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KILHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1835.

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"KILHAM, a parish partly within the liberty of ST-PETER-OF-YORK, and partly in the wapentake of DICKERING, East riding of the county of YORK, 5 miles N.N.E. from Great Driffield, containing 971 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Dean of York, rated in the king's books at £6. 13. 4. The church, dedicated to All Saints, is a stately edifice. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyan Methodists. The town, pleasantly situated on a declivity of the Wolds, now consists of one irregular street, extending from east to west nearly one mile and a quarter, but was once a much larger place, vestiges of foundations having been often discovered. It had anciently a market, which, from the vicinity and greater convenience of that at Great Driffield, had long been declining, and is now entirely discontinued. Fairs for cattle are held on August 21st and November 12th; the latter is also a statute fair. A free school was founded, in the 9th of Charles I., by John, Lord D Arcy, who endowed it with a rent-charge of £30, for which sum, and trifling quarterages paid by the pupils, from eighty to one hundred children are instructed. A branch of the river Hull has its source in the parish; and at Hempit Hole a remarkable intermittent spring, called the Gipsey, issues with such violence from the earth as to form an arch sufficiently elevated for a man on horseback to pass beneath it. Near the Rudston road is a fine mineral spring, possessing medicinal properties."

[Transcribed by Mel Lockie © from
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of England 1835]