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KEYINGHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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"KEYINGHAM, a parish in the S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, East Riding county York, 5 miles S.W. of Patrington, and 5 E. of Hedon, its post town. It is a station on the Hull and Holderness section of the North-Eastern railway. The village is situated on an eminence adjoining the Keyingham Level Drain, which runs into the Humber. The parish includes Salthaugh Grange. The soil is marshy clay, and the land chiefly arable. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the corn mills and brickfields. There are some remains of an ancient cross. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value £92, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church, dedicated to St. Nicholas, is an ancient stone structure, with tower crowned by an octagonal spire and containing three bells. There are several marble tablets. The register commences in 1604. The parochial charities produce about £8 per annum for educational purposes. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. There are National, Sunday, and infant schools. Keyingham Creek, which formerly extended to Salthaugh, and divided this parish from Sunk Island, is now nearly closed. In the village are the remains of two ancient crosses. There is also a holy well called St. Philip's Well, noted for the cure of scorbutic diseases; and on a farm in the neighbourhood is a well of warm water. Sometime since was discovered the baptismal font of Andrew Marvel. At the residence of S. J. Owst, Esq., is a collection of antiquities and paintings."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013