the rivers Teme and Corve."

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