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ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY.

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY.

Data from the 'Collectio Rerum Ecclesiasticarum' from the year 1842.

The place: COTTINGHAM.     Church dedication: SAINT MARY.     Church type: Rectory in charge.

Area, 8,530 acres. Harthill wapentake. Hunsley Beacon. -Population, 2,575 *1 ; Church-room, 700; Net value, £124. -At the time of the Domesday Survey, there were here five fisheries of eight thousand eels.

The manor of Cottingham was held, together with its members, by the heirs of Cottingham or Stutevill of the King, whereof John de Hastings held half a carucate by mesne of St. John of Beverley. And the Abbot of Meaux held ten carucates in the same, with pastures for twenty-one cows and one bull, in exchange for a certain ditch passing through. Also the Lady de Stutevill held therein two carucates of land of the Archbishop of York, which came to the Stutevills and the Lords Wake of Lydell, who held of the said Archbishop the east part of the orchard of his manor of Cottingham, with two carucates of land and two places of meadow, containing fifty-eight acres, by knight's service and suit of court at the Archbishop's manor of Burton, from three weeks to three weeks.

Apud Ebor., 6th November, 2nd Ed. II. -The King granted to Thomas Lord Wake and his heirs the liberty of a Tuesday market every week at his manor of Cottingham, and also of two yearly fairs, for six days' space, viz., the one on the vigil day and morrow of St. Thomas the Martyr, and the other on the vigil day and morrow of St. Martin, in winter.

The Church, which contained three Chantries, was part of the endowment which the Lord Wake, who had it from the Stutevills, settled upon his Priory of Haltemprice, and it was by apostolic license appropriated to the Canons there, and a Vicarage ordained therein, Non. December 1338. Notwithstanding this appropriation, the Church came afterwards into the Crown, and was given by Richard II. to the Vicars Choral of York, to whom it was appropriated 15th December 1485 by Archbishop Rotherham, who endowed a Vicarage therein ; but it does not appear that this appropriation took any effect, for until the days of King Henry VIII. it continued a Rectory presentable to by the Crown, and in Queen Elizabeth's time begins a catalogue of Vicars, who were all presented by private patrons. The last was in 1622, when Mr. Maltby presented. From that time there were no institutions until 1723, when the Crown presented by reason of lapse, since which the Bishop of Chester has presented. The Bishop is also the impropriator.

Valued in Pope Nicholas's taxation, at £66. 13s. 4d.; in the King's books, at £106. 13s. 4d.; in the Parliamentary Survey, vol. xvii. page 347, at £240; and in 1818, at £102 per annum.

Augmented in 1812, with £800 from the Parliamentary grant, by lot ; and in 1814, with £300 from the same grant, to meet benefaction of £200 from the Rev. James Deans, the Vicar.

A decree in the Exchequer, in Michaelmas Term, 42nd Elizabeth, is unreported.

Inclosure Acts were passed 6th and 54th Geo. III.

23rd October 1773, a faculty was granted to erect a gallery.

9th July 1798, ditto to erect an organ.

5th October 1804, ditto to erect a gallery.

27th July 1805, ditto to alter the situation of the pulpit, &c.

The glebe house is fit for residence, and which was rebuilt under faculty granted 19th November 1791.

The Register Books commence in 1563.

Charities:
Edward Thompson's charity, by will, dated 24th October 1653. Rent of four acres of land, for apprenticing a boy, or otherwise for the benefit of the poor.

Mark Kirby's charity, by will, dated 16th September 1712. Rent of sixteen acres of land, paid to the master of the free school for teaching ten poor children reading, writing, and arithmetic.

James Milnes's charity, by will, dated 18th October 1750. Interest of £200 on Christmas-day and the Sunday after Midsummer-day among the poor, of whatever religion or profession soever.

Joseph Meadley's charity, by will, dated 26th August 1813. Interest of £100 among the poor of Cottingham, at the discretion of the trustees. -Vide 9th Report, page 742.

Post town: Hull.


References:
Torre's MS., page 1351. Abp. Sharp's MS., vol. ii. page 50. Mon. Angl., vol. vi. page 519. Oliver's Beverley, page 458. Frost's Hull, page 43. Tickell's Hull, page 888. Bawdwen's Domesday Book (Cotingeham), pages 7. 202. Burton's Monasticon, pages 57. 313, 314. Wood's Bodleian MS., No. 5101. Ashmole Catalogue, Nos. 8487 and 8518.


Notes:
*1 The parish contains part of the township of Willerby, in the county of the town of Kingston-upon-Hull.


Other information:
HALTEMPRICE. -(Parish of Cottingham.) -Here was an Austin Priory, founded about the year 1324 by Thomas Lord Wake of Lydell. It was originally begun at Cottingham in 1322.


From the original book published by
George Lawton in 1842..
OCR and changes for Web page presentation
by Colin Hinson. © 2013.