Hide

PATRINGTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1829.

hide
Hide
Hide

"PATRINGTON, is a market and parish-town, having no dependent township, in the wapentake of Holderness, west riding, is 189 miles from London, 112 from Manchester, 56 from York, 18 from Hull and 10 from Hedon. It is pleasantly situated within a mile and a half of the Humber, and about half a mile from the village of Humber-side, up to which runs a small creek, called Patrington haven, by means of which the export of corn and import of coal is facilitated. According to report, this was once an excellent little port, but the embankment of Sunk Island has caused an accumulation of sand and mud, which has prevented the access of all vessels but very small craft. The only structure worthy of notice is its church, which has a remarkably lofty spire, and serves mariners as a sea mark for entering the Humber; it is dedicated to St. Patrick; the living is a rectory in the incumbency of the Rev. John Mansfield. and the Rev. Robert Metcalf is the resident curate. There are besides a chapel each belonging to the Wesleyan, independent and primitive Methodists. The portion of Holderness district, in which this town is situated, is a rich agricultural country, famed for excellent beans and wheat, large cattle of the horned kind and heavy sheep. The market is on Saturday, principally for corn. The fairs are 28th March, for pedlary, shoes, &c. 18th July and 6th December, for pedlary. The population of the parish, in 1821, was l,244."

[Transcribed from Pigot's National Commericial Directory for 1828-29 ]
by Colin Hinson ©2007