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BRIDLINGTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

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"BRIDLINGTON, a parish in the wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, comprising the sea-port and market-town of Bridlington, the chapelries of Grindalland Specton, the townships of Buckton, Hilderthorp, and Sewerby with Marton, and the hamlet of Easton, and containing 5034 inhabitants, of which number, 4275 are in the town of Bridlington with Quay, 38 miles E.N.E. from York, and 201 N. from London. This place was chiefly remarkable for an extensive priory 'of Augustine canons, founded in 1106, by Walter de Gaunt, and dedicated to the Virgin Mary, which, from its vicinity to the sea, being exposed to injury from the vessels of the enemy, was, by permission of Richard II., defended by fortifications, the only remains of which are an arched gateway, with a room over it occasionally used as the town-hall, and underneath are some cells used as a temporary prison. The priors for many years enjoyed extensive privileges, granted by the popes; but in 1537, its last prior, William Wolde, being executed for treason, the priory was forfeited to the Crown: its revenue, at the dissolution, was £682. 15. 9. In 1643, the queen of Charles I., bringing a supply of arms and ammunition from Helvoetsluys, narrowly escaped the squadron under the command of Admiral Batten, who had been stationed to intercept her, and who, on her landing at this place, entered the bay with two of his ships and cannonaded, the town.. In 1779, a desperate naval fight took place off the. coast, between the noted Paul Jones and two British ships of war, when, after a sanguinary conflict, the former was victorious. The town is pleasantly situated on a gentle acclivity, about a mile from the sea, and consists principally of one long street intersected by some smaller ones, irregularly formed and inconveniently narrow; the houses are in. general ancient and of mean appearance: the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. About a mile to the south-east is Bridlington Quay, forming in itself a small, handsome, and well-built town, consisting of one spacious street, leading directly to the harbour. This part of the town is much frequented for sea-bathing, and contains hot and cold baths conveniently fitted up for the accommodation of visitors. About a quarter of a mile from the Quay is a chalybeate spring, in much repute for its medicinal properties; and, in the harbour, an ebbing and flowing spring was discovered in 1811, that furnishes an abundant supply of fresh water. The quay, on which is the custom-house, affords an agreeable promenade; and the two piers forming the harbour, stretching out a considerable distance into the ocean, command extensive prospects, especially the northern pier, from which are fine views of Flamborough Head and Bridlington bay. The harbour, which is defended by two batteries, one on the north, and the other on the south, side of the town, affords a secure retreat to numerous coasting vessels that shelter there during contrary winds; and the bay, protected from the north-west winds by the coast, and from the north winds by the promontory of Flamborough Head, offers safe anchorage for ships in gales of wind from those points. The port is a member of the port of Hull, and the number of vessels belonging to it, according to the return of 1829, is forty, averaging one hundred and fifty-five tons' burden"; the number of vessels that entered inward and cleared outward, in 1826, was nine British and nineteen foreign, besides several engaged in the coasting trade. There is a small manufactory for hats: the trade in corn and malt, formerly flourishing, has declined since the opening of the Driffield canal to Hull; there are several windmills for corn, and a steam-mill for grinding bones. The market is on Saturday; and fairs for cattle, linen, and woollen cloth, &c., are held on the Monday before Whitsuntide and October 21st. The living is a perpetual curacy, with the rectory of Argam united, in the archdeaconry of the East riding, and diocese of York, endowed with £200 private benefaction, £400 royal bounty, and £1600 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York. The church is part of the ancient edifice belonging to the priory, formerly a magnificent structure, of which the two towers at the''western end have been made level with the nave, and the chancel and transepts destroyed. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. The free grammar school for twenty boys was founded by Mr. William Hustler, in 1637, and endowed with a rent-charge of £40, to which a considerable donation in land was added by William Bower, in 1670, for teaching twelve other children: a charity school for girls was endowed in. 1671, and a National school, for two hundred children of both sexes, is supported by subscription. Numerous fossil remains have been found here; and in the vicinity the head of an enormous elk was discovered, the extremities of the horns being more than eleven feet apart. Sir George Ripley, a celebrated alchymist of the fifteenth century, author of a treatise on the philosopher's stone, and who, in the earlier part of his life, Was a canon of Bridlington; William de Newburgh, an eminent historian in the reign of King John; John de Bridlington, prior of the monastery, and author of " Carmina Vaticinalia," who died in 1379; and Richard Boyle, Earl of Burlington, a great patron of the fine arts, whose title was derived from this place, and became, extinct at his death in 1753; were natives of Bridlington."


"BUCKTON, a township in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK; 4% miles N.E. from Bridlington, containing 14% inhabitants."


"EASTON, a hamlet in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, lj mile W. from Bridlington, containing 21 inhabitants."


"GRINDALL, a chapelry in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, 4 miles N.W. from Bridlington, containing 107 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry of the East riding, and diocese of York, endowed with £1000 royal bounty. John Greame, Esq. was patron in 1816."


"HILDERTHORP, a township in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, 1 mile S. from Bridlington, containing 51 inhabitants."


"MARTON, a township, joint with Sewerby, in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, 2 miles N.E. from Bridlington. The population is returned with Sewerby. Here are vestiges of an ancient ravine, consisting of a double line of defence, with breast-works, extending one mile and a quarter from, the southern shore of Flamborough-head; this immense work is ascribed to the Danes, and is therefore termed "Danes Dike.""


"SEWERBY, a township, joint with Marton, in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, I miles E.N.E. from Bridlington, containing, with Marton, 317 inhabitants."


"SPECTON, a chapelry in the parish of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, 5 miles N.N.W. from Bridlington, containing 116 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry of the East riding, and diocese of York, endowed with £800 royal bounty, and in the patronage of W. J. Denison, Esq."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]