Hide

Petworth

hide
Hide

PETWORTH is a railway and telegraph station, and union, market town, parish, and polling place for the Western division of the county, 55 miles by rail and 49 by road from London, 14 from Chichester and 12 from Arundel, in the rape of Arundel, hundred of Rotherbridge, diocese and archdeaconry of Chichester, and rural deanery of Midhurst. It is situated on a considerable eminence, on the high road from London to Chichester, near the navigable river Rother. The union comprises 5 parishes, viz.: - Billinghurst, Kirdford, Petworth, Rudgwick, and Wisborough Green.
In the centre of the town is the market-house and courtroom, a stone building, having at the north side a bust of William III.: this structure was built at the sole expense of the late Earl of Egremont: in the court-room are held the Epiphany and Easter quarter-sessions for West Sussex; also the petty sessions, the first and third Saturday in every month. The market is held on Saturday, and there are three fairs held annually, on the 1st of May, 4th of September, and 20th of November. The London and County Bank has a branch here, and there is a Savings Bank in the Town Hall.
The "Half Moon" and "Swan" are the principal hotels, whence an omnibus runs to meet all trains. The station is a mile and three quarters from the town. The new subscription reading-room is in the Town Hall, and is well supplied with daily and weekly papers, &c. There is also a Working Man's Institute in the Town Hall. The lectures, the singing, the discussion, reading and writing classes are held in the Town Hall. The town is lighted by gas. The cemetery is close to the town. The county court is held monthly, and has jurisdiction over the following parishes:- Barlavington, Bignor, Bury, Burton, Coates, Coldwaltham, Duncton, Egdean, Fittleworth, Greatham, Hardham, Kirdford, Lodsworth, Lurgashall, North Chapel, Parham, Pulborough, Selham, Stopham, Storrington, Sullington, Sutton, Thakeham, Tillington, West Chiltington, Wisborough Green.
The church of St. Mary was erected about the time of Henry VII.: it is in the Decorated style of architecture, and some years since underwent extensive repairs, and was materially altered and improved: three costly painted windows were added, the greater part of the tower rebuilt, and surmounted with a lofty spire, 180 feet high, under the direction of the late Sir Charles Barry, the whole expense, of more than £16,000, was defrayed by the late Earl of Egremont. Many of the Percys are interred in the chapel of St. Thomas, adjoining the church. The register commences in 1559. The living is a rectory, value £850 per annum, with residence, in the gift of Lord Leconfield, and held by the Rev. Charles Holland, M.A., of University College, Oxford.
There are Grammar, National, Infants', Endowed, Dissenters' and Sunday schools, and various charities, amongst which are the almshouses called the Somerset Hospital, built and endowed by Charles, Duke of Somerset, in 1746, for twenty-two poor widows, with a room for each, and £20 annually; also seven almshouses, built and endowed by Thomas Thompson Esq., in 1618, for twelve poor people of this parish, with £10 annually each; also four almshouses, built G O'Brien, Earl of Egremont, for four poor aged men. The boys' school has been renovated by Lord Leconfield - it is now boarded: a large class-room and a good playground have been added, and it is capable of holding 150 scholars. There is an excellent girls' school, also endowed by the late Earl of Egremont. and which is now placed, with the other schools, under the Government system. There is a very excellent school for girls at Byworth, and a new Infant school has been erected and endowed by Lord Leconfield. Taylor's Charity clothes and educates ten boys and ten girls, and apprentices a boy and a girl each year.
The Independents and Calvinists have each a chapel here.
Petworth House, the seat of Lord Leconfield, was restored by Charles, Duke of Somerset, who married the sole heiress of the Earls of Northumberland: the frontage is 324 feet in breadth, and 62 feet in height to the parapet, having twenty-one windows in each of the three stories: the interior arrangements are on a proportionate scale, and are remarkable for magnificence and elegance, all the principal apartments being adorned with productions of first-rate artists. The sculpture gallery contains, among many antique statues and busts, the last work and chef-d'oeuvre of Flaxman; the Promethean group, by Carew, is in the tenants' dining-room, and many works of modern artists, of whom the Earl was a noble patron. Petworth House is especially remarkable for the most complete collection of exquisite carvings in wood by Grinling Gibbons, to which were subsequently added some very well executed ones by. Jonathan Ritson: the sword said to have been used by Hotspur at the Battle of Shrewsbury is shown in the house. The park wall is twelve miles in circumference: the enclosure is beautifully undulating, and graced with trees of the noblest growth. The views which the park commands of the Downs of Surrey and Sussex and the intervening scenery are of singular beauty and grandeur. The park is open to the public, who are also allowed to view the house, on application at the lodge. The population in 1861 way 3,368, and the area 5,982 acres [Kelly's Post Office Directory of Essex, Herts, Middlesex, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, 1867.]

Hide
topup

Description & Travel

You can see pictures of Petworth which are provided by:

topup

Directories

topup

Gazetteers

topup

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Petworth has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

topup

Maps

View a map of the boundaries of this town/parish.

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SU977217 (Lat/Lon: 50.986423, -0.609452), Petworth which are provided by: